WorldWideScience

Sample records for wildlife species listing

  1. Species List for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a species list of fish, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles that are either common to the Back Bay area or have ranges that extend into this region. This list...

  2. 76 FR 46361 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 23 Species on Oahu as Endangered and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 23 Species on Oahu as Endangered and Designating Critical Habitat for... Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 23 Species on Oahu as Endangered and Designating... Oahu in the Hawaiian Islands as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act...

  3. 75 FR 606 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia as Endangered Throughout...)-- all native to Peru. The ash-breasted tit-tyrant and royal cinclodes are also native to Bolivia. This...

  4. 75 FR 38069 - Injurious Wildlife Species; Listing the Boa Constrictor, Four Python Species, and Four Anaconda...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Constrictor, Four Python Species, and Four Anaconda Species as Injurious Reptiles AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... regulations to add Indian python (Python molurus, including Burmese python Python molurus bivittatus), reticulated python (Broghammerus reticulatus or Python reticulatus), Northern African python (Python sebae...

  5. 75 FR 11808 - Injurious Wildlife Species; Listing the Boa Constrictor, Four Python Species, and Four Anaconda...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Constrictor, Four Python Species, and Four Anaconda Species as Injurious Reptiles AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... to add Indian python (Python molurus, including Burmese python Python molurus bivittatus), reticulated python (Broghammerus reticulatus or Python reticulatus), Northern African python (Python sebae...

  6. 50 CFR 222.309 - Permits for listed species of sea turtles involving the Fish and Wildlife Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permits for listed species of sea turtles... species of sea turtles involving the Fish and Wildlife Service. (a) This section establishes specific... survival of endangered or threatened species of sea turtles; zoological exhibition or educational purposes...

  7. 77 FR 43433 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia as Endangered... Bolivia as Endangered Throughout Their Range AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final... species are native to Peru. The ash-breasted tit-tyrant and royal cinclodes are also native to Bolivia...

  8. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge Bird List

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This bird list includes 293 species of birds which have been recorded on the refuge, principally on Bulls Island, and is based on observations by refuge personnel...

  9. 76 FR 15857 - Injurious Wildlife Species; Listing the Bighead Carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) as Injurious Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ...The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) adds the bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), a large fish native to eastern Asia, to the list of injurious fish, mollusks, and crustaceans. The importation into the United States and interstate transportation between States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or any territory or possession of the United States of all forms of live bighead carp, gametes, viable eggs, and hybrids thereof is prohibited, except by permit for zoological, education, medical, or scientific purposes (in accordance with permit regulation at 50 CFR 16.22) or by Federal agencies without a permit solely for their own use.

  10. Fungi Regeneration Following Prescribed Forest Burns and Fungi Species List for the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study was conducted during the summer of 1995 as a special project. Other assigned work took precedent. Also, the summer proved to be one of the driest in New...

  11. 77 FR 21936 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 23 Species on Oahu as Endangered and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ...; Listing 23 Species on Oahu as Endangered and Designating Critical Habitat for 124 Species AGENCY: Fish and..., proposal to list as endangered and to designate critical habitat for 23 species on the island of Oahu in... boundary for Oahu--Lowland Dry--Unit 8, from that described in the proposed rule, based on new information...

  12. Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge Butterflies and Dragonflies List

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following butterfly and dragonfly list contains 72 butterfly species and 31 dragonfly and damselfly species that have been recorded by Dr. Brian G Scholtens, Dr....

  13. 77 FR 38762 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Seven Listed Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... interbreeds when mature; (B) Endangered species means any species that is in danger of extinction throughout... 5-year status reviews under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), of seven animal... to as the List) in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for...

  14. 77 FR 51767 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Five Species of Sturgeon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... WildEarth Guardians and Friends of Animals to list 15 species of sturgeon (Acipenser naccarii--Adriatic... shovelnose/little shovelnose sturgeon/Small Amu-dar shovelnose sturgeon; P. kaufmanni--false shovelnose...

  15. The World of Endangered Wildlife. [Filmstrip, Cassette Tape Narration, Teacher's Guide, Two Copies of National Wildlife Magazine's Special Issue on Endangered Species, State-by-State List of Endangered Animals, and Wildlife Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    The gradual disappearance of many species of wildlife, too often a prelude to extinction, is a problem of large proportions and increasing urgency. This filmstrip kit is designed to help students and teachers to understand the more serious threats to endangered species, what is being done about them, and how the individual can help. The kit…

  16. Endangered species act : the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service has incomplete information about effects on listed species from section 7 consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The western United States, including vast stretches of federal land, is home to more than a third of the 1,317 species listed under the Endangered Species Act. Under section 7 of the act, federal agencies must ensure that any actions they authorize, ...

  17. 50 CFR 15.31 - Criteria for including species in the approved list for captive-bred species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for including species in the approved list for captive-bred species. 15.31 Section 15.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Approved List of Species Listed...

  18. 76 FR 44564 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Seven Listed Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... listed rule publication date and citation ANIMALS Bat, gray Myotis grisescens Endangered Central and April 28, 1976 Southeastern (41 FR 17736). U.S.A. Bat, Indiana Myotis sodalis... Endangered Eastern and... Contact address Gray bat Dr. Paul McKenzie, (573) 234-2132, Columbia Missouri Field extension 107, paul...

  19. 77 FR 47587 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 38 Species on Molokai, Lanai, and Maui as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... plant Gahnia lanaiensis, due to new information that this species is synonymous with G. lacera, a widespread species from New Zealand. In addition, we propose name changes or corrections for 11 endangered... climate change on the species included in this proposed rule, and any special management needs or...

  20. 75 FR 6616 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; Notice of 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List 83 Species of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... species and the die-off of 95 percent of the regions' long-spined sea urchins (Diadema antillarum) in the... known as coral reefs in shallow tropical and subtropical seas around the world. The rapid calcification... Indo- Pacific. The petition includes species accounts (i.e., description of the species' morphology...

  1. 78 FR 69376 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 19 Species and 3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... or causally linked to the petitioned species (e.g., discussion of dead zones yet no identification... economic exclusive zone (EEZ), conducted from 1984-2006, have identified the species as being present in... specimens have all occurred inshore, from the intertidal zone to 30 m depth, and within a small ] area (less...

  2. 77 FR 63927 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 15 Species on Hawaii Island as Endangered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... that may be unique to certain species, but do not apply to all species under consideration within the same ecosystem. For example, the threat of predation by nonnative wasps is unique to the picture-wing...; aridosols, which are characterized by horizons with accumulations of carbonates, gypsum, or sodium chloride...

  3. 78 FR 10601 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List 44 Species of Corals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ...) which interbreeds when mature (16 U.S.C. 1532(16)). Because corals are invertebrate species, we are... in a negative fashion; then we assess the potential significance of that negative response. Biology... presented in the petition or is presently available on the biology, population characteristics, distribution...

  4. 77 FR 34463 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 38 Species on Molokai, Lanai, and Maui as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... seed shape and surface features determined by scanning electron microscopy. In their treatment, Terrell... based on achene morphology and chromosome number, while retaining 6 of the Hawaiian species in... 1930 (Koyama 2010, p. 30). Born and raised in New Zealand, Munro is known to have used seeds of New...

  5. 50 CFR 23.91 - How do I find out if a species is listed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How do I find out if a species is listed? 23.91 Section 23.91 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  6. 50 CFR 23.90 - What are the criteria for listing species in Appendix III?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the criteria for listing species in Appendix III? 23.90 Section 23.90 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE...

  7. 76 FR 57943 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the List of Endangered and Threatened...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ...; Revising the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife for the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) in the Eastern... the listing of the Minnesota population of gray wolves (Canis lupus) under the Endangered Species Act... Ragan, 612-713-5350. Direct all questions or requests for additional information to: Gray Wolf Questions...

  8. 50 CFR 15.33 - Species included in the approved list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS WILD BIRD CONSERVATION ACT Approved List of Species Listed in the Appendices to the.... Emblema guttata Diamond Sparrow. Emblema picta Painted finch. Lonchura castaneothorax Chestnut-breasted...

  9. Vascular Plant Species Occurrences - Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Charlton, Clinch, and Ware Counties GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This spreadsheet contains up-to-date (2016) information on the occurrence of vascular plant species observed within the Okefenokee NWR since 1932. This list should...

  10. Wildlife hosts for OIE-Listed diseases: considerations regarding global wildlife trade and host-pathogen relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristine M; Machalaba, Catherine M; Jones, Hilary; Cáceres, Paula; Popovic, Marija; Olival, Kevin J; Ben Jebara, Karim; Karesh, William B

    2017-05-01

    The expanding international wildlife trade, combined with a lack of surveillance for key animal diseases in most countries, represents a potential pathway for transboundary disease movement. While the international wildlife trade represents over US $300 billion per year industry involving exchange of billions of individual animals, animal products, and plants as traditional medicines, meat from wild animals, trophies, live exotic pets, commercial products and food, surveillance and reporting of OIE-Listed diseases in wildlife are often opportunistic. We reviewed peer-reviewed literature for reports of 73 OIE-Listed terrestrial animal diseases in wild animals and found 528 possible wild animal hosts using our methodology. Not all host-pathogen relationships indicate that a particular species serves an epidemiologically significant role in the transmission of disease, but improved reporting of infections in wild animals along with clinical and pathological findings would contribute to improved One Health risk assessments.

  11. 50 CFR 70.9 - Wildlife species management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife species management. 70.9 Section 70.9 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) MANAGEMENT OF FISHERIES CONSERVATION AREAS NATIONAL FISH HATCHERIES § 70.9 Wildlife species...

  12. 50 CFR 23.89 - What are the criteria for listing species in Appendix I or II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the criteria for listing species in Appendix I or II? 23.89 Section 23.89 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE...

  13. National Wildlife. Special Issue: Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, John, Ed.

    This is the first special issue in the 12-year history of "National Wildlife," and is devoted entirely to endangered species of animals and plants in the United States. An overview of the problem stresses the impact of man's haphazard development, suburban sprawl, and urban pollution upon a fragile environment, resulting in dozens of…

  14. 50 CFR 424.11 - Factors for listing, delisting, or reclassifying species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... reclassifying species. 424.11 Section 424.11 Wildlife and Fisheries JOINT REGULATIONS (UNITED STATES FISH AND... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A LISTING ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES AND DESIGNATING CRITICAL HABITAT Revision of the Lists § 424.11...

  15. 75 FR 235 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Rule To List the Galapagos Petrel and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ...; Final Rule To List the Galapagos Petrel and Heinroth's Shearwater as Threatened Throughout Their Ranges... Service (Service), determine threatened status for the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) previously... list of Threatened and Endangered Wildlife (50 CFR 17.11), including two species (Galapagos petrel, and...

  16. Endangerment and Likeability of Wildlife Species: How Important are they for Proposed Payments for Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.; Swarna Nantha, Hemanath; Wilson, Clevo

    2004-01-01

    Examines empirically the relative influence of the degree of endangerment of wildlife species and their stated likeability on individuals’ willingness to pay (WTP) for their conservation. To do this, it utilises data obtained from the IUCN Red List and likeability and WTP data obtained from two serial surveys of a sample of the Australian public who were requested to assess 24 Australian wildlife species in each of three animal classes: mammals, birds and reptiles. Between the first and secon...

  17. Vegetation and Vertebrates of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Outline of Ecology and Annotated Lists 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an extensive list of vegetation and vertebrates at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center based on information gathered during the years 1936-1946.

  18. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  19. Under what circumstances can wildlife farming benefit species conservation?

    OpenAIRE

    Tensen, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Wild animals and their derivatives are traded worldwide. Consequent poaching has been a main threat to species conservation. As current interventions and law enforcement cannot circumvent the resulting extinction of species, an alternative approach must be considered. It has been suggested that commercial breeding can keep the pressure off wild populations, referred to as wildlife farming. During this review, it is argued that wildlife farming can benefit species conservation only if the foll...

  20. Potential effects of forestry operations and associated best management practices on riparian wildlife species in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke M. Warrington; W. Michael Aust; Scott M. Barrett; W. Mark Ford; M. Chad Bolding; Andy Dolloff

    2016-01-01

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service is considering the addition of 374 riparian and aquatic species in the southeastern United States to the federal Threated and Endangered Species List. This recommendation is a result of a 2011 petition, which recognized forest operations as having negative effects on 51 percent of the listed species, citing research conducted in the...

  1. Uncertainty in invasive alien species listing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Melodie A; Spear, Dian; Kleynhans, Elizabeth J; Marais, Elrike

    2012-04-01

    Lists of invasive alien species (IAS) are essential for preventing, controlling, and reporting on the state of biological invasions. However, these lists suffer from a range of errors, with serious consequences for their use in science, policy, and management. Here we (1) collated and classified errors in IAS listing using a taxonomy of uncertainty; and (2) estimated the size of these errors using data from a completed listing exercise, with the purpose of better understanding, communicating, and dealing with them. Ten errors were identified. Most result from a lack of knowledge or measurement error (epistemic uncertainty), although two were a result of context dependence and vagueness (linguistic uncertainty). Estimates of the size of the effects of these errors were substantial in a number of cases and unknown in others. Most errors, and those with the largest estimated effect, result in underestimates of IAS numbers. However, there are a number of errors where the size and direction of the effect remains poorly understood. The effect of differences in opinion between specialists is potentially large, particularly for data-poor taxa and regions, and does not have a clearly directional or consistent effect on the size and composition of IAS lists. Five tactics emerged as important for reducing uncertainty in IAS lists, and while uncertainty will never be removed entirely, these approaches will significantly improve the transparency, repeatability, and comparability of IAS lists. Understanding the errors and uncertainties that occur during the process of listing invasive species, as well as the potential size and nature of their effects on IAS lists, is key to improving the value of these lists for governments, management agencies, and conservationists. Such understanding is increasingly important given positive trends in biological invasion and the associated risks to biodiversity and biosecurity.

  2. 78 FR 18938 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing as Endangered and Designation of Critical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... cultural and natural resources and no acu a cactus plants were located. We are considering withdrawing this... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AZ43 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing as Endangered and Designation of Critical Habitat for Acu a Cactus and the Fickeisen Plains Cactus...

  3. Wildlife DNA Forensic in Curbing Illegal Wildlife Trade: Specie Identification from Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ved P.; Dhyanendra Kumar; Goyal, Surendra P.

    2014-01-01

    Species identification in wildlife forensics is the one of the major concern to enforce law and curbing illegal wildlife trade. Among all the available analytical teqniques DNA based species identification is the most robust and acceptable evidence in the court of law. We analysed cytochrome b and 12S rRNA mtDNA fragments to identify species from three different seizures. DNA based analysis of Cyt b and 12S rRNA has identified three seizures as Hog deer, Chital and Swamp deer.

  4. Controlling wildlife reproduction : reversible suppression of reproductive function or sex-related behaviour in wildlife species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertschinger, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Fertility control represents a proactive approach to population management for various mammalian wildlife species. In large predators, deslorelin implants have proven to be useful contraceptives in species such as lions, tigers and cheetahs. Although female lions and tigers responded well to various

  5. The bird species of pandam wildlife park and the surrounding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the bird species abundance and diversity of the Pandam wildlife park and the surrounding farmlands. The effect of time of day as well as vegetation variables on bird species diversity in the park and surrounding farmlands was also conducted. 10 transects in each study site were surveyed twice ...

  6. Barcoding markers for Pneumocystis species in wildlife : Fungal Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danesi, P.; Da Rold, G.; Rizzoli, A.; Hauffe, H. C.; Marangon, S.; Samerpitak, K.; Demanche, C.; Guillot, J.; Capelli, G.; De Hoog, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung specimens (n = 216) from six wildlife species were examined for occurrence of Pneumocystis species in pulmonary tissues. Among small mammals the shrew Sorex antinorii (80 %) were most frequently colonized. In contrast, foxes and badgers did not yield positive amplification. Host-specificity was

  7. Species distributions models in wildlife planning: agricultural policy and wildlife management in the great plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Joseph J.; Jorgensen, Christopher; Stuber, Erica F.; Gruber, Lutz F.; Bishop, Andrew A.; Lusk, Jeffrey J.; Zach, Eric S.; Decker, Karie L.

    2017-01-01

    We know economic and social policy has implications for ecosystems at large, but the consequences for a given geographic area or specific wildlife population are more difficult to conceptualize and communicate. Species distribution models, which extrapolate species-habitat relationships across ecological scales, are capable of predicting population changes in distribution and abundance in response to management and policy, and thus, are an ideal means for facilitating proactive management within a larger policy framework. To illustrate the capabilities of species distribution modeling in scenario planning for wildlife populations, we projected an existing distribution model for ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) onto a series of alternative future landscape scenarios for Nebraska, USA. Based on our scenarios, we qualitatively and quantitatively estimated the effects of agricultural policy decisions on pheasant populations across Nebraska, in specific management regions, and at wildlife management areas. 

  8. Under what circumstances can wildlife farming benefit species conservation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wild animals and their derivatives are traded worldwide. Consequent poaching has been a main threat to species conservation. As current interventions and law enforcement cannot circumvent the resulting extinction of species, an alternative approach must be considered. It has been suggested that commercial breeding can keep the pressure off wild populations, referred to as wildlife farming. During this review, it is argued that wildlife farming can benefit species conservation only if the following criteria are met: (i the legal products will form a substitute, and consumers show no preference for wild-caught animals; (ii a substantial part of the demand is met, and the demand does not increase due to the legalized market; (iii the legal products will be more cost-efficient, in order to combat the black market prices; (iv wildlife farming does not rely on wild populations for re-stocking; (v laundering of illegal products into the commercial trade is absent. For most species encountered in the wildlife trade, these criteria are unlikely to be met in reality and commercial breeding has the potential to have the opposite effect to what is desired for conservation. For some species, however, none of the criteria are violated, and wildlife farming can be considered a possible conservation tool as it may help to take the pressure off wild populations. For these species, future research should focus on the impact of legal products on the market dynamics, effective law enforcement that can prevent corruption, and wildlife forensics that enable the distinction between captive-bred and wild-caught species.

  9. 76 FR 63419 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Petition Finding, Proposed Listing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... Plants; 12-Month Petition Finding, Proposed Listing of Coqu[iacute] Llanero as Endangered, and... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Petition Finding, Proposed Listing of Coqu[iacute] Llanero as... (249 hectares) of a freshwater wetland for designation as critical habitat. The proposed critical...

  10. 76 FR 53379 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the List of Endangered and Threatened...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ...; Revising the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife for the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) in the Eastern...), published a proposed rule to reevaluate the listing of the Minnesota population of gray wolves (Canis lupus... proposed rule, we recognized recent taxonomic information indicating that the gray wolf subspecies Canis...

  11. 78 FR 54614 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removing the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) From the List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ...; Removing the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) From the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Maintaining Protections for the Mexican Wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) by Listing It as Endangered AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... endangered status for the Mexican wolf by listing it as a subspecies (Canis lupus baileyi), and we announced...

  12. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), species lists, weed control, ecological and plant...

  13. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, burn study, pine survival, species lists,...

  14. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, species lists, ecological and plant...

  15. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), water movement studies, cover type studies, species lists,...

  16. 76 FR 62503 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Black...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ...). Annual adult death rates for the black-footed albatross are normally very low, on the order of 3 to 8... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Black-footed Albatross as... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Black-footed Albatross as...

  17. 76 FR 81665 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) in the Western...-AX57 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revising the Listing of the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus... Minnesota population of gray wolves (Canis lupus) to conform to current statutory and policy requirements...

  18. 78 FR 60813 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removing the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) From the List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ...; Removing the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) From the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Maintaining Protections for the Mexican Wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) by Listing It as Endangered AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... it as a subspecies (Canis lupus baileyi). On September 5, 2013, we announced three public hearings on...

  19. Attitudes Toward Wildlife Species Protection: Assessing Moderating and Mediating Effects in the Value-Attitude Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Tarrant; Alan D. Bright; H. Ken Cordell

    1997-01-01

    Framed in the cognitive hierarchy approach, we examine (1) the mediating effect of general environmental atritudes and (2) the moderating effect of factual wildlife knowledge on the relationship berween values and specific wildlife attitudes (wildlife species protection). These relationships are assessed across four wildlife constituent groups: (I) consumptive users...

  20. Coprophilous ascomycetes in Kenya: Saccobolus species from wildlife dung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungai PG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomy, occurrence and distribution of Saccobolus species was investigated from wild herbivore dung types in Kenya. Dung samples incubated in a moist chamber culture were examined for fungi over three months. Seven species, Saccobolus citrinus, S. depauperatus, S. diffusus, S. infestans, S. platensis, S. truncatus and S. versicolor were isolated from African elephant, black rhinoceros, Cape buffalo, dikdik, giraffe, hartebeest, hippopotamus, impala, waterbuck and zebra dung. Five taxa, S. citrinus, S. diffusus, S. infestans, S. platensis and S. truncatus, are new records for Kenya. The most common taxa were S. depauperatus and S. citrinus. The diversity of coprophilous Saccobolus species in wildlife dung is very high.

  1. Advances in DNA metabarcoding for food and wildlife forensic species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Gravendeel, Barbara; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Scholtens, Ingrid; Peelen, Tamara; Prins, Theo W; Kok, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Species identification using DNA barcodes has been widely adopted by forensic scientists as an effective molecular tool for tracking adulterations in food and for analysing samples from alleged wildlife crime incidents. DNA barcoding is an approach that involves sequencing of short DNA sequences from standardized regions and comparison to a reference database as a molecular diagnostic tool in species identification. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made towards developing DNA metabarcoding strategies, which involves next-generation sequencing of DNA barcodes for the simultaneous detection of multiple species in complex samples. Metabarcoding strategies can be used in processed materials containing highly degraded DNA e.g. for the identification of endangered and hazardous species in traditional medicine. This review aims to provide insight into advances of plant and animal DNA barcoding and highlights current practices and recent developments for DNA metabarcoding of food and wildlife forensic samples from a practical point of view. Special emphasis is placed on new developments for identifying species listed in the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) appendices for which reliable methods for species identification may signal and/or prevent illegal trade. Current technological developments and challenges of DNA metabarcoding for forensic scientists will be assessed in the light of stakeholders' needs.

  2. Dragonflies of Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Detailed list of dragonfly species found at Loess Bluffs NWR. Morphological traits are included for each species listed along with typical body size measurements.

  3. 77 FR 45869 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the British Columbia Distinct Population...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... component of goshawk diets (Lewis et al. 2006, pp. 1153-1156). Red squirrel densities on the Queen Charlotte... stands by red squirrels. (7) Comment: Prey populations may be more stable within the range of the Queen... Wildlife and Plants; Listing the British Columbia Distinct Population Segment of the Queen Charlotte...

  4. 78 FR 20074 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing and Designation of Critical Habitat for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Checkerspot Butterfly, Streaked Horned Lark, and Four Subspecies of Mazama Pocket Gopher AGENCY: Fish and... to list four subspecies of Mazama pocket gopher (Olympia, Tenino, Yelm, and Roy Prairie) and to... for the Mazama pocket gophers; from the Washington Fish and Wildlife Office's Web site ( http://www...

  5. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  6. Wildlife

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes wildlife observations on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1992 and 2009.

  7. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  8. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  9. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2013] Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  10. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  11. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  12. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  13. Invasive Plant Species and Area Prioritization Report: Kern National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — On August 4-5, 2015 a workshop was held at the Kern National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) headquarters to prioritize species and area targets for inventory. Participants at...

  14. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2011] Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  15. Anuran Point Count Species Abundance and Frequency 2001 Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These are summary sheets outlining the point count species abundance and frequency rates of anuran at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge during the spring and summer...

  16. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  17. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  18. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  19. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  20. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  1. Ranking the risk of wildlife species hazardous to military aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, E.J.; Bissonette, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Collisions between birds and aircraft (birdstrikes) pose a major threat to aviation safety. Different species pose different levels of threat; thus, identification of the most hazardous species can help managers identify the level of hazard and prioritize mitigation efforts. Dolbeer et al. (2000) assessed the hazard posed by birds to civilian aircraft by analyzing data from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Wildlife Strike Database to rank the hazardous species and species groups. A similar analysis has not been done for the military but would be useful and necessary. Military flight characteristics differ from those of civilian flights. During the period 1985-1998, birdstrikes cost the United States Air Force (USAF) an average of $35 million/year in damage. Using the USAF Birdstrike Database, we selected and evaluated each species or species group by the number of strikes recorded in each of 3 damage categories. We weighted damage categories to reflect extent and cost of damage. The USAF Birdstrike Database contained 25,519 records of wildlife strikes in the United States. During the period 1985-1998, 22 (mean = 1.6/year) Class-A birdstrikes (>$1,000,000 damage, loss of aircraft, loss of life, or permanent total disability) were sustained, accounting for 80% of total monetary losses caused by birds. Vultures (Cathartes aura, Coragyps atratus, Caracara cheriway) were ranked the most hazardous species group (Hazard Index Rank [HIR] = 127) to USAF aircraft, followed by geese (Branta canadensis, Chen caerulescens, HIR = 76), pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, P. occidentalis, HIR = 47), and buteos (Buteo sp., HIR = 30). Of the smaller flocking birds, blackbirds and starlings (mostly Agelaius phoeniceus, Euphagus cyanocephalus, Molothrus ater, Sturnus vulgaris, HIR = 46), horned larks (Eremophila alpestris, HIR = 24), and swallows (Families Hirundinidae, Apodidae, HIR = 23) were species groups ranked highest. Coupling these results with local bird census

  2. Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea in wildlife: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Spratt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20 given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100–500 larvae often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna

  3. Influence of aesthetic appreciation of wildlife species on attitudes towards their conservation in Kenyan agropastoralist communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Roque de Pinho

    Full Text Available The influence of human aesthetic appreciation of animal species on public attitudes towards their conservation and related decision-making has been studied in industrialized countries but remains underexplored in developing countries. Working in three agropastoralist communities around Amboseli National Park, southern Kenya, we investigated the relative strength of human aesthetic appreciation on local attitudes towards the conservation of wildlife species. Using semi-structured interviewing and free listing (n = 191 as part of a mixed methods approach, we first characterized local aesthetic judgments of wildlife species. With a Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM approach, we then determined the influence of perceiving four species as beautiful on local support for their protection ("rescuing them", and of perceiving four other species as ugly on support for their removal from the area, while controlling for informant personal and household socioeconomic attributes. Perceiving giraffe, gazelles and eland as beautiful is the strongest variable explaining support for rescuing them. Ugliness is the strongest variable influencing support for the removal of buffalo, hyena, and elephant (but not lion. Both our qualitative and quantitative results suggest that perceptions of ugly species could become more positive through direct exposure to those species. We propose that protected areas in developing countries facilitate visitation by local residents to increase their familiarity with species they rarely see or most frequently see in conflict with human interests. Since valuing a species for its beauty requires seeing it, protected areas in developing countries should connect the people who live around them with the animals they protect. Our results also show that aesthetic appreciation of biodiversity is not restricted to the industrialized world.

  4. Influence of aesthetic appreciation of wildlife species on attitudes towards their conservation in Kenyan agropastoralist communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pinho, Joana Roque; Grilo, Clara; Boone, Randall B; Galvin, Kathleen A; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G

    2014-01-01

    The influence of human aesthetic appreciation of animal species on public attitudes towards their conservation and related decision-making has been studied in industrialized countries but remains underexplored in developing countries. Working in three agropastoralist communities around Amboseli National Park, southern Kenya, we investigated the relative strength of human aesthetic appreciation on local attitudes towards the conservation of wildlife species. Using semi-structured interviewing and free listing (n = 191) as part of a mixed methods approach, we first characterized local aesthetic judgments of wildlife species. With a Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) approach, we then determined the influence of perceiving four species as beautiful on local support for their protection ("rescuing them"), and of perceiving four other species as ugly on support for their removal from the area, while controlling for informant personal and household socioeconomic attributes. Perceiving giraffe, gazelles and eland as beautiful is the strongest variable explaining support for rescuing them. Ugliness is the strongest variable influencing support for the removal of buffalo, hyena, and elephant (but not lion). Both our qualitative and quantitative results suggest that perceptions of ugly species could become more positive through direct exposure to those species. We propose that protected areas in developing countries facilitate visitation by local residents to increase their familiarity with species they rarely see or most frequently see in conflict with human interests. Since valuing a species for its beauty requires seeing it, protected areas in developing countries should connect the people who live around them with the animals they protect. Our results also show that aesthetic appreciation of biodiversity is not restricted to the industrialized world.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA in wildlife forensic science: Species identification of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Matthew A.; Palmisciano, Daniel A.; Vyse, Ernest R.; Cameron, David G.

    1991-01-01

    A common problem in wildlife law enforcement is identifying the species of origin of carcasses, meat, or blood when morphological characters such as hair or bones are not available. Immunological and protein electrophoretic (allozyme or general protein) procedures have been used in species identification with considerable success (Bunch et al. 1976, McClymont et al. 1982, Wolfe 1983, Mardini 1984, Pex and Wolfe 1985, Dratch 1986), However, immunological tests often are not sensitive enough to distinguish closely related species. Furthermore, electrophoretically detectable protein polymorphisms may be lacking in certain populations or species and may not be species-specific.Analysis of DNA in human and wildlife forensics has been shown to be a potentially powerful tool for identification of individuals (Jeffreys et al. 1985, Vassartet al. 1987, Thommasen et al. 1989). Differences in copy number and nucleotide sequence of repetitive sequences in the nuclear (chromosomal) DNA result in hypervariability and individual-specific patterns which have been termed DNA "fingerprints." However, these patterns may be too variable for species identification necessitating analyses of more conservative parts of the genome.Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is haploid, maternally inherited, similar in nucleotide sequence among conspecifics from the same geographic region, and more suitable for species identification, in contrast to hypervariable DNA fingerprints. MtDNA has several characteristics which make it useful as a species-specific marker. In mammals, individuals have a single mtDNA genotype shared by all tissues. Because mtDNA is haploid and reflects only maternal ancestry, the mtDNA gene number in a population is 4 times less than the nuclear gene number (Birky et al. 1983). This can result in relatively rapid loss or fixation of mtDNA genotypes so that all individuals in a population may be descended from a single ancestral female in as few as 4N (N = population size) generations

  6. 75 FR 13717 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Southern...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding... Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. A species may be determined to be an endangered or threatened... references on impacts of sand and gravel mining to freshwater mussels and other invertebrates (e.g., Wild...

  7. 50 CFR Table I to Part 36 - Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act, Pub. L. 96-487, December 2, 1980 I Table I to... (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Pt. 36, Table I Table I to...

  8. 76 FR 58441 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing and Designation of Critical Habitat for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... conservation of a number of rare and listed species, including the Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi), Bolson tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus), Chiricahua leopard frog, black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys...

  9. 76 FR 55638 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Snowy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... on a Petition To List the Snowy Plover and Reclassify the Wintering Population of Piping Plover... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a 90-day finding on a petition to list the snowy... becomes available concerning the status of, or threats to, the snowy plover or the piping plover or their...

  10. 77 FR 16323 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing and Designation of Critical Habitat for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... biology and ecology of the Chiricahua leopard frog refer to the final listing rule (67 FR 40790; June 13... species or taxa, the geographic region in which the species occurs, and conservation biology principles... adjacent to and west of Three Forks near the Campbell Blue and Coleman Creeks Unit. Our Response: Please...

  11. Using Wildlife Species Richness to Identify Land Protection Priorities in California's Hardwood Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert S. Motroni; Daniel A. Airola; Robin K. Ma rose; Nancy D. Tosta

    1991-01-01

    A geographic information system was used to assess wildlife species richness (number of species) in valley-foothill hardwood habitats throughout California to set priorities for conservation attention. Species richness values were assessed and compared using three methods: one that included all species without considering canopy cover conditions and species preferences...

  12. evaluation of wildlife hunting and species of animals marketed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PHILIP

    2014-09-02

    Sep 2, 2014 ... Trade in bushmeat and wildlife products as well as wildlife based industries contributes .... marketing. 42% of them lack other source of income apart from bushmeat trading. 64% of the respondents have year round supply of bushmeat, while 36% of the respondents who have complementary income does it ...

  13. Species List of Alaskan Birds, Mammals, Fish, Amphibians, Reptiles, and Invertebrates. Alaska Region Report Number 82.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tamra Faris

    This publication contains a detailed list of the birds, mammals, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates found in Alaska. Part I lists the species by geographical regions. Part II lists the species by the ecological regions of the state. (CO)

  14. Wildlife species composition in various forest types on Sebuku Island, South Kalimantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmana, C.; Manshur, A.; Rusdian, O.; Putro, H. R.; Hakim, F.; Ermyanyla, M.

    2017-01-01

    Sebuku is one of the small islands in South Kalimantan Provincehaving various forest types with high potential economic in mining sector. Based on it’s business permit, the island has been divided up into several mining concessions. So that biological diversity studies in this island is an interesting in order to serve biological baseline data if someday this island to be extractedfor mining. This research was conducted on 28th November to 5th December 2015 aims to explore wildlife species inhabit mangrove forest, beach forest, and lowland forest usinga rectangle transect (40 x 1000 meter) in each forest type. The results show there are 90 wildlife species identified in Sebuku Island. The beach forest has the highest wildlife species richness (36 species), while the area having the highest protected wildlife species isthe lowland forest. Mangrove forests generally have a lower wildlife species richness. Nevertheless, in Sebuku Island, can be found mangrove forest that have a quite high wildlife species richness (28 species, 50% protected). It is due to silt sedimentation in the estuary area, so that this area become feeding ground for shore and migratory birds.

  15. 77 FR 24908 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Aliciella...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ...). In the 1996 CNOR, we announced a revised list of animal and plant taxa that were regarded as... species responds to the factor in a way that causes actual impacts to the species. If there is exposure to... of extinction of the species such that the species may warrant listing as endangered or threatened as...

  16. Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce Rickel

    2005-01-01

    This volume addresses the wildlife and fish of the grasslands in the Southwestern Region of the USDA Forest Service. Our intent is to provide information that will help resource specialists and decisionmakers manage wildlife populations within grassland ecosystems in the Southwestern United States. The information and analysis presented is at a Regional scale.

  17. Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the significant activities conducted in 1994 to monitor the wildlife resources of the Site. Wildlife populations inhabiting the Hanford Site are monitored in order to measure the status and condition of the populations and assess effects of Hanford operations.

  18. Mapping Habitat and Potential Distributions of Invasive Plant Species on USFWS National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Many invasive species ecologists prefer to use ecological niche models that rely on presence-only data and not make any assumptions on whether or not an absence...

  19. Proposal - Investigation of possible new crayfish species from the Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge, Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal is to investigate the morphological and genetic information about vernal crawfish from Dahomey NWR and other source within the species range of Procambarus...

  20. Development of environmental DNA markers for three aquatic invasive species for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The report concerns the development of species specific primers for Mayan cichlids, Asian Swamp Eels, and the lion fish which are considered aquatic invasive...

  1. Harvest Records for Game Species Collected at Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuges in 1997 and 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These records were taken by Refuge employees at check stations between 1997 and 1998 involving archery, muzzle loading, and multiple game species

  2. 78 FR 73173 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Straight-Horned Markhor as Threatened...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... burn any tree listed in Schedule I; quarry stone, burn lime or charcoal, or collect or remove forest... Balochistan Forest Department, they turned to wildlife biologists in the United States, including the U.S... prohibit the cutting of forests to preserve and maintain forests as a national asset. However, these...

  3. 78 FR 29100 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on Petitions To List the Dusky Shark as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on Petitions To List the Dusky Shark as Threatened or Endangered Under... shark (Carcharhinus obscurus) range-wide or, in the alternative, the Northwest Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico population of the dusky shark as a threatened or endangered distinct population segment (DPS...

  4. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Swan River National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  5. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2013] Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake & Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  6. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  7. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake & Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  8. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  9. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  10. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2013] Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  11. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2011] Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  12. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Charles M. Russel National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  13. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2011] Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  14. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  15. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake & Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  16. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2013] Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  17. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2011] Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  18. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  19. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  20. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2011] Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  1. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  2. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  3. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  4. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  5. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2016] Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  6. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  7. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  8. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Swan River National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  9. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2011] Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  10. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2013] Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  11. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Charles M. Russel National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  12. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Lake Mason National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  13. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Charles M. Russel National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  14. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2013] Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  15. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2013] Charles M. Russel National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  16. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2015] Charles M. Russel National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  17. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  18. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  19. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  20. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Lake Mason National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  1. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2012] Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake & Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  2. [Montana MOYOCO Invasive Species Strike Team Final Report 2014] Lost Trail National Wildlife Refuge, Benton Lake & Lee Metcalf ISST

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The MOYOCO (MT) Invasive Species Strike Team is made up of two field strike teams, housed at Benton Lake and Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuges, yet administered...

  3. [Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge : Sentinel plant species field inventory study plan and methods : Summer 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study plan is for the assessment and adaptive management of environmental processes with sentinel plant species at Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge....

  4. 76 FR 54423 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List All...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... species would apply except for live animals of these species held in captivity in the United States on the... and international trade, predation by other animals, and diseases of this species. (5) Information on... Institute, the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance, the Fund for Animals...

  5. Fish Springs NWR mammal, fish, amphibian, and reptile list

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following is a species list for mammals, fishes, amphibians, and reptiles found on or adjacent to Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge, as of October, 1996.

  6. 77 FR 57647 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for 23 Species on Oahu and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for 23 Species on Oahu and Designation of... Species on Oahu and Designation of Critical Habitat for 124 Species AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... the island of Oahu in the Hawaiian Islands as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as...

  7. Trypanosome Diversity in Wildlife Species from the Serengeti and Luangwa Valley Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, Harriet; Anderson, Neil E.; Picozzi, Kim; Lembo, Tiziana; Mubanga, Joseph; Hoare, Richard; Fyumagwa, Robert D.; Mable, Barbara; Hamill, Louise; Cleaveland, Sarah; Welburn, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The importance of wildlife as reservoirs of African trypanosomes pathogenic to man and livestock is well recognised. While new species of trypanosomes and their variants have been identified in tsetse populations, our knowledge of trypanosome species that are circulating in wildlife populations and their genetic diversity is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Molecular phylogenetic methods were used to examine the genetic diversity and species composition of trypanosomes circulating in wildlife from two ecosystems that exhibit high host species diversity: the Serengeti in Tanzania and the Luangwa Valley in Zambia. Phylogenetic relationships were assessed by alignment of partial 18S, 5.8S and 28S trypanosomal nuclear ribosomal DNA array sequences within the Trypanosomatidae and using ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 for more detailed analysis of the T. vivax clade. In addition to Trypanosoma brucei, T. congolense, T. simiae, T. simiae (Tsavo), T. godfreyi and T. theileri, three variants of T. vivax were identified from three different wildlife species within one ecosystem, including sequences from trypanosomes from a giraffe and a waterbuck that differed from all published sequences and from each other, and did not amplify with conventional primers for T. vivax. Conclusions/Significance Wildlife carries a wide range of trypanosome species. The failure of the diverse T. vivax in this study to amplify with conventional primers suggests that T. vivax may have been under-diagnosed in Tanzania. Since conventional species-specific primers may not amplify all trypanosomes of interest, the use of ITS PCR primers followed by sequencing is a valuable approach to investigate diversity of trypanosome infections in wildlife; amplification of sequences outside the T. brucei clade raises concerns regarding ITS primer specificity for wildlife samples if sequence confirmation is not also undertaken. PMID:23094115

  8. 78 FR 6299 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on Two Petitions To List White Marlin as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Finding on Two Petitions To List White Marlin as Threatened or Endangered Under the Endangered Species Act... finding on two petitions to list white marlin (Kajikia albidus) as threatened or endangered under the... list white marlin (Kajikia albidus) as threatened or endangered under the ESA. We received a separate...

  9. Public health significance of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species in wildlife: Critical insights into better drinking water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Alireza; Paparini, Andrea; Jian, Fuchun; Robertson, Ian; Ryan, Una

    2016-04-01

    Cryptosporidium is an enteric parasite that is transmitted via the faecal-oral route, water and food. Humans, wildlife and domestic livestock all potentially contribute Cryptosporidium to surface waters. Human encroachment into natural ecosystems has led to an increase in interactions between humans, domestic animals and wildlife populations. Increasing numbers of zoonotic diseases and spill over/back of zoonotic pathogens is a consequence of this anthropogenic disturbance. Drinking water catchments and water reservoir areas have been at the front line of this conflict as they can be easily contaminated by zoonotic waterborne pathogens. Therefore, the epidemiology of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium in free-ranging and captive wildlife is of increasing importance. This review focuses on zoonotic Cryptosporidium species reported in global wildlife populations to date, and highlights their significance for public health and the water industry.

  10. Public health significance of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species in wildlife: Critical insights into better drinking water management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zahedi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium is an enteric parasite that is transmitted via the faecal–oral route, water and food. Humans, wildlife and domestic livestock all potentially contribute Cryptosporidium to surface waters. Human encroachment into natural ecosystems has led to an increase in interactions between humans, domestic animals and wildlife populations. Increasing numbers of zoonotic diseases and spill over/back of zoonotic pathogens is a consequence of this anthropogenic disturbance. Drinking water catchments and water reservoir areas have been at the front line of this conflict as they can be easily contaminated by zoonotic waterborne pathogens. Therefore, the epidemiology of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium in free-ranging and captive wildlife is of increasing importance. This review focuses on zoonotic Cryptosporidium species reported in global wildlife populations to date, and highlights their significance for public health and the water industry.

  11. An overview to the investigative approach to species testing in wildlife forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The extent of wildlife crime is unknown but it is on the increase and has observable effects with the dramatic decline in many species of flora and fauna. The growing awareness of this area of criminal activity is reflected in the increase in research papers on animal DNA testing, either for the identification of species or for the genetic linkage of a sample to a particular organism. This review focuses on the use of species testing in wildlife crime investigations. Species identification relies primarily on genetic loci within the mitochondrial genome; focusing on the cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase 1 genes. The use of cytochrome b gained early prominence in species identification through its use in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, while the gene sequence for cytochrome oxidase was adopted by the Barcode for Life research group. This review compares how these two loci are used in species identification with respect to wildlife crime investigations. As more forensic science laboratories undertake work in the wildlife area, it is important that the quality of work is of the highest standard and that the conclusions reached are based on scientific principles. A key issue in reporting on the identification of a particular species is a knowledge of both the intraspecies variation and the possible overlap of sequence variation from one species to that of a closely related species. Recent data showing this degree of genetic separation in mammalian species will allow greater confidence when preparing a report on an alleged event where the identification of the species is of prime importance. The aim of this review is to illustrate aspects of species testing in wildlife forensic science and to explain how a knowledge of genetic variation at the genus and species level can aid in the reporting of results. PMID:21232099

  12. 77 FR 3329 - Injurious Wildlife Species; Listing Three Python Species and One Anaconda Species as Injurious...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... hybrid of these four constrictor snakes is prohibited, except by permit for zoological, education... purposeful or accidental introduction and subsequent establishment of these large nonnative constrictor snake... constrictor snakes in the Python, Boa, and Eunectes genera as injurious under the Act. As a result, most...

  13. 2009 Progress Report on Surveys of Bees and Some Wasps of Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report includes an updated list of bee and wasp species collected as part of study at Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge. Report includes map of survey...

  14. Cheat Mountain Salamander Monitoring Outline 2001 Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A primary responsibility of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service is to identify, monitor, and protect nationally listed endangered and threatened species of...

  15. FWS Critical Habitat for Threatened and Endangered Species Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When a species is proposed for listing as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must consider whether there...

  16. Biological Assessment of the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2006-09-19

    This biological assessment considers the effects of continuing to operate Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally listed threatened or endangered species, based on current and future operations identified in the 2006 Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS; DOE In Prep.). We reviewed 40 projects analyzed in the SWEIS as well as two aspects on ongoing operations to determine if these actions had the potential to affect Federally listed species. Eighteen projects that had not already received U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) consultation and concurrence, as well as the two aspects of ongoing operations, ecological risk from legacy contaminants and the Outfall Reduction Project, were determined to have the potential to affect threatened or endangered species. Cumulative impacts were also analyzed.

  17. 76 FR 67401 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List All...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... also making the petition and the large volume of supporting documents submitted with the petition...-delivery: Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWS-R9-ES-2010-0086; Division of Policy and Directives..., Branch of Foreign Species, Endangered Species Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401 N. Fairfax...

  18. 76 FR 78898 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on Petition To List the Barndoor Skate, Winter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Finding on Petition To List the Barndoor Skate, Winter Skate and Smooth Skate Under the Endangered Species... finding for a petition to list the ] barndoor skate (Dipturus laevis), winter skate (Leucoraja ocellata) and smooth skate (Malacoraja senta) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). We find that the petition...

  19. Updated list of Collembola species currently recorded from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Deharveng, Louis; Bedos, Anne; Chown, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the abundance and richness of species is one of the most fundamental steps in effecting their conservation. Despite global recognition of the significance of the below-ground component of diversity for ecosystem functioning, the soil remains a poorly studied terrestrial ecosystem. In South Africa, knowledge is increasing for a variety of soil faunal groups, but many still remain poorly understood. We have started to address this gap in the knowledge of South African soil biodiversity by focusing on the Collembola in an integrated project that encompasses systematics, barcoding and ecological assessments. Here we provide an updated list of the Collembola species from South Africa. A total of 124 species from 61 genera and 17 families has been recorded, of which 75 are considered endemic, 24 widespread, and 25 introduced. This total number of species excludes the 36 species we consider to be dubious. From the published data, Collembola species richness is high compared to other African countries, but low compared to European countries. This is largely a consequence of poor sampling in the African region, as our discovery of many new species in South Africa demonstrates. Our analyses also show that much ongoing work will be required before a reasonably comprehensive and spatially explicit picture of South Africa’s springtail fauna can be provided, which may well exceed 1000 species. Such work will be necessary to help South Africa meet its commitments to biodiversity conservation, especially in the context of the 2020 Aichi targets of the Convention on Biological Diversity. PMID:26019671

  20. Precision wildlife medicine: applications of the human-centred precision medicine revolution to species conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilde, Jenny; Martindale, Mark Q; Duffy, David J

    2017-05-01

    The current species extinction crisis is being exacerbated by an increased rate of emergence of epizootic disease. Human-induced factors including habitat degradation, loss of biodiversity and wildlife population reductions resulting in reduced genetic variation are accelerating disease emergence. Novel, efficient and effective approaches are required to combat these epizootic events. Here, we present the case for the application of human precision medicine approaches to wildlife medicine in order to enhance species conservation efforts. We consider how the precision medicine revolution, coupled with the advances made in genomics, may provide a powerful and feasible approach to identifying and treating wildlife diseases in a targeted, effective and streamlined manner. A number of case studies of threatened species are presented which demonstrate the applicability of precision medicine to wildlife conservation, including sea turtles, amphibians and Tasmanian devils. These examples show how species conservation could be improved by using precision medicine techniques to determine novel treatments and management strategies for the specific medical conditions hampering efforts to restore population levels. Additionally, a precision medicine approach to wildlife health has in turn the potential to provide deeper insights into human health and the possibility of stemming and alleviating the impacts of zoonotic diseases. The integration of the currently emerging Precision Medicine Initiative with the concepts of EcoHealth (aiming for sustainable health of people, animals and ecosystems through transdisciplinary action research) and One Health (recognizing the intimate connection of humans, animal and ecosystem health and addressing a wide range of risks at the animal-human-ecosystem interface through a coordinated, collaborative, interdisciplinary approach) has great potential to deliver a deeper and broader interdisciplinary-based understanding of both wildlife and human

  1. Advances in DNA metabarcoding for food and wildlife forensic species identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, Martijn; Arulandhu, Alfred J.; Gravendeel, Barbara; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Scholtens, Ingrid; Peelen, Tamara; Prins, Theo W.; Kok, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Species identification using DNA barcodes has been widely adopted by forensic scientists as an effective molecular tool for tracking adulterations in food and for analysing samples from alleged wildlife crime incidents. DNA barcoding is an approach that involves sequencing of short DNA sequences

  2. 76 FR 15947 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; Notice of 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Caribbean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ...Petitions.htm . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrew Herndon, NMFS Southeast Region, 727-824-5312, or... mature (16 U.S.C. 1532(16)). A joint NOAA-U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) policy clarifies the... lacking over most of the species' range, declines to 2 (95% confidence intervals 0.5 to 5%) of its...

  3. Wildlife-livestock interactions and risk areas for cross-species spread of bovine tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha V. Meunier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of diseases between livestock and wildlife can be a hindrance to effective disease control. Maintenance hosts and contact rates should be explored to further understand the transmission dynamics at the wildlife-livestock interface. Bovine tuberculosis (BTB has been shown to have wildlife maintenance hosts and has been confirmed as present in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer in the Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP in Uganda since the 1960s. The first aim of this study was to explore the spatio-temporal spread of cattle illegally grazing within the QENP recorded by the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA rangers in a wildlife crime database. Secondly, we aimed to quantify wildlife-livestock interactions and cattle movements, on the border of QENP, using a longitudinal questionnaire completed by 30 livestock owners. From this database, 426 cattle sightings were recorded within QENP in 8 years. Thirteen (3.1% of these came within a 300 m–4 week space-time window of a buffalo herd, using the recorded GPS data. Livestock owners reported an average of 1.04 (95% CI 0.97–1.11 sightings of Uganda kob, waterbuck, buffalo or warthog per day over a 3-month period, with a rate of 0.22 (95% CI 0.20–0.25 sightings of buffalo per farmer per day. Reports placed 85.3% of the ungulate sightings and 88.0% of the buffalo sightings as further than 50 m away. Ungulate sightings were more likely to be closer to cattle at the homestead (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.6 compared with the grazing area. Each cattle herd mixed with an average of five other cattle herds at both the communal grazing and watering points on a daily basis. Although wildlife and cattle regularly shared grazing and watering areas, they seldom came into contact close enough for aerosol transmission. Between species infection transmission is therefore likely to be by indirect or non-respiratory routes, which is suspected to be an infrequent mechanism of transmission of BTB

  4. 75 FR 57720 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List Agave...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... already developed and managed as tourism and residential projects. Based on information reported by the....) these areas are advertised by realtors as areas for tourism and residential development and, as... Include New Mexico 1/05/2010 Listing Foreign Bird Species Proposed Listing 75 FR 605-649 in Peru and...

  5. 76 FR 61307 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Calopogon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... scientific and commercial information, we find that listing Calopogon oklahomensis is not warranted at this... commercial information that listing the species may be warranted, we make a finding within 12 months of the... branching stem with flowers) length, bud characterization, anthesis (the period from flowering to fruiting...

  6. Genetically engineered Mengo virus vaccination of multiple captive wildlife species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backues, K A; Hill, M; Palmenberg, A C; Miller, C; Soike, K F; Aguilar, R

    1999-04-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), has caused the deaths of many species of animals in zoological parks and research institutions. The Audubon Park Zoo, (New Orleans, Louisiana, USA) attempted vaccination of several species with a killed EMCV vaccine with mixed results. This paper reports an attempt at vaccination against EMCV using a genetically engineered, live attenuated Mengo virus (vMC0) at the Audubon Park Zoo and Miami Metro Zoo, (Miami, Florida, USA) from December 1996 to June 1997. Several species of animals were vaccinated with vMC0, which is serologically indistinguishable from the field strain of EMCV. Serum samples were taken at the time of vaccination and again 21 days later, then submitted for serum neutralization titers against EMCV. The vaccinate species included red capped mangebey (Cercocebus torquatus), colobus (Colobus guereza), angolan colobus (Colobus angolensis), ruffed lemur (Lemur variegatus ruber and Lemur variegatus variegatus), back lemur (Lemur macaco), ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), diana guenon (Cercopithicus diana), spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi), common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), talapoin monkey (Cercopithecus talapoin), Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris), Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii), Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), gerenuk (Litocranius walleri), guanaco (Lama glama guanicoe), black duiker (Cephalophus niger), Vietnamese potbellied pig (Sus scrofa), babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa), collard peccary (Tayass tajacu), and African crested porcupine (Hystrix africaeaustralis). The vaccine response was variable, with high virus neutralizing antibody titer responses in some primate species and mixed to poor responses for other species. No ill effects were seen with vaccination.

  7. 75 FR 46894 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Mexican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... finding on two petitions to list the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) (Mexican wolf) as an... endangered subspecies on April 28, 1976 (41 FR 17742). The gray wolf species (Canis lupus) in North America...

  8. A Checklist of the Herpetofauna of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a list of amphibians and reptiles of the Back Bay/False Gape Natural Area. This list includes the relative abundance of each species. The author...

  9. Invasive species: The categorization of wildlife in science, policy, and wildlife management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman-Berson, S.H.; Turnhout, E.; Tatenhove, van J.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Species categories commonly used in nature conservation, such as protected, endangered, reintroduced,or invasive, are open to various interpretations that can result in diverging and sometimes serious con-sequences. This is vividly apparent with respect to invasiveness because the categorization of

  10. 75 FR 8621 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Withdrawal of Proposed Rule To List the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AW72 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants.... Coastal cutthroat trout spend more time in the freshwater environment and make more extensive use of this... nonmigratory; freshwater migrants; and marine migrants. Residents may stay within the same stream segment their...

  11. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

    2007-10-01

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  12. Computerized map of risk to manage wildlife species in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Lay, G; Clergeau, P; Hubert-Moy, L

    2001-03-01

    For the last 20 years, human-wildlife conflicts have been rapidly increasing in towns. Although people want "greener" cities, the expansion of disliked species causes problems that are difficult to manage and to reduce. The complexity of the numerous factors involved in these human-wildlife relations needs the development of a comprehensive tool for urban planners. Today, with the development of computers and geographical information systems, it is easier to analyze and combine different spatial data as methods used for the management of risks in studies of natural hazards. Here we present a method for assessing and mapping the risk in cases of human-wildlife conflict. An application to starling management in a town in western France will show the efficiency of our methods to combine information given by a network of experts and to highlight higher risk sites. The map of risk provides a spatial result useful for comprehension, communication between people and agencies, and public education.

  13. Cross-species transmission potential between wild pigs, livestock, poultry, wildlife, and humans: Implications for disease risk management in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryan S.; Sweeney, Steven J.; Slootmaker, Chris; Grear, Daniel A.; DiSalvo, Paul A.; Kiser, Deborah; Shwiff, Stephanie A.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-species disease transmission between wildlife, domestic animals and humans is an increasing threat to public and veterinary health. Wild pigs are increasingly a potential veterinary and public health threat. Here we investigate 84 pathogens and the host species most at risk for transmission with wild pigs using a network approach. We assess the risk to agricultural and human health by evaluating the status of these pathogens and the co-occurrence of wild pigs, agriculture and humans. We identified 34 (87%) OIE listed swine pathogens that cause clinical disease in livestock, poultry, wildlife, and humans. On average 73% of bacterial, 39% of viral, and 63% of parasitic pathogens caused clinical disease in other species. Non-porcine livestock in the family Bovidae shared the most pathogens with swine (82%). Only 49% of currently listed OIE domestic swine diseases had published wild pig surveillance studies. The co-occurrence of wild pigs and farms increased annually at a rate of 1.2% with as much as 57% of all farms and 77% of all agricultural animals co-occurring with wild pigs. The increasing co-occurrence of wild pigs with livestock and humans along with the large number of pathogens shared is a growing risk for cross-species transmission.

  14. Species List and Status of Mammals and Birds in Sambisa Game ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the species list and status of mammals and birds in Sambisa Game Reserve. Species list was determined using direct sighting, animal signs and activities, information from hunters and visits to bush meat processing and selling centers. Results indicate that a total of seventeen (17) species of ...

  15. 75 FR 38776 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding for a Petition to List Puget Sound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... Finding for a Petition to List Puget Sound Coho Salmon as Endangered or Threatened AGENCY: National Marine... coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) as an endangered or threatened species and to designate critical... our Policy on Applying the Definition of Species under the ESA to Pacific Salmon (56 FR 58612...

  16. Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Daniel

    1984-10-01

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

  17. Identification of Alpha and Beta Coronavirus in Wildlife Species in France: Bats, Rodents, Rabbits, and Hedgehogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Monchatre-Leroy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are closely monitored in the context of emerging diseases and, as illustrated with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-coronavirus (MERS-CoV, are known to cross the species barrier and eventually to move from wildlife to humans. Knowledge of the diversity of coronaviruses in wildlife is therefore essential to better understand and prevent emergence events. This study explored the presence of coronaviruses in four wild mammal orders in France: Bats, rodents, lagomorphs, and hedgehogs. Betacoronavirus and Alphacoronavirus genera were identified. The results obtained suggest the circulation of potentially evolving virus strains, with the potential to cross the species barrier.

  18. Annotated list of marine alien species in the Mediterranean with records of the worst invasive species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ZENETOS

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This collaborative effort by many specialists across the Mediterranean presents an updated annotated list of alien marine species in the Mediterranean Sea. Alien species have been grouped into six broad categories namely established, casual, questionable, cryptogenic, excluded and invasive, and presented in lists of major ecofunctional/taxonomic groups. The establishment success within each group is provided while the questionable and excluded records are commented in brief. A total of 963 alien species have been reported from the Mediterranean until December 2005, 218 of which have been classified as excluded (23% leaving 745 of the recorded species as valid aliens. Of these 385 (52% are already well established, 262 (35% are casual records, while 98 species (13% remain “questionable” records. The species cited in this work belong mostly to zoobenthos and in particular to Mollusca and Crustacea, while Fish and Phytobenthos are the next two groups which prevail among alien biota in the Mediterranean. The available information depends greatly on the taxonomic group examined. Thus, besides the three groups explicitly addressed in the CIESM atlas series (Fish, Decapoda/Crustacea and Mollusca, which are however updated in the present work, Polychaeta, Phytobenthos, Phytoplankton and Zooplankton are also addressed in this study. Among other zoobenthic taxa sufficiently covered in this study are Echinodermata, Sipuncula, Bryozoa and Ascidiacea. On the contrary, taxa such as Foraminifera, Amphipoda and Isopoda, that are not well studied in the Mediterranean, are insufficiently covered. A gap of knowledge is also noticed in Parasites, which, although ubiquitous and pervasive in marine systems, have been relatively unexplored as to their role in marine invasions. Conclusively the lack of funding purely systematic studies in the region has led to underestimation of the number of aliens in the Mediterranean. Emphasis is put on those species that are

  19. Preliminary list of Coleoptera heritage species of the Talassemtane National Park, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Yousra Benyahia; Hervé Brustel; Salwa El Antry; Olivier Courtin; Noureddin Maatouf; Lionel Valladares; Latifa Rohi

    2016-01-01

    A faunistic survey on beetles was conducted within the Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, District of Chefchaouen), in order to improve knowledge of their local diversity, to assess species and provide the first list of heritage species. This is an inventory that took place for 3 consecutive years (2013-2015). Out of 550 species identified so far, 137 are processed in this document, which lists heritage species: 67 endemic to Morocco, 20 rare saproxylic and 48 species new to Morocco, in...

  20. Identification of sarcosaprophagous Diptera species through DNA barcoding in wildlife forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolo, Eva A; Oliveira, Ana Rita; Dourado, Catarina G; Farinha, Ana; Rebelo, Maria Teresa; Dias, Deodália

    2013-05-10

    In recent years, forensic entomology has been applied in wildlife crimes, such as neglect cases, animal cruelty and illegal poaching. Likewise in human death investigations, in which insects can help to provide information about postmortem interval (PMI) and corpse transfer, entomology may be an important source of information in animal murder suspicion. The use of insects in forensic context relies primarily on its identification at the species level. To overcome some problems of morphological determination, molecular identification has gained relevance and has been applied frequently in forensic areas. Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene was adopted in DNA barcoding approach. This methodology intends to unify the DNA-based identification using a specific region of mitochondrial DNA. COI sequences have been collected into the BOLD online database, allowing the molecular identification of sequences from unknown specimens. Nonetheless, to achieve a correct identification of an unknown sample, it is necessary that sequences from species under study exist, for comparison, in online databases. Due to the geographic differences, it is of huge importance to have samples from a certain species from its distribution range. In that sense, the aim of this research is to contribute to the potential and accuracy improvement of such databases in identification of species commonly found in wildlife carcasses. A portion of COI was sequenced from 95 specimens of seven species belonging to two families of Diptera (Calliphoridae and Muscidae) found in wildlife carcasses-baited traps in Serra da Estrela (Portugal). All specimens were identified at species level with a high specimen similarity and maximum identity percentage (through BOLD Systems and GenBank online databases, respectively). We also demonstrate the correct discrimination of all species through phylogenic and sequence divergence analyses proposed in DNA barcoding studies, reinforcing the suitability of this marker

  1. 76 FR 78891 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on Petitions To List the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... climate change to specific impacts on thorny skate. One possibility is that global warming could cause a... as a reason for listing is other natural or manmade factors. Specifically, they claim that global warming poses a long-term threat to Northwest Atlantic thorny skates and their recovery from depletion...

  2. Harvest Records for Game Species Collected at Hillside, Mathews Brake, and Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuges from 1998 to 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These harvest records were taken by Refuge employees at check stations between 1998 and 2002 involving archery, muzzle loading, and multiple game species

  3. Species composition and seasonal variation of butterflies in Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary, Jharkhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Verma

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary is located 10km from Jamshedpur in Jharkhand, India. The species composition and seasonal variation of butterflies was analyzed in this sanctuary over the course of 2 years. A total of 39 species belonging to 31 genera and 4 families were identified. Of these, Nymphalidae and Pieridae were found to be the dominant families, in comparison to Lycaenidae and Papilionidae. The monthly diversity was calculated by using the Shannon-Weiner diversity index. The highest diversity was found during late winter and spring while a comparatively low diversity was observed during the rainy season and summer. Nymphalidae showed the greatest variation with respect to distribution of species richness throughout the year. Nymphalidae and Lycaenidae showed greatest species richness and relative abundance during the rainy season. Little seasonal variation in species richness was observed in case of families Pieridae and Papilionidae

  4. Cytochrome c Oxidase Sequences of Zambian Wildlife Helps to Identify Species of Origin of Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelo Syakalima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate species identification is a crucial tool in wildlife conservation. Enforcement of antipoaching law is more achievable with robust molecular identification of poached meat. Determining the region where the animal may have been taken from would also be a useful tool in suppression of cross-border trade of poached meat. We present data from a cytochrome c oxidase “barcoding” study of Zambian ruminants that adequately identifies the species of origin of meat samples. Furthermore, the method demonstrates possible improvement and application in regional variation in sequence identity that has a potential for discriminating meat samples from different subpopulations.

  5. Observations of marine wildlife tourism effects on a non-focal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzari, J R; Semmens, J M; Fox, A; Huveneers, C

    2017-09-01

    A radio-acoustic positioning system was used to assess the effects of shark cage-diving operators (SCDO) on the fine-scale movements of a non-focal species, the smooth stingray Bathytoshia brevicaudata. The results revealed that the time spent in the array was individually variable, but generally increased when SCDO were present and that the presence of SCDO may have the capacity to elicit changes in the space use of B. brevicaudata. These results indicate that the effects of marine wildlife tourism may extend beyond the focal species of interest. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Bull Trout Spawning Surveys: Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bull trout are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and Myrtle Creek was designated as critical habitat for bull trout this year. Myrtle Creek flows...

  7. Anadromous fish inventory: Alaska Coastal National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bibliography, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs escapements, harvest data, effort, and mylar overlays.

  8. 76 FR 27629 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing of the Altamaha Spinymussel and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ..., Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Georgia Ecological Services Office, 105 Westpark Dr... public awareness of the presence of the Altamaha spinymussel and the importance of habitat protection... associated with the following categories of activity: Electric power generation and transmission...

  9. 75 FR 57431 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    .... The ESA defines an endangered species as ``any species which is in danger of extinction throughout all... animals and plants. They are threatened with extinction, and CITES prohibits the international trade in...). CBD asserts that the western Atlantic bluefin tuna population is also in imminent danger of extinction...

  10. Species list and status of mammals and birds in Sambisa game ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... ABSTRACT. This study determined the species list and status of mammals and birds in Sambisa Game. Reserve. Species list was determined using direct sighting, animal signs and activities, information from hunters and visits to bush meat processing and selling centers. Results indicate that a total of ...

  11. Evaluation of a Petition Requesting National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to List the Smooth Hammerhead Shark (Sphryna zygaena) as a Threatened or Endangered Species Under the Endangered Species Act (ESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    The wildlife conservation organization, Defenders of Wildlife, petitioned NMFS to list the smooth hammerhead shark, Sphryna zygaena, as endangered or threatened throughout its range under the ESA. The petition was critically evaluated to determine if the petitioners presented substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the smooth hammerhead shark may warrant listing under the ESA. The petition and the cited scientific literature (as well as scientific literature readily available in NMFS files) were evaluated to determine if the smooth hammerhead shark may be threatened or endangered because of any one or a combination of the following five ESA section 4(a)(1) factors: (1) present or threatened destruction, modification, or curtailment of its habitat or range; (2) over utilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes; (3) disease or predation; (4) inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms; (5) or other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence. The available scientific literature indicates that the smooth hammerhead shark populations have declined in multiple regions. Smooth hammerhead sharks may warrant listing due to ongoing threats of over utilization for commercial purposes by global fisheries that target and retain incidental catch of these species to obtain their high-value fins, possible inadequacies in global regulatory mechanisms to control this level of exploitation, and natural factors (such as inherent biological vulnerabilities) that may be exacerbating these threats. Based on these findings, the smooth hammerhead shark may warrant listing as a threatened or endangered species under the ESA and a status review of the species is currently being conducted.

  12. 75 FR 17947 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 69 Species in Idaho...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods used to gather and analyze the data, and/or copies... information. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are initiating 5-year reviews for 69 species in... Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). We request any new information on these species that may...

  13. 2002 Sedge Wren Nest Search Effort on Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sedge wrens, Cistothorus platensis, are listed as a USFWS Region 3 priority species due to suspected population declines range wide. Although this species main...

  14. Ecological vulnerability in wildlife: application of a species-ranking method to food chains and habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, Hendrika J; Lahr, Joost; Van der Pol, Joost J C; Faber, Jack H

    2010-12-01

    Nature development in The Netherlands is often planned on contaminated soils or sediments. This contamination may present a risk for wildlife species desired at those nature development sites and must be assessed by specific risk assessment methods. In a previous study, we developed a method to predict ecological vulnerability in wildlife species by using autecological data and expert judgment; in the current study, this method is further extended to assess ecological vulnerability of food chains and terrestrial and aquatic habitats typical for The Netherlands. The method is applied to six chemicals: Cd, Cu, Zn, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, chlorpyrifos, and ivermectin. The results indicate that species in different food chains differ in vulnerability, with earthworm-based food chains the most vulnerable. Within and between food chains, vulnerability varied with habitat, particularly at low trophic levels. The concept of habitat vulnerability was applied to a case study of four different habitat types in floodplains contaminated with cadmium and zinc along the river Dommel, The Netherlands. The alder floodplain forest habitat contained the most vulnerable species. The differences among habitats were significant for Cd. We further conclude that the method has good potential for application in mapping of habitat vulnerability. © 2010 SETAC.

  15. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Mingo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Mingo NWR outlines procedures for monitoring the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of the species of wildlife...

  16. 75 FR 42040 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... amphibians that we were reviewing to determine whether those species should be proposed for listing as..., pp. 2-4). The Committee, sanctioned by the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, the... Conservation Agreement and Strategy (CAS) as an conservation action (NDOW 2000, p. A-11) and involves capture...

  17. 75 FR 13720 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Striped...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... climate change on this species and its habitat. If we determine that listing the striped newt is warranted... olive- green to dark brown. The belly is yellow, usually sparsely marked with black specks. The skin of... pond where its skin changes into the aquatic adult form. If a breeding pond retains water and does not...

  18. 75 FR 316 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Insular Population...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ...) potential for acoustic impacts on false killer whale behavior; (6) inadequacy of existing regulatory...-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Insular Population of Hawaiian False Killer Whales as an... killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). We find that...

  19. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Amendment #1 : Tewaukon NWR and WMD : Survey of threatened and endangered species

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This amendment to the Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Inventory Plan addresses the current procedures that will be used to monitor the activities and...

  20. Conservation Status of Marine Biodiversity in Oceania: An Analysis of Marine Species on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

    OpenAIRE

    Polidoro, Beth A.; Elfes, Cristiane T.; Sanciangco, Jonnell C.; Pippard, Helen; Carpenter, Kent E.

    2011-01-01

    Given the economic and cultural dependence on the marine environment in Oceania and a rapidly expanding human population, many marine species populations are in decline and may be vulnerable to extinction from a number of local and regional threats. IUCN Red List assessments, a widely used system for quantifying threats to species and assessing species extinction risk, have been completed for 1190 marine species in Oceania to date, including all known species of corals, mangroves, seagrasses,...

  1. 78 FR 26581 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing and Designation of Critical Habitat for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... (mi\\2\\)) plus 31 kilometers (km) (19.2 miles (mi)) of surface stream in 4 units located in Perry... educational benefits of mapping areas containing essential features that aid in the recovery of the listed... scenario (all costs attributed to critical habitat). Total present value impacts anticipated to result from...

  2. 77 FR 5913 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Listing Determinations for Two Distinct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... recolonized only very slowly; (2) loss of reproducing individuals; (3) loss of genetic biodiversity; (4... Biodiversity Legal Foundation requesting that we list Atlantic sturgeon in the United States, where it... may replace at least some of those losses (Thomas, 1994). However, if the cause of extinction is a...

  3. 77 FR 665 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Two Distinct Population Segments of Broad...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... successful (wild populations are increasing), and broad-snouted caiman production and harvest is increasing... population has increased since the time of the original listing. Technical Corrections This proposed rule... status of the population in two ways: by creating incentives for landowners and by increasing public...

  4. 78 FR 38162 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing One Distinct Population Segment of Broad...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... ways: By creating incentives for landowners, and by increasing public awareness in the local... international boundaries, we are able to clearly identify the geographic extent of the DPS listing and thereby... boundaries that result in significant differences in control of exploitation, management, or habitat...

  5. 76 FR 50051 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Six Foreign Birds as Endangered Throughout...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... and continues to cause significant changes in forest structure such as: Species composition, density... if the species is restricted to an island. Hawaii's avian malaria is a limiting factor for many...

  6. Preliminary list of Coleoptera heritage species of the Talassemtane National Park, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousra Benyahia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A faunistic survey on beetles was conducted within the Talassemtane National Park (Western Rif, District of Chefchaouen, in order to improve knowledge of their local diversity, to assess species and provide the first list of heritage species. This is an inventory that took place for 3 consecutive years (2013-2015. Out of 550 species identified so far, 137 are processed in this document, which lists heritage species: 67 endemic to Morocco, 20 rare saproxylic and 48 species new to Morocco, including two new to science.

  7. 77 FR 40221 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Scarlet Macaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... other areas of Columbia outside the Amazon Biome) of this species. (2) Information on the species... percent) of the species' current range lies within the Amazon Biome of South America (BLI 2011a... primarily in the Maya Forest region of eastern Chiapas (Mexico), northern Guatemala, and southwest Belize...

  8. Using social media to measure the contribution of red list species to the nature-based tourism potential of African protected areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemen, Louise; Cottam, Andrew J.; Drakou, Evangelia G.

    2015-01-01

    services for large areas. In this paper we explore a method to quantify cultural benefits through the enjoyment of natured-based tourism, by assessing the potential tourism attractiveness of species for each protected area in Africa using the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. We use the number...... most attractive to nature-based tourism are the Lion, African Elephant and Leopard. Combining the photo counts with species range data, African protected areas with the highest potential to attract wildlife tourists based on attractive species occurrence were Samburu National Reserve in Kenya, Mukogodo...... assessments. The index directly links species presence to the tourism potential of protected areas, making the connection between nature and human benefits explicit, but excludes other important contributing factors for tourism, such as accessibility and safety. This social media based index provides a broad...

  9. 76 FR 14299 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Species: Correction To Codify in the Code of Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... and Correcting Amendment We listed the Southern Resident killer whale DPS as an endangered species... separate endangered species under the ESA. In that more recent rule the Southern Resident killer whale DPS... Threatened Species: Correction To Codify in the Code of Federal Regulations Endangered Status for Southern...

  10. Public Choice of Species for the Ark: Phylogenetic Similarity and Preferred Wildlife Species for Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.; Wilson, Clevo; Swarna Nantha, Hemanath

    2005-01-01

    Humans play a role in deciding which species are preserved and which will perish in the current extinction wave. Because of the Similarity Principle, physical attractiveness and likeability, it is argued that public choice would greatly favour the survival of higher-order species at the expense of others. This paper empirically tests this argument by considering a hypothetical ‘Ark’ situation. Results are drawn from surveys of 204 members of the Australian public who were asked whether they a...

  11. Wildlife species benefitting from a greener Arctic are most sensitive to shrub cover at leading range edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Helen C; Høye, Toke T; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2017-07-21

    Widespread expansion of shrubs is occurring across the Arctic. Shrub expansion will substantially alter arctic wildlife habitats. Identifying which wildlife species are most affected by shrubification is central to predicting future arctic community composition. Through meta-analysis, we synthesized the published evidence for effects of canopy-forming shrubs on birds and mammals in the Arctic and Subarctic. We examined variation in species behaviour, distribution and population dynamics in birds and mammals in response to shrub cover (including shrub cover indicators such as shrub occurrence, extent, density and height). We also assessed the degree of heterogeneity in wildlife responses to shrub cover and synthesized the remaining literature that did not fit the criteria for our quantitative meta-analyses. Species from higher green vegetation biomass habitats (high Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, NDVI, across their distribution) were more likely to respond positively to shrub cover, demonstrating the potential for species to expand from boreal to arctic habitats under shrubification. Wildlife populations located in the lowest vegetation biomass (low NDVI) areas of their species' range had the greatest proportion of positive responses to shrub cover, highlighting how increases in performance at leading edges of invaders distributions may be particularly rapid. This demonstrates the need to study species at these leading edges to accurately predict expansion potential. Arctic specialists were poorly represented across studies (limited to 5 bird and 0 mammal species), this knowledge gap potentially explains the few reported negative effects of shrub cover (3 of 29 species). Species responses to shrub cover showed substantial heterogeneity and varied among sites and years in all studies with sufficient replication to detect such variation. Our study highlights the importance of responses at species range edges in determining outcomes of shrubification for

  12. Status of Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thompson, Brent E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berryhill, Jesse Tobias [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wright, Marjorie Alys [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Compliance with the Endangered Species Act at LANL is achieved through the implementation of the LANL Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan (HMP; LANL 2017a). This plan is a formal agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the management of endangered species and their habitats at LANL. Actions and activities approved in the HMP were reviewed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and do not require further consultations. Projects that cannot follow the HMP requirements must go through separate section 7 consultations. The controls for Endangered Species Act compliance are incorporated into an internal project review process through which all LANL projects are reviewed for environmental compliance (LANL 2017b).

  13. Immunohistochemical study of rabies virus within the central nervous system of domestic and wildlife species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L T; Rech, R R; Harrison, L; Brown, C C

    2010-07-01

    Immunohistochemistry using a commercial polyclonal antibody for lyssavirus was applied to 39 archival cases of rabies. Paraffin blocks from 13 different species were available, including 3 dogs, 4 cats, 1 pig, 6 cattle, 4 horses, 1 llama, 7 skunks (Mephitis mephitis), 7 raccoons (Procyon lotor), 1 bat (Myotis species), 1 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), 1 bobcat (Lynx rufus), 2 gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and 1 red fox (Vulpes vulpes). All cases had previously been diagnosed as rabies using histopathology and/or fluorescent antibody testing. The immunohistochemistry technique successfully detected lyssavirus antigen in all cases. In species for which 3 or more samples were available, distributional trends were seen in 4 main brain regions: brainstem, cerebellum, hippocampus, and cerebrum. The best site for rabies virus detection in dogs and cats was the hippocampus. For cattle, viral antigen was most prominent in the brainstem, followed by the cerebellum. In horses, the cervical spinal cord and adjacent brainstem were the optimal sites for detecting rabies virus antigen. In raccoons and skunks, positive labeling was widely dispersed, so selection might be less important for these wildlife reservoir species. Immunohistochemistry should prove useful in enhancing the accuracy of rabies diagnosis through informed selection of brain sampling sites when composite sampling is not feasible. This immunohistochemical technique could provide reliable virus detection in formalin-fixed tissues in any potentially infected species.

  14. Intra-Service Section 7 Biological Evaluation Form : [2010 Proposed Hunting Plan for Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Section 7 Evaluation states that the Sherburne NWR Hunting Plan will have no effect on listed/proposed/candidate species or the critical habitat of these species.

  15. Psychoactive plant species – actual list of plants prohibited in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Simonienko, Katarzyna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szulc, Agata

    2013-01-01

    According to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction (20-th of March, 2009, Dz. U. Nr 63 poz. 520.) the list of federally prohibited plants in Poland was expanded to include 16 new species. Until that time the only illegal plant materials were cannabis, papaver, coca and most of their products. The actual list of herbal narcotics includes species which significantly influence on the central nervous system work but which are rarely described in the national literature. The plants usually come ...

  16. Using Social Media to Measure the Contribution of Red List Species to the Nature-Based Tourism Potential of African Protected Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Willemen

    Full Text Available Cultural ecosystem services are defined by people's perception of the environment, which make them hard to quantify systematically. Methods to describe cultural benefits from ecosystems typically include resource-demanding survey techniques, which are not suitable to assess cultural ecosystem services for large areas. In this paper we explore a method to quantify cultural benefits through the enjoyment of natured-based tourism, by assessing the potential tourism attractiveness of species for each protected area in Africa using the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. We use the number of pictures of wildlife posted on a photo sharing website as a proxy for charisma, popularity, and ease of observation, as these factors combined are assumed to determine how attractive species are for the global wildlife tourist. Based on photo counts of 2473 African animals and plants, species that seem most attractive to nature-based tourism are the Lion, African Elephant and Leopard. Combining the photo counts with species range data, African protected areas with the highest potential to attract wildlife tourists based on attractive species occurrence were Samburu National Reserve in Kenya, Mukogodo Forest Reserve located just north of Mount Kenya, and Addo Elephant National Park in South-Africa. The proposed method requires only three data sources which are freely accessible and available online, which could make the proposed index tractable for large scale quantitative ecosystem service assessments. The index directly links species presence to the tourism potential of protected areas, making the connection between nature and human benefits explicit, but excludes other important contributing factors for tourism, such as accessibility and safety. This social media based index provides a broad understanding of those species that are popular globally; in many cases these are not the species of highest conservation concern.

  17. Using Social Media to Measure the Contribution of Red List Species to the Nature-Based Tourism Potential of African Protected Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemen, Louise; Cottam, Andrew J; Drakou, Evangelia G; Burgess, Neil D

    2015-01-01

    Cultural ecosystem services are defined by people's perception of the environment, which make them hard to quantify systematically. Methods to describe cultural benefits from ecosystems typically include resource-demanding survey techniques, which are not suitable to assess cultural ecosystem services for large areas. In this paper we explore a method to quantify cultural benefits through the enjoyment of natured-based tourism, by assessing the potential tourism attractiveness of species for each protected area in Africa using the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. We use the number of pictures of wildlife posted on a photo sharing website as a proxy for charisma, popularity, and ease of observation, as these factors combined are assumed to determine how attractive species are for the global wildlife tourist. Based on photo counts of 2473 African animals and plants, species that seem most attractive to nature-based tourism are the Lion, African Elephant and Leopard. Combining the photo counts with species range data, African protected areas with the highest potential to attract wildlife tourists based on attractive species occurrence were Samburu National Reserve in Kenya, Mukogodo Forest Reserve located just north of Mount Kenya, and Addo Elephant National Park in South-Africa. The proposed method requires only three data sources which are freely accessible and available online, which could make the proposed index tractable for large scale quantitative ecosystem service assessments. The index directly links species presence to the tourism potential of protected areas, making the connection between nature and human benefits explicit, but excludes other important contributing factors for tourism, such as accessibility and safety. This social media based index provides a broad understanding of those species that are popular globally; in many cases these are not the species of highest conservation concern.

  18. Relative abundance and activity patterns of terrestrial mammalian species, in Barra del Colorado Wildlife Refuge, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanny Arroyo-Arce, Arroyo-Arce; Thomson, Ian; Salom-Pérez, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little information has been generated regarding the mammal diversity of Barra del Colorado Wildlife Refuge, Costa Rica. This study assessed relative abundance and activity patterns of some terrestrial mammalian species. We used ten camera traps distributed within the refuge, during 2014. After a total of 1 611 camera trap nights, we identified 15 mammalian species in seven orders and 11 families. The most abundant species were Dasyprocta punctata, Leopardus pardalis, Tayassu pecari...

  19. Trade in non-native, CITES-listed, wildlife in Asia, as exemplified by the trade in freshwater turtles and tortoises (Chelonidae) in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, V.; Shepherd, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    In 1973 the Convention in International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was called to life as to regulate the international wildlife trade, and to prevent species becoming (economically and biologically) extinct. The trade in freshwater turtles and tortoises in Asia is so

  20. Honeybees Increase Fruit Set in Native Plant Species Important for Wildlife Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuela, Luis; Ruiz-Arriaga, Sarah; Ozers, Christian P.

    2011-11-01

    Honeybee colonies are declining in some parts of the world. This may have important consequences for the pollination of crops and native plant species. In Spain, as in other parts of Europe, land abandonment has led to a decrease in the number of non professional beekeepers, which aggravates the problem of honeybee decline as a result of bee diseases In this study, we investigated the effects of honeybees on the pollination of three native plant species in northern Spain, namely wildcherry Prunus avium L., hawthorn Crataegus monogyna Jacq., and bilberry Vaccinium myrtillus L. We quantified fruit set of individuals from the target species along transects established from an apiary outwards. Half the samples were bagged in a nylon mesh to avoid insect pollination. Mixed-effects models were used to test the effect of distance to the apiary on fruit set in non-bagged samples. The results showed a negative significant effect of distance from the apiary on fruit set for hawthorn and bilberry, but no significant effects were detected for wildcherry. This suggests that the use of honeybees under traditional farming practices might be a good instrument to increase fruit production of some native plants. This may have important consequences for wildlife conservation, since fruits, and bilberries in particular, constitute an important feeding resource for endangered species, such as the brown bear Ursus arctos L. or the capercaillie Tetrao urogallus cantabricus L.

  1. A Breeding Bird Survey of the West Mountain Wildlife Management Area and the Nulhegan Basin Division of the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this study were to: 1) Create a list of birds occurring in the study area during the breeding season; 2.) Identify species and habitats of...

  2. 75 FR 286 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Six Foreign Birds as Endangered Throughout...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... in Frankham 1997, p. 311). Based on genetics alone, endemic island species are predicted to have... subsequent inbreeding depression and genetic drift. Although the population of Eiao warblers appears to be...

  3. 78 FR 59 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Honduran Emerald Hummingbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... programs that benefit this species. (6) Genetics and taxonomy. (7) The factors that are the basis for... composition of a population) due to inbreeding depression and genetic drift (random changes in gene frequency...

  4. Conservation Status of Marine Biodiversity in Oceania: An Analysis of Marine Species on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A. Polidoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the economic and cultural dependence on the marine environment in Oceania and a rapidly expanding human population, many marine species populations are in decline and may be vulnerable to extinction from a number of local and regional threats. IUCN Red List assessments, a widely used system for quantifying threats to species and assessing species extinction risk, have been completed for 1190 marine species in Oceania to date, including all known species of corals, mangroves, seagrasses, sea snakes, marine mammals, sea birds, sea turtles, sharks, and rays present in Oceania, plus all species in five important perciform fish groups. Many of the species in these groups are threatened by the modification or destruction of coastal habitats, overfishing from direct or indirect exploitation, pollution, and other ecological or environmental changes associated with climate change. Spatial analyses of threatened species highlight priority areas for both site- and species-specific conservation action. Although increased knowledge and use of newly available IUCN Red List assessments for marine species can greatly improve conservation priorities for marine species in Oceania, many important fish groups are still in urgent need of assessment.

  5. Digenean parasites of Chinese marine fishes: a list of species, hosts and geographical distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-fa; Peng, Wen-feng; Gao, Peng; Fu, Ming-jun; Wu, Han-zhou; Lu, Ming-ke; Gao, Ji-qing; Xiao, Jun

    2010-01-01

    In the literature, 630 species of Digenea (Trematoda) have been reported from Chinese marine fishes. These belong to 209 genera and 35 families. The names of these species, along with their hosts, geographical distribution and records, are listed in this paper.

  6. An annotated list of the species of the genus Corbicula from Indonesia (Mollusca: Corbiculidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djajasasmita, Machfudz

    1977-01-01

    The species of the genus Corbicula known from Indonesia are alphabetically listed and noted. Sixteen out of the 35 described species are considered valid, i.e. C. gustaviana, C. moltkiana, C. sumatrana, C. tobae and C. tumida from Sumatra; C. javanica, C. pulchella and C. rivalis from Java; C.

  7. 77 FR 39965 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Hyacinth Macaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... prevents the growth of extensive closed-canopy tropical forests. In Par , the species prefers palm-rich v rzea (flooded forests), seasonally moist forests with clearings, and savannas. In the Gerais region, it is located within the Cerrado biome, where it inhabits dry open forests in rocky, steep-sided valleys...

  8. 77 FR 73769 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Four Subspecies of Mazama Pocket Gopher...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... predators eat pocket gophers, including weasels, snakes, badgers, foxes, skunks, bobcats, coyotes, great... fall (Ingles 1952, p. 89; Howard and Childs 1959, p. 312; Olson 2011b, unnumbered pp. 3-4). They are... most species of pocket gophers that have been studied, often as much as 4:1 (Howard and Childs 1959, p...

  9. The historic role of humans and other keystone species in shaping central hardwood forests for disturbance-dependent wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Greenberg; Kendrick Weeks; Gordon S. Warburton

    2015-01-01

    EXCERPT FROM: Natural Disturbances and Historic Range Variation 2015  Multiple natural disturbance types historically created conditions thatwere suitable for many, but not all, disturbance-dependent wildlife species in the Central Hardwood Region (CHR). In...

  10. 75 FR 55820 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Seven Midwest Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... analytical methods. IV. How do we determine whether a species is endangered or threatened? Section 4(a)(1) of... information, support it with documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods used to gather and... (=Lesquerella filiformis). (573) 234-2132, Field Office, U.S. extension 107, Fish and Wildlife paul--mckenzie...

  11. Preplanting Treatments and Natural Invasion of Tree Species Onto Former Agricultural Fields at the Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. McCoy; Bobby D. Keeland; Brian Roy Lockhart; Thomas Dean

    2002-01-01

    As part of a study of oak planting techniques for bottomland hardwood afforestation we examined the natural invasion of woody species onto former agricultural fields at Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge. Three replications of 14 treatments were established as 0.4 hectare (1 acre) plots in a complete randomized block design. Combinations of these treatments were...

  12. 77 FR 13248 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 46 Species in Idaho...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ..., bibliographic references, methods used to gather and analyze the data, and/or copies of any pertinent...; request for information. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are initiating 5-year reviews... Islands under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). We request any new information on...

  13. Incorporating population viability models into species status assessment and listing decisions under the U.S. Endangered Species Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor P. McGowan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of a species' status is a key part of management decision making for endangered and threatened species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Predicting the future state of the species is an essential part of species status assessment, and projection models can play an important role in developing predictions. We built a stochastic simulation model that incorporated parametric and environmental uncertainty to predict the probable future status of the Sonoran desert tortoise in the southwestern United States and North Central Mexico. Sonoran desert tortoise was a Candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, and decision makers wanted to use model predictions in their decision making process. The model accounted for future habitat loss and possible effects of climate change induced droughts to predict future population growth rates, abundances, and quasi-extinction probabilities. Our model predicts that the population will likely decline over the next few decades, but there is very low probability of quasi-extinction less than 75 years into the future. Increases in drought frequency and intensity may increase extinction risk for the species. Our model helped decision makers predict and characterize uncertainty about the future status of the species in their listing decision. We incorporated complex ecological processes (e.g., climate change effects on tortoises in transparent and explicit ways tailored to support decision making processes related to endangered species.

  14. Incorporating population viability models into species status assessment and listing decisions under the U.S. Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.; Allan, Nathan; Servoss, Jeff; Hedwall, Shaula J.; Wooldridge, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of a species' status is a key part of management decision making for endangered and threatened species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Predicting the future state of the species is an essential part of species status assessment, and projection models can play an important role in developing predictions. We built a stochastic simulation model that incorporated parametric and environmental uncertainty to predict the probable future status of the Sonoran desert tortoise in the southwestern United States and North Central Mexico. Sonoran desert tortoise was a Candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, and decision makers wanted to use model predictions in their decision making process. The model accounted for future habitat loss and possible effects of climate change induced droughts to predict future population growth rates, abundances, and quasi-extinction probabilities. Our model predicts that the population will likely decline over the next few decades, but there is very low probability of quasi-extinction less than 75 years into the future. Increases in drought frequency and intensity may increase extinction risk for the species. Our model helped decision makers predict and characterize uncertainty about the future status of the species in their listing decision. We incorporated complex ecological processes (e.g., climate change effects on tortoises) in transparent and explicit ways tailored to support decision making processes related to endangered species.

  15. Analysis of the effects of Stillwater NWR proposed water management on Newlands Project Operations and Truckee River listed species

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In response to a change in Stillwater NWR Complex purposes, an analysis was performed to evaluate potential impacts to endangered species and Newlands Project...

  16. Anadromous fish inventory: Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska and associated area of ecological concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bibliography, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs escapements, harvest data, effort, and mylar overlays.

  17. Anadromous fish inventory: Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, and associated area of ecological concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bibliography, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs escapements, harvest data, effort, and mylar overlays.

  18. Anadromous fish inventory: Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, and associated area of ecological concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bibliography, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs escapements, harvest data, effort, and mylar overlays.

  19. Anadromous fish inventory: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska and associated area of ecological concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bibliography, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs escapements, harvest data, effort, and mylar overlays.

  20. Alien plant species list and distribution for Camdeboo National Park, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmoto L. Masubelele

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas globally are threatened by the potential negative impacts that invasive alien plants pose, and Camdeboo National Park (CNP, South Africa, is no exception. Alien plants have been recorded in the CNP since 1981, before it was proclaimed a national park by South African National Parks in 2005. This is the first publication of a list of alien plants in and around the CNP. Distribution maps of some of the first recorded alien plant species are also presented and discussed. To date, 39 species of alien plants have been recorded, of which 13 are invasive and one is a transformer weed. The majority of alien plant species in the park are herbaceous (39% and succulent (24% species. The most widespread alien plant species in the CNP are Atriplex inflata (= A. lindleyi subsp. inflata, Salsola tragus (= S. australis and cacti species, especially Opuntia ficus-indica. Eradication and control measures that have been used for specific problematic alien plant species are described. Conservation implications: This article represents the first step in managing invasive alien plants and includes the collation of a species list and basic information on their distribution in and around the protected area. This is important for enabling effective monitoring of both new introductions and the distribution of species already present. We present the first species list and distribution information for Camdeboo National Park.

  1. Pseudoleptonema tansoongnerni new species (Hydropsychidae: Trichoptera) with species list of Trichoptera from Li Phi Falls, Mekong River, southern Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudee, Pongsak; Malicky, Hans

    2017-03-10

    A new species named Pseudoleptonema tansoongnerni n. sp. is presented along with a list of Trichoptera from Li Phi falls, Mekong River, southern Laos. Pseudoleptonema tansoongnerni n. sp. is described and figured based on adult males and females. It is distinguished from the others by its forewing pattern and color, which is yellowish brown.

  2. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

  3. An internationally standardized species identification test for use on suspected seized rhinoceros horn in the illegal wildlife trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Kyle M; Frankham, Greta J; McEwing, Ross; Webster, Lucy M I; Ciavaglia, Sherryn A; Linacre, Adrian M T; The, Dang Tat; Ovouthan, Kanitia; Johnson, Rebecca N

    2018-01-01

    Rhinoceros (rhino) numbers have dwindled substantially over the past century. As a result, three of the five species are now considered to be critically endangered, one species is vulnerable and one species is near-threatened. Poaching has increased dramatically over the past decade due to a growing demand for rhino horn products, primarily in Asia. Improved wildlife forensic techniques, such as validated tests for species identification of seized horns, are critical to aid current enforcement and prosecution efforts and provide a deterrent to future rhino horn trafficking. Here, we present an internationally standardized species identification test based on a 230 base pair cytochrome-b region. This test improves on previous nested PCR protocols and can be used for the discrimination of samples with The assay was designed to amplify water buffalo samples, a common 'rhino horn' substitute, but to exclude human DNA, a common contaminant. Phylogenetic analyses using this partial cytochrome-b region resolved the five extant rhino species. Testing successfully returned a sequence and correct identification for all of the known rhino horn samples and vouchered rhino samples from museum and zoo collections, and provided species level identification for 47 out of 52 unknown samples from seizures. Validation and standardization was carried out across five different laboratories, in four different countries, demonstrating it to be an effective and reproducible test, robust to inter laboratory variation in equipment and consumables (such as PCR reagents). This is one of the first species identification tests to be internationally standardized to produce data for evidential proceedings and the first published validated test for rhinos, one of the flagship species groups of the illegal wildlife trade and for which forensic tools are urgently required. This study serves as a model for how species identification tests should be standardized and disseminated for wildlife forensic

  4. Compensation for Wildlife Damage: Habitat Conversion, Species Preservation and Local Welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rondeau, D.; Bulte, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a model of hunting, farming and defensive action to study the environmental and economic consequences of introducing a program to compensate peasants of a small economy for the damage caused by wildlife. We show that the widespread belief that compensation induces wildlife conservation

  5. 75 FR 22063 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-day Finding on a Petition to List the Mohave...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... squirrel was found to consume leaves of annual and perennial plants, their fruits and seeds, fungi, and... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-day Finding... squirrels must mate, gather enough nutrition to produce and sustain a litter, and ensure nutritional...

  6. Effects of non-consumptive wildlife-oriented tourism on marine species and prospects for their sustainable management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Shelley; Hardiman, Nigel

    2015-03-15

    Marine non-consumptive wildlife-oriented tourism, whereby tourists observe and/or interact closely with animals, without purposely having a detrimental effect on them, has been growing globally in recent decades. Human-mediated feeding (provisioning) is widely used by tour operators to attract target species, facilitate viewing and interaction with tourists. Although potential effects of such provisioning on terrestrial fauna have been given moderate scientific research attention, equivalent research in the marine environment is limited. Effects of provisioning marine wildlife may include direct habituation, behavioural change, and/or dietary impacts among individuals and species. There may also be disruption to the species associated assemblage. It was found that the literature on the effects of non-consumptive wildlife tourism is fragmented and results from different areas and taxa are frequently contradictory. Most studies appeared to be of a few years duration, at most. This reflects the relative immaturity of the industry - many enterprises studied typically commenced within the 1990 s. Studies (other than fish) tended to focus on a focal species with few addressing the wider implications for the associated assemblage. Supplementary feeding may also have impacts on the health and wellbeing of provisioned animals. It is concluded that such nature tourism is often not benign - focal species and their assemblage are often disrupted. We conclude that funding to better understand the impacts and thus address them is imperative. To supplement funding for the research and monitoring required, an additional charge could incorporated into the fee charged to those engaging in marine wildlife tourism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.; Baron, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

    1995-08-01

    Historically, ecological risk assessment at CERCLA sites [such as the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)], has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source operable unit. Consequently the species that are generally considered are those with home ranges small enough such that multiple individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the contaminated site. This approach is adequate for sites with single, discrete areas of contamination that only provide habitat for species with limited requirements. This approach is not adequate however for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. Because wide-ranging wildlife species may travel between and use multiple contaminated sites they may be exposed to and be at risk from contaminants from multiple locations. Use of a particular contaminated site by wide-ranging species will be dependent upon the amount of suitable habitat available at that site. Therefore to adequately evaluate risks to wide-ranging species at the ORR-wide scale, the use of multiple contaminated sites must be weighted by the amount of suitable habitat on OUs. This reservation-wide ecological risk assessment is intended to identify which endpoints are significantly at risk; which contaminants are responsible for this risk; and which OUs significantly contribute to risk.

  8. 75 FR 56975 - Injurious Wildlife Species; Review of Information Concerning a Petition To List All Live...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ...--primarily for pet use and as live animals for consumption as frog legs--continues to threaten the survival... of live amphibians or their eggs may be imported, transported, and possessed in captivity only if the... World Organization for Animal Health in its Aquatic Animal Health Code on Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis...

  9. 75 FR 50813 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Three Foreign Bird Species From Latin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... 1992, p. 512; Mascitti and Casta era 2006, pp. 328-329). Andean flamingos feed principally on diatoms... wetlands only in winter (see Table 1). Recent research established that there is an important.... 10). Research in Argentina at highland (breeding) and lowland (non-breeding) sites indicated that...

  10. 75 FR 81793 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Seven Brazilian Bird Species as Endangered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Atlantic Forest, with the exception of the Brazilian merganser, which is also found in the Cerrado Biome... are found in the Atlantic Forest Biome and Cerrado Biome; thus, it is reasonable to address them together within a regional conservation perspective. Biomes are large geographic areas such as forests and...

  11. 78 FR 48943 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Act Listing Determination for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ...). Many landlocked populations occur as a result of stocking to provide a forage base for game fish... stocking by recreational anglers to provide forage for game fish, and also through the construction of... state and Federal fisheries management agencies and academic institutions. Participants presented...

  12. 76 FR 31556 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Act Listing Determination for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... Mediterranean exhibit differences in temperature, circulation patterns, and salinity, and the basins are... subsequently, the stability of the global thermohaline state of equilibrium (Wurtz, 2010). There are a variety...

  13. Intra-service section 7 biological evaluation : prescribed and wildfire suppression on the Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This evaluation represents an assessment of potential effects to listed and candidate species from implementation of the Fire Management Plan for the Klamath Basin...

  14. Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge & Management Area Hunting and Fishing Plan : Intra-Service Section 7 Evaluation Form

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Section 7 Evaluation states that the Patoka River NWR Hunting and Fishing Plan is not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitats on the...

  15. Nest Site Selection Among Grassland Passerines of the Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge : a Mid-Study Evaluation [Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The author examined trends in annual variation in habitat characteristics for each bird species, for each variable listed in Table 11. The author concludes his...

  16. red - an R package to facilitate species red list assessments according to the IUCN criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Cardoso

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List is the most useful database of species that are at risk of extinction worldwide, as it relies on a number of objective criteria and is now widely adopted. The R package red – IUCN Redlisting Tools - performs a number of spatial analyses based on either observed occurrences or estimated ranges. Functions include calculating Extent of Occurrence (EOO, Area of Occupancy (AOO, mapping species ranges, species distribution modelling using climate and land cover and calculating the Red List Index for groups of species. The package allows the calculation of confidence limits for all measures. Spatial data of species occurrences, environmental or land cover variables can be either given by the user or automatically extracted from several online databases. It outputs geographical range, elevation and country values, maps in several formats and vectorial data for visualization in Google Earth. Several examples are shown demonstrating the usefulness of the different methods. The red package constitutes an open platform for further development of new tools to facilitate red list assessments.

  17. The Status and Distribution of Birds Surveyed on Missouri's Four National Wildlife Refuges with Special Emphasis to Ten United States Fish and Wildlife Service Species of Management Concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1988 the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) began a project to determine the distribution,...

  18. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Mohawk Run Shrub Fen Complex Invasive Plant Species Management Plan For Erie National Wildlife Refuge 2003-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The recovery plan for Drooping Bluegrass, Thin Leaved Cotton Grass, Slender Spikerush, and Swampfly Honeysuckle on Erie National Wildlife Refuge discusses the...

  19. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document lists the objectives of Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Topics outlined in this plan include wildlife-wildlands interpretation,...

  20. 77 FR 1900 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Humboldt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... of Policy and Directives Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, MS 2042... scientific survey techniques use nonlethal methods, such as track-plates, camera stations, and live traps...

  1. 76 FR 14209 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Withdrawal of Proposed Rule To List the Flat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... it inhospitable for crops. To prevent this hypersalinization of the soils, a surplus of water is used... (Carlsbad Fish and Wildlife Office geographic information system (GIS) files) illustrates the development of...

  2. 76 FR 61895 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... known to prey upon small ] northern leopard frogs, birds, and snakes (Merrell 1977, p. 15). Status... frogs for education use (Wildlife Code Missouri 3CSR10-9.110); however, these five individuals cannot be...

  3. Occurrence of three red listed species of Epinephelus (Perciformes: Serranidae on Digha coast, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yennawar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During routine efforts to maintain diversity in the public aquarium of the Marine Aquarium & regional Center, Digha, of the Zoological Survey of India (ZSI, the authors encountered three more species of the Genus Epinephelus which after thorough literature survey were found to be not reported earlier from this area though listed in IUCN Red list of threatened fauna. Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822 Orange Spotted Grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus (Bloch, 1790 Brindle Grouper and Epinephelus latifasciatus (Temminck & Schlegel, 1842 Striped Grouper are the first time reports from Digha Coast.

  4. Development of biometric and environmental DNA standardized protocols for early detection and population assessment of aquatic invasive species for Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal seeks to develop standard data collection techniques to support inventory and monitoring programs for aquatic invasive species (AIS) within National...

  5. Endangered Species and Wildlife Resources Inventory Kwajalein Atoll, U.S. Army , Republic of the Marshall Islands 1996 (NODC Accession 0000251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report summarizes the results of the first Environmental Standards and Procedures (UES) inventory of endangered species and wildlife resources at United States...

  6. Inventory of endangered species and wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1988 (NODC Accession 0000631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An inventory of endangered species and the wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Island were conducted from 30 October 1998 to...

  7. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 55 chemicals on six representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, white-footed mouse, cottontail ink, red fox, and whitetail deer) and eight avian wildlife species (American robin, woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, Cooper`s hawk, and redtailed hawk) (scientific names are presented in Appendix C). These species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The benchmarks presented in this report are values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species.

  8. Assessing the impact of the U.S. Endangered Species Act recovery planning guidelines on managing threats for listed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Caitlin M; Gerber, Leah R

    2015-10-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of the United States was enacted in 1973 to prevent the extinction of species. Recovery plans, required by 1988 amendments to the ESA, play an important role in organizing these efforts to protect and recover species. To improve the use of science in the recovery planning process, the Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) commissioned an independent review of endangered species recovery planning in 1999. From these findings, the SCB made key recommendations for how management agencies could improve the recovery planning process, after which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service redrafted their recovery planning guidelines. One important recommendation called for recovery plans to make threats a primary focus, including organizing and prioritizing recovery tasks for threat abatement. We sought to determine the extent to which results from the SCB study were incorporated into these new guidelines and whether the SCB recommendations regarding threats manifested in recovery plans written under the new guidelines. Recovery planning guidelines generally incorporated the SCB recommendations, including those for managing threats. However, although recent recovery plans have improved in their treatment of threats, many fail to adequately incorporate threat monitoring. This failure suggests that developing clear guidelines for monitoring should be an important priority in improving ESA recovery planning. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. Inventory of the mosses, liverworts, and lichens of Olympic National Park, Washington- Species list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutten, M.; Woodward, Andrea; Hutten, K.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of non-vascular cryptogam species (lichens, mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) is especially challenging because of their small size, their often microscopic or chemical distinguishing features, and their enormous diversity. Consequently, they are a poorly known component of Olympic National Park, despite their ecological and aesthetic importance. This project is the first attempt at a systematic, comprehensive survey of non-vascular cryptogams in the Park and presents the current species list with descriptions of the substrate and vascular vegetation type where they were observed. The authors strove to collect from as many park environments as feasible, and distributed collections along important environmental gradients in different regions of the park using vascular vegetation as an environmental indicator. They also collected opportunistically when interesting habitats or microhabitats were encountered. Finally, the authors updated the nomenclature in the Park’s previous collection of nonvascular plants. This study identified approximately 13,200 bryophyte and lichen species, adding approximately 425 new species to the Olympic National Park Herbarium. These data, combined with select literature reports and personal data from Martin and Karen Hutten, added more than 350 species to the previously documented Olympic Peninsula lichen and bryophyte list. The authors discuss the list in a local, regional, and global context of rarity, as well as cryptogam conservation and further work needed in Olympic National Park. The improved inventory of Olympic National Park cryptogams represented by this project enables Olympic National Park to protect populations of rare and sensitive species, assess the damage caused by illegal harvest, and contribute information to the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service Sensitive Species Programs.

  10. Use of Artificial Propagation and Supplementation for Rebuilding Salmon Stocks Listed under the Endangered Species Act : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 5 of 11.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichatowich, Jim; Watson, Bruce

    1993-06-01

    Conventional hatcheries, supplementation, and habitat protection are management activities located on a production continuum. At one end of the continuum is the conventional hatchery which attempts to separate artificially propagated fish from naturally reproducing populations. On the other end of the continuum is natural production. Supplementation which attempts to increase natural production through the use of artificial propagation lies somewhere between natural production and conventional hatcheries on the continuum. The use of artificial propagation in the recovery of listed species is controversial. Guidance on the use of artificial propagation in the recovery of listed species comes from three sources: The Endangered Species Act (ESA), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) policies and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) guidelines.

  11. DNA barcoding of shark meats identify species composition and CITES-listed species from the markets in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shang-Yin Vanson; Chan, Chia-Ling Carynn; Lin, Oceana; Hu, Chieh-Shen; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2013-01-01

    An increasing awareness of the vulnerability of sharks to exploitation by shark finning has contributed to a growing concern about an unsustainable shark fishery. Taiwan's fleet has the 4th largest shark catch in the world, accounting for almost 6% of the global figures. Revealing the diversity of sharks consumed by Taiwanese is important in designing conservation plans. However, fins make up less than 5% of the total body weight of a shark, and their bodies are sold as filets in the market, making it difficult or impossible to identify species using morphological traits. In the present study, we adopted a DNA barcoding technique using a 391-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene to examine the diversity of shark filets and fins collected from markets and restaurants island-wide in Taiwan. Amongst the 548 tissue samples collected and sequenced, 20 major clusters were apparent by phylogenetic analyses, each of them containing individuals belonging to the same species (most with more than 95% bootstrap values), corresponding to 20 species of sharks. Additionally, Alopias pelagicus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Isurus oxyrinchus, and Prionace glauca consisted of 80% of the samples we collected, indicating that these species might be heavily consumed in Taiwan. Approximately 5% of the tissue samples used in this study were identified as species listed in CITES Appendix II, including two species of Sphyrna, C. longimanus and Carcharodon carcharias. DNA barcoding provides an alternative method for understanding shark species composition when species-specific data is unavailable. Considering the global population decline, stock assessments of Appendix II species and highly consumed species are needed to accomplish the ultimate goal of shark conservation.

  12. DNA barcoding of shark meats identify species composition and CITES-listed species from the markets in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Yin Vanson Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An increasing awareness of the vulnerability of sharks to exploitation by shark finning has contributed to a growing concern about an unsustainable shark fishery. Taiwan's fleet has the 4th largest shark catch in the world, accounting for almost 6% of the global figures. Revealing the diversity of sharks consumed by Taiwanese is important in designing conservation plans. However, fins make up less than 5% of the total body weight of a shark, and their bodies are sold as filets in the market, making it difficult or impossible to identify species using morphological traits. METHODS: In the present study, we adopted a DNA barcoding technique using a 391-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI gene to examine the diversity of shark filets and fins collected from markets and restaurants island-wide in Taiwan. RESULTS: Amongst the 548 tissue samples collected and sequenced, 20 major clusters were apparent by phylogenetic analyses, each of them containing individuals belonging to the same species (most with more than 95% bootstrap values, corresponding to 20 species of sharks. Additionally, Alopias pelagicus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Isurus oxyrinchus, and Prionace glauca consisted of 80% of the samples we collected, indicating that these species might be heavily consumed in Taiwan. Approximately 5% of the tissue samples used in this study were identified as species listed in CITES Appendix II, including two species of Sphyrna, C. longimanus and Carcharodon carcharias. CONCLUSION: DNA barcoding provides an alternative method for understanding shark species composition when species-specific data is unavailable. Considering the global population decline, stock assessments of Appendix II species and highly consumed species are needed to accomplish the ultimate goal of shark conservation.

  13. Information for Species Status and Environmental Baseline for National-Scale Pesticide Listed Species Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance to support an analysis of the effects of past and ongoing human and natural factors leading to the current status of the species, its habitat, (including designated critical habitat), and ecosystem.

  14. Miscellaneous Wildlife Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of species donated to ADF&G and the Alaska Zoo from Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Animals include sockeye salmon eggs, rainbow trout eggs,...

  15. 50 CFR 91.4 - Eligible species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligible species. 91.4 Section 91.4... species. Five or fewer of the species listed below will be identified as eligible each year; those eligible species will be provided to each contestant with the information provided in § 91.1. (a) Whistling...

  16. Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

  17. 78 FR 51277 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Species Status for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... Information Taxonomy The Austin blind and Jollyville Plateau salamanders are neotenic (do not transform into a... salamander is found in three of the four Barton Springs outlets in the COA's Zilker Park, Travis County... the near future (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) 2011, p. 11). Jollyville Plateau...

  18. 77 FR 60803 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for the Fluted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... water quality parameters necessary for the fluted kidneyshell and the slabside pearlymussel. (5) Current... Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources (KDFWR) translocated 144 individuals from the Clinch River into the... the Slabside Pearlymussel Water body Drainage County State Historical or current Cumberland River...

  19. A review of previous studies on the Sri Lankan echinoid fauna, with an updated species list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchige, Gayashan M; Jayakody, Sevvandi; Mooi, Rich; Kroh, Andreas

    2017-02-09

    A comprehensive review and analysis of the literature on echinoids from Sri Lankan waters were conducted to compile an annotated list that integrates the existing published data with original data from recent research. According to the published literature, 115 echinoid species and one subspecies have been reported from Sri Lanka to date. However, the current study revealed that only 66 echinoid species and one subspecies belonging to 20 families can be verified to occur in Sri Lankan waters. According to the present analysis, 49 species were excluded from the list due to uncertain records (16) or synonymy (33) with other taxa known from the region. Of the 66 species and one subspecies occurring in Sri Lankan waters, 11 were first described from type material collected from this region. Six of the type specimens are "regular" echinoids and five are Irregularia. Out of these 11, Araeosoma coriaceum indicum has been recorded only from and appears to be endemic to Sri Lankan waters. However, 34 species of Sri Lankan echinoids have not been recorded in the last 90 years. Echinoid species recorded from Sri Lankan waters represent 6.7% of the currently accepted species of extant echinoids and include representatives of 28% of the extant echinoid families. Forty-five percent (45%) of echinoids recorded from the Indian coast (113 species and subspecies) are present in Sri Lankan waters. The current study highlights the need for systematic revision of echinoid records in Sri Lanka through field surveys and reconciliation of discrepancies in the existing literature. Offshore sampling is also needed due to lack of recent information on local deep-sea echinoids.

  20. 78 FR 72058 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Northern Long-Eared Bat as an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... comments on this proposal be submitted by the close of business on January 2, 2014. ADDRESSES: Document... comments (such as form letters), our preferred format is a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel. (2) By hard copy....gov , or by appointment, during normal business hours, at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Green...

  1. 76 FR 61531 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 10 Subspecies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... Butterflies as Threatened or Endangered With Critical Habitat; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76... To List 10 Subspecies of Great Basin Butterflies as Threatened or Endangered With Critical Habitat... petition to list 10 subspecies of Great Basin butterflies in Nevada and California as threatened or...

  2. 75 FR 52928 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Notice of 90-Day Finding for a Petition to List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ...; Notice of 90-Day Finding for a Petition to List Georgia Basin Populations of China Rockfish and Tiger Rockfish as Endangered or Threatened AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...) received a petition to list Georgia Basin populations of China rockfish (Sebastes nebulosus) and tiger...

  3. Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

    1996-09-01

    More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

  4. 78 FR 68370 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Technical Corrections for Kirtland's Warbler

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... taxonomic change is supported by published studies in peer-reviewed journals. We revise the scientific name... Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 222; Arlington, VA 22203. See Public... bird species listed under section 4 of the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). The change to the List of...

  5. Evaluating Connectivity for two mid-sized mammals Across Riparian Corridors using Wildlife Crossing Monitoring and Species Distribution Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S.

    2016-12-01

    The movement of wildlife can be constrained by river renovation projects owing to the presence of artificial structures. This study evaluates lateral connectivity, the ability to cross from habitat on one side of the river, through riparian vegetation, embankments, and the river to the other, of two mammal species, the leopard cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura) and water deer (Hydropotes inermis). We used 34 months of monitoring on 250 m stream segments on the Seom river, in South Korea to model the lateral connectivity of the stream between suitable habitats on either side of the steam. Habitat suitability within the landscape was determined using species distribution modelingand was used to determine where we thought the animals would want to pass across the river. We compared the predicted crossing locations to observed crossings.We assessed lateral connectivity suitability with maximum entropy and logistic regression models, and species' presences detected from snow tracking, heat sensor cameras, and scat or other signs, as well as landscape variables. Leopard cats prefer upland forest, while water deer prefer the forest edge and riparian corridor. For both target species, the best riparian habitats were characterized by the presence of vegetation cover on the embankment and by at least one side of an embankment being adjacent to farmland or forest cover. The lateral connectivity for the two target species showed different requirements. Water deer cross through large culverts with an openness ratio of 0.7 or under bridges, whereas leopard cats utilized drainage pipes and culvert boxes with a much smaller openness ratio. Stream reaches located close to a river tributary had the highest connectivity values, and areas modeled as good habitat for both species thatlink watershed and riparian habitats showed high connectivity values. Artifacts such as steep banks, concrete embankments, and adjacent roads were found to degrade the lateral connectivity of wildlife

  6. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  7. 77 FR 61375 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on Petitions To List the Mexican...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... two petitions to list the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) (Mexican wolf) as an endangered.... lupus) throughout the conterminous 48 States and Mexico, except for the Minnesota gray wolf population...

  8. 77 FR 13251 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of a 5-Year Review of Nine Northeastern...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... wildlife and plants (which we refer to collectively as the list) at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12... vertebrate, that interbreeds when mature; (B) Endangered species means any species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range; and (C) Threatened species means any species...

  9. Actual and potential use of population viability analyses in recovery of plant species listed under the US endangered species act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Sara L; Che-Castaldo, Judy P; Neel, Maile C

    2013-12-01

    Use of population viability analyses (PVAs) in endangered species recovery planning has been met with both support and criticism. Previous reviews promote use of PVA for setting scientifically based, measurable, and objective recovery criteria and recommend improvements to increase the framework's utility. However, others have questioned the value of PVA models for setting recovery criteria and assert that PVAs are more appropriate for understanding relative trade-offs between alternative management actions. We reviewed 258 final recovery plans for 642 plants listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act to determine the number of plans that used or recommended PVA in recovery planning. We also reviewed 223 publications that describe plant PVAs to assess how these models were designed and whether those designs reflected previous recommendations for improvement of PVAs. Twenty-four percent of listed species had recovery plans that used or recommended PVA. In publications, the typical model was a matrix population model parameterized with ≤5 years of demographic data that did not consider stochasticity, genetics, density dependence, seed banks, vegetative reproduction, dormancy, threats, or management strategies. Population growth rates for different populations of the same species or for the same population at different points in time were often statistically different or varied by >10%. Therefore, PVAs parameterized with underlying vital rates that vary to this degree may not accurately predict recovery objectives across a species' entire distribution or over longer time scales. We assert that PVA, although an important tool as part of an adaptive-management program, can help to determine quantitative recovery criteria only if more long-term data sets that capture spatiotemporal variability in vital rates become available. Lacking this, there is a strong need for viable and comprehensive methods for determining quantitative, science-based recovery criteria for

  10. [Psychoactive plant species--actual list of plants prohibited in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonienko, Katarzyna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szulc, Agata

    2013-01-01

    According to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction (20-th of March, 2009, Dz. U. Nr 63 poz. 520.) the list of federally prohibited plants in Poland was expanded to include 16 new species. Until that time the only illegal plant materials were cannabis, papaver, coca and most of their products. The actual list of herbal narcotics includes species which significantly influence on the central nervous system work but which are rarely described in the national literature. The plants usually come from distant places, where--among primeval cultures--are used for ritual purposes. In our civilization the plants are usually used experimentally, recreationally or to gain particular narcotic effects. The results of the consumption vary: they can be specific or less typical, imitate other substances intake, mental disorders or different pathological states. The plant active substances can interact with other medicaments, be toxic to internal organs, cause serious threat to health or even death. This article describes the sixteen plant species, which are now prohibited in Poland, their biochemical ingredients and their influence on the human organism.

  11. Evaluating potential conservation conflicts between two listed species: sea otters and black abalone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Peter; Jurgens, Laura J; Tinker, M Tim

    2015-11-01

    Population consequences of endangered species interacting as predators and prey have been considered theoretically and legally, but rarely investigated in the field. We examined relationships between spatially variable populations of a predator, the California sea otter, Enhydra lutris nereis, and a prey species, the black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii. Both species are federally listed under the Endangered Species Act and co-occur along the coast of California. We compared the local abundance and habitat distribution of black abalone at 12 sites with varying densities of sea otters. All of the populations of abalone we examined were in the geographic area currently unaffected by withering disease, which has decimated populations south of the study area. Surprisingly, our findings indicate that sea otter density is positively associated with increased black abalone density. The presence of sea otters also correlated with a shift in black abalone to habitat conferring greater refuge, which could decrease illegal human harvest. These results highlight the need for a multi-species approach to conservation management of the two species, and demonstrate the importance of using field-collected data rather than simple trophic assumptions to understand relationships between jointly vulnerable predator and prey populations.

  12. 75 FR 17363 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List a Stonefly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... characteristics and measures of rarity) should be linked to potential threats. It is not sufficient to say that... species' rarity is relevant to the conservation status of a species. Generally speaking, a species that... rare species. We do not find that rarity alone, without corroborating information regarding threats...

  13. 77 FR 43218 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Sonoran...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... species,'' within the geographical range currently occupied by the species; (2) Where these features are... protection; (4) Specific areas outside the geographical area occupied by the species that are ``essential for the conservation of the species''; and (5) What, if any, critical habitat you think we should propose...

  14. 76 FR 23256 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Arapahoe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... journal articles or other publications) to allow us to verify any scientific or commercial information you...), requesting that the Service consider all full species in our Mountain-Prairie Region ranked as G1 or G1G2 by...-species petitions--one for mountain-prairie species, and one for southwest species. We subsequently...

  15. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence and genotype diversity in select wildlife species from the southeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W. Gerhold

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite that infects humans and other animals. Previous studies indicate some genotypes of T. gondii are more frequently isolated in wildlife than agricultural animals, suggesting a wild/feral animal diversity model. To determine seroprevalence and genetic diversity of T. gondii in southeastern US wildlife, we collected sera from 471 wild animals, including 453 mammals and 18 birds, between 2011 and 2014. These serum samples were assayed for T. gondii infection using the modified agglutination test (MAT. Heart or tongue tissues from 66 seropositive animals were bioassayed in mice and 19 isolates were obtained. The isolated parasites were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method employing 10 genetic markers. Results One hundred and ninety-six of 471 samples (41.6% had a titer ≥1:32 and were considered positive for T. gondii infection. Of 453 mammals, 195 (43% were seropositive, whereas only one (5.6% of 18 birds was seropositive. The seroprevalence in mammals was significantly higher than in the birds. Mammalian hosts with adequate samples size (≥ 20 comprised white-tailed deer (n = 241, feral hogs (n = 100, raccoons (n = 34 and coyotes (n = 22, with seroprevalences of 41.0%, 51.0%, 50.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Coyotes had significantly higher seroprevalence than the white-tailed deer. Genotyping revealed five distinct genotypes, including the ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #5 (a.k.a type 12 for 15 isolates, genotype #3 (a.k.a. type II for 1 isolate, and genotypes #154, #167 and #216, each for 1 isolate. The results showed moderate to high infection rates of T. gondii in white-tailed deer, feral hogs, raccoons and coyotes. Genotyping results indicated limited genetic diversity and a dominance of genotype #5, which has been reported as a major type in wildlife in North America. Conclusions We conclude that T. gondii

  16. 77 FR 60749 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Species Status for the Florida...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... proposed rule. To assist the reader, we provide a list of these here for easy reference: Babcock-Webb WMA...-glaucinus complex presented a unique opportunity to study the process of speciation using new techniques...). However, Belwood (1981, p. 412) noted that this finding is consistent with the reproductive chronology of...

  17. 78 FR 59269 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for the Fluted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ..., and analyses. We invited these peer reviewers to comment on our listing proposal. We also considered... length. The shape of the shell is roughly oval elongate, and the solid, relatively heavy valves (shells..., food particles that adhere to the foot while it is extended outside the shell and are moved inside the...

  18. 77 FR 61835 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Cape Sable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... herbs. Tree species may include Bursera simaruba (gumbo limbo), Coccoloba uvifera (seagrape... Bursera simaruba, Conocarpus erectus, Eugenia foetida, and Pithecellobium unguis-cati (catclaw blackbead... species include Bursera simaruba, Lysiloma latisiliquum (false tamarind), Coccoloba diversifolia (pigeon...

  19. 75 FR 18959 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Status for 48 Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... species under consideration within the same ecosystem. For example, the threat of avian malaria is unique..., p. 45) or pasture. Intentional and inadvertent introduction of alien plant and animal species has...

  20. 76 FR 72891 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Scalloped Hammerhead...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... standards on extinction risk and impacts or threats discussed above. Distribution and Life History of the... WildEarth Guardians and Friends of Animals to list the scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini) as..., or DPS is ``endangered'' if it is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of...

  1. 76 FR 48777 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Nueces...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... included in the State of Texas' Clean Water Act 303(d) list as impaired due to concentrations of dissolved... commercial information, there is no evidence that pollution causing diminished water quality may be having an... of pollution (Norris et al. 2005, p. 5). Furthermore, water quality monitoring has been conducted in...

  2. 77 FR 42238 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Six Sand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ...Earth Guardians (referred to below as the petitioner). The petitioner requested that the Service list... into loose sand to access wet sand (Hardy and Andrew 1987, p. 175). The year-round wet sand is usually... Earth 1990, 1996, 1997, 2004, and 2010) and conducted a site visit in January 2012. The vegetation...

  3. 78 FR 60766 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Species Status for Spring Pygmy Sunfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... the species and its habitat through the established Belle Mina Farms CCAA ameliorates the current threats to the species to the point that threatened status is appropriate. The Belle Mina Farms CCAA... the species' range, which is downstream from Belle Mina Farms, is owned by two landowners who are...

  4. 77 FR 25687 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Speckled Hind as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... species' extinction risk. For example, our 2007 status review for the Atlantic white marlin (73 FR 843, January 4, 2008; http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/endangered%20species/pdf/2007_Atlantic_white_marlin_status...

  5. 76 FR 9722 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Solanum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Species Description Solanum conocarpum is a dry-forest shrub of the Solanaceae, or tomato, family that may... only species within the Solanaceae family facing this threat. Matabuey (Goetzea elegans) is an example...

  6. 76 FR 55169 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on Five Petitions To List Seven...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ..., the DLNR is building a predator-proof fence to prevent nonnative species, such as cats and dogs that... controlling nonnative species. Mokuauia is easily accessed by the public and is a popular destination for...

  7. 78 FR 72622 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 11 Tarantula...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... potential effects of climate change on each species and its habitat. Please include sufficient information... 11 species named in the petition include six species native to India and five native to Sri Lanka.... Poecilotheria formosa beautiful India. parachute spider, finely formed parachute spider, Salem ornamental...

  8. 78 FR 21086 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Two...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... ``physical or biological features essential to the conservation of the species,'' within the geographical... the geographical area occupied by the species that are ``essential for the conservation of the species'' and why; and (5) What, if any, critical habitat you think we should propose for designation if the...

  9. 75 FR 16713 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; Notice of 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Bumphead...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... threat to this species, as coral is its primary food source. The petition asserts that biological traits...) and (20)). Biology of the Bumphead Parrotfish This species is slow growing and long-lived (up to 40... its coral habitat, citing NMFS (2009). Coral is a primary food source for this species, and the...

  10. A preliminary survey on raccoon (Procyon lotor (Linnaeus, 1758 status as new invasive species in Iran (Case study: Lavandevil wildlife refuge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Farashi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive species are a major threat to biodiversity and have many adverse effects which cause economic losses. In this study, it was tried to survey raccoon damages in Iran at Lavandevil wildlife refuge. The purpose of this research was to address three main topics: (1 to study the effective environmental factors on raccoon distribution in Lavandevil wildlife refuge, (2 to study some of raccoon effects on their vital ecosystems and communities, and (3 to study local people knowledge of the presence of invasive species and its destructive effects. At first, Ecological Niche Factor Analysis (ENFA method was used to determine the effective environmental factors on raccoon distribution in Lavandevil wildlife refuge. Also, we studied some effects of raccoon on ecosystems and its vital communities, using scat analysis to determine raccoon diet during four seasons and also diseases like rabies, distemper and parvovirus infection were diagnosed. The results showed that vegetation communities, vegetation density and water resources were important in micro-scale. Garbages had the largest share and fish had the lowest share in raccoon diet throughout the year. Unfortunately, food resources providing and availability for raccoon could pave the way for its population increase in Lavandevil wildlife refuge also and other northern refuges in Iran. Local people in Lavandevil wildlife refuges did not know raccoon as a non-native invasive species and they were not informed of their threats at all. As the first step, managers in the region must duly inform the local people of the matter.

  11. Feather barbs as a good source of mtDNA for bird species identification in forensic wildlife investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speller, Camilla F; Nicholas, George P; Yang, Dongya Y

    2011-07-28

    The ability to accurately identify bird species is crucial for wildlife law enforcement and bird-strike investigations. However, such identifications may be challenging when only partial or damaged feathers are available for analysis. By applying vigorous contamination controls and sensitive PCR amplification protocols, we found that it was feasible to obtain accurate mitochondrial (mt)DNA-based species identification with as few as two feather barbs. This minimally destructive DNA approach was successfully used and tested on a variety of bird species, including North American wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), blue heron (Ardea herodias) and pygmy owl (Glaucidium californicum). The mtDNA was successfully obtained from 'fresh' feathers, historic museum specimens and archaeological samples, demonstrating the sensitivity and versatility of this technique. By applying appropriate contamination controls, sufficient quantities of mtDNA can be reliably recovered and analyzed from feather barbs. This previously overlooked substrate provides new opportunities for accurate DNA species identification when minimal feather samples are available for forensic analysis.

  12. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: an assessment of coral reef fishes in the US Pacific Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgliczynski, B. J.; Williams, I. D.; Schroeder, R. E.; Nadon, M. O.; Richards, B. L.; Sandin, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Widespread declines among many coral reef fisheries have led scientists and managers to become increasingly concerned over the extinction risk facing some species. To aid in assessing the extinction risks facing coral reef fishes, large-scale censuses of the abundance and distribution of individual species are critically important. We use fisheries-independent data collected as part of the NOAA Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program from 2000 to 2009 to describe the range and density across the US Pacific of coral reef fishes included on The International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) 2011 Red List of Threatened Species. Forty-five species, including sharks, rays, groupers, humphead wrasse ( Cheilinus undulatus), and bumphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum), included on the IUCN List, were recorded in the US Pacific Islands. Most species were generally rare in the US Pacific with the exception of a few species, principally small groupers and reef sharks. The greatest diversity and densities of IUCN-listed fishes were recorded at remote and uninhabited islands of the Pacific Remote Island Areas; in general, lower densities were observed at reefs of inhabited islands. Our findings complement IUCN assessment efforts, emphasize the efficacy of large-scale assessment and monitoring efforts in providing quantitative data on reef fish assemblages, and highlight the importance of protecting populations at remote and uninhabited islands where some species included on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species can be observed in abundance.

  13. Proposal: Bat occurrence relative to silvicultural treatments intended to yield Desired Forest Conditions for priority wildlife species

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We propose to conduct an initial assessment of bat occurrence within bottomland forests on National Wildlife Refuges relative to silvicultural treatments prescribed...

  14. An assessment of Idaho's wildlife management areas for the protection of wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J.W.; Scott, J.M.; Strand, Espen

    2005-01-01

    Since 1940, Idaho Department of Fish and Game has developed a network of 31 Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) across the state. This program has been focused mostly on conservation of game species and their habitats. We assessed the contribution of Idaho's WMAs to conservation of all Idaho's wildlife and other aspects of ecological diversity. Predicted occurrences of species' breeding habitats and other data were used to evaluate the representation of wildlife habitat and other ecological conditions. We found 33 of 39 natural land cover types were mapped as occurring in WMAs. WMAs occurred in 10 of 15 of Bailey's ecoregion sections, absent only from two sections that occupy greater than 1% of Idaho. Percent area of WMAs by elevation followed a pattern similar to percent area of Idaho; however, mean elevation for WMAs was lower than for the state and other protected areas in Idaho. We predicted breeding habitat for 98.4% of Idaho's wildlife and all federal and state listed threatened, endangered, or candidate terrestrial vertebrates to occur in at least one WMA. We predicted habitat for 39 species to occur on five or fewer WMAs, and predicted no habitat on WMAs for five species. We found that a system of WMAs established mainly to protect game species potentially conserves many other aspects of Idaho's ecological diversity, may provide habitat for more than 98% of Idaho's wildlife, and complements other protected areas in the state.

  15. 77 FR 40171 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Two Foreign Macaw Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... include: Brosimum alicastrum (Maya nut, ram n), Bunchosia montana (no common name (ncn)), Bursera aptera (ncn), Bursera schlechtendalii (ncn), Celtis caudate (ncn), Cedrela species (cedar fruits), Cyrtocarpa...

  16. 78 FR 40669 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Cape Sable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Cape Sable Thoroughwort, Florida Semaphore Cactus, and... thoroughwort), Consolea corallicola (Florida semaphore cactus), and Harrisia aboriginum (aboriginal prickly...

  17. Habitat types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and plant species of concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H.; Brandt, C.A. [and others

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive source of the best available information on Hanford Site sensitive and critical habitats and plants and animals of importance or special status. In this report, sensitive habitats include areas known to be used by threatened, endangered, or sensitive plant or animal species, wetlands, preserves and refuges, and other sensitive habitats outlined in the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology. Potentially important species for risk assessment and species of special concern with regard to their status as threatened, endangered, or sensitive are described, and potential habitats for these species identified.

  18. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    -tailed hawk, osprey) (scientific names for both the mammalian and avian species are presented in Appendix B). [In this document, NOAEL refers to both dose (mg contaminant per kg animal body weight per day) and concentration (mg contaminant per kg of food or L of drinking water)]. The 20 wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The NOAEL-based benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species; LOAEL-based benchmarks represent threshold levels at which adverse effects are likely to become evident. These benchmarks consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media only. Exposure through inhalation and/or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  19. 78 FR 47582 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for the Sharpnose Shiner...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... reproduction. Texas does not have adequate water supplies to meet current or projected water demand in the..., including the Texas Environmental Flows Program, saltcedar control programs, and groundwater conservation... Texas, as endangered species under the ] Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). If we...

  20. Abundance of food plant species and food habits of Rhinoceros unicorns Linn. in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Konwar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Food habits and abundance of food plant species of Rhinoceros unicornis in Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary were studied from January 1999 through December 2001. Totally 32 numbers of Rhino food plants were identified, of which 15 were grasses, four shrubs, five aquatic hydrophytes and eight tree species (21 terrestrial and 11 aquatic. During the dry season, the Rhino feeds on almost 90% food items from Hemarthria compressa, Arundo donax, Phragmites karka, Cerex rubro-brumee etc. The other short grasses such as Cynodon dactylon, Andropogon ssp., Cenchrus ciliaris, Chrysopogon aciculatus and tender and young shoots and twigs of Schelristechya fuesche, Saccharum spontaneum, Lagerstroemia flosreginae etc. are consumed in limited portions. The rhino consumes 11 cultivated crops and vegetables, viz., Ricinus communis, Oryza sativa, Solanum melongena, Lycopersicon esculentum, Solanum tuberosum, Brassica nigra, Luffa cylindrica, Luffa acutangula, Cucurbita moschata, Cucumis sativus and Ipomoea batatas etc. Highest density of food plant species observed in the study area were Cynodon dactylon (167.5/m2, Hemarthria compressa (73.75/m2, Vetiveria zizanioides (56/m2, Saccharum ravannae (51.5/m2, Pharagmites karka (50.75/m2, Leersia hexandra (46.75/m2, Brachiarea pseudointerrupta (40/m2 and Eichhornia crassipes (35/m2.

  1. Quantifying errors and omissions in alien species lists: The introduction status of Melaleuca species in South Africa as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn Jacobs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduced species lists provide essential background information for biological invasions research and management. The compilation of these lists is, however, prone to a variety of errors. We highlight the frequency and consequences of such errors using introduced Melaleuca (sensu lato, including Callistemon species in South Africa as a case study. We examined 111 herbarium specimens from South Africa and noted the categories and sub-categories of errors that occurred in identification. We also used information from herbarium specimens and distribution data collected in the field to determine whether a species was introduced, naturalized and invasive. We found that 72% of the specimens were not named correctly. These were due to human error (70% (misidentification, and improved identifications and species identification problems (30% (synonyms arising from inclusion of Callistemon, and unresolved taxonomy. At least 36 Melaleuca species have been introduced to South Africa, and field observations indicate that ten of these have naturalized, including five that are invasive. While most of the errors likely have negligible impact on management, we highlight one case where incorrect identification lead to an inappropriate management approach and some instances of errors in published lists. Invasive species lists need to be carefully reviewed to minimise errors, and herbarium specimens supported by DNA identification are required where identification using morphological features is particularly challenging.

  2. 77 FR 47352 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Graptopetalum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... for reproduction, germination, and survival; (b) Genetics and taxonomy; (c) Historical and current... finding. Petition History On July 7, 2010, we received a petition dated July 7, 2010, from the Center for..., considered candidates. For each of the species, we provide a description of the species and its life history...

  3. 76 FR 30757 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Salmon-Crested Cockatoo as Threatened...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... alleviate the loss of species and their habitats. Before a plant or animal species can receive the... application requirements on the origin of birds in trade (e.g., wild or bred in captivity). Under the... import foreign specimens. Furthermore, to control diseases, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal...

  4. 76 FR 63443 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Northern...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... northern leatherside chub (Lepidomeda copei) is a rare desert fish in the minnow family (Cyprinidae) that..., entire). The species is native to smaller, mid-elevation, desert streams in the northeastern portions of..., ecology, or status until recently (Belk and Johnson 2007, pp. 67-68). Taxonomy and Species Description The...

  5. 76 FR 15919 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Berry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... species are generalist feeders and cannibalization of other conspecifics (belonging to the same species... the threat of harvesting individuals for the pet trade exists in unmonitored caves (M. Niemiller, pers... the pet trade or other purposes is occurring. Furthermore, the Tennessee State law discussed above is...

  6. 76 FR 9320 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Alabama Shad as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... the rationale for the Species of Concern designation, citing Alabama shad's rarity throughout much of... ``species that are in need of immediate conservation action and/or research because of extreme rarity... that meet three of the following factors: Rarity; very limited, disjunct, or peripheral distribution...

  7. 77 FR 47583 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Desert...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... ``physical or biological features essential to the conservation of the species'' within the geographical... outside the geographical area occupied by the subspecies that are ``essential for the conservation of the species;'' and (5) What, if any, critical habitat you think we should propose for designation if the...

  8. 78 FR 76795 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Coleman's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ..., 2013, settlement agreement. Species Information Description and Taxonomy A member of the orchid family... coralroot (Hexalectris colemanii) as a distinct species. Habitat and Life History Orchids, such as Coleman's... range from a relatively small number of individual orchids to many hundred individual plants. A colony...

  9. 75 FR 50739 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Brian Head...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ..., recreational, scientific, or educational purposes; (C) Disease or predation; (D) The inadequacy of existing... Curtailment of the Species' Habitat or Range. Ski resort operations exist to the west and northwest of Brian... the ski resort does not appear to provide a threat to the species or its habitat. No information was...

  10. 50 CFR 31.12 - Sale of wildlife specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sale of wildlife specimens. 31.12 Section 31.12 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDLIFE SPECIES MANAGEMENT Terms and Conditions of Wildlife...

  11. 76 FR 41286 - Conboy Lake and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuges, WA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... crane, elk); wildlife-dependent use; effective law enforcement; impacts of climate change; staffing... 1500-1508); other appropriate Federal laws and regulations; and our policies and procedures for... species; rare and listed species recovery; impacts of climate change; contaminants and water quality...

  12. Hunting, Livelihoods and Declining Wildlife in the Hponkanrazi Wildlife Sanctuary, North Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Madhu; Htun, Saw; Zaw, Than; Myint, Than

    2010-08-01

    The Hponkanrazi Wildlife Sanctuary, North Myanmar and three contiguous protected areas, comprise some of the largest expanses of natural forest remaining in the region. Demand for wildlife products has resulted in unsustainable exploitation of commercially valuable species resulting in local extirpation of vulnerable species. Camera trap, track and sign, and questionnaire-based surveys were used to examine (a) wildlife species targeted by hunters, (b) the importance of wild meat for household consumption, and (c) the significance of hunting as a livelihood activity for resident villages. Certain commercially valuable species highly preferred by hunters were either completely absent from hunt records (tiger, musk deer and otter) or infrequently obtained during actual hunts (bear, pangolin). Species obtained by hunters were commonly occurring species such as muntjacs with low commercial value and not highly preferred by hunters. Fifty eight percent of respondents ( n = 84) indicated trade, 27% listed subsistence use and 14% listed human-wildlife conflict as the main reason for hunting ( n = 84). Average amount of wild meat consumed per month is not significantly higher during the hunting season compared to the planting season (paired t-test, P > 0.05). Throughout the year, the average amount of fish consumed per month was higher than livestock or wild meat (Friedman test, P conservation strategies to address globally prevalent problems of declining wildlife populations and dependent human communities. The study provides recommendations to reduce illegal hunting and protect vulnerable species by strengthening park management through enforcement, increasing the opportunity costs of poaching, establishing no-take zones and research to determine the economic significance of hunting for livelihoods.

  13. Species list of bats (Mammalia, Chiroptera of Santarém area, Pará State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Bernard

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite its enormous area, diversity of habitat, and bat species, studies in the Brazilian Amazon represent just a small portion of the bat research in the South América. Consequently, the distribution of the major part of the bat species in the Brazilian Amazon remains incompletely documented. Conservation strategies involving bat species in the Brazilian Amazon may be difficult without more information about geographic distribution, status, roost, food preferences, and reproduction of the species. Here is presented an updated list of species of bats of Alter do Chão, and complete this list with data from the nearby Amazon National Park, providing a list of bats in the Santarém area. This list includes at least 55 species of bats, representing 34 genera, and 7 families. The higher taxonomic composition of bat fauna of Santarérn area is similar to other areas sampled in the Brazilian Amazon, with a high proportion of frugivores, but the number of aerial insectivores is lower, probably due the use of mist nets as the principal sampling method.

  14. 78 FR 47590 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Species Status for Graham's Beardtongue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... population trends, including: (a) Biological or ecological requirements of these species; (b) Genetics and... occur and prevents inbreeding depression (Dodge and Yates 2009, p. 18). Pollinators generally need a...

  15. 76 FR 10165 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Astragalus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... population genetics of Astragalus hamiltonii, and as a probable outcrosser, this species could potentially be... extinction due to the potential for inbreeding depression, loss of genetic diversity, and lower sexual...

  16. 76 FR 9309 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Sand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... with yellow and black forewing lines and is the only species within the genus with a predominantly gray... petitioners state the sand verbena moth is likely subject to predation by bats, birds, and small mammals...

  17. 75 FR 19592 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the Wyoming...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... consume substantial quantities of species related to B. tectorum, B. mollis (soft brome) and B. rubens (red brome), when the nutrient content of the plants was highest (Hunt 1992, p. 49). While Bromus...

  18. 76 FR 60431 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... suggests urbanization in Hudson River tributaries impacts the invertebrate communities used as food for the... estimating abundance of fish species are being developed, but due to the global and complex life-history...

  19. 78 FR 15624 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Yellow-Billed Parrot With Special Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... slopes, hillsides are cleared and used by small subsistence farmers for carrots, peas, bananas, plantains... high (John and Newman 2006, p. 15). Deforestation can also change the species composition and structure...

  20. 78 FR 29098 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Iliamna Lake Seals as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... warrant protection under the ESA. Broad statements about generalized threats to the species, or..., food habits, population density and trends, and habitat trends; (2) Information on the effects of...

  1. Development Plan : St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A number of development projects for St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge are listed in this plan. These include support facilities- such as an administration...

  2. 1988 Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Contaminant Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides partial lists of both freshwater algae and benthic invertebrates found at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge and in Black Brook, a principle...

  3. 76 FR 20302 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Species; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Chinook Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... salmon, including life history and physiology, diet, associated fish species, habitat requirements..., reproduction, or rearing of offspring; and (5) habitats that are protected from disturbance or are...

  4. 76 FR 49201 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Four Foreign Parrot Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... petition dated January 29, 2008, from Friends of Animals, as represented by the Environmental Law Clinic... factors, including live capture and hunting, domestic and international trade, predation by other animals...-2). Although in captivity this species has been known to exhibit aggression in males, it is a social...

  5. 78 FR 32013 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Status for 38 Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... habitat destruction and modification from fire. All 37 plant species face threats from destruction and... essentially identical in terms of the nature of the its impact, its severity, its imminence, and its scope... ecosystems, in 9 occurrences totaling an estimated 7,000 individuals (TNC 2007; HBMP 2008; Oppenheimer 2008a...

  6. 78 FR 61003 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for the Florida Bonneted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Brazilian (=Mexican) free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). Wings of the members of the genus Eumops are... Babcock-Webb WMA. Understanding of roosting behavior and site selection is limited. However, there is a... Brazilian free-tailed bats to their high wing-aspect ratios, with that species capable of traveling 65...

  7. Analysis of Sensitivity and Uncertainty in an Individual-Based Model of a Threatened Wildlife Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present a multi-faceted sensitivity analysis of a spatially explicit, individual-based model (IBM) (HexSim) of a threatened species, the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) on a national forest in Washington, USA. Few sensitivity analyses have been conducted on ...

  8. 78 FR 45074 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Diamond Darter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Tennessee. The species is currently known to exist only within the lower Elk River in Kanawha and Clay... the Courier Journal, which in combination cover all affected counties in West Virginia and Kentucky... substrates that are not embedded with fine silts or clays, and removed references to measures of embeddedness...

  9. 78 FR 55599 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Species Status for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ..., p. 1050) found the disruption of sodium balance by acidic conditions in three species of terrestrial salamanders. A low pH substrate can also reduce salamander body sodium, body water levels, and body mass... unique conditions occur when the population density of red-backed salamanders is so high in a given area...

  10. Increased accuracy of species lists developed for alpine lakes using morphology and cytochrome oxidase I for identification of specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Kristy; Knapp, Roland A; Boiano, Daniel M; May, Bernie

    2013-09-01

    The first step in many community ecology studies is to produce a species list from a sample of individuals. Community ecologists now have two viable ways of producing a species list: morphological and barcode identification. In this study, we compared the taxonomic resolution gained by a combined use of both methods and tested whether a change in taxonomic resolution significantly impacted richness estimates for benthic macroinvertebrates sampled from ten lakes in Sequoia National Park, USA. Across all lakes, 77 unique taxa were identified and 42% (32) were reliably identified to species using both barcode and morphological identification. Of the 32 identified to species, 63% (20) were identified solely by comparing the barcode sequence from cytochrome oxidase I to the Barcode of Life reference library. The increased resolution using a combined identification approach compared to identifications based solely on morphology resulted in a significant increase in estimated richness within a lake at the order, family, genus and species levels of taxonomy (P COI sequences to the genus or species level on average 75% of the time. Our results demonstrate that a combined identification approach improves accuracy of benthic macroinvertebrate species lists in alpine lakes and subsequent estimates of richness. We encourage the use of barcodes for identification purposes and specifically when morphology is insufficient, as in the case of damaged and early life stage specimens of benthic macroinvertebrates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 77 FR 52650 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Platte...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... July 24, 2007, from Forest Guardians (now WildEarth Guardians), requesting that 206 species in the... Service would complete the 12-month finding for the Platte River caddisfly by the end of Fiscal Year 2012..., linear depressions that are historical channel remnants of these river systems (Friesen et al. 2000, p. 4...

  12. 77 FR 39666 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Maytenus cymosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... the species may meet the definition of threatened or endangered under the Act. In making this 90-day... access to Pi[ntilde]eros Island while protecting the ecology of the island by disturbing only a small... information regarding the ecology or reproductive biology of M. cymosa (e.g., lack of pollinators and/or fruit...

  13. 78 FR 50032 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Whale Shark as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... species (Castro et al., 2007). A second study, using nuclear DNA, also found low differentiation among... (e.g., population abundance and trends, productivity, spatial structure, age structure, sex ratio... megamouth (Megachasma pelagios) shark. Among the whale shark's distinctive features are its large, first...

  14. 75 FR 35746 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Honduran...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... populations and captive breeding and domestic trade of this species in the United States (8) Genetics and... inbreeding depression and genetic drift (random changes in gene frequency). This, in turn, compromises a... inbreeding depression. On the basis of our evaluation of the material provided in the petition and available...

  15. 75 FR 51969 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the Oklahoma...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ..., including: (a) Habitat requirements; (b) Genetics and taxonomy; (c) Historical and current range, including... environment, genetics, or other factors, in a process described as an ``extinction vortex'' by Gilpin and... variability or genetic depression due to inbreeding, which ] diminishes the species' capacity to adapt and...

  16. 77 FR 51958 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Bay...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... skipper, particularly the lack of quantitative morphological studies of Texas populations (TPWD 2011). While we agree that additional studies would be useful, the species has been appropriately described... habitats are also present, and such habitats are not conducive to development, farming, or other land use...

  17. 76 FR 56607 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 42 Great...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... information on: (1) The species' biology, range, and population trends, including: (a) Habitat requirements... from the phylum Mollusca, class Gastropoda, superorder Caenogastropoda (Bouchet and Rocroi 2005, pp. 4... al. 2009, p. 42). The petition indicates that unauthorized collection of invertebrates was observed...

  18. 75 FR 54707 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised 12-Month Finding to List the Upper...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... widely but irregularly distributed in the upper Missouri River system above the Great Falls in Montana...-timer'' accounts report that the species may have been present in the Ruby River, at least seasonally... grayling in rivers typically migrate downstream in the fall, moving into larger streams or mainstem rivers...

  19. 75 FR 78513 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Astragalus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... ground every year. The plant has slender stems that are sparsely branched with dark green pinnate leaves... is essential for tracking the status of the species but is somewhat problematic for an over- arching...) livestock, deer and elk use of habitat; (8) mining, oil and gas leasing; (9) climate change; and (10...

  20. 76 FR 10310 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ..., existing information was not available to estimate the extent or rate of changes in habitat or population... species, it estimates the number of occurrences at 1-20. NatureServe also ranks the three subspecies... change has taken and will take its toll through altered fire regimes, more severe and frequent droughts...

  1. 76 FR 23265 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Smooth...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ..., p. 5). In Puerto Rico, Guyana, Cuba, Jamaica, Colombia, and the Gal pagos Islands, this species uses... lowlands, often near the coast, preferring a source of water (e.g., marsh, pond, river) and avoiding dense..., reproductive and social behaviors, habitat quality, and foraging patterns (Quinn and Startek-Foote 2000...

  2. 78 FR 35663 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removing the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) From the List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... subspecies or as DPSs. Second, the strategy promotes the continued representation of all substantially unique... described in the scientific literature (e.g., Mech 1970, Mech and Boitani 2003), in Service recovery plans...). The literature contains at least 31 published names for species or subspecies in the genus (Hall and...

  3. 76 FR 63479 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Two South...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... km\\2\\ (177,606 mi\\2\\), an area larger than previously thought (Brightsmith 2009, pers. comm.; Tobias... that this species occurs at a conservative density of one mature individual per 10-50 km\\2\\ (3.0-19.3... holder the right to exploit the resources within a given area, but also gives the holder responsibility...

  4. 76 FR 37706 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List Castanea...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Castanea pumila may be intermediate and identification of the two species may not always be possible... rates suggest that most populations are highly outcrossed (Dane and Hawkins 1999, p. 9). Johnson (1988... hypovirulent strains in Europe, research and conservation efforts began in the early 1970s with the American...

  5. 75 FR 22012 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List Susan's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... that incidental dispersal via wind or adhesion to animals or humans could occur, but neither dispersal... species is imperiled (at a high risk of extinction) globally due to a very restricted range, very few... Spring may be impacted by poor water quality because of large amounts of filamentous algae in Trout Creek...

  6. 75 FR 310 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Withdrawal of Proposed Rule to List Cook's Petrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... conclusion in the proposed rule that there was a likelihood of extinction for Cook's petrel within the... species are impacts from extremely small populations, limited breeding locations or foraging ranges, loss... plants and animals that were historically known from this area but no longer occur there (Maungatautari...

  7. 77 FR 54548 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Eagle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... trends, including: (a) Habitat requirements for feeding, breeding, and sheltering; (b) Genetics and... been released throughout the western United States and Canada for sport fishery purposes (Moyle et al... the wild and affected their genetics through gene pool alteration and species contamination. Issue 1...

  8. 77 FR 19755 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... variability of environments where the species has been observed will be discussed below. BILLING CODE 4310-55... implementation of the program within an adaptive management framework. The intention of this framework is that... end of the Yolo Bypass (a flood control project) has likely benefitted longfin smelt. After years of...

  9. 78 FR 41371 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; Determination on Whether To List the Ribbon Seal as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... concentrated, with at least part of the Bering Sea population moving towards the Bering Strait and the southern... through the Bering Strait, there are usually only a small number of ribbon seals hauled out on the ice... Sea of Okhotsk and the Bering and Chukchi seas. This species gets its common and specific (fasciata...

  10. 77 FR 36871 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Withdrawal of the Proposed Rule To List Dunes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... 15,000 years ago during the late Pleistocene era, when suitable habitat for each species became... shinnery oak community. During the late Pleistocene era, wind erosion of the Blackwater Draw formation... and Hobbs, New Mexico). These populations are separated from each other by geologic and ecologic...

  11. 75 FR 67925 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List Cirsium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... global average sea level (2007a, p. 5). For the next two decades, a warming of about 0.4 degrees... threatened species Cirsium vinaceum (Forest Service 2003, pp. 42-43). The same likely holds true for C... Climate Change (IPCC) states that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, based on observations of...

  12. 77 FR 4973 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List the San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)) and the Federal... effects of climate change on the species and its habitat, including information on the upwards shifts in... have been isolated in forested, higher elevation refugia by a warming climate (Butler et al. 1991, p. 4...

  13. 75 FR 6437 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-month Finding on a Petition to List the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ...) Climate change; (2) livestock grazing; (3) native plant succession; (4) invasive plant species; and (5... range as a result of effects related to global climate change. We also solicited additional data and... from habitat becoming too dry due to environmental changes resulting from historical changes in climate...

  14. 75 FR 23654 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Hermes Copper...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... grouped under Factor A: development, wildfire, fire management techniques, and habitat fragmentation. The... facilities may potentially be a threat to Hermes copper butterfly through fragmentation of habitat... the potential threat of prescribed fires in our status review for this species. Habitat Fragmentation...

  15. 75 FR 17062 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Thorne's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ..., vehicle access and recreation, and habitat fragmentation. Wildfire Information Provided in the Petition... status review for this species. Habitat Fragmentation Information Provided in the Petition The petitioners claim that both habitat fragmentation and habitat degradation pose a substantial threat to Thorne...

  16. 75 FR 53615 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List the White...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... coarser coat, including the fringe of hair along the inner margin of the ear, the throat patch, and the hue of dorsal cover hairs. Specimens of this subspecies also have paler rump patches that contrast... exists throughout the species' range, including coyote (Canus latrans), kit fox (Vulpes macrotis), gray...

  17. 77 FR 52301 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Prince of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... sabrinus griseifrons) is a small (4.6 ounces ), nocturnal, nonhibernating, arboreal rodent that is endemic... structure of arboreal rodents (although not mutually exclusive), especially squirrels (Family Sciuridae... lifestyle. Despite the high number of endemic species in Southeast Alaska, the small mammal community is...

  18. 76 FR 44547 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the Giant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Agricultural School (now Washington State University) in Pullman, Washington, which does not offer numerical or... indicate scientific disagreement about its taxonomic classification as a species. Adult specimens in the... Leavenworth, WA. In those studies, the GPE was associated with pores leading down into unconsolidated parent...

  19. 76 FR 18684 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To List the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... States from the eastern Sierra Nevadas in the west to the Black Hills in the east, and from southern...). Biology and Life History Most mountainsnail species are relatively large land snails (adult body size... have both male and female genitalia and can assume either role in mating) (Pisbry 1939, p. 427...

  20. 76 FR 20613 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Spring...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... include sufficient information with your submission (such as scientific journal articles or other... Review (61 FR 7595), we adopted a single category of candidate species defined as follows: ``Those... mile). During the flight season, Spring Mountains acastus checkerspot adults have been observed...

  1. 76 FR 31920 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Golden...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... chrysoptera) is a neotropical migrant (breeding in North America and wintering in Central and South America...-winged warbler is to mandate Federal protection across the species' entire North and South America range... paginated; Sibley 2003, p. 429). Golden-winged warblers breed across the north-central and eastern United...

  2. Wildlife Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Spash, Clive L.; Aldred, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we consider how conservation has arisen as a key aspect of the reaction to human-initiated degradation and disappearance of ecosystems, wild lands. and wildlife. Concern over species extinction is given an historical perspective which shows the way in which pressure on wild and natural aspects of global ecology have changed in recent centuries. The role of conservation in the struggle to protect the environment is then analysed using underlying ethical arguments behind the econo...

  3. Herpetofauna of Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Das

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A herpetofaunal inventory based on field surveys, literature records and photographic records is presented for Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary and its environs, situated in the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh, India. We list a total of 10 species of amphibians and 42 species of reptiles from the area. Compiled observations presented here include biological notes on the Critically Endangered Gavialis gangeticus and new locality records and natural history information of poorly known species including Polypedates taeniatus and Sibynophis sagittarius. Besides recording members of currently recognized species complexes, the study also documents species that were either conferred to closely related species (e.g., Fejervarya cf. teraiensis or their identity remains to be ascertained (e.g., Kaloula sp.. The present study indicates that species count at Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary is likely to increase with additional surveys and systematic work.

  4. Species interactions in a parasite community drive infection risk in a wildlife population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, Sandra; Lambin, Xavier; Birtles, Richard; Beldomenico, Pablo; Burthe, Sarah; Paterson, Steve; Begon, Mike

    2010-10-08

    Most hosts, including humans, are simultaneously or sequentially infected with several parasites. A key question is whether patterns of coinfection arise because infection by one parasite species affects susceptibility to others or because of inherent differences between hosts. We used time-series data from individual hosts in natural populations to analyze patterns of infection risk for a microparasite community, detecting large positive and negative effects of other infections. Patterns remain once variations in host susceptibility and exposure are accounted for. Indeed, effects are typically of greater magnitude, and explain more variation in infection risk, than the effects associated with host and environmental factors more commonly considered in disease studies. We highlight the danger of mistaken inference when considering parasite species in isolation rather than parasite communities.

  5. 76 FR 50447 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 5-Year Reviews for 5 Evolutionarily Significant Units of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ...: Background Under the ESA, a list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plant species must be maintained. The list is published at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for plants). Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the... considered new genetic and biogeographic information related to each species' freshwater and estuarine...

  6. Two new species of scale insects (Hemiptera, Coccoidea from Sardinia (Italy with a check list of Sardinian Coccoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Pellizzari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of scale insects collected in Sardinia (Italy are described and illustrated: Spinococcus giuliae sp. n. (Pseudococcidae off the roots of Umbilicus rupestris (Crassulaceae and Micrococcus sardous sp. n. (Micrococcidae off the root of an undetermined grass (Poaceae growing near the sea. A n identification key to Micrococcus species and a revised list of the scales presently known in the island are also provided.

  7. Testing decision rules for categorizing species' extinction risk to help develop quantitative listing criteria for the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Tracey J; Taylor, Barbara L; Thompson, Grant G; Cochrane, Jean Fitts; Ralls, Katherine; Runge, Michael C; Merrick, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Lack of guidance for interpreting the definitions of endangered and threatened in the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) has resulted in case-by-case decision making leaving the process vulnerable to being considered arbitrary or capricious. Adopting quantitative decision rules would remedy this but requires the agency to specify the relative urgency concerning extinction events over time, cutoff risk values corresponding to different levels of protection, and the importance given to different types of listing errors. We tested the performance of 3 sets of decision rules that use alternative functions for weighting the relative urgency of future extinction events: a threshold rule set, which uses a decision rule of x% probability of extinction over y years; a concave rule set, where the relative importance of future extinction events declines exponentially over time; and a shoulder rule set that uses a sigmoid shape function, where relative importance declines slowly at first and then more rapidly. We obtained decision cutoffs by interviewing several biologists and then emulated the listing process with simulations that covered a range of extinction risks typical of ESA listing decisions. We evaluated performance of the decision rules under different data quantities and qualities on the basis of the relative importance of misclassification errors. Although there was little difference between the performance of alternative decision rules for correct listings, the distribution of misclassifications differed depending on the function used. Misclassifications for the threshold and concave listing criteria resulted in more overprotection errors, particularly as uncertainty increased, whereas errors for the shoulder listing criteria were more symmetrical. We developed and tested the framework for quantitative decision rules for listing species under the U.S. ESA. If policy values can be agreed on, use of this framework would improve the implementation of the ESA by

  8. Yersinia enterocolitica and related species isolated from wildlife in New York State.

    OpenAIRE

    Shayegani, M; Stone, W B; DeForge, I; Root, T; Parsons, L M; Maupin, P

    1986-01-01

    Fecal specimens for Yersinia screening were obtained from a variety of wild mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, and invertebrates throughout New York State. One specimen from each of 1,426 animals was examined. A total of 148 isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica and related species were obtained from 133 (9.3%) of the animals. Y. enterocolitica was isolated from 100 (7%) of the animals tested, including 81 (10%) of 812 mammals and 19 (3.3%) of 573 birds. Y. intermedia, Y. frederiksenii, and Y. kri...

  9. Chilopoda Geophilomorpha of Europe: a revised list of species, with taxonomic and nomenclatorial notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Lucio; Minelli, Alessandro

    2014-03-03

    An annotated list is provided for the genera and species of Chilopoda Geophilomorpha recorded from Europe, including Macaronesia. The list derives from a critical evaluation of all published information. All synonyms are also listed and all taxonomic and nomenclatorial novelties are discussed. Additionally, all available genus-group and species-group names are listed, together with type species and type localities respectively.To date, 452 available species-group names and 95 available genus-group names have been applied to European geophilomorphs, together with another 10 unavailable names. A total of 179 species in 37 genera are provisionally recognized here, but the actual taxonomic identity of 84 of these species is uncertain because their morphology is in completely or imprecisely known. Another 5 species have been recorded from European localities but probably are not established in the wild, and another 8 species have been reported probably only erroneously. We introduce the following 116 new synonymies: Algerophilus hispanicus (Meinert, 1870) [= Geophilus arago nicus Daday, 1889], Bothriogaster signata (Kessler, 1874) [= Notiphilus taeniatus C.L. Koch, 1847, = N. sanguineus C.L. Koch, 1847, = B. affinis Sseliwanoff, 1879, = B. meinerti Sseliwanoff, 1879], Clinopodes C.L. Koch, 1847 [= Poabius C.L. Koch, 1847], Clinopodes carinthiacus (Latzel, 1880) [= Geophilus flavidus styriacus Attems, 1895, = G. trebevicensis poschiavensis Verhoeff, 1934], C. flavidus C.L. Koch, 1847 [= Geophilus flavidus pachypus Verhoeff, 1942, = G. flavidus faitanus Verhoeff, 1943, = G. flavidus improvisus Verhoeff, 1943, = G. flavidus karamani Verhoeff, 1943, = G. flavidus sorattinus Verhoeff, 1951], Dignathodon Meinert, 1870 [= Rhysonotum Attems, 1952], Escaryus retusidens Attems, 1904 [= E. retusidens pallidus Folkmanová, 1956], Geophilus Leach, 1814 [= Homalarthrus Agassiz, 1846, = Esthiomenus Gistel, 1847, = Geophilus (Anadenophilus) Verhoeff, 1928], Geophilus aetnensis Verhoeff

  10. Natural colonization and adaptation of a mosquito species in Galapagos and its implications for disease threats to endemic wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cunningham, Andrew A; Cedeño, Virna; Patiño, Leandro; Constantinou, Andreas; Kramer, Laura D; Goodman, Simon J

    2009-06-23

    Emerging infectious diseases of wildlife have been recognized as a major threat to global biodiversity. Endemic species on isolated oceanic islands, such as the Galápagos, are particularly at risk in the face of introduced pathogens and disease vectors. The black salt-marsh mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus) is the only mosquito widely distributed across the Galápagos Archipelago. Here we show that this mosquito naturally colonized the Galápagos before the arrival of man, and since then it has evolved to represent a distinct evolutionary unit and has adapted to habitats unusual for its coastal progenitor. We also present evidence that A. taeniorhynchus feeds on reptiles in Galápagos in addition to previously reported mammal and bird hosts, highlighting the important role this mosquito might play as a bridge-vector in the transmission and spread of extant and newly introduced diseases in the Galápagos Islands. These findings are particularly pertinent for West Nile virus, which can cause significant morbidity and mortality in mammals (including humans), birds, and reptiles, and which recently has spread from an introductory focus in New York to much of the North and South American mainland and could soon reach the Galápagos Islands. Unlike Hawaii, there are likely to be no highland refugia free from invading mosquito-borne diseases in Galápagos, suggesting bleak outcomes to possible future pathogen introduction events.

  11. Brucellosis in terrestrial wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroid, J; Garin-Bastuji, B; Saegerman, C; Blasco, J M

    2013-04-01

    The epidemiological link between brucellosis in wildlife and brucellosis in livestock and people is widely recognised. When studying brucellosis in wildlife, three questions arise: (i) Is this the result of a spillover from livestock or a sustainable infection in one or more host species of wildlife? (ii) Does wildlife brucellosis represent a reservoir of Brucella strains for livestock? (iii) Is it of zoonotic concern? Despite their different host preferences, B. abortus and B. suis have been isolated from a variety of wildlife species, whereas B. melitensis is rarely reported in wildlife. The pathogenesis of Brucella spp. in wildlife reservoirs is not yet fully defined. The prevalence of brucellosis in some wildlife species is very low and thus the behaviour of individual animals, and interactions between wildlife and livestock, may be the most important drivers for transmission. Since signs of the disease are non-pathognomonic, definitive diagnosis depends on laboratory testing, including indirect tests that can be applied to blood or milk, as well as direct tests (classical bacteriology and methods based on the polymerase chain reaction [PCR]). However, serological tests cannot determine which Brucella species has induced anti-Brucella antibodies in the host. Only the isolation of Brucella spp. (or specific DNA detection by PCR) allows a definitive diagnosis, using classical or molecular techniques to identify and type specific strains. There is as yet no brucellosis vaccine that demonstrates satisfactory safety and efficacy in wildlife. Therefore, controlling brucellosis in wildlife should be based on good management practices. At present, transmission of Brucella spp. from wildlife to humans seems to be linked to the butchering of meat and dressing of infected wild or feral pig carcasses in thedeveloped world, and infected African buffalo in the developing world. In the Arctic, the traditional consumption of raw bone marrow and the internal organs of freshly

  12. Two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera: Calcarea) from the deep Antarctic Eckström Shelf and a revised list of species found in Antarctic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Hans Tore; Göcke, Christian; Tendal, Ole Secher

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Calcarea) from the Antarctic Weddell Sea, Clathrina brandtae sp. nov. and Leucetta delicata sp. nov., collected at 600 m depth during the ANT XXIV/2-SYSTCO expedition in January 2008. The new species are described based...... on a combination of morphological and molecular data. With these new additions the number of species of calcareous sponges reported from south of 50 degrees S (similar to south of the Polar Front) reaches 50 species. We report an exceptionally high degree of endemism within the group, and as many as 44 out...... of the 50 species of calcareous sponges are solely confined to Antarctic waters. An updated list of species of calcareous sponges from the area is provided....

  13. Two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera: Calcarea) from the deep Antarctic Eckstrom Shelf and a revised list of species found in Antarctic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Hans Tore; Göcke, Christian; Tendal, Ole Secher

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Calcarea) from the Antarctic Weddell Sea, Clathrina brandtae sp. nov. and Leucetta delicata sp. nov., collected at 600 m depth during the ANT XXIV/2-SYSTCO expedition in January 2008. The new species are described based...... on a combination of morphological and molecular data. With these new additions the number of species of calcareous sponges reported from south of 50 degrees S (similar to south of the Polar Front) reaches 50 species. We report an exceptionally high degree of endemism within the group, and as many as 44 out...... of the 50 species of calcareous sponges are solely confined to Antarctic waters. An updated list of species of calcareous sponges from the area is provided....

  14. Endangered and Threatened Species at Kennedy Space Center Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdolfi, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Throughout my internship, I assisted with the long-term monitoring of the Florida Scrub- Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a threatened species endemic to Florida. The Florida Scrub Jay diet consists of insects and small vertebrates throughout most of the year; however, during the winter their primary diet is acorns because the insect population is low. Furthermore, the Florida Scrub-Jay is a habitat specialist that lives in a disappearing plant community called the scrub, which consists of sand live oak, myrtle oak and chapman oak. The Florida Scrub-Jay is considered threatened because its numbers are decreasing primarily due to the loss of habitat that it needs to survive. Scrub habitat is highly desirable for human development because it is high, dry, and sandy. Periodic controlled burns maintain the scrub in a low, open condition favored by Scrub-Jays. Florida Scrub-Jays build their nests approximately 3-5 feet (approximately 1.5 m) above the ground in shrubby oaks (Breininger 153), mate for life and are cooperative breeders; which means that the young jays remain in their natal territory for at least a year to help their parents defend their territory, feed the young, and mob predators. (Breininger 152). I assisted in conducting monthly censuses at long-term monitoring sites and a juvenile in July survey to determine reproductive success for the year. In addition, to Scrub-Jay monitoring, I also had the opportunity to assist with some long term monitoring of ecosystem recovery. Scrub is a fire maintained system. Fire maintains the structure of scrub necessary for many of the threatened species that reside in the scrub habitat.

  15. Yersinia enterocolitica and related species isolated from wildlife in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayegani, M; Stone, W B; DeForge, I; Root, T; Parsons, L M; Maupin, P

    1986-01-01

    Fecal specimens for Yersinia screening were obtained from a variety of wild mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, and invertebrates throughout New York State. One specimen from each of 1,426 animals was examined. A total of 148 isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica and related species were obtained from 133 (9.3%) of the animals. Y. enterocolitica was isolated from 100 (7%) of the animals tested, including 81 (10%) of 812 mammals and 19 (3.3%) of 573 birds. Y. intermedia, Y. frederiksenii, and Y. kristensenii were isolated from 39 (2.7%), 5 (0.35%), and 4 (0.28%) animals, respectively. The 81 Y. enterocolitica isolates from mammals belonged to 15 serogroups and included three pathogens: two isolates of typical serogroup 0:8, the "American strain," one from a gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and one from a porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum); and one isolate of serogroup 0:3, bacteriophage type IXb, the "Canadian strain," from a gray fox. The most prevalent serogroups recovered from mammals were 0:6,31 (16 isolates) and 0:5,27 (6 isolates). The 19 isolates of Y. enterocolitica from birds belonged to nine serogroups and included one serogroup 0:6,31 isolate from a common grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) and two serogroup 0:5,27 isolates from great horned owls (Bubo virginianus). PMID:3767355

  16. Plantings for wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel B. Kirby; Claude L. Ponder; Donald J. Smith

    1989-01-01

    Grains, forages, and other vegetation can be planted to provide critical habitat for desired wildlife species or to increase habitat diversity. Plantings may be in openings created in the forest (see Note 9.11 Wildlife Openings) or along the forest edge in cultivated or pastured fields if protected from domestic livestock. The first step in determining if and what type...

  17. Heap leach cyanide irrigation and risk to wildlife: Ramifications for the international cyanide management code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, D B; Madden-Hallett, D M; Smith, G B; Gursansky, W

    2017-06-01

    Exposed cyanide-bearing solutions associated with gold and silver recovery processes in the mining industry pose a risk to wildlife that interact with these solutions. This has been documented with cyanide-bearing tailings storage facilities, however risks associated with heap leach facilities are poorly documented, monitored and audited. Gold and silver leaching heap leach facilities use cyanide, pH-stabilised, at concentrations deemed toxic to wildlife. Their design and management are known to result in exposed cyanide-bearing solutions that are accessible to and present a risk to wildlife. Monitoring of the presence of exposed solutions, wildlife interaction, interpretation of risks and associated wildlife deaths are poorly documented. This paper provides a list of critical monitoring criteria and attempts to predict wildlife guilds most at risk. Understanding the significance of risks to wildlife from exposed cyanide solutions is complex, involving seasonality, relative position of ponding, temporal nature of ponding, solution palatability, environmental conditions, in situ wildlife species inventory and provision of alternative drinking sources for wildlife. Although a number of heap leach operations are certified as complaint with the International Cyanide Management Code (Cyanide Code), these criteria are not considered by auditors nor has systematic monitoring regime data been published. Without systematic monitoring and further knowledge, wildlife deaths on heap leach facilities are likely to remain largely unrecorded. This has ramifications for those operations certified as compliance with the Cyanide Code. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 50 CFR 31.1 - Determination of surplus wildlife populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination of surplus wildlife populations. 31.1 Section 31.1 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDLIFE SPECIES MANAGEMENT Surplus...

  19. Exploring Wildlife, Unit 1, Colorado Division of Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jon K.; Smith, Dwight R.

    This booklet on wildlife is part of a series to encourage youth to pursue environmental projects. The booklet discusses various aspects of wildlife management such as life zones, pollution, predator control, game stocking, habitat improvement, hunting, legislation, and careers. Key words are defined, and suggested activities are listed. (MR)

  20. 76 FR 76386 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 5-Year Reviews for 4 Distinct Population Segments of Steelhead...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... ESA, a list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plant species must be maintained. The list is published at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for plants). Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the ESA requires that... species' freshwater and estuarine geographic boundaries. At the end of this process, the Center prepared a...

  1. Interim Report -Herpetofaunal inventory and occurrence species mapping in the Culebra National Wildlife Refuge’s offshore cays.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is designed to address the inventory of herpetofauna on the 12 cays of Culebra NWR and determine if the Virgin Island tree boa or the giant anole are...

  2. 75 FR 8293 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jim Serfis, Chief, Branch of Candidate Conservation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 4401... entitled Amphibians, in the discussion of ``Mountain yellow-legged frog, Sierra Nevada DPS (Rana muscosa...

  3. Proposal - Herpetofaunal inventory and occurrence species mapping in the Culebra National Wildlife Refuge’s offshore cays.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is designed to address the inventory of herpetofauna on the 12 cays of Culebra NWR and determine if the Virgin Island tree boa or the giant anole are...

  4. The Wildlife in Your Backyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDruff, Larry

    1979-01-01

    Urban environments often provide wildlife habitat. In addition to such open areas as parks and cemeteries, and such natural areas as may exist along rivers and streams, manmade structures may approximate habitat sought by some species and may attract wildlife. Actions to attract wildlife in the urban setting are suggested. (RE)

  5. Legalizing markets and the consequences for poaching of wildlife species: the vicuña as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Ryan R J; McNeill, Desmond; Gordon, Iain J

    2009-01-01

    Vicuña provide an excellent case study for examining the sustainable use of wildlife outside protected areas: the community-based conservation approach. Vicuña populations in the high Andes of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador and Perú fell to a critically low level, but a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) ban on trade in their fiber has seen numbers recover dramatically, and now live shearing of vicuña for a high-value international market is being promoted as a mechanism to secure both sustainable vicuña populations and local livelihoods. We used a dynamic optimization model to explore the consequences of legalizing markets, including the consequences for poaching which is critical in vicuña dynamics. Using parameters obtained from the literature and expert knowledge, we explored different scenarios for the Argentine region of Cieneguillas. Our results showed that the role of the international market is ambiguous; live shearing for an international market can provide the very best of outcomes for both vicuña and local people, with large herds generating high revenues. But an international market also creates a market for poached vicuña fiber; as a result, vicuña numbers risk once again falling to critically low levels, resulting also in minimal revenues from sale of fiber. The message for the international community is that if community-based conservation is not implemented carefully then its impact can easily be perverse.

  6. Wildlife Species, Potential habitat layer for Forest Interior Dwelling Species in the State of Maryland. These data are only the results of a model depicting where FIDS habitat might occur based on certain criteria. These polygons have NOT been field tested or field verifi, Published in 2006, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Wildlife Species dataset current as of 2006. Potential habitat layer for Forest Interior Dwelling Species in the State of Maryland. These data are only the results...

  7. 78 FR 17708 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Supplement to the Grizzly Bear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document... availability of a draft Revised Supplement to the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan. Specifically, this supplement..., Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) are federally listed as threatened under the Endangered Species...

  8. 78 FR 25243 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 15 Species on Hawaii Island as Endangered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... confirmed by the Oxford Museum on Natural History and the Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Department of Marine Zoology, through the examination of two specimens collected by the Hawaii Department of Natural...

  9. 78 FR 6785 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 38 Species on Molokai, Lanai, and Maui as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... habitat, such as time delays, regulatory uncertainty, and negative perceptions related to critical habitat..., farming, or other economic activities due to the rugged mountain terrain and remote location. As a result...

  10. 78 FR 66675 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Multiple Species of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ..., Excel, or Adobe PDF file formats only. Copies of the petition and related materials are available upon... surface of the bottom sediments, but are also quick to scavenge dead fish and whales. Females lay a small... discusses the increase in the number and size of ``dead zones'' (i.e., areas of very low levels of dissolved...

  11. 78 FR 63941 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 23 Species of Corals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... of dead zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico is from an area outside the range of the petitioned... ENSO. However, after a second ENSO in 1997-98, all known colonies were found dead (Glynn et al., 2001...

  12. 78 FR 64691 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Five Foreign Bird Species in Colombia and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    .... 5-8; Cuervo and Salaman 1999, p. 8). Cracids are slow to reproduce, with a replacement rate of at... intense pressures from human colonization and illegal crop cultivation (Vi a et al. 2004, p. 124). The...: forest clearing for subsistence agriculture, cash crops (such as coffee), and grazing (BLI 2007d, p. 3...

  13. A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radioactive substances from molecules to populations in wildlife species - A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radionuclides from molecules to populations in wildlife species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, Frederic; Parisot, Florian; Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier- Laplace, Jacqueline [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul- Lez-Durance, 13115 (France)

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how toxic contaminants affect wildlife species at various levels of biological organisation (sub-cellular, histological, physiological, organism, population levels) is a major research goal in both ecotoxicology and radioecology. A mechanistic understanding of the links between the different observed perturbations is necessary to predict consequences for survival, growth and reproduction which are critical for population dynamics. However, time scales at which such links are established in the laboratory are rarely relevant for natural populations. With a small size and short life cycle, the cladoceran micro-crustacean Daphnia magna is a particularly suitable biological model for studying effects of radioactive contaminants over several generations. Multi-generational exposures are much more representative of the environmental context of field populations for which contaminations can last for durations which largely exceed individual longevity and involve exposure of many successive generations. Over the last decade, multi-generational investigations of toxic effects were conducted under controlled conditions in D. magna exposed to various radionuclides including depleted uranium, americium-241 and cesium-137, representing respectively a dominantly chemo-toxic metal, an alpha internal contamination and a gamma external radiation. Results showed in all cases that toxic effects on physiology and life history (survival, body size, fecundity) increased in severity across generations. These observations demonstrated that measured effects in one generation might not be representative of toxicity in the following offspring generations, and ultimately of the population response. Reduction in somatic growth and reproduction induced by uranium were analysed using the mechanistic modelling approach known as DEBtox (model of dynamic energy budget applied to toxicology). Modelling results suggested that uranium primarily affects assimilation. This metabolic mode

  14. Human–wildlife interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Rosell, C. (Carlos); Llimona, F.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of wildlife management throughout the world is changing. The increase in the world’s human population has been accompanied by a rapid expansion of agricultural and urban areas and infrastructures, especially road and railway networks. Worldwide, wildlife habitats are being transformed and fragmented by human activities, and the behavior of several species has changed as a result of human activities. Some species have adapted easily to urban or peri–urban habitats and take advantage...

  15. Fish and wildlife surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the monitoring of radioactive contaminants in fish and wildlife species that inhabit the Colombia River and Hanford Site. Wildlife have access to areas of the Site containing radioactive contamination, and fish can be exposed to contamination in spring water entering the river along the shoreline. Therefore, samples are collected at various locations annually, generally during the hunting or fishing season, for selected species.

  16. Wildlife forestry: Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife forestry is management of forest resources, within sites and across landscapes, to provide sustainable, desirable habitat conditions for all forest-dependent (silvicolous) fauna while concurrently yielding economically viable, quality timber products. In practice, however, management decisions associated with wildlife forestry often reflect a desire to provide suitable habitat for rare species, species with declining populations, and exploitable (i.e., game) species. Collectively, these species are deemed priority species and they are assumed to benefit from habitat conditions that result from prescribed silvicultural management actions.

  17. Proposal - Mapping of Six Federally Endangered Listed Plants and Surveying the Population Status of Eugenia woodburyana at La Tinaja, Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge. Lajas, Puerto Rico

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal concerns the distribution and relative abundance of 5 federally endangered plants endemic to Puerto Rico and specifically on Laguna Cartagena National...

  18. 50 CFR 15.32 - Criteria for including species in the approved list for non-captive-bred species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... where the species forages (aerial feeder, tree canopy, tree trunk, midstory, understory, open water or... species and its habitats. Incentives for conservation may be generated by environmental education... this decision, the Director shall consider in addition to the general criteria in part 13 of this...

  19. Propagation, mapping and re-introducing rare species to restored bogs and wet pine savanna in Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this project was to support the US Fish and Wildlife Service wet prairie and seepage slope restoration at Big Branch Marsh National Wildlife Refuge....

  20. Towards informed and multi-faceted wildlife trade interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W.S. Challender

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available International trade in wildlife is a key threat to biodiversity conservation. CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, seeks to ensure international wildlife trade is sustainable, relying on trade bans and controls. However, there has been little comprehensive review of its effectiveness and here we review approaches taken to regulate wildlife trade in CITES. Although assessing its effectiveness is problematic, we assert that CITES boasts few measurable conservation successes. We attribute this to: non-compliance, an over reliance on regulation, lack of knowledge and monitoring of listed species, ignorance of market forces, and influence among CITES actors. To more effectively manage trade we argue that interventions should go beyond regulation and should be multi-faceted, reflecting the complexity of wildlife trade. To inform these interventions we assert an intensive research effort is needed around six key areas: (1 factors undermining wildlife trade governance at the national level, (2 determining sustainable harvest rates for, and adaptive management of CITES species, (3 gaining the buy-in of local communities in implementing CITES, (4 supply and demand based market interventions, (5 means of quantifying illicit trade, and (6 political processes and influence within CITES.

  1. 78 FR 19510 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 56 Species in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... longirostris Mexico (Baja 1969. Bridges, 760-431- Wildlife Service, levipes. California). 9440 (phone... 54938; 10/13/ Bradd Baskerville-Bridges (above). thornmint. Mexico. 1998. Acanthoscyphus (Oxytheca...). clarkia. 1998. Cordylanthus maritimus subsp. Salt marsh bird's Endangered........ U.S.A. (CA), 43 FR 44810...

  2. Spatial statistics for modeling of abundance and distribution of wildlife species in the Masai Mara ecosystem, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaemba, W.M.; Stein, A.

    2001-01-01

    This study illustrates the use of modern statistical procedures for better wildlife management by addressing three key issues: determination of abundance, modeling of animal distributions and variability of diversity in space and time. Prior information in Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods is

  3. 76 FR 22139 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Three Species in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ..., please support it with documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods used to gather and... Wildlife Service, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of initiation of reviews; request for information; reopening... of 1973, as amended (Act). See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION for details. Because we may not have...

  4. 75 FR 18233 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 10 Southeastern Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ..., bibliographic references, methods used to gather and analyze the data, and/or copies of any pertinent...; request for information. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are initiating 5-year... conduct these reviews, we must receive your comments or information on or before June 8, 2010. However, we...

  5. 75 FR 18232 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 15 Caribbean Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... be supported by documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods used to gather and...; request for information. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), are initiating 5-year... conduct this review, we must receive your comments or information on or before June 8, 2010. However, we...

  6. Comparison of herbage yield, nutritive value and ensilability traits of three ryegrass species evaluated for the Irish Recommended List

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns G. A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined 169 of the newest varieties of three ryegrass species, perennial (Lolium perenne L., Italian (Lolium multiflorum Lam. and hybrid (Lolium boucheanum Kunth, from Recommended List trials in Ireland. The traits examined were yield, dry matter concentration, three nutritive value traits (in vitro dry matter digestibility, water-soluble carbohydrate on a dry matter basis and crude protein concentration and two ensilability traits (buffering capacity and water soluble carbohydrate concentration on an aqueous phase basis. Varietal monocultures of each species underwent a six cut combined simulated grazing and silage management in each of two years following sowing. Perennial ryegrass yielded less than both other species in one-year-old swards, but less than only Italian ryegrass in two-year-old swards, but generally had the higher in vitro dry matter digestibility and crude protein values. Italian ryegrass displayed the most favourable ensilability characteristics of the three species with perennial ryegrass less favourable and hybrid ryegrass intermediate. Overall, despite the high yields and favourable nutritive value and ensilability traits recorded, the general differences between the three ryegrass species studied were in line with industry expectations. These findings justify assessing the nutritive value and ensilability of ryegrass species, in addition to yield, to allow farmers select species that match farming enterprise requirements.

  7. Zoological researches in Liberia. List of Mollusca, with descriptions of new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepman, M.M.

    1888-01-01

    The following paper contains a complete list of the Mollusks, collected during the travels of Messrs. Büttikofer and Sala (1879—1882), of Mr. Stampfli, sent out by Mr. Büttikofer after his return from Liberia (1884—1885), and of a second visit to that country by Büttikofer and Stampfli (1886—1887).

  8. Invasive species

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of management activities and research related to invasive species on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. As part of the...

  9. List of documented bird species from the municipality of Ubatuba, state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Simpson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although preliminary surveys have been conducted at the Atlantic Forest of Ubatuba, there is no list of documented bird records from this coastline municipality. To organize such a compilation, we searched the literature and a number of different sources for all documented records of birds from Ubatuba, state of São Paulo. We further carried out a 7-year non-systematic bird inventory in different regions and elevations to document the species within the municipality. The total number of documented bird species is 417, 11% of which are endemic to Brazil. Another 26% are Atlantic Forest endemics and as many as 60 species are under threat categories, including near-threatened birds, in the state. Some 49 species of 27 families are reported from the municipality but still lack documentation. Considering historical records, no species have extinguished from the municipality. Ubatuba is one of the most studied regions along Serra do Mar in São Paulo regarding its ornithology, but there are still high-elevational gaps that will yield significant additions of species to the area with increasing surveying efforts.

  10. Inventory Plan for Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a wildlife inventory plan for Merritt Island, Pelican Island and St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge system. Species selected were based on the Refuge...

  11. Quivira National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2001 calendar year. A list of the year’s highlights is...

  12. Public Waterfowl Hunting Environmental Assessment for Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary objective of this environmental assessment is to add Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge to the Code of Federal Regulations list of refuges open to...

  13. Grassland Management Plan : Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Grassland Management Plan for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge provides an overview of the Refuge, a list of special considerations affecting grassland...

  14. Improve wildlife species tracking—Implementing an enhanced global positioning system data management system for California condors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltermire, Robert G.; Emmerich, Christopher U.; Mendenhall, Laura C.; Bohrer, Gil; Weinzierl, Rolf P.; McGann, Andrew J.; Lineback, Pat K.; Kern, Tim J.; Douglas, David C.

    2016-05-03

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) staff in the Pacific Southwest Region and at the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex requested technical assistance to improve their global positioning system (GPS) data acquisition, management, and archive in support of the California Condor Recovery Program. The USFWS deployed and maintained GPS units on individual Gymnogyps californianus (California condor) in support of long-term research and daily operational monitoring and management of California condors. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) obtained funding through the Science Support Program to provide coordination among project participants, provide GPS Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) transmitters for testing, and compare GSM/GPS with existing Argos satellite GPS technology. The USFWS staff worked with private companies to design, develop, and fit condors with GSM/GPS transmitters. The Movebank organization, an online database of animal tracking data, coordinated with each of these companies to automatically stream their GPS data into Movebank servers and coordinated with USFWS to improve Movebank software for managing transmitter data, including proofing/error checking of incoming GPS data. The USGS arranged to pull raw GPS data from Movebank into the USGS California Condor Management and Analysis Portal (CCMAP) (https://my.usgs.gov/ccmap) for production and dissemination of a daily map of condor movements including various automated alerts. Further, the USGS developed an automatic archiving system for pulling raw and proofed Movebank data into USGS ScienceBase to comply with the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002. This improved data management system requires minimal manual intervention resulting in more efficient data flow from GPS data capture to archive status. As a result of the project’s success, Pinnacles National Park and the Ventana Wildlife Society California condor programs became partners and adopted the same

  15. Black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae of French Guiana: cytotaxonomy and a preliminary list of species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Hamada

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to broaden the survey of simuliid species in French Guiana and to cytologically analyze the species in the Simulium perflavum species group. Twelve species of Simulium were collected from which S. goeldii, S. quadrifidum, S. trombetense, S. near incrustatum, S. metallicum (s.l. sp1, S. metallicum (s.l. sp2 and S. ochraceum (s.l. are reported for the first time for this region. The only species collected in the S. perflavum group was S. rorotaense; 34 larvae of this species were cytologically analyzed, all of which had the standard sequence. S. metallicum (s.l., S. ochraceum (s.l., S. guianense (s.l. and S. oyapockense (s.l. are involved with transmission of onchocerciasis in Central and South America, however, in French Guiana these species were not found biting humans during the sampling period. With the few collections made during this study, we increase the number of simulid species known in French Guiana from 6 to 13. It is clear that more simuliid species can be expected to be found when more sampling is done, including collections in other ecoregions in French Guiana.

  16. Quantification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Strains Representing Distinct Genotypes and Isolated from Domestic and Wildlife Animal Species by Use of an Automatic Liquid Culture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker; Prieto, José M.; Garrido, Joseba M.; Juste, Ramon A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of 11 clinical strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolated from domestic (cattle, sheep, and goat) and wildlife (fallow deer, deer, wild boar, and bison) animal species in an automatic liquid culture system (Bactec MGIT 960) was accomplished. The strains were previously isolated and typed using IS1311 PCR followed by restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA) into type C, S, or B. A strain-specific quantification curve was generated for each M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain by relating the time to detection in the liquid culture system to the estimated log10 CFU in each inoculum. According to their growth curves, the tested M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were classified into two distinct groups. The first group included the S-type strain isolated from goat and all the sheep strains with C, S, and B genotypes. A second group contained the C- and B-type strains isolated from cattle, goat, and wildlife animals with the exception of the fallow deer strain. The strains isolated from cattle or sheep showed similar strain-specific standard curves irrespective of their genotype. In contrast, the strains isolated from goat or from wildlife animal species varied in their rates of growth in liquid culture. Universal-standard curves and algorithms for the quantification of each group of strains were generated. In addition, the liquid culture system was compared with a real-time quantitative PCR system for the quantification of the 11 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains. Correlations between the estimated log10 CFU and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA copy numbers were very high for all the tested strains (R ≥ 0.9). PMID:22649014

  17. Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Endangered Species Protection Program helps promote recovery of listed species. The ESPP determines if pesticide use in a geographic area may affect any listed species. Find needed limits on pesticide use in Endangered Species Protection Bulletins.

  18. CITES Under the Lens of the IUCN Red List

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouvet, Lionel; Conde, Dalia Amor; Stärk, Johanna

    The illegal international wildlife trade is a major threat to biodiversity by directly diminishing populations numbers. Additional threats are the potential introduction of invasive species and the spread of diseases, either due to intentional or accidental releases of confiscated animals...... of species under CITES is mainly based on the species extinction risk, on which export quotas are determined. Here we analyzed which species listed in CITES overlap with those listed as threated by human extraction under the IUCN Red List. Additionally, we assessed for how many species it is possible......, which can flag CITES and IUCN Specialist Groups (SSC) of possible important overlaps to consider. Moreover, with the connection to animal life history databases, and experts from the SSC it will be possible to obtain better data to estimate quotas. These will certainly promote a closer collaboration...

  19. Odonata de Uruguay: lista de especies y nuevos registros Odonata from Uruguay: species list and new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Von Ellenrieder

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Se proporciona una lista de las 70 especies citadas para Uruguay. Catorce de ellas constituyen nuevos registros para el país: Mnesarete pruinosa (Hagen en Selys [Calopterygidae, Acanthagrion lancea Selys, A. peruvianum Leonard, Argia serva Hagen en Selys y Oxyagrion chapadense Costa (Coenagrionidae, Neoneura ethela Williamson (Protoneuridae, Progomphus costalis Hagen en Selys (Gomphidae, Elasmothemis constricta (Calvert, Erythrodiplax basalis (Kirby, Erythrodiplax media Borror, Micrathyria hypodidyma Calvert, Micrathyria ringueleti Rodrigues Capitulo, Orthemis ambinigra Calvert y Perithemis icteroptera (Selys en Sagra (Libelullidae.A list of 70 species known to occur in Uruguay is given. Fourteen species are new country records: Mnesarete pruinosa (Hagen in Selys (Calopterygidae, Acanthagrion lancea Selys, A. peruvianum Leonard, Argia serva Hagen in Selys, and Oxyagrion chapadense Costa (Coenagrionidae, Neoneura ethela Williamson (Protoneuridae, Progomphus costalis Hagen in Selys (Gomphidae, Elasmothemis constricta (Calvert, Erythrodiplax basalis (Kirby, Erythrodiplax media Borror, Micrathyria hypodidyma Calvert, Micrathyria ringueleti Rodrigues Capitulo, Orthemis ambinigra Calvert, and Perithemis icteroptera (Selys in Sagra (Libelullidae.

  20. Phage display allows identification of zona pellucida-binding peptides with species-specific properties: novel approach for development of contraceptive vaccines for wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Schemera, Bettina; Breiteneicher, Adam H; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Petrenko, Valery A; Cox, Nancy R

    2012-12-31

    Multiple phage-peptide constructs, where the peptides mimic sperm epitopes that bind to zona pellucida (ZP) proteins, were generated via selection from a phage display library using a novel approach. Selections were designed to allow for identification of ZP-binding phage clones with potential species-specific properties, an important feature for wildlife oral vaccines as the goal is to control overpopulation of a target species while not affecting non-target species' reproduction. Six phage-peptide antigens were injected intramuscularly into pigs and corresponding immune responses evaluated. Administration of the antigens into pigs stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies, which were shown to act as anti-sperm antibodies. Potentially, such anti-sperm antibodies could interfere with sperm delivery or function in the male or female genital tract, leading to contraceptive effects. Staining of semen samples collected from different mammalian species, including pig, cat, dog, bull, and mouse, with anti-sera from pigs immunized with ZP-binding phage allowed identification of phage-peptide constructs with different levels of species specificity. Based on the intensity of the immune responses and specificity of these responses in different species, two of the antigens with fusion peptide sequences GEGGYGSHD and GQQGLNGDS were recognized as the most promising candidates for development of contraceptive vaccines for wild pigs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 77 FR 24975 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for the Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability... recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is federally listed as threatened... preparation of the final revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog. The Service and other Federal...

  2. 75 FR 57055 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan for Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... for Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document... availability of a draft revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is.... The Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens), found only in southwestern and central Utah, was listed as...

  3. Wildlife Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Karstoft, Henrik

    This report contains a progress report for the ph.d. project titled “Wildlife Communication”. The project focuses on investigating how signal processing and pattern recognition can be used to improve wildlife management in agriculture. Wildlife management systems used today experience habituation...... from wild animals which makes them ineffective. An intelligent wildlife management system could monitor its own effectiveness and alter its scaring strategy based on this...

  4. Wildlife Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Beth; And Others

    This pocket folder of instructional materials is designed to introduce youths aged 9 to 12 to the nature and needs of wildlife and to give children the opportunity to search for wildlife and their signs. The document includes a member's guide, a leader's guide, field record forms, and wildlife project materials. The illustrated 4-H member's guide…

  5. Wildlife Habitat Models for Terrestrial Vertebrates

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project developed habitat capability models for representative wildlife species. It was part of a project led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst to...

  6. Furbearer Trapping Plan : Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge Trapping Plan outlines trapping areas, species, regulations, equipment and seasons. This plan will allow harvest of a...

  7. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, prairie ecology, ecological and plant...

  8. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), nest predation, weed control, ecological and plant...

  9. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, ecological and plant succession, and public...

  10. 75 FR 15454 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 14 Southwestern Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... citation ANIMALS Alamosa springsnail Tryonia alamosae.. Endangered........ U.S.A. (NM)....... September 30... vertebrate, which interbreeds when mature. B. Endangered species (E) means any species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. C. Threatened species (T) means any species...

  11. DNA Barcoding of Malagasy Rosewoods: Towards a Molecular Identification of CITES-Listed Dalbergia Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassold, Sonja; Lowry, Porter P; Bauert, Martin R; Razafintsalama, Annick; Ramamonjisoa, Lolona; Widmer, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Illegal selective logging of tropical timber is of increasing concern worldwide. Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot and home to some of the world's most sought after tropical timber species. Malagasy rosewoods belong to the genus Dalbergia (Fabaceae), which is highly diverse and has a pantropical distribution, but these timber species are among the most threatened as a consequence of intensive illegal selective logging and deforestation. Reliable identification of Dalbergia species from Madagascar is important for law enforcement but is almost impossible without fertile plant material, which is often unavailable during forest inventories or when attempting to identify logged trees of cut wood. DNA barcoding has been promoted as a promising tool for species identification in such cases. In this study we tested whether DNA barcoding with partial sequences of three plastid markers (matK, rbcL and trnL (UAA)) can distinguish between Dalbergia from Madagascar and from other areas of its distributional range, and whether Malagasy species can be distinguished from one another. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Malagasy Dalbergia species studied form two monophyletic groups, each containing two subgroups, only one of which corresponds to a single species. We characterized diagnostic polymorphisms in the three DNA barcoding markers that allow rapid discrimination between Dalbergia from Madagascar and from other areas of its distribution range. Species identification success based on individual barcoding markers or combinations was poor, whereas subgroup identification success was much higher (up to 98%), revealing both the value and limitations of a DNA barcoding approach for the identification of closely related Malagasy rosewoods.

  12. 50 CFR 222.103 - Federal/state cooperation in the conservation of endangered and threatened species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of resident species listed as endangered or threatened. In order for a state program to be deemed an... threatened resident species, the conservation of which may be enhanced by cooperation of such states, jointly... conservation of endangered and threatened species. 222.103 Section 222.103 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL...

  13. Endangered Species on Military Training Lands: Cooperation Between the Military Services and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-17

    marine mammals, 16 U.S.C. 1361-1385 (1985 & 1994 Supp.); Whales, 16 U.S.C. 916-916 1 (1985); African Elephant , 16 U.S.C. 4201-4215 (1994 Supp.). Fish... Elephants : No Place to Hide, New Scientist, Jan. 15, 1994, at 34. 36. E. Grumbine, Protecting Diversity through the Greater Ecosystem Concept, 10 Natural...foreign countries to find alternatives to deforestation, to prevent poaching of imperiled wildlife, and to protect vital water and soil resources. On 4

  14. EnviroAtlas - NatureServe Analysis of Imperiled or Federally Listed Species by HUC-12 for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset includes analysis by NatureServe of species that are Imperiled (G1/G2) or Listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) by 12-digit...

  15. Zoantharia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) of the South China Sea and Gulf of Thailand: a species list based on past reports and new photographic records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, J.D.; Wee, H.B.; Put, A.; Hoeksema, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    This study is the first review of Zoantharia species in the South China Sea and Gulf of Thailand. In addition to past literature records, new field observations are added from previously unexamined countries and regions. In total 16 species are listed, 15 of which belong to suborder Brachycnemina,

  16. Feasibility of using high-resolution satellite imagery to assess vertebrate wildlife populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Michelle A; Stapleton, Seth; Anderson, Morgan

    2017-02-01

    Although remote sensing has been used for >40 years to learn about Earth, use of very high-resolution satellite imagery (VHR) (<1-m resolution) has become more widespread over the past decade for studying wildlife. As image resolution increases, there is a need to understand the capabilities and limitations of this exciting new path in wildlife research. We reviewed studies that used VHR to examine remote populations of wildlife. We then determined characteristics of the landscape and the life history of species that made the studies amenable to use of satellite imagery and developed a list of criteria necessary for appropriate use of VHR in wildlife research. From 14 representative articles, we determined 3 primary criteria that must be met for a system and species to be appropriately studied with VHR: open landscape, target organism's color contrasts with the landscape, and target organism is of detectable size. Habitat association, temporal exclusivity, coloniality, landscape differentiation, and ground truthing increase the utility of VHR for wildlife research. There is an immediate need for VHR imagery in conservation research, particularly in remote areas of developing countries, where research can be difficult. For wildlife researchers interested in but unfamiliar with remote sensing resources and tools, understanding capabilities and current limitations of VHR imagery is critical to its use as a conservation and wildlife research tool. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Streblidae (Diptera: Hippoboscoidea) from Yucatan and Updated Species List for Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuxim-Koyoc, Alan; Reyes-Novelo, Enrique; Morales-Malacara, Juan B; Bolívar-Cimé, Beatriz; Laborde, Javier

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the diversity of ectoparasitic bat flies (Diptera: Streblidae) in the state of Yucatan, Mexico. Fieldwork was carried out from June 2010 to January 2012 in seven municipalities of Yucatan, where 13 sampling sites were selected to capture bats using mist nets. Over 156 sampling nights a total of 910 bats were captured; these belonged to 19 species in four families: Mormoopidae, Phyllostomidae, Natalidae, and Vespertilionidae. Phyllostomidae was the richest family (13 bat species), followed by Mormoopidae (3 spp.), Vespertilionidae (2 spp.), and Natalidae (1 spp.). After careful inspection of the bats, a total of 2,134 Streblid bat flies were collected, belonging to 17 species in six genera (Nycterophilia coxata Ferris, N. natali Wenzel, Trichobius diphyllae Wenzel, T. dugesii Townsend, T. galei Wenzel, T. hirsutulus Bequaert, T. intermedius Peterson and Hurka, T. parasiticus Gervais, T. uniformis Curran, T. yunkeri Wenzel, Megistopoda aranea Coquillett, M. proxima Séguy, Aspidoptera delatorrei Wenzel, Strebla alvarezi Wenzel, S. diphyllae Wenzel, S. wiedemanni Kolenati, and Metelasmus pseudopterus Coquillett). The richest and most diverse genus was Trichobius. Five species--N. natali, T. diphyllae, M. proxima, A. delatorrei, and M. pseudopterus, are new records for Yucatan, and T. galei is a new record for the country, increasing the total number of Streblidae species for Mexico to 49. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. An updated comprehensive annotated list of the butterflies (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera) occurring at Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex Stutsman County, North Dakota 1995-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Ron

    1996-01-01

    A project to produce a comprehensive, site-specific butterfly list that could serve as a basis for future monitoring of butterfly populations and as an aid in making management decisions for the area.

  19. Tuberculosis in Tanzanian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaveland, S; Mlengeya, T; Kazwala, R R; Michel, A; Kaare, M T; Jones, S L; Eblate, E; Shirima, G M; Packer, C

    2005-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a pathogen of growing concern in free-ranging wildlife in Africa, but little is known about the disease in Tanzanian wildlife. Here, we report the infection status of Mycobacterium bovis in a range of wildlife species sampled from protected areas in northern Tanzania. M. bovis was isolated from 11.1% (2/18) migratory wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and 11.1% (1/9) topi (Damaliscus lunatus) sampled systematically in 2000 during a meat cropping program in the Serengeti ecosystem, and from one wildebeest and one lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) killed by sport hunters adjacent to Tarangire National Park. A tuberculosis antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to screen serum samples collected from 184 Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) and 19 lions from Ngorongoro Crater sampled between 1985 and 2000. Samples from 212 ungulates collected throughout the protected area network between 1998 and 2001 also were tested by EIA. Serological assays detected antibodies to M. bovis in 4% of Serengeti lions; one positive lion was sampled in 1984. Antibodies were detected in one of 17 (6%) buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Tarangire and one of 41 (2%) wildebeest in the Serengeti. This study confirms for the first time the presence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife of northern Tanzania, but further investigation is required to assess the impact on wildlife populations and the role of different wildlife species in maintenance and transmission.

  20. 77 FR 25112 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Reviews of Species in California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ...) Species biology, including but not limited to population trends, distribution, abundance, demographics... pertaining to the biology or ecology of these species; information regarding the effects of current land... updates to, recovery plans and additional actions or studies that would benefit these species in the...

  1. 76 FR 35906 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 12 Species in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... any species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range; and... 5-year status reviews under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), of 2 animal and 10... status reviews under the Act of 2 animal and 10 plant species: Autumn buttercup (Ranunculus acriformis...

  2. Forensic timber identification: a case study of a CITES listed species, Gonystylus bancanus (Thymelaeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin Kit Siong; Lee, Soon Leong; Tnah, Lee Hong; Nurul-Farhanah, Zakaria; Ng, Chin Hong; Lee, Chai Ting; Tani, Naoki; Diway, Bibian; Lai, Pei Sing; Khoo, Eyen

    2016-07-01

    Illegal logging and smuggling of Gonystylus bancanus (Thymelaeaceae) poses a serious threat to this fragile valuable peat swamp timber species. Using G. bancanus as a case study, DNA markers were used to develop identification databases at the species, population and individual level. The species level database for Gonystylus comprised of an rDNA (ITS2) and two cpDNA (trnH-psbA and trnL) markers based on a 20 Gonystylus species database. When concatenated, taxonomic species recognition was achieved with a resolution of 90% (18 out of the 20 species). In addition, based on 17 natural populations of G. bancanus throughout West (Peninsular Malaysia) and East (Sabah and Sarawak) Malaysia, population and individual identification databases were developed using cpDNA and STR markers respectively. A haplotype distribution map for Malaysia was generated using six cpDNA markers, resulting in 12 unique multilocus haplotypes, from 24 informative intraspecific variable sites. These unique haplotypes suggest a clear genetic structuring of West and East regions. A simulation procedure based on the composition of the samples was used to test whether a suspected sample conformed to a given regional origin. Overall, the observed type I and II errors of the databases showed good concordance with the predicted 5% threshold which indicates that the databases were useful in revealing provenance and establishing conformity of samples from West and East Malaysia. Sixteen STRs were used to develop the DNA profiling databases for individual identification. Bayesian clustering analyses divided the 17 populations into two main genetic clusters, corresponding to the regions of West and East Malaysia. Population substructuring (K=2) was observed within each region. After removal of bias resulting from sampling effects and population subdivision, conservativeness tests showed that the West and East Malaysia databases were conservative. This suggests that both databases can be used independently

  3. Investigation of the role of environmental contaminants upon ecological sentinel species and their habitats at Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During the summers of 1996 and 1997, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, New Mexico Ecological Services Field Office collected 139 biologic and substrate samples,...

  4. Vegetation condition and bird species-habitat relationships in meadows at Baca National Wildlife Refuge in the San Luis Valley, Colorado [Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Baca National Wildlife Refuge was established in the arid San Luis Valley of south central Colorado in 2000. Intermittently to seasonally flooded meadows dominated...

  5. 50 CFR 31.11 - Donation and loan of wildlife specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... resident species of wildlife will not be made unless the recipient has secured the approval of the State. ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDLIFE SPECIES MANAGEMENT Terms and Conditions...

  6. List of Strigiformes species in the Belgrade Natural History Museum bird collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novčić Ivana D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available During re-inventory of the order Strigiformes in the ornithological collection of the Belgrade Natural History Museum, we recorded a total of 134 specimens, collected at over 40 localities throughout Serbia. Of these 71 are in the study collection, 59 in the exhibition collection, and four in the historical collection of birds. In view of the number of specimens diversity of species, and the geographical representatives, the collection of owls in the Natural History Museum represents an extremely important source of information for the taxon Strigiformes.

  7. Helminths of Liophis miliaris (Squamata, Dipsadidae: a list of species and new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mati V. L. T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to have better knowledge of the parasites of the common water snake Liophis miliaris (Linnaeus, 1758, a checklist of its helminths was produced based on a review of the literature and new records of worms identified during the course of a parasitological survey combining data from stool analysis (n = 22 and necropsies (n = 8 of specimens of this snake from Muriaé, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Thirty-one helminth species (two acanthocephalans, one cestode, 11 nematodes and 17 trematodes were so far reported in L. miliaris in the Neotropical region, already including the records in the present study of Acanthorhabdias acanthorhabdias Pereira, 1927, Paracapillaria (Ophidiocapillaria cesarpintoi (Freitas & Lent, 1934 and Strongyloides ophidiae Pereira, 1929. Taxonomic comments on these nematode species are given, and areas of occurrence of A. acanthorhabdias and P. cesarpintoi are expanded in southeastern Brazil. In addition, factors related to parasite richness of L. miliaris, which is likely related to its aquatic habits, are discussed.

  8. 75 FR 28636 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 34 Species in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ..., such as--(A) Species biology including, but not limited to, population trends, distribution, abundance... or trends; information pertaining to the biology or ecology of these species; information regarding..., or potential updates to, recovery plans and additional actions or studies that would benefit these...

  9. 76 FR 33334 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of Nine Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ...-spired Three-toothed Land Snail, Puritan Tiger Beetle, Dwarf Wedgemussel, and Bog Turtle AGENCY: Fish and... CFR 424.11(d)): (A) The species is considered extinct; (B) The species is considered to be recovered.... (62 FR 1647). Beetle, Puritan tiger Cicindela puritana Threatened........ U.S.A. (CT, MD, August 7...

  10. Infections shared with wildlife: an updated perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gortázar, Christian; Ruiz Fons, Francisco; Höfle, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Infections shared with wildlife matter because many are zoonotic, because of their impact on animal health and in consequence on livestock production, and due to their adverse effects on conservation and on the sustainable use of wildlife. We describe recent environmental and societal changes that contribute to explain the current wildlife disease scenario, propose an updated list and ranking of relevant shared disease agents, illustrate key risk factors which often underlay shared infections...

  11. Mammals of Erie National Wildlife Refuge 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of this study is to compile a list of mammals currently living on the refuge property. Habitats and behavioral features of the refuge's mammals were also...

  12. Nuisance Animal Control Plan for Loess Bluffs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Control Plan will cover control of invasive animal species on Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The primary nuisance species on Squaw Creek NWR is the...

  13. Influence of Aesthetic Appreciation of Wildlife Species on Attitudes towards Their Conservation in Kenyan Agropastoralist Communities: e88842

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joana Roque de Pinho; Clara Grilo; Randall B Boone; Kathleen A Galvin; Jeffrey G Snodgrass

    2014-01-01

      The influence of human aesthetic appreciation of animal species on public attitudes towards their conservation and related decision-making has been studied in industrialized countries but remains...

  14. 75 FR 37460 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... threatened species: Lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid's lupine), Sidalcea nelsoniana (Nelson's...), Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens (Willamette daisy), Lomatium bradshawii (Bradshaw's lomatium), Lupinus... ameliorate threats and increase population sizes of Fender's blue butterfly, Lupinus sulphureus ssp...

  15. 78 FR 69436 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of a 5-Year Review of the Vicuña in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... of the Vicu a in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, and Peru AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). We originally listed the vicu a as... primarily commercial international trade in vicu a products. Certain populations of vicu as in Chile and...

  16. Wildlife trade and global disease emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karesh, William B; Cook, Robert A; Bennett, Elizabeth L; Newcomb, James

    2005-07-01

    The global trade in wildlife provides disease transmission mechanisms that not only cause human disease outbreaks but also threaten livestock, international trade, rural livelihoods, native wildlife populations, and the health of ecosystems. Outbreaks resulting from wildlife trade have caused hundreds of billions of dollars of economic damage globally. Rather than attempting to eradicate pathogens or the wild species that may harbor them, a practical approach would include decreasing the contact rate among species, including humans, at the interface created by the wildlife trade. Since wildlife marketing functions as a system of scale-free networks with major hubs, these points provide control opportunities to maximize the effects of regulatory efforts.

  17. Monitoring pesticides in wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustman, E.H.; Martin, W.E.; Heath, R.G.; Reichel, W.L.

    1971-01-01

    Early in the development of the wildlife monitoring program, certain criteria were recognized as being important in the selection of species of wild animals suitable for pesticide monitoring purposes. Ideally, the forms selected should be geographically well distributed, and they should be reasonably abundant and readily available for sampling. In addition, animals occurring near the top of food chains have the capacity to reflect residues in organisms occurring at lower levels in the same food chains. Based on these criteria, species chosen for monitoring include the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and black ducks (Anas rubripes), and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The black duck is substituted for the mallard in States where suitable numbers of mallards cannot be obtained. The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is held responsible for the execution of the wildlife portion of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program. The primary objective is to ascertain on a nationwide basis and independent of specific treatments the levels and trends of certain pesticidal chemicals and other pollutants in the bodies of selected forms of wildlife. The program was first described by Johnson et al. (4) in 1967. The purpose of this report is to update and redescribe the wildlife monitoring program and briefly review accomplishments.

  18. 75 FR 11193 - Endangered Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... survival activities for a plant that was recently added to the List of Endangered and Threatened Plants... common name), a plant endemic to the island of Molokai, Hawaii. The purpose of these activities is to...

  19. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is

  20. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  1. Anticoagulant rodenticide exposure and toxicosis in four species of birds of prey presented to a wildlife clinic in Massachusetts, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    Mortalities among birds of prey from anticoagulant rodenticide (AR) toxicosis have been documented in several countries. Reports on extent of exposure within regions of the United States are limited. This study investigated AR exposure and toxicosis in four species of birds of prey (red-tailed hawks [Buteo jamaicensis], barred owls [Strix varia], eastern screech owls [Megascops asio] and great horned owls [Bubo virginianus]) presented to a wildlife clinic in Massachusetts. The aims of this study are to document the proportion of these four species that died or were euthanized due to their presenting injuries that had detectable amounts of ARs in liver tissue; to identify and quantify ARs present; to describe clinical, postmortem, and histopathologic signs of toxicosis; to evaluate potential sublethal effects of AR exposure; and to associate liver AR level with toxicosis. Birds included in the study were sampled without regard to signs of AR toxicosis. Postmortem examinations were conducted, and liver samples were analyzed for AR residues. Of 161 birds tested, 86% had AR residues in liver tissue. The second-generation AR (SGAR) brodifacoum was identified in 99% of positive birds. Mortality from AR toxicosis was diagnosed in 6% of birds. No indications of sublethal effects of exposure were found, and no association between liver brodifacoum level and signs of toxicosis was apparent. Given the high proportion of birds in this study exposed to ARs, specifically brodifacoum, continued monitoring is warranted as new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations on the sale and use of SGARs are enacted.

  2. Wildlife cancer: a conservation perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAloose, Denise; Newton, Alisa L

    2009-07-01

    Until recently, cancer in wildlife was not considered to be a conservation concern. However, with the identification of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease, sea turtle fibropapillomatosis and sea lion genital carcinoma, it has become apparent that neoplasia can be highly prevalent and have considerable effects on some species. It is also clear that anthropogenic activities contribute to the development of neoplasia in wildlife species, such as beluga whales and bottom-dwelling fish, making them sensitive sentinels of disturbed environments.

  3. Description of two new Ogma Southern, 1914 species (Nemata: Criconematoidea with a list of plant-parasitic nematode species from Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Van den Berg

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new O^nia Southern, 1914 species are described and figured from Giant's Castle Nature Reserve, Kamberg Nature Reserve and the Royal Natal National Park. O^ma naomiae spec. nov. females are characterised by having 10 to 12 longitudinal rows of scales on 63 to 69 retrorse body annuli; scales haphazardly arranged on first nine to 10 annuli; scales mostly with two projections, becoming longer toward tail end; all scales with minute protuberances on outer edges; lip region with one annulus with a greater diameter than first body annulus. Juveniles with 14 to 16 longitudinal rows of scales on 73 to 76 retrorse body annuli; each scale bearing five to seven sharply pointed processes; one lip annulus with an equal diameter to first body annulus. O^ma ueckermanni spec. nov. females are characterised by eight longitudinal rows of rounded scales on 60 to 67 body annuli becoming longer toward tail tip where they bear two, three or four-pronged processes; roughly sculptured recessed part of annulus extends to follow the outline of the scale almost forming a pillar between two succeeding scales; one lip annulus with a greater diameter than first body annulus; raised labial area with six pseudolips and no submedian lobes; margin of lip annulus with rounded tooth-like projections; stylet 49,3 to 60,7 ^m long. A list is given of the 16 known plant-parasitic nematodes found in these areas.

  4. 76 FR 30377 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Reviews of Species in California, Nevada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... determination or most recent status review, such as: (A) Species biology, including but not limited to... that may show population size or trends; information pertaining to the biology or ecology of these... request recommendations pertaining to the development of, or potential updates to, recovery plans and...

  5. Development of landscape-level habitat suitability models for ten wildlife species in the central hardwoods region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; William D. Dijak; Frank R. III Thompson; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2007-01-01

    Reports landscape-level habitat suitability models for 10 species in the Central Hardwoods Region of the Midwestern United States: American woodcock, cerulean warbler, Henslow's sparrow, Indiana bat, northern bobwhite, ruffed grouse, timber rattlesnake, wood thrush, worm-eating warbler, and yellow-breasted chat. All models included spatially explicit variables and...

  6. A review of neosporosis and pathologic findings of Neospora caninum infection in wildlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L. Donahoe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that is the etiologic agent of neosporosis, a devastating infectious disease regarded as a major cause of reproductive loss in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs worldwide. This protozoan pathogen is maintained in the environment by a heteroxenous life cycle that involves a definitive canid host and a wide range of intermediate hosts. In recent years, a number of wildlife species have been investigated for their possible involvement in the N. caninum life cycle and many have been implicated as intermediate hosts. However, in many instances these studies have utilized serological and molecular techniques to detect infection in clinically normal animals, and investigation of possible associated morbidity, mortality, and pathology has been neglected. As such, the occurrence and importance of Neospora-associated disease in wildlife species are unknown. In order to improve our understanding of the significance of N. caninum infection in nondomestic species, the present review provides an up-to-date summary of clinical neosporosis and N. caninum-associated pathologic lesions in naturally and experimentally infected wildlife species. We provide a list of all free-ranging and captive wildlife species identified with N. caninum infection to date using currently available diagnostic tools. The advantages and disadvantages of diagnostic methods in wildlife are addressed in order to recommend optimal diagnosis of confirming N. caninum infection and neosporosis in nondomestic species. Although current data would suggest that N. caninum infection does not adversely impact wildlife populations, there is a need for greater international uniformity in the diagnosis of N. caninum infection and neosporosis in nondomestic species in order to assess the true consequences of parasite infection.

  7. A review of neosporosis and pathologic findings of Neospora caninum infection in wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Lindsay, Scott A; Krockenberger, Mark; Phalen, David; Šlapeta, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite that is the etiologic agent of neosporosis, a devastating infectious disease regarded as a major cause of reproductive loss in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs worldwide. This protozoan pathogen is maintained in the environment by a heteroxenous life cycle that involves a definitive canid host and a wide range of intermediate hosts. In recent years, a number of wildlife species have been investigated for their possible involvement in the N. caninum life cycle and many have been implicated as intermediate hosts. However, in many instances these studies have utilized serological and molecular techniques to detect infection in clinically normal animals, and investigation of possible associated morbidity, mortality, and pathology has been neglected. As such, the occurrence and importance of Neospora-associated disease in wildlife species are unknown. In order to improve our understanding of the significance of N. caninum infection in nondomestic species, the present review provides an up-to-date summary of clinical neosporosis and N. caninum-associated pathologic lesions in naturally and experimentally infected wildlife species. We provide a list of all free-ranging and captive wildlife species identified with N. caninum infection to date using currently available diagnostic tools. The advantages and disadvantages of diagnostic methods in wildlife are addressed in order to recommend optimal diagnosis of confirming N. caninum infection and neosporosis in nondomestic species. Although current data would suggest that N. caninum infection does not adversely impact wildlife populations, there is a need for greater international uniformity in the diagnosis of N. caninum infection and neosporosis in nondomestic species in order to assess the true consequences of parasite infection.

  8. Auditing wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    B.K. Reilly; Y. Reillly

    2003-01-01

    Reilly B.K. and Y. Reilly. 2003. Auditing wildlife. Koedoe 46(2): 97–102. Pretoria. ISSN 0075-6458. Accountants and auditors are increasingly confronted with the problem of auditing wildlife populations on game ranches as their clients' asset base expands into this industry. This paper aims to provide guidelines on these actions based on case study data and research in the field of wildlife monitoring. Parties entering into dispute on numbers of animals on a property often resort to their au...

  9. Wildlife Trade and Human Health in Lao PDR: An Assessment of the Zoonotic Disease Risk in Markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe F Greatorex

    Full Text Available Although the majority of emerging infectious diseases can be linked to wildlife sources, most pathogen spillover events to people could likely be avoided if transmission was better understood and practices adjusted to mitigate risk. Wildlife trade can facilitate zoonotic disease transmission and represents a threat to human health and economies in Asia, highlighted by the 2003 SARS coronavirus outbreak, where a Chinese wildlife market facilitated pathogen transmission. Additionally, wildlife trade poses a serious threat to biodiversity. Therefore, the combined impacts of Asian wildlife trade, sometimes termed bush meat trade, on public health and biodiversity need assessing. From 2010 to 2013, observational data were collected in Lao PDR from markets selling wildlife, including information on volume, form, species and price of wildlife; market biosafety and visitor origin. The potential for traded wildlife to host zoonotic diseases that pose a serious threat to human health was then evaluated at seven markets identified as having high volumes of trade. At the seven markets, during 21 observational surveys, 1,937 alive or fresh dead mammals (approximately 1,009 kg were observed for sale, including mammals from 12 taxonomic families previously documented to be capable of hosting 36 zoonotic pathogens. In these seven markets, the combination of high wildlife volumes, high risk taxa for zoonoses and poor biosafety increases the potential for pathogen presence and transmission. To examine the potential conservation impact of trade in markets, we assessed the status of 33,752 animals observed during 375 visits to 93 markets, under the Lao PDR Wildlife and Aquatic Law. We observed 6,452 animals listed by Lao PDR as near extinct or threatened with extinction. The combined risks of wildlife trade in Lao PDR to human health and biodiversity highlight the need for a multi-sector approach to effectively protect public health, economic interests and

  10. Wildlife Trade and Human Health in Lao PDR: An Assessment of the Zoonotic Disease Risk in Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatorex, Zoe F; Olson, Sarah H; Singhalath, Sinpakone; Silithammavong, Soubanh; Khammavong, Kongsy; Fine, Amanda E; Weisman, Wendy; Douangngeun, Bounlom; Theppangna, Watthana; Keatts, Lucy; Gilbert, Martin; Karesh, William B; Hansel, Troy; Zimicki, Susan; O'Rourke, Kathleen; Joly, Damien O; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2016-01-01

    Although the majority of emerging infectious diseases can be linked to wildlife sources, most pathogen spillover events to people could likely be avoided if transmission was better understood and practices adjusted to mitigate risk. Wildlife trade can facilitate zoonotic disease transmission and represents a threat to human health and economies in Asia, highlighted by the 2003 SARS coronavirus outbreak, where a Chinese wildlife market facilitated pathogen transmission. Additionally, wildlife trade poses a serious threat to biodiversity. Therefore, the combined impacts of Asian wildlife trade, sometimes termed bush meat trade, on public health and biodiversity need assessing. From 2010 to 2013, observational data were collected in Lao PDR from markets selling wildlife, including information on volume, form, species and price of wildlife; market biosafety and visitor origin. The potential for traded wildlife to host zoonotic diseases that pose a serious threat to human health was then evaluated at seven markets identified as having high volumes of trade. At the seven markets, during 21 observational surveys, 1,937 alive or fresh dead mammals (approximately 1,009 kg) were observed for sale, including mammals from 12 taxonomic families previously documented to be capable of hosting 36 zoonotic pathogens. In these seven markets, the combination of high wildlife volumes, high risk taxa for zoonoses and poor biosafety increases the potential for pathogen presence and transmission. To examine the potential conservation impact of trade in markets, we assessed the status of 33,752 animals observed during 375 visits to 93 markets, under the Lao PDR Wildlife and Aquatic Law. We observed 6,452 animals listed by Lao PDR as near extinct or threatened with extinction. The combined risks of wildlife trade in Lao PDR to human health and biodiversity highlight the need for a multi-sector approach to effectively protect public health, economic interests and biodiversity.

  11. Wildlife Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Wildlife Districts layer is part of a larger dataset contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes feature...

  12. 77 FR 3423 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the `I'iwi as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... way that causes actual impacts to the species. If there is exposure to a factor, but no response, or... invasion, transport weeds into native forests, cause soil erosion, disrupt seedling regeneration of native.... 150); mosquitoes may carry avian malaria (see Factor C). Their continued rooting on the forest floor...

  13. New technologies for offshore wildlife risk studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Caleb

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Two research initiatives by Pandion Systems, funded by the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE), are addressing the enormous challenges of conducting offshore wind-wildlife risk/impact studies by providing new wildlife sensing technologies that surmount some of the limitations of previous techniques. Both initiatives rest on the shoulders of pioneering European studies and experience. One entails the development of a remote-operating acoustic/thermographic detector. This device, designed with input from the Danish National Environmental Research Institute (NERI) and Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology (CLO), will provide species-specific occurrence data, as well as flight altitude estimation, for vocalizing flying wildlife that flies within a detection beam that corresponds roughly to the rotor swept zone of a single, commercial marine wind turbine. While the detection beam is small and limitations exist for silently flying animals, this device will be capable of providing information on bats and on federally-listed bird species that has been difficult or impossible to achieve with other methods. A preliminary version of this device was developed in 2009-2010 in a BOEMRE-funded pilot study, and a sea-worthy device is currently being developed, scheduled for initial deployment on the US Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (AOCS) in summer, 2011. A second initiative is targeted at developing a high-definition aerial survey protocol capable of providing a safe, cost-effective, reproducible snapshot of bird, marine mammal, and sea turtle distribution on the entire AOCS. This research, being conducted with a team of technologists and biologists including scientists from the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), entails conducting a series of pilot experiments in spring, 2011 with a variety of different aircraft, cameras, flight altitudes, and image resolutions, to determine optimum protocols for the large-scale surveys. Both of

  14. 77 FR 19309 - Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Great Falls, MT; Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... 2011. Comments we received cover topics such as land protection, climate change, wetland health, water..., including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental... wildlife practices benefiting migratory species and other wildlife would not be expanded or changed...

  15. Minidoka Dam Wildlife Impact Assessment: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Robert C.; Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1989-03-01

    A wildlife impact assessment has been developed for the US Bureau of Reclamation's Minidoka Dam and Reservoir in south central Idaho. This assessment was conducted to fulfill requirements of the Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of this study included the following: select target wildlife species, and identify their current status and management goals; estimate the net effects on target wildlife species resulting from hydroelectric development and operation; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals for target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation; and consult and coordinate impact assessment activities with the Northwest Power Planning Council, Bonneville Power Administration, US Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Land Management, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee, and other entities expressing interest in the project. 62 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Survey for Pondberry (Lindera melissifolia) on Portions of Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge in Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Survey efforts for the endangered listed pondberry on Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge in Bolivar County, MS is presented. Sampling in 2008 did not detect the...

  17. Current research at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge as of June 3, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a list of research projects in progress at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge as of June 3, 2005. For each project, the principle investigator, the...

  18. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Malheur NWR summarizes Refuge objectives, policies on wildlife inventory procedures, biological habitat units, physical facility...

  19. Illustrated keys to the mosquitoes of Thailand I. Background; geographic distribution; lists of genera, subgenera, and species; and a key to the genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanarithikul, Rampa; Harrison, Bruce A; Panthusiri, Prachong; Coleman, Russell E

    2005-01-01

    This is the first of a series of six sections that will cover 436 species of mosquitoes currently known to occur in Thailand. In this section we provide information on the background, geographic distribution, bionomics, lists of genera, subgenera, and specie of mosquitoes that occur in Thailand, and a key to the genera. The sections, listed below will be published as separate supplements in following issues of this journal: II. Key to the Culex; III. Key to the Aedeomyia, Ficalbia, Mimomyia, Hodgesia, Coquillettidia, Mansonia, and Uranotaenia. The additional 3 supplements consisting of the Key to the Tribe Aedini; Key to the Anopheles; and the Keys to the Armigeres, Heizmannia, Orthopodomyia, Malaya, Topomyia, Tripteroides, and Toxorhynchites will be published as they are completed. At the conclusion of this project, one large supplement to the Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health will be produced that includes all of these keys in a single document.

  20. 50 CFR 23.43 - What are the requirements for a wildlife hybrid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the requirements for a wildlife hybrid? 23.43 Section 23.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...