WorldWideScience

Sample records for wind momentum flux

  1. Air-sea fluxes of momentum and mass in the presence of wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zülicke, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    An air-sea interaction model (ASIM) is developed including the effect of wind waves on momentum and mass transfer. This includes the derivation of profiles of dissipation rate, flow speed and concentration from a certain height to a certain depth. Simplified assumptions on the turbulent closure, skin - bulk matching and the spectral wave model allow for an analytic treatment. Particular emphasis was put on the inclusion of primary (gravity) waves and secondary (capillary-gravity) waves. The model was tuned to match wall-flow theory and data on wave height and slope. Growing waves reduce the air-side turbulent stress and lead to an increasing drag coefficient. In the sea, breaking waves inject turbulent kinetic energy and accelerate the transfer. Cross-reference with data on wave-related momentum and energy flux, dissipation rate and transfer velocity was sufficient. The evaluation of ASIM allowed for the analytical calculation of bulk formulae for the wind-dependent gas transfer velocity including information on the air-side momentum transfer (drag coefficient) and the sea-side gas transfer (Dalton number). The following regimes have been identified: the smooth waveless regime with a transfer velocity proportional to (wind) × (diffusion)2-3, the primary wave regime with a wind speed dependence proportional to (wind)1-4 × (diffusion)1-2-(waveage)1-4 and the secondary wave regime including a more-than-linear wind speed dependence like (wind)15-8 × (diffusion)1-2 × (waveage)5-8. These findings complete the current understanding of air-sea interaction for medium winds between 2 and 20 m s^-1.

  2. Mechanism of air-sea momentum flux from low to high winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongliang

    2017-04-01

    In the condition of wind speed less than 20 m/s, many studies have shown that drag coefficient roughly increases linearly with wind speed, which is usually extrapolated to high winds in practice. Since the pioneer work of Powell et al. (2003), both field and laboratory studies have indicated that the drag coefficient begins to decrease or saturate when wind speed is greater than a critical value such as 30 m/s. All the reduction mechanisms proposed up to now are related to the effect of sea spray induced by wave breaking in high winds. This study tries to propose another mechanism that is directly related to wave breaking. Based on the wind-wave growth relations, it is found that drag coefficient increases simultaneously with wave age and wave steepness. The reduction of drag coefficient with wave age that has been shown by previous studies mainly reflect the wind effect because the phase speeds of waves vary in a very narrow range, and can be roughly regarded as constant. It is indicated that two parameters including wave age and wave steepness together control the momentum transfer through air-sea interface. The wave age and wave steepness represent the abilities of wind input and wave receiving energy, respectively. In general, the two parameters are well correlated and can be replaced one another in the condition of low and moderate winds, in which the wave steepness decreases with the increasing wave age. In the condition of high winds, the wave steepness reaches to its upper threshold due to wave breaking, in which wave steepness cannot increase with the decreasing of wave age. At the same time, wave ages become very small, thus drag coefficients begin to decrease with wind speed. It is further suggested that there are two different upper thresholds of wave steepness for laboratory and field waves, which can be applied to explain the reduction of drag coefficient either in laboratory or in field

  3. A numerical study of the wave shoaling effect on wind-wave momentum flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xuanting; Shen, Lian

    2017-11-01

    Momentum transfer between wind and waves is crucial to many physical processes in air-sea interactions. For decades, there has been a number of observational evidence that the surface roughness in the nearshore region is notably higher than in the open sea. In order to explain the mechanism behind this important phenomenon, in particular the wave shoaling effect on surface roughness, we conduct a series of numerical experiments using the wind-wave module of WOW (Wave-Ocean-Wind), a high-fidelity computational framework developed in house. We use prescribed monochromatic waves with linear shoaling effect incorporated, while the wind field is simulated using wall-resolved large-eddy simulation. A comparison between a shallow water wave case and deep water wave cases shows remarkably stronger wave effects on the wind for the former. Detailed analyses show that the increased surface roughness is closely associated with the increased form drag that is mainly due to the reduced wave age in wave shoaling.

  4. Meteor Wind Radar Observations of Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes at Middle and Lower Latitudes at Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fátima Andrioli, Vânia; Clemesha, Barclay; Prado Batista, Paulo; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Buriti, Ricardo

    It is well known that the upward propagation of internal gravity waves from the lower atmo-sphere to the mesosphere plays an important role in the dynamics and energy balance of this region. Hocking (2005) developed a technique to calculate gravity wave momentum flux using meteor radar data. This technique is a generalization of the 2-beam technique of Vincent and Reid (1983). Hocking's technique uses radial velocity variances, from 80 to 100 km, which are mainly caused by gravity waves, to determine the gravity wave momentum fluxes. We apply this technique to data from a SKiMET meteor radar located at Santa Maria (29.7S, 53.7o W) during 2005. The data were analyzed in 3-km/2-h bins centered on 82, 85, 88 km etc. and 1, 3, 5 UT etc., generating monthly means. It was found that the meridional variances showed a fairly constant behavior throughout the year, with maximum at around 90 km. The zonal and vertical variances were less consistent. The monthly means of the horizontal momentum flux, uv, showed an oscillatory behavior with phase decreasing with increasing altitude and similar behavior was observed in the v'w' component. Although the behavior of u'w' was observed to be oscillatory, its phase did not show altitude propagation. In order to study the features of gravity wave activity in different latitude these results will be compared with two other radars located at São João do Cariri (7.3S, 36.4W) and Cachoeira Paulista (22.7S, 45.0W) for the a a same period.

  5. Gravity wave amplitudes and momentum fluxes inferred from OH airglow intensities and meteor radar winds during SpreadFEx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vargas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We show in this report the momentum flux content input in the mesosphere due to relatively fast and small scale gravity waves (GWs observed through OH airglow images. The acquisition of OH NIR images was carried out in Brazil at Brasilia (14.8° S, 47.6° W and Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W from September 2005 to November 2005 during the SpreadFEx Campaign. Horizontal wind information from meteor radar was available in Cariri only. Our findings showed strong wave activity in both sites, mainly in Cariri. High wave directionality was also observed in both sites during SpreadFEx, which have been observed by other investigators using different analysis' techniques and different types of data during the campaign. We discuss also the possibility of plasma bubble seeding by gravity waves presenting spatial and temporal scales estimated with our novel analysis technique during the SpreadFEx campaign.

  6. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed at moderate and strong wind, and as it was shows recently CD decreases at hurricane wind speed. Waves are known to increase the sea surface resistance due to enhanced form drag, the sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the 'drag reduction' at hurricane conditions. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CD on the wind speed is not so certain and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is not completely understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of surface waves on the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the laboratory experiment, when wind and wave parameters are maintained and controlled. The effect of spray on turbulent exchange at strong winds is also estimated. A series of experiments to study the processes of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat in a stably stratified temperature turbulent boundary layer air flow over waved water surface were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS, the peculiarity of this experiment was the option to change the surface wave parameters regardless of the speed of the wind flow in the channel. For this purpose a polyethylene net with the variable depth (0.25 mm thick and a cell of 1.6 mm × 1.6mm) has been stretched along the channel. The waves were absent when the net was located at the level of the undisturbed water surface, and had maximum

  7. Drake Antarctic Agile Meteor Radar (DrAAMER) First Results: Configuration and Comparison of Mean and Tidal Wind and Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Measurements with SAAMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Iimura, H.; Hocking, W. K.; Bageston, J. V.; Pene, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    A new-generation meteor radar was installed at the Brazilian Antarctic Comandante Ferraz Base (62.1degS) in March 2010. This paper describes the motivations for the radar location, its measurement capabilities, and comparisons of measured mean winds, tides, and gravity wave momentum fluxes from April to June of 2010 and 2011 with those by a similar radar on Tierra del Fuego (53.8degS). Motivations for the radars include the "hotspot" of small-scale gravity wave activity extending from the troposphere into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) centered over the Drake Passage, the maximum of the semidiurnal tide at these latitudes, and the lack of other MLT wind measurements in this latitude band. Mean winds are seen to be strongly modulated at planetary wave and longer periods and to exhibit strong coherence over the two radars at shorter time scales as well as systematic seasonal variations. The semidiurnal tide contribute most to the large-scale winds over both radars, with maximum tidal amplitudes during May and maxima at the highest altitudes varying from approx.20 to >70 m/s. In contrast, the diurnal tide and various planetary waves achieve maximum winds of approx.10 to 20 m/s. Monthly-mean gravity wave momentum fluxes appear to reflect the occurrence of significant sources at lower altitudes, with relatively small zonal fluxes over both radars, but with significant, and opposite, meridional momentum fluxes below approx.85 km. These suggest gravity waves propagating away from the Drake Passage at both sites, and may indicate an important source region accounting in part for this "hotspot".

  8. Lidar Scanning of Momentum Flux in the Marine Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Mann, Jakob; Courtney, Michael

    Momentum flux measurements are important for describing the wind profile in the atmospheric boundary layer, modeling the atmospheric flow over water, the accounting of exchange processes between air and sea, etc. It is also directly related to the friction velocity, which is a velocity scale...... turbulence measurements from a sonic anemometer, showing high agreement. In this study, a conical scanning lidar is used to derive the momentum flux, which compares well to the estimations from the bulk-derived method, but it also shows a filtering effect due to the large spatial-averaging volume...

  9. Megawatt wind turbines gaining momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlenschlaeger, K.; Madsen, B.T.

    1996-01-01

    Through the short history of the modern wind turbine, electric utilities have made it amply clear that they have held a preference for large scale wind turbines over smaller ones, which is why wind turbine builders through the years have made numerous attempts develop such machines - machines that would meet the technical, aesthetic and economic demands that a customer would require. Considerable effort was put into developing such wind turbines in the early 1980s. There was the U.S. Department of Energy's MOD 1-5 program, which ranged up to 3.2 MW, Denmark's Nibe A and B, 630 kW turbine and the 2 MW Tjaereborg machine, Sweden's Naesudden, 3 MW, and Germany's Growian, 3 MW. Most of these were dismal failures, though some did show the potential of MW technology. (au)

  10. Parasitic momentum flux in the tokamak core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.

    2017-10-01

    Tokamak plasmas rotate spontaneously without applied torque. This intrinsic rotation is important for future low-torque devices such as ITER, since rotation stabilizes certain instabilities. In the mid-radius `gradient region,' which reaches from the sawtooth inversion radius out to the pedestal top, intrinsic rotation profiles may be either flat or hollow, and can transition suddenly between these two states, an unexplained phenomenon referred to as rotation reversal. Theoretical efforts to explain the mid-radius rotation shear have largely focused on quasilinear models, in which the phase relationships of some selected instability result in a nondiffusive momentum flux (``residual stress''). In contrast, the present work demonstrates the existence of a robust, fully nonlinear symmetry-breaking momentum flux that follows from the free-energy flow in phase space and does not depend on any assumed linear eigenmode structure. The physical origin is an often-neglected portion of the radial ExB drift, which is shown to drive a symmetry-breaking outward flux of co-current momentum whenever free energy is transferred from the electrostatic potential to ion parallel flows. The fully nonlinear derivation relies only on conservation properties and symmetry, thus retaining the important contribution of damped modes. The resulting rotation peaking is counter-current and scales as temperature over plasma current. As first demonstrated by Landau, this free-energy transfer (thus also the corresponding residual stress) becomes inactive when frequencies are much higher than the ion transit frequency, which allows sudden transitions between hollow and flat profiles. Simple estimates suggest that this mechanism may be consistent with experimental observations. This work was funded in part by the Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Mesospheric gravity wave momentum flux estimation using hybrid Doppler interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Spargo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesospheric gravity wave (GW momentum flux estimates using data from multibeam Buckland Park MF radar (34.6° S, 138.5° E experiments (conducted from July 1997 to June 1998 are presented. On transmission, five Doppler beams were symmetrically steered about the zenith (one zenith beam and four off-zenith beams in the cardinal directions. The received beams were analysed with hybrid Doppler interferometry (HDI (Holdsworth and Reid, 1998, principally to determine the radial velocities of the effective scattering centres illuminated by the radar. The methodology of Thorsen et al. (1997, later re-introduced by Hocking (2005 and since extensively applied to meteor radar returns, was used to estimate components of Reynolds stress due to propagating GWs and/or turbulence in the radar resolution volume. Physically reasonable momentum flux estimates are derived from the Reynolds stress components, which are also verified using a simple radar model incorporating GW-induced wind perturbations. On the basis of these results, we recommend the intercomparison of momentum flux estimates between co-located meteor radars and vertical-beam interferometric MF radars. It is envisaged that such intercomparisons will assist with the clarification of recent concerns (e.g. Vincent et al., 2010 of the accuracy of the meteor radar technique.

  12. Doppler lidar measurement of profiles of turbulence and momentum flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Cupp, Richard E.; Healy, Kathleen R.

    1989-01-01

    A short-pulse CO2 Doppler lidar with 150-m range resolution measured vertical profiles of turbulence and momentum flux. Example measurements are reported of a daytime mixed layer with strong mechanical mixing caused by a wind speed of 15 m/sec, which exceeded the speed above the capping inversion. The lidar adapted an azimuth scanning technique previously demonstrated by radar. Scans alternating between two elevation angles allow determination of mean U-squared, V-squared, and W-squared. Expressions were derived to estimate the uncertainty in the turbulence parameters. A new processing method, partial Fourier decomposition, has less uncertainty than the filtering used earlier.

  13. On geodynamo integrations conserving momentum flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C.; Roberts, P. H.

    2012-12-01

    The equations governing the geodynamo are most often integrated by representing the magnetic field and fluid velocity by toroidal and poloidal scalars (for example, MAG code [1]). This procedure does not automatically conserve the momentum flux. The results can, particularly for flows with large shear, introduce significant errors, unless the viscosity is artificially increased. We describe a method that evades this difficulty, by solving the momentum equation directly while properly conserving momentum. It finds pressure by FFT and cyclic reduction, and integrates the governing equations on overlapping grids so avoiding the pole problem. The number of operations per time step is proportional to N3 where N is proportional to the number of grid points in each direction. This contrasts with the order N4 operations of standard spectral transform methods. The method is easily parallelized. It can also be easily adapted to schemes such as the Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) method [2], a flux based procedure based on upwinding that is numerically stable even for zero explicit viscosity. The method has been successfully used to investigate the generation of magnetic fields by flows confined to spheroidal containers and driven by precessional and librational forcing [3, 4]. For spherical systems it satisfies dynamo benchmarks [5]. [1] MAG, http://www.geodynamics.org/cig/software/mag [2] Liu, XD, Osher, S and Chan, T, Weighted Essentially Nonoscillatory Schemes, J. Computational Physics, 115, 200-212, 1994. [3] Wu, CC and Roberts, PH, On a dynamo driven by topographic precession, Geophysical & Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, 103, 467-501, (DOI: 10.1080/03091920903311788), 2009. [4] Wu, CC and Roberts, PH, On a dynamo driven topographically by longitudinal libration, Geophysical & Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, DOI:10.1080/03091929.2012.682990, 2012. [5] Christensen, U, et al., A numerical dynamo benchmark, Phys. Earth Planet Int., 128, 25-34, 2001.

  14. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  15. TropFlux wind stresses over the tropical oceans: Evaluation and comparison with other products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PraveenKumar, B.; Vialard, J.; Lengaigne, M.; Murty, V.S.N.; McPhaden, M.J.; Cronin, M.F.; Pinsard, F.; Reddy, K.G.

    the hourly values. Note that, we neglected surface currents (which are not always available) while computing wind stresses at these moorings. 3. The TropFlux wind stress product In this section, we first present the methodology for computing Trop... onset. Hence, we recommend the use of TropFlux for studies of equatorial ocean dynamics. Key words: TropFlux, tropics, air-sea momentum fluxes, wind stress products validation. 3 1. Introduction The tropics are home to many climatically relevant...

  16. Studies of vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum in the lower atmosphere using the MU-radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kuo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the momentum flux of the atmospheric motions in the height ranges between 6 and 22 km observed using the MU radar at Shigaraki in Japan during a 3 day period in January 1988. The data were divided by double Fourier transformation into data set of waves with downward- phase- velocity and data set of waves with upward-phase-velocity for independent momentum flux calculation. The result showed that both the 72 h averaged upward flux and downward flux of zonal momentum were negative at nearly each height, meaning that the upward flux was dominated by westward propagating waves while the downward flux was dominated by eastward propagating waves. The magnitude of the downward flux was approximately a factor of 1.5 larger than the upward flux for waves in the 2~7 h and 7~24 h period bands, and about equal to the upward flux in the 10–30 min and 30 min–2 h period bands. It is also observed that the vertical flux of zonal momentum tended to be small in each frequency band at the altitudes below the jet maximum (10~12 km, and the flux increased toward more negative values to reach a negative maximum at some altitude well above the jet maximum. Daily averaged flux showed tremendous variation: The 1st 24 h (quiet day was relatively quiet, and the fluxes of the 2nd and 3rd 24 h (active days increased sharply. Moreover, the upward fluxes of zonal momentum below 17 km in the quiet day for each period band (10~30 min, 30 min~2 h, 2~7 h, and 7~24 h were dominantly positive, while the corresponding downward fluxes were dominantly negative, meaning that the zonal momentum below 17 km in each period band under study were dominantly eastward (propagating along the mean wind. In the active days, both the upward fluxes and downward fluxes in each frequency band were dominantly negative throughout the whole altitude range 6.1–18.95 km.

  17. Measurement of momentum flux using two meteor radars in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Matsumoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Two nearly identical meteor radars were operated at Koto Tabang (0.20° S, 100.32° E, West Sumatra, and Biak (1.17° S, 136.10° E, West Papua, in Indonesia, separated by approximately 4000 km in longitude on the Equator. The zonal and meridional momentum flux, u′w′ and v′w′, where u, v, and w are the eastward, northward, and vertical wind velocity components, respectively, were estimated at 86 to 94 km altitudes using the meteor radar data by applying a method proposed by Hocking (2005. The observed u′w′ at the two sites agreed reasonably well at 86, 90, and 94 km during the observation periods when the data acquisition rate was sufficiently large enough. Variations in v′w′ were consistent between 86, 90, and 94 km altitudes at both sites. The climatological variation in the monthly averaged u′w′ and v′w′ was investigated using the long-term radar data at Koto Tabang from November 2002 to November 2013. The seasonal variations in u′w′ and v′w′ showed a repeatable semiannual and annual cycles, respectively. u′w′ showed eastward values in February–April and July–September and v′w′ was northward in June to August at 90–94 km, both of which were generally anti-phase with the mean zonal and meridional winds, having the same periodicity. Our results suggest the usefulness of the Hocking method.

  18. `Surface-Layer' momentum fluxes in nocturnal slope flows over steep terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Pardyjak, E.; Higgins, C. W.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    A common working definition for the `surface layer' is the lowest 10% of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) where the turbulent fluxes are essentially constant. The latter part of this definition is a critical assumption that must hold for accurate flux estimations from land-surface models, wall models, similarity theory, flux-gradient relations and bulk transfer methods. We present cases from observed momentum fluxes in nocturnal slope flows over steep (35.5 degree), alpine terrain in Val Ferret, Switzerland that satisfy the classical definitions of the surface layer and other cases where no traditional surface layer is observed. These cases broadly fall into two distinct flow regimes occurring under clear-sky conditions: (1) buoyancy-driven, `katabatic flow', characterized by an elevated velocity maximum (katabatic jet peak) and (2) `downslope winds', for which larger-scale forcing prevents formation of a katabatic jet. Velocity profiles in downslope wind cases are quite similar to logarithmic profiles typically observed over horizontal and homogeneous terrain, and the corresponding momentum fluxes roughly resemble a constant-flux surface-layer. Contrastingly, velocity profiles in the katabatic regime exhibit a jet-like shape. This jet strongly modulates the corresponding momentum fluxes, which exhibit strong gradients over the shallow katabatic layer and usually change sign near the jet peak, where the velocity gradients also change sign. However, a counter-gradient momentum flux is frequently observed near the jet peak (and sometimes at higher levels), suggesting strong non-local turbulent transport within the katabatic jet layer. We compare our observations with katabatic flow theories and observational studies over shallow-angle slopes and use co-spectral analyses to better identify and understand the non-local transport dynamics. Finally, we show that because of the counter-gradient momentum fluxes, surface layer stability and even local stability can be

  19. Improved blade element momentum theory for wind turbine aerodynamic computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhenye; Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) theory is widely used in aerodynamic performance predictions and design applications for wind turbines. However, the classic BEM method is not quite accurate which often tends to under-predict the aerodynamic forces near root and over-predict its performance near tip....... The reliability of the aerodynamic calculations and design optimizations is greatly reduced due to this problem. To improve the momentum theory, in this paper the influence of pressure drop due to wake rotation and the effect of radial velocity at the rotor disc in the momentum theory are considered. Thus...... the axial induction factor in far downstream is not simply twice of the induction factor at disc. To calculate the performance of wind turbine rotors, the improved momentum theory is considered together with both Glauert's tip correction and Shen's tip correction. Numerical tests have been performed...

  20. Magnetic flux periodicities and finite momentum pairing in unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loder, Florian

    2009-12-22

    This work contains a thorough study of the magnetic flux periodicity of loops of conventional and unconventional, especially d-wave, superconductors. Although already in 1961, several independent works showed that the flux period of a conventional superconducting loop is the superconducting flux quantum hc/2e, this question has never been investigated deeply for unconventional superconductors. And indeed, we show here that d-wave superconducting loops show a basic flux period of the normal flux quantum hc/e, a property originating from the nodal quasi-particle states. This doubling of the flux periodicity is best visible in the persistent current circulating in the loop, and it affects other properties of the superconductor such as the periodicity of d-wave Josephson junctions. In the second part of this work, the theory of electron pairing with finite center-of-mass momentum, necessary for the description of superconducting loops, is extended to systems in zero magnetic field. We show that even in the field free case, an unconventional pairing symmetry can lead to a superconducting ground state with finite-momentum electron pairs. Such a state has an inhomogeneous charge density and therefore is a basis for the description of coexistence of superconductivity and stripe order. (orig.)

  1. Regional variations of mesospheric gravity-wave momentum flux over Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Espy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Images of mesospheric airglow and radar-wind measurements have been combined to estimate the difference in the vertical flux of horizontal momentum carried by high-frequency gravity waves over two dissimilar Antarctic stations. Rothera (67° S, 68° W is situated in the mountains of the Peninsula near the edge of the wintertime polar vortex. In contrast, Halley (76° S, 27° W, some 1658 km to the southeast, is located on an ice sheet at the edge of the Antarctic Plateau and deep within the polar vortex during winter. The cross-correlation coefficients between the vertical and horizontal wind perturbations were calculated from sodium (Na airglow imager data collected during the austral winter seasons of 2002 and 2003 at Rothera for comparison with the 2000 and 2001 results from Halley reported previously (Espy et al., 2004. These cross-correlation coefficients were combined with wind-velocity variances from coincident radar measurements to estimate the daily averaged upper-limit of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum due to gravity waves near the peak emission altitude of the Na nightglow layer, 90km. The resulting momentum flux at both stations displayed a large day-to-day variability and showed a marked seasonal rotation from the northwest to the southwest throughout the winter. However, the magnitude of the flux at Rothera was about 4 times larger than that at Halley, suggesting that the differences in the gravity-wave source functions and filtering by the underlying winds at the two stations create significant regional differences in wave forcing on the scale of the station separation.

  2. Variance Method to Determine Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum And Sensible Heat in The Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debruin, H.A.R.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is presented that in the stable atmospheric surface layer turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum can be determined from the standard deviations of longitudinal wind velocity and temperature, ¿u and ¿T respectively, measured at a single level. An attractive aspect of this method is that it

  3. Improved analysis of all-sky meteor radar measurements of gravity wave variances and momentum fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Andrioli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of using a composite day analysis for all-sky interferometric meteor radars when measuring mean winds and tides are widely known. On the other hand, problems arise if this technique is applied to Hocking's (2005 gravity wave analysis for all-sky meteor radars. In this paper we describe how a simple change in the procedure makes it possible to use a composite day in Hocking's analysis. Also, we explain how a modified composite day can be constructed to test its ability to measure gravity wave momentum fluxes. Test results for specified mean, tidal, and gravity wave fields, including tidal amplitudes and gravity wave momentum fluxes varying strongly with altitude and/or time, suggest that the modified composite day allows characterization of monthly mean profiles of the gravity wave momentum fluxes, with good accuracy at least at the altitudes where the meteor counts are large (from 89 to 92.5 km. In the present work we also show that the variances measured with Hocking's method are often contaminated by the tidal fields and suggest a method of empirical correction derived from a simple simulation model. The results presented here greatly increase our confidence because they show that our technique is able to remove the tide-induced false variances from Hocking's analysis.

  4. A new approach to momentum flux determinations using SKiYMET meteor radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Hocking

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The current primary radar method for determination of atmospheric momentum fluxes relies on multiple beam studies, usually using oppositely directed coplanar beams. Generally VHF and MF radars are used, and meteor radars have never been successfully employed. In this paper we introduce a new procedure that can be used for determination of gravity wave fluxes down to time scales of 2-3h, using the SKiYMET meteor radars. The method avoids the need for beam forming, and allows simultaneous determination of the three components of the wind averaged over the radar volume, as well as the variance and flux components $overline {u'^2},overline {v'^2},overline {w'^2}, overline {u'v'},overline {u'w'} {rm and} : overline {v'w'}$, where $u'$ refers to the fluctuating eastward wind, $v'$ refers to the fluctuating northward wind, and $w'$ refers to the fluctuating vertical wind. Data from radars in New Mexico and Resolute Bay are used to illustrate the data quality, and demonstrate theoretically expected seasonal forcing.

    Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Middle atmosphere dynamics; Waves and tides; Climatology

  5. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Zwickl, R.D.; Smith, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Normally the approx. >80-eV electrons which carry the solar wind electron heat flux are collimated along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the direction pointing outward away from the sun. Occasionally, however, collimated fluxes of approx. >80-eV electrons are observed traveling both parallel and antiparallel to the IMF. Here we present the results of a survey of such bidirectional electron heat flux events as observed with the plasma and magnetic field experiments aboard ISEE 3 at times when the spacecraft was not magnetically connected to the earth's bow shock. The onset of a bidirectional electron heat flux at ISEE 3 usually signals spacecraft entry into a distinct solar wind plasma and field entity, most often characterized by anomalously low proton and electron temperatures, a strong, smoothly varying magnetic field, a low plasma beta, and a high total pressure. Significant field rotations often occur at the beginning and/or end of bidirectional heat flux events, and, at times, the large field rotations characteristic of ''magnetic clouds'' are present. Approximately half of all bidirectional heat flux events are associated with and follow interplanetary shocks, while the other events have no obvious shock associations

  6. Gravity wave intensity and momentum fluxes in the mesosphere over Shigaraki, Japan (35°N, 136°E during 1986-1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Gavrilov

    Full Text Available Averaged seasonal variations of wind perturbation intensities and vertical flux of horizontal momentum produced by internal gravity waves (IGWs with periods 0.2-1 h and 1-6 h are studied at the altitudes 65-80 km using the MU radar measurement data from the middle and upper atmosphere during 1986-1997 at Shigaraki, Japan (35° N, 136° E. IGW intensity has maxima in winter and summer, winter values having substantial interannual variations. Mean wave momentum flux is directed to the west in winter and to the east in summer, opposite to the mean wind in the middle atmosphere. Major IGW momentum fluxes come to the mesosphere over Shigaraki from the Pacific direction in winter and continental Asia in summer.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides · Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances

  7. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Pryor, Sara

    2010-01-01

    extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected...... wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher...... than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes....

  8. Heat and Momentum Fluxes Near a Forest Edge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, B.; Klaassen, W.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Veen, A.W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes have been measured downwind of an interface between agricultural land and mixed deciduous forest. Theory predicts the presence of vertical flux divergences within the adjusting layer of air. It was investigated whether edge effects and advection can be characterized by measured

  9. An instrument for measuring the momentum flux from atomic and charged particle jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Zonca, F.; Timberlake, J.; Bennett, T.; Cuthbertson, J.; Langer, W.; Motley, R.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed an instrument to measure the momentum flux from an intense plasma stream for which the standard techniques used for low pressure gases ( -5 - 10 -3 Newtons with a response time of 10 12 cm -3 ). Such forces are transmitted predominantly by ionic and neutral species, with 10's of eV's of kinetic energy, are accompanied by high heat fluxes, and are pulsed. The momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer, a capacitance-type pressure gauge. This protects the transducer from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering. An absolute force calibration of the PMM to 1% accuracy has been made is described. A flat carbon target has been used in measurements of the momentum flux of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr, plasmas produced in a magnetized linear plasma device. 7 refs., 7 figs

  10. Mesospheric momentum fluxes over Adelaide during the 2-day wave: Results and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D. J.; Vincent, R. A.

    1998-11-01

    Estimates of the vertical flux of meridional momentum due to waves of periods between 8 min and 1 hour were obtained over a height range of approximately 80 to 94 km while the 2-day wave was active during January 1987. Between 0600 and 1100 LT on the days of the northward phase of the 2-day wave, pulses of momentum-flux density, somewhat larger than the values present at other times, were found. The interpretation of momentum-flux density profiles is considered and the concepts developed are applied to the data presented. It is found that the data are generally not consistent with the expected scenario of breaking upgoing gravity waves. An alternative explanation involving downgoing waves is tendered.

  11. The practical application of scintillometers in determining the surface fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis has collated one review chapter and five experiments concerned with addressing the question, 'how successful is the scintillometer method in determining the surface fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum and under what circumstances does it appear to fail?'

  12. Gravity wave momentum fluxes studies using OH imager, Na Lidar and meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrioli, Vania Fatima; Clemesha, Barclay; Batista, Paulo

    In this paper we have used atmospheric data, from 80 to 100 km altitude, measured by three different equipments for studying gravity wave activity. An OH CCD imager and a meteor radar located at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7 ° S, 45 ° W) were used together with a sodium lidar operating at São José dos Campos (23.1 ° S, 45.9 °W). We have used two years of data from 2007 to 2008 with 28 days of simultaneous data, totalizing 148 hours of observations. In an earlier presentation we inferred mean momentum fluxes and variances by using Hocking’s (2005) analysis of the meteor radar data and compared the variances values with the ones derived from Na lidar temperature profiles. The main objective of the present work is a comparison between the momentum fluxes inferred by using Hocking’s (2005) analysis of the meteor radar data and those derived from imaging data using the Swenson and Gardner (1998) model. This is an analytical model that relates the intensity perturbation of the OH emission to the relative perturbation in the atmospheric density. And then applying the GW polarization relations it is possible to compute the vertical energy and momentum fluxes due to waves seen in the OH emission.This analysis will make possible a comprehensive study of the momentum flux and variance due to GW over this region.

  13. Regional fluxes of momentum and sensible heat over a sub-arctic landscape during late winter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    Based on measurements at Sodankyla Meteorological Observatory the regional (aggregated) momentum and sensible heat fluxes are estimated for two days over a site in Finnish Lapland during late winter. The forest covers 49% of the area. The study shows that the forest dominates and controls the reg...

  14. Calibrated Blade-Element/Momentum Theory Aerodynamic Model of the MARIN Stock Wind Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupee, A.; Kimball, R.; de Ridder, E. J.; Helder, J.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2015-04-02

    In this paper, a calibrated blade-element/momentum theory aerodynamic model of the MARIN stock wind turbine is developed and documented. The model is created using open-source software and calibrated to closely emulate experimental data obtained by the DeepCwind Consortium using a genetic algorithm optimization routine. The provided model will be useful for those interested in validating interested in validating floating wind turbine numerical simulators that rely on experiments utilizing the MARIN stock wind turbine—for example, the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30’s Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continued, with Correlation project.

  15. QBO Modulation of the Mesopause Gravity Wave Momentum Flux over Tierra del Fuego

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, R. J.; Janches, D.; Fritts, D. C.; Hibbins, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The interannual variability of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) gravity wave momentum flux over southern mid latitudes (53.7degS) has been studied using more than 7 years of meteor radar observations at Ro Grande, Argentina. A modulation, with periods similar to that of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), is observed in the vertical flux of zonal as well as meridional momentum. The QBO signal is largest in the zonal component during summer and is in phase with the stratospheric QBO at 50 hPa (approx. 21 km). The relation between the stratospheric QBO and the QBO modulation in the MLT gravity wave forcing (derived from the divergence of the momentum flux) was found to be consistent with that expected from the Holton-Tan effect coupled to the interhemispheric coupling mechanism. These results provide the first observational support for the existence of the midlatitude gravity wave forcing anomalies as hypothesized in the interhemispheric coupling mechanism.

  16. Momentum and energy balance in late-type stellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, K. B.

    1981-01-01

    Observations at ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths indicate that the classical picture of a static stellar atmosphere containing a radiative equilibrium temperature distribution is inapplicable to the majority of late type stars. Mass loss and the presence of atmospheric regions characterized by gas temperatures in excess of the stellar effective temperature appear to be almost ubiquitous throughout the HR diagram. Evidence pertaining to the thermal and dynamical structure of the outer envelopes of cool stars is summarized. These results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models which were proposed to account for mass loss from latetype stars. Models in which the outflow is thermally radiatively, or wave driven are considered for identification of the physical processes responsible for the observed wind properties. The observed variation of both the wind, thermal and dynamical structure as one proceeds from the supergiant branch toward the main sequence in the cool portion of the HR diagram give consideration to potential mechanisms for heating and cooling the flow from low gravity stars.

  17. Multi-year observations of gravity wave momentum fluxes at low and middle latitudes inferred by all-sky meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrioli, V. F.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.; Schuch, N. J.; Buriti, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    We have applied a modified composite day analysis to the Hocking (2005) technique to study gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). Wind measurements from almost continuous meteor radar observations during June 2004-December 2008 over São João do Cariri (Cariri; 7° S, 36° W), April 1999-November 2008 over Cachoeira Paulista (CP; 23° S, 45° W), and February 2005-December 2009 over Santa Maria (SM; 30° S, 54° W) were used to estimate the GW momentum fluxes and variances in the MLT region. Our analysis can provide monthly mean altitude profiles of vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum for short-period (less than 2-3 h) GWs. The averages for each month throughout the entire data series have shown different behavior for the momentum fluxes depending on latitude and component. The meridional component has almost the same behavior at the three sites, being positive (northward), for most part of the year. On the other hand, the zonal component shows different behavior at each location: it is positive for almost half the year at Cariri and SM but predominantly negative over CP. Annual variation in the GW momentum fluxes is present at all sites in the zonal component and also in SM at 89 km in the meridional component. The seasonal analysis has also shown a 4-month oscillation at 92.5 km over SM in the zonal component and over CP at the same altitudes but for the meridional component.

  18. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26 α and H30 α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30 α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26 α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30 α line. H26 α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30 α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R {sup −4}. In addition, the H30 α and H26 α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  19. Wind stress and heat fluxes over a Brazilian Coastal Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Marcelo; Candella, Rogério

    2017-04-01

    Coastal upwelling zones have been intensively studied in the last decades especially due to their importance to the biological cycle. The coastal upwelling system of the Cabo Frio region (east coast of the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil) keeps the surface water cold during most part of the year, what induces a stable atmospheric boundary layer associated to northeast winds. The main goal of this study is to investigate the wind stress and heat fluxes exchanges between the ocean and the atmosphere in that area. For this purpose, a set of hourly data meteorological and oceanographic data collected by a Wavescan metocean buoy anchored at 23o59S; 42oW, were used, as well as solar radiation and relative humidity from a terrestrial meteorological station from the Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (InMet). COARE 3.0 algorithm was used to calculate the latent and sensible heat fluxes. In this discussion, positive values represent fluxes towards the ocean. The average net heat flux over our study period is 88 W m-2. The reduction of the net heat flux is due to the increase of the ocean latent heat loss, although a reduction in incoming shortwave radiation and an increase in ocean long wave cooling also contributes. The latent heat is 20 times larger than the sensible heat flux, but the mean value of the latent heat flux, 62 W m-2, is half the typical value found in open ocean. The temporal variability of both sensible and latent heat fluxes reflects their dependence on wind speed and air-sea temperature differences. When upwelling events, here periods when diurnal SST is lower than 18oC, are compared with undisturbed (without upwelling) events, it can be noted the sensible heat fluxes are positives and 10 times greater in magnitude. This is related to an increment, during these upwelling events, of the air-sea temperature difference and an increasing of the wind speed. The cold waters of the upwelling increase the air-sea temperature gradient and, also, the horizontal land

  20. Intraseasonal to interannual variability of Kelvin wave momentum fluxes as derived from high-resolution radiosonde data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Sjoberg

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Observational estimates of Kelvin wave momentum fluxes in the tropical lower stratosphere remain challenging. Here we extend a method based on linear wave theory to estimate daily time series of these momentum fluxes from high-resolution radiosonde data. Daily time series are produced for sounding sites operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE and from the recent Dynamics of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO field campaign. Our momentum flux estimates are found to be robust to different data sources and processing and in quantitative agreement with estimates from prior studies. Testing the sensitivity to vertical resolution, our estimated momentum fluxes are found to be most sensitive to vertical resolution greater than 1 km, largely due to overestimation of the vertical wavelength. Climatological analysis is performed over a selected 11-year span of data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM radiosonde sites. Analyses of this 11-year span of data reveal the expected seasonal cycle of momentum flux maxima in boreal winter and minima in boreal summer, and variability associated with the quasi-biennial oscillation of maxima during easterly phase and minima during westerly phase. Comparison between periods with active convection that is either strongly or weakly associated with the Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO suggests that the MJO provides a nontrivial increase in the lowermost stratospheric momentum fluxes.

  1. Angular momentum, g-value, and magnetic flux of gyration states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1991-10-01

    Two of the world's leading (Nobel laureate) physicists disagree on the definition of the orbital angular momentum L of the Landau gyration states of a spinless charged particle in a uniform external magnetic field B = B i Z . According to Richard P. Feynman (and also Frank Wilczek) L = (rxμv) = rx(p - qA/c), while Felix Bloch (and also Kerson Huang) defines it as L = rxp. We show here that Bloch's definition is the correct one since it satisfies the necessary and sufficient condition LxL = iℎ L, while Feynman's definition does not. However, as a consequence of the quantized Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux, this canonical orbital angular momentum (surprisingly enough) takes half-odd-integral values with a zero-point gyration states of L Z = ℎ/2. Further, since the diamagnetic and the paramagnetic contributions to the magnetic moment are interdependent, the g-value of these gyration states is two and not one, again a surprising result for a spinless case. The differences between the gauge invariance in classical and quantum mechanics, Onsager's suggestion that the flux quantization might be an intrinsic property of the electromagnetic field-charged particle interaction, the possibility that the experimentally measured fundamental unit of the flux quantum need not necessarily imply the existence of ''electron pairing'' of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductivity theory, and the relationship to the Dirac's angular momentum quantization condition for the magnetic monopole-charged particle composites (i.e. Schwinger's dyons), are also briefly examined from a pedestrian viewpoint

  2. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  3. sizing of wind powered axial flux permanent magnet alternator using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... Using analytical calculations, the design parameters of the alternator's main dimensions were obtained in a ... SIZING OF WIND POWERED AXIAL FLUX PERMANENT MAGNET ALTERNATOR USING ANALYTICAL APPROACH,. A. O. Otuoze, et al .... then be expressed as. Equation (7) can be re-written as.

  4. Manifestation of solar activity in solar wind particle flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the origin of long-term variations in flux density of solar wind particles (nv) for different velocity regimes. The study revealed a relationship of these variations to the area of the polar coronal holes (CH). It is shown that within the framework of the model under development, the main longterm variations of nv are a result of the latitude redistribution of the solar wind mass flux in the heliosphere and are due to changes in the large-scale geometry of the solar plasma flow in the corona. A study has been made of the variations of nv for high speed solar wind streams. It is found that nv in high speed streams which are formed in CH, decreases from minimum to maximum solar activity. The analysis indicates that this decrease is attributable to the magnetic field strength increase in coronal holes. It has been found that periods of rapid global changes of background magnetic fields on the Sun are accompanied by a reconfiguration of coronal magnetic fields, rapid changes in the length of quiescent filaments, and by an increase in the density of the particle flux of a high speed solar wind. It has been established that these periods precede the formation of CH, corresponding to the increase in solar wind velocity near the Earth and to enhancement of the level of geomagnetic disturbance. (author)

  5. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-05-29

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system.

  6. Mass, momentum, and energy flux conservation between linear and nonlinear steady-state wave groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeng; Xu, Dali; Liao, Shijun

    2017-12-01

    This paper provides a mass, momentum, and energy flux conservation analysis between the linear and nonlinear steady-state wave groups. Convergent high-order solutions for nonlinear wave groups with multiple steady-state near resonances in deep water have been obtained by means of the homotopy analysis method. The small divisors associated with nearly resonant components are transformed to singularities that are originally caused by exact resonances by a piecewise auxiliary linear operator. Both two primary components and other nearly resonant ones are considered in the initial guess to search for finite amplitude wave groups. It is found that as nonlinearity of wave groups increases, more wave components appear in the spectrum due to the nearly resonant interactions. The nonlinear wave fields change from the initial bi-chromatic waves that contain only two nontrivial primary components into the steady-state resonant waves that contain both two primary components and other nearly resonant ones. The conservation of mean rates of mass, momentum, and energy fluxes is established between the nonlinear wave groups and linear waves that are combined by two primary components with the same frequencies as in nonlinear wave groups. Comparison of the linear and nonlinear wave fields shows that the nearly resonant components influence the wave field distribution significantly: the nonlinear free surfaces have more peaked crests, steeper troughs, and more flatten wave nodes, and the related velocities at the crests and troughs increase more rapidly with the nonlinearity. All of these findings are helpful to enrich and deepen our understanding about nonlinear wave groups.

  7. Wind tunnel experiments on the effects of tillage ridge features on wind erosion horizontal fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the well-known soil factors which control wind erosion on flat, unridged surfaces, two specific processes affect the susceptibility of tillage ridged surfaces to wind erosion: ridge-induced roughness and ridge- trapping efficiency. In order to parameterize horizontal soil fluxes produced by wind over tillage ridges, eight-ridge configurations composed of sandy soil and exhibiting ridge heights to ridge spacing (RH/RS ratios ranging from 0.18 to 0.38 were experimented in a wind tunnel. These experiments are used to develop a parameterization of the horizontal fluxes over tillage ridged surfaces based only on the geometric characteristics of the ridges. Indeed, the key parameters controlling the horizontal flux, namely the friction velocity, threshold friction velocity and the adjustment coefficient, are derived through specific expressions, from ridge heights (RH and ridge spacing (RS. This parameterization was evaluated by comparing the results of the simulations to an additional experimental data set and to the data set obtained by Hagen and Armbrust (1992. In both cases, predicted and measured values are found to be in a satisfying agreement. This parameterization was used to evaluate the efficiency of ridges in reducing wind erosion. The results show that ridged surfaces, when compared to a loose, unridged soil surface, lead to an important reduction in the horizontal fluxes (exceeding 60%. Moreover, the effect of ridges in trapping particles contributes for more than 90% in the flux reduction while the ridge roughness effect is weak and decreases when the wind velocity increases.

  8. Wind tunnel experiments on the effects of tillage ridge features on wind erosion horizontal fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the well-known soil factors which control wind erosion on flat, unridged surfaces, two specific processes affect the susceptibility of tillage ridged surfaces to wind erosion: ridge-induced roughness and ridge- trapping efficiency.

    In order to parameterize horizontal soil fluxes produced by wind over tillage ridges, eight-ridge configurations composed of sandy soil and exhibiting ridge heights to ridge spacing (RH/RS ratios ranging from 0.18 to 0.38 were experimented in a wind tunnel. These experiments are used to develop a parameterization of the horizontal fluxes over tillage ridged surfaces based only on the geometric characteristics of the ridges. Indeed, the key parameters controlling the horizontal flux, namely the friction velocity, threshold friction velocity and the adjustment coefficient, are derived through specific expressions, from ridge heights (RH and ridge spacing (RS. This parameterization was evaluated by comparing the results of the simulations to an additional experimental data set and to the data set obtained by Hagen and Armbrust (1992. In both cases, predicted and measured values are found to be in a satisfying agreement.

    This parameterization was used to evaluate the efficiency of ridges in reducing wind erosion. The results show that ridged surfaces, when compared to a loose, unridged soil surface, lead to an important reduction in the horizontal fluxes (exceeding 60%. Moreover, the effect of ridges in trapping particles contributes for more than 90% in the flux reduction while the ridge roughness effect is weak and decreases when the wind velocity increases.

  9. Close binary evolution. II. Impact of tides, wind magnetic braking, and internal angular momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. F.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Ekström, S.; Eggenberger, P.; Georgy, C.; Qin, Y.; Fragos, T.; Soerensen, M.; Barblan, F.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Massive stars with solar metallicity lose important amounts of rotational angular momentum through their winds. When a magnetic field is present at the surface of a star, efficient angular momentum losses can still be achieved even when the mass-loss rate is very modest, at lower metallicities, or for lower-initial-mass stars. In a close binary system, the effect of wind magnetic braking also interacts with the influence of tides, resulting in a complex evolution of rotation. Aims: We study the interactions between the process of wind magnetic braking and tides in close binary systems. Methods: We discuss the evolution of a 10 M⊙ star in a close binary system with a 7 M⊙ companion using the Geneva stellar evolution code. The initial orbital period is 1.2 days. The 10 M⊙ star has a surface magnetic field of 1 kG. Various initial rotations are considered. We use two different approaches for the internal angular momentum transport. In one of them, angular momentum is transported by shear and meridional currents. In the other, a strong internal magnetic field imposes nearly perfect solid-body rotation. The evolution of the primary is computed until the first mass-transfer episode occurs. The cases of different values for the magnetic fields and for various orbital periods and mass ratios are briefly discussed. Results: We show that, independently of the initial rotation rate of the primary and the efficiency of the internal angular momentum transport, the surface rotation of the primary will converge, in a time that is short with respect to the main-sequence lifetime, towards a slowly evolving velocity that is different from the synchronization velocity. This "equilibrium angular velocity" is always inferior to the angular orbital velocity. In a given close binary system at this equilibrium stage, the difference between the spin and the orbital angular velocities becomes larger when the mass losses and/or the surface magnetic field increase. The

  10. Validation of effective momentum and heat flux models for stratification and mixing in a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    The pressure suppression pool is the most important feature of the pressure suppression system in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) that acts primarily as a passive heat sink during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or when the reactor is isolated from the main heat sink. The steam injection into the pool through the blowdown pipes can lead to short term dynamic phenomena and long term thermal transient in the pool. The development of thermal stratification or mixing in the pool is a transient phenomenon that can influence the pool's pressure suppression capacity. Different condensation regimes depending on the pool's bulk temperature and steam flow rates determine the onset of thermal stratification or erosion of stratified layers. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (i) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (ii) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale

  11. Small-scale Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Zheng, J.

    2017-12-01

    We have quantitatively examined one type of fundamental space plasma structures in the solar wind, the magnetic flux ropes, especially those of relatively small scales. They usually are of durations ranging from a few minutes to a few hours. The main objectives are to reveal the existence in terms of their occurrence and distributions in the solar wind, to quantitatively examine their configurations and properties, and to relate to other relevant processes. The goal is to understand their origin as transient and/or coherent structures in association with other transients, such as current sheets and shocks. The technical approach is a combination of time-series analysis methods with the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique. This modeling method is capable of characterizing two and a half dimensional cross section of space plasma structures, based on in-situ spacecraft measurements along a single path across. We present the automated detection and construction of an online magnetic flux rope database, and preliminary statistical analysis result of the properties of these structures in the solar wind.

  12. Evolution of close binaries under the assumption that they lose angular momentum by a magnetic stellar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraicheva, Z.T.; Tutukov, A.V.; Yungel'son, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method is proposed for describing the evolution of semidetached close binaries whose secondary components have degenerated helium cores and lose orbital angular momentum by a magnetic stellar wind. The results of calculations are used to estimate the initial parameters of a series of low-mass (M 1 + M 2 ≤ 5M.) systems of Algol type under the two assumptions of conservative and nonconservative evolution with respect to the orbital angular momentum. Only the assumption that the systems with secondary components possessing convective shells lose angular momentum makes it possible to reproduce their initial parameters without contradiction

  13. Heat and Flux Configurations on Offshore Wind Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuksahin, D; Bot, E T G

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the best configurations of the Heat and Flux concept for more profitable and utilizable settings in a wind farm in terms of increase in the energy yield and reduction in loadings. The computations are performed with alteration of a single parameter at a time. The reference farm for this study is EWTW, the ECN test farm in Wieringermeer, as this farm was also the reference for the validation of both the Heat and Flux concept and the software tool FarmFlow. All the studies are performed with FarmFlow developed by ECN, which computes wake deficits and turbulence intensities, resulting in the energy yield of all turbines in the farm

  14. Flux of parallel flow momentum by parallel shear flow driven instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosuga, Yusuke; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The flux of parallel momentum by parallel shear flow driven instability is calculated with the self-consistent mode dispersion. The result indicates that the diffusive component has two characteristic terms: ν D1 ∼ v tilde x 2 /γ (0) and ν D2 ∼ v tilde x 2 /(k ∥ 2 D ∥ ) where v tilde x is the fluctuation radial velocity, γ (0) is the growth rate of the mode, k ∥ is the parallel wave number, and D ∥ is the electron diffusivity along the magnetic field. ν D1 results when the parallel flow shear is above the threshold, while ν D2 is important around the marginal state. Since typically ν D1 >> ν D2 ∼ D n , where D n is the particle diffusivity, the Prandtl number (≡ ν/D n ) becomes large when parallel flow shear driven instability occurs. This feature may explain the experimental observation on the difference between profiles of density and toroidal flow in edge and SOL plasmas. (author)

  15. Dependence of thermospheric zonal winds on solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and hemisphere as measured by CHAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Liu, Libo; Liu, Songtao

    2017-08-01

    The thermospheric zonal winds measured by the CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite are used to statistically determine the climatology under quiet and active geomagnetic conditions. By collectively analyzing the bin-averaged wind trend with F10.7 and the solar-induced difference in wind structures, the solar flux dependence of global thermosphere zonal wind is determined. The increase of solar flux enhances the eastward winds at low latitudes from dusk to midnight. The increased ion drag reduces the nighttime eastward wind in the subauroral latitudes, and the daytime westward winds from 06 to 08 MLT at all latitudes decrease with increasing solar flux. Zonal winds show coupled seasonal/extreme ultraviolet (EUV) dependency. The equatorial zonal winds from 18 to 04 magnetic local time (MLT) indicate weaker eastward winds during the June solstice at high solar flux levels. Quiet time eastward winds at subauroral latitudes from 16 to 20 MLT are further decreased in the winter hemisphere. Influenced by asymmetries in solar illumination and the magnetic field, zonal winds show hemispheric asymmetries. Quiet daytime winds are additionally influenced by solar illumination effects, and the westward winds at the middle and subauroral latitudes are always stronger in the summer. The nighttime eastward winds are higher in the winter hemisphere during the solstices, as in the Southern Hemisphere during equinoxes, with the winter-summer asymmetry lessened or receding at the solar maxima. Storm-induced subauroral westward disturbance winds are higher in the summer hemisphere and in the Northern Hemisphere during equinoxes. At a high level of solar flux, the westward disturbance winds are comparable in the two hemispheres during December solstice. Geomagnetic disturbance wind observations from CHAMP agree well with the empirical geomagnetic disturbance wind model, except for stronger subauroral westward jets. Westward winds during the afternoon may be enhanced in

  16. Inverse design-momentum, a method for the preliminary design of horizontal axis wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battisti, L; Soraperra, G; Fedrizzi, R; Zanne, L

    2007-01-01

    Wind turbine rotor prediction methods based on generalized momentum theory BEM routinely used in industry and vortex wake methods demand the use of airfoil tabulated data and geometrical specifications such as the blade spanwise chord distribution. They belong to the category of 'direct design' methods. When, on the other hand, the geometry is deduced from some design objective, we refer to 'inverse design' methods. This paper presents a method for the preliminary design of wind turbine rotors based on an inverse design approach. For this purpose, a generalized theory was developed without using classical tools such as BEM. Instead, it uses a simplified meridional flow analysis of axial turbomachines and is based on the assumption that knowing the vortex distribution and appropriate boundary conditions is tantamount to knowing the velocity distribution. The simple conservation properties of the vortex components consistently cope with the forces and specific work exchange expressions through the rotor. The method allows for rotor arbitrarily radial load distribution and includes the wake rotation and expansion. Radial pressure gradient is considered in the wake. The capability of the model is demonstrated first by a comparison with the classical actuator disk theory in investigating the consistency of the flow field, then the model is used to predict the blade planform of a commercial wind turbine. Based on these validations, the authors postulate the use of a different vortex distribution (i.e. not-uniform loading) for blade design and discuss the effect of such choices on blade chord and twist, force distribution and power coefficient. In addition to the method's straightforward application to the pre-design phase, the model clearly shows the link between blade geometry and performance allowing quick preliminary evaluation of non uniform loading on blade structural characteristics

  17. On consistent definitions of momentum and energy fluxes for molecular dynamics models with multi-body interatomic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Li, Xiantao

    2015-01-01

    Results from molecular dynamics simulations often need to be further processed to understand the physics on a larger scale. This paper considers the definitions of momentum and energy fluxes obtained from a control-volume approach. To assess the validity of these defined quantities, two consistency criteria are proposed. As examples, the embedded atom potential and the Tersoff potential are considered. The consistency is verified using analytical and numerical methods.

  18. Turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat over land in the High-Arctic summer: the influence of observation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sjöblom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Different observation techniques for atmospheric turbulent fluxes of momentum and sensible heat were tested in a High-Arctic valley in Svalbard during two consecutive summers (June–August in 2010 and 2011. The gradient method (GM and the bulk method (BM have been compared to the more direct eddy covariance method (ECM in order to evaluate if relatively robust and cheap instrumentation with low power consumption can be used as a means to increase the number of observations, especially at remote locations where instruments need to be left unattended for extended periods. Such campaigns increase knowledge about the snow-free surface exchange processes, an area which is relatively little investigated compared to snow-covered ground. The GM agreed closely to the ECM, especially for momentum flux where the two methods agree within 5%. For sensible heat flux, the GM produces, on average, approximately 40% lower values for unstable stratification and 67% lower for stable stratification. However, this corresponds to only 20 and 12 W m−2, respectively. The BM, however, shows a greater scatter and larger differences for both parameters. In addition to testing these methods, radiation properties were measured and the surface albedo was found to increase through the summer, from approximately 0.1 to 0.2. The surface energy budget shows that the sensible heat flux is usually directed upwards for the whole summer, while the latent heat flux is upwards in June, but becomes downward in July and August.

  19. Momentum and energy deposition in late-type stellar atmospheres and winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L.; Macgregor, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    The present study calculates the response of the outer atmospheres of cool low-gravity stars to the passage of the mechanical energy fluxes of solar magnitude in the form of acoustic waves and Alfven waves. It is shown that Alfven waves are efficient in generating outflow, and can account for the order of magnitude of observed mass loss in late-type luminous stars. However, unless these magnetic waves undergo some dissipation within several stellar radii of the surface, the predicted terminal velocities of the resulting stellar winds are far too high. Alfven wave dissipation should give rise to extended warm chromospheres in low-gravity late-type stars, a prediction which can be observationally tested.

  20. The heliospheric magnetic flux, solar wind proton flux, and cosmic ray intensity during the coming solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; McCracken, K. G.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Goelzer, Molly L.

    2014-07-01

    Recent papers have linked the heliospheric magnetic flux to the sunspot cycle with good correlation observed between prediction and observation. Other papers have shown a strong correlation between magnetic flux and solar wind proton flux from coronal holes. We combine these efforts with an expectation that the sunspot activity of the approaching solar minimum will resemble the Dalton or Gleissberg Minimum and predict that the magnetic flux and solar wind proton flux over the coming decade will be lower than at any time during the space age. Using these predictions and established theory, we also predict record high galactic cosmic ray intensities over the same years. The analysis shown here is a prediction of global space climate change within which space weather operates. It predicts a new parameter regime for the transient space weather behavior that can be expected during the coming decade.

  1. Momentum transport and nonlocality in heat-flux-driven magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Fox, William; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Thomas, Alexander G. R.; Joglekar, Archis S.

    2017-10-01

    Recent theory has demonstrated a novel physics regime for magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas where the magnetic field is advected by heat flux via the Nernst effect. Here we elucidate the physics of the electron dissipation layer in this regime. Through fully kinetic simulation and a generalized Ohm's law derived from first principles, we show that momentum transport due to a nonlocal effect, the heat-flux-viscosity, provides the dissipation mechanism for magnetic reconnection. Scaling analysis, and simulations show that the reconnection process comprises a magnetic field compression stage and quasisteady reconnection stage, and the characteristic width of the current sheet in this regime is several electron mean-free paths. These results show the important interplay between nonlocal transport effects and generation of anisotropic components to the distribution function.

  2. A flux-mnemonic permanent magnet brushless machine for wind power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuang; Chau, K. T.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the concept of flux mnemonics is newly extended to the wind power generator. By incorporating a small magnetizing winding into an outer-rotor doubly salient AlNiCo permanent magnet (PM) machine, a new flux-mnemonic PM brushless wind power generator is proposed and implemented. This generator can offer effective and efficient air-gap flux control. First, the characteristics of the proposed generator are analyzed by using the finite element method. Second, the closed-loop flux control is devised to achieve a constant generated voltage under time-varying wind speeds. Finally, the experimental results are given to verify the validity of the proposed generator and control system.

  3. Global surface wind and flux fields from model assimilation of Seasat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, R.; Busalacchi, A. J.; Kalnay, E.; Bloom, S.; Ghil, M.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for dealiasing Seasat data and developing global surface wind and latent and sensible heat flux fields are discussed. Seasat data from September 20, 1978 was dealiased using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) analysis/forecast system. The wind data obtained with the objective GLA forecast model are compared to the data subjectively dealiased by Peteherych et al. (1984) and Hoffman (1982, 1984). The GLA procedure is also verified using simulated Seasat data. The areas of high and low heat fluxes and cyclonic and anticyclonic wind stresses detected in the generated fields are analyzed and compared to climatological fields. It is observed that there is good correlation between the time-averaged analyses of wind stress obtained subjectively and objectively, and the monthly mean wind stress and latent fluxes agree with climatological fields and atmospheric and oceanic features.

  4. Blade-Element/Momentum Technique for Rotors operating in Wind Tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft

    2003-01-01

    small, since important properties of the blade boundary layer otherwise cannot be captured correctly. On the other hand, severe problems with wind tunnel blockage may be the result if the ratio between the areas of the rotor and the wind tunnel cross section is too big. In all cases, wind tunnel...

  5. How well can we measure the vertical wind speed? Implications for fluxes of energy and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Kochendorfer; Tilden P. Meyers; John Frank; William J. Massman; Mark W. Heuer

    2012-01-01

    Sonic anemometers are capable of measuring the wind speed in all three dimensions at high frequencies (10­50 Hz), and are relied upon to estimate eddy-covariance-based fluxes of mass and energy over a wide variety of surfaces and ecosystems. In this study, wind-velocity measurement errors from a three-dimensional sonic anemometer with a nonorthogonal transducer...

  6. Transient performances analysis of wind turbine system with induction generator including flux saturation and skin effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H.; Zhao, B.; Han, L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to analyze correctly the effect of different models for induction generators on the transient performances of large wind power generation, Wind turbine driven squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) models taking into account both main and leakage flux saturation and skin effect were...

  7. Effective Momentum and heat flux models for simulation of stratification and mixing in a large pool of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    Performance of a boiling water reactor (BWR) containment is mostly determined by reliable operation of pressure suppression pool which serves as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel. Thermal stratification in the pool can significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. A source of momentum is required in order to break stratification and mix the pool. It is important to have reliable prediction of transient development of stratification and mixing in the pool in different regimes of steam injection. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (1) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (2) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized, to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale modeling, and (c) validate our proposed models. Specifically the data from POOLEX STB-21 and PPOOLEX STR-03 and STR-04 tests are used for validation of the EHS and EMS models in this

  8. Effective Momentum and heat flux models for simulation of stratification and mixing in a large pool of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P.

    2012-06-01

    Performance of a boiling water reactor (BWR) containment is mostly determined by reliable operation of pressure suppression pool which serves as a heat sink to cool and condense steam released from the core vessel. Thermal stratification in the pool can significantly impede the pool's pressure suppression capacity. A source of momentum is required in order to break stratification and mix the pool. It is important to have reliable prediction of transient development of stratification and mixing in the pool in different regimes of steam injection. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (1) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (2) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The POOLEX/PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized, to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale modeling, and (c) validate our proposed models. Specifically the data from POOLEX STB-21 and PPOOLEX STR-03 and STR-04 tests are used for validation of the EHS and EMS models in this work. We

  9. Under-ice eddy covariance flux measurements of heat, salt, momentum, and dissolved oxygen in an artificial sea ice pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Else, B. G T; Rysgaard, S.; Attard, K.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent exchanges under sea ice play a controlling role in ice mass balance, ice drift, biogeochemistry, and mixed layer modification. In this study, we examined the potential to measure under-ice turbulent exchanges of heat, salt, momentum, and dissolved oxygen using eddy covariance...... in an experimental sea ice facility. Over a 15-day period in January 2013, an underwater eddy covariance system was deployed in a large (500 m3) inground concrete pool, which was filled with artificial seawater and exposed to the ambient (−5 to −30 °C) atmosphere. Turbulent exchanges were measured continuously...... initial ice growth were directed upward at 10 to 25 W m−2. Dissolved oxygen fluxes were directed downward at rates of 5 to 50mmolm−2 d−1 throughout the experiment, at times exceeding the expected amount of oxygen rejected with the brine during ice growth. Bubble formation and dissolution was identified...

  10. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas

  11. Effects of trees on mean wind, turbulence and momentum exchange within and above a real urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giometto, M. G.; Christen, A.; Egli, P. E.; Schmid, M. F.; Tooke, R. T.; Coops, N. C.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-08-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are used to gain insight into the effects of trees on turbulence, aerodynamic parameters, and momentum transfer rates characterizing the atmosphere within and above a real urban canopy. Several areas are considered that are part of a neighborhood in the city of Vancouver, BC, Canada where a small fraction of trees are taller than buildings. In this area, eight years of continuous wind and turbulence measurements are available from a 30 m meteorological tower. Data from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) are used to represent both buildings and vegetation at the LES resolution. In the LES algorithm, buildings are accounted through an immersed boundary method, whereas vegetation is parameterized via a location-specific leaf area density. LES are performed including and excluding vegetation from the considered urban areas, varying wind direction and leaf area density. Surface roughness lengths (z0) from both LES and tower measurements are sensitive to the 0 ≤ LAI /λfb lower than the 27% increase featured by LES for the most representative canopy (leaves-off LAI / λfSUP>b = 0.74 , leaves-on LAI /λfb = 2.24). Removing vegetation from such a canopy would cause a dramatic drop of approximately 50% in z0 when compared to the reference summer value. The momentum displacement height (d) from LES also consistently increases as LAI / λfb increases, due in large part to the disproportionate amount of drag that the (few) relatively taller trees exert on the flow. LES and measurements both predict an increase in the ratio of turbulent to mean kinetic energy (TKE/MKE) at the tower sampling height going from winter to summer, and LES also show how including vegetation results in a more (positive) negatively skewed (horizontal) vertical velocity distribution - reflecting a more intermittent velocity field which favors sweep motions when compared to ejections. Within the urban canopy, the effects of trees are twofold: on one hand, they act

  12. Whistler Mode Waves and the Electron Heat Flux in the Solar Wind: Cluster Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; de Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.

    2014-11-01

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ~10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β e∥ is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β e∥ >= 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  13. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: cluster observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, UPMC Université Paris 06, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Matteini, L. [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Santolík, O. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics ASCR, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-20

    The nature of the magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind between the ion and electron scales is still under debate. Using the Cluster/STAFF instrument, we make a survey of the power spectral density and of the polarization of these fluctuations at frequencies f in [1, 400] Hz, during five years (2001-2005), when Cluster was in the free solar wind. In ∼10% of the selected data, we observe narrowband, right-handed, circularly polarized fluctuations, with wave vectors quasi-parallel to the mean magnetic field, superimposed on the spectrum of the permanent background turbulence. We interpret these coherent fluctuations as whistler mode waves. The lifetime of these waves varies between a few seconds and several hours. Here, we present, for the first time, an analysis of long-lived whistler waves, i.e., lasting more than five minutes. We find several necessary (but not sufficient) conditions for the observation of whistler waves, mainly a low level of background turbulence, a slow wind, a relatively large electron heat flux, and a low electron collision frequency. When the electron parallel beta factor β {sub e∥} is larger than 3, the whistler waves are seen along the heat flux threshold of the whistler heat flux instability. The presence of such whistler waves confirms that the whistler heat flux instability contributes to the regulation of the solar wind heat flux, at least for β {sub e∥} ≥ 3, in slow wind at 1 AU.

  14. The importance of wind-flux feedbacks during the November CINDY-DYNAMO MJO event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley Dellaripa, Emily; Maloney, Eric; van den Heever, Susan

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution, large-domain cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations probing the importance of wind-flux feedbacks to Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) convection are performed for the November 2011 CINDY-DYNAMO MJO event. The work is motivated by observational analysis from RAMA buoys in the Indian Ocean and TRMM precipitation retrievals that show a positive correlation between MJO precipitation and wind-induced surface fluxes, especially latent heat fluxes, during and beyond the CINDY-DYNAMO time period. Simulations are done using Colorado State University's Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The domain setup is oceanic and spans 1000 km x 1000 km with 1.5 km horizontal resolution and 65 stretched vertical levels centered on the location of Gan Island - one of the major CINDY-DYNAMO observation points. The model is initialized with ECMWF reanalysis and Aqua MODIS sea surface temperatures. Nudging from ECMWF reanalysis is applied at the domain periphery to encourage realistic evolution of MJO convection. The control experiment is run for the entire month of November so both suppressed and active, as well as, transitional phases of the MJO are modeled. In the control experiment, wind-induced surface fluxes are activated through the surface bulk aerodynamic formula and allowed to evolve organically. Sensitivity experiments are done by restarting the control run one week into the simulation and controlling the wind-induced flux feedbacks. In one sensitivity experiment, wind-induced surface flux feedbacks are completely denied, while in another experiment the winds are kept constant at the control simulations mean surface wind speed. The evolution of convection, especially on the mesoscale, is compared between the control and sensitivity simulations.

  15. General momentum theory for wind turbines at low tip speed ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; van Kuik, Gijs A. M.

    2011-01-01

    General momentum theory is used to study the behaviour of the ‘classical’ free vortex wake model of Joukowsky. This model has recently attained considerable attention as it shows the possibility of achieving a power performance that greatly exceeds the Lanchester‐Betz limit for rotors running at ...... never exceeds the Lanchester‐Betz limit and which tends to zero at zero tip speed ratio. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....... at low tip speed ratios. This behaviour is confirmed even when including the effect of a centre vortex, allowing azimuthal velocities and the associated radial pressure gradient to be taken into account in the axial momentum balance without any simplifying assumptions. It is shown that the most likely......General momentum theory is used to study the behaviour of the ‘classical’ free vortex wake model of Joukowsky. This model has recently attained considerable attention as it shows the possibility of achieving a power performance that greatly exceeds the Lanchester‐Betz limit for rotors running...

  16. sizing of wind powered axial flux permanent magnet alternator using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... Various direct drive wind powered generators have been explored in [6-8]. In this quest, Permanent- magnet (PM) machines are chosen and increasingly becoming dominant with the cost competitiveness of high energy permanent magnets. Significant developments of permanent magnet materials have.

  17. Application of a Heat Flux Sensor in Wind Power Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Baygildina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes and investigates the application of the gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS for measuring the local heat flux in power electronics. Thanks to its thinness, the sensor can be placed between the semiconductor module and the heat sink. The GHFS has high sensitivity and yields direct measurements without an interruption to the normal power device operation, which makes it attractive for power electronics applications. The development of systems for monitoring thermal loading and methods for online detection of degradation and failure of power electronic devices is a topical and crucial task. However, online condition monitoring (CM methods, which include heat flux sensors, have received little research attention so far. In the current research, an insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT module-based test setup with the GHFS implemented on the base plate of one of the IGBTs is introduced. The heat flux experiments and the IGBT power losses obtained by simulations show similar results. The findings give clear evidence that the GHFS can provide an attractive condition monitoring method for the thermal loading of power devices.

  18. Optimization of an axial-flux permanent-magnet generator for a small wind energy application

    OpenAIRE

    Vansompel, Hendrik; Sergeant, Peter; Dupré, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Axial-flux permanent-magnet synchronous machines have a high torque output at low speeds and are therefore very suitable for direct drive wind energy applications. This research focuses on: measures to improve the efficiency of the energy conversion; simplification of the construction and easy maintenance by introduction of a modular stator construction; adaptations required to obtain an efficient power conversion in direct drive wind energy applications.

  19. Air-Sea Enthalpy and Momentum Exchange at Major Hurricane Wind Speeds Observed during CBLAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    700 m, but the virtual potential temperature mixed layer depth was 400 m, and the inflow layer extended to 1 km (Zhang et al. 2009). Mixed layer depths...FIG. 20. Wind speed dependence of CK from this study (green squares) compared with previous studies. ASIST laboratory results (blue circles) and CBLAST

  20. Aerodynamic optimization of wind turbine rotors using a blade element momentum method with corrections for wake rotation and expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Mads; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The blade element momentum (BEM) method is widely used for calculating the quasi-steady aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines. Recently, the BEM method has been expanded to include corrections for wake expansion and the pressure due to wake rotation (), and more accurate solutions can now...... by the positive effect of wake rotation, which locally causes the efficiency to exceed the Betz limit. Wake expansion has a negative effect, which is most important at high tip speed ratios. It was further found that by using , it is possible to obtain a 5% reduction in flap bending moment when compared with BEM....... In short, allows fast aerodynamic calculations and optimizations with a much higher degree of accuracy than the traditional BEM model. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  1. A modified model of axial flux permanent magnet generator for wind turbine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Generators (AFPMGs) are gaining immense attention in the modern era. The single stage AFPMG topology consists of one stator disc which is held stationery between two revolving rotor discs attached with a common shaft. The number of poles of AFPMG depends on the winding pattern in which the coils are connected in series within stator disc. Connecting the coils in begin-to-end winding pattern, doubles the number of poles which also increases the active mass of AFPMG. The AFPMG considering begin-to-end winding pattern, can be operated at half shaft speed. This AFPMG is also having greater air gap flux density which, ultimately, improves the power density parameter of AFPMG. In this paper, a modified AFPMG has been proposed which is designed by considering begin-to-end winding pattern. A 380W single phase, single stage prototype model has been developed and tested. The test results show that power density of designed AFPMG with begin-to-end winding pattern has been improved by 32% as compared to AFPMG with begin-to-begin winding pattern. The proposed low speed and high power density AFPMG model can be actively deployed for wind turbine applications. (author)

  2. Measurement uncertainties in quantifying aeolian mass flux: evidence from wind tunnel and field site data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, A.; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Maroulis, J.; Visser, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sediment traps are widely used to estimate the total volume of wind-driven sediment transport, but also to study the vertical mass distribution of a saltating sand cloud. The reliability of sediment flux estimations from such measurements are dependent upon the specific configuration of the

  3. Enhanced control of DFIG wind turbine based on stator flux decay compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Rongwu; Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    For the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG)- based wind energy conversion system (WECS), the decaying flux and negative flux are the main reasons to cause the DFIG rotor overcurrent, during grid faults. The stator decaying flux characteristics versus the depth and instant of the stator voltage...... variation are analyzed firstly. On the basis of the stator flux performances, the enhanced control strategy is proposed to limit the decaying flux approximately into zero in half fundamental period by changing the stator voltage drop and recovery mode, and consequently the rotor transient current pulse...... is significantly reduced during grid faults. The experimental results based on the 7.5 kW DFIG setup is carried to validate the correctness and feasibility of the proposed strategy. Dynamic voltage restorer (DVR) can be one of the applications. With the proposed strategy, the DVR only works in a half fundamental...

  4. Flux and transformation of the solar wind energy in the magnetosheath of the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudovkin, M.I.; Semenov, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Energy flux, incoming from the solar wind to the Earth magnetosphere is calculated. It is shown that Poynting vector flux, incoming to the reconnection area is generated mainly in the transitional area between the departed shock wave front and magnetopause in the result of the retardation of the solar wind and partial transformation of its kinetic energy into magnetic one. In this case the energy transformation coefficient depends on the interplanetary magnetic field intensity. Solar wind energy gets into the area of magnetic field reconnection at the magnetopause mainly in two forms: electromagnetic and thermal energy. In the course of reconnection process magnetic energy converts into kinetic energy of the accelerated plasma mass movement and subsequently turns (in a high-latitude boundary layer) into electromagnetic energy, incoming directly to magnetosphere tail

  5. Design Considerations of a Transverse Flux Machine for Direct-Drive Wind Turbine Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Tausif; Hasan, Iftekhar; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the design considerations of a double-sided transverse flux machine (TFM) for direct-drive wind turbine applications. The proposed TFM has a modular structure with quasi-U stator cores and toroidal ring windings. The rotor is constructed with ferrite magnets in a flux-concentrating setup to achieve high air gap flux density. Pole number selection is critical in the design process of a TFM as it affects both the torque density and power factor under fixed magnetic and changing electrical loading. Several key design ratios are introduced to facilitate the initial design procedure. The effect of pole shaping on back-EMF and inductance is also analyzed. These investigations provide guidance toward the required design of a TFM for direct-drive applications. The analyses are carried out using analytical and three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). A proof-of-concept prototype was developed to experimentally validate the FEA results.

  6. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  7. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  8. Hourly interaction between wind speed and energy fluxes in Brazilian Wetlands - Mato Grosso - Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thiago R; Curado, Leone F A; Pereira, Vinicius M R; Sanches, Luciana; Nogueira, José S

    2016-01-01

    Matter and energy flux dynamics of wetlands are important to understand environmental processes that govern biosphere-atmosphere interactions across ecosystems. This study presents analyses about hourly interaction between wind speed and energy fluxes in Brazilian Wetlands - Mato Grosso - Brazil. This study was conducted in Private Reserve of Natural Heritage (PRNH SESC, 16º39'50''S; 56º47'50''W) in Brazilian Wetland. According to Curado et al. (2012), the wet season occurs between the months of January and April, while the June to September time period is the dry season. Results presented same patterns in energies fluxes in all period studied. Wind speed and air temperature presented same patterns, while LE was relative humidity presented inverse patterns of the air temperature. LE was predominant in all seasons and the sum of LE and H was above 90% of net radiation. Analyses of linear regression presented positive interactions between wind speed and LE, and wind speed and H in all seasons, except in dry season of 2010. Confidence coefficient regression analyses present statistical significance in all wet and dry seasons, except dry season of 2010, suggest that LE and H had interaction with other micrometeorological variables.

  9. Hourly interaction between wind speed and energy fluxes in Brazilian Wetlands - Mato Grosso - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THIAGO R. RODRIGUES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Matter and energy flux dynamics of wetlands are important to understand environmental processes that govern biosphere-atmosphere interactions across ecosystems. This study presents analyses about hourly interaction between wind speed and energy fluxes in Brazilian Wetlands - Mato Grosso - Brazil. This study was conducted in Private Reserve of Natural Heritage (PRNH SESC, 16º39'50''S; 56º47'50''W in Brazilian Wetland. According to Curado et al. (2012, the wet season occurs between the months of January and April, while the June to September time period is the dry season. Results presented same patterns in energies fluxes in all period studied. Wind speed and air temperature presented same patterns, while LE was relative humidity presented inverse patterns of the air temperature. LE was predominant in all seasons and the sum of LE and H was above 90% of net radiation. Analyses of linear regression presented positive interactions between wind speed and LE, and wind speed and H in all seasons, except in dry season of 2010. Confidence coefficient regression analyses present statistical significance in all wet and dry seasons, except dry season of 2010, suggest that LE and H had interaction with other micrometeorological variables.

  10. Reduction of Thermal Loss in HTS Windings by Using Magnetic Flux Deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Koshiba, Y.; Izumi, M.; Umemoto, K.; Aizawa, K.; Yanamoto, T.

    Efforts on the generation of intensified magnetic flux have been made for the optimized shape of HTS winding applications. This contributes to the high efficiency of the rotating machines using HTS windings. Heat generation from the HTS windings requires to be suppressed as much as possible, when those coils are under operation with either direct or alternative currents. Presently, the reduction of such thermal loss generated by the applied currents on the HTS coils is reported with a magnetic flux deflection system. The HTS coils are fixed together with flattened magnetic materials to realize a kind of redirection of the flux pathway. Eventually, the magnetic flux density perpendicular to the tape surface (equivalent to the a-b plane) of the HTS tape materials is reduced to the proximity of the HTS coil. To verify the new geometry of the surroundings of the HTS coils with magnetic materials, a comparative study of the DC coil voltage was done for different applied currents in prototype field-pole coils of a ship propulsion motor.

  11. An optimal design of coreless direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet generator for wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, D; Ahmad, A

    2013-01-01

    Different types of generators are currently being used in wind power technology. The commonly used are induction generator (IG), doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) and permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG). However, the use of PMSG is rapidly increasing because of advantages such as higher power density, better controllability and higher reliability. This paper presents an innovative design of a low-speed modular, direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet (AFPM) generator with coreless stator and rotor for a wind turbine power generation system that is developed using mathematical and analytical methods. This innovative design is implemented in MATLAB / Simulink environment using dynamic modelling techniques. The main focus of this research is to improve efficiency of the wind power generation system by investigating electromagnetic and structural features of AFPM generator during its operation in wind turbine. The design is validated by comparing its performance with standard models of existing wind power generators. The comparison results demonstrate that the proposed model for the wind power generator exhibits number of advantages such as improved efficiency with variable speed operation, higher energy yield, lighter weight and better wind power utilization.

  12. An optimal design of coreless direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet generator for wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, D.; Ahmad, A.

    2013-06-01

    Different types of generators are currently being used in wind power technology. The commonly used are induction generator (IG), doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) and permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG). However, the use of PMSG is rapidly increasing because of advantages such as higher power density, better controllability and higher reliability. This paper presents an innovative design of a low-speed modular, direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet (AFPM) generator with coreless stator and rotor for a wind turbine power generation system that is developed using mathematical and analytical methods. This innovative design is implemented in MATLAB / Simulink environment using dynamic modelling techniques. The main focus of this research is to improve efficiency of the wind power generation system by investigating electromagnetic and structural features of AFPM generator during its operation in wind turbine. The design is validated by comparing its performance with standard models of existing wind power generators. The comparison results demonstrate that the proposed model for the wind power generator exhibits number of advantages such as improved efficiency with variable speed operation, higher energy yield, lighter weight and better wind power utilization.

  13. Seismic, high wind, tornado, and probabilistic risk assessment of the high flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.P.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Dizon, J.O.; Hashimoto, P.S.

    1989-01-01

    Natural phenomena analyses were performed on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations were made to determine the risks resulting from earthquakes, high winds, and tornadoes. Analytic methods in conjunction with field evaluations and an earthquake experience data base evaluation methods were used to provide more realistic results in a shorter amount of time. Plant modifications completed in preparation for HFIR restart and potential future enhancements are discussed

  14. Seismic, high wind, tornado, and probabilistic risk assessments of the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Dizon, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    Natural phenomena analyses were performed on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations were made to determine the risks resulting from earthquakes, high winds, and tornadoes. Analytic methods in conjunction with field evaluations and an earthquake experience data base evaluation methods were used to provide more realistic results in a shorter amount of time. Plant modifications completed in preparation for HFIR restart and potential future enhancements are discussed. 5 figs

  15. On the Relationship Between High Speed Solar Wind Streams and Radiation Belt Electron Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    Both past and recent research results indicate that solar wind speed has a close connection to radiation belt electron fluxes [e.g., Paulikas and Blake, 1979; Reeves et aI., 2011]: a higher solar wind speed is often associated with a higher level of radiation electron fluxes. But the relationship can be very complex [Reeves et aI., 2011]. The study presented here provides further corroboration of this viewpoint by emphasizing the importance of a global perspective and time history. We find that all the events during years 2010 and 2011 where the >0.8 MeV integral electron flux exceeds 10(exp 5) particles/sq cm/sr/s (pfu) at GEO orbit are associated with the high speed streams (HSS) following the onset of the Stream Interaction Region (SIR), with most of them belonging to the long-lasting Corotating Interaction Region (CIR). Our preliminary results indicate that during HSS events, a maximum speed of 700 km/s and above is a sufficient but not necessary condition for the > 0.8 MeV electron flux to reach 10(exp 5) pfu. But in the exception cases of HSS events where the electron flux level exceeds the 10(exp 5) pfu value but the maximum solar wind speed is less than 700 km/s, a prior impact can be noted either from a CME or a transient SIR within 3-4 days before the arrival of the HSS - stressing the importance of time history. Through superposed epoch analysis and studies providing comparisons with the CME events and the HSS events where the flux level fails to reach the 10(exp 5) pfu, we will present the quantitative assessment of behaviors and relationships of various quantities, such as the time it takes to reach the flux threshold value from the stream interface and its dependence on different physical parameters (e.g., duration of the HSS event, its maximum or average of the solar wind speed, IMF Bz, Kp). The ultimate goal is to apply what is derived to space weather forecasting.

  16. Design and analysis of a flux intensifying permanent magnet embedded salient pole wind generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yujing; Jin, Ping; Lin, Heyun; Yang, Hui; Lyu, Shukang

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents an improved flux intensifying permanent magnet embedded salient pole wind generator (FI-PMESPWG) with mirror symmetrical magnetizing directions permanent magnet (PM) for improving generator's performances. The air-gap flux densities, the output voltage, the cogging torque and the d- and q-axis inductances of FI-PMESPWG are all calculated and analyzed by using the finite element method (FEM). To highlight the advantages of the proposed FI-PMESPWG, an original permanent magnet embedded salient pole wind generator (PMESPWG) model is adopted for comparison under the same operating conditions. The calculating results show that the air-gap flux densities of FI-PMESPWG are intensified with the same magnet amounts because the PMs are set in a form of V shape in each pole. The difference between d-axis inductance and q-axis inductance of the proposed FI-PMESPWG is reduced. Thus, the output power of the proposed FI-PMESPWG reaches a higher value than that of the original PMESPWG at the same current phase angle. The cogging torque is diminished because the flux path is changed. All the analysis results indicate that the electromagnetic characteristics of the proposed FI-PMESPWG are significantly better than that of the original PMESPWG.

  17. Impact of wind waves on the air-sea fluxes: A coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, V.; Chapron, B.; Makin, V.

    2014-02-01

    A revised wind-over-wave-coupling model is developed to provide a consistent description of the sea surface drag and heat/moister transfer coefficients, and associated wind velocity and temperature profiles. The spectral distribution of short wind waves in the decimeter to a few millimeters range of wavelengths is introduced based on the wave action balance equation constrained using the Yurovskaya et al. (2013) optical field wave measurements. The model is capable to reproduce fundamental statistical properties of the sea surface, such as the mean square slope and the spectral distribution of breaking crests length. The surface stress accounts for the effect of airflow separation due to wave breaking, which enables a better fit of simulated form drag to observations. The wave breaking controls the overall energy losses for the gravity waves, but also the generation of shorter waves including the parasitic capillaries, thus enhancing the form drag. Breaking wave contribution to the form drag increases rapidly at winds above 15 m/s where it exceeds the nonbreaking wave contribution. The overall impact of wind waves (breaking and nonbreaking) leads to a sheltering of the near-surface layer where the turbulent mixing is suppressed. Accordingly, the air temperature gradient in this sheltered layer increases to maintain the heat flux constant. The resulting deformation of the air temperature profile tends to lower the roughness scale for temperature compared to its value over the smooth surface.

  18. Structured Slow Solar Wind Variability: Streamer Blob Flux Ropes and Torsional Alfven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, B. J.; Higginson, A. K.

    2017-12-01

    The slow solar wind exhibits strong variability on timescales from minutes to days, in addition to changing with the heliosphere on longer timescales from months to years. While the large-scale changes are likely due to the emerging or restructuring of coronal flux, the variability in magnetic field and plasma properties on the smaller timescales is likely related to magnetic reconnection processes in the extended solar corona. Higginson et al. (2017, ApJ 840, L10) presented a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation which showed that interchange magnetic reconnection is likely responsible for the release of much of the slow solar wind, including along topological features known as the Separatrix-web (S-web). Here, we continue our analysis of the Higginson et al. simulation, focusing now on two specific aspects of structured slow solar wind variability. First, we examine the formation and evolution of three-dimensional magnetic flux ropes that form at the top of the helmet streamer belt by reconnection in the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Second, we examine the simulated remote and in situ signatures of the large-scale torsional Alfven wave (TAW) which propagates along an S-web arc to high latitudes. We describe the similarities and differences between the reconnection-generated flux ropes in the HCS, which resemble the well-known "streamer blob" observations, and the similarly structured TAW. We discuss the implications of our results for the complexity of the HCS and surrounding plasma sheet, and the potential for particle acceleration, as well as the interchange reconnection scenarios which may generate TAWs in the solar corona. We consider our simulation results within the context of the future Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter observations, and make predictions for the dynamic slow solar wind in the extended corona and inner heliosphere.

  19. Design Considerations of a Transverse Flux Machine for Direct-Drive Wind Turbine Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Tausif; Hasan, Iftekhar; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2017-02-16

    This paper presents the design considerations of a double-sided transverse flux machine (TFM) for direct-drive wind turbine applications. The TFM has a modular structure with quasi-U stator cores and ring windings. The rotor is constructed with ferrite magnets in a flux-concentrating arrangement to achieve high air gap flux density. The design considerations for this TFM with respect to initial sizing, pole number selection, key design ratios, and pole shaping are presented in this paper. Pole number selection is critical in the design process of a TFM because it affects both the torque density and power factor under fixed magnetic and changing electrical loading. Several key design ratios are introduced to facilitate the design procedure. The effect of pole shaping on back-emf and inductance is also analyzed. These investigations provide guidance toward the required design of a TFM for direct-drive applications. The analyses are carried out using analytical and three-dimensional finite element analysis. A prototype is under construction for experimental verification.

  20. Design Considerations of a Transverse Flux Machine for Direct-Drive Wind Turbine Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Tausif; Hasan, Iftekhar; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design considerations of a double-sided transverse flux machine (TFM) for direct-drive wind turbine applications. The TFM has a modular structure with quasi-U stator cores and ring windings. The rotor is constructed with ferrite magnets in a flux-concentrating arrangement to achieve high air gap flux density. The design considerations for this TFM with respect to initial sizing, pole number selection, key design ratios, and pole shaping are presented in this paper. Pole number selection is critical in the design process of a TFM because it affects both the torque density and power factor under fixed magnetic and changing electrical loading. Several key design ratios are introduced to facilitate the design procedure. The effect of pole shaping on back-emf and inductance is also analyzed. These investigations provide guidance toward the required design of a TFM for direct-drive applications. The analyses are carried out using analytical and three-dimensional finite element analysis. A prototype is under construction for experimental verification.

  1. Characteristics and Geoeffectiveness of Small-scale Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Joon; Park, Kyung Sun; Lee, Dae-Young; Choi, Cheong-Rim; Kim, Rok Soon; Cho, Kyungsuk; Choi, Kyu-Cheol; Kim, Jaehun

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes, often observed during intervals of interplanetary coronal mass ejections, have long been recognized to be critical in space weather. In this work, we focus on magnetic flux rope structure but on a much smaller scale, and not necessarily related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Using near-Earth solar wind advanced composition explorer (ACE) observations from 1998 to 2016, we identified a total of 309 small-scale magnetic flux ropes (SMFRs). We compared the characteristics of identified SMFR events with those of normal magnetic cloud (MC) events available from the existing literature. First, most of the MCs and SMFRs have similar values of accompanying solar wind speed and proton densities. However, the average magnetic field intensity of SMFRs is weaker ( 7.4 nT) than that of MCs ( 10.6 nT). Also, the average duration time and expansion speed of SMFRs are 2.5 hr and 2.6 km/s, respectively, both of which are smaller by a factor of 10 than those of MCs. In addition, we examined the geoeffectiveness of SMFR events by checking their correlation with magnetic storms and substorms. Based on the criteria Sym-H database than used in previous studies, all these previously known features are now firmly confirmed by the current work. Accordingly, the results emphasize the significance of SMFRs from the viewpoint of possible triggering of substorms.

  2. 3-D FEM Analysis, Prototyping and Tests of an Axial Flux Permanent-Magnet Wind Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joya C. Kappatou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the research and development of Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines (AFPMSM; and in particular the design, the construction stages and measurements of a double rotor single internal non-ferromagnetic stator with a trapezoidal-concentrated winding machine for wind power generation applications. The initial dimensions of the machine were calculated using analytical formulas and a model was created and analyzed using the 3D Finite Element Method (FEM. The shape of the magnets of the machine was optimized and presented in a previous paper and a prototype was constructed and tested in the laboratory. In addition, a temperature test of the stator was performed experimentally. Finally, the effect of the different axial widths of the two air gaps on the electrical magnitudes and the field of the machine were investigated using both FEM analysis and experiments.

  3. The effect of vegetation patterns on Aeolian mass flux at regional scale: a wind tunnel study

    OpenAIRE

    Youssef, Feras; Visser, Saskia M; Karssenberg, Derek; Erpul, Gunay; Cornelis, Wim; Gabriels, Donald; Poortinga, Ate; De Boever, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although insight on the effect of vegetation pattern on Aeolian mass transport is essential for re-planting degraded land, only limited knowledge on this effect is available. The objective of this research was to understand the effect of vegetation design on the Aeolian mass flux inside a single land unit and at the borders among land units. A simulation of Atriplex halimus shrubs inside a wind tunnel was made, and sand redistribution was measured after the application of 200-230 sec...

  4. Virtual Damping Flux-Based LVRT Control for DFIG-Based Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Rongwu; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a virtual damping flux-based low-voltage ride through (LVRT) control strategy for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG)-based wind turbine. During the transient states of grid voltage drop and recovery, the proposed virtual damping flux-based strategy can suppress rotor...... to support grid voltage for symmetrical grid faults. The effectiveness of the proposed strategies is examined by the simulation with a 2-MW DFIG in MATLAB/Simulink and verified by the experimental results from a scaled-down 7.5-kW DFIG controlled by a DSPACE1006. In addition, the impacts of the magnetic...... nonlinearity characteristics of a practical DFIG are investigated under asymmetrical grid faults. Although the magnetic nonlinearity characteristics degrade the control effects, the proposed strategies can still improve the DFIG performances during asymmetrical grid faults. The results clearly demonstrate...

  5. The impact of changing wind speeds on gas transfer and its effect on global air-sea CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninkhof, R.; Triñanes, J.

    2017-06-01

    An increase in global wind speeds over time is affecting the global uptake of CO2 by the ocean. We determine the impact of changing winds on gas transfer and CO2 uptake by using the recently updated, global high-resolution, cross-calibrated multiplatform wind product (CCMP-V2) and a fixed monthly pCO2 climatology. In particular, we assess global changes in the context of regional wind speed changes that are attributed to large-scale climate reorganizations. The impact of wind on global CO2 gas fluxes as determined by the bulk formula is dependent on several factors, including the functionality of the gas exchange-wind speed relationship and the regional and seasonal differences in the air-water partial pressure of CO2 gradient (ΔpCO2). The latter also controls the direction of the flux. Fluxes out of the ocean are influenced more by changes in the low-to-intermediate wind speed range, while ingassing is impacted more by changes in higher winds because of the regional correlations between wind and ΔpCO2. Gas exchange-wind speed parameterizations with a quadratic and third-order polynomial dependency on wind, each of which meets global constraints, are compared. The changes in air-sea CO2 fluxes resulting from wind speed trends are greatest in the equatorial Pacific and cause a 0.03-0.04 Pg C decade-1 increase in outgassing over the 27 year time span. This leads to a small overall decrease of 0.00 to 0.02 Pg C decade-1 in global net CO2 uptake, contrary to expectations that increasing winds increase net CO2 uptake.Plain Language SummaryThe effects of changing winds are isolated from the total change in trends in global air-sea CO2 fluxes over the last 27 years. The overall effect of increasing winds over time has a smaller impact than expected as the impact in regions of outgassing is greater than for the regions acting as a CO2 sink.

  6. System Integration of the Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine: The Design of Turbine Blades with an Axial-Flux Permanent Magnet Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Jeng Bai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In designing a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT blade, system integration between the blade design and the performance test of the generator is important. This study shows the aerodynamic design of a HAWT blade operating with an axial-flux permanent magnet (AFPM generator. An experimental platform was built to measure the performance curves of the AFPM generator for the purpose of designing the turbine blade. An in-house simulation code was developed based on the blade element momentum (BEM theory and was used to lay out the geometric shape of the turbine blade, including the pitch angle and chord length at each section. This simulation code was combined with the two-dimensional (2D airfoil data for predicting the aerodynamic performance of the designed blades. In addition, wind tunnel experiments were performed to verify the simulation results for the various operating conditions. By varying the rotational speeds at four wind speeds, the experimental and simulation results for the mechanical torques and powers presented good agreement. The mechanical power of the system, which maximizes at the best operating region, provided significant information for designing the HAWT blade.

  7. Using sonic anemometer temperature to measure sensible heat flux in strong winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Burns

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sonic anemometers simultaneously measure the turbulent fluctuations of vertical wind (w' and sonic temperature (Ts', and are commonly used to measure sensible heat flux (H. Our study examines 30-min heat fluxes measured with a Campbell Scientific CSAT3 sonic anemometer above a subalpine forest. We compared H calculated with Ts to H calculated with a co-located thermocouple and found that, for horizontal wind speed (U less than 8 m s−1, the agreement was around ±30 W m−2. However, for U ≈ 8 m s−1, the CSAT H had a generally positive deviation from H calculated with the thermocouple, reaching a maximum difference of ≈250 W m−2 at U ≈ 18 m s−1. With version 4 of the CSAT firmware, we found significant underestimation of the speed of sound and thus Ts in high winds (due to a delayed detection of the sonic pulse, which resulted in the large CSAT heat flux errors. Although this Ts error is qualitatively similar to the well-known fundamental correction for the crosswind component, it is quantitatively different and directly related to the firmware estimation of the pulse arrival time. For a CSAT running version 3 of the firmware, there does not appear to be a significant underestimation of Ts; however, a Ts error similar to that of version 4 may occur if the CSAT is sufficiently out of calibration. An empirical correction to the CSAT heat flux that is consistent with our conceptual understanding of the Ts error is presented. Within a broader context, the surface energy balance is used to evaluate the heat flux measurements, and the usefulness of side-by-side instrument comparisons is discussed.

  8. Recovery strategies for fluxes affected by the Gill-Solent WindMaster-Pro "w-boost" firmware bug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billesbach, D. P.; Chan, S. W.; Biraud, S.; David, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    In late 2015 and early 2016, work done by the AmeriFlux Tech Team helped to uncover a bug in the Gill WindMaster Pro sonic anemometers used by many researchers for eddy covariance flux measurements. Gill has addressed this issue and has since sent out a notice that the vertical wind speed component (a critical piece of all eddy covariance fluxes) was being erroneously computed and reported. The problem (known as the w-boost bug) resulted in positive (upward) wind speeds being under-reported by 16.6% and negative (downward) wind speeds being under-reported by 28.9%. This has the potential to cause similar underestimates in fluxes obtained from these instruments. While the manufacturer has offered a firmware upgrade to fix this bug, there exist many data sets that have already been affected by it. Researchers who use the affected units have contributed to numerous data archives (AmeriFlux, FluxNet, ICOS, etc.), and third-party scientists have, in turn used these data in many types of research projects. The volume of affected data over such a long period of time makes a complete reprocessing of the raw data sets impractical. To address this, the AmeriFlux Tech Team has endeavored to develop a method of correcting affected fluxes using only the downloadable data sets that are available from these archives. In a previous poster, we reported preliminary results from a pair of Arctic tundra flux towers, and showed that fluxes could be underestimated by 15% to 20%. In this poster, we present results that extend our study to include a forested site in Equatorial Africa. We also have evaluated methods to estimate flux errors without accessing the raw data sets.

  9. The Solar Wind - Magnetosphere Energy Coupling Function and Open Magnetic Flux Estimation: Two Science Aspects of the SMILE Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Dai, L.; Sun, T.; Han, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission to observe solar wind - magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind /magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, X-ray images of the magnetosphere, and UV images of global auroral distribution defining system - level consequences. The SMILE mission is jointly supported by ESA and CSA, and the launch date is expected to be in 2021. SMILE will address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the magnetospheres on a global level. Quantitatively estimating the energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere on a global scale is still an observational challenge. Using global MHD simulations, we derive a new solar wind - magnetosphere energy coupling function. The X-ray images of the magnetosphere from the SMILE mission will help estimate the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. A second aspect SMILE can address is the open magnetic flux, which is closely related to magnetic reconnections in the dayside magnetopause and magnetotail. In a similar way, we find that the open magnetic flux can be estimated through a combined parameter f, which is a function of the solar wind velocity, number density, the southern interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the ionospheric Pederson conductance. The UV auroral images from SMILE will be used to determine the open magnetic flux, which may serve as a key space weather forecast element in the future.

  10. Observation-based parameterization of air-sea fluxes in terms of wind speed and atmospheric stability under low-to-moderate wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhongshui; Zhao, Dongliang; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jun A.; Huang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    This study explores the behavior of the exchange coefficients for wind stress (CD), sensible heat flux (CH), and water vapor flux (CE) as functions of surface wind speed (U10) and atmospheric stability using direct turbulent flux measurements obtained from a platform equipped with fast-response turbulence sensors in a low-to-moderate wind region. Turbulent fluxes are calculated using the eddy-correlation method with extensive observations. The total numbers of quality-controlled 30 min flux runs are 12,240, 5813, and 5637 for estimation of CD, CH, and CE, respectively. When adjusted to neutral stability using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST), we found that CDN, CHN, and CEN decrease with neutral-adjusted wind speed when wind speed is less than 5 m/s. CDN is constant over the range 5 m/s 12 m/s. In contrast, CHN and CEN exhibit no clear dependence on wind speed and are generally constant, with mean values of 0.96 × 10-3 and 1.2 × 10-3, respectively. This behavior of neutral exchange coefficients is consistent with the findings of previous studies. We also found that CDN under offshore winds is generally greater than that under onshore wind conditions, which is ascribed to the younger wind waves present due to the shorter fetch in the former case. However, this behavior is not exhibited by CHN or CEN. The original CD, CH, and CE values without MOST adjustment are also investigated to develop a new parameterization based on wind speed and stability. Three stability parameters are tested, including the bulk Richardson number, stability as defined in COARE 3.0, and a simplified Richardson number using the Charnock parameter. This new parameterization is free of MOST and the associated self-correlation. Compared with previous studies and COARE 3.0 results, the new parameterization using the simplified Richardson number performs well, with an increased correlation coefficient and reduction of root-mean-square error and bias.

  11. Comparison of Sea-Air CO2 Flux Estimates Using Satellite-Based Versus Mooring Wind Speed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, A. J.; Sabine, C. L.; Feely, R. A.; Wanninkhof, R. H.

    2016-12-01

    The global ocean is a major sink of anthropogenic CO2, absorbing approximately 27% of CO2 emissions since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Any variation or change in the ocean CO2 sink has implications for future climate. Observations of sea-air CO2 flux have relied primarily on ship-based underway measurements of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) combined with satellite, model, or multi-platform wind products. Direct measurements of ΔpCO2 (seawater - air pCO2) and wind speed from moored platforms now allow for high-resolution CO2 flux time series. Here we present a comparison of CO2 flux calculated from moored ΔpCO2 measured on four moorings in different biomes of the Pacific Ocean in combination with: 1) Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP) winds or 2) wind speed measurements made on ocean reference moorings excluded from the CCMP dataset. Preliminary results show using CCMP winds overestimates CO2 flux on average by 5% at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory, Ocean Station Papa, WHOI Hawaii Ocean Timeseries Station, and Stratus. In general, CO2 flux seasonality follows patterns of seawater pCO2 and SST with periods of CO2 outgassing during summer and CO2 uptake during winter at these locations. Any offsets or seasonal biases in CCMP winds could impact global ocean sink estimates using this data product. Here we present patterns and trends between the two CO2 flux estimates and discuss the potential implications for tracking variability and change in global ocean CO2 uptake.

  12. IMFIT Integrated Modeling Applications Supporting Experimental Analysis: Multiple Time-Slice Kinetic EFIT Reconstructions, MHD Stability Limits, and Energy and Momentum Flux Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, A.; Lao, L. L.; Abla, G.; Chu, M. S.; Prater, R.; Smith, S. P.; St. John, H. E.; Guo, W.; Li, G.; Pan, C.; Ren, Q.; Park, J. M.; Bisai, N.; Srinivasan, R.; Sun, A. P.; Liu, Y.; Worrall, M.

    2010-11-01

    This presentation summarizes several useful applications provided by the IMFIT integrated modeling framework to support DIII-D and EAST research. IMFIT is based on Python and utilizes modular task-flow architecture with a central manager and extensive GUI support to coordinate tasks among component modules. The kinetic-EFIT application allows multiple time-slice reconstructions by fetching pressure profile data directly from MDS+ or from ONETWO or PTRANSP. The stability application analyzes a given reference equilibrium for stability limits by performing parameter perturbation studies with MHD codes such as DCON, GATO, ELITE, or PEST3. The transport task includes construction of experimental energy and momentum fluxes from profile analysis and comparison against theoretical models such as MMM95, GLF23, or TGLF.

  13. Design and simulation of an axial flux motor with Nd Fe B magnets and Pcb windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguero, A.; Cacace, R.; Moyano, R.; Actis, F. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial, Cordoba (Argentina). Centro de Investigacion de Materiales y Metrologia

    1996-12-31

    Permanent magnets are increasingly used in generators and motors to supply the magnetic field required for their operation. Rare earth magnets are known to have a high power density and allow volume and weight reduction of the machine under design. Electronically commutated motor applications have been a result of the recent advances in electronics. This paper deals with a simple and typical axial flux permanent magnet (PM) machine topology which is basically formed by sintered neodymium-iron-boron magnets and etched air gap windings. An eight poles machine prototype was designed and constructed. The stator rotor has holes containing axially magnetized PM which are mounted on the disk surface faced to the machine stator. PM are cylindrical shaped. Magnetic circuit design and optimization was conducted applying a 2-dimensional finite element analysis computer code. The performance of the small size prototype was evaluated through experimental testing. (author) 9 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Magnetotail magnetic flux monitoring based on simultaneous solar wind and magnetotail observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukhtina, M. A.; Gordeev, E. I.; Sergeev, V. A.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    The magnetotail magnetic flux (MTF) is an important global variable to describe the magnetospheric state and dynamics. Existing methods of MTF estimation on the basis of the polar cap area, inferred from observations of global auroras and field-aligned currents, do not allow benchmarking due to the absence of a gauge for comparison; besides, they rarely allow a systematic nearly real time MTF monitoring. We describe three modifications (F0, F1, and F2) of the method to calculate the MTF, based on simultaneous spacecraft observations in the magnetotail and in the solar wind, suitable for real-time MTF monitoring. The MTF dependence on the solar wind parameters and the observed tail lobe magnetic field is derived from the pressure balance conditions. An essential part of this study is the calibration of our approximate method against global 3-D MHD simulations and the empirical T14 magnetospheric field model. The calibration procedure provides all variables required to evaluate F0, F1, and F2 quantities and, at the same time, computes the reference MTF value through any tail cross section. It allowed us to extend the method to be used in the near tail, investigate its errors, and define the applicability domain. The method was applied to Cluster and THEMIS measurements and compared with methods of polar cap area calculation based on IMAGE and AMPERE observations. We also discuss possible applications and some recent results based on the proposed method.

  15. Atmosphere–Surface Fluxes of CO2 using Spectral Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2010-01-01

    Different flux estimation techniques are compared here in order to evaluate air–sea exchange measurement methods used on moving platforms. Techniques using power spectra and cospectra to estimate fluxes are presented and applied to measurements of wind speed and sensible heat, latent heat and CO2...... fluxes. Momentum and scalar fluxes are calculated from the dissipation technique utilizing the inertial subrange of the power spectra and from estimation of the cospectral amplitude, and both flux estimates are compared to covariance derived fluxes. It is shown how even data having a poor signal......-to-noise ratio can be used for flux estimations....

  16. Wind Effects on Flow Patterns and Net Fluxes in Density-Driven High-Latitude Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Helga S.; Ryan, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    A semianalytic two-dimensional model is used to analyze the interplay between the different forces acting on density-driven flow in high-latitude channels. In particular, the balance between wind stress, viscous forces, baroclinicity, and sea surface slope adjustments under specified flux conditions is examined. Weak winds are found not to change flow patterns appreciably, with minimal (change the flow significantly, especially at the surface, by either strengthening the dual-jet pattern, established without wind, by a factor of 2-3 or initiating return flow at the surface. A nonzero flux does not result in the addition of a uniform velocity throughout the channel cross section, but modifies both along-channel and cross-channel velocities to become more symmetric, dominated by a down-channel jet centered in the domain and counter-clockwise lateral flow. We also consider formulations of the model that allow adjustments of the net flux in response to the wind. Flow patterns change, beyond uniform intensification or weakening, only for strong winds and high Ekman number. Comparisons of the model results to observational data collected in Nares Strait in the Canadian Archipelago in the summer of 2007 show rough agreement, but the model misses the upstream surface jet on the east side of the strait and propagates bathymetric effects too strongly in the vertical for this moderately high eddy viscosity. Nonetheless, the broad strokes of the observed high-latitude flow are reproduced.

  17. ELECTRON HEAT FLUX IN THE SOLAR WIND: ARE WE OBSERVING THE COLLISIONAL LIMIT IN THE 1 AU DATA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Matteini, L. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot 5, place J. Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2014-07-20

    Using statistically significant data at 1 AU, it has recently been shown (Bale et al.) that in the solar wind, when the Knudsen number K {sub T} (the ratio between the electron mean free path and the electron temperature scale height) drops below about 0.3, the electron heat flux q intensity rapidly approaches the classical collisional Spitzer-Härm limit. Using a fully kinetic model including the effect of Coulomb collisions and the expansion of the solar wind with heliocentric distance, we observe that the heat flux strength does indeed approach the collisional value for Knudsen numbers smaller than about 0.3 in very good agreement with the observations. However, closer inspection of the heat flux properties, such as its variation with the heliocentric distance and its dependence on the plasma parameters, shows that for Knudsen numbers between 0.02 and 0.3 the heat flux is not conveniently described by the Spitzer-Härm formula. We conclude that even though observations at 1 AU seem to indicate that the electron heat flux intensity approaches the collisional limit when the Knudsen drops below ∼0.3, the collisional limit is not a generally valid closure for a Knudsen larger than 0.01. Moreover, the good agreement between the heat flux from our model and the heat flux from solar wind measurements in the high-Knudsen number regime seems to indicate that the heat flux at 1 AU is not constrained by electromagnetic instabilities as both wave-particle and wave-wave interactions are neglected in our calculations.

  18. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  19. The Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum and Sensible Heat over the Open Sea during Moderate to Strong Winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    from the spectra of the scalars, *r(f), and downstream velocity, *u(f), at frequencies, f, in the -5/3 region where the Kolmogoroff hypothesis predicts...dissipation methods is proportional to c ) zb [*t #u]%/2 <U>-i . (2.33) (Bt’ K’ ]I Again uncertainty in 9, Z and the Kolmogoroff constants together could...the record length, the subsampling scheme and the portions of frequency space covered by each sampling rate. In additional switch sets the time interval

  20. Analysis of trends between solar wind velocity and energetic electron fluxes at geostationary orbit using the reverse arrangement test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Homayon; Boynton, Richard J.; Walker, Simon N.

    2013-02-01

    A correlation between solar wind velocity (VSW) and energetic electron fluxes (EEF) at the geosynchronous orbit was first identified more than 30 years ago. However, recent studies have shown that the relation between VSW and EEF is considerably more complex than was previously suggested. The application of process identification technique to the evolution of electron fluxes in the range 1.8 - 3.5 MeV has also revealed peculiarities in the relation between VSW and EEF at the geosynchronous orbit. It has been revealed that for a constant solar wind density, EEF increase with VSW until a saturation velocity is reached. Beyond the saturation velocity, an increase in VSW is statistically not accompanied with EEF enhancement. The present study is devoted to the investigation of saturation velocity and its dependency upon solar wind density using the reverse arrangement test. In general, the results indicate that saturation velocity increases as solar wind density decreases. This implies that solar wind density plays an important role in defining the relationship between VSW and EEF at the geosynchronous orbit.

  1. Comparing the effect of low wind spead parameterization on heat fluxes in atmosphere only and coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Olivier; Braconnot, Pascale; Marti, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The turbulent fluxes across the ocean/atmosphere interface represent one of the principal driving forces of the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Representation of these fluxes presents a challenge due to the small scale acting turbulent processes compared to the resolved scales of the models. Beyond this subgrid parameterization issue, a comprehensive understanding of the impact of air-sea interactions on the system is still lacking. We are developing a methodology to investigate how differences in the parameterizations affect the water supply of the atmospheric column in the tropics, the ocean heat content and the equator-pole redistribution of heat and water by the oceanic and atmospheric circulation. We focus on the representation of the latent heat fluxes in the tropics. We investigate how the representation of the heat transfer coefficient in weak winds affect the climate response considering both atmosphere only and ocean-atmosphere coupled simulations with the IPSL climate model. We compare simulations where the only difference is the activation of a function that increases latent heat fluxes during periods of weak wind. This allows us to isolate the behavior of the Pacific warmpool region where low winds occurs frequently. Although the heat transfer coefficients are very similar for a given parameterization between atmosphere only and ocean-atmosphere coupled simulation the surface heat fluxes are very different. We analyze in detail the ocean feedbacks and the role of the latent heat fluxes by looking at the energy transport carried out by the atmosphere considering the divergent part of the moist static energy. Differences appear between the coupled and uncoupled models due to the role of the ocean which dampens a large part of the disturbance caused by the modification of parameterization.

  2. Analytical Modeling of a Double-Sided Flux Concentrating E-Core Transverse Flux Machine with Pole Windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, Eduard [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hasan, Iftekhar [University of Akron; Husain, Tausif [University of Akron; Sozer, Yilmaz [University of Akron; Husain, Iqbal [North Carolina State University

    2017-08-08

    In this paper, a nonlinear analytical model based on the Magnetic Equivalent Circuit (MEC) method is developed for a double-sided E-Core Transverse Flux Machine (TFM). The proposed TFM has a cylindrical rotor, sandwiched between E-core stators on both sides. Ferrite magnets are used in the rotor with flux concentrating design to attain high airgap flux density, better magnet utilization, and higher torque density. The MEC model was developed using a series-parallel combination of flux tubes to estimate the reluctance network for different parts of the machine including air gaps, permanent magnets, and the stator and rotor ferromagnetic materials, in a two-dimensional (2-D) frame. An iterative Gauss-Siedel method is integrated with the MEC model to capture the effects of magnetic saturation. A single phase, 1 kW, 400 rpm E-Core TFM is analytically modeled and its results for flux linkage, no-load EMF, and generated torque, are verified with Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The analytical model significantly reduces the computation time while estimating results with less than 10 percent error.

  3. A canopy-type similarity model for wind farm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Zhang, Wei; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow through and over wind farms has been found to be similar to canopy-type flows, with characteristic flow development and shear penetration length scales (Markfort et al., 2012). Wind farms capture momentum from the ABL both at the leading edge and from above. We examine this further with an analytical canopy-type model. Within the flow development region, momentum is advected into the wind farm and wake turbulence draws excess momentum in from between turbines. This spatial heterogeneity of momentum within the wind farm is characterized by large dispersive momentum fluxes. Once the flow within the farm is developed, the area-averaged velocity profile exhibits a characteristic inflection point near the top of the wind farm, similar to that of canopy-type flows. The inflected velocity profile is associated with the presence of a dominant characteristic turbulence scale, which may be responsible for a significant portion of the vertical momentum flux. Prediction of this scale is useful for determining the amount of available power for harvesting. The new model is tested with results from wind tunnel experiments, which were conducted to characterize the turbulent flow in and above model wind farms in aligned and staggered configurations. The model is useful for representing wind farms in regional scale models, for the optimization of wind farms considering wind turbine spacing and layout configuration, and for assessing the impacts of upwind wind farms on nearby wind resources. Markfort CD, W Zhang and F Porté-Agel. 2012. Turbulent flow and scalar transport through and over aligned and staggered wind farms. Journal of Turbulence. 13(1) N33: 1-36. doi:10.1080/14685248.2012.709635.

  4. Development and test of an axial flux type PM synchronous motor with liquid nitrogen cooled HTS armature windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H; Morishita, T; Tsuda, T; Takeda, T; Togawa, H; Oota, T; Ohmatsu, K; Yoshida, S

    2008-01-01

    We developed an axial gap permanent magnet type superconducting synchronous motor cooled by liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ). The motor includes 8 poles and 6 armature windings. The armature windings are made from BSCCO wire operated at the temperature level between 66K∼70K. The design of the rated output is 400kW at 250rpm. Because HTS wires produce AC loss, there are few motors developed with a superconducting armature winding. In a large capacity motor, HTS windings need to be connected in parallel way. However, the parallel connection causes different current flowing to each HTS winding. To solve this problem, we connected a current distributor to the motor. As a result, not only the current difference can be suppressed, but also the current of each winding can be adjusted freely. The low frequency and less flux penetrating HTS wire because of current distributor contribute to low AC loss. This motor is an axial gap rotating-field one, the cooling parts are fixed. This directly leads to simple cooling system. The motor is also brushless. This paper presents the structure, the analysis of the motor and the tests

  5. Modelling and Analysis of Radial Flux Surface Mounted Direct-Driven PMSG in Small Scale Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theint Zar Htet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling and analysis of permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG which are used in direct driven small scale wind turbines. The 3 kW PM generator which is driven directly without gear system is analyzed by Ansoft Maxwell 2D RMxprt. The performance analysis of generator includes the cogging torque in two teeth, induced coil voltages under load, winding current under load, airgap flux density distribution and so on. The modelling analysis is based on the 2D finite element techniques. In an electrical machine, an accurate determination of the geometry parameters is a vital role. The proper performance results of 3kW PMSG in small scale wind turbine can be seen in this paper.

  6. Reminiscences on the study of wind waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuyasu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The wind blowing over sea surface generates tiny wind waves. They develop with time and space absorbing wind energy, and become huge wind waves usually referred to ocean surface waves. The wind waves cause not only serious sea disasters but also take important roles in the local and global climate changes by affecting the fluxes of momentum, heat and gases (e.g. CO2) through the air-sea boundary. The present paper reviews the selected studies on wind waves conducted by our group in the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics (RIAM), Kyushu University. The themes discussed are interactions between water waves and winds, the energy spectrum of wind waves, nonlinear properties of wind waves, and the effects of surfactant on some air-sea interaction phenomena.

  7. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  8. Optimization of electrical parameters of windings used in axial flux electrical machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrik, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with shape optimization of windings used in electrical machines with disc type construction. These machines have short axial length what makes them suitable for use in small wind-power turbines or in-wheel traction drives. Disc type construction of stator offers more possibilities for winding arrangements than are available in classical machines with cylindrical construction. To find out the best winding arrangement for the novel disc type machine construction a series of analytical calculations, simulations and experimental measurements were performed. (Authors)

  9. Comparison of WindTrax and flux-gradient technique in determining PM10 emission rates from a beef cattle feedlot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several emission estimation methods can be used to determine emission fluxes from ground-level area sources, including open-lot beef cattle feedlots. This research determined PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial cattle feedlot in Kansas using WindTrax, a backward Lagrangian stochastic-based atmosp...

  10. Maximum Power Point Tracking Sensorless Control of an Axial-Flux Permanent Magnet Vernier Wind Power Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Luo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Vernier permanent magnet (VPM machines, one special case of magnetic flux-modulated (MFM machines, benefiting from their compact, simple construction and low-speed/ high-torque characteristics, have been receiving increasing interest. In this paper, the Vernier structure is integrated with an axial-flux PM machine to obtain the magnetic gear effect and produce an improved torque density for direct-drive wind power generation application. Another advantage of the proposed machine is that the stator flux rotating speed can be relatively high when the shaft speed is low. With this benefit, sensorless control strategy can be easily implemented in a wide speed range. In this paper, an improved sliding mode observer (SMO is proposed to estimate the rotor position and the speed of the proposed machine. With the estimated shaft speeds, the maximum power point tracking (MPPT control strategy is applied to maximize the wind power extraction. The machine design and the sensorless MPPT control strategy are verified by finite element analysis and experimental verification.

  11. Reduction of horizontal wind speed in a boundary layer with obstacles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emeis, S.; Frandsen, S.

    1993-01-01

    The reduction of horizontal wind speed at hub height in an infinite cluster of wind turbines is computed from a balance between a loss of horizontal momentum due to the drag and replenishment from above by turbulent fluxes. This reduction is derived without assumptions concerning the vertical win...

  12. Active Power and Flux Control of a Self-Excited Induction Generator for a Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Woonki; Muljadi, Eduard; Leighty, Bill; Kim, Jonghoon

    2017-05-11

    A Self-Excited Induction Generation (SEIG) for a variable speed wind turbine generation(VS-WG) is normally considered to be a good candidate for implementation in stand-alone applications such as battery charging, hydrogenation, water pumping, water purification, water desalination, and etc. In this study, we have examined a study on active power and flux control strategies for a SEIG for a variable speed wind turbine generation. The control analysis for the proposed system is carried out by using PSCAD software. In the process, we can optimize the control design of the system, thereby enhancing and expediting the control design procedure for this application. With this study, this control design for a SEIG for VS-WG can become the industry standard for analysis and development in terms of SEIG.

  13. Dynamic modeling of wind turbine based axial flux permanent magnetic synchronous generator connected to the grid with switch reduced converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Dehghanzadeh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the power electronic converters for grid connection of axial flux permanent magnetic synchronous generators (AFPMSG based variable speed wind turbine. In this paper, a new variable speed wind turbine with AFPMSG and Z-source inverter is proposed to improve number of switches and topology reliability. Besides, dynamic modeling of AFPMSG is presented to analyze grid connection of the proposed topology. The Z-source inverter controls maximum power point tracking (MPPT and delivering power to the grid. Therefore other DC–DC chopper is not required to control the rectified output voltage of generator in view of MPPT. As a result, the proposed topology requires less power electronic switches and the suggested system is more reliable against short circuit. The ability of proposed energy conversion system with AFPMSG is validated with simulation results and experimental results using PCI-1716 data acquisition system.

  14. Alongshore wind stress and heat flux divergence off Visakhapatnam, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, D.P.

    Annual variation of heat flux divergence (Qv) was computed for the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam. The mean values of net heat exchange (Qn) and heat flux divergence (Qv) were found to be 114 and 115 W.m/2 respectively on annual scale. The net heat...

  15. Seasonal-to-interannual fluctuations in surface temperature over the Pacific: effects of monthly winds and heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayan, Daniel R.; Miller, Arthur J.; Barnett, Tim P.; Graham, Nicholas E.; Ritchie, Jack N.; Oberhuber, Josef M.

    1995-01-01

    Monthly heat fluxes and wind stresses are used to force the Oberhuber isopycnic ocean general-circulation (OPYC) model of the Pacific basin over a two-decade period from 1970 to 1988. The surface forcings are constructed from COADS marine observations via bulk formulae. Monthly anomalies of the fluxes and stresses are superimposed upon model climatological means of these variables, which were saved from a long spin-up. Two aspects of this work are highlighted, both aimed at a better understanding of the atmosphere-ocean variability and exchanges and at diagnosing the performance of the OPYC model in simulating monthly to decadal-scale variability. The first is the evaluation of the data used to force the model ocean, along with its relationship to other observed data. The second is the diagnosis of the processes revealed in the model that are associated with sea surface temperature (SST) variability, including their seasonal and geographic structure.

  16. Dynamic modeling and performance evaluation of axial flux PMSG based wind turbine system with MPPT control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Behjat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work develops dynamic model of a gearless small scale wind power generation system based on a direct driven single sided outer rotor AFPMSG with coreless armature winding. Dynamic modeling of the AFPMSG based wind turbine requires machine parameters. To this end, a 3D FEM model of the generator is developed and from magnetostatic and transient analysis of the FEM model, machine parameters are calculated and utilized in dynamic modeling of the system. A maximum power point tracking (MPPT-based FOC control approach is used to obtain maximum power from the variable wind speed. The simulation results show the proper performance of the developed dynamic model of the AFPMSG, control approach and power generation system.

  17. On the parameterization of turbulent fluxes over the tropical Eastern Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Raga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present estimates of turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum derived from low level (~30 m aircraft measurements over the tropical Eastern Pacific and provide empirical relationships that are valid under high wind speed conditions (up to 25 ms−1. The estimates of total momentum flux and turbulent kinetic energy can be represented very accurately (r2=0.99, when data are binned every 1 ms−1 by empirical fits with a linear and a cubic terms of the average horizontal wind speed. The latent heat flux shows a strong quadratic dependence on the horizontal wind speed and a linear relationship with the difference between the air specific humidity and the saturated specific humidity at the sea surface, explaining 96% of the variance. The estimated values were used to evaluate the performance of three currently used parameterizations of turbulence fluxes, varying in complexity and computational requirements. The comparisons with the two more complex parameterizations show good agreement between the observed and parameterized latent heat fluxes, with less agreement in the sensible heat fluxes, and one of them largely overestimating the momentum fluxes. A third, very simple parameterization shows a surprisingly good agreement of the sensible heat flux, while momentum fluxes are again overestimated and a poor agreement was observed for the latent heat flux (r2=0.62. The performance of all three parameterizations deteriorates significantly in the high wind speed regime (above 10–15 ms−1. The dataset obtained over the tropical Eastern Pacific allows us to derive empirical functions for the turbulent fluxes that are applicable from 1 to 25 ms−1, which can be introduced in meteorological models under high wind conditions.

  18. Laboratory Measurements of the Water/Air Flux of Dimethylsulfide Using a Wind/Wave Tank

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dacey, John

    1998-01-01

    The flux of dimethylsulfide (DMS) from the surface water of the ocean to the atmosphere is an important biogeochemical problem, since DMS contributes to optical haze and potentially impacts global climate by influencing earth's albedo...

  19. Analytical Modeling of a Novel Transverse Flux Machine for Direct Drive Wind Turbine Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, IIftekhar; Husain, Tausif; Uddin, Md Wasi; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain; Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-08-24

    This paper presents a nonlinear analytical model of a novel double-sided flux concentrating Transverse Flux Machine (TFM) based on the Magnetic Equivalent Circuit (MEC) model. The analytical model uses a series-parallel combination of flux tubes to predict the flux paths through different parts of the machine including air gaps, permanent magnets, stator, and rotor. The two-dimensional MEC model approximates the complex three-dimensional flux paths of the TFM and includes the effects of magnetic saturation. The model is capable of adapting to any geometry that makes it a good alternative for evaluating prospective designs of TFM compared to finite element solvers that are numerically intensive and require more computation time. A single-phase, 1-kW, 400-rpm machine is analytically modeled, and its resulting flux distribution, no-load EMF, and torque are verified with finite element analysis. The results are found to be in agreement, with less than 5% error, while reducing the computation time by 25 times.

  20. Momentum distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    The content of the portion of the workshop concerned with momentum distributions in condensed matter is outlined and the neutron scattering approach to their measurement is briefly described. Results concerning helium systems are reviewed. Some theoretical aspects are briefly mentioned

  1. Design of Transverse Flux Permanent Magnet Machines for Large Direct-Drive Wind Turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bang, D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to maximize the energy harnessed, to minimize the cost, to improve the power quality and to ensure safety together with the growth of the size, various wind turbine concepts have been developed during last three decades. Different generator systems such as geared and direct-drive generator

  2. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Turbulent and Advective Scalar Fluxes: A Case Study on Intersection Ventilation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štěpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 381357 (2012), s. 1-13 ISSN 1537-744X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : air pollution * atmospheric boundary layer * wind tunnel modelling * contaminant spreading * street canyon Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2012 http://www.tswj.com/2012/381357/

  3. The effect of vegetation patterns on Aeolian mass flux at regional scale: A wind tunnel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, I.F.; Visser, S.M.; Karssenberg, D.; Erpul, G.; Cornelis, W.M.; Gabriels, D.; Poortinga, A.; Boever, de M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although insight on the effect of vegetation pattern on Aeolian mass transport is essential for re-planting degraded land, only limited knowledge on this effect is available. The objective of this research was to understand the effect of vegetation design on the Aeolian mass flux inside a

  4. The impact of in-canopy wind profile formulations on heat flux estimation in an open orchard using the remote sensing-based two-source model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cammalleri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For open orchard and vineyard canopies containing significant fractions of exposed soil (>50%, typical of Mediterranean agricultural regions, the energy balance of the vegetation elements is strongly influenced by heat exchange with the bare soil/substrate. For these agricultural systems a "two-source" approach, where radiation and turbulent exchange between the soil and canopy elements are explicitly modelled, appears to be the only suitable methodology for reliably assessing energy fluxes. In strongly clumped canopies, the effective wind speed profile inside and below the canopy layer can strongly influence the partitioning of energy fluxes between the soil and vegetation components. To assess the impact of in-canopy wind profile on model flux estimates, an analysis of three different formulations is presented, including algorithms from Goudriaan (1977, Massman (1987 and Lalic et al. (2003. The in-canopy wind profile formulations are applied to the thermal-based two-source energy balance (TSEB model developed by Norman et al. (1995 and modified by Kustas and Norman (1999. High resolution airborne remote sensing images, collected over an agricultural area located in the western part of Sicily (Italy comprised primarily of vineyards, olive and citrus orchards, are used to derive all the input parameters needed to apply the TSEB. The images were acquired from June to October 2008 and include a relatively wide range of meteorological and soil moisture conditions. A preliminary sensitivity analysis of the three wind profile algorithms highlights the dependence of wind speed just above the soil/substrate to leaf area index and canopy height over the typical range of canopy properties encountered in these agricultural areas. It is found that differences among the models in wind just above the soil surface are most significant under sparse and medium fractional cover conditions (15–50%. The TSEB model heat flux estimates are compared with micro

  5. ULF power fluctuations in the solar-wind parameters and their relationship with the relativistic electron flux at the geosynchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regi, M.

    2016-01-01

    We focused the attention on the Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations in response to the solar wind forcing and their relationship with the relativistic electron flux at geostationary orbit. We present here the results of a correlation analysis between the Pc5 power in the magnetosphere and on the ground, at low and high latitude, and the solar-wind speed and fluctuation power of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar-wind dynamic pressure through the years 2006 to 2010, also showing the relative timing between pulsations and solar-wind parameters. The Pc5 power appears significantly correlated with simultaneous solar-wind pressure fluctuations and with the solar-wind speed lagged by several hours. The relative amplitude of the two correlation peaks depends on the solar cycle phase and on the latitude. We also show a strong relationship between the Pc5 power and the > 600 keV and > 2MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Clear evidence emerges that the electron flux follows the Pc5 power by about 2 days; the time delay is a bit longer for the higher-energy electrons.

  6. Whistler mode waves and the electron heat flux in the solar wind: Cluster observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lacombe, C.; Alexandrova, O.; Matteini, L.; Santolík, Ondřej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Mangeney, A.; De Conchy, Y.; Maksimovic, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 796, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-11 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar wind * turbulence * waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 5.993, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/796/1/5/article

  7. Sensing the wind profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, A.

    2009-03-15

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theoretical progress of the study that is based on a number of journal papers. The papers, which constitute the second part of the report, aim to analyze, measure, and model the wind prole in and beyond the surface layer by combining observations from cup anemometers with lidars. The lidar is necessary to extend the measurements on masts at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm and over at land at Hoevsoere, Denmark. Both sensing techniques show a high degree of agreement for wind speed measurements performed at either sites. The wind speed measurements are averaged for several stability conditions and compare well with the surface-layer wind profile. At Hoevsoere, it is sufficient to scale the wind speed with the surface friction velocity, whereas at Horns Rev a new scaling is added, due to the variant roughness length. This new scaling is coupled to wind prole models derived for flow over the sea and tested against the wind proles up to 160 m at Horns Rev. The models, which account for the boundary-layer height in stable conditions, show better agreement with the measurements than compared to the traditional theory. Mixing-length parameterizations for the neutral wind prole compare well with length-scale measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere and 950 m at Leipzig. The mixing-length-derived wind proles strongly deviate from the logarithmic wind prole, but agree better with the wind speed measurements. The length-scale measurements are compared to the length scale derived from a spectral analysis performed up to 160 m at Hoevsoere showing high agreement. Mixing-length parameterizations are corrected to account for stability and used to derive wind prole models. These compared better to wind speed measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere than the surface-layer wind prole. The boundary-layer height is derived in nearneutral and stable conditions based on turbulent momentum uxes only and in unstable conditions

  8. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  9. Onshore Wind Stress and Buoyancy Flux Observed on a Dissipative Mediterranean Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    provided by a 12V lead acid battery that was housed in a separate waterproof enclosure. 11 Table 1. Surf Flux Tripod Sensor Suite Sensor Height...13 waterproof data shuttle, and pressure sensors were swapped-out during this time. 3. Beach Topography A total of 10 walking surveys were...system, which has a horizontal accuracy of O(1 cm). The surveys were conducted at the start and end of the study with additional surveys made after

  10. Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  11. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gurcan, O.E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and non‐resonant off‐diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves...... and particles is accounted for. Two related momentum conservation theorems are derived. These relate the resonant particle momentum flux, the wave momentum flux and the refractive force. A perturbative calculation, in the spirit of Chapman‐Enskog theory, is used to obtain the wave momentum flux, which...... contributes significantly to the residual stress. A general equation for mean κ∥(〈κ∥〉) is derived and used to develop a generalized theory of symmetry breaking. The resonant particle momentum flux is calculated, and pinch and residual stress effects are identified. The implications of the theory for intrinsic...

  12. Transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, P.H.; McDevitt, C.J.; Gürcan, O.D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, unified approach to the theory of turbulent transport of parallel momentum by collisionless drift waves. The physics of resonant and nonresonant off-diagonal contributions to the momentum flux is emphasized, and collisionless momentum exchange between waves...... and particles is accounted for. Two related momentum conservation theorems are derived. These relate the resonant particle momentum flux, the wave momentum flux, and the refractive force. A perturbative calculation, in the spirit of Chapman-Enskog theory, is used to obtain the wave momentum flux, which...... contributes significantly to the residual stress. A general equation for mean k(parallel to) () is derived and used to develop a generalized theory of symmetry breaking. The resonant particle momentum flux is calculated, and pinch and residual stress effects are identified. The implications...

  13. Integrated cosmic muon flux in the zenith angle range 0 < cosθ < 0.37 for momentum threshold up to 11.6 GeV/c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hirofumi; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Kohei; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Kodama, Hideyo; Nagamine, Kanetada; Sato, Kazuyuki; Sato, Kotaro; Kim, Shin-Hong; Suzuki, Atsuto; Takahashi, Kazuki; Takasaki, Fumihiko

    2017-12-01

    We have measured the cosmic muon flux in the zenith angle range {technique called muon radiography, where the mass distribution inside a large object is investigated from the cosmic muon distribution measured behind the object.

  14. The problem of the second wind turbine – a note on a common but flawed wind power estimation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kleidon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Several recent wind power estimates suggest that this renewable energy resource can meet all of the current and future global energy demand with little impact on the atmosphere. These estimates are calculated using observed wind speeds in combination with specifications of wind turbine size and density to quantify the extractable wind power. However, this approach neglects the effects of momentum extraction by the turbines on the atmospheric flow that would have effects outside the turbine wake. Here we show with a simple momentum balance model of the atmospheric boundary layer that this common methodology to derive wind power potentials requires unrealistically high increases in the generation of kinetic energy by the atmosphere. This increase by an order of magnitude is needed to ensure momentum conservation in the atmospheric boundary layer. In the context of this simple model, we then compare the effect of three different assumptions regarding the boundary conditions at the top of the boundary layer, with prescribed hub height velocity, momentum transport, or kinetic energy transfer into the boundary layer. We then use simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model that explicitly simulate generation of kinetic energy with momentum conservation. These simulations show that the assumption of prescribed momentum import into the atmospheric boundary layer yields the most realistic behavior of the simple model, while the assumption of prescribed hub height velocity can clearly be disregarded. We also show that the assumptions yield similar estimates for extracted wind power when less than 10% of the kinetic energy flux in the boundary layer is extracted by the turbines. We conclude that the common method significantly overestimates wind power potentials by an order of magnitude in the limit of high wind power extraction. Ultimately, environmental constraints set the upper limit on wind power potential at larger scales rather than

  15. Meridional transport of magnetic flux in the solar wind between 1 and 10 AU: a theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzo, V.J.; Goldstein, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Pioneer 10 observations suggest that the mean (longitudinally averaged) solar wind azimuthal field strength, B/sub phi/, near the ecliptic plane falls off more rapidly with heliocentric distance than would be expected in a classic Parker expansion, showing a deficit of 10--20% (as compared to the projected 1-AU value) by 10 AU. Though this observational interpretation has been challenged by subsequent analyses of Voyager data, it has nevertheless stimulated efforts to explain the inferred deficit on the basis of systematic north-south magnetic pressure gradients generated by the differential spiral wrapping of magnetic field lines in interplanetary space. We reexamine this issue from the theoretical perspective using a three-dimensional MHD nonlinear numerical model for steady, corotating flow. For realistic solar wind parameters we find that a purely axisymmetric expansion is capable of producing sizable magnetic flux deficits only when there are substantial meridional gradients in mean flow conditions localized about the ecliptic plane near the sun. Even then the match between plausible flow states and significant mean B/sub phi/ deficit is achieved over such a limited parameter range that it is unlikely this mechanism alone can produce deficits of the magnitude inferred from the Pioneer data

  16. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Valioulis

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  17. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Valioulis

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  18. Reply to comment by Mauder on "How well can we measure the vertical wind speed? Implications for fluxes of energy and mass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Kochendorfer; Tilden P. Meyers; John M. Frank; William J. Massman; Mark W. Heuer

    2013-01-01

    In Kochendorfer et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 145:383-398, 2012, hereafter K2012) the vertical wind speed (w) measured by a non-orthogonal three-dimensional sonic anemometer was shown to be underestimated by 12%. Turbulent statistics and eddycovariance fluxes estimated using w were also affected by this underestimate in w. Methodologies used in K2012 are clarified...

  19. Blade-element/momentum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2016-01-01

    Although there exists a large variety of methods for predicting performance and loadings of wind turbines, the only approach used today by wind turbine manufacturers is based on the blade-element/momentum (BEM) theory by Glauert (Aerodynamic theory. Springer, Berlin, pp. 169-360, 1935). A basic...... assumption in the BEM theory is that the flow takes place in independent stream tubes and that the loading is determined from two-dimensional sectional airfoil characteristics....

  20. Determination of the phenomena involved when de-energing transformers for wind-farms. Modelling, residual fluxes calculation and validation by on site tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioual, Michel [Societe Electricite de France (EDF) (France). Themis Dept.; Reveret, Jean-Christophe [Ecole Speciale de Mecanique et d' Electricite, Ivry-sur-Seine (France)

    2009-07-01

    The energization of the main transformers for wind-farms is an important issue, as it has a major impact on the voltage dips at the Delivery Point and consequently on the power delivery. One of the main point is the determination of the phenomena at the transformer energizing prior its energization, which are described in the paper, and mainly the residual fluxes circulating in the iron core. The residual fluxes have been determined in the case of the de-energization of the main transformers for wind-farms, with a detailed modelling of the equipment under the phenomena involved. A methodology is presented to obtain those fluxes; the values obtained have then be considered as initial conditions for the transformers energization, the inrush currents and overvoltages determined by the EMTP-RV program, and finally validated by on site tests. (orig.)

  1. Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Arik; Liemohn, Michael W.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2003-03-01

    We present a case study of a remarkable upstream O+ and N+ ion outflow event. We present observational evidence for spatially structured outflow of these Low Charge State Heavy Ions (LCSHIs) of magnetospheric origin along a small reconnected field line region within the framework of a magnetic cloud of an ICME. From the particles' in situ 3D distribution function we conclude that in this case the interaction of the outflow with the bow shock is small. We conclude further that the gyrophases of outflowing ions at the reconnection point are randomly distributed. This leads to the formation of a flux tube with a specific geometry. In particular, the outflow reveals spatial dispersion and non-gyrotropy. This result has implications for the size of the dayside reconnection site.

  2. Net sea–air CO2 flux uncertainties in the Bay of Biscay based on the choice of wind speed products and gas transfer parameterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Otero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of sea–air CO2 fluxes is largely dependent on wind speed through the gas transfer velocity parameterization. In this paper, we quantify uncertainties in the estimation of the CO2 uptake in the Bay of Biscay resulting from the use of different sources of wind speed such as three different global reanalysis meteorological models (NCEP/NCAR 1, NCEP/DOE 2 and ERA-Interim, one high-resolution regional forecast model (HIRLAM-AEMet, winds derived under the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP project, and QuikSCAT winds in combination with some of the most widely used gas transfer velocity parameterizations. Results show that net CO2 flux estimations during an entire seasonal cycle (September 2002–September 2003 may vary by a factor of ~ 3 depending on the selected wind speed product and the gas exchange parameterization, with the highest impact due to the last one. The comparison of satellite- and model-derived winds with observations at buoys advises against the systematic overestimation of NCEP-2 and the underestimation of NCEP-1. In the coastal region, the presence of land and the time resolution are the main constraints of QuikSCAT, which turns CCMP and ERA-Interim in the preferred options.

  3. New approaches for air-sea fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gille, S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Air-sea exchanges in the Southern Ocean of momentum, heat, freshwater, carbon dioxide, and other gases are not well documented because fluxes are sparsely sampled (see Figure 1) and because high winds, high sea state, and lack of calibration...

  4. Influence of stability on the flux-profile relationships for wind speed, Φm, and temperature, Φh, for the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yagüe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from SABLES98 experimental campaign have been used in order to study the influence of stability (from weak to strong stratification on the flux-profile relationships for momentum, Φm, and heat, Φh. Measurements from 14 thermocouples and 3 sonic anemometers at three levels (5.8, 13.5 and 32 m for the period from 10 to 28 September 1998 were analysed using the framework of the local-scaling approach (Nieuwstadt, 1984a; 1984b, which can be interpreted as an extension of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (Obukhov, 1946. The results show increasing values of Φm and Φh with increasing stability parameter ζ=z/Λ, up to a value of ζ≈1–2, above which the values remain constant. As a consequence of this levelling off in Φm and Φh for strong stability, the turbulent mixing is underestimated when linear similarity functions (Businger et al., 1971 are used to calculate surface fluxes of momentum and heat. On the other hand when Φm and Φh are related to the gradient Richardson number, Ri, a different behaviour is found, which could indicate that the transfer of momentum is greater than that of heat for high Ri. The range of validity of these linear functions is discussed in terms of the physical aspects of turbulent intermittent mixing.

  5. Experimental study of heat and momentum exchange between a forest lake and the atmosphere in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barskov, K. V.; Chernyshev, R. V.; Stepanenko, V. M.; Repina, I. A.; Artamonov, A. Yu; Guseva, S. P.; Gavrikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    The article presents the results of an experimental study of turbulent heat exchange between the surface of a frozen lake surrounded by forest and the atmospheric boundary layer. Heat and momentum fluxes were measured at three levels by an eddy covariance (EC) technique. Additionally, the heat fluxes were estimated by a surface energy balance method using a temperature profile measured in the snow cover and net longwave and shortwave radiation. The results of the measurements show that the eddy covariance fluxes correlate well with those obtained by the surface energy balance method, with a tendency of underestimation. The presence of wind-shear effects at treetop height demonstrated recently in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) [3] was supported in our measurements by the fact that the momentum flux increased with height from the surface. The negative sensible heat flux increased with height most of the time. We suggest that this phenomenon may partially be caused by the high negative heat fluxes above the surface formed when warm advection occurs at altitudes of ~100 m. During the warm advection events, Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails to reproduce the sharp increase of the negative heat flux at the surface layer. Beyond the warm advection events, the MOST calculations agree well with the EC fluxes, however, with some systematic underestimation bias.

  6. Angular Momentum of Topologically Structured Darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Samuel N; Siemens, Mark E

    2017-11-17

    We theoretically analyze and experimentally measure the extrinsic angular momentum contribution of topologically structured darkness found within fractional vortex beams, and show that this structured darkness can be explained by evanescent waves at phase discontinuities in the generating optic. We also demonstrate the first direct measurement of the intrinsic orbital angular momentum of light with both intrinsic and extrinsic angular momentum, and explain why the total orbital angular momenta of fractional vortices do not match the winding number of their generating phases.

  7. T2K off-axis near detector νμ flux measurement and absolute momentum scale calibration of the off-axis near detector tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaszczyk, F.

    2011-09-01

    In this thesis we present the results from the ν μ energy spectrum measurement at T2K's near detector and T2K's near detector tracker absolute momentum scale calibration. First we review the main historical steps and the current state of the art of neutrino physics as well as the theoretical framework required to understand the thesis physics analyses presented later on. In particular we focus on the neutrino oscillation parametrization and the neutrino-matter interaction models. We then describe T2K, an off-axis long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan which consists of a muon neutrino beam sent from J-PARC to Super- Kamiokande, with a magnetized near detector located at 280 m from the neutrino production site. T2K's main goals are measuring the last unknown angle of the PMNS matrix θ 13 through the search of ν e appearance in the ν μ beam and measuring precisely the atmospheric parameters through muon neutrino disappearance. We briefly describe the detectors, in particular the near detector tracker and its performance. We then present the analyses tools, such as the reconstruction techniques used and how the neutrino charged current interaction events needed for the energy spectrum measurement are selected. The main goal of the thesis, the muon neutrino energy spectrum measurement done with the first T2K data is explained next. We give the motivations for such measurement, the results obtained with the first T2K data sample, and the different systematic errors studied. Finally, the absolute momentum scale calibration of T2K's near detector tractor, done through the reconstruction of the neutral kaon invariant mass, is explained. (author)

  8. Average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kataoka

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We report average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit (GEO. It is found that seven of top ten extreme events at GEO during solar cycle 23 are associated with the magnetosphere inflation during the storm recovery phase as caused by the large-scale solar wind structure of very low dynamic pressure (<1.0 nPa during rapid speed decrease from very high (>650 km/s to typical (400–500 km/s in a few days. For the seven events, the solar wind parameters, geomagnetic activity indices, and relativistic electron flux and geomagnetic field at GEO are superposed at the local noon period of GOES satellites to investigate the physical cause. The average profiles support the "double inflation" mechanism that the rarefaction of the solar wind and subsequent magnetosphere inflation are one of the best conditions to produce the extreme flux enhancement at GEO because of the excellent magnetic confinement of relativistic electrons by reducing the drift loss of trapped electrons at dayside magnetopause.

  9. Response of a tokamak plasma to particle and momentum sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1978-12-01

    The response of an axisymmetric toroidal tokamak plasma to first-order particle and momentum sources is investigated. The momentum sources drive coupled poloidal and toroidal mass flows and electrostatic field evolution which relax to asymptotic values on a time scale that is characteristic of the dominant viscous or external drag mechanism. The asymptotic steady-state momentum balance provides the necessary condition to completely determine the particle fluxes and currents in the flux surfaces, and, hence, to determine transport fluxes across flux surfaces. Transport fluxes are driven across flux surfaces both by interspecies collisional momentum exchange, the usual case, and by momentum exchange between the plasma and external sources and/or drags. A generalized Ohm's law is obtained and used to determine the manner in which particle and momentum sources can drive parallel currents and can alter the evolution of the q-profile. The theory is formulated for arbitrary plasma cross sections, beta, and collision regimes

  10. Trace elements and radioactivity in lunar rocks: implications for meteorite infall, solar-wind flux, and formation conditions of moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keays, R R; Ganapathy, R; Laul, J C; Anders, E; Herzog, G F; Jeffery, P M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar soil and type C breccias are enriched 3-to 100-fold in Ir, Au, Zn, Cd, Ag, Br, Bi, and Tl, relative to type A, B rocks. Smaller enrichments were found for Co, Cu, Ga, Pd, Rb, and Cs. The solar wind at present intensity can account for only 3 percent of this enrichment; an upper limit to the average proton flux during the last 4.5 x 109 years thus is 8 x 10(9) cm(-2) yr(-1). The remaining enrichment seems to be due to a 1.5 to 2 percent admixture of carbonaceous-chondritelike material, corresponding to an average influx rate of meteoritic and cometary matter of 2.9 x 10(-9) g cm(-2) yr(-1) at Tranquility Base. This is about one-quarter the terrestrial rate. Type A, B rocks are depleted 10-to 100-fold in Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, In, Tl, and Bi, relative to terrestrial basalts. This suggests loss by high-temperature volatilization, before or after accretion of the moon. Positron activities due mainly to (22)Na and (26)Al range from 90 to 220 beta(+) min(-1) kg(-1) in five small rocks or fragments (9 to 29 g). The higher activities presumably indicate surface locations. Th and U contents generally agree with those found by the preliminary examination team.

  11. Transonic Wind Tunnel Modernization for Experimental Investigation of Dynamic Stall in a Wide Range of Mach Numbers by Plasma Actuators with Combined Energy/Momentum Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-02

    wind tunnel for the study of plasma based methods for the control of dynamic stall for helicopter rotor blades. The tunnel has a 3D positioning...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This equipment grant supported the design and construction of a subsonic variable speed wind tunnel for the study of...plasma based methods for the control of dynamic stall for helicopter rotor blades. The tunnel has a 3D positioning system and servomotor mounted below

  12. Momentum transport in gyrokinetic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Rico

    2016-07-01

    In this thesis, the gyrokinetic-Vlasov code GKW is used to study turbulent transport, with a focus on radial transport of toroidal momentum. To support the studies on turbulent transport an eigenvalue solver has been implemented into GKW. This allows to find, not only the most unstable mode, but also subdominant modes. Furthermore it is possible to follow the modes in parameter scans. Furthermore, two fundamental mechanisms that can generate an intrinsic rotation have been investigated: profile shearing and the velocity nonlinearity. The study of toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak due to profile shearing reveals that the momentum flux can not be accurately described by the gradient in the turbulent intensity. Consequently, a description using the profile variation is used. A linear model has been developed that is able to reproduce the variations in the momentum flux as the profiles of density and temperature vary, reasonably well. It uses, not only the gradient length of density and temperature profile, but also their derivative, i.e. the second derivative of the logarithm of the temperature and the density profile. It is shown that both first as well as second derivatives contribute to the generation of a momentum flux. A difference between the linear and nonlinear simulations has been found with respect to the behaviour of the momentum flux. In linear simulations the momentum flux is independent of the normalized Larmor radius ρ{sub *}, whereas it is linear in ρ{sub *} for nonlinear simulations, provided ρ{sub *} is small enough (≤4.10{sup -3}). Nonlinear simulations reveal that the profile shearing can generate an intrinsic rotation comparable to that of current experiments. Under reactor conditions, however, the intrinsic rotation from the profile shearing is expected to be small due to the small normalized Larmor radius ρ{sub *}

  13. Coastal Boundary Layer Characteristics of Wind, Turbulence, and Surface Roughness Parameter over the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. S. Namboodiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the features of wind, turbulence, and surface roughness parameter over the coastal boundary layer of the Peninsular Indian Station, Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station (TERLS. Every 5 min measurements from an ultrasonic anemometer at 3.3 m agl from May 2007 to December 2012 are used for this work. Symmetries in mesoscale turbulence, stress off-wind angle computations, structure of scalar wind, resultant wind direction, momentum flux (M, Obukhov length (L, frictional velocity (u*, w-component, turbulent heat flux (H, drag coefficient (CD, turbulent intensities, standard deviation of wind directions (σθ, wind steadiness factor-σθ relationship, bivariate normal distribution (BND wind model, surface roughness parameter (z0, z0 and wind direction (θ relationship, and variation of z0 with the Indian South West monsoon activity are discussed.

  14. Experimental study of the impact of large-scale wind farms on land–atmosphere exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Markfort, Corey D; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale wind farms, covering a significant portion of the land and ocean surface, may affect the transport of momentum, heat, mass and moisture between the atmosphere and the land locally and globally. To understand the wind-farm–atmosphere interaction, we conducted wind-tunnel experiments to study the surface scalar (heat) flux using model wind farms, consisting of more than ten rows of wind turbines—having typical streamwise and spanwise spacings of five and four rotor diameters—in a neutral boundary layer with a heated surface. The spatial distribution of the surface heat flux was mapped with an array of surface heat flux sensors within the quasi-developed regime of the wind-farm flow. Although the overall surface heat flux change produced by the wind farms was found to be small, with a net reduction of 4% for a staggered wind farm and nearly zero change for an aligned wind farm, the highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of the surface heat flux, dependent on the wind-farm layout, was significant. The difference between the minimum and maximum surface heat fluxes could be up to 12% and 7% in aligned and staggered wind farms, respectively. This finding is important for planning intensive agriculture practice and optimizing farm land use strategy regarding wind energy project development. The well-controlled wind-tunnel experiments presented in this study also provide a first comprehensive dataset on turbulent flow and scalar transport in wind farms, which can be further used to develop and validate new parameterizations of surface scalar fluxes in numerical models. (letter)

  15. Turbulence Driven by Common Non-stationary Weak Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, L.

    2015-12-01

    Complications with analysis of turbulence in common non-stationary weak-wind conditions are briefly surveyed. The behavior of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is then examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field using measurements from three field programs with towers ranging from 12 to 20 m and an extensive horizontal network of sonic anemometers. The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions are studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso motions. Cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The relationship between the heat flux, wind speed and stratification is investigated. Weak wind conditions include frequent vertical convergence of the heat flux and implied temperature advection.

  16. Motion-Correlated Flow Distortion and Wave-Induced Biases in Air-Sea Flux Measurements From Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytherch, J.; Yelland, M. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Tupman, D. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Moat, B. I.; Norris, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Direct measurements of the turbulent air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture and gases are often made using sensors mounted on ships. Ship-based turbulent wind measurements are corrected for platform motion using well established techniques, but biases at scales associated with wave and platform motion are often still apparent in the flux measurements. It has been uncertain whether this signal is due to time-varying distortion of the air flow over the platform, or to wind-wave interactions impacting the turbulence. Methods for removing such motion-scale biases from scalar measurements have previously been published but their application to momentum flux measurements remains controversial. Here we use eddy covariance momentum flux measurements obtained onboard RRS James Clark Ross as part of the Waves, Aerosol and Gas Exchange Study (WAGES), a programme of near-continuous measurements using the autonomous AutoFlux system (Yelland et al., 2009). Measurements were made in 2013 in locations throughout the North and South Atlantic, the Southern Ocean and the Arctic Ocean, at latitudes ranging from 62°S to 75°N. We show that the measured motion-scale bias has a dependence on the horizontal ship velocity, and that a correction for it reduces the dependence of the measured momentum flux on the orientation of the ship to the wind. We conclude that the bias is due to experimental error, and that time-varying motion-dependent flow distortion is the likely source. Yelland, M., Pascal, R., Taylor, P. and Moat, B.: AutoFlux: an autonomous system for the direct measurement of the air-sea fluxes of CO2, heat and momentum. J. Operation. Oceanogr., 15-23, doi:10.1080/1755876X.2009.11020105, 2009.

  17. Plasmons with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, J. T.; Ali, S.; Thide, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electron plasma waves carrying orbital angular momentum are investigated in an unmagnetized collisionless plasma composed of inertial electrons and static ions. For this purpose, the usual plasmon dispersion relation is employed to derive an approximate paraxial equation. The latter is analyzed with a Gaussian beam solution. For a finite angular momentum associated with the plasmon, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) solutions are employed for solving the electrostatic potential problem which gives approximate solution and is valid for plasmon beams in the paraxial approximation. The LG potential determines the electric field components and energy flux of plasmons with finite angular momentum. Numerical illustrations show that the radial and angular mode numbers strongly modify the profiles of the LG potential.

  18. Projections and downscaling of 21st century temperatures, precipitation, radiative fluxes and winds for the southwestern US, with focus on the Lake Tahoe basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent projections of global climate changes in response to increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere include warming in the Southwestern US and, especially, in the vicinity of Lake Tahoe of from about +3°C to +6°C by end of century and changes in precipitation on the order of 5-10 % increases or (more commonly) decreases, depending on the climate model considered. Along with these basic changes, other climate variables like solar insolation, downwelling (longwave) radiant heat, and winds may change. Together these climate changes may result in changes in the hydrology of the Tahoe basin and potential changes in lake overturning and ecological regimes. Current climate projections, however, are generally spatially too coarse (with grid cells separated by 1 to 2° latitude and longitude) for direct use in assessments of the vulnerabilities of the much smaller Tahoe basin. Thus, daily temperatures, precipitation, winds, and downward radiation fluxes from selected global projections have been downscaled by a statistical method called the constructed-analogues method onto 10 to 12 km grids over the Southwest and especially over Lake Tahoe. Precipitation, solar insolation and winds over the Tahoe basin change only moderately (and with indeterminate signs) in the downscaled projections, whereas temperatures and downward longwave fluxes increase along with imposed increases in global greenhouse-gas concentrations.

  19. RETRACTED: The influence of sand diameter and wind velocity on sand particle lift-off and incident angles in the windblown sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiao-Jing; Duan, Shao-Zhen; Liang, Yi-Rui

    2013-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors-in-Chief. This article also contains significant similarity with parts of text, written by the same author(s), that have appeared in Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, The influence of wind velocity and sand grain diameter on the falling velocities of sand particles, Powder Technology, Volume 241, June 2013, Pages 158-165. Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux, Acta Mechanica Sinica, April 2013, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 158-165. Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, Influence of sand grain diameter and wind velocity on lift-off velocities of sand particles, The European Physical Journal E, May 2013, 36:50. Tian-Li Bo, Shao-Zhen Duan, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Yi-Rui Liang, The influence of sand bed temperature on lift-off and falling parameters in windblown sand flux, Geomorphology, Volume 204, 1 January 2014, Pages 477-484. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  20. Dual electromagnetism: helicity, spin, momentum and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y

    2013-01-01

    The dual symmetry between electric and magnetic fields is an important intrinsic property of Maxwell equations in free space. This symmetry underlies the conservation of optical helicity and, as we show here, is closely related to the separation of spin and orbital degrees of freedom of light (the helicity flux coincides with the spin angular momentum). However, in the standard field-theory formulation of electromagnetism, the field Lagrangian is not dual symmetric. This leads to problematic dual-asymmetric forms of the canonical energy–momentum, spin and orbital angular-momentum tensors. Moreover, we show that the components of these tensors conflict with the helicity and energy conservation laws. To resolve this discrepancy between the symmetries of the Lagrangian and Maxwell equations, we put forward a dual-symmetric Lagrangian formulation of classical electromagnetism. This dual electromagnetism preserves the form of Maxwell equations, yields meaningful canonical energy–momentum and angular-momentum tensors, and ensures a self-consistent separation of the spin and orbital degrees of freedom. This provides a rigorous derivation of the results suggested in other recent approaches. We make the Noether analysis of the dual symmetry and all the Poincaré symmetries, examine both local and integral conserved quantities and show that only the dual electromagnetism naturally produces a complete self-consistent set of conservation laws. We also discuss the observability of physical quantities distinguishing the standard and dual theories, as well as relations to quantum weak measurements and various optical experiments. (paper)

  1. An Exploration of Wind Stress Calculation Techniques in Hurricane Storm Surge Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra M. Bryant

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As hurricanes continue to threaten coastal communities, accurate storm surge forecasting remains a global priority. Achieving a reliable storm surge prediction necessitates accurate hurricane intensity and wind field information. The wind field must be converted to wind stress, which represents the air-sea momentum flux component required in storm surge and other oceanic models. This conversion requires a multiplicative drag coefficient for the air density and wind speed to represent the air-sea momentum exchange at a given location. Air density is a known parameter and wind speed is a forecasted variable, whereas the drag coefficient is calculated using an empirical correlation. The correlation’s accuracy has brewed a controversy of its own for more than half a century. This review paper examines the lineage of drag coefficient correlations and their acceptance among scientists.

  2. A correlative study of simultaneously measured He(++) fluxes in the solar wind and in the magnetosphere utilizing Imp-1 and 1971-089A satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneously measured He(++) fluxes in the solar wind and in the magnetosphere were studied using data from the plasma spectrometer on the Imp I satellite and the energetic ion mass spectrometer on the low altitude polar orbiting satellite 1971-89A. A detailed comparison of the He(++) energy spectra measured simultaneously in the solar wind and in the low altitude dayside polar cusp on March 7, 1972 was made. The energy-per-unit-charge range of the energetic ion mass spectrometer on board the polar orbiting satellite was 700 eV to 12 keV. Within this range there was a clear maximum in the He(++) energy spectrum at approximately 1.5 keV/nucleon. There was not a clearly defined maximum in the H(+) spectrum, but the data were consistent with a peak between 0.7 and 1.0 keV/nucleon. Both spectra could be reasonably well fit with a convecting Maxwellian plus a high energy tail; however, the mean velocity for He(++) distribution was significantly greater than that for the H(+) distribution. The simultaneous solar wind measurements showed the mean velocities for both ion species to be approximately 600 km/sec. The discrepancies between the relative velocity distributions in the low altitude cusp and those in the solar wind are consistent with a potential difference of approximately 1.4 kV along their flow direction between the two points of observation.

  3. Relationship between Relativistic Electron Flux in the Inner Magnetosphere and ULF Pulsation on the Ground Associated with Long-term Variations of Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, K.; Nagatsuma, T.; Troshichev, O. A.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Saita, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study the relativistic electron flux (0.59-1.18MeV) measured by Standard Dose Monitor (SDOM) onboard DRTS (KODAMA) satellite at the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) is analyzed to investigate the long term (from 2002 to 2014) variations of the electron flux enhancement (REF) during the passage of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) and/or Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). The long term variations of the REF clearly shows the 27-days period associated with the high speed solar wind velocity caused by the CIRs, whereas it is very few that the enhancement of REF lasts for several days after passage of CMEs. The 27-days period enhancement of REF represents the quite strong peak in 2003 when the high speed stream of the solar wind were quit active. We also conducted the same analysis for the Pc5 pulsations observed on the ground. The ground magnetic variations data globally observed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and International Center for Space Weather Science and Education (ICSWSE) Kyushu University are used to investigate the long term variations of Pc5 power. The same signature in the REF variations is shown in the time variability of the Pc5 power on the ground. These results indicate that the solar wind condition strongly affects the acceleration process of the relativistic electron flux by the ULF wave. In particular the dependence of the REF and Pc5 variations on the sector structures and their seasonal variations strongly suggest that the relationship between Pc5 and REF variations could be controlled by the Russell-McPherron effect.

  4. A class of flux observers for doubly-fed induction generators used in small power wind generation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, C.; Boldea, I.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates a family of stator and rotor flux observers for sensorless operation of doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG). Four stator flux observer topologies are described and compared. All proposed schemes use the voltage and current models connected in parallel or in series...

  5. Simulated solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere: influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Modolo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere is investigated by means of 3-D multi-species hybrid simulations. The influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is examined by comparing two simulations describing the two extreme states of the solar cycle. The hybrid formalism allows a kinetic description of each ions species and a fluid description of electrons. The ionization processes (photoionization, electron impact and charge exchange are included self-consistently in the model where the production rate is computed locally, separately for each ionization act and for each neutral species. The results of simulations are in a reasonable agreement with the observations made by Phobos 2 and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The position of the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is weakly dependent of the solar EUV flux. The motional electric field creates strong asymmetries for the two plasma boundaries.

  6. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  7. Automated calculation of surface energy fluxes with high-frequency lake buoy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Hamilton, David P.; Maberly, Stephen C; Muroaka, Kohji; Read, Jordan S.; Smyth, Robyn L; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is a program used for calculating the surface energy fluxes in lakes according to established literature methodologies. The program was developed in MATLAB for the rapid analysis of high-frequency data from instrumented lake buoys in support of the emerging field of aquatic sensor network science. To calculate the surface energy fluxes, the program requires a number of input variables, such as air and water temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and short-wave radiation. Available outputs for Lake Heat Flux Analyzer include the surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat and their corresponding transfer coefficients, incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation. Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is open source and can be used to process data from multiple lakes rapidly. It provides a means of calculating the surface fluxes using a consistent method, thereby facilitating global comparisons of high-frequency data from lake buoys.

  8. How do uncertainties in NCEP R2 and CFSR surface fluxes impact tropical ocean simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Caihong; Xue, Yan; Kumar, Arun; Behringer, David; Yu, Lisan

    2017-11-01

    NCEP/DOE reanalysis (R2) and Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) surface fluxes are widely used by the research community to understand surface flux climate variability, and to drive ocean models as surface forcings. However, large discrepancies exist between these two products, including (1) stronger trade winds in CFSR than in R2 over the tropical Pacific prior 2000; (2) excessive net surface heat fluxes into ocean in CFSR than in R2 with an increase in difference after 2000. The goals of this study are to examine the sensitivity of ocean simulations to discrepancies between CFSR and R2 surface fluxes, and to assess the fidelity of the two products. A set of experiments, where an ocean model was driven by a combination of surface flux components from R2 and CFSR, were carried out. The model simulations were contrasted to identify sensitivity to different component of the surface fluxes in R2 and CFSR. The accuracy of the model simulations was validated against the tropical moorings data, altimetry SSH and SST reanalysis products. Sensitivity of ocean simulations showed that temperature bias difference in the upper 100 m is mostly sensitive to the differences in surface heat fluxes, while depth of 20 °C (D20) bias difference is mainly determined by the discrepancies in momentum fluxes. D20 simulations with CFSR winds agree with observation well in the western equatorial Pacific prior 2000, but have large negative bias similar to those with R2 winds after 2000, partly because easterly winds over the central Pacific were underestimated in both CFSR and R2. On the other hand, the observed temperature variability is well reproduced in the tropical Pacific by simulations with both R2 and CFSR fluxes. Relative to the R2 fluxes, the CFSR fluxes improve simulation of interannual variability in all three tropical oceans to a varying degree. The improvement in the tropical Atlantic is most significant and is largely attributed to differences in surface winds.

  9. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  10. ESCAPING PARTICLE FLUXES IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS. II. REDUCED MASS-LOSS RATES AND ANISOTROPIC WINDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    In Paper I, we presented a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the winds of close-in exoplanets. However, close-in exoplanets are tidally locked and irradiated only on the day sides by their host stars. This requires two-dimensional hydrodynamic models with self-consistent radiative transfer calculations. In this paper, for the tidal-locking (two-dimensional radiative transfer) and non-tidal-locking cases (one-dimensional radiative transfer), we constructed a multi-fluid two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with detailed radiative transfer to depict the escape of particles. We found that the tidal forces (the sum of tidal gravity of the star and centrifugal force due to the planetary rotation) supply significant accelerations and result in anisotropic winds. An important effect of the tidal forces is that it severely depresses the outflow of particles near the polar regions where the density and the radial velocity are a factor of a few (ten) smaller than those of the low-latitude regions. As a consequence, most particles escape the surface of the planet from the regions of low latitude. Comparing the tidal-locking and non-tidal-locking cases, we found that their optical depths are very different so that the flows also emerge with a different pattern. In the case of non-tidal locking, the radial velocities at the base of the wind are higher than the meridional velocities. However, in the case of tidal locking, the meridional velocities dominate the flow at the base of the wind, and they can effectively transfer mass and energy from the day sides to the night sides. Further, we also found that the differences of the winds show a middle extent at large radii. This means that the structure of the wind at the base can be changed by the two-dimensional radiative transfer due to large optical depths, but the extent is reduced with an increase in radius. Because the escape is depressed in the polar regions, the mass-loss rate predicted by the non-tidal-locking model, in

  11. A new geometrical construction using rounded surfaces proposed for the transverse flux machine for direct drive wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argeseanu, Alin; Nica, Florin Valentin Traian; Ritchie, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new construction for transverse flux machines (TFM) using a rounded surfaces core geometry. The new concept has been developed for TFM with U core geometry. In this case a new analytic design procedure was proposed. The analytic design of the new TFM construction is further...... improved by FEM modelling and analysis. Using the new concept, a significant reduction of the active materials is obtained. The innovative geometry also provides a uniform magnetic field in the core structure. According to the comparison of both the TFM with prismatic and rounded core geometries the new...

  12. Large momentum transfer phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imachi, Masahiro; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Matsuoka, Takeo; Sawada, Shoji.

    1978-01-01

    The large momentum transfer phenomena in hadron reaction drastically differ from small momentum transfer phenomena, and are described in this paper. Brief review on the features of the large transverse momentum transfer reactions is described in relation with two-body reactions, single particle productions, particle ratios, two jet structure, two particle correlations, jet production cross section, and the component of momentum perpendicular to the plane defined by the incident protons and the triggered pions and transverse momentum relative to jet axis. In case of two-body process, the exponent N of the power law of the differential cross section is a value between 10 to 11.5 in the large momentum transfer region. The breaks of the exponential behaviors into the power ones are observed at the large momentum transfer region. The break would enable to estimate the order of a critical length. The large momentum transfer phenomena strongly suggest an important role of constituents of hadrons in the hard region. Hard rearrangement of constituents from different initial hadrons induces large momentum transfer reactions. Several rules to count constituents in the hard region have been proposed so far to explain the power behavior. Scale invariant quark interaction and hard reactions are explained, and a summary of the possible types of hard subprocess is presented. (Kato, T.)

  13. Momentum considerations on the New MEXICO experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, E. A.; Boorsma, K.; Schepers, J. G.; Snel, H.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper regards axial and angular momentum considerations combining detailed loads from pressure sensors and the flow field mapped with particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. For this end, the study implements important results leaning on experimental data from wind tunnel measurements of the New MEXICO project. The measurements, taken on a fully instrumented rotor, were carried out in the German Dutch Wind tunnel Organisation (DNW) testing the MEXICO rotor in the open section. The work revisits the so-called momentum theory, showing that the integral thrust and torque measured on the rotor correspond with an extent of 0.7 and 2.4% respectively to the momentum balance of the global flow field using the general momentum equations. Likewise, the sectional forces combined with the local induced velocities are found to plausibly obey the annular streamtube theory, albeit some limitations in the axial momentum become more apparent at high inductions after a=0.3. Finally, azimuth induced velocities are measured and compared to predictions from models of Glauert and Burton et al., showing close-matching forecasts for blade spans above 25%.

  14. Introducing Conservation of Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton's laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered…

  15. Study of momentum transfers within a vegetation canopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    man (1987) compared several wind profile models against observed data. Massman (1997) again used Albini's model of wind profile (1981) to develop one dimensional analytical model of momentum transfer and para- meterized the surface drag coefficient to estimate d/h and z0/h as functions of foliage structure and.

  16. Value and Momentum Everywhere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asness, Clifford S.; Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    across asset classes than passive exposures to the asset classes themselves. However, value and momentum are negatively correlated both within and across asset classes. Our results indicate the presence of common global risks that we characterize with a three factor model. Global funding liquidity risk......We study the returns to value and momentum strategies jointly across eight diverse markets and asset classes. Finding consistent value and momentum premia in every asset class, we further find strong common factor structure among their returns. Value and momentum are more positively correlated...... is a partial source of these patterns, which are identifiable only when examining value and momentum simultaneously across markets. Our findings present a challenge to existing behavioral, institutional, and rational asset pricing theories that largely focus on U.S. equities....

  17. Surface Stress with Non-stationary Weak Winds and Stable Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, L.; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind, stably-stratified, boundary layer over land is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field using measurements from three field programs. These field programs include towers ranging from 12 to 20 m in height and an extensive horizontal network of sonic anemometers. The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and non-stationary submeso motions is investigated from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected partly due to enhancement of the turbulence by submeso motions. Cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases in the downward transport of momentum.

  18. The Impact of Wind Speed Changes on the Surface Stress in the Weak-wind Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field based upon field observations. Extensive sonic anemometer measurements from horizontal networks and vertical towers ranging from 12 to 20 m height were collected from three field programs in moderately sloped terrain with a varying degree of surface heterogeneity, namely the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) and the Flow Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) II experiments in Colorado (USA), and the Advanced Canopy Resolution Experiment (ARCFLO) in Oregon (USA). The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions is studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso-scale motions. Consequently, the roles of the wind speed and stratification are not adequately accommodated by a single non-dimensional combination, such as the bulk Richardson number. Howver, cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The latter may be significant in explaining the small-scale weak turbulence during stable stratification and deviations from conventional flux-profile relationships.

  19. Data Acquisition and Flux Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebmann, C.; Kolle, O; Heinesch, B

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation.......In this chapter, the basic theory and the procedures used to obtain turbulent fluxes of energy, mass, and momentum with the eddy covariance technique will be detailed. This includes a description of data acquisition, pretreatment of high-frequency data and flux calculation....

  20. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  1. Value and Momentum Everywhere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asness, Clifford S.; Moskowitz, Tobias; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    are negatively correlated with each other, both within and across asset classes. Our results indicate the presence of common global risks that we characterize with a three-factor model. Global funding liquidity risk is a partial source of these patterns, which are identifiable only when examining value......We find consistent value and momentum return premia across eight diverse markets and asset classes, and a strong common factor structure among their returns. Value and momentum returns correlate more strongly across asset classes than passive exposures to the asset classes, but value and momentum...

  2. Structure of Turbulence in Katabatic Flows Below and Above the Wind-Speed Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey A.; Leo, Laura S.; Sabatino, Silvana Di; Fernando, Harindra J. S.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Fairall, Christopher W.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of small-scale turbulence made in the atmospheric boundary layer over complex terrain during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program are used to describe the structure of turbulence in katabatic flows. Turbulent and mean meteorological data were continuously measured on four towers deployed along the east lower slope (2-4°) of Granite Mountain near Salt Lake City in Utah, USA. The multi-level (up to seven) observations made during a 30-day long MATERHORN field campaign in September-October 2012 allowed the study of temporal and spatial structure of katabatic flows in detail, and herein we report turbulence statistics (e.g., fluxes, variances, spectra, and cospectra) and their variations in katabatic flow. Observed vertical profiles show steep gradients near the surface, but in the layer above the slope jet the vertical variability is smaller. It is found that the vertical (normal to the slope) momentum flux and horizontal (along-slope) heat flux in a slope-following coordinate system change their sign below and above the wind maximum of a katabatic flow. The momentum flux is directed downward (upward) whereas the along-slope heat flux is downslope (upslope) below (above) the wind maximum. This suggests that the position of the jet-speed maximum can be obtained by linear interpolation between positive and negative values of the momentum flux (or the along-slope heat flux) to derive the height where the flux becomes zero. It is shown that the standard deviations of all wind-speed components (and therefore of the turbulent kinetic energy) and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy have a local minimum, whereas the standard deviation of air temperature has an absolute maximum at the height of wind-speed maximum. We report several cases when the destructive effect of vertical heat flux is completely cancelled by the generation of turbulence due to the along-slope heat flux. Turbulence above the wind

  3. Optical Angular Momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-01-01

    For many years the Institute of Physics has published books on hot topics based on a collection of reprints from different journals, including some remarks by the editors of each volume. The book on Optical Angular Momentum, edited by L Allen, S M Barnett and M J Padgett, is a recent addition to the series. It reproduces forty four papers originally published in different journals and in a few cases it provides direct access to works not easily accessible to a web navigator. The collection covers nearly a hundred years of progress in physics, starting from an historic 1909 paper by Poynting, and ending with a 2002 paper by Padgett, Barnett and coworkers on the measurement of the orbital angular momentum of a single photon. The field of optical angular momentum has expanded greatly, creating an interdisciplinary attraction for researchers operating in quantum optics, atomic physics, solid state physics, biophysics and quantum information theory. The development of laser optics, especially the control of single mode sources, has made possible the specific design of optical radiation modes with a high degree of control on the light angular momentum. The editors of this book are important figures in the field of angular momentum, having contributed to key progress in the area. L Allen published an historical paper in 1999, he and M J Padgett (together with M Babiker) produced few years ago a long review article which is today still the most complete basic introduction to the angular momentum of light, while S M Barnett has contributed several high quality papers to the progress of this area of physics. The editors' choice provides an excellent overview to all readers, with papers classified into eight different topics, covering the basic principles of the light and spin and orbital angular momentum, the laboratory tools for creating laser beams carrying orbital angular momentum, the optical forces and torques created by laser beams carrying angular momentum on

  4. Momentum, March 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Momentum is the quarterly magazine of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech. In this issue: Lead-free piezoelectric material in development; Harnessing the energy of ocean waves; Meet the Hyperloop team; Maleshia Jones - Graduate student with focus.

  5. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  6. On the early stages of wind wave under non-stationary wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    Most efforts in the study of the generation and evolution of wind waves have been conducted under constant wind. The balance of the transfer of different properties has been studied mainly for situations where the wave has already reached the equilibrium with the constant wind conditions. The purpose of these experiments is to study the early stages of the generation of waves under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine a balance in the exchange at the air-water interface for non-equilibrium wind conditions. A total of 16 experiments with a characteristic acceleration and deceleration rate of wind speed were conducted in a large wind-wave facility of Institut Pythéas (Marseille-France). The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. The momentum fluxes were estimated from hot wire anemometry at station 7. Also, the free surface displacement was measured along the channel tank at 11 stations where resistance wires were installed, except at stations 1, 2, and 7 where capacitance wires were installed. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. During experiments the wind intensity was abruptly increased with a constant acceleration rate over time, reaching a constant maximum intensity of 13 m/s. This constant velocity remains some time until the intensity is again reduced suddenly. We observed that wind drag coefficient values are higher for the experiments that present the lower acceleration rate; some field data from previous studies is presented for reference (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2011; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). The empirical grow curves show that in the experiments with lower acceleration, the wave field is more developed, showing higher dimensional energy and lower dimensional peak frequency. In the evolution of the spectral wave energy, there is first high frequency energy saturation, followed by a downshift of

  7. Reconstruction of geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 yr – Part 4: Near-Earth solar wind speed, IMF, and open solar flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the concluding paper of this tetralogy, we here use the different geomagnetic activity indices to reconstruct the near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and solar wind flow speed, as well as the open solar flux (OSF from 1845 to the present day. The differences in how the various indices vary with near-Earth interplanetary parameters, which are here exploited to separate the effects of the IMF and solar wind speed, are shown to be statistically significant at the 93% level or above. Reconstructions are made using four combinations of different indices, compiled using different data and different algorithms, and the results are almost identical for all parameters. The correction to the aa index required is discussed by comparison with the Ap index from a more extensive network of mid-latitude stations. Data from the Helsinki magnetometer station is used to extend the aa index back to 1845 and the results confirmed by comparison with the nearby St Petersburg observatory. The optimum variations, using all available long-term geomagnetic indices, of the near-Earth IMF and solar wind speed, and of the open solar flux, are presented; all with ±2σ uncertainties computed using the Monte Carlo technique outlined in the earlier papers. The open solar flux variation derived is shown to be very similar indeed to that obtained using the method of Lockwood et al. (1999.

  8. Directional Absorption of Parameterized Mountain Waves and Its Influence on the Wave Momentum Transport in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Tang, Ying; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Ming

    2018-03-01

    The directional absorption of mountain waves in the Northern Hemisphere is assessed by examination of horizontal wind rotation using the 2.5° × 2.5° European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis between 2011 and 2016. In the deep layer of troposphere and stratosphere, the horizontal wind rotates by more than 120° all over the Northern Hemisphere primary mountainous areas, with the rotation mainly occurring in the troposphere (stratosphere) of lower (middle to high) latitudes. The rotation of tropospheric wind increases markedly in summer over the Tibetan Plateau and Iranian Plateau, due to the influence of Asian summer monsoonal circulation. The influence of directional absorption of mountain waves on the mountain wave momentum transport is also studied using a new parameterization scheme of orographic gravity wave drag (OGWD) which accounts for the effect of directional wind shear. Owing to the directional absorption, the wave momentum flux is attenuated by more than 50% in the troposphere of lower latitudes, producing considerable orographic gravity wave lift which is normal to the mean wind. Compared with the OGWD produced in traditional schemes assuming a unidirectional wind profile, the OGWD in the new scheme is suppressed in the lower stratosphere but enhanced in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. This is because the directional absorption of mountain waves in the troposphere reduces the wave amplitude in the stratosphere. Consequently, mountain waves are prone to break at higher altitudes, which favors the production of stronger OGWD given the decrease of air density with height.

  9. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  10. Spacecraft momentum control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leve, Frederick A; Peck, Mason A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this book is to serve both as a practical technical reference and a resource for gaining a fuller understanding of the state of the art of spacecraft momentum control systems, specifically looking at control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). As a result, the subject matter includes theory, technology, and systems engineering. The authors combine material on system-level architecture of spacecraft that feature momentum-control systems with material about the momentum-control hardware and software. This also encompasses material on the theoretical and algorithmic approaches to the control of space vehicles with CMGs. In essence, CMGs are the attitude-control actuators that make contemporary highly agile spacecraft possible. The rise of commercial Earth imaging, the advances in privately built spacecraft (including small satellites), and the growing popularity of the subject matter in academic circles over the past decade argues that now is the time for an in-depth treatment of the topic. CMGs are augmented ...

  11. Time Series Momentum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moskowitz, Tobias J.; Ooi, Yao Hua; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    We document significant “time series momentum” in equity index, currency, commodity, and bond futures for each of the 58 liquid instruments we consider. We find persistence in returns for one to 12 months that partially reverses over longer horizons, consistent with sentiment theories of initial...... under-reaction and delayed over-reaction. A diversified portfolio of time series momentum strategies across all asset classes delivers substantial abnormal returns with little exposure to standard asset pricing factors and performs best during extreme markets. Examining the trading activities...... of speculators and hedgers, we find that speculators profit from time series momentum at the expense of hedgers....

  12. Rotations and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyborg, P.; Froyland, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of rotational invariance and the properties of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. In particular, the problem of addition of angular momenta is treated in detail, and tables of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients are included

  13. Energy momentum complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashed, Gamal G.L. [Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Science. Mathematics Dept.

    2010-09-15

    We show that the definition of the energy-momentum complex given by Moeller using Weitzenboeck spacetime in the calculations of gravitational energy gives results which are different from those obtained from other definitions given in the framework of general relativity. (author)

  14. Momentum, Fall 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Momentum is the quarterly magazine of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech. In this issue: Nano engineering - Scaling up; Coating 3D objects quickly Energy Harvesting - from soldier's backpacks to nuclear monitoring Hyperloop - team readies pod, university to build test track.

  15. Momentum constraint relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Full relativistic simulations in three dimensions invariably develop runaway modes that grow exponentially and are accompanied by violations of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Recently, we introduced a numerical method (Hamiltonian relaxation) that greatly reduces the Hamiltonian constraint violation and helps improve the quality of the numerical model. We present here a method that controls the violation of the momentum constraint. The method is based on the addition of a longitudinal component to the traceless extrinsic curvature A ij -tilde, generated by a vector potential w i , as outlined by York. The components of w i are relaxed to solve approximately the momentum constraint equations, slowly pushing the evolution towards the space of solutions of the constraint equations. We test this method with simulations of binary neutron stars in circular orbits and show that it effectively controls the growth of the aforementioned violations. We also show that a full numerical enforcement of the constraints, as opposed to the gentle correction of the momentum relaxation scheme, results in the development of instabilities that stop the runs shortly

  16. Fission fragment angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenne, D. De

    1991-01-01

    Most of the energy released in fission is converted into translational kinetic energy of the fragments. The remaining excitation energy will be distributed among neutrons and gammas. An important parameter characterizing the scission configuration is the primary angular momentum of the nascent fragments. Neutron emission is not expected to decrease the spin of the fragments by more than one unit of angular momentum and is as such of less importance in the determination of the initial fragment spins. Gamma emission is a suitable tool in studying initial fragment spins because the emission time, number, energy, and multipolarity of the gammas strongly depend on the value of the primary angular momentum. The main conclusions of experiments on gamma emission were that the initial angular momentum of the fragments is large compared to the ground state spin and oriented perpendicular to the fission axis. Most of the recent information concerning initial fragment spin distributions comes from the measurement of isomeric ratios for isomeric pairs produced in fission. Although in nearly every mass chain isomers are known, only a small number are suitable for initial fission fragment spin studies. Yield and half-life considerations strongly limit the number of candidates. This has the advantage that the behavior of a specific isomeric pair can be investigated for a number of fissioning systems at different excitation energies of the fragments and fissioning nuclei. Because most of the recent information on primary angular momenta comes from measurements of isomeric ratios, the global deexcitation process of the fragments and the calculation of the initial fragment spin distribution from measured isomeric ratios are discussed here. The most important results on primary angular momentum determinations are reviewed and some theoretical approaches are given. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Estimations of atmospheric boundary layer fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Chen, Tzvi; Xu, Mei; Eberhard, Wynn L.

    1992-11-01

    Techniques for extraction of boundary layer parameters from measurements of a short pulse (≈0.4 μs) CO2 Doppler lidar (λ = 10.6 μm) are described. The lidar is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL). The measurements are those collected during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE). The recorded radial velocity measurements have a range resolution of 150 m. With a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz it is possible to perform scannings in two perpendicular vertical planes (x-z and y-z) in approximately 72 s. By continuously operating the lidar for about an hour, one can extract stable statistics of the radial velocities. Assuming that the turbulence is horizontally homogeneous, we have estimated the mean wind, its standard deviations, and the momentum fluxes. We have estimated the first, second, and, third moments of the vertical velocity from the vertically pointing beam. Spectral analysis of the radial velocities is also performed, from which (by examining the amplitude of the power spectrum at the inertial range) we have deduced the kinetic energy dissipation. Finally, using the statistical form of the Navier-Stokes equations, the surface heat flux is derived as the residual balance between the vertical gradient of the third moment of the vertical velocity and the kinetic energy dissipation. With the exception of the vertically pointing beam an individual radial velocity estimate is accurate only to ±0.7 m s-1. Combining many measurements would normally reduce the error, provided that it is unbiased and uncorrelated. The nature of some of the algorithms, however, is such that biased and correlated errors may be generated even though the "raw" measurements are not. We have developed data processing procedures that eliminate bias and minimize error correlation. Once bias and error correlations are accounted for, the large sample size is

  18. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Large transverse momentum phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1977-09-01

    It is pointed out that it is particularly significant that the quantum numbers of the leading particles are strongly correlated with the quantum numbers of the incident hadrons indicating that the valence quarks themselves are transferred to large p/sub t/. The crucial question is how they get there. Various hadron reactions are discussed covering the structure of exclusive reactions, inclusive reactions, normalization of inclusive cross sections, charge correlations, and jet production at large transverse momentum. 46 references

  20. Angular momentum projected semiclassics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.

    1986-10-01

    By using angular momentum projected plane waves as wave functions, we derive semiclassical expressions for the single-particle propagator, the partition function, the nonlocal density matrix, the single-particle density and the one particle- one hole level density for fixed angular momentum and fixed z-component or summed over the z-components. Other quantities can be deduced from the propagator. In coordinate space (r, r') the relevant quantities depend on vertical stroker - r 3 vertical stroke instead of vertical stroker - r'vertical stroke and in Wigner space (R, P) they become proportional to the angular momentum constraints δ(vertical strokeRxPvertical stroke/ℎ - l) and δ((RxP) z /ℎ - m). As applications we calculate the single-particle and one particle- one hole level densities for harmonic oscillator and Hill-Wheeler box potentials and the imaginary part of the optical potential and its volume integral with an underlying harmonic oscillator potential and a zero range two-body interaction. (orig.)

  1. Heat and momentum transport in sheared Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Ruby; Zhu, Yi

    This is a report on laboratory measurements of heat and momentum flux in sheared Rayleigh-Benard convection. A cylindrical annulus of water uniformly heated below and cooled above was subjected to an imposed shear by driving the bottom boundary so that it rotated steadily around the vertical axis of symmetry. The top boundary was stationary and formed part of a torsion balance. It was suspended from the laboratory ceiling by a long torsion wire. The torque exerted upon the top boundary by the fluid was measured by the twist of the torsion wire. From this angle of twist, the vertical flux of horizontal momentum was determined. The heat flux as well as the momentum flux were measured at each fixed value of Rayleigh number Ra and Reynolds number Re. The measurements were made in the range 6 × 10 6 ≤ Ra ≤ 6 × 10 7 and 38 ≤ Re ≤ 352. One of the most striling results is that at Ra near 3 × 10 7 to 5 × 10 7 depending upon Re, the dimensionless momentum flux Mo ceases its increasing trend and begins to decrease with increasing Ra. This may be described by saying that the effective viscosity decreases with further increasing of Ra. However, Mo always remained greater than unity in the range investigated.

  2. Probability distribution of surface wind speed induced by convective adjustment on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    The influence of convective adjustment on the spatial structure of Venusian surface wind and probability distribution of its wind speed is investigated using an idealized weather research and forecasting model. When the initially uniform wind is much weaker than the convective wind, patches of both prograde and retrograde winds with scales of a few kilometers are formed during active convective adjustment. After the active convective adjustment, because the small-scale convective cells and their related vertical momentum fluxes dissipate quickly, the large-scale (>4 km) prograde and retrograde wind patches remain on the surface and in the longitude-height cross-section. This suggests the coexistence of local prograde and retrograde flows, which may correspond to those observed by Pioneer Venus below 10 km altitude. The probability distributions of surface wind speed V during the convective adjustment have a similar form in different simulations, with a sharp peak around ∼0.1 m s-1 and a bulge developing on the flank of the probability distribution. This flank bulge is associated with the most active convection, which has a probability distribution with a peak at the wind speed 1.5-times greater than the Weibull fitting parameter c during the convective adjustment. The Weibull distribution P(> V) (= exp[-(V/c)k]) with best-estimate coefficients of Lorenz (2016) is reproduced during convective adjustments induced by a potential energy of ∼7 × 107 J m-2, which is calculated from the difference in total potential energy between initially unstable and neutral states. The maximum vertical convective heat flux magnitude is proportional to the potential energy of the convective adjustment in the experiments with the initial unstable-layer thickness altered. The present work suggests that convective adjustment is a promising process for producing the wind structure with occasionally generating surface winds of ∼1 m s-1 and retrograde wind patches.

  3. The physics of galactic winds driven by active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) drive fast winds in the interstellar medium of their host galaxies. It is commonly assumed that the high ambient densities and intense radiation fields in galactic nuclei imply short cooling times, thus making the outflows momentum conserving. We show that cooling of high-velocity shocked winds in AGN is in fact inefficient in a wide range of circumstances, including conditions relevant to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), resulting in energy-conserving outflows. We further show that fast energy-conserving outflows can tolerate a large amount of mixing with cooler gas before radiative losses become important. For winds with initial velocity vin ≳ 10 000 km s-1, as observed in ultraviolet and X-ray absorption, the shocked wind develops a two-temperature structure. While most of the thermal pressure support is provided by the protons, the cooling processes operate directly only on the electrons. This significantly slows down inverse Compton cooling, while free-free cooling is negligible. Slower winds with vin ˜ 1000 km s-1, such as may be driven by radiation pressure on dust, can also experience energy-conserving phases but under more restrictive conditions. During the energy-conserving phase, the momentum flux of an outflow is boosted by a factor ˜vin/2vs by work done by the hot post-shock gas, where vs is the velocity of the swept-up material. Energy-conserving outflows driven by fast AGN winds (vin ˜ 0.1c) may therefore explain the momentum fluxes Ṗ≫LAGN/c of galaxy-scale outflows recently measured in luminous quasars and ULIRGs. Shocked wind bubbles expanding normal to galactic discs may also explain the large-scale bipolar structures observed in some systems, including around the Galactic Centre, and can produce significant radio, X-ray and γ-ray emission. The analytic solutions presented here will inform implementations of AGN feedback in numerical simulations, which typically do not include all the important

  4. Improved fixed point iterative method for blade element momentum computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhenye; Shen, Wen Zhong; Chen, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The blade element momentum (BEM) theory is widely used in aerodynamic performance calculations and optimization applications for wind turbines. The fixed point iterative method is the most commonly utilized technique to solve the BEM equations. However, this method sometimes does not converge...

  5. Colliding Stellar Wind Models with Orbital Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Francis P.; O'Connor, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    We present thin-shell models for the collision between two ballistic stellar winds, including orbital motion.The stellar orbits are assumed circular, so that steady-state solutions exist in the rotating frame, where we include centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Exact solutions for the pre-shock winds are incorporated. Here we discuss 2-D model results for equal wind momentum-loss rates, although we allow for the winds to have distinct speeds and mass loss rates. For these unequal wind conditions, we obtain a clear violation of skew-symmetry, despite equal momentum loss rates, due to the Coriolis force.

  6. A BROADBAND EMISSION MODEL OF MAGNETAR WIND NEBULAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shuta J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan)

    2016-08-20

    Angular momentum loss by the plasma wind is considered as a universal feature of isolated neutron stars including magnetars. The wind nebulae that are powered by magnetars allow us to compare the wind properties and the spin evolution of magnetars with those of rotation-powered pulsars (RPPs). In this paper, we construct a broadband emission model of magnetar wind nebulae (MWNe). This model is similar to past studies of young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) around RPPs, but is modified for the application to MWNe that have far less observational information than the young PWNe. We apply the model to the MWN around the youngest (∼1 kyr) magnetar, 1E 1547.0-5408, which has the largest spin-down power L {sub spin} among all the magnetars. However, the MWN is faint because of the low L {sub spin} of 1E 1547.0-5408 when compared to the young RPPs. Since most parameters are not well constrained by only an X-ray flux upper limit of the MWN, we adopt the model’s parameters from the young PWN Kes 75 around PSR J1846-0258, which is a peculiar RPP showing magnetar-like behaviors. The model predicts that γ -ray flux will be detected in a future TeV γ -ray observation by CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array). The MWN spectrum does not allow us to test the hypothesis that 1E 1547.0-5408 had a period of milliseconds at its birth because the particles injected during the early phase of evolution suffered from severe adiabatic and synchrotron losses. Furthermore, both observational and theoretical studies of the wind nebulae around magnetars are required to constrain the wind and the spin-down properties of magnetars.

  7. Komar fluxes of circularly polarized light beams and cylindrical metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Bičák, J.

    2017-11-01

    The mass per unit length of a cylindrical system can be found from its external metric as can its angular momentum. Can the fluxes of energy, momentum, and angular momentum along the cylinder also be so found? We derive the metric of a beam of circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation from the Einstein-Maxwell equations. We show how the uniform plane wave solutions miss the angular momentum carried by the wave. We study the energy, momentum, angular momentum, and their fluxes along the cylinder both for this beam and in general. The three Killing vectors of any stationary cylindrical system give three Komar flux vectors which in turn give six conserved fluxes. We elucidate Komar's mysterious factor 2 by evaluating Komar integrals for systems that have no trace to their stress tensors. The Tolman-Komar formula gives twice the energy for such systems which also have twice the gravity. For other cylindrical systems their formula gives correct results.

  8. An Improved Local Gradient Method for Sea Surface Wind Direction Retrieval from SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhang Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea surface wind affects the fluxes of energy, mass and momentum between the atmosphere and ocean, and therefore regional and global weather and climate. With various satellite microwave sensors, sea surface wind can be measured with large spatial coverage in almost all-weather conditions, day or night. Like any other remote sensing measurements, sea surface wind measurement is also indirect. Therefore, it is important to develop appropriate wind speed and direction retrieval models for different types of microwave instruments. In this paper, a new sea surface wind direction retrieval method from synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery is developed. In the method, local gradients are computed in frequency domain by combining the operation of smoothing and computing local gradients in one step to simplify the process and avoid the difference approximation. This improved local gradients (ILG method is compared with the traditional two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT method and local gradients (LG method, using interpolating wind directions from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF reanalysis data and the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP wind vector product. The sensitivities to the salt-and-pepper noise, the additive noise and the multiplicative noise are analyzed. The ILG method shows a better performance of retrieval wind directions than the other two methods.

  9. Wind Statistics from a Forested Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnqvist, Johan; Segalini, Antonio; Dellwik, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    An analysis and interpretation of measurements from a 138-m tall tower located in a forested landscape is presented. Measurement errors and statistical uncertainties are carefully evaluated to ensure high data quality. A 40(Formula presented.) wide wind-direction sector is selected as the most...... representative for large-scale forest conditions, and from that sector first-, second- and third-order statistics, as well as analyses regarding the characteristic length scale, the flux-profile relationship and surface roughness are presented for a wide range of stability conditions. The results are discussed...... characteristics are however not detected in the presented analysis. Dimensionless gradients are shown to follow theoretical curves up to 100 m in stable conditions despite surface-layer approximations being invalid. This is attributed to a balance of momentum decay and reduced shear length scale growth...

  10. Angular Momentum in Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönnenwein, F.; Bunakov, V.; Dorvaux, O.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Hanappe, F.; Kadmensky, S.; von Kalben, J.; Khlebnikov, S.; Kinnard, V.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Petrov, G.; Prokhorova, E.; Rubchenya, V.; Sillanpää, M.; Simpson, G.; Sokolov, V.; Soldner, T.; Stuttgé, L.; Tiourine, G.; Trzaska, W.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Wagemans, C.; Wollersheim, H.-J.; Zavarukhina, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-04-01

    Three novel experiments in spontaneous and thermal neutron induced fission all with a bearing on angular momentum in fission are reviewed. In the first experiment it was observed that, in the reaction 235U(n, f) with incident polarized cold neutrons, the nucleus undergoing scission is rotating. This was inferred from the shift in angular distributions of ternary particles being dependent on the orientation of neutron spin. In the second study the properties of the angular momentum of spherical fission fragments was investigated. Current theories trace the spin of fragments to their deformations allowing for collective rotational vibrations at scission. However, in particular the spherical 132Te isotope exhibits a large spin at variance with theory. Exploiting the specific properties of cold deformed fission it could be proven that, for 132Te, single particle excitations instead of collective modes are responsible for the large spin observed. In a third project a pilot study was exploring the possibility to search for an evaporation of neutrons from fragments being anisotropic in their own cm-system. Due to fragment spin this anisotropy is claimed since decades to exist. It was so far never observed. A scheme has been devised and tested were triple coincidences between a fragment and two neutrons are evaluated in a way to bring the cm-anisotropy into the foreground while getting rid of the kinematical anisotropy in the lab-system due to evaporation from moving fragments. The test was run for spontaneous fission of 252Cf.

  11. Mass entrainment rate of an ideal momentum turbulent round jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medrano, Fermın Franco; Fukumoto, Yasuhide; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    be approximated by a mixture of two fluids with their phases in dynamic equilibrium. To derive the model, we impose conservation of the initial volume and total momentum fluxes. Our model equations admit analytical solutions for the composite density and velocity of the two-phase fluid, both as functions...

  12. Radial transport of poloidal momentum in ASDEX Upgrade in L-mode and H-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Mehlmann, F.; Naulin, Volker

    2012-01-01

    A reciprocating probe was used for localized measurements of the radial transport of poloidal momentum in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). The probe measured poloidal and radial electric field components and density. We concentrate on three components of the momentum transport......: Reynolds stress, convective momentum flux and triple product of the fluctuating components of density, radial and poloidal electric field. For the evaluation we draw mainly on the probability density functions (PDFs)....

  13. An Integrated Approach To Offshore Wind Energy Assessment: Great Lakes 3D Wind Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelmie, R. J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering; Pryor, S. C. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    2017-09-18

    This grant supported fundamental research into the characterization of flow parameters of relevance to the wind energy industry focused on offshore and the coastal zone. A major focus of the project was application of the latest generation of remote sensing instrumentation and also integration of measurements and numerical modeling to optimize characterization of time-evolving atmospheric flow parameters in 3-D. Our research developed a new data-constrained Wind Atlas for the Great Lakes, and developed new insights into flow parameters in heterogeneous environments. Four experiments were conducted during the project: At a large operating onshore wind farm in May 2012; At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Wind Technology Center (NREL NWTC) during February 2013; At the shoreline of Lake Erie in May 2013; and At the Wind Energy Institute of Canada on Prince Edward Island in May 2015. The experiment we conducted in the coastal zone of Lake Erie indicated very complex flow fields and the frequent presence of upward momentum fluxes and resulting distortion of the wind speed profile at turbine relevant heights due to swells in the Great Lakes. Additionally, our data (and modeling) indicate the frequent presence of low level jets at 600 m height over the Lake and occasions when the wind speed profile across the rotor plane may be impacted by this phenomenon. Experimental data and modeling of the fourth experiment on Prince Edward Island showed that at 10-14 m escarpment adjacent to long-overseas fetch the zone of wind speed decrease before the terrain feature and the increase at (and slightly downwind of) the escarpment is ~3–5% at turbine hub-heights. Additionally, our measurements were used to improve methods to compute the uncertainty in lidar-derived flow properties and to optimize lidar-scanning strategies. For example, on the basis of the experimental data we collected plus those from one of our research partners we advanced a new methodology to

  14. Force As A Momentum Current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-01-01

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  15. Gravity Wave Dynamics in a Mesospheric Inversion Layer: 2. Instabilities, Turbulence, Fluxes, and Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ling; Laughman, Brian; Lund, Thomas S.; Collins, Richard L.

    2018-01-01

    A companion paper by Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) employed an anelastic numerical model to explore the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) encountering a mesospheric inversion layer (MIL) having a moderate static stability enhancement and a layer of weaker static stability above. That study revealed that MIL responses, including GW transmission, reflection, and instabilities, are sensitive functions of GW parameters. This paper expands on two of the Fritts, Laughman, et al. (2017) simulations to examine GW instability dynamics and turbulence in the MIL; forcing of the mean wind and stability environments by GW, instability, and turbulence fluxes; and associated heat and momentum transports. These direct numerical simulations resolve turbulence inertial-range scales and yield the following results: GW breaking and turbulence in the MIL occur below where they would otherwise, due to enhancements of GW amplitudes and shears in the MIL. 2-D GW and instability heat and momentum fluxes are 20-30 times larger than 3-D instability and turbulence fluxes. Mean fields are driven largely by 2-D GW and instability dynamics rather than 3-D instabilities and turbulence. 2-D and 3-D heat fluxes in regions of strong turbulence yield small departures from initial T(z) and N2(z) profiles, hence do not yield nearly adiabatic "mixed" layers. Our MIL results are consistent with the relation between the turbulent vertical velocity variance and energy dissipation rate proposed by Weinstock (1981) for the limited intervals evaluated.

  16. 1D equation for toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhansky, V A; Senichenkov, I Yu

    2010-01-01

    A 1D equation for toroidal momentum transport is derived for a given set of turbulent transport coefficients. The averaging is performed taking account of the poloidal variation of the toroidal fluxes and is based on the ambipolar condition of the zero net radial current through the flux surface. It is demonstrated that taking account of the Pfirsch-Schlueter fluxes leads to a torque in the toroidal direction which is proportional to the gradient of the ion temperature. This effect is new and has not been discussed before. The boundary condition at the separatrix, which is based on the results of the 2D simulations of the edge plasma, is formulated.

  17. Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its second edition, it has been entirely updated and substantially extended to reflect advances in technology, research into rotor aerodynamics and the structural...... response of the wind turbine structure. Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element...... Momentum method is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behavior of a turbine. The new material includes a description of the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modeled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Further...

  18. Eddy dynamics over continental slopes under retrograde winds: Insights from a model inter-comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Stewart, Andrew L.

    2018-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous in the ocean and play a key role in exchanges across continental slopes. In this study the properties of wind-driven baroclinic turbulence are investigated using eddy-resolving process simulations, focusing on the case of retrograde winds that arises around the margins of the subtropical gyres. In contrast to a flat-bottomed ocean, over steep slopes eddies develop from baroclinic instabilities are confined to the top few hundred meters. Deeper in the water column baroclinic instability and vertical momentum transfer are suppressed, so wind-input momentum is exported toward the open ocean by eddies before traversing down to the ocean bed. Close to the sloping topography, eddy energy sourced from the upper ocean is converted to potential energy, steepening isopycnals and driving bottom-trapped prograde flows. This process is associated with upgradient lateral buoyancy fluxes and downgradient isopycnal potential vorticity fluxes, and cannot be reproduced via linear stability calculations. These properties of wind-driven shelf/slope turbulence are contrasted against simulations with flat bathymetry. The key differences described above hinge on the flow close to the steep topographic slope, which may be sensitive to the model's vertical coordinate system. The simulations are therefore replicated using models that employ geopotential coordinates, terrain-following coordinates, and isopycnal coordinates. Quantitative inter-model discrepancies in the momentum and energy budgets are much more pronounced in the presence of a steep bottom slope. However, the key findings of this study are consistent across the models, suggesting that they are robust and warrant incorporation into parameterizations of eddy transfer across continental slopes.

  19. Momentum and particle transport in a nonhomogenous canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Andrew W.

    Turbulent particle transport through the air plays an important role in the life cycle of many plant pathogens. In this study, data from a field experiment was analyzed to explore momentum and particle transport within a grape vineyard. The overall goal of these experiments was to understand how the architecture of a sparse agricultural canopy interacts with turbulent flow and ultimately determines the dispersion of airborne fungal plant pathogens. Turbulence in the vineyard canopy was measured using an array of four sonic anemometers deployed at heights z/H 0.4, 0.9, 1.45, and 1.95 where z is the height of the each sonic and H is the canopy height. In addition to turbulence measurements from the sonic anemometers, particle dispersion was measured using inert particles with the approximate size and density of powdery mildew spores and a roto-rod impaction trap array. Measurements from the sonic anemometers demonstrate that first and second order statistics of the wind field are dependent on wind direction orientation with respect to vineyard row direction. This dependence is a result of wind channeling which transfers energy between the velocity components when the wind direction is not aligned with the rows. Although the winds have a strong directional dependence, spectra analysis indicates that the structure of the turbulent flow is not fundamentally altered by the interaction between wind direction and row direction. Examination of a limited number of particle release events indicates that the wind turning and channeling observed in the momentum field impacts particle dispersion. For row-aligned flow, particle dispersion in the direction normal to the flow is decreased relative to the plume spread predicted by a standard Gaussian plume model. For flow that is not aligned with the row direction, the plume is found to rotate in the same manner as the momentum field.

  20. Weakest solar wind of the space age and the current 'MINI' solar maximum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D. J.; Angold, N.; Elliott, H. A.; Livadiotis, G.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.; Skoug, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    The last solar minimum, which extended into 2009, was especially deep and prolonged. Since then, sunspot activity has gone through a very small peak while the heliospheric current sheet achieved large tilt angles similar to prior solar maxima. The solar wind fluid properties and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have declined through the prolonged solar minimum and continued to be low through the current mini solar maximum. Compared to values typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s, the following proton parameters are lower on average from 2009 through day 79 of 2013: solar wind speed and beta (∼11%), temperature (∼40%), thermal pressure (∼55%), mass flux (∼34%), momentum flux or dynamic pressure (∼41%), energy flux (∼48%), IMF magnitude (∼31%), and radial component of the IMF (∼38%). These results have important implications for the solar wind's interaction with planetary magnetospheres and the heliosphere's interaction with the local interstellar medium, with the proton dynamic pressure remaining near the lowest values observed in the space age: ∼1.4 nPa, compared to ∼2.4 nPa typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. The combination of lower magnetic flux emergence from the Sun (carried out in the solar wind as the IMF) and associated low power in the solar wind points to the causal relationship between them. Our results indicate that the low solar wind output is driven by an internal trend in the Sun that is longer than the ∼11 yr solar cycle, and they suggest that this current weak solar maximum is driven by the same trend.

  1. Actuator disk model of wind farms based on the rotor average wind speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xing Xing; Xu, Chang; Liu, De You

    2016-01-01

    Due to difficulty of estimating the reference wind speed for wake modeling in wind farm, this paper proposes a new method to calculate the momentum source based on the rotor average wind speed. The proposed model applies volume correction factor to reduce the influence of the mesh recognition...

  2. Decrease of the solar flare/solar wind flux ratio in the past several aeons from solar neon and tracks in lunar soil plagioclases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieler, R.; Etique, Ph.; Signer, P.; Poupeau, G.

    1982-08-01

    The He, Ne, and Ar concentrations and isotopic compositions of mineral separates of six lunar subsurface samples and of two regolith breccias which were exposed to the sun as early as 2 - 3 billion years ago are determined. The results are compared with our noble gas data obtained previously on mineral separates of lunar surface soil samples most of which contain recently implanted solar gases. The mean solar flare track densities were determined on aliquots of several of the plagioclase separates analyzed for noble gases. Solar wind retentive mafic minerals and ilmenites show that a possible secular increase of the 20 Ne/ 22 Ne ratio in the solar wind during the last 2 - 3 Ga. is 20 Ne/ 22 Ne of approximately 11.3 - 11.8, reported for solar flare Ne retained in plagioclase separates from lunar soils. The solar flare track data and the Ne data independently show that plagioclases exposed to the sun over the last 10 8 years recorded a lower mean ratio of solar flare to solar wind intensities than samples exposed about 1 - 3 billion years ago. On the basis of track data these ratios are estimated to differ by a factor approximately 2. (Author) [pt

  3. The intOA Experiment: A Study of Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions Under Moderate to Strong Offshore Winds and Opposing Swell Conditions in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Torres, F. J.; García-Nava, H.; Durazo, R.; Osuna, P.; Díaz Méndez, G. M.; Graber, H. C.

    2011-03-01

    The Gulf of Tehuantepec air-sea interaction experiment ( intOA) took place from February to April 2005, under the Programme for the Study of the Gulf of Tehuantepec (PEGoT, Spanish acronym for Programa para el Estudio del Golfo de Tehuantepec). PEGoT is underway aiming for better knowledge of the effect of strong and persistent offshore winds on coastal waters and their natural resources, as well as performing advanced numerical modelling of the wave and surface current fields. One of the goals of the intOA experiment is to improve our knowledge on air-sea interaction processes with particular emphasis on the effect of surface waves on the momentum flux for the characteristic and unique conditions that occur when strong Tehuano winds blow offshore against the Pacific Ocean long period swell. For the field campaign, an air-sea interaction spar (ASIS) buoy was deployed in the Gulf of Tehuantepec to measure surface waves and the momentum flux between the ocean and the atmosphere. High frequency radar systems (phase array type) were in operation from two coastal sites and three acoustic Doppler current profilers were deployed near-shore. Synthetic aperture radar images were also acquired as part of the remote sensing component of the experiment. The present paper provides the main results on the wave and wind fields, addressing the direct calculation of the momentum flux and the drag coefficient, and gives an overview of the intOA experiment. Although the effect of swell has been described in recent studies, this is the first time for the very specific conditions encountered, such as swell persistently opposing offshore winds and locally generated waves, to show a clear evidence of the influence on the wind stress of the significant steepness of swell waves.

  4. Accelerating momentum for change!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, S; Panetta, J

    1995-05-01

    As we develop strategies to compete globally, we are challenged with integrating our resources to execute these strategies effectively. Many companies are in the midst of dramatic shifts in corporate cultures, giving more responsibility to employees while raising expectations for their performance. The extent of these changes is far reaching and brings significant challenges to both employees and corporations. This article is a continuation of the evolution (over five years) of a corrective action/continuous improvement process implemented at Exide Electronics. It discusses organizational structures, including steering committees, corrective action teams, task teams, and work cells. Specific expectations, goals, and results of the teams are presented, along with ground rules for functioning within the organization. After structuring the organization and coordinating the resources effectively, the next challenge is accelerating momentum for change. The presentation also discusses the evolutionary process required to make a culture focused on change, including ongoing communication and feedback, constant evaluation and direction of the process, and measuring and paying for performance.

  5. On the Angular Momentum Loss of Tropical Cyclones: An f-Plane Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin; Kim, Won-Ho

    2018-02-01

    The angular momentum for ideal axisymmetric tropical cyclones on the f-plane is investigated with a focus on the total-volume integrated quantity. Budget analysis of the momentum equation at cylindrical coordinates shows that a tropical cyclone loses angular momentum during its development and mature stages due to the dynamical difference between the viscous inward-flow near the surface and the angular momentum conserving outward-flow aloft. The total relative angular momentum of a tropical cyclone, as a result, can be negative (i.e., implying anticyclonic rotation as a whole) despite intense cyclonic wind in the tropospheric layers. This anticyclonic rotation was measured in terms of the super-rotation ratio, the ratio of total relative angular momentum to the planetary angular momentum. Simulations with the numerical model of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) version 3.4.1 was found to be in favor of the theoretical angular-momentum budget analysis. It was revealed in the numerical simulations that the super-rotation ratio was negative, indicating a sub-rotation, as was predicted by analysis. The sub-rotation ratio was found to be less than one percent for typical tropical cyclones. To show the angular momentum decrease even in the decaying stage, numerical simulations where the thermal forcing by sea surface temperature switched off in the mature stage were carried out. In support of the angular momentum budget analysis, the results indicated that the angular momentum also decreases for a while soon after the forcing was eliminated.

  6. On the angular momentum loss of tropical cyclones: An f-plane approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-12-01

    The angular momentum for ideal axisymmetric tropical cyclones on the f-plane is investigated with a focus on the total-volume integrated quantity. Budget analysis of the momentum equation at cylindrical coordinates shows that a tropical cyclone loses angular momentum during its development and mature stages due to the dynamical difference between the viscous inward-flow near the surface and the angular momentum conserving outward-flow aloft. The total relative angular momentum of a tropical cyclone, as a result, can be negative (i.e., implying anticyclonic rotation as a whole) despite intense cyclonic wind in the tropospheric layers. This anticyclonic rotation was measured in terms of the super-rotation ratio, the ratio of total relative angular momentum to the planetary angular momentum. Simulations with the numerical model of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) version 3.4.1 was found to be in favor of the theoretical angular-momentum budget analysis. It was revealed in the numerical simulations that the super-rotation ratio was negative, indicating a sub-rotation, as was predicted by analysis. The sub-rotation ratio was found to be less than one percent for typical tropical cyclones. To show the angular momentum decrease even in the decaying stage, numerical simulations where the thermal forcing by sea surface temperature switched off in the mature stage were carried out. In support of the angular momentum budget analysis, the results indicated that the angular momentum also decreases for a while soon after the forcing was eliminated.

  7. The OSMOSIS Model of the Wind-Driven Ocean Surface Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A. L.; Belcher, S. E.; Pearson, B.; Polton, J.

    2016-02-01

    In the wind-driven ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) the vertical velocity variance is observed to be larger than in shear driven turbulence. The observed variances are consistent with the results from large-eddy simulations (LES) which parametrize the interaction between the Stokes drift of the surface waves and vorticity. The resulting flow is known as Langmuir turbulence and the close connection between winds and waves suggests that Langmuir turbulence is common in the OSBL. This poster describes a model of the OSBL, developed as part of the OSMOSIS project, in which mixing is by Langmuir turbulence. The transports of momentum, heat and salinity are represented by a first-order closure scheme with flux-gradient relationships that include non-gradient contributions. In this the model is similar to the KPP scheme which uses flux-gradient relationships with non-gradient contributions to represent scalar transports. The flux-gradient relationships are derived from an analysis of the turbulent flux budgets of momentum and scalars (heat) obtained from LES. The non-gradient terms represent the contributions to the turbulent flux by the terms in the turbulent flux budget that represent the effects of the Stokes shear, buoyancy and turbulent transport. The eddy viscosity, diffusivities and non-gradient components are represented by similarity profiles. The depth of the boundary layer is determined by a prognostic equation, which represents the time variation of the boundary layer depth in both unstable and stable conditions. It is based on the equation for the depth integrated potential energy combined with a parametrization of the turbulent kinetic energy budget. The use of the prognostic equation allows the effects of Langmuir turbulence on boundary layer depth to be explicitly represented in the model. Comparison with the results from LES of the diurnal cycle of the OSBL are presented as a test for the model.

  8. Modelling the turbulent transport of angular momentum in tokamak plasmas - A quasi-linear gyrokinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottier, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic confinement in tokamaks is for now the most advanced way towards energy production by nuclear fusion. Both theoretical and experimental studies showed that rotation generation can increase its performance by reducing the turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas. The rotation influence on the heat and particle fluxes is studied along with the angular momentum transport with the quasi-linear gyro-kinetic eigenvalue code QuaLiKiz. For this purpose, the QuaLiKiz code is modified in order to take the plasma rotation into account and compute the angular momentum flux. It is shown that QuaLiKiz framework is able to correctly predict the angular momentum flux including the E*B shear induced residual stress as well as the influence of rotation on the heat and particle fluxes. The major approximations of QuaLiKiz formalisms are reviewed, in particular the ballooning representation at its lowest order and the eigenfunctions calculated in the hydrodynamic limit. The construction of the quasi-linear fluxes is also reviewed in details and the quasi-linear angular momentum flux is derived. The different contributions to the turbulent momentum flux are studied and successfully compared both against non-linear gyro-kinetic simulations and experimental data. (author) [fr

  9. DESIGN ASPECTS OF A RESIDENTIAL WIND GENERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. BRAD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some aspects about the design of a small permanent magnet wind generator with axial magnetic flux often used in residential wind turbine. There are summarised the main steps of the magnetic and electric calculations with applications to a particular case: 0.6 kVA wind generator. The axial flux wind generator design starts with the characteristics of the rare earths permanent magnet existing on the market.

  10. Wall Correction Model for Wind Tunnels with Open Test Section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2004-01-01

    In th paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, that is based on a onedimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. Generally......, the corrections from the model are in very good agreement with the CFD computaions, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections. Keywords: Wind tunnel correction, momentum theory...

  11. Enhanced winds and tidal streams in massive X-ray binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondin, J.M.; Stevens, I.R.; Kallman, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    The tidal effects created by the presence of a compact companion are expected to induce a stream of enhanced wind from the early-type primary star in massive X-ray binary systems. In this paper, two-dimensional gasdynamical simulations of such streams are presented. It is found that the wind enhancement is a sensitive function of the binary separation, and develops into a tidal stream as the primary approaches its critical surface. For typical system parameters, the Coriolis force deflects the stream sufficiently that it does not impact directly on the compact companion but passes behind it. The density in the stream can reach values of 20-30 times the ambient wind density, leading to strong attenuation of the X-ray flux that passes through the tidal stream, providing a possible explanation of the enhanced absorption events seen at later phases in the X-ray observations of massive X-ray binary systems such as Vela X-1. In contrast to the time-variable accretion wake, the tidal stream is relatively stationary, producing absorption features that should remain fixed from orbit to orbit. For systems with a strong tidal stream, the large asymmetry in the accreting wind results in the accretion of angular momentum of constant sign, as opposed to systems without streams, where the sign of the accreted angular momentum can change. 39 refs

  12. Inside anti-wind groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rap, C.

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning the opposition to wind turbines was based on the preservation of the landscape. Now as wind farms are more frequent, the reasons to fight them become more concrete: -) the loss of value of properties due to the installation of a wind turbine in the surroundings, -) the noise and the view, or -) the impact on the fauna. More and more people question the choice of wind power as an efficient and reliable source of energy. In France about a few tens of thousand people are registered in associations of opponents to wind energy. These associations have merged into 2 main federations: 'Vent de colere' and 'Federation Environement Durable'. In october 2008 Apaw, a European platform against wind energy, was founded. Apaw gathers 400 federations from 21 European countries. Wind energy opponents are getting momentum, they are becoming experts on how to communicate, how to organize demonstrations, how to take legal actions and on active lobbying. (A.C.)

  13. Using albedo to reform wind erosion modelling, mapping and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are used to assess the impacts of dust on radiative forcing in the atmosphere, cloud formation, nutrient fertilisation and human health. The models are underpinned by a two-dimensional geometric property (lateral cover; L) used to characterise the three-dimensional aerodynamic roughness (sheltered area or wakes) of the Earth's surface and calibrate the momentum it extracts from the wind. We reveal a fundamental weakness in L and demonstrate that values are an order of magnitude too small and significant aerodynamic interactions between roughness elements and their sheltered areas have been omitted, particularly under sparse surface roughness. We describe a solution which develops published work to establish a relation between sheltered area and the proportion of shadow over a given area; the inverse of direct beam directional hemispherical reflectance (black sky albedo; BSA). We show direct relations between shadow and wind tunnel measurements and thereby provide direct calibrations of key aerodynamic properties. Estimation of the aerodynamic parameters from albedo enables wind erosion assessments over areas, across platforms from the field to airborne and readily available satellite data. Our new approach demonstrated redundancy in existing wind erosion models and thereby reduced model complexity and improved fidelity. We found that the use of albedo enabled an adequate description of aerodynamic sheltering to characterise fluid dynamics and predict sediment transport without the use of a drag partition scheme (Rt) or threshold friction velocity (u∗t). We applied the calibrations to produce global maps of aerodynamic properties which showed very similar spatial patterns to each other and confirmed the redundancy in the traditional parameters of wind erosion modelling. We evaluated temporal patterns of predicted horizontal mass flux at locations across Australia which revealed variation between land cover types that would not

  14. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design...... a classical pitch and torque regulator to control rotational speed and power, while the section on structural dynamics has been extended with a simplified mechanical system explaining the phenomena of forward and backward whirling modes. Readers will also benefit from a new chapter on Vertical Axis Wind...... Turbines (VAWT). Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum method...

  15. Aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its third edition, it has been substantially updated with respect to structural dynamics and control. The new control chapter now includes details on how to design...... Turbines (VAWT). Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element Momentum method...... is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behaviour of a turbine. The book describes the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modelled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Furthermore, it examines how to calculate...

  16. Lidar Orbital Angular Momentum Sensor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recognition in recent decades that electromagnetic fields have angular momentum (AM) in the form of not only polarization (or spin AM) but also orbital (OAM) has...

  17. Angular momentum from tidal torques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Efstathiou, G.; Cambridge Univ., England)

    1987-01-01

    The origin of the angular momentum of bound objects in large N-body simulations is studied using three sets of models. One model with white-noise initial conditions is analyzed as well as two in which the initial conditions have more power on large scales, as predicted in models with cold dark matter. The growth and distribution of angular momentum in individual objects is studied and it is found that the specific angular momentum distribution of bound clumps increases in a near linear fashion with radius while the orientation of the angular momentum in the inner high-density regions is often poorly correlated with that of the outer parts. It is also found that the dimensionless spin parameter is insensitive to the initial perturbation spectrum and has a median value of about 0.05. 61 references

  18. Determining the power-law wind-profile exponent under near-neutral stability conditions at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. A.; Meindl, Eric A.; Gilhousen, David B.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of 30 samples from near-simultaneous overwater measurements by pairs of anemometers located at different heights in the Gulf of Mexico and off the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, the mean and standard deviation for the exponent of the power-law wind profile over the ocean under near-neutral atmospheric stability conditions were determined to be 0.11 +/- 0.03. Because this mean value is obtained from both deep and shallow water environments, it is recommended for use at sea to adjust the wind speed measurements at different heights to the standard height of 10 m above the mean sea surface. An example to apply this P value to estimate the momentum flux or wind stress is provided.

  19. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role wind energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of wind energy use, the wind energy resource, wind energy technology including intermediate-size and small wind turbines and intermittency of wind power, public attitudes toward wind power, and environmental, siting and land use issues

  20. Influence of the Coriolis force on the structure and evolution of wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation combined with a turbine model is used to investigate the effect of vertical wind veer associated with the Coriolis force on the structure and evolution of wind turbine wakes. In order to isolate the Coriolis effect on the wake, two cases are considered. In the first case, atmospheric boundary-layer flow is driven by a geostrophic wind, including the effect of Earth's rotation and the Coriolis force. In the second case, the boundary-layer flow is unidirectional and is forced by an imposed pressure gradient. Both cases have the same mean horizontal velocity and turbulence intensity at the hub height. The simulation results show that the Coriolis force significantly affects the aerodynamics of the wake including the mean velocity deficit, turbulence statistics, and wake-meandering characteristics downwind of the turbine. In particular, when the flow is forced by a geostrophic wind, vertical wind veer causes a skewed spatial structure in the wake. Moreover, the presence of lateral wind shear, in addition to the vertical one, enhances the shear production of turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent momentum flux. This leads to a larger flow entrainment and, thus, a faster wake recovery compared to the case forced by unidirectional pressure gradient. Consistent with this result, wake meandering is also stronger in both lateral and vertical directions in the case of geostrophic forcing compared to the case with pressure-gradient forcing.

  1. Climatology of mesopause region nocturnal temperature, zonal wind, and sodium density observed by sodium lidar over Hefei, China (32°N, 117°E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Ban, C.; Fang, X.; Li, J.; Wu, Z.; Xiong, J.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Science and Technology of China narrowband sodium temperature/wind lidar, located in Hefei, China (32°N, 117°E), was installed in November 2011 and have made routine nighttime measurements since January 2012. We obtained 154 nights ( 1400 hours) of vertical profiles of temperature, sodium density, and zonal wind, and 83 nights ( 800 hours) of vertical flux of gravity wave (GW) zonal momentum in the mesopause region (80-105 km) during the period of 2012 to 2016. In temperature, it is likely that the diurnal tide dominates below 100 km in spring, while the semidiurnal tide dominates above 100 km throughout the year. A clear semiannual variation in temperature is revealed near 90 km, likely related to the tropical mesospheric semiannual oscillation (MSAO). The variability of sodium density is positively correlated with temperature, suggesting that in addition to dynamics, the chemistry may also play an important role in the formation of sodium atoms. The observed sodium peak density is 1000 cm-3 higher than that simulated by the model. In zonal wind, the diurnal tide dominates in both spring and fall, while semidiurnal tide dominates in winter. The observed semiannual variation in zonal wind near 90 km is out-of-phase with that in temperature, consistent with tropical MSAO. The GW zonal momentum flux is mostly westward in fall and winter, anti-correlated with eastward zonal wind. The annual mean flux averaged over 87-97 km is -0.3 m2/s2 (westward), anti-correlated with eastward zonal wind of 10 m/s. The comparisons of lidar results with those observed by satellite, nearby radar, and simulated by model show generally good agreements.

  2. Electromagnetic energy and momentum from a charged particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, E.

    1975-01-01

    The flux of the stress-energy tensor across a tube surrounding the world line of a charged particle is computed. By slight modifications of the definition of the Coulomb energy-momentum, the resulting expression contains the radiation reaction term (proportional to the square of the four-acceleration) but not the Schott term (proportional to the derivative of the acceleration). The equation of motion for the particle derived from this expression implies a variable rest mass. (author)

  3. Wind energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesto, E.

    1992-02-01

    Interest in wind energy as a supplementary source for the production of electricity has recently gained renewed momentum due to widespread concern about environmental impacts from the large scale use of fossil fuels and nuclear energy. In addition, political unrest in the Middle East has drawn attention to the importance of national energy self-sufficiency. European government administrations, however, have not yet fully appreciated the real worth of the 'clean energy' afforded by wind energy. In this regard, the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) is acting as a strong voice to inform the public and energy planners by stimulating international wind energy R ampersand D cooperation, and organizing conferences to explain the advantages of wind energy. In October 1991, EWEA published a strategy document giving a picture of the real possibilities offered by wind energy within the geographical, social, and European economic context. This paper provides an overview of the more significant features to emerge from this document which represents a useful guideline for wind power plant technical/economic feasibility studies in that it contains brief notes on resource availability, land requirements, visual and acoustic impacts, turbine sizing, performance, interconnection to utility grids, maintenance and operating costs, safety, as well as, on marketing aspects

  4. Momentum-Space Josephson Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junpeng; Luo, Xi-Wang; Sun, Kuei; Bersano, Thomas; Gokhroo, Vandna; Mossman, Sean; Engels, Peter; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2018-03-01

    The Josephson effect is a prominent phenomenon of quantum supercurrents that has been widely studied in superconductors and superfluids. Typical Josephson junctions consist of two real-space superconductors (superfluids) coupled through a weak tunneling barrier. Here we propose a momentum-space Josephson junction in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate, where states with two different momenta are coupled through Raman-assisted tunneling. We show that Josephson currents can be induced not only by applying the equivalent of "voltages," but also by tuning tunneling phases. Such tunneling-phase-driven Josephson junctions in momentum space are characterized through both full mean field analysis and a concise two-level model, demonstrating the important role of interactions between atoms. Our scheme provides a platform for experimentally realizing momentum-space Josephson junctions and exploring their applications in quantum-mechanical circuits.

  5. NAMMA SENEGAL RADIOSONDE AND TOWER FLUX DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Radiosonde and Tower Flux data includes measurements of humidity, wind speed/direction and velocity. Additionally, the flux data includes...

  6. NAMMA SENEGAL RADIOSONDE AND TOWER FLUX DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Radiosonde and Tower Flux data includes measurements of humidity, wind speed/direction and velocity. Additionally the Flux data includes...

  7. Automated Angular Momentum Recoupling Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H. T.; Silbar, Richard R.

    1992-04-01

    We present a set of heuristic rules for algebraic solution of angular momentum recoupling problems. The general problem reduces to that of finding an optimal path from one binary tree (representing the angular momentum coupling scheme for the reduced matrix element) to another (representing the sub-integrals and spin sums to be done). The method lends itself to implementation on a microcomputer, and we have developed such an implementation using a dialect of LISP. We describe both how our code, called RACAH, works and how it appears to the user. We illustrate the use of RACAH for several transition and scattering amplitude matrix elements occurring in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.

  8. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Measurements in the boundary layer of the fluxes of sensible and latent heat, momentum, ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide, plus supporting meteorological...

  9. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Measurements in the boundary layer of the fluxes of sensible and latent heat, momentum, ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide, plus supporting meteorological parameters...

  10. Variability of Wind Speeds and Power over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambke, J.; von Bremen, L.; de Decker, J.; Schmidt, M.; Steinfeld, G.; Wolff, J.-O.

    2010-09-01

    This study comprises two parts: First, we describe the vertical wind speed and turbulence profiles that result from our improved PBL scheme and compare it to observations and 1-dimensional approaches (Monin-Obukhov etc.). Second, we analyse the spatio-temporal correlations in our meso-scale simulations for the years 2004 to 2007 over entire Europe, with special focus on the Irish, North and Baltic Sea. 1.) Vertical Wind Speed Profiles The vertical wind profile above the sea has to be modelled with high accuracy for tip heights up to 160m in order to achieve precise wind resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes of wind turbines as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecasts. We present an assessment of different models for wind profiles in unstable, neutral and stable thermal stratification. The meso-scale models comprise MM5, WRF and COSMO-EU (LME). Both COSMO-EU from the German Weather Service DWD and WRF use a turbulence closure of 2.5th order - and lead to similar results. Especially the limiting effect of low boundary layer heights on the wind shear in very stable stratification is well captured. In our new WRF-formulation for the mixing length in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) parameterisation of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL-scheme), the master length scale itself depends on the Monin-Obukhov-Length as a parameter for the heat flux effects on the turbulent mixing. This new PBL-scheme shows a better performance for all weather conditions than the original MYJ-scheme. Apart from the low-boundary-layer-effect in very stable situations (which are seldom), standard Monin-Obukhov formulations in combination with the Charnock relation for the sea surface roughness show good agreement with the FINO1-data (German Bight). Interesting results were achieved with two more detailed micro-scale approaches: - the parameterization proposed by Pena, Gryning and Hasager [BLM 2008] that depends on the boundary layer height - our ICWP-model, were the flux

  11. Ka-band Doppler Scatterometer for Measurements of Ocean Vector Winds and Surface Currents

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ocean surface currents impact heat transport, surface momentum and gas fluxes, ocean productivity and marine biological communities. Ocean currents also have social...

  12. A Changing Wind Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazé, Yaël; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Pittard, Julian M.; Parkin, Elliot Ross; Rauw, Gregor; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hillier, D. John

    2018-02-01

    We report on the first detection of a global change in the X-ray emitting properties of a wind–wind collision, thanks to XMM-Newton observations of the massive Small Magellenic Cloud (SMC) system HD 5980. While its light curve had remained unchanged between 2000 and 2005, the X-ray flux has now increased by a factor of ∼2.5, and slightly hardened. The new observations also extend the observational coverage over the entire orbit, pinpointing the light-curve shape. It has not varied much despite the large overall brightening, and a tight correlation of fluxes with orbital separation is found without any hysteresis effect. Moreover, the absence of eclipses and of absorption effects related to orientation suggests a large size for the X-ray emitting region. Simple analytical models of the wind–wind collision, considering the varying wind properties of the eruptive component in HD 5980, are able to reproduce the recent hardening and the flux-separation relationship, at least qualitatively, but they predict a hardening at apastron and little change in mean flux, contrary to observations. The brightness change could then possibly be related to a recently theorized phenomenon linked to the varying strength of thin-shell instabilities in shocked wind regions. Based on XMM-Newton and Chandra data.

  13. Dividing Attention Increases Operational Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koleen McCrink

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available When adding or subtracting two quantities, adults often compute an estimated outcome that is larger or smaller, respectively, than the actual outcome, a bias referred to as “operational momentum”. The effects of attention on operational momentum were investigated. Participants viewed a display in which two arrays of objects were added, or one array was subtracted from another array, and judged whether a subsequent outcome (probe array contained the correct or incorrect number of objects. In a baseline condition, only the arrays to be added or subtracted were viewed. In divided attention conditions, participants simultaneously viewed a sequence of colors or shapes, and judged which color (a non-spatial judgment or shape (a spatial judgment was repeated. Operational momentum occurred in all conditions, but was higher in divided attention conditions than in the baseline condition, primarily for addition problems. This pattern suggests that dividing attention, rather than decreasing operational momentum by decreasing attentional shifts, actually increased operational momentum. These results are consistent with a heightened use of arithmetic heuristics under conditions of divided attention.

  14. The impact of non-stationary flows on the surface stress in the weak-wind stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field based upon field observations. Extensive sonic anemometer measurements from horizontal networks and vertical towers ranging from 12 to 20 m height and innovative fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing observations were collected from three field programs in moderately sloped terrain with a varying degree of surface heterogeneity, namely the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) and the Flow Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) II experiments in Colorado (USA), and the Advanced Canopy Resolution Experiment (ARCFLO) in Oregon (USA). The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions is studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso-scale motions. Consequently, the roles of the wind speed and stratification are not adequately accommodated by a single non-dimensional combination, such as the bulk Richardson number. However, cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The latter may be significant in explaining the small-scale weak turbulence during stable stratification and deviations from conventional flux-profile relationships. Contrary to expectations, the vertical coherence was strongest for weakest winds and declined fast with increasing velocities, which suggests that submeso-scale motions are much deeper than previously thought.

  15. Dynamic Response of Offshore Wind Turbines subjected to Joint Wave and Wind Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Weiliang; Chen, Jianbing; Liu, Wenfeng

    2013-01-01

    into consideration. Wind and wave loads are generated by the physical random models. The aerodynamic loads on blades are calculated by the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory, and the wave loads are calculated by the linear theory of wave. The dynamic response of the NREL-5MW wind turbine system is carried out...

  16. A Kinetic Transport Theory for Particle Acceleration and Transport in Regions of Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of particle acceleration in turbulent plasma regions with multiple contracting and merging (reconnecting) magnetic islands emphasize the key role of temporary particle trapping in island structures for the efficient acceleration of particles to form hard power-law spectra. Statistical kinetic transport theories have been developed that capture the essential physics of particle acceleration in multi-island regions. The transport theory of Zank et al. is further developed by considering the acceleration effects of both the mean and the variance of the electric fields induced by the dynamics of multiple inertial-scale flux ropes. A focused transport equation is derived that includes new Fokker-Planck terms for particle scattering and stochastic acceleration due to the variance in multiple flux-rope magnetic fields, plasma flows, and reconnection electric fields. A Parker transport equation is also derived in which a new expression for momentum diffusion appears, combining stochastic acceleration by particle scattering in the mean multi-flux-rope electric fields with acceleration by the variance in these electric fields. Test particle acceleration is modeled analytically considering drift acceleration by the variance in the induced electric fields of flux ropes in the slow supersonic, radially expanding solar wind. Hard power-law spectra occur for sufficiently strong inertial-scale flux ropes with an index modified by adiabatic cooling, solar wind advection, and diffusive escape from flux ropes. Flux ropes might be sufficiently strong behind interplanetary shocks where the index of suprathermal ion power-law spectra observed in the supersonic solar wind can be reproduced.

  17. Energy, momentum and angular momentum conservations in de Sitter gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jia-An

    2016-01-01

    In de Sitter (dS) gravity, where gravity is a gauge field introduced to realize the local dS invariance of the matter field, two kinds of conservation laws are derived. The first kind is a differential equation for a dS-covariant current, which unites the canonical energy-momentum (EM) and angular momentum (AM) tensors. The second kind presents a dS-invariant current which is conserved in the sense that its torsion-free divergence vanishes. The dS-invariant current unites the total (matter plus gravity) EM and AM currents. It is well known that the AM current contains an inherent part, called the spin current. Here it is shown that the EM tensor also contains an inherent part, which might be observed by its contribution to the deviation of the dust particle’s world line from a geodesic. All the results are compared to the ordinary Lorentz gravity. (paper)

  18. A methodology for the design and testing of atmospheric boundary layer models for wind energy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sanz Rodrigo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS 1, 2 and 3 are used to develop a methodology for the design and testing of Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS atmospheric boundary layer (ABL models for wind energy applications. The first two GABLS cases are based on idealized boundary conditions and are suitable for verification purposes by comparing with results from higher-fidelity models based on large-eddy simulation. Results from three single-column RANS models, of 1st, 1.5th and 2nd turbulence closure order, show high consistency in predicting the mean flow. The third GABLS case is suitable for the study of these ABL models under realistic forcing such that validation versus observations from the Cabauw meteorological tower are possible. The case consists on a diurnal cycle that leads to a nocturnal low-level jet and addresses fundamental questions related to the definition of the large-scale forcing, the interaction of the ABL with the surface and the evaluation of model results with observations. The simulations are evaluated in terms of surface-layer fluxes and wind energy quantities of interest: rotor equivalent wind speed, hub-height wind direction, wind speed shear and wind direction veer. The characterization of mesoscale forcing is based on spatially and temporally averaged momentum budget terms from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF simulations. These mesoscale tendencies are used to drive single-column models, which were verified previously in the first two GABLS cases, to first demonstrate that they can produce similar wind profile characteristics to the WRF simulations even though the physics are more simplified. The added value of incorporating different forcing mechanisms into microscale models is quantified by systematically removing forcing terms in the momentum and heat equations. This mesoscale-to-microscale modeling approach is affected, to a large extent, by the input uncertainties of the mesoscale

  19. The Open Flux Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.; Liu, Y.; Derosa, M. L.; Yeates, A.; Owens, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  20. Stratified magnetically driven accretion-disk winds and their relations to jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, θ), ionization parameter ξ(r, θ), and velocity structure v(r, θ) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvénic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfvén surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, ξ, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  1. Stratified magnetically driven accretion-disk winds and their relations to jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumura, Keigo [University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC/CRESST), Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Behar, Ehud [Department of Physics, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Contopoulos, Ioannis, E-mail: fukumukx@jmu.edu [Research Center for Astronomy, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece)

    2014-01-10

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, θ), ionization parameter ξ(r, θ), and velocity structure v(r, θ) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvénic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfvén surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, ξ, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  2. Stratified Magnetically Driven Accretion-disk Winds and Their Relations to Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, Francesco; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    We explore the poloidal structure of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds in relation to their potential association with the X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) and the highly ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), in a single unifying approach. We present the density n(r, θ), ionization parameter ξ(r, θ), and velocity structure v(r, θ) of such ionized winds for typical values of their fluid-to-magnetic flux ratio, F, and specific angular momentum, H, for which wind solutions become super-Alfvénic. We explore the geometrical shape of winds for different values of these parameters and delineate the values that produce the widest and narrowest opening angles of these winds, quantities necessary in the determination of the statistics of AGN obscuration. We find that winds with smaller H show a poloidal geometry of narrower opening angles with their Alfvén surface at lower inclination angles and therefore they produce the highest line of sight (LoS) velocities for observers at higher latitudes with the respect to the disk plane. We further note a physical and spatial correlation between the X-ray WAs and UFOs that form along the same LoS to the observer but at different radii, r, and distinct values of n, ξ, and v consistent with the latest spectroscopic data of radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies. We also show that, at least in the case of 3C 111, the winds' pressure is sufficient to contain the relativistic plasma responsible for its radio emission. Stratified MHD disk winds could therefore serve as a unique means to understand and unify the diverse AGN outflows.

  3. Laboratory modeling of air-sea interaction under severe wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vasiliy, Kazakov; Nicolay, Bogatov; Olga, Ermakova; Mikhail, Salin; Daniil, Sergeev; Maxim, Vdovin

    2010-05-01

    velocity profile was measured by WindSonic ultrasonic wind sensor. The water elevation was measured by the three-channel wave-gauge. Top and side views of the water surface were fixed by CCD-camera. Wind friction velocity and surface drag coefficients were retrieved from the measurements by the profile method. Obtained values are in good agreement with the data of measurements by Donelan et al (2004). The directional frequency-wave-number spectra of surface waves were retrieved by the wavelet directional method (Donelan et al, 1996). The obtained dependencies of parameters of the wind waves indicate existing of two regimes of the waves with the critical wind speed Ucr about 30 m/s. For U10Ucr the dependencies of peak wave period, peak wavelength, significant wave height on the wind speed tend to saturation, in the same time the peak wave slope has the maximum at approximately Ucr and then decreases with the tendency to saturation. The surface drag also tends to saturation for U10>Ucr similarly to (Donelan et al, 2004). Video filming indicates onset of wave breaking with white-capping and spray generation at wind speeds approximately equal to Ucr. We compared the obtained experimental dependencies with the predictions of the quasi-linear model of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface (Reutov&Troitskaya, 1995). Comparing shows that theoretical predictions give low estimates for the measured drag coefficient and wave fields. Taking into account momentum flux associated with the spray generation yields theoretical estimations in good agreement with the experimental data. Basing on the experimental data a possible physical mechanism of the drag is suggested. Tearing of the wave crests at severe wind conditions leads to the effective smoothing (decreasing wave slopes) of the water surface, which in turn reduces the aerodynamic roughness of the water surface. Quantitative agreement of the experimental data and theoretical estimations od the surface drag occurs

  4. Momentum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbek, Lisa; Tønder, Esben Sandvik

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the pilot study was to examine the use of a smartphone application as a modern decision aid to support shared decision making in mental health. METHOD: 78 people using mental health services and 116 of their providers participated in a 4-month pilot study. At the end of the ...

  5. Cosmic rays flux and geomagnetic field variations at midlatitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Anna; Ribeiro, Paulo; Tragaldabas Collaboration Team

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that the cosmic rays flux is modulated by the solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field. The Earth's magnetic field deflects charged particles in accordance with their momentum and the local field strength and direction. The geomagnetic cutoffs depend both on the internal and the external components of the geomagnetic field, therefore reflecting the geodynamo and the solar activity variations. A new generation, high performance, cosmic ray detector Tragaldabas was recently installed at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). The detector has been acquiring test data since September 2013 with a rate of about 80 events/s over a solid angle of ~5 srad. around the vertical direction. To take full advantage of this new facility for the study of cosmic rays arriving to the Earth, an international collaboration has been organized, of about 20 researchers from 10 laboratories of 5 European countries. The Magnetic Observatory of Coimbra (Portugal) has been measuring the geomagnetic field components for almost 150 years since the first measurements in 1866. It is presently equipped with up-to-date instruments. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the global cosmic ray fluxes acquired by the new Tragaldabas detector in relation to the geomagnetic field variations measured by the Coimbra observatory. We also compare the data from the new cosmic rays detector with results obtained by the Castilla-La Mancha Neutron Monitor (CaLMa, Gadalajara, Spain) that is in operation since October 2011.

  6. Rigorous bounds on buoyancy flux in surface driven flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, C. P.

    2004-11-01

    Stably stratified shear flows, where both the velocity and density vary with height, are common in environmentally and geophysically relevant flows. An understanding of constraints on mixing processes is essential for an improved parameterization of geophysical turbulence, in particular for appropriate modelling of the budgets of heat, salinity and momentum in larger scale models. Flows that are principally driven by surface-localized stresses (e.g. caused by wind) are particularly prevalent in geophysical flows. In this talk, I will derive rigorous bounds on the long-time averaged buoyancy flux for a class of such flows, using the background method developed by Doering & Constantin. Interestingly, flows that maximize the buoyancy flux can be directly related to laminar flows with stronger forcing. This is qualitatively different from other stratified mixing problems, for example in stratified plane Couette flow. This result suggests that quasi-laminar mixing, which is typically much more efficient than strongly turbulent mixing, may be the dominant process by which irreversible changes in density occur within such surface driven flows.

  7. Angular momentum in QGP holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The quark chemical potential is one of the fundamental parameters describing the quark–gluon plasma produced by sufficiently energetic heavy-ion collisions. It is not large at the extremely high temperatures probed by the LHC, but it plays a key role in discussions of the beam energy scan programmes at the RHIC and other facilities. On the other hand, collisions at such energies typically (that is, in peripheral collisions give rise to very high values of the angular momentum density. Here we explain that holographic estimates of the quark chemical potential of a rotating sample of plasma can be very considerably improved by taking the angular momentum into account.

  8. Parametrizing Evaporative Resistance for Heterogeneous Sparse Canopies through Novel Wind Tunnel Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, B.; Ebtehaj, A. M.; Guala, M.

    2017-12-01

    The understanding of heat and water vapor transfer from the land surface to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration (ET) is crucial for predicting the hydrologic water balance and climate forecasts used in water resources decision-making. However, the complex distribution of vegetation, soil and atmospheric conditions makes large-scale prognosis of evaporative fluxes difficult. Current ET models, such as Penman-Monteith and flux-gradient methods, are challenging to apply at the microscale due to ambiguity in determining resistance factors to momentum, heat and vapor transport for realistic landscapes. Recent research has made progress in modifying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for dense plant canopies as well as providing clearer description of diffusive controls on evaporation at a smooth soil surface, which both aid in calculating more accurate resistance parameters. However, in nature, surfaces typically tend to be aerodynamically rough and vegetation is a mixture of sparse and dense canopies in non-uniform configurations. The goal of our work is to parameterize the resistances to evaporation based on spatial distributions of sparse plant canopies using novel wind tunnel experimentation at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL). The state-of-the-art SAFL wind tunnel was updated with a retractable soil box test section (shown in Figure 1), complete with a high-resolution scale and soil moisture/temperature sensors for recording evaporative fluxes and drying fronts. The existing capabilities of the tunnel were used to create incoming non-neutral stability conditions and measure 2-D velocity fields as well as momentum and heat flux profiles through PIV and hotwire anemometry, respectively. Model trees (h = 5 cm) were placed in structured and random configurations based on a probabilistic spacing that was derived from aerial imagery. The novel wind tunnel dataset provides the surface energy budget, turbulence statistics and spatial soil moisture data under varying

  9. Large transverse momentum behavior of gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquereaux, Robert; De Rafael, Eduardo.

    1977-05-01

    The large transverse momentum behavior of Compton scattering and Moeller scattering in Quantum Electrodynamics; and of elastic quark-quark scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics are examined in perturbation theory. The results strongly suggest that the large transverse momentum regime in gauge theories is governed by a differential equation of the Callan-Symanzik type with a suitable momentum dependent anomalous dimension term. An explicit solution for the quark-quark elastic scattering amplitude at large transverse momentum is given

  10. Momentum in Transformation of Technical Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten

    1999-01-01

    Current infrastructure holds a considerable momentum and this momentum is a barrier of transformation towards more sustainable technologies and more sustainable styles of network management. Using the sewage sector in Denmark as an example of a technical infrastructure system this paper argues...... that there are technical, economical and social aspects of the current infrastructures momentum....

  11. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Flow between Independently Rotating Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paoletti, M. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the (Ω 1 , Ω 2 ) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where Ω 1 (Ω 2 ) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro=(Ω 1 -Ω 2 )/Ω 2 fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro=∞)≡G ∞ . The ratio G/G ∞ is a linear function of Ro -1 in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London), 444, 343 (2006)], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)].

  12. Wind Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez D, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The general theory of the wind energy conversion systems is presented. The availability of the wind resource in Colombia and the ranges of the speed of the wind in those which is possible economically to use the wind turbines are described. It is continued with a description of the principal technological characteristics of the wind turbines and are split into wind power and wind-powered pumps; and its use in large quantities grouped in wind farms or in autonomous systems. Finally, its costs and its environmental impact are presented

  13. Streamwise Evolution of Statistical Events in a Model Wind-Turbine Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viestenz, Kyle; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-02-01

    Hot-wire anemometry data, obtained from a wind-tunnel experiment containing a 3 × 3 model wind-turbine array, are used to conditionally average the Reynolds stresses. Nine profiles at the centreline behind the array are analyzed to characterize the turbulent velocity statistics of the wake flow. Quadrant analysis yields statistical events occurring in the wake of the wind farm where quadrants 2 and 4 produce ejections and sweeps, respectively. The scaled difference between these two events is expressed via the Δ R0 parameter and is based on the Δ S0 quantity as introduced by M. R. Raupach (J Fluid Mech 108:363-382, 1981). Δ R0 attains a maximum value at hub height and changes sign near the top of the rotor. The ratio of quadrant events of upward momentum flux to those of the downward flux, known as the exuberance, is examined and reveals the effect of root vortices persisting to eight rotor diameters downstream. These events are then associated with the triple correlation term present in the turbulent kinetic energy equation of the fluctuations where it is found that ejections play the dual role of entraining mean kinetic energy while convecting turbulent kinetic energy out of the turbine canopy. The development of these various quantities possesses significance in closure models, and is assessed in light of wake remediation, energy transport and power fluctuations, where it is found that the maximum fluctuation is about 30% of the mean power produced.

  14. AVERAGE FLUXES FROM HETEROGENEOUS VEGETATED REGIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLAASSEN, W

    Using a surface-layer model, fluxes of heat and momentum have been calculated for flat regions with regularly spaced step changes in surface roughness and stomatal resistance. The distance between successive step changes is limited to 10 km in order to fill the gap between micro-meteorological

  15. Wind power barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The global wind power market not only repelled the strictures of the financial crisis, but saw the installation of 37 GW in 2009, which is almost 10 GW up on 2008. China and the United States registered particularly steady growth and the European Union also picked up momentum to break its installation record. A total capacity of 158 GW of wind power are now installed across the world from which 74.8 GW in the European Union. Among the European countries Denmark has the highest wind capacity per inhabitant in 2009: 627.5 kW/1000 inhabitants. Spain seeks to limit its market's growth in order to better manage the development of wind energy across the country. German growth is back, Italy chalks up a new record for installation and the French market is becoming increasingly regulated. United-Kingdom is developing offshore wind farms: the offshore capacity could reasonably rise to 20000 MW by 2020. The last part of the article reports some economical news from the leading players: Vestas, GE-Energy, Gamesa, Enercon, Sinovel and Siemens. (A.C.)

  16. Heat Flux Inhibition by Whistlers: Experimental Confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Heat flux in weakly magnetized collisionless plasma is, according to theoretical predictions, limited by whistler turbulence that is generated by heat flux instabilities near threshold. Observations of solar wind electrons by Gary and coworkers appear to confirm the limit on heat flux as being roughly the product of the magnetic energy density and the electron thermal velocity, in agreement with prediction (Pistinner and Eichler 1998)

  17. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C., E-mail: cliu@pppl.gov [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bhattacharjee, A. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  18. Is blade element momentum theory (BEM) enough for smart rotor design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, W.; Simao Ferreira, C.J.; van Kuik, G.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart rotor emerges as an innovation technique to reduce the impact of dynamic loading on wind turbines. Local movements of distributed aerodynamic devices will enhance the non-uniformity and dynamic effects of loading, which will challenge the applicability of the blade element momentum theory

  19. Optical angular momentum in classical electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2017-06-01

    Invoking Maxwell’s classical equations in conjunction with expressions for the electromagnetic (EM) energy, momentum, force, and torque, we use a few simple examples to demonstrate the nature of the EM angular momentum. The energy and the angular momentum of an EM field will be shown to have an intimate relationship; a source radiating EM angular momentum will, of necessity, pick up an equal but opposite amount of mechanical angular momentum; and the spin and orbital angular momenta of the EM field, when absorbed by a small particle, will be seen to elicit different responses from the particle.

  20. On the Classical and Quantum Momentum Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, Chiara

    In this thesis we study the classical and quantum momentum maps and the theory of reduction. We focus on the notion of momentum map in Poisson geometry and we discuss the classification of the momentum map in this framework. Furthermore, we describe the so-called Poisson Reduction, a technique...... that allows us to reduce the dimension of a manifold in presence of symmetries implemented by Poisson actions. Using techniques of deformation quantization and quantum groups, we introduce the quantum momentum map as a deformation of the classical momentum map, constructed in such a way that it factorizes...

  1. Determination of Energy Fluxes Over Agricultural Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Argete

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy budget was conducted over two kinds if surfaces: grass and corn canopy. The net radiative flux and the soil heat flux were directly measured while the latent and sensible heat flux were calculated from the vertical profiles if wet and dry-bulb temperature and wind speed. The crop storage flux was also estimated. Using the gradient or aerodynamic equations, the calculated fluxes when compared to the measured fluxes in the context of an energy budget gave an SEE = 63 Wm-2 over grass and SEE = 81 Wm-2 over corn canopy. The calculated fluxes compared reasonably well with those obtained using the Penman equations.For an energy budget research with limited instrumentation, the aerodynamic method performed satisfactorily in estimating the daytime fluxes, when atmospheric conditions are fully convective, but failed when conditions were stably stratified as during nighttime.

  2. Aerodynamic Aspects of Wind Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the most important aerodynamic research topics in the field of wind energy. Wind turbine aerodynamics concerns the modeling and prediction of aerodynamic forces, such as performance predictions of wind farms, and the design of specific parts of wind turbines, such as rotor......-blade geometry. The basics of the blade-element momentum theory are presented along with guidelines for the construction of airfoil data. Various theories for aerodynamically optimum rotors are discussed, and recent results on classical models are presented. State-of-the-art advanced numerical simulation tools...

  3. Photon momentum and optical forces in cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, the electromagnetic field momentum in material media has been under debate in the Abraham-Minkowski controversy as convincing arguments have been advanced in favor of both the Abraham and Minkowski forms of photon momentum. Here we study the photon momentum and optical...... forces in cavity structures in the cases of dynamical and steady-state fields. In the description of the single-photon transmission process, we use a field-kinetic one-photon theory. Our model suggests that in the medium photons couple with the induced atomic dipoles forming polariton quasiparticles...... with the Minkowski form momentum. The Abraham momentum can be associated to the electromagnetic field part of the coupled polariton state. The polariton with the Minkowski momentum is shown to obey the uniform center of mass of energy motion that has previously been interpreted to support only the Abraham momentum...

  4. Stellar winds, dead zones, and coronal mass ejections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppens, R.; Goedbloed, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Axisymmetric stellar wind solutions are presented that were obtained by numerically solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Stationary solutions are critically analyzed using the knowledge of the flux functions. These flux functions enter in the general variational principle governing

  5. Design and use of a sparged platform for energy flux measurements over lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, S.; Wenker, K.; van Emmerik, T.; de Jong, S.; Annor, F.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2012-12-01

    Energy flux measurements over lakes or reservoirs demand relatively stable platforms. Platforms can not be stabilized by fixing them on the bottom of the lake when the water body is too deep or when water levels show significant fluctuations. We present the design and first operational results of a sparged platform. The structure consists of a long PVC pipe, the sparge, which is closed at the bottom. On the PVC pipe rests an aluminum frame platform that carries instrumentation and solar power panel. In turn, the platform rests partially on a large inflated tire. At the bottom of the PVC pipe, lead weights and batteries were placed to ensure a very low point of gravity to minimize wave impact on the platform movement. The tire ensures a large second moment of the water plane. The overall volume of displacement is small in this sparged design. The combination of large second momentum of the water plane and small displacement ensure a high placement of the metacenter. The distance between the point of gravity and the metacenter is relatively long and the weight is large due to the weights and batteries. This ensures that the eigenfrequency of the platform is very low. The instrumentation load consisted of a WindMaster Pro (sonic anemometer for 3D wind speed and air temperature to perform eddy covariance measurements of sensible heat flux), a NR Lite (net radiometer), and air temperature and relative humidity sensors. The platform had a wind vane and the sparge could turn freely around its anchor cable to ensure that the anemometer always faced upwind. A compass in the logger completed this setup. The stability was measured with an accelerometer. In addition to the design and its stability, some first energy flux results will be presented.

  6. Gearless wind power generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, L.; Ridanpaeae, P.; Vihriaelae, H.; Peraelae, R. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab. of Electricity and Magnetism

    1998-12-31

    During the wind power generator project a design algorithm for a gearless permanent magnet generator with an axially orientated magnetic flux was developed and a 10 kW model machine was constructed. Utilising the test results a variable wind speed system of 100 kW was designed that incorporates a permanent magnet generator, a frequency converter and a fuzzy controller. This system produces about 5-15% more energy than existing types and stresses to the blades are minimised. The type of generator designed in the project represents in general a gearless solution for slow-speed electrical drives. (orig.)

  7. A wind-tunnel investigation of wind-turbine wakes in yawed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments were performed to study the performance of a model wind turbine and its wake characteristics in a boundary layer under different operating conditions, including different yaw angles and tip speed ratios. High-resolution particle image- velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the three velocity components in a horizontal plane at hub height covering a broad streamwise range from upstream of the turbine to the far- wake region. Additionally, thrust and power coefficients of the turbine were measured under different conditions. These power and thrust measurements, together with the highly-resolved flow measurements, enabled us to systematically study different wake properties. The near-wake region is found to have a highly complex structure influenced by different factors such as tip speed ratio and wake rotation. In particular, for higher tip speed ratios, a noticeable speed-up region is observed in the central part of near wake, which greatly affects the flow distribution in this region. In this regard, the behavior of the near wake for turbines with similar thrust coefficients but different tip speed ratios can vary widely. In contrast, it is shown that the mean streamwise velocity in the far wake of the turbine with zero yaw angle has a self-similar Gaussian distribution, and the strength of wake in this region is consistent with the magnitude of the thrust coefficient. With increasing yaw angle, as expected, the power and thrust coefficients decrease, and the wake deflection increases. The measurements also reveal that, in addition to turbulent momentum flux, lateral mean momentum flux boosts the flow entrainment in only one side of the wake, which results in a faster wake recovery in that side. It is also found that the induced velocity upstream of a yawed turbine has a non-symmetric distribution, and its distribution is in agreement with the available model in the literature. Moreover, the results suggest that in order to accurately

  8. A survey of flux transfer events observed in the dayside magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, M. D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Lee, S. H.; Gonzalez, W.; Koga, D.

    2017-12-01

    Flux transfer events (FTE) have been interpreted to be results from transient magnetic reconnection and can be observed in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetopause, as well in other planets. FTE acts as a flux tube connecting the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere allowing the transference of particles, energy and momentum in both sides magnetopause. Their main signatures in satellite data are bipolar variation in the magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause, centered in an enhanced magnetic field strength. Other signatures such as pressure imbalance, bulk flow jets, and particle anisotropy distribution can be observed inside the those structures. We surveyed FTEs observed by MMS on the vicinity of the magnetopause (from x = 0 to 13Re and y = -12 to 12Re). Taking advantage of the MMS tetrahedron configuration we will employed timing analysis to determine the FTEs direction of motion and scale lengths. We will present information about occurrence related with IMF clock angle and other parameters, amplitude of the perturbations induced by the FTEs in the environment magnetic field and plasma; characteristic time and structure scale size. Using data from ACE, Wind and Artemis we can evaluate which is the best solar wind monitor for each FTE observed and then employ the appropriated lag time corresponding to FTE location and magnetic field orientation. The objective is to investigate the mechanisms of generation of FTEs comparing characteristics of the events observed on the dayside region and on the magnetopause flanks determining the motion and speed of FTEs.

  9. Wind Stress Variability Directly Measured at a Tidal Inlet from a Mobile Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Haus, B. K.; Laxague, N.; Williams, N. J.; Graber, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal inlets are characterized by a dynamic coupling of waves, currents, wind, and topography and to better understand these processes the Riverine and Estuarine Transport (RIVET) experiment was conducted during the month of May 2012 at New River Inlet, North Carolina. As a part of that effort, the Surface Physics Experimental Catamaran (SPEC) was outfitted with a suite of concurrently sampled atmospheric and oceanographic sensors. These included a meteorological mast capable of measuring the air-sea momentum flux, paired subsurface ADV's, a downward looking ADCP, and a bow-mounted wave-staff array. Using a mobile platform enabled capturing the fine-scale dynamical features across this highly sheared zone, without compromising spatial or temporal resolution. The SPEC was deployed, in part, to make direct wind stress measurements and the eddy covariance method was used to calculate the 10 m neutral drag coefficients from the observed wind shear velocities. In general, for any given wind speed, measured drag coefficients were about 2.5 times greater than those derived from bulk relations (e.g. Smith, 1988). Observations of the wind stress angle show significant wind stress steering, up to about 70o off the mean wind direction, within 2 km off-shore of the inlet mouth. The causes for the departure of these observations from conventional open ocean results remains under investigation, although it is highly likely that these findings highlight processes unique to coastal waters that are not regarded in the well-established algorithms (e.g. depth-limited wave breaking and wave-current interactions). Preliminary results from the second installment in the RIVET campaign, which took place at the Mouth of the Columbia River during the spring of 2013, will also be shown.

  10. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    1999-01-01

    is capable of determining the correct qualitative behaviour for airfoils subject to rotation. The method shows that lift is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. Thedifferent systematic methods show the importance of rotational and 3D effects on rotors. Furthermore, the methods show high......Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are basedon four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum...... theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotorwith LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall...

  11. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  12. Measurements of carbon dioxide and heat fluxes during monsoon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using these observations, we explored the diurnal variability of CO2 flux along with sensible and latent heat. The CO2 flux was positive during night-time and negative during daytime and in phase with convective instability. The CO2 flux relationships with the meteorological parameters such as wind speed, temperature and ...

  13. Wind Structure and Wind Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    The purpose of this note is to provide a short description of wind, i.e. of the flow in the atmosphere of the Earth and the loading caused by wind on structures. The description comprises: causes to the generation of windhe interaction between wind and the surface of the Earthhe stochastic nature...... of windhe interaction between wind and structures, where it is shown that wind loading depends strongly on this interaction...

  14. Electromagnetic energy momentum in dispersive media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philbin, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    The standard derivations of electromagnetic energy and momentum in media take Maxwell's equations as the starting point. It is well known that for dispersive media this approach does not directly yield exact expressions for the energy and momentum densities. Although Maxwell's equations fully describe electromagnetic fields, the general approach to conserved quantities in field theory is not based on the field equations, but rather on the action. Here an action principle for macroscopic electromagnetism in dispersive, lossless media is used to derive the exact conserved energy-momentum tensor. The time-averaged energy density reduces to Brillouin's simple formula when the fields are monochromatic. The time-averaged momentum density for monochromatic fields corresponds to the familiar Minkowski expression DxB, but for general fields in dispersive media the momentum density does not have the Minkowski value. The results are unaffected by the debate over momentum balance in light-matter interactions.

  15. The Asymmetric Bow Shock/Pulsar Wind Nebula of PSR J2124–3358

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Slane, Patrick; Green, Andrew W.

    2017-12-01

    We describe new measurements of the remarkable Hα/UV/X-ray bow shock and pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of the isolated millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J2124‑3358. Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging shows a one-sided jet structure with a softer equatorial outflow. KOALA integral field unit spectroscopy shows that non-radiative emission dominates the bow shock and that the Hα nebula is asymmetric about the pulsar velocity with an elongation into the plane of the sky. We extend analytic models of the contact discontinuity to accommodate such shapes and compare these to the data. Using Hubble Space Telescope UV detections of the pulsar and bow shock, radio timing distance, proper motion measurements, and the CXO-detected projected spin axis, we model the 3D PWN momentum flux distribution. The integrated momentum flux depends on the ionization of the ambient ISM, but for an expected ambient warm neutral medium, we infer I=2.4× {10}45 {{g}} {{cm}}2. This implies {M}{NS}=1.6{--}2.1 {M}ȯ , depending on the equation of state, which in turn suggests that the MSP gained significant mass during recycling and then lost its companion. However, this conclusion is at present tentative, since lower ionization allows ∼ 30 % lower masses, and uncertainty in the parallax allows up to 50% error.

  16. Mechanical pressure and momentum conservation in dry active matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fily, Y.; Kafri, Y.; Solon, A. P.; Tailleur, J.; Turner, A.

    2018-01-01

    We relate the breakdown of equations of states (EOS) for the mechanical pressure of generic dry active systems to the lack of momentum conservation in such systems. We show how net sources and sinks of momentum arise generically close to confining walls. These typically depend on the interactions of the container with the particles, which makes the mechanical pressure a container-dependent quantity. We show that an EOS is recovered if the dynamics of the propulsive forces of the particles are decoupled from other degrees of freedom and lead to an apolar bulk steady-state. This recovery of an EOS stems from the mean steady-state active force density being the divergence of the flux of ‘active impulse’, an observable which measures the mean momentum particles will receive from the substrate in the future. ), which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. A. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Julien Tailleur was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. A as an Emerging Talent.

  17. Momentum management strategy during Space Station buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lynda; Malchow, Harvey; Hattis, Philip

    1988-01-01

    The use of momentum storage devices to control effectors for Space Station attitude control throughout the buildup sequence is discussed. Particular attention is given to the problem of providing satisfactory management of momentum storage effectors throughout buildup while experiencing variable torque loading. Continuous and discrete control strategies are compared and the effects of alternative control moment gyro strategies on peak momentum storage requirements and on commanded maneuver characteristics are described.

  18. Optical momentum and angular momentum in complex media: from the Abraham–Minkowski debate to unusual properties of surface plasmon-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y.; Nori, Franco

    2017-12-01

    We examine the momentum and angular momentum (AM) properties of monochromatic optical fields in dispersive and inhomogeneous isotropic media, using the Abraham- and Minkowski-type approaches, as well as the kinetic (Poynting-like) and canonical (with separate spin and orbital degrees of freedom) pictures. While the kinetic Abraham–Poynting momentum describes the energy flux and the group velocity of the wave, the Minkowski-type quantities, with proper dispersion corrections, describe the actual momentum and AM carried by the wave. The kinetic Minkowski-type momentum and AM densities agree with phenomenological results derived by Philbin. Using the canonical spin–orbital decomposition, previously used for free-space fields, we find the corresponding canonical momentum, spin and orbital AM of light in a dispersive inhomogeneous medium. These acquire a very natural form analogous to the Brillouin energy density and are valid for arbitrary structured fields. The general theory is applied to a non-trivial example of a surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) wave at a metal-vacuum interface. We show that the integral momentum of the SPP per particle corresponds to the SPP wave vector, and hence exceeds the momentum of a photon in the vacuum. We also provide the first accurate calculation of the transverse spin and orbital AM of the SPP. While the intrinsic orbital AM vanishes, the transverse spin can change its sign depending on the SPP frequency. Importantly, we present both macroscopic and microscopic calculations, thereby proving the validity of the general phenomenological results. The microscopic theory also predicts a transverse magnetization in the metal (i.e. a magnetic moment for the SPP) as well as the corresponding direct magnetization current, which provides the difference between the Abraham and Minkowski momenta.

  19. Optical momentum and angular momentum in complex media: from the Abraham-Minkowski debate to unusual properties of surface plasmon-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Bliokh, Konstantin; Y Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Nori, Franco

    2017-12-01

    We examine the momentum and angular momentum (AM) properties of monochromatic optical fields in dispersive and inhomogeneous isotropic media, using the Abraham- and Minkowski-type approaches, as well as the kinetic (Poynting-like) and canonical (with separate spin and orbital degrees of freedom) pictures. While the kinetic Abraham-Poynting momentum describes the energy flux and the group velocity of the wave, the Minkowski-type quantities, with proper dispersion corrections, describe the actual momentum and AM carried by the wave. The kinetic Minkowski-type momentum and AM densities agree with phenomenological results derived by Philbin. Using the canonical spin-orbital decomposition, previously used for free-space fields, we find the corresponding canonical momentum, spin and orbital AM of light in a dispersive inhomogeneous medium. These acquire a very natural form analogous to the Brillouin energy density and are valid for arbitrary structured fields. The general theory is applied to a non-trivial example of a surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) wave at a metal-vacuum interface. We show that the integral momentum of the SPP per particle corresponds to the SPP wave vector, and hence exceeds the momentum of a photon in the vacuum. We also provide the first accurate calculation of the transverse spin and orbital AM of the SPP. While the intrinsic orbital AM vanishes, the transverse spin can change its sign depending on the SPP frequency. Importantly, we present both macroscopic and microscopic calculations, thereby proving the validity of the general phenomenological results. The microscopic theory also predicts a transverse magnetization in the metal (i.e. a magnetic moment for the SPP) as well as the corresponding direct magnetization current, which provides the difference between the Abraham and Minkowski momenta.

  20. A Study of Large Transverse Momentum Phenomena

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment studies the structure of those p-p and @*-p collisions which are characterized by a very high transverse momentum flow in the central region. Some specific items studied are:\\\\ \\\\ \\item -~~Structure of events, where the high transverse momentum is shared by charged and neutral hadron (``jets''). Transverse momentum distribution, correlations and momentum balance for such events. \\item -~~Structure of events, where the high transverse momentum is mostly carried by one identified particle. Quantum number dependence and quantum number correlations of the high transverse momentum events. \\item -~~Structure of events containing large transverse momentum leptons or lepton pairs or direct photons. \\end{enumerate}.sk -~~Study of low momentum electrons and photons. -~~Search for gluonium states. -~~Search for new and rare particles. \\\\ \\\\ A conventional C-type magnet with a 0.5 T field in the direction of the beams together with a 42-layer cylindrical drift chamber detector is used for momentum analysi...

  1. Gearless wind power generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, L.; Ridanpaeae, P.; Vihriaelae, H.; Peraelae, R. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab. of Electricity and Magnetism

    1998-10-01

    In the project a 100 kW axial flux permanent magnet wind power generator has been designed. The toroidal stator with air gap winding is placed between two rotating discs with permanent magnets. The magnet material is NdBFe due to its excellent magnetic properties compared to other materials. This type of topology enables a very large number of poles compared to conventional machine of the same size. A large number of poles is required to achieve a low rotational speed and consequently a direct driven system. The stator winding is formed by rectangular coils. The end winding is very short leading to small resistive losses. On the other hand, the absence of iron teeth causes eddy current losses in the conductors. These can be restricted to an acceptable level by keeping the wire diameter and flux density small. This means that the number of phases should be large. Several independent three phase systems may be used. The toothless stator also means that the iron losses are small and there exists no cogging torque

  2. State of the art in wind turbine aerodynamics and aeroelasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Voutsinas, S

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive review of wind turbine aeroelasticity is given. The aerodynamic part starts with the simple aerodynamic Blade Element Momentum Method and ends with giving a review of the work done applying CFD on wind turbine rotors. In between is explained some methods of intermediate complexity...

  3. Investigation of blade performance of horizontal axis wind turbine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The shape of rotor blade plays an important role in determining the overall aerodynamic performance of a horizontal axis wind turbine. In this work, blade is designed for a 5KW horizontal axis wind turbine which is already in market. For designing blade, blade element momentum theory (BEMT) is used and a computer ...

  4. Dust and Molecular Gas in the Winds of Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Alexander N.

    2015-04-01

    Galactic winds provide a fundamental mechanism for galaxy evolution. The outflow of material in winds remains the most likely culprit responsible for a host of galaxy observations, plus mounting evidence for galactic winds at times in the past points to their importance in understanding the history of the universe. Therefore, detailed observations of galactic winds are critical to fleshing out the narrative of galaxy evolution. In particular, the dust and molecular gas of a galaxy's interstellar medium (ISM) play crucial roles in the absorption, scattering, and reemission of starlight, the heating of the ISM, and provide critical materials for star formation. We present results from archival Spitzer Space Telescope ata and exceptionally deep Herschel Space Observatory data of the dust and molecular gas found in and around 20 nearby galaxies known to host galactic-scale winds. Selecting nearby galaxies has allowed us the resolution and sensitivity to differentiate dust and molecular gas outside the galaxies and observe their typically faint emission. These are the most detailed surveys currently available of the faint dust and molecular gas components in galactic winds, and we have utilized them to address the following questions: i) What are the location and morphology of dust and molecular gas, and how do these components compare with better known neutral and ionized gas features? ii) How much do dust and molecular gas contribute to the mass and energy of galactic winds? iii) Do the properties of the dust and molecular gas correlate with the properties of the wind-hosting galaxy? Spitzer archival data has revealed kiloparsec-scale polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) structures in the extraplanar regions of nearly all the wind-hosting galaxies we investigated. We found a nearly linear correlation between the extraplanar PAH emission and the total infrared flux, a proxy for star formation. Our results also suggest a correlation between the height of extraplanar

  5. Superconducting generators for wind turbines: design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2010-01-01

    The harmonic content of high temperature superconductors (HTS) field winding in air-core high temperature superconducting synchronous machine (HTS SM) has been addressed in order to investigate tendency of HTS SM towards mechanical oscillation and additional loss caused by higher flux harmonic. B....... Both analytical expressions for flux distribution and current sheet distribution have been derived and analyzed. The two main contributors to the AC loss of HTS rotor winding are also identified and their influence addressed on general level....

  6. A parameterization of momentum roughness length and displacement height for a wide range of canopy densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Verhoef

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Values of the momentum roughness length, z0, and displacement height, d, derived from wind profiles and momentum flux measurements, are selected from the literature for a variety of sparse canopies. These include savannah, tiger-bush and several row crops. A quality assessment of these data, conducted using criteria such as available fetch, height of wind speed measurement and homogeneity of the experimental site, reduced the initial total of fourteen sites to eight. These datapoints, combined with values carried forward from earlier studies on the parameterization of z0 and d, led to a maximum number of 16 and 24 datapoints available for d and z0, respectively. The data are compared with estimates of roughness length and displacement height as predicted from a detailed drag partition model, R92 (Raupach, 1992, and a simplified version of this model, R94 (Raupach, 1994. A key parameter in these models is the roughness density or frontal area index, λ. Both the comprehensive and the simplified model give accurate predictions of measured z0 and d values, but the optimal model coefficients are significantly different from the ones originally proposed in R92 and R94. The original model coefficients are based predominantly on measured aerodynamic parameters of relatively closed canopies and they were fitted `by eye'. In this paper, best-fit coefficients are found from a least squares minimization using the z0 and d values of selected good-quality data for sparse canopies and for the added, mainly closed canopies. According to a statistical analysis, based on the coefficient of determination (r2, the number of observations and the number of fitted model coefficients, the simplified model, R94, is deemed to be the most appropriate for future z0 and d predictions. A CR value of 0.35 and a cd1 value of about 20 are found to be appropriate for a large range of canopies varying in density from closed to very sparse. In this case, 99% of the total variance

  7. The mechanical advantage of the magnetosphere: solar-wind-related forces in the magnetosphere-ionosphere-Earth system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Vasyliūnas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions involve electric currents that circulate between the two regions; the associated Lorentz forces, existing in both regions as matched opposite pairs, are generally viewed as the primary mechanism by which linear momentum, derived ultimately from solar wind flow, is transferred from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere, where it is further transferred by collisions to the neutral atmosphere. For a given total amount of current, however, the total force is proportional to ℒB and in general, since ℒ2B~ constant by flux conservation, is much larger in the ionosphere than in the magnetosphere (ℒ = effective length, B = magnetic field. The magnetosphere may be described as possesing a mechanical advantage: the Lorentz force in it is coupled with a Lorentz force in the ionosphere that has been amplified by a factor given approximately by the square root of magnetic field magnitude ratio (~20 to 40 on field lines connected to the outer magnetosphere. The linear momentum transferred to the ionosphere (and thence to the atmosphere as the result of magnetic stresses applied by the magnetosphere can thus be much larger than the momentum supplied by the solar wind through tangential stress. The added linear momentum comes from within the Earth, extracted by the Lorentz force on currents that arise as a consequence of magnetic perturbation fields from the ionosphere (specifically, the shielding currents within the Earth that keep out the time-varying external fields. This implies at once that Fukushima's theorem on the vanishing of ground-level magnetic perturbations cannot be fully applicable, a conclusion confirmed by re-examining the assumptions from which the theorem is derived. To balance the inferred Lorentz force within the Earth's interior, there must exist an antisunward mechanical stress there, only a small part of which is the acceleration of the entire Earth system

  8. Flux-profile relationships over a fetch limited beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N.O.

    2005-01-01

    heat flux and momentum (phi(h) and phi(m)) and analysed as a function of atmospheric stability and fetch. For heat, the influences of the roughness sublayer and the internal boundary layer were in agreement with previous studies. For momentum, the strong vertical gradient of the flow just above...... surface. The different influence of the roughness sublayer on phi(h) and phi(m) is reflected in the aerodynamic resistance for the site. The aerodynamic resistance for sensible heat is considerably smaller than the corresponding value for momentum.......The influence of an internal boundary layer and a roughness sublayer on flux-profile relationships for momentum and sensible heat have been investigated for a closed beech forest canopy with limited fetch conditions. The influence was quantified by derivation of local scaling functions for sensible...

  9. No generalized transverse momentum dependent factorization in the hadroproduction of high transverse momentum hadrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, T.C.; Mulders, P.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    It has by now been established that standard QCD factorization using transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions fails in hadroproduction of nearly back-to-back hadrons with high transverse momentum. The essential problem is that gauge-invariant transverse momentum dependent parton

  10. Transverse momentum distributions of identified particles produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We assume that the transverse momentum distributions of identified particles measured in final state are contributed by a few energy sources which can be regarded as partons or quarks in the interacting system. The particle is contributed by each source with gluons which have transverse momentum distributions in an ...

  11. Transport processes: Momentum, heat and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geankoplis, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses basic transport processes including mass transport. Topics covered are as follows: an introduction to engineering principles and units; principles of momentum transfer and overall balances; principles of momentum transfer and applications; principles of steady-state heat transfer; principles of unsteady-state heat transfer; principles of mass transfer; principles of unsteady-state and convective mass transfer

  12. Essays on Momentum Strategies in Finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. van Oord (Arco)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis section briefly summarizes in which way we have investigated momentum in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we alter the momentum strategy to improve its performance, while in Chapter 3 we leave the strategy as is, but aim at improving its performance by hedging. In Chapter 4 we develop a

  13. Representational momentum in memory for pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyd, J J; Kelly, M H; DeKay, M L

    1990-11-01

    When a visual pattern is displayed at successively different orientations such that a rotation or translation is implied, an observer's memory for the final position is displaced forward. This phenomenon of representational momentum shares some similarities with physical momentum. For instance, the amount of memory shift is proportional to the implied velocity of the inducing display; representational momentum is specifically proportional to the final, not the average, velocity; representational momentum follows a continuous stopping function for the first 250 ms or so of the retention interval. In a previous paper (Kelly & Freyd, 1987) we demonstrated a forward memory asymmetry using implied changes in pitch, for subjects without formal musical training. In the current paper we replicate our earlier finding and show that the forward memory asymmetry occurs for subjects with formal musical training as well (Experiment 1). We then show the structural similarity between representational momentum in memory for pitch with previous reports of parametric effects using visual stimuli. We report a velocity effect for auditory momentum (Experiment 2), we demonstrate specifically that the velocity effect depends on the implied acceleration (Experiment 3), and we show that the stopping function for auditory momentum is qualitatively the same as that for visual momentum (Experiment 4). We consider the implications of these results for theories of mental representation.

  14. RADIATIVE AND MOMENTUM-BASED MECHANICAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL GALAXY EVOLUTION CODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the growth of black holes (BHs) in galaxies using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with new implementations of the momentum mechanical feedback, and restriction of accreted elements to those that are gravitationally bound to the BH. We also include the feedback from the X-ray radiation emitted by the BH, which heats the surrounding gas in the host galaxies, and adds radial momentum to the fluid. We perform simulations of isolated galaxies and merging galaxies and test various feedback models with the new treatment of the Bondi radius criterion. We find that overall the BH growth is similar to what has been obtained by earlier works using the Springel, Di Matteo, and Hernquist algorithms. However, the outflowing wind velocities and mechanical energy emitted by winds are considerably higher (v w ∼ 1000-3000 km s –1 ) compared to the standard thermal feedback model (v w ∼ 50-100 km s –1 ). While the thermal feedback model emits only 0.1% of BH released energy in winds, the momentum feedback model emits more than 30% of the total energy released by the BH in winds. In the momentum feedback model, the degree of fluctuation in both radiant and wind output is considerably larger than in standard treatments. We check that the new model of BH mass accretion agrees with analytic results for the standard Bondi problem.

  15. Wall correction model for wind tunnels with open test section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2006-01-01

    In the paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, which is based on a one-dimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. In the model...... the exchange of axial momentum between the tunnel and the ambient room is represented by a simple formula, derived from actuator disc computations. The correction model is validated against Navier-Stokes computations of the flow about a wind turbine rotor. Generally, the corrections from the model are in very...... good agreement with the CFD computations, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections....

  16. Wake Influence on Dynamic Load Characteristics of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Minu; Lee, Soogab; Kim, Taeseong

    2016-01-01

    Because the flow conditions of an offshore floating wind turbine and onshore fixed wind turbine differ, it is debatable whether the aerodynamic load predictions of an offshore floating wind turbine using the conventional blade-element momentum theory, which does not consider the dynamic wake effe...

  17. On the viability of wind farms with 2- and 3-bladed wind turbines: a numerical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Imran; Chatterjee, Tanmoy; Peet, Julia; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2017-11-01

    With offshore wind farms gaining substantial momentum in recent years, 2-bladed turbines (2BT) are increasingly becoming a viable alternative to 3-bladed counterparts (3BT). Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments with wind farms containing 2BT and 3BT in alternating rows were performed to explore potential benefits associated with the relatively higher momentum available in the wake of 2BT. The flow within and above the wind farm and power measurements were inspected for various wind farm layouts. Large-Eddy simulations complemented with wind-tunnel measurements at various locations revealed distinctive effects of the 2BT on the power output of the wind farms as well as the distribution and structure of the surrounding flow. During the talk, we will discuss the potential of using a combination of 2BT and 3BT for practical applications.

  18. Momentum Maps and Stochastic Clebsch Action Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzeiro, Ana Bela; Holm, Darryl D.; Ratiu, Tudor S.

    2018-01-01

    We derive stochastic differential equations whose solutions follow the flow of a stochastic nonlinear Lie algebra operation on a configuration manifold. For this purpose, we develop a stochastic Clebsch action principle, in which the noise couples to the phase space variables through a momentum map. This special coupling simplifies the structure of the resulting stochastic Hamilton equations for the momentum map. In particular, these stochastic Hamilton equations collectivize for Hamiltonians that depend only on the momentum map variable. The Stratonovich equations are derived from the Clebsch variational principle and then converted into Itô form. In comparing the Stratonovich and Itô forms of the stochastic dynamical equations governing the components of the momentum map, we find that the Itô contraction term turns out to be a double Poisson bracket. Finally, we present the stochastic Hamiltonian formulation of the collectivized momentum map dynamics and derive the corresponding Kolmogorov forward and backward equations.

  19. Population momentum across vertebrate life histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, D.N.; Grand, J.B.; Arnold, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Population abundance is critically important in conservation, management, and demographic theory. Thus, to better understand how perturbations to the life history affect long-term population size, we examined population momentum for four vertebrate classes with different life history strategies. In a series of demographic experiments we show that population momentum generally has a larger effect on long-term population size for organisms with long generation times than for organisms with short generation times. However, patterns between population momentum and generation time varied across taxonomic groups and according to the life history parameter that was changed. Our findings indicate that momentum may be an especially important aspect of population dynamics for long-lived vertebrates, and deserves greater attention in life history studies. Further, we discuss the importance of population momentum in natural resource management, pest control, and conservation arenas. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Momentum of the Pure Radiation Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The local momentum equation of the pure radiation field is considered in terms of an earlier elaborated and revised electromagnetic theory. In this equation the contribution from the volume force is found to vanish in rectangular geometry, and to become nonzero but negligible in cylindrical geometry. Consequently the radiated momentum is due to the Poynting vector only, as in conventional electrodynamics. It results in physically relevant properties of a photon model having an angular momentum (spin. The Poynting vector concept is further compared to the quantized momentum concept for a free particle, as represented by a spatial gradient operator acting on the wave function. However, this latter otherwise successful concept leads to difficulties in the physical interpretation of known and expected photon properties such as the spin, the negligible loss of transverse momentum across a bounding surface, and the Lorentz invariance.

  1. Momentum Maps and Stochastic Clebsch Action Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzeiro, Ana Bela; Holm, Darryl D.; Ratiu, Tudor S.

    2017-11-01

    We derive stochastic differential equations whose solutions follow the flow of a stochastic nonlinear Lie algebra operation on a configuration manifold. For this purpose, we develop a stochastic Clebsch action principle, in which the noise couples to the phase space variables through a momentum map. This special coupling simplifies the structure of the resulting stochastic Hamilton equations for the momentum map. In particular, these stochastic Hamilton equations collectivize for Hamiltonians that depend only on the momentum map variable. The Stratonovich equations are derived from the Clebsch variational principle and then converted into Itô form. In comparing the Stratonovich and Itô forms of the stochastic dynamical equations governing the components of the momentum map, we find that the Itô contraction term turns out to be a double Poisson bracket. Finally, we present the stochastic Hamiltonian formulation of the collectivized momentum map dynamics and derive the corresponding Kolmogorov forward and backward equations.

  2. Why the Coriolis force turns a wind farm wake clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2017-01-01

    and a roughness change. When the wind farm simulations are performed with a horizontally constant Coriolis force in order to isolate the effect of the wind veer, the wind farm wake deflection of the 5 × 5 actuator disks simulation remains unchanged. This proves that the present wind veer deflects the wind farm......The interaction between the Coriolis force and a wind farm wake is investigated by Reynoldsaveraged Navier–Stokes simulations, using two different wind farm representations: a high roughness and 5 × 5 actuator disks. Surprisingly, the calculated wind farm wake deflection is the opposite in the two...... simulations. A momentum balance in the cross flow direction shows that the interaction between the Coriolis force and the 5 × 5 actuator disks is complex due to turbulent mixing of veered momentum from above into the wind farm, which is not observed for the interaction between the Coriolis force...

  3. Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    highly charged ions of the solar wind. The main challenge in predicting the resultant photon flux in the X-ray energy bands is due to the...Newton, an X-ray astronomical observatory. We use OMNI solar wind conditions, heavy ion composition data from ACE, the Hodges neutral hydrogen model...of SWEEP was to compare theoretical models of X-ray emission in the terrestrial magnetosphere caused by the Solar Wind Charge Exchange

  4. Investigation of Flyback Transformer Flux Leakage Reduction Ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvardas Bielskis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental investigation and design optimization of flyback transformer are presented. Aim of the work is to investigate experimentally the impact of the flyback transformer design on the flux leakage and maximal output power. It is difficult to evaluate the effect of the leakage flux mathematically because it depends on various factors: the position of the windings relative to each other; the position of the windings in the transformer; the distance between the winding. A multi-winding flyback transformer was used for experiments. Using the results of the experiments optimal design of the investigated flyback transformer was defined.

  5. Electrical system studies for the grid connection of wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, K.; Hanson, J.; Hopp, S.; Zimmermann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Wind power is gaining momentum in the world's energy balance. Several issues have to be addressed whenever power-generating devices are connected to the grid. The paper describes studies needed to evaluate the influence of wind farms on the connected transmission system and how faults in the system impact on induction generators in a wind farm. Some generalized results of studies for an offshore wind farm in the North Sea and a Bulgarian wind farm show how studies can influence the layout of the internal network and the electrical equipment. (authors)

  6. The Darrieus wind turbine for electrical power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. L.

    1981-06-01

    Aspects of wind as an energy source and the momentum theory of wind turbines are briefly examined. Types of Darrieus wind turbine are described; attention is given to a turbine with airfoil blades curved in troposkein form, and a turbine with straight blades of fixed or variable pitch. The Darrieus vertical-axis wind turbine is then considered with regard to aerodynamics, annual energy output, structures, control systems, and energy storage. Brief reviews of selected Darrieus wind turbine projects are given, including those at Magdalen Islands, Canada, Sandia Laboratories, Reading University, and Australia and New Zealand.

  7. Wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a translation of the edition published in the USA under the title of ''wind power: renewable energy for home, farm and business''. In the wake of mass blackouts and energy crises, wind power remains a largely untapped resource of renewable energy. It is a booming worldwide industry whose technology, under the collective wing of aficionados like author Paul Gipe, is coming of age. Wind Power guides us through the emergent, sometimes daunting discourse on wind technology, giving frank explanations of how to use wind technology wisely and sound advice on how to avoid common mistakes. Since the mid-1970's, Paul Gipe has played a part in nearly every aspect of wind energy development from installing small turbines to promoting wind energy worldwide. As an American proponent of renewable energy, Gipe has earned the acclaim and respect of European energy specialists for years, but his arguments have often fallen on deaf ears at home. Today, the topic of wind power is cropping up everywhere from the beaches of Cape Cod to the Oregon-Washington border, and one wind turbine is capable of producing enough electricity per year to run 200 average American households. Now, Paul Gipe is back to shed light on this increasingly important energy source with a revised edition of Wind Power. Over the course of his career, Paul Gipe has been a proponent, participant, observer, and critic of the wind industry. His experience with wind has given rise to two previous books on the subject, Wind Energy Basics and Wind Power for Home and Business, which have sold over 50,000 copies. Wind Power for Home and Business has become a staple for both homeowners and professionals interested in the subject, and now, with energy prices soaring, interest in wind power is hitting an all-time high. With chapters on output and economics, Wind Power discloses how much you can expect from each method of wind technology, both in terms of energy and financial savings. The book updated models

  8. California's Future Carbon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

    2008-12-01

    The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

  9. Simulations of large winds and wind shears induced by gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional (2-D numerical model, we simulated gravity waves (GWs breaking and their contributions to the formation of large winds and wind shears in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT. An eddy diffusion coefficient is used in the 2-D numerical model to parameterize realistic turbulent mixing. Our study shows that the momentum deposited by breaking GWs accelerates the mean wind. The resultant large background wind increases the GW's apparent horizontal phase velocity and decreases the GW's intrinsic frequency and vertical wavelength. Both the accelerated mean wind and the decreased GW vertical wavelength contribute to the enhancement of wind shears. This, in turn, creates a background condition that favors the occurrence of GW instability, breaking, and momentum deposition, as well as mean wind acceleration, which further enhances the wind shears. We find that GWs with longer vertical wavelengths and faster horizontal phase velocity can induce larger winds, but they may not necessarily induce larger wind shears. In addition, the background temperature can affect the time and height of GW breaking, thus causing accelerated mean winds and wind shears.

  10. DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s –2 to 320 km s –1 , thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 μT, 6 R ☉ above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 × 10 11 Wb (1.6 × 10 19 Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day –1 and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 × 10 13 Wb yr –1 (6 × 10 21 Mx yr –1 ) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to ∼ – 0.2 nT yr –1 change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

  11. Momentum scale in the HARP TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Catanesi, M G; Edgecock, R; Ellis, M; Soler, F J P; Gössling, C; Bunyatov, S; Krasnoperov, A; Popov, B; Serdiouk, V; Tereschenko, V; Di Capua, E; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Artamonov, A; Giani, S; Gilardoni, S; Gorbunov, P; Grant, A; Grossheim, A; Ivanchenko, V; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I; Chernyaev, E; Tsukerman, I; Veenhof, R; Wiebusch, C; Zucchelli, P; Blondel, A; Borghi, S; Morone, M C; Prior, G; Schroeter, R; Meurer, C; Gastaldi, Ugo; Mills, G B; Graulich, J S; Grégoire, G; Bonesini, M; Ferri, F; Kirsanov, M; Bagulya, A; Grichine, V; Polukhina, N; Palladino, V; Coney, L; Schmitz, D; Barr, G; De Santo, A; Bobisut, F; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Mezzetto, M; Dumarchez, J; Dore, U; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Booth, C; Howlett, L; Bogomilov, M; Chizhov, M; Kolev, D; Tsenov, R; Piperov, S; Temnikov, P; Apollonio, M; Chimenti, P; Giannini, G; Burguet-Castell, J; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Martín-Albo, J; Novella, P; Sorel, M

    2007-01-01

    Recently a claim was made that the reconstruction of the large angle tracks in the HARP TPC was affected by a momentum bias as large as 15% at 500 MeV/c transverse momentum. In the following we recall the main issues with the momentum measurement in the HARP TPC, and describe the cross-checks made to validate the momentum scale. Proton-proton elastic scattering data off the hydrogen target are used to alibrate the momentum of charged particles with a precision evaluated to be 3.5%. A full description of the time development of the dynamic distortions in the TPC during physics spills is now available together with a correction algorithm. This allows a new cross-check using an enlarged data set made by comparing positive and negative pion elasticscattering data collected with negative polarity of the solenoid magnet. These data confirm the absence of a bias in the sagitta measurement. The dE/dx versus momentum curves are revisited, and shown to provide a confirmation that the HARP momentum calibration is correc...

  12. BOREAS TF-02 SSA-OA Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Precipitation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Energy, carbon dioxide, water vaport, and momentum flux data collected above the canopy and in profiles through the canopy, along with meteorological data at the...

  13. BOREAS AFM-03 Electra 1994 Aircraft Flux and Moving Window Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Measurements of the fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide, and ozone over the entire BOREAS region to tie together measurements made in both...

  14. Latitudinal variation of air sea fluxes in the western Indian Ocean during austral summer and fall

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Rao, L.V.G.

    degrees S and 60 degrees -70 degrees S zones for summer and fall, respectively. Higher momentum flux values over the 40 degrees -50 degrees S zone in summer shifted to the 50 degrees -60 degrees S zone during fall....

  15. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  16. Laboratory development of wind turbine simulator using variable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The wind energy conversion system simulates the steady state wind turbine behaviors in a controlled environment without dependence on natural wind resource and ..... The equation shows the relationship between rotor current and slip frequency at a given flux which is constant in constant torque operating region. 4.

  17. Deuterium electrodisintegration at high recoil momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenholen, G.

    1996-01-01

    The availability of continuous electron beams made it possible to carry out various deuterium electro-disintegration experiments in kinematical domains corresponding to a high recoil momentum. Three such experiments are discussed: 1) the left-right asymmetry with respect to the direction of the momentum transfer has been measured with good precision; 2) cross sections have been obtained in a kinematical region well above the quasi-elastic peak; 3) data have been taken in quasi-elastic kinematics that can be used to study high-momentum components in the deuterium wave function [ru

  18. Parameterization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2015-06-01

    boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near-surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low-level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidence around thermal plumes in typically less than 1 h. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong nonlinearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE chemistry transport model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERA-Interim reanalyses. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyses used for nudging themselves. It also generates dust emissions in better agreement with current estimates, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  19. Wind Turbine Performance in an Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Betz Analysis Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jacob; Lele, Sanjiva

    2017-11-01

    Using large eddy simulation of an infinite (periodic in x and y) wind farm, we compute momentum and mean mechanical energy budgets. We focus on the control volume defined by a streamtube of the mean flow that intersects with a turbine actuator disk, in a similar way as traditional Betz analysis is done for a streamtube in inviscid, irrotational flow through an actuator disk. This analysis reveals that many of the same phenomena from Betz analysis are found in the atmospheric boundary layer case. The streamtube expands as the fluid decelerates through the turbine, and the pressure increases and then drops sharply across the actuator disk. However, away from the turbine, the downstream streamtube shrinks and fluid accelerates due to turbulent mixing. In this way, turbulence alters the idealization of the Betz streamtube. We anticipate that the Betz analysis can be applied most effectively to a wind turbine in the atmospheric boundary layer by focusing on the immediate vicinity around the turbine, where inviscid, potential flow effects dominate. Adjustments can be made to account for the vertical energy flux in wind farms, as well as the energy contained in velocity fluctuations.

  20. Ice and ocean velocity in the Arctic marginal ice zone: Ice roughness and momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia T. Cole

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between sea ice concentration, sea ice roughness, ocean stratification, and momentum transfer to the ice and ocean is subject to seasonal and decadal variations that are crucial to understanding the present and future air-ice-ocean system in the Arctic. In this study, continuous observations in the Canada Basin from March through December 2014 were used to investigate spatial differences and temporal changes in under-ice roughness and momentum transfer as the ice cover evolved seasonally. Observations of wind, ice, and ocean properties from four clusters of drifting instrument systems were complemented by direct drill-hole measurements and instrumented overhead flights by NASA operation IceBridge in March, as well as satellite remote sensing imagery about the instrument clusters. Spatially, directly estimated ice-ocean drag coefficients varied by a factor of three with rougher ice associated with smaller multi-year ice floe sizes embedded within the first-year-ice/multi-year-ice conglomerate. Temporal differences in the ice-ocean drag coefficient of 20–30% were observed prior to the mixed layer shoaling in summer and were associated with ice concentrations falling below 100%. The ice-ocean drag coefficient parameterization was found to be invalid in September with low ice concentrations and small ice floe sizes. Maximum momentum transfer to the ice occurred for moderate ice concentrations, and transfer to the ocean for the lowest ice concentrations and shallowest stratification. Wind work and ocean work on the ice were the dominant terms in the kinetic energy budget of the ice throughout the melt season, consistent with free drift conditions. Overall, ice topography, ice concentration, and the shallow summer mixed layer all influenced mixed layer currents and the transfer of momentum within the air-ice-ocean system. The observed changes in momentum transfer show that care must be taken to determine appropriate parameterizations

  1. Computational Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong

    To analyse the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine rotors, the main tool in use today is the 1D-Blade Element Momentum (BEM) technique combined with 2D airfoil data. Because of its simplicity, the BEM technique is employed by industry when designing new wind turbine blades. However, in order...... to obtain more detailed information of the flow structures and to determine more accurately loads and power yield of wind turbines or cluster of wind turbines, it is required to resort to more sophisticated techniques, such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). As computer resources keep on improving year...... by year (about ten times every five years from statistics over the last twenty years), CFD has now become a popular tool for studying the aerodynamics of wind turbines. The present thesis consists of 19 selected papers dealing with the development and use of CFD methods for studying the aerodynamics...

  2. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, E.; Hakobyan, H.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Braverman, M.; Brooks, W. K.; Gilad, S.; Adhikari, K. P.; Arrington, J.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Beck, A.; Beck, S. M. -T.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bertozzi, W.; Biselli, A.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Forest, T.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkanov, B. I.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Korover, I.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lowry, M.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. M.; Mustapha, B.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Rossi, P.; Sabatie, F.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Shneor, R.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Wood, M. H.; Wood, S. A.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zheng, X.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-16

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions: protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority of fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron-scattering measurements using C-12, Al-27, Fe-56, and Pb-208 targets show that even in heavy, neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few-body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin-state, ultracold atomic gas systems.

  3. Constituent models and large transverse momentum reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    The discussion of constituent models and large transverse momentum reactions includes the structure of hard scattering models, dimensional counting rules for large transverse momentum reactions, dimensional counting and exclusive processes, the deuteron form factor, applications to inclusive reactions, predictions for meson and photon beams, the charge-cubed test for the e/sup +-/p → e/sup +-/γX asymmetry, the quasi-elastic peak in inclusive hadronic reactions, correlations, and the multiplicity bump at large transverse momentum. Also covered are the partition method for bound state calculations, proofs of dimensional counting, minimal neutralization and quark--quark scattering, the development of the constituent interchange model, and the A dependence of high transverse momentum reactions

  4. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission...

  5. Energy-momentum tensor in scalar QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, S.D.; Misra, A.

    1988-01-01

    We consider the renormalization of the energy-momentum tensor in scalar quantum electrodynamics. We show the need for adding an improvement term to the conventional energy-momentum tensor. We consider two possible forms for the improvement term: (i) one in which the improvement coefficient is a finite function of bare parameters of the theory (so that the energy-momentum tensor can be obtained from an action that is a finite function of bare quantities); (ii) one in which the improvement coefficient is a finite quantity, i.e., a finite function of renormalized parameters. We establish a negative result; viz., neither form leads to a finite energy-momentum tensor to O(e 2 λ/sup n/). .AE

  6. Momentum and hamiltonian in complex action theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, Keiichi; Nielsen, Holger Frits Bech

    2012-01-01

    In the complex action theory (CAT) we explicitly examine how the momentum and Hamiltonian are defined from the Feynman path integral (FPI) point of view. In arXiv:1104.3381[quant-ph], introducing a philosophy to keep the analyticity in parameter variables of FPI and defining a modified set...... of complex conjugate, hermitian conjugates and bras, we have extended $| q >$ and $| p >$ to complex $q$ and $p$ so that we can deal with a complex coordinate $q$ and a complex momentum $p$. After reviewing them briefly, we describe in terms of the newly introduced devices the time development of a $\\xi......$-parametrized wave function, which is a solution to an eigenvalue problem of a momentum operator $\\hat{p}$, in FPI with a starting Lagrangian. Solving the eigenvalue problem, we derive the momentum and Hamiltonian. Oppositely, starting from the Hamiltonian we derive the Lagrangian in FPI, and we are led...

  7. Exclusive processes at high momentum transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoker, Paul

    2002-01-01

    This book focuses on the physics of exclusive processes at high momentum transfer and their description in terms of generalized parton distributions, perturbative QCD, and relativistic quark models. It covers recent developments in the field, both theoretical and experimental.

  8. Amplitude damping channel for orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneering work on the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, much attention has been devoted to the subject, with particular attention into the quantum aspects of information processing using OAM. Furthermore...

  9. Do Momentum Strategies Work?: - Australian Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Michael E. Drew; Madhu Veeraraghavan; Min Ye

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the profitability of momentum investment strategy and the predictive power of trading volume for equities listed in the Australian Stock Exchange. Recent research finds that momentum and trading volume appear to predict subsequent returns in U.S. market and past volume helps to reconcile intermediate-horizon “under reaction” and long-horizon “overreaction” effects. However, bulk of the evidence on this important relationship between past returns and future returns is l...

  10. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Parrinello, C. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Soni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16{sup 3}{times}40 lattice at {beta}=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  11. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); Parrinello, C. (New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3][times]40 lattice at [beta]=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  12. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Dept. of Physics, Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Parrinello, C. (Physics Dept., New York Univ., NY (United States) Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3] x 40 lattice at [beta] = 6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others. (orig.)

  13. Transverse angular momentum in topological photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Min; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Fu-Li; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Engineering local angular momentum of structured light fields in real space enables applications in many fields, in particular, the realization of unidirectional robust transport in topological photonic crystals with a non-trivial Berry vortex in momentum space. Here, we show transverse angular momentum modes in silicon topological photonic crystals when considering transverse electric polarization. Excited by a chiral external source with either transverse spin angular momentum or transverse phase vortex, robust light flow propagating along opposite directions is observed in several kinds of sharp-turn interfaces between two topologically-distinct silicon photonic crystals. A transverse orbital angular momentum mode with alternating phase vortex exists at the boundary of two such photonic crystals. In addition, unidirectional transport is robust to the working frequency even when the ring size or location of the pseudo-spin source varies in a certain range, leading to the superiority of the broadband photonic device. These findings enable one to make use of transverse angular momentum, a kind of degree of freedom, to achieve unidirectional robust transport in the telecom region and other potential applications in integrated photonic circuits, such as on-chip robust delay lines.

  14. Rindler fluid with weak momentum relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimphun, Sunly; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Park, Chanyong; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2018-01-01

    We realize the weak momentum relaxation in Rindler fluid, which lives on the time-like cutoff surface in an accelerating frame of flat spacetime. The translational invariance is broken by massless scalar fields with weak strength. Both of the Ward identity and the momentum relaxation rate of Rindler fluid are obtained, with higher order correction in terms of the strength of momentum relaxation. The Rindler fluid with momentum relaxation could also be approached through the near horizon limit of cutoff AdS fluid with momentum relaxation, which lives on a finite time-like cutoff surface in Anti-de Sitter(AdS) spacetime, and further could be connected with the holographic conformal fluid living on AdS boundary at infinity. Thus, in the holographic Wilson renormalization group flow of the fluid/gravity correspondence with momentum relaxation, the Rindler fluid can be considered as the Infrared Radiation(IR) fixed point, and the holographic conformal fluid plays the role of the ultraviolet(UV) fixed point.

  15. The Solar Wind Environment in Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pognan, Quentin; Garraffo, Cecilia; Cohen, Ofer; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2018-03-01

    We use magnetograms of eight solar analogs of ages 30 Myr–3.6 Gyr obtained from Zeeman Doppler Imaging and taken from the literature, together with two solar magnetograms, to drive magnetohydrodynamical wind simulations and construct an evolutionary scenario of the solar wind environment and its angular momentum loss rate. With observed magnetograms of the radial field strength as the only variant in the wind model, we find that a power-law model fitted to the derived angular momentum loss rate against time, t, results in a spin-down relation Ω ∝ t ‑0.51, for angular speed Ω, which is remarkably consistent with the well-established Skumanich law Ω ∝ t ‑0.5. We use the model wind conditions to estimate the magnetospheric standoff distances for an Earth-like test planet situated at 1 au for each of the stellar cases, and to obtain trends of minimum and maximum wind ram pressure and average ram pressure in the solar system through time. The wind ram pressure declines with time as \\overline{{P}ram}}\\propto {t}2/3, amounting to a factor of 50 or so over the present lifetime of the solar system.

  16. Studies of momentum transfer and X-ray spectra in a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Pierre

    Studies of momentum transfer from a ballistic pendulum appear to give satisfactory results for absorbed laser energies in excess of 200 mJ i.e. for fluxes in the 3.10 10 to 3.10 12 W.cm -2 range. A hard X-ray component attributed to fast electrons was revealed by an X-ray spectrometer with a PM system of greater sensitivity than PIN diodes. The laser energy is however too weak to enable studies to be conducted as a function of laser flux or measurements to be performed on targets of low Z [fr

  17. Fluctuation theorem for entropy production during effusion of an ideal gas with momentum transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin; Van den Broeck, C; Kawai, R; Lindenberg, Katja

    2007-06-01

    We derive an exact expression for entropy production during effusion of an ideal gas driven by momentum transfer in addition to energy and particle flux. Following the treatment in Cleuren [Phys. Rev. E 74, 021117 (2006)], we construct a master equation formulation of the process and explicitly verify the thermodynamic fluctuation theorem, thereby directly exhibiting its extended applicability to particle flows and hence to hydrodynamic systems.

  18. Estimations of ABL fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvi, Gal-Chen; Mei, XU; Eberhard, Wynn

    1990-01-01

    Techniques for extracting boundary layer parameters from measurements of a short pulse CO2 Doppler Lidar are described. The radial velocity measurements have a range resolution of 150 m. With a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz, it is possible to perform scannings in two perpendicular vertical planes in approx. 72 s. By continuously operating the Lidar for about an hour, one can extract stable statistics of the radial velocities. Assuming that the turbulence is horizontally homogeneous, the mean wind, its standard deviations, and the momentum fluxes were estimated. From the vertically pointing beam, the first, second, and third moments of the vertical velocity were also estimated. Spectral analysis of the radial velocities is also performed from which, by examining the amplitude of the power spectrum at the inertial range, the kinetic energy dissipation was deduced. Finally, using the statistical form of the Navier-Stokes equations, the surface heat flux is derived as the residual balance between the vertical gradient of the third moment of the vertical velocity and the kinetic energy dissipation.

  19. Estimations of ABL fluxes and other turbulence parameters from Doppler lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzvi, Gal-Chen; Mei, Xu; Eberhard, Wynn

    Techniques for extracting boundary layer parameters from measurements of a short pulse CO2 Doppler Lidar are described. The radial velocity measurements have a range resolution of 150 m. With a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz, it is possible to perform scannings in two perpendicular vertical planes in approx. 72 s. By continuously operating the Lidar for about an hour, one can extract stable statistics of the radial velocities. Assuming that the turbulence is horizontally homogeneous, the mean wind, its standard deviations, and the momentum fluxes were estimated. From the vertically pointing beam, the first, second, and third moments of the vertical velocity were also estimated. Spectral analysis of the radial velocities is also performed from which, by examining the amplitude of the power spectrum at the inertial range, the kinetic energy dissipation was deduced. Finally, using the statistical form of the Navier-Stokes equations, the surface heat flux is derived as the residual balance between the vertical gradient of the third moment of the vertical velocity and the kinetic energy dissipation.

  20. Accounting for the speed shear in wind turbine power performance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Gottschall, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The current IEC standard for wind turbine power performance measurement only requires measurement of the wind speed at hub height assuming this wind speed to be representative for the whole rotor swept area. However, the power output of a wind turbine depends on the kinetic energy flux, which...

  1. The influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wind regime (Mahrt et al. ... Influence of wind speed on surface layer stability and turbulent fluxes. 1401. Table 1. Specifications of the eddy ..... different soil and vegetation properties and other regional climatic factors. Earlier, it was found that.

  2. Surface fluxes in heterogeneous landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay Hasager, C.

    1997-01-01

    The surface fluxes in homogeneous landscapes are calculated by similarity scaling principles. The methodology is well establish. In heterogeneous landscapes with spatial changes in the micro scale range, i e from 100 m to 10 km, advective effects are significant. The present work focus on these effects in an agricultural countryside typical for the midlatitudes. Meteorological and satellite data from a highly heterogeneous landscape in the Rhine Valley, Germany was collected in the large-scale field experiment TRACT (Transport of pollutants over complex terrain) in 1992. Classified satellite images, Landsat TM and ERS SAR, are used as basis for roughness maps. The roughnesses were measured at meteorological masts in the various cover classes and assigned pixel by pixel to the images. The roughness maps are aggregated, i e spatially averaged, into so-called effective roughness lengths. This calculation is performed by a micro scale aggregation model. The model solves the linearized atmospheric flow equations by a numerical (Fast Fourier Transform) method. This model also calculate maps of friction velocity and momentum flux pixel wise in heterogeneous landscapes. It is indicated how the aggregation methodology can be used to calculate the heat fluxes based on the relevant satellite data i e temperature and soil moisture information. (au) 10 tabs., 49 ills., 223 refs.

  3. Revolution evolution: tracing angular momentum during star and planetary system formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Claire Louise

    2015-04-01

    Stars form via the gravitational collapse of molecular clouds during which time the protostellar object contracts by over seven orders of magnitude. If all the angular momentum present in the natal cloud was conserved during collapse, stars would approach rotational velocities rapid enough to tear themselves apart within just a few Myr. In contrast to this, observations of pre-main sequence rotation rates are relatively slow (∼ 1 - 15 days) indicating that significant quantities of angular momentum must be removed from the star. I use observations of fully convective pre-main sequence stars in two well-studied, nearby regions of star formation (namely the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus-Auriga) to determine the removal rate of stellar angular momentum. I find the accretion disc-hosting stars to be rotating at a slower rate and contain less specific angular momentum than the disc-less stars. I interpret this as indicating a period of accretion disc-regulated angular momentum evolution followed by near-constant rotational evolution following disc dispersal. Furthermore, assuming that the age spread inferred from the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram constructed for the star forming region is real, I find that the removal rate of angular momentum during the accretion-disc hosting phase to be more rapid than that expected from simple disc-locking theory whereby contraction occurs at a fixed rotation period. This indicates a more efficient process of angular momentum removal must operate, most likely in the form of an accretion-driven stellar wind or outflow emanating from the star-disc interaction. The initial circumstellar envelope that surrounds a protostellar object during the earliest stages of star formation is rotationally flattened into a disc as the star contracts. An effective viscosity, present within the disc, enables the disc to evolve: mass accretes inwards through the disc and onto the star while momentum migrates outwards, forcing the outer regions of the

  4. Wind energy

    CERN Document Server

    Woll, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Across the country, huge open spaces are covered in gently turning wind turbines. In Wind Energy, explore how these machines generate electricity, learn about the history of wind power, and discover the latest advances in the field. Easy-to-read text, vivid images, and helpful back matter give readers a clear look at this subject. Features include a table of contents, infographics, a glossary, additional resources, and an index. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Core Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  5. Mass and momentum conservation for fluid simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Momentum conservation has long been used as a design principle for solid simulation (e.g. collisions between rigid bodies, mass-spring elastic and damping forces, etc.), yet it has not been widely used for fluid simulation. In fact, semi-Lagrangian advection does not conserve momentum, but is still regularly used as a bread and butter method for fluid simulation. In this paper, we propose a modification to the semi-Lagrangian method in order to make it fully conserve momentum. While methods of this type have been proposed earlier in the computational physics literature, they are not necessarily appropriate for coarse grids, large time steps or inviscid flows, all of which are common in graphics applications. In addition, we show that the commonly used vorticity confinement turbulence model can be modified to exactly conserve momentum as well. We provide a number of examples that illustrate the benefits of this new approach, both in conserving fluid momentum and passively advected scalars such as smoke density. In particular, we show that our new method is amenable to efficient smoke simulation with one time step per frame, whereas the traditional non-conservative semi-Lagrangian method experiences serious artifacts when run with these large time steps, especially when object interaction is considered. Copyright © 2011 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  6. The amplituhedron from momentum twistor diagrams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yuntao [Department of Physics, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ, 08544 (United States); He, Song [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ, 08540 (United States); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2015-02-10

    We propose a new diagrammatic formulation of the all-loop scattering amplitudes/Wilson loops in planar N=4 SYM, dubbed the “momentum-twistor diagrams”. These are on-shell-diagrams obtained by gluing trivalent black and white vertices in momentum twistor space, which, in the reduced diagram case, are known to be related to diagrams in the original twistor space. The new diagrams are manifestly Yangian invariant, and they naturally represent factorization and forward-limit contributions in the all-loop BCFW recursion relations in momentum twistor space, in a fashion that is completely different from those in momentum space. We show how to construct and evaluate momentum-twistor diagrams, and how to use them to obtain tree-level amplitudes and loop-level integrands; in particular the latter involve isolated bubble-structures for loop variables arising from forward limits, or the entangled removal of particles. From each diagram, the generalized “boundary measurement” directly gives the C, D matrices, thus a cell in the amplituhedron associated with the amplitude, and we expect that our diagrammatic representations of the amplitude provide triangulations of the amplituhedron. To demonstrate the computational power of the formalism, we give explicit results for general two-loop integrands, and the cells of the amplituhedron for two-loop MHV amplitudes.

  7. Wind turbine aerodynamic response under atmospheric icing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etemaddar, M.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, T.

    2014-01-01

    -four hours of icing, with time varying wind speed and atmospheric icing conditions, was simulated on a rotor. Computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, was used to estimate the aerodynamic coefficients of the blade after icing. The results were also validated against wind tunnel measurements performed at LM...... Wind Power using a NACA64618 airfoil. The effects of changes in geometry and surface roughness are considered in the simulation. A blade element momentum code WT-Perf is then used to quantify the degradation in performance curves. The dynamic responses of the wind turbine under normal and iced...

  8. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 60; Issue 3 ... Quantum defect theory; wave functions of alkali-metal atoms; momentum properties. ... to study the momentum properties of atoms from 3Li to 37Rb. The numerical results obtained for the momentum density, moments of momentum density and Compton ...

  9. Momentum and Stochastic Momentum for Stochastic Gradient, Newton, Proximal Point and Subspace Descent Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Loizou, Nicolas

    2017-12-27

    In this paper we study several classes of stochastic optimization algorithms enriched with heavy ball momentum. Among the methods studied are: stochastic gradient descent, stochastic Newton, stochastic proximal point and stochastic dual subspace ascent. This is the first time momentum variants of several of these methods are studied. We choose to perform our analysis in a setting in which all of the above methods are equivalent. We prove global nonassymptotic linear convergence rates for all methods and various measures of success, including primal function values, primal iterates (in L2 sense), and dual function values. We also show that the primal iterates converge at an accelerated linear rate in the L1 sense. This is the first time a linear rate is shown for the stochastic heavy ball method (i.e., stochastic gradient descent method with momentum). Under somewhat weaker conditions, we establish a sublinear convergence rate for Cesaro averages of primal iterates. Moreover, we propose a novel concept, which we call stochastic momentum, aimed at decreasing the cost of performing the momentum step. We prove linear convergence of several stochastic methods with stochastic momentum, and show that in some sparse data regimes and for sufficiently small momentum parameters, these methods enjoy better overall complexity than methods with deterministic momentum. Finally, we perform extensive numerical testing on artificial and real datasets, including data coming from average consensus problems.

  10. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  11. Borel resummation of transverse momentum distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We present a new prescription for the resummation of contributions due to soft gluon emission to the transverse momentum distribution of processes such as Drell-Yan production in hadronic collisions. We show that familiar difficulties in obtaining resummed results as a function of transverse momentum starting from impact-parameter space resummation are related to the divergence of the perturbative expansion of the momentum-space result. We construct a resummed expression by Borel resummation of this divergent series, removing the divergence in the Borel inversion through the inclusion of a suitable higher twist term. The ensuing resummation prescription is free of numerical instabilities, is stable upon the inclusion of subleading terms, and the original divergent perturbative series is asymptotic to it. We compare our results to those obtained using alternative prescriptions, and discuss the ambiguities related to the resummation procedure

  12. Borel resummation of transverse momentum distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvini, Marco; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We present a new prescription for the resummation of contributions due to soft gluon emission to the trasverse momentum distribution of processes such as Drell-Yan production in hadronic collisions. We show that familiar difficulties in obtaining resummed results as a function of transverse momentum starting from impact-parameter space resummation are related to the divergence of the perturbative expansion of the momentum-space result. We construct a resummed expression by Borel resummation of this divergent series, removing the divergence in the Borel inversion through the inclusion of a suitable higher twist term. The ensuing resummation prescription is free of numerical instabilities, is stable upon the inclusion of subleading terms, and the original divergent perturbative series is asymptotic to it. We compare our results to those obtained using alternative prescriptions, and discuss the ambiguities related to the resummation procedure.

  13. The price momentum of stock in distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijun; Wang, Longfei

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a new momentum of stock in distribution is proposed and applied in real investment. Firstly, assuming that a stock behaves as a multi-particle system, its share-exchange distribution and cost distribution are introduced. Secondly, an estimation of the share-exchange distribution is given with daily transaction data by 3 σ rule from the normal distribution. Meanwhile, an iterative method is given to estimate the cost distribution. Based on the cost distribution, a new momentum is proposed for stock system. Thirdly, an empirical test is given to compare the new momentum with others by contrarian strategy. The result shows that the new one outperforms others in many places. Furthermore, entropy of stock is introduced according to its cost distribution.

  14. Superscaling and nucleon momentum distributions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.

    2005-01-01

    The scaling functions f(ψ ' ) and F(y) from the ψ ' - and y-scaling analyses of inclusive electron scattering from nuclei are constructed within the Coherent Density Fluctuation Model (CDFM) using its two equivalent formulations based on either the local density or the nucleon momentum distribution (NMD). The approach is a natural extension of the relativistic Fermi-gas model to finite realistic nuclear systems. The calculations show that the high-momentum components of NMD in the CDFM and their similarity for different nuclei lead to quantitative description of the super-scaling phenomenon and to a good agreement with the experimental data for y ' ' ' - and y-scaling are informative for NMDs at momenta not larger than 2.0-2.5 fm -1 . The work shows the role of both basic quantities, the momentum and density distributions, for the explanation of super-scaling in inclusive electron scattering from nuclei

  15. Effects of trees on momentum exchange within and above a real urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesky, S.; Giometto, M. G.; Christen, A.; Egli, P. E.; Schmid, M. F.; Tooke, T. R.; Coops, N. C.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are used to gain insight into the effects of trees on momentum transfer rates characterizing the atmosphere within and above a real urban canopy. Several areas are considered that are part of a neighbourhood in the city of Vancouver, BC, Canada where a small fraction of trees are taller than buildings. In this area, eight years of continuous wind and turbulence measurements are available from a 30 m meteorological tower. Buildings and vegetation geometries are obtained from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. In the LES algorithm, buildings are accounted through an immersed boundary method, whereas vegetation is parameterized via a location-specific leaf area density. LES are performed varying wind direction and leaf area densities. Surface roughness lengths (z0) from both LES and tower measurements are sensitive to the 0 ≤ LAI/λ lower than the 27% increase featured by LES for the most representative canopy (leaves-off LAI/λ = 0.74, leaves-on LAI/λ = 2.24). Removing vegetation from such a canopy would cause a dramatic drop of approximately 50% in z0 when compared to the reference summer value. The momentum displacement height (d) from LES also consistently increases as LAI/λ increases, due to the disproportionate amount of drag that the (few) relatively taller trees exert on the flow. Within the urban canopy, the effects of trees are twofold: on one hand, they act as a direct momentum sink for the mean flow; on the other, they reduce downward turbulent transport of high-momentum fluid, significantly reducing the wind intensity at the heights where people live and buildings consume energy.

  16. Hamiltonian boundary term and quasilocal energy flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-M.; Nester, James M.; Tung, R.-S.

    2005-01-01

    The Hamiltonian for a gravitating region includes a boundary term which determines not only the quasilocal values but also, via the boundary variation principle, the boundary conditions. Using our covariant Hamiltonian formalism, we found four particular quasilocal energy-momentum boundary term expressions; each corresponds to a physically distinct and geometrically clear boundary condition. Here, from a consideration of the asymptotics, we show how a fundamental Hamiltonian identity naturally leads to the associated quasilocal energy flux expressions. For electromagnetism one of the four is distinguished: the only one which is gauge invariant; it gives the familiar energy density and Poynting flux. For Einstein's general relativity two different boundary condition choices correspond to quasilocal expressions which asymptotically give the ADM energy, the Trautman-Bondi energy and, moreover, an associated energy flux (both outgoing and incoming). Again there is a distinguished expression: the one which is covariant

  17. Momentum transport studies from multi-machine comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Kamada, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kaye, S.; Solomon, W.; Bell, R.E.; Rice, J.; Podpaly, Y.; Reinke, M.L.; Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Burrell, K.H.; Ferreira, J.; McDonald, D.; Mantica, P.

    2012-01-01

    A database of toroidal momentum transport on five tokamaks, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, JET, NSTX and JT-60U, has been constructed under a wide range of conditions in order to understand the characteristics of toroidal momentum transport coefficients, namely the toroidal momentum diffusivity (χ φ ) and the pinch velocity (V pinch ). Through an inter-machine comparison, the similarities and differences in the properties of χ φ and V pinch among the machines have been clarified. Parametric dependences of these momentum transport coefficients have been investigated over a wide range of plasma parameters taking advantage of the different operation regimes in machines. The approach offers insights into the parametric dependences as follows. The toroidal momentum diffusivity (χ φ ) generally increases with increasing heat diffusivity (χ i ). The correlation is observed over a wide range of χ φ , covering roughly two orders of magnitude, and within each of the machines over the whole radius. Through the inter-machine comparison, it is found that χ φ becomes larger in the outer region of the plasma. Also observed is a general trend for V pinch in tokamaks; the inward pinch velocity (−V pinch ) increases with increasing χ φ . The results that are commonly observed in machines will support a toroidal rotation prediction in future devices. On the other hand, differences among machines have been observed. The toroidal momentum diffusivity, χ φ , is larger than or equal to χ i in JET and JT-60U; on the other hand, χ φ is smaller than or equal to χ i in NSTX, DIII-D and Alcator C-Mod. In DIII-D, the ratio −RV pinch /χ φ at r/a = 0.5–0.6 is about 2, which is small compared with that in other tokamaks (−RV pinch /χ φ ≈ 5). Based on these different observations, parametric dependences of χ φ /χ i , RV pinch /χ φ and χ φ have been investigated in H-mode plasmas. Across the dataset from all machines, the ratio χ φ /χ i tends to be larger in low

  18. The blade element momentum (BEM) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The current chapter presents the blade element momentum (BEM) method. The BEM method for a steady uniform inflow is presented in a first section. Some of the ad-hoc corrections that are usually added to the algorithm are discussed in a second section. An exception is made to the tip-loss correction...... which is introduced early in the algorithm formulation for practical reasons. The ad-hoc corrections presented are: the tip-loss correction, the high-thrust correction (momentum breakdown) and the correction for wake rotation. The formulation of an unsteady BEM code is given in a third section...

  19. Results on large transverse momentum phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Büsser, F W; Blumenfeld, B; Camilleri, L L; Cool, R L; Di Lella, L; Gladding, G; Lederman, Leon Max; Litt, L; Placci, A; Pope, B G; Segler, S L; Smith, A M; Yoh, J K; Zavattini, E

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary results of an experiment on large transverse momentum phenomena performed at the CERN-ISR at centre-of-mass energies of 52.7 and 44.8 GeV are presented. The topics studied were the inclusive reaction p+p to pi /sup 0/+'anything', where the pi /sup 0/ was emitted around 90 degrees in the centre- of-mass system, ( pi /sup 0/ pi /sup 0/) correlations, and the charged multiplicity associated with large transverse momentum pi /sup 0/'s. In addition, results of a search for electrons and electron pairs are included. (4 refs).

  20. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  1. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel Energy...

  2. Optimum Operational Parameters for Yawed Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Peters

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of systematical optimum operational parameters for wind turbines under various wind directions is derived by using combined momentum-energy and blade-element-energy concepts. The derivations are solved numerically by fixing some parameters at practical values. Then, the interactions between the produced power and the influential factors of it are generated in the figures. It is shown that the maximum power produced is strongly affected by the wind direction, the tip speed, the pitch angle of the rotor, and the drag coefficient, which are specifically indicated by figures. It also turns out that the maximum power can take place at two different optimum tip speeds in some cases. The equations derived herein can also be used in the modeling of tethered wind turbines which can keep aloft and deliver energy.

  3. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent flux measurements are key to understanding ecosystem scale energy and matter exchange, including atmospheric trace gases. While the eddy covariance approach has evolved as an invaluable tool to quantify fluxes of e.g. CO2 and H2O continuously, it is limited to very few atmospheric constituents for which sufficiently fast analyzers exist. High instrument cost, lack of field-readiness or high power consumption (e.g. many recent laser-based systems requiring strong vacuum) further impair application to other tracers. Alternative micrometeorological approaches such as conditional sampling might overcome major limitations. Although the idea of eddy accumulation has already been proposed by Desjardin in 1972 (Desjardin, 1977), at the time it could not be realized for trace gases. Major simplifications by Businger and Oncley (1990) lead to it's widespread application as 'Relaxed Eddy Accumulation' (REA). However, those simplifications (flux gradient similarity with constant flow rate sampling irrespective of vertical wind velocity and introduction of a deadband around zero vertical wind velocity) have degraded eddy accumulation to an indirect method, introducing issues of scalar similarity and often lack of suitable scalar flux proxies. Here we present a real implementation of a true eddy accumulation system according to the original concept. Key to our approach, which we call 'Conditional Eddy Sampling' (CES), is the mathematical formulation of conditional sampling in it's true form of a direct eddy flux measurement paired with a performant real implementation. Dedicated hardware controlled by near-real-time software allows full signal recovery at 10 or 20 Hz, very fast valve switching, instant vertical wind velocity proportional flow rate control, virtually no deadband and adaptive power management. Demonstrated system performance often exceeds requirements for flux measurements by orders of magnitude. The system's exceptionally low power consumption is ideal

  4. LBA-ECO CD-04 CO2 and Heat Flux, km 83 Gap Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports 30-minute values for above-canopy meteorology and fluxes of momentum, heat, and carbon dioxide, and within-canopy carbon dioxide and water...

  5. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY ON THERMALLY DRIVEN WIND: TOWARD A GENERAL FORMULATION OF THE BRAKING LAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Réville, Victor; Brun, Allan Sacha; Strugarek, Antoine; Pinto, Rui F.; Matt, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Stellar wind is thought to be the main process responsible for the spin down of main-sequence stars. The extraction of angular momentum by a magnetized wind has been studied for decades, leading to several formulations for the resulting torque. However, previous studies generally consider simple dipole or split monopole stellar magnetic topologies. Here we consider, in addition to a dipolar stellar magnetic field, both quadrupolar and octupolar configurations, while also varying the rotation rate and the magnetic field strength. Sixty simulations made with a 2.5D cylindrical and axisymmetric set-up, and computed with the PLUTO code, were used to find torque formulations for each topology. We further succeed to give a unique law that fits the data for every topology by formulating the torque in terms of the amount of open magnetic flux in the wind. We also show that our formulation can be applied to even more realistic magnetic topologies, with examples of the Sun in its minimum and maximum phases as observed at the Wilcox Solar Observatory, and of a young K-star (TYC-0486-4943-1) whose topology has been obtained by Zeeman-Doppler Imaging

  6. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953...

  7. Rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky: Momentum theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kuik, G. A. M.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Okulov, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers on the history of rotor aerodynamics with special emphasis on the role of Joukowsky. The present one focuses on the development of the momentum theory while the second one surveys the development of vortex theory for rotors. Joukowsky has played a major role ...

  8. Angular and linear momentum of excited ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Kamra, A.; Cao, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2013-01-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist

  9. Orbital momentum and topological phase transformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Středa, Pavel; Kučera, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 23 (2015), "235152-1"-"235152-6" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13436S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : orbital momentum * anomalous Hall effect * topological phase transformation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  10. Residual Momentum and Reversal Strategies Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Huij (Joop); S.D. Lansdorp (Simon)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this note we revisit the 2011 and 2013 papers of Blitz, Huij, and Martens (BHM2011), and Blitz, Huij, Lansdorp, and Verbeek (BHLV2013) in which momentum and reversal strategies on residual returns are proposed. Our results indicate that the main findings of these studies, that

  11. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fusion reactions. The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de- excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly ...

  12. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de-excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly smaller than critical ...

  13. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard universal sd-shell (USD) interaction and the canonical ...

  14. Transverse spin and momentum correlations in quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions are of significance for the analysis of azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, as well as for the overall physical understanding of the distribution of transversely polarized quarks in unpolarized hadrons. In this context we also ...

  15. Average Transverse Momentum Quantities Approaching the Lightfront

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel

    In this contribution to Light Cone 2014, three average transverse momentum quantities are discussed: the Sivers shift, the dijet imbalance, and the p (T) broadening. The definitions of these quantities involve integrals over all transverse momenta that are overly sensitive to the region of large

  16. Angular momentum gated neutron evaporation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T.K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Mukherjee, G.; Gohil, M.; Meena, J.K.; Pandey, R.; Pai, H.; Dey, A.; Biswas, M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, D.; Pal, S.; Banerjee, S.R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bandhopadhyay, T.

    2010-01-01

    The inverse level density parameter k (k = A/a, where A is the mass number of the compound nucleus)is investigated as a function of angular momentum by measuring γ-ray fold gated neutron evaporation spectrum in 4 He + 115 In fusion reaction using 35 MeV 4 He ion beam from VECC K130 cyclotron

  17. Transverse momentum distributions of identified particles produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... sources which can be regarded as partons or quarks in the interacting system. The particle is contributed by each source with gluons which have transverse momentum distributions in an exponential form. The modelling results are compared and found to be in agreement with the experimental data at high energies.

  18. Transverse spin and momentum correlations in quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (SSAs) in hard scattering processes when transverse momentum scales are on the order of quarks in hadrons, ... are of particular interest as they emerge from the colour gauge invariant definition of the quark-gluon-quark ..... For n ≥ 3, there are enough powers of l+ to eliminate this divergence. f(p2) is a covariant Gaussian ...

  19. Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 91, 043821 (2015) Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes Christian Schulze, Filippus S. Roux, Angela Dudley, Ronald Rop, Michael Duparr´e, and Andrew Forbes Abstract: We introduce a class of light field that angularly...

  20. The high momentum spectrometer drift chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D.; Baker, O. K.; Beaufait, J.; Bennett, C.; Bryant, E.; Carlini, R.; Kross, B.; McCauley, A.; Naing, W.; Shin, T.; Vulcan, W.

    1992-12-01

    The High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C will use planar drift chambers for charged particle track reconstruction. The chambers are constructed using well understood technology and a conventional gas mixture. Two (plus one spare) drift chambers will be constructed for this spectrometers. Each chamber will contain 6 planes of readout channels. This paper describes the chamber design and gas handling system used.

  1. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs

  2. Experimental determination of high angular momentum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, J.L.V.

    1985-01-01

    The current knowledge of the atomic nucleus structure is summarized. A short abstract of the nuclear properties at high angular momentum and a more detailed description of the experimental methods used in the study of high angular momenta is made. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Momentum transfer in a Brillouin surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of acoustic excitation scattering in the surface of Brilloiun of opaque materials, is related to the question of momentum transfexed from radiation fields to the material when the incident eight is scattered in a measurable spectrum. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  4. High Momentum Probes of Nuclear Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, R.

    2009-07-24

    We discuss how the chemical composition of QCD jets is altered by final state interactions in surrounding nuclear matter. We describe this process through conversions of leading jet particles. We find that conversions lead to an enhancement of kaons at high transverse momentum in Au+Au collisions at RHIC, while their azimuthal asymmetry v{sub 2} is suppressed.

  5. Angular momentum and the electromagnetic top

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-06

    Jul 6, 2016 ... standard expression of the force on m, in order to con- serve the linear mechanical momentum of an isolated system. This problem of classical electrodynamics has particular relevance in quantum mechanics in the con- text of the nonlocality of Aharonov–Bohm [6] effects. Specifically, key to understanding ...

  6. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Heavy-ion reactions; incomplete fusion; isomeric cross-section ratio; 12C, 16O beams; 93Nb; 89Y targets; angular momentum. ... R Tripathi1 A Goswami1. Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain 456 010, India ...

  7. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model ... Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006, India; Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110 067, India ...

  8. Anomalous momentum transport from drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, R.R.; Staebler, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    A sheared slab magnetic field model B = B 0 [z + (x/L s )y], with inhomogeneous flows in the y and z directions, is used to perform a fully-kinetic stability analysis of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and dissipative trapped electron (DTE) modes. The concomitant quasilinear stress components that couple to the local perpendicular (y-component) and parallel (z-component) momentum transport are also calculated and the anomalous perpendicular and parallel viscous stresses obtained. A breakdown of the ITG-induced perpendicular viscous stress is generally observed at moderate values of the sheared perpendicular flow. The ITG-induced parallel viscous stress is generally larger and strongly dependent on the sheared flows. The DTE-induced perpendicular viscous stress may sometimes be negative, tending to cancel the ITG contributions while the DTE-induced parallel viscous stress is generally small. The effect of the perpendicular stress component in the momentum balance equations is generally small while the parallel stress component can dominate the usual neoclassical viscous stress terms. The dominant contribution to parallel viscous stress by the ITG mode suggests that bulk plasma toroidal momentum confinement, like energy confinement, is governed by an anomalous ion loss mechanism. Furthermore, the large anomalous effect suggests that the neoclassical explanation of poloidal flows in tokamaks may be incorrect. The present results are in general agreement with existing experimental observations on momentum transport in tokamaks

  9. Line-driven disc wind model for ultrafast outflows in active galactic nuclei - scaling with luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, M.; Ohsuga, K.

    2017-03-01

    In order to reveal the origin of the ultrafast outflows (UFOs) that are frequently observed in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we perform two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the line-driven disc winds, which are accelerated by the radiation force due to the spectral lines. The line-driven winds are successfully launched for the range of MBH = 106-9 M⊙ and ε = 0.1-0.5, and the resulting mass outflow rate (dot{M_w}), momentum flux (dot{p_w}), and kinetic luminosity (dot{E_w}) are in the region containing 90 per cent of the posterior probability distribution in the dot{M}_w-Lbol plane, dot{p}_w-Lbol plane, and dot{E}_w-Lbol plane shown in Gofford et al., where MBH is the black hole mass, ε is the Eddington ratio, and Lbol is the bolometric luminosity. The best-fitting relations in Gofford et al., d log dot{M_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 0.9, d log dot{p_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 1.2, and d log dot{E_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 1.5, are roughly consistent with our results, d log dot{M_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 9/8, d log dot{p_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 10/8, and d log dot{E_w}/d log {L_bol}˜ 11/8. In addition, our model predicts that no UFO features are detected for the AGNs with ε ≲ 0.01, since the winds do not appear. Also, only AGNs with MBH ≲ 108 M⊙ exhibit the UFOs when ε ∼ 0.025. These predictions nicely agree with the X-ray observations. These results support that the line-driven disc wind is the origin of the UFOs.

  10. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  11. Angular Momentum Evolution of Solar-type Stars and Implications for Gyrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terndrup, Donald M.; Somers, Garrett; Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the assembly history and rate of chemical enrichment in the Milky Way requires accurate ages for vast numbers of stars. Standard age-dating techniques have significant degeneracies and other limitations, and in any case are mostly limited to the tiny minority of stars in bound clusters.Data from the Kepler and K2 surveys, along with ground-based studies, show that stellar rotation rates could potentially be exploited to determine ages of field stars since rotation declines with age; this method is called gyrochronology. Several groups have advocated a purely empirical gyrochronology, essentially fitting simple mathematical expressions to rotation/age data, but here we argue that the power of rotation studies lies in their use for calibrating (or rejecting) proposed physical mechanisms for internal angular momentum transport and angular momentum loss through magnetized winds.We will review the available data and discuss several important selection biases, and will present the results of a detailed Bayesian modeling exercise to show how well a gyrochronology might work in the most favorable cases. We will also discuss whether evidence for saturation of wind loss or of internal angular momentum transfer is properly justified in a statistical sense.

  12. Flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms approaching the infinite wind farm regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Due to the increasing number and the growing size of wind farms, the distance among them continues to decrease. Thus, it is necessary to understand how these large finite-size wind farms and their wakes could interfere the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and adjacent wind farms. Fully-developed flow inside wind farms has been extensively studied through numerical simulations of infinite wind farms. The transportation of momentum and energy is only vertical and the advection of them is neglected in these infinite wind farms. However, less attention has been paid to examine the length of wind farms required to reach such asymptotic regime and the ABL dynamics in the leading and trailing edges of the large finite-size wind farms. Large eddy simulations are performed in this study to investigate the flow adjustment inside large finite-size wind farms in conventionally-neutral boundary layer with the effect of Coriolis force and free-atmosphere stratification from 1 to 5 K/km. For the large finite-size wind farms considered in the present work, when the potential temperature lapse rate is 5 K/km, the wind farms exceed the height of the ABL by two orders of magnitude for the incoming flow inside the farms to approach the fully-developed regime. An entrance fetch of approximately 40 times of the ABL height is also required for such flow adjustment. At the fully-developed flow regime of the large finite-size wind farms, the flow characteristics match those of infinite wind farms even though they have different adjustment length scales. The role of advection at the entrance and exit regions of the large finite-size wind farms is also examined. The interaction between the internal boundary layer developed above the large finite-size wind farms and the ABL under different potential temperature lapse rates are compared. It is shown that the potential temperature lapse rate plays a role in whether the flow inside the large finite-size wind farms adjusts to the fully

  13. Magnetically Induced Disk Winds and Transport in the HL Tau Disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Flock, Mario; Turner, Neal J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Okuzumi, Satoshi, E-mail: yasuhiro@caltech.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2017-08-10

    The mechanism of angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks is fundamental to understanding the distributions of gas and dust in the disks. The unprecedented ALMA observations taken toward HL Tau at high spatial resolution and subsequent radiative transfer modeling reveal that a high degree of dust settling is currently achieved in the outer part of the HL Tau disk. Previous observations, however, suggest a high disk accretion rate onto the central star. This configuration is not necessarily intuitive in the framework of the conventional viscous disk model, since efficient accretion generally requires a high level of turbulence, which can suppress dust settling considerably. We develop a simplified, semi-analytical disk model to examine under what condition these two properties can be realized in a single model. Recent, non-ideal MHD simulations are utilized to realistically model the angular momentum transport both radially via MHD turbulence and vertically via magnetically induced disk winds. We find that the HL Tau disk configuration can be reproduced well when disk winds are properly taken into account. While the resulting disk properties are likely consistent with other observational results, such an ideal situation can be established only if the plasma β at the disk midplane is β {sub 0} ≃ 2 × 10{sup 4} under the assumption of steady accretion. Equivalently, the vertical magnetic flux at 100 au is about 0.2 mG. More detailed modeling is needed to fully identify the origin of the disk accretion and quantitatively examine plausible mechanisms behind the observed gap structures in the HL Tau disk.

  14. WIND TURBINES FOR WIND POWER INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barladean A.S.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of wind turbine choice for wind power stations is examined in this paper. It is shown by comparison of parameters and characteristics of wind turbines, that for existing modes and speeds of wind in territory of Republic of Moldova it is necessary to use multi-blade small speed rotation wind turbines of fan class.

  15. Solar Illumination Control of the Polar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, L.; Maggiolo, R.; De Keyser, J.; André, M.; Eriksson, A. I.; Haaland, S.; Li, K.; Poedts, S.

    2017-11-01

    Polar wind outflow is an important process through which the ionosphere supplies plasma to the magnetosphere. The main source of energy driving the polar wind is solar illumination of the ionosphere. As a result, many studies have found a relation between polar wind flux densities and solar EUV intensity, but less is known about their relation to the solar zenith angle at the ionospheric origin, certainly at higher altitudes. The low energy of the outflowing particles and spacecraft charging means it is very difficult to measure the polar wind at high altitudes. We take advantage of an alternative method that allows estimations of the polar wind flux densities far in the lobes. We analyze measurements made by the Cluster spacecraft at altitudes from 4 up to 20 RE. We observe a strong dependence on the solar zenith angle in the ion flux density and see that both the ion velocity and density exhibit a solar zenith angle dependence as well. We also find a seasonal variation of the flux density.

  16. Rotating flux compressor for energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, P.; Linton, T.W.; Phillips, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The rotating flux compressor (RFC) converts rotational kinetic energy into an electrical output pulse which would have higher energy than the electrical energy initially stored in the compressor. An RFC has been designed in which wedge-shaped rotor blades pass through the air gaps between successive turns of a solenoid, the stator. Magnetic flux is generated by pulsing the stator solenoids when the inductance is a maximum, i.e., when the flux fills the stator-solenoid volume. Connecting the solenoid across a load conserves the flux which is compressed within the small volume surrounding the stator periphery when the rotor blades cut into the free space between the stator plates, creating a minimum-inductance condition. The unique features of this design are: (1) no electrical connections (brushes) to the rotor; (2) no conventional windings; and (3) no maintenance. The device has been tested up to 5000 rpm of rotor speed

  17. Wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  18. TOWARD A COMPLETE ACCOUNTING OF ENERGY AND MOMENTUM FROM STELLAR FEEDBACK IN GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-05-21

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  19. TOWARD A COMPLETE ACCOUNTING OF ENERGY AND MOMENTUM FROM STELLAR FEEDBACK IN GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  20. Eddy Covariance flux measurements over an ice/snow covered lake in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potes, Miguel; Salgado, Rui; Provenzale, Maria; Mammarella, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    The inland water bodies play an important role in the regional heat and mass transfer with the atmosphere. As lakes cover an area of 4.2 million km2, representing an area of more than 3% of Earth continental surface, an increasing concern in estimation of heat and greenhouse gases exchanges between inland water bodies and the atmosphere has been developed in the last years. The eddy covariance (EC) method is the worldwide most common technique used to assess turbulent fluxes over all types of surface. In the framework of two Short Term Scientific Mission of the COST action "A European network for a harmonized monitoring of snow for the benefit of climate change scenarios, hydrology and numerical weather prediction" (ES1404), it was feasible to have parallel EC measurements with two identical equipment over a boreal lake. In this communication the results are related to the period comprised between November 2015 and May 2016, including freezing and ice-free periods. Observed near surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass (H2O and CO2) were obtained with a new eddy covariance system (EC), Campbell Scientific's IRGASON Integrated Open-Path CO2/H2O Gas Analyzer and 3D Sonic Anemometer, over lake Vanajavesi in Finland. The measurement site is located in a tip of narrow peninsula on the lake (61.133935°N; 24.259119°E), offering very good conditions for eddy covariance flux measurements. The EC system was installed at 2.5m height above the lake surface and was oriented against the prevailing wind direction in the site.

  1. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  2. An Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Icing on Wind Turbine Rotor Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar; Soltani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    are printed with 3D printer and tested one by one in a Wind Tunnel. Lift, drag and moment coefficients are calculated from the measured experimental data and program WT-Perf based on blade-element momentum (BEM) theory is used to predict the performance of wind turbine. Cp curves generated from the test...

  3. Modeling and Control of Direct Driven PMSG for Ultra Large Wind Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed M. Hemeida; Wael A. Farag; Osama A. Mahgoub

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing an integrated reliable and sophisticated model for ultra large wind turbines And to study the performance and analysis of vector control on large wind turbines. With the advance of power electronics technology, direct driven multi-pole radial flux PMSG (Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator) has proven to be a good choice for wind turbines manufacturers. To study the wind energy conversion systems, it is important to develop a wind turbin...

  4. MULTI-SHELL MAGNETIC TWISTERS AS A NEW MECHANISM FOR CORONAL HEATING AND SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawski, K. [Group of Astrophysics, Institute of Physics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi-221005 (India); Musielak, Z. E. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvén waves in an isolated photospheric flux tube and explore the propagation of these waves along such magnetic structure that extends from the photosphere, where these waves are triggered, to the solar corona, and we analyze resulting magnetic shells. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the magnetic flux tube that is rooted in the solar photosphere. The evolution of the solar atmosphere is described by 3D, ideal MHD equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal, based on the physical properties of the multi-shell magnetic twisters and the amount of energy and momentum associated with them, that these multi-shell magnetic twisters may be responsible for the observed heating of the lower solar corona and for the formation of solar wind. Moreover, it is likely that the existence of these twisters can be verified by high-resolution observations.

  5. Wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the wind power. It presents the principles, the technology takes off, its applications and technology focus, the global market trends and the outlooks and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  6. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portilla S, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    The wind energy or eolic energy is a consequence of solar energy, the one which is absorbed by the atmosphere and is transformed into energy of movement of large bulks of air. In this process the atmosphere acts as the filter to the solar radiation and demotes the ultraviolet beams that result fatal to life in the Earth. The ionosphere is the most external cap and this is ionized by means of absorption process of ultraviolet radiation arising to the Sun. The atmosphere also acts as a trap to the infrared radiation, it that results from the continual process of energetic degradation. In this way, the interaction between Earth - Atmospheres, is behaved as a great greenhouse, maintaining the constant temperatures, including in the dark nights. Processes as the natural convection (that occur by the thermodynamic phenomenon), equatorial calmness, trade winds and against trade winds and global distribution of the air currents are described. The other hand, techniques as the transformation of the wind into energy and its parameters also are shown

  7. Wind Energy Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsubara, Kazuyo [Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    An overview is given of wind energy in Japan: Background; Wind Energy in Japan; Japanese Wind Energy Industry; Government Supports; Useful Links; Major Japanese Companies; Profiles of Major Japanese Companies; Major Wind Energy Projects in Japan.

  8. Transport of momentum in full f gyrokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Catto, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Full f electrostatic gyrokinetic formulations employ two gyrokinetic equations, one for ions and the other for electrons, and quasineutrality to obtain the ion and electron distribution functions and the electrostatic potential. We demonstrate with several examples that the long wavelength radial electric field obtained with full f approaches is extremely sensitive to errors in the ion and electron density since small deviations in density give rise to large, nonphysical deviations in the conservation of toroidal angular momentum. For typical tokamak values, a relative error of 10 -7 in the ion or electron densities is enough to obtain the incorrect toroidal rotation. Based on the insights gained with the examples considered, three simple tests to check transport of toroidal angular momentum in full f simulations are proposed.

  9. Air Bag Momentum Force Including Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Nusholtz

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A gas-jet momentum force drives the air bag into position during a crash. The magnitude of this force can change as a result of aspiration. To determine the potential magnitude of the effect on the momentum force and mass flow rate in an aspirated system, a series of experiments and simulations of those experiments was conducted. The simulation consists of a two-dimensional unsteady isentropic CFD model with special “infinite boundaries”. One of the difficulties in simulating the gas-jet behavior is determining the mass flow rate. To improve the reliability of the mass flow rate input to the simulation, a sampling procedure involving multiple tests was used, and an average of the tests was adopted.

  10. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  11. Electron in three-dimensional momentum space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mantovani, Luca; Pasquini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We study the electron as a system composed of an electron and a photon, using lowest-order perturbation theory. We derive the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent distribution functions for both the electron and photon in the dressed electron, thereby offering a three-dimensional description of the dressed electron in momentum space. To obtain the distribution functions, we apply both the formalism of the light-front wave function overlap representation and the diagrammatic approach. We perform the calculations both in light-cone gauge and Feynman gauge, and we present a detailed discussion of the role of the Wilson lines to obtain gauge-independent results. We provide numerical results and plots for many of the computed distributions.

  12. Linear momentum quantization in periodic structures II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vliet, Carolyne M.

    2010-04-01

    Fraunhofer interference of a single particle by a periodic array of scatterers, usually treated with a wave picture, can be fully explained on the basis of linear momentum quantization, as pointed out in a previous study by Van Vliet (1967) [4]. This analysis is now extended to scattering (or passing through slits) involving a finite number N of equidistantly spaced entities comprising the interferometer. The usual intensity probability distribution for W(sinθ) is obtained, noting that total momentum is conserved (as in the Compton effect), while the interferometer is treated as a quantum object-rather than a classical measuring apparatus, as perceived in the Copenhagen interpretation. Various aspects of the ‘orthodox view’ are examined and renounced.

  13. Transverse Momentum Correlations in Hadronic Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    Using data obtained with the ALEPH detector at the Z resonance, a measure based on transverse momentum is shown to exhibit a correlation between the two halves of a hadronic event which cannot be explained by energy-momentum conservation, flavour conservation, the imposition of an event axis or imperfect event reconstruction. Two possible explanations based on Monte Carlo models are examined: a) ARIADNE, with the correlation forming early in the parton shower and with the transition from partons to hadrons playing only a minor part; b) JETSET, with the correlation forming at the fragmentation stage. A correlation technique based on a jet cluster analysis is used to make a comparison of the models with the data. It is concluded that both non-perturbative and perturbative effects make important contributions to the observed correlation.

  14. Quantum scattering theory on the momentum lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubtsova, O. A.; Pomerantsev, V. N.; Kukulin, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach based on the wave-packet continuum discretization method recently developed by the present authors for solving quantum-mechanical scattering problems for atomic and nuclear scattering processes and few-body physics is described. The formalism uses the complete continuum discretization scheme in terms of the momentum stationary wave-packet basis, which leads to formulation of the scattering problem on a lattice in the momentum space. The solution of the few-body scattering problem can be found in the approach from linear matrix equations with nonsingular matrix elements, averaged on energy over lattice cells. The developed approach is illustrated by the solution of numerous two- and three-body scattering problems with local and nonlocal potentials below and well above the three-body breakup threshold.

  15. Wind energy barometer - EurObserv'ER - March 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    The global wind power market not only repelled the strictures of the financial crisis, but according to initial estimates, saw the installation of 37 GW, which is almost 10 GW up on 2008. China and the United States registered particularly steady growth and the European Union also picked up momentum to break its installation record

  16. Wind Field of a Nonmesocyclone Anticyclonic Tornado Crossing the Hong Kong International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Kosiba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonmesocyclone tornado traversed the Hong Kong International Airport on September 6, 2004 directly impacting a surface weather station. This allowed for 1-second 10-meter above ground level (AGL wind observations through the core of the tornado. Integration of these 10-meter AGL wind data with Ground-Based Velocity Track (GBVTD wind retrievals derived from LIDAR data provided a time history of the three-dimensional wind field of the tornado. These data indicate a progressive decrease in radial inflow with time and little to no radial inflow near the time the tornado crosses the surface weather station. Anemometer observations suggest that the tangential winds approximate a modified-Rankine vortex outside the radius of maximum winds, suggesting that frictionally induced radial inflow was confined below 10 m AGL. The radial-height distribution of angular momentum depicts an increase in low-level angular momentum just prior to the tornado reaching its maximum intensity.

  17. High momentum transfer processes in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, A.V.; Radyushkin, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    A unified approach to the investigation of inclusive high momentum transfer processes in the QCD framework is proposed. A modified parton model (with parton distribution functions depending on an additional renormalization parameter) is shown to be valid in all orders of perturbation theory. The approach is also applicable for studying wide-angle elastic scattering processes of colourless bound states of quarks (the hadrons). The asymptotic behaviour of pion electromagnetic form factor is calculated as an example

  18. Detector magnets for charged particle momentum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, Gianluigi

    1995-01-01

    Basic formulae related to the momentum measurement of charged particles by tracking devices in magnetic fields and typical detector magnet geometries are briefly revised. From these, guidelines are worked out for the determination of the basic specifications (yoke size, excitation current, conductor type and size, cooling) both for normal and superconducting magnets. The problem of magnetic shielding of components placed near big detector magnets is also considered.

  19. Elliptic flow coefficients from transverse momentum conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdak, Adam; Ma, Guo-Liang

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the k -particle (k =2 ,4 ,6 ,8 ) azimuthal cumulants resulting from the conservation of transverse momentum. We find that c2{k } >0 and, depending on the transverse momenta, c2{k } can reach substantial values even for a relatively large number of particles. The impact of our results on the understanding of the onset of collectivity in small systems is emphasized.

  20. Transverse momentum distributions of identified particles produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparisons with experimental data. The pT spectra, in different presentation forms as used in [11,28–31], for identified parti- cles emitted in pp collisions at different centre-of-mass energies are shown in figures 1–4, where y, E, p, σ, and B denote the rapidity, energy, momentum, cross-section, and di- lepton branching ratio ...

  1. Muon momentum measurement in magnetized iron spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, R.; Zupancic, C.

    1984-01-01

    Measuring the momentum of high-energy muons with a magnetized iron spectrometer is a conventional technique employed by numerous experiments and may appear to be an old-fashioned subject. In the TeV regime, multiple scattering errors become small compared to measurement errors achieveable with large-surface particle detectors, and there are indications that new physical effects influencing the resolution properties of a muon spectrometer may become important. (orig./HSI)

  2. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-28

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  3. Turbulent Flow Inside and Above a Wind Farm: A Wind-Tunnel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo P. Chamorro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were carried out to better understand boundary layer effects on the flow pattern inside and above a model wind farm under thermally neutral conditions. Cross-wire anemometry was used to characterize the turbulent flow structure at different locations around a 10 by 3 array of model wind turbines aligned with the mean flow and arranged in two different layouts (inter-turbine separation of 5 and 7 rotor diameters in the direction of the mean flow by 4 rotor diameters in its span. Results suggest that the turbulent flow can be characterized in two broad regions. The first, located below the turbine top tip height, has a direct effect on the performance of the turbines. In that region, the turbulent flow statistics appear to reach equilibrium as close as the third to fourth row of wind turbines for both layouts. In the second region, located right above the first one, the flow adjusts slowly. There, two layers can be identified: an internal boundary layer where the flow is affected by both the incoming wind and the wind turbines, and an equilibrium layer, where the flow is fully adjusted to the wind farm. An adjusted logarithmic velocity distribution is observed in the equilibrium layer starting from the sixth row of wind turbines. The effective surface roughness length induced by the wind farm is found to be higher than that predicted by some existing models. Momentum recovery and turbulence intensity are shown to be affected by the wind farm layout. Power spectra show that the signature of the tip vortices, in both streamwise and vertical velocity components, is highly affected by both the relative location in the wind farm and the wind farm layout.

  4. On the angular momentum in star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horedt, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the rotation of interstellar clouds which are in a stage immediately before star formation. Cloud collisions seem to be the principal cause of the observed rotation of interstellar clouds. The rotational motion of the clouds is strongly influenced by turbulence. Theories dealing with the resolution of the angular momentum problem in star formation are classified into five major groups. The old idea that the angular momentum of an interstellar cloud passes during star formation into the angular momentum of double star systems and/or circumstellar clouds, is developed. It is suggested that a rotating gas cloud contracts into a ring-like structure which fragments into self-gravitating subcondensations. By collisions and gas accretion these subcondensations accrete into binary systems surrounded by circumstellar clouds. Using some rough approximations the authors find analytical expressions for the semi-major axis of the binary system and for the density of the circumstellar clouds as a function of the initial density and of the initial angular velocity of an interstellar cloud. The obtained values are well within the observational limits. (Auth.)

  5. Energy-Momentum Conservation Laws in Hamiltonian Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Sardanashvily, G.

    1994-01-01

    In the Lagrangian field theory, one gets different identities for different stress energy-momentum tensors, e.g., canonical energy-momentum tensors. Moreover, these identities are not conservation laws of the above-mentioned energy-momentum tensors in general. In the framework of the multimomentum Hamiltonian formalism, we have the fundamental identity whose restriction to a constraint space can be treated the energy-momentum conservation law. In standard field models, this appears the metric...

  6. Accounting analyses of momentum and contrarian strategies in emerging markets

    OpenAIRE

    Nnadi, Matthias Akandu; Tanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the momentum and contrarian effects of stock markets in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) using accounting data. The five markets show different characteristics with the Indian market having the strongest momentum effect. Stock markets in China and Brazil show significant short-term contrarian profit and intermediate to long-term momentum profit while South Africa shows short-term momentum effect and intermediate to long-term contrarian effect. The Russian stock...

  7. Eddy covariance flux measurements over a man made lake during the ALEX 2014 field campaign in South Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, R.; Potes, M.; Albino, A.; Rodrigues, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Energy, vapor, CO2 and momentum exchanges between water and air were measured using the new IRGASON eddy covariance system, an integrated open-path CO2 /H2O Gas Analyser and 3D Sonic Anemometer, installed on a instrumented floating platform (Figure 1) in the Alqueva reservoir, a large man made lake (area of 250 km2) in South Portugal. Radiation sensors were also mounted on the raft in order to measure near surface up and down radiative fluxes, while the water temperature profile below the platform were continuously archived. An accelerometer was mounted on the support bar near the sonic anemometer in order to correct the vertical component of the wind due to the the raft swing. The measurements were performed during the ALqueva hydro-meteorological EXperiment, ALEX 2014, between June and September 2014. ALEX 2014 ( http://www.alex2014.cge.uevora.pt) was an integrated field campaign with measurements of chemical, physical and biological parameters at different experimental sites in the reservoir and in its surrounding area. Worldwide, there are few reported flux measurements over lakes. This set of observations contribute to improve the characterization of the exchanges between a lake and the atmosphere in a semi-arid climate. The eddy covariance estimates of lake evaporation are compared against other methods.

  8. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and ...

  9. Earth-like sand fluxes on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N T; Ayoub, F; Avouac, J-P; Leprince, S; Lucas, A; Mattson, S

    2012-05-09

    Strong and sustained winds on Mars have been considered rare, on the basis of surface meteorology measurements and global circulation models, raising the question of whether the abundant dunes and evidence for wind erosion seen on the planet are a current process. Recent studies showed sand activity, but could not determine whether entire dunes were moving--implying large sand fluxes--or whether more localized and surficial changes had occurred. Here we present measurements of the migration rate of sand ripples and dune lee fronts at the Nili Patera dune field. We show that the dunes are near steady state, with their entire volumes composed of mobile sand. The dunes have unexpectedly high sand fluxes, similar, for example, to those in Victoria Valley, Antarctica, implying that rates of landscape modification on Mars and Earth are similar.

  10. Parametric dependences of momentum pinch and Prandtl number in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Corrigan, G.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, V.; Peeters, A.G.; Solomon, W. M.; Strintzi, D.; Tsalas, M.; Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Several parametric scans have been performed to study momentum transport on JET. A neutral beam injection modulation technique has been applied to separate the diffusive and convective momentum transport terms. The magnitude of the inward momentum pinch depends strongly on the inverse density

  11. Fragmentation and momentum correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The role of momentum correlations in the production of light and medium mass frag- ments is studied by imposing momentum cut in the clusterization of the phase space. Our detailed investigation shows that momentum cut has a major role to play in the emission of fragments. A comparison with the experimental ...

  12. REIT Momentum and the Performance of Real Estate Mutual Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Derwall (Jeroen); J.J. Huij (Joop); W.A. Marquering (Wessel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractREITs exhibit a strong and prevalent momentum effect that is not captured by conventional factor models. This REIT momentum anomaly hampers proper judgments about the performance of actively managed REIT portfolios. In contrast, a REIT momentum factor adds incremental explanatory power

  13. Fragmentation and momentum correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 78; Issue 3 ... Quantum molecular dynamics; multifragmentation; momentum correlations. Abstract. The role of momentum correlations in the production of light and medium mass fragments is studied by imposing momentum cut in the clusterization of the phase space.

  14. Fragmentation and momentum correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The role of momentum correlations in the production of light and medium mass fragments is studied by imposing momentum cut in the clusterization of the phase space. Our detailed investigation shows that momentum cut has a major role to play in the emission of fragments. A comparison with the experimental data is also ...

  15. Wind Loads on Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbye, Claes; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Wind loads have to be taken into account when designing civil engineering structures. The wind load on structures can be systematised by means of the wind load chain: wind climate (global), terrain (wind at low height), aerodynamic response (wind load to pressure), mechanical response (wind...... pressure to structural response) and design criteria. Starting with an introduction of the wind load chain, the book moves on to meteorological considerations, atmospheric boundary layer, static wind load, dynamic wind load and scaling laws used in wind-tunnel tests. The dynamic wind load covers vibrations...... induced by wind turbulence, vortex shedding, flutter and galloping. The book gives a comprehensive treatment of wind effects on structures and it will be useful for consulting engineers designing wind-sensitive structures. It will also be valuable for students of civil engineering as textbook...

  16. Statistical mechanical foundation of the peridynamic nonlocal continuum theory: energy and momentum conservation laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoucq, R B; Sears, Mark P

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the energy and momentum conservation laws of the peridynamic nonlocal continuum theory using the principles of classical statistical mechanics. The peridynamic laws allow the consideration of discontinuous motion, or deformation, by relying on integral operators. These operators sum forces and power expenditures separated by a finite distance and so represent nonlocal interaction. The integral operators replace the differential divergence operators conventionally used, thereby obviating special treatment at points of discontinuity. The derivation presented employs a general multibody interatomic potential, avoiding the standard assumption of a pairwise decomposition. The integral operators are also expressed in terms of a stress tensor and heat flux vector under the assumption that these fields are differentiable, demonstrating that the classical continuum energy and momentum conservation laws are consequences of the more general peridynamic laws. An important conclusion is that nonlocal interaction is intrinsic to continuum conservation laws when derived using the principles of statistical mechanics.

  17. Axial flux permanent magnet brushless machines

    CERN Document Server

    Gieras, Jacek F; Kamper, Maarten J

    2008-01-01

    Axial Flux Permanent Magnet (AFPM) brushless machines are modern electrical machines with a lot of advantages over their conventional counterparts. They are being increasingly used in consumer electronics, public life, instrumentation and automation system, clinical engineering, industrial electromechanical drives, automobile manufacturing industry, electric and hybrid electric vehicles, marine vessels and toys. They are also used in more electric aircrafts and many other applications on larger scale. New applications have also emerged in distributed generation systems (wind turbine generators

  18. Structural optimization study of composite wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Shen, Wen Zhong; Wang, Quan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the initial layout of a 2. MW composite wind turbine blade is designed first. The new airfoils families are selected to design a 2. MW wind turbine blade. The finite element parametric model for the blade is established. Based on the modified Blade Element Momentum theory, a new one......-way fluid-structure interaction method is introduced. A procedure combining finite element analysis and particle swarm algorithm to optimize composite structures of the wind turbine blade is developed. The procedure proposed not only allows thickness variation but also permits the spar cap location...

  19. Stellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymann, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    It is known that a steady outflow of material at comparable rates of mass loss but vastly different speeds is now known to be ubiquitous phenomenon among both the luminous hot stars and the luminous but cool red giants. The flows are probably massive enough in both cases to give rise to significant effects on stellar evolution and the mass balance between stars and the interstellar medium. The possible mechanisms for these phenomena as well as the methods of observation used are described. In particular, the mass-loss processes in stars other than the sun that also involve a steady flow of matter are considered. The evidence for their existence is described, and then the question of whether the process thought to produce the solar wind is also responsible for producing these stellar winds is explored

  20. Energy, momentum and angular momentum in the dyadosphere of a charged spacetime in teleparallel equivalent of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, G. L. Nashed

    2012-03-01

    We apply the energy momentum and angular momentum tensor to a tetrad field, with two unknown functions of radial coordinate, in the framework of a teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR). The definition of the gravitational energy is used to investigate the energy within the external event horizon of the dyadosphere region for the Reissner—Nordström black hole. We also calculate the spatial momentum and angular momentum.

  1. Dependence of two-neutron momentum densities on total pair momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joseph A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiringa, R B [ANL; Schiavilla, R [JEFFERSON LAB; Pieper, Steven C [ANL

    2008-01-01

    Two-nucleon momentum distributions are calculated for the ground states of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He as a function of the nucleons' relative and total momenta. We use variational Monte Carlo wave functions derived from a realistic Hamiltonian with two- and three-nucleon potentials. The momentum distribution of pp pairs is found to be much smaller than that of pn pairs for values of the relative momentum in the range (300--500) MeV/c and vanishing total momentum. Howeer, as the totalmomentum increases to 400 MeV/c, the ratio of pp to pn pairs in this relative momentum range grows and approaches the limit 1/2 for {sup 3}He and 1/4 for {sup 4}He, corresponding to the ratio of pp to pn pairs in these nuclei. This behavior should be easily observable in two-nucleon knock-out processes, such as A(e, e'pN).

  2. Numerical modeling study of the momentum deposition of small amplitude gravity waves in the thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the momentum deposition in the thermosphere from the dissipation of small amplitude gravity waves (GWs within a wave packet using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional compressible numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear propagation and dissipation of a GW packet from the stratosphere into the thermosphere with realistic molecular viscosity and thermal diffusivity for various Prandtl numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for GW packets with initial vertical wavelengths (λz ranging from 5 to 50 km. We show that λz decreases in time as a GW packet dissipates in the thermosphere, in agreement with the ray trace results of Vadas and Fritts (2005 (VF05. We also find good agreement for the peak height of the momentum flux (zdiss between our simulations and VF05 for GWs with initial λz ≤ 2π H in an isothermal, windless background, where H is the density scale height. We also confirm that zdiss increases with increasing Prandtl number. We include eddy diffusion in the model, and find that the momentum deposition occurs at lower altitudes and has two separate peaks for GW packets with small initial λz. We also simulate GW packets in a non-isothermal atmosphere. The net λz profile is a competition between its decrease from viscosity and its increase from the increasing background temperature. We find that the wave packet disperses more in the non-isothermal atmosphere, and causes changes to the momentum flux and λz spectra at both early and late times for GW packets with initial λz ≥ 10 km. These effects are caused by the increase in T in the thermosphere, and the decrease in T near the mesopause.

  3. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  4. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause (III) transport of energy and momentum by unstable compressional waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Zu-yin; Kivelson, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    Assuming the earth's magnetopause to be a one-dimensional tangential discontinuity, the transport of energy and momentum on both sides of the magnetopause caused by unstable compressional Kelvin-Helmholtz waves are investigated. The physical mechanism is also discussed. The calculations show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can indeed play an important role in the coupling processes between the solar wind and the magnetosphere

  5. Shape Optimization of Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xudong; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2009-01-01

    of the rotor. The design variables used in the current study are the blade shape parameters, including chord, twist and relative thickness. To validate the implementation of the aerodynamic/aero-elastic model, the computed aerodynamic results are compared to experimental data for the experimental rotor used......This paper presents a design tool for optimizing wind turbine blades. The design model is based on an aerodynamic/aero-elastic code that includes the structural dynamics of the blades and the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. To model the main aero-elastic behaviour of a real wind turbine...... in the European Commision-sponsored project Model Experiments in Controlled Conditions, (MEXICO) and the computed aero-elastic results are examined against the FLEX code for flow post the Tjereborg 2 MW rotor. To illustrate the optimization technique, three wind turbine rotors of different sizes (the MEXICO 25 k...

  6. Wind conditions for wind turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B.

    1999-04-01

    Delegates from Europe and USA attended the meeting and discussed general aspects of wind conditions for wind turbine design. The subjects and the presented papers covered a very broad range of aspects of wind conditions and related influence on the wind turbine. (EHS)

  7. Momentum, vorticity, and helicity in covariant superfluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, B.; Khalatnikov, I.M.

    1992-01-01

    The convective and potential variational principles that can be used for alternative derivations of the same natural relativistic generalisation of the standard Landau theory of perfect superfluid dynamics are both characterised by the feature that, instead of attributing special importance to a partition in terms of certain non-conserved open-quotes superfluidclose quotes and open-quotes normalclose quotes current vectors j v s and j v N they accord a much more prominent role to certain open-quotes particleclose quotes and open-quotes thermalclose quotes momentum convectors μ v and Θ v of which the latter in particular has been unduly neglected in traditional discussions. The present article discusses the interdependence and the dynamic evolution of these quantities, drawing attention to consequences such as the conservation of the flux associated with the open-quotes thermal velocityclose quotes form W μv , and the conservation of the related open-quotes thermal helicityclose quotes current H v . The comparison of this theory with some other conducting fluid theories is briefly discussed, and more particularly it is shown explicitly how this generalisation of the fully non-linear Landau theory relates to an analogous generalisation of the more restricted type of theory previously developed by Tisza and London, in which the quantities j v s and j v N had a more fundamental role. 40 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Energy-momentum tensor in the fermion-pairing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawati, S.; Miyata, H.

    1980-01-01

    The symmetric energy-momentum tensor for the self-interacting fermion theory (psi-barpsi) 2 is expressed in terms of the collective mode within the Hartree approximation. The divergent part of the energy-momentum tensor for the fermion theory induces an effective energy-momentum tensor for the collective mode, and this effective energy-momentum tensor automatically has the Callan-Coleman-Jackiw improved form. The renormalized energy-momentum tensor is structurally equivalent to the Callan-Coleman-Jackiw improved tensor for the Yukawa theory

  9. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, Cédric; Corde, Sébastien; Lehe, Rémi; Le Bouteiller, Madeleine; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Davoine, Xavier; Rax, J. M.; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laserplasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  10. U.S. Hail Frequency and the Global Wind Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensini, Vittorio A.; Allen, John T.

    2018-02-01

    Changes in Earth relative atmospheric angular momentum can be described by an index known as the Global Wind Oscillation. This global index accounts for changes in Earth's atmospheric budget of relative angular momentum through interactions of tropical convection anomalies, extratropical dynamics, and engagement of surface torques (e.g., friction and mountain). It is shown herein that U.S. hail events are more (less) likely to occur in low (high) atmospheric angular momentum base states when excluding weak Global Wind Oscillation days, with the strongest relationships found in the boreal spring and fall. Severe, significant severe, and giant hail events are more likely to occur during Global Wind Oscillation phases 8, 1, 2, and 3 during the peak of U.S. severe weather season. Lower frequencies of hail events are generally found in Global Wind Oscillation phases 4-7 but vary based on Global Wind Oscillation amplitude and month. In addition, probabilistic anomalies of atmospheric ingredients supportive of hail producing supercell thunderstorms closely mimic locations of reported hail frequency, helping to corroborate report results.

  11. Heat, Moisture, and Momentum Budgets of Isolated Deep Midlatitude and Tropical Convective Clouds as Diagnosed from Three-Dimensional Model Output. Part I: Control Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Robert E.

    1994-12-01

    This project uses a three-dimensional anelastic cloud model with a simple ice phase parameterization to evaluate the feedback between isolated deep convective clouds and their near surroundings. The horizontal Reynolds averaging approach of Anthes is adopted to diagnose the vertical profiles of the individual budget terms for heat, moisture, and horizontal momentum, as well as the resultant effects of each budget as defined by apparent sources or sinks. The averaging area, 33.75 km on a side, is comparable to one grid cell for typical mesoscale numerical weather prediction models.Two comparative simulations are run, one for a severe Oklahoma thunderstorm in strong vertical wind shear and the other for a tropical Atlantic cumulonimbus in much weaker shear. The midlatitude cloud evolves to a vigorous quasi-steady mature stage with several supercell characteristics including an erect large-diameter updraft, a strong and vertically extensive mesolow, and a well-developed highly asymmetric cold pool that spreads rapidly. In contrast, the tropical updraft is much narrower and slower with a shallow weak midlevel mesolow, leans markedly downshear, and evolves early into slow decay modulated by bubblelike pulsations, while the cold pool is weak and quasi-circular and spreads slowly.There are several similarities between corresponding budgets in the two runs. Most notably: 1) The heat and moisture budgets are dominated by condensation, which is maximized in the midtroposphere. 2) The horizontal pressure gradient force dominates the momentum budget. 3) Vertical eddy transport (flux divergence) is highly important to each budget. Thermodynamically, it acts to mainly cool and dry the lower troposphere, while warming and moistening the upper troposphere, though with a lower crossover level for moisture than for heat. 4) The altitudes of the peak apparent heat sources are determined by the vertical eddy transport of heat. 5) Net evaporation has 40% as much amplitude as the

  12. Dynamoelectric machine with a superconductive field winding that can operate in either a synchronous or an asynchronous mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, C.J.; Haller, H.E. III.

    1977-01-01

    Two parallel magnetic flux paths are provided in a dynamoelectric machine having a superconductive field winding. A first, or main, magnetic flux path includes at least one area of nonferromagnetic or diamagnetic material. A second, or shunt, magnetic flux path prevents the relatively low frequency ac flux present during starting or asynchronous operation of the machine, when used as an ac motor, from penetrating the superconductive winding

  13. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  14. Wind regimes derived from martian large ripples: Implications for long-term and short-term wind dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Y. C.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Fenton, L. K.

    2016-12-01

    Aeolian bedforms, such as sand dunes and wind ripples, have been extensively used to derive surface wind regimes on Mars. However, the distinction of different temporal (i.e., long-term vs. short-term) and spatial (i.e., global vs. local) scales of surface winds derived from these bedforms is unclear. In addition, many recent studies have utilized various scales of numeric modeling, such as global scale general circulation models, mesoscale, and microscale airflow models, to analyze surface wind regimes based on aeolian features and compare the modeled winds with those derived from mapping of dunes and ripples. These results showed some degree of discrepancy between mapping-inferred winds and modeled winds, which may be in part due to the lack of recognition of different scales of winds. Since the knowledge of possible wind patterns is essential to understanding past and present climate on Mars, this study aims to classify the types of surface wind derived from different aeolian features. Here we use large martian ripples as indicators to infer near-surface wind regimes, following an approach previously developed by us. We then compare the ripple-inferred winds with those derived from both dune slipfaces and crestline alignments, using IMGBNT (inverse maximum gross bedform-normal transport) and IMSF (inverse mean sand flux) techniques. Our initial results show that ripple-inferred wind regimes are consistent with either dune crestline orientations or slipface-inferred wind regimes. The former implies the interaction between airflow and dune crest topography (i.e., form-flow), which produces the longitudinal winds, whereas the slipface-inferred winds are most likely transverse in nature. Furthermore, our results suggest that dune slipface and large ripples may better reflect local-scale, short-period wind dynamics, whereas dune alignment may better reflects large-scale, long-period wind dynamics. Thus, comparison of wind regimes using numeric modeling should be

  15. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j * and mass M * (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j * reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j * in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ∼100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j * versus M * . The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j * -M * tracks, with log-slopes of ∼0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ∼3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ∼7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j * -M * trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j * -M * scaling relations. This provides a

  16. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Fall, S. Michael [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j{sub *} and mass M{sub *} (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j{sub *} reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j{sub *} in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of {approx}100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j{sub *} versus M{sub *}. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j{sub *}-M{sub *} tracks, with log-slopes of {approx}0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of {approx}3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and {approx}7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j{sub *}-M{sub *} trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow

  17. Diffuser augmented wind turbine analysis code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jonathan

    Wind Energy is becoming a significant source of energy throughout the world. This ever increasing field will potentially reach the limit of availability and practicality with the wind farm sites and size of the turbine itself. Therefore, it is necessary to develop innovative wind capturing devices that can produce energy in the locations where large conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) are too impractical to install and operate. A diffuser augmented wind turbine (DAWT) is one such innovation. DAWTs increase the power output of the rotor by increasing the wind speed into the rotor using a duct. Currently, developing these turbines is an involved process using time consuming Computational Fluid Dynamics codes. A simple and quick design tool is necessary for designers to develop efficient energy capturing devices. This work lays out the theory for a quick analysis tool for DAWTs using an axisymmetric surface vorticity method. This method allows for quick analysis of duct, hubs and rotors giving designers a general idea of the power output of the proposed hub, blade and duct geometry. The method would be similar to the way blade element momentum theory is used to design conventional HAWTs. It is determined that the presented method is viable for preliminary design of DAWTs.

  18. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  19. Energy-momentum density of graphite by electron-momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, M.; Fang, Z.; Canney, S.; Kheifets, A.; McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1996-11-01

    The energy-resolved electron momentum density of graphite has been measured along a series of well-defined directions using electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). This is the first measurement of this kind performed on a single-crystal target with a thoroughly controlled orientation which clearly demonstrates the different nature of the σ and π bands in graphite. Good agreement between the calculated density and the measured one is found, further establishing that fact that EMS yields more direct and complete information on the valence electronic structure that any other method. 12 refs., 2 figs

  20. The QCD vacuum at infinite momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    We outline how ''topological confinement'' can be seen by the analysis of Regge limit infra-red divergences. We suggest that it is a necessary bridge between conventional confinement and the parton model at infinite momentum. It is produced by adding a chiral doublet of color sextet quarks to conventional QCD. An immediate signature of the resultant electroweak symmetry breaking would be large cross-sections for W + W/sup /minus// and Z 0 Z 0 pairs at the CERN and Fermilab /bar p/p colliders. 24 refs