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Sample records for wildlife circulating quinolone

  1. Antibiotics Threaten Wildlife: Circulating Quinolone Residues and Disease in Avian Scavengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Jesús Á.; Blanco, Guillermo; Grande, Javier; Arroyo, Bernardo; García-Montijano, Marino; Martínez, Felíx

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic residues that may be present in carcasses of medicated livestock could pass to and greatly reduce scavenger wildlife populations. We surveyed residues of the quinolones enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics (amoxicillin and oxytetracycline) in nestling griffon Gyps fulvus, cinereous Aegypius monachus and Egyptian Neophron percnopterus vultures in central Spain. We found high concentrations of antibiotics in the plasma of many nestling cinereous (57%) and Egyptian (40%) vultures. Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were also found in liver samples of all dead cinereous vultures. This is the first report of antibiotic residues in wildlife. We also provide evidence of a direct association between antibiotic residues, primarily quinolones, and severe disease due to bacterial and fungal pathogens. Our results indicate that, by damaging the liver and kidney and through the acquisition and proliferation of pathogens associated with the depletion of lymphoid organs, continuous exposure to antibiotics could increase mortality rates, at least in cinereous vultures. If antibiotics ingested with livestock carrion are clearly implicated in the decline of the vultures in central Spain then it should be considered a primary concern for conservation of their populations. PMID:18197254

  2. Antibiotics threaten wildlife: circulating quinolone residues and disease in Avian scavengers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús A Lemus

    Full Text Available Antibiotic residues that may be present in carcasses of medicated livestock could pass to and greatly reduce scavenger wildlife populations. We surveyed residues of the quinolones enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics (amoxicillin and oxytetracycline in nestling griffon Gyps fulvus, cinereous Aegypius monachus and Egyptian Neophron percnopterus vultures in central Spain. We found high concentrations of antibiotics in the plasma of many nestling cinereous (57% and Egyptian (40% vultures. Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were also found in liver samples of all dead cinereous vultures. This is the first report of antibiotic residues in wildlife. We also provide evidence of a direct association between antibiotic residues, primarily quinolones, and severe disease due to bacterial and fungal pathogens. Our results indicate that, by damaging the liver and kidney and through the acquisition and proliferation of pathogens associated with the depletion of lymphoid organs, continuous exposure to antibiotics could increase mortality rates, at least in cinereous vultures. If antibiotics ingested with livestock carrion are clearly implicated in the decline of the vultures in central Spain then it should be considered a primary concern for conservation of their populations.

  3. Antitubercular activities of quinolones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As part of a study optimize the quinolone antibacterials against M. tuberculosis, Renau and coworkers 12 have synthesized a series of N-2,4-difluorophenyl quinolones and evaluated a variety of C7 substituted quinolones with varying degrees of substitution and lipophilicity on the heterocyclic side chain (table 1). In order to ...

  4. Update on Quinolone Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doña, Inmaculada; Moreno, Esther; Pérez-Sánchez, Natalia; Andreu, Inmaculada; Hernández Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Torres, María José

    2017-08-01

    Quinolones are a group of synthetic antibiotics widely use as first-line treatment for many infections. There has been an increase in the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions to quinolones in recent years, likely due to increased prescription. The purpose of this review is to summarize the clinical pictures, the methods used for diagnosing and the management of allergic reactions to quinolones. Allergic reactions to quinolones can be immediate or delayed, being anaphylaxis and maculopapular exanthema respectively the most frequent clinical entities. A precise diagnosis is particularly difficult since clinical history is often unreliable, skin tests can induce false-positive results, and commercial in vitro test are not well validated. Therefore, drug provocation testing is considered the gold standard to establish diagnosis, which is not a risk-free procedure. Cross-reactivity between quinolones is difficult to predict due to the small number of patients included in the few published studies. Moreover, hypersensitivity to quinolones has also been associated with beta-lactam and neuromuscular blocking agent allergies, although further studies are needed to understand the underlying mechanisms. Avoidance of the culprit quinolone is indicated in patients with a diagnosis of hypersensitivity to these drugs. When quinolone treatment is the only therapeutic option available, desensitization is necessary. This review summarizes the complex diagnostic approach and management of allergic reactions to quinolones.

  5. Wildlife

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes wildlife observations on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1992 and 2009.

  6. Circulation of canine parvovirus among dogs living in human-wildlife interface in the Atlantic forest biome, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia V. Vieira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite of the role of domestic dogs as reservoirs for threatening viral diseases for wild carnivores, few studies have focused to identify circulation of viruses among dogs living in human/wildlife interfaces. To identify canine parvovirus (CPV types circulating in dogs living in an Atlantic forest biome, faecal samples (n = 100 were collected at the same period (one week corresponding to each of four areas, during 2014 to 2016 and corresponded to 100 different individuals. CPV was isolated in cell culture from 67 out 100 (67% samples from healthy dogs. Cytopathic effects were characterized by total or partial cell culture lysis. Genome sequences of CPV-2a (10%, CPV-2b (7% and CPV-2c (50% were concomitantly detected by PCR and nucleotide sequencing. The current study addresses the importance of monitoring CPV circulation among dogs presenting potential contact with wildlife species.

  7. Clinical pharmacodynamics of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Paul G; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Owens, Robert C

    2003-09-01

    An understanding of fundamental PK-PD principles forms the basis for the rational use of antimicrobial agents. For quinolones, the fAUC24:MIC ratio is predictive of efficacy in animal and in vitro infection models, and in infected patients. The magnitude of the fAUC24:MIC ratio predictive of efficacy in animal and in vitro infection models has been shown to be concordant with those obtained from human data. By accounting for PK and microbiologic variability together with PK-PD targets associated with efficacy or resistance suppression by Monte Carlo simulation, it is possible to discriminate between therapeutic regimens and select those regimens likely to be of greater benefit to patients. The maturation of antimicrobial PK-PD as a scientific discipline continues to accelerate and currently impacts clinical practice, drug development, and regulatory decision making.

  8. Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce Rickel

    2005-01-01

    This volume addresses the wildlife and fish of the grasslands in the Southwestern Region of the USDA Forest Service. Our intent is to provide information that will help resource specialists and decisionmakers manage wildlife populations within grassland ecosystems in the Southwestern United States. The information and analysis presented is at a Regional scale.

  9. Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the significant activities conducted in 1994 to monitor the wildlife resources of the Site. Wildlife populations inhabiting the Hanford Site are monitored in order to measure the status and condition of the populations and assess effects of Hanford operations.

  10. DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH QUINOLONE ANTIBACTERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ

    1992-01-01

    The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result. Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts,

  11. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and

  12. Comparative Dissolution Profiles of Representative Quinolones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implication in the choice of medium for dissolution testing of quinolones, particularly for comparative purposes in the absence of specific monograph recommendations. Furthermore, it supports the change from 0.1N to 0.01NHCl for ciprofloxacin in the USP as a monographic modification. Conclusion: We conclude that there ...

  13. Quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    over Asia and Africa) emerged from Southeast Asia and then spread to other regions of the world [13]. Travellers also played a significant role in spreading the resistant. Salmonella Typhi, especially to the developed world [16,. 17]. The quinolone-resistant Salmonella Typhi is not only prevalent in hospital settings but also in ...

  14. Emergence of Quinolone Resistance amongst Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and seventy three isolates of Escherichia coli obtained from 7 hospitals in Lagos were screened for Fluoroquinolone resistance (FQR). Rate of resistance was 22.3% showing an increase in quinolone resistance when compared with resistant rates between 1994 and 1999 which ranged from 0 – 2% then.

  15. Quinolones in the treatment of Salmonella carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Noriega, E; Andrade-Villanueva, J; Amaya-Tapia, G

    1989-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella typhi are commonly followed by a chronic carrier state despite positive clinical and initial bacteriologic responses. The use of primary antibiotics like chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has several major drawbacks, including in some instances the failure to prevent the carrier state. The appearance worldwide of strains with multiple resistance to the most commonly used regimens has prompted the search for new forms of therapy. Among the agents studied have been third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones, which are active in vitro against bacterial enteropathogens like S. typhi. Resolution of chronic carriage of S. typhi and other salmonellae is difficult, and regimens commonly fail (including those that combine antibiotic administration with removal of the gallbladder). In addition to being active in vitro against Salmonella species, the newer quinolones adequately penetrate the intestinal lumen, liver, bile, and gallbladder. Initial experience with norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin in oral treatment of the chronic S. typhi carrier state in adults has been promising.

  16. New Role of Quinolones in Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald F Grossman

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of limited activity of the standard quinolones such as ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin against some clinically important organisms including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, new quinolones have been developed. In addition to their improved activity against S pneumoniae, some also demonstrate excellent anaerobic activity. None of the quinolones have a role to play in the treatment of paediatric infections. Quinolones (both older and newer agents have demonstrated equivalent efficacy to standard antimicrobials in the treatment of acute sinusitis. Several groups have suggested that quinolones are excellent agents in the treatment of high risk patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. These patients include the elderly, and those with frequent exacerbations, significant comorbid conditions. long duration of chronic bronchitis and major impairment of lung function. There is no evidence to suggest that the newer quinolones will differ from the currently available agents for th is disease. The major advantage of the newer quinolones appears to be in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia where pneumococcal infection is a real concern. A new parenteral quinolone with pneumococcal activity may replace the standard macrolide/cephalosporin combination that is commonly prescribed. For patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the newer agents are alternative choices, especially among patients with early onset pneumonia (less than five days of hospitalization, but are unlikely to replace ciprofloxacin in the intensive care unit setting because of poor Pseudomonas aeruginosa coverage.

  17. Detection of mutations in quinolone-resistant determining regions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... mutation(s) in gyrA and/or in another target such as parC is required. Thus, it has been proposed that the MIC of nalidixic acid could be used as a genetic marker of resistance for quinolone family in Gram-negative bacteria. (Ruiz, 2003). Quinolone resistance genes associated with plasmids have been also ...

  18. Increasing quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, K.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has remained sensitive to most antibiotics. However, national surveillance data from Denmark show that quinolone resistance in S. Enteritidis has increased from 0.8% in 1995 to 8.5% in 2000. These data support concerns that the current use...... of quinolone in food animals leads to increasing resistance in S. Enteritidis and that action should be taken to limit such use....

  19. [Current value of quinolones in Helicobacter pylori therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasz, S; Miehlke, S; Berning, M; Morgner, A; Labenz, J

    2011-08-01

    Eradication rates in first-line Helicobacter pylori therapy have been declining over the last decades, mainly due to increasing resistance against the recommended antibiotics clarithromycin and metronidazole. Thus, there is a need to evaluate novel regimens and substances to offer effective alternative treatment strategies. New generation quinolones, like levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, exhibit a broad-spectrum activity against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains and are mostly well tolerated. Based on a large number of studies, quinolones have been introduced in second-line and rescue treatment and are recommended for these indications in current guidelines. Various studies have investigated alternative strategies for first-line treatment including quinolone-based regimens. In the context of increasing resistance rates of Helicobacter pylori against quinolones some risks and benefits have to be considered when using quinolones as a first-line strategy. Besides numerous studies investigating levofloxacin and moxifloxacin there are some promising results for the new substance sitafloxacin, which might overcome primary resistance of Helicobacter pylori against conventional quinolones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Quinolone Resistance Determinants of Clinical Salmonella Enteritidis in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Nakajima, Chie; Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Siripanichgon, Kanokrat; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Changkaew, Kanjana; Tsunoda, Risa; Tamura, Yutaka; Suthienkul, Orasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis has emerged as a global concern regarding quinolone resistance and invasive potential. Although quinolone-resistant S. Enteritidis has been observed with high frequency in Thailand, information on the mechanism of resistance acquisition is limited. To elucidate the mechanism, a total of 158 clinical isolates of nalidixic acid (NAL)-resistant S. Enteritidis were collected throughout Thailand, and the quinolone resistance determinants were investigated in the context of resistance levels to NAL, norfloxacin (NOR), and ciprofloxacin (CIP). The analysis of point mutations in type II topoisomerase genes and the detection of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes showed that all but two harbored a gyrA mutation, the qnrS1 gene, or both. The most commonly affected codon in mutant gyrA was 87, followed by 83. Double codon mutation in gyrA was found in an isolate with high-level resistance to NAL, NOR, and CIP. A new mutation causing serine to isoleucine substitution at codon 83 was identified in eight isolates. In addition to eighteen qnrS1-carrying isolates showing nontypical quinolone resistance, one carrying both the qnrS1 gene and a gyrA mutation also showed a high level of resistance. Genotyping by multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis suggested a possible clonal expansion of NAL-resistant strains nationwide. Our data suggested that NAL-resistant isolates with single quinolone resistance determinant may potentially become fluoroquinolone resistant by acquiring secondary determinants. Restricted therapeutic and farming usage of quinolones is strongly recommended to prevent the emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates.

  1. Quinolones Resistance And R-Plasmids Of Clinical Isolates Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been reported incidence in the emergence of. Quinolones resistance in clinical isolates in Nigeria and the level in resistance has been on the increase. Objective: To determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmids profiles of 67 clinical Pseudomonas species from a teaching hospital ...

  2. Detection of mutations in quinolone-resistant determining regions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study devotes to determine the resistance rate of fluoroquinolones for 112 Escherichia coli isolates from Prince Salman Hospital, Riyadh and to detect the mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC in the fluoroquinolones resistant isolates. The resistance rate of ciprofloxacin for ...

  3. Quinolone Resistance Reversion by Targeting the SOS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recacha, E; Machuca, J; Díaz de Alba, P; Ramos-Güelfo, M; Docobo-Pérez, F; Rodriguez-Beltrán, J; Blázquez, J; Pascual, A; Rodríguez-Martínez, J M

    2017-10-10

    Suppression of the SOS response has been postulated as a therapeutic strategy for potentiating antimicrobial agents. We aimed to evaluate the impact of its suppression on reversing resistance using a model of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli representing multiple levels of quinolone resistance. E. coli mutants exhibiting a spectrum of SOS activity were constructed from isogenic strains carrying quinolone resistance mechanisms with susceptible and resistant phenotypes. Changes in susceptibility were evaluated by static (MICs) and dynamic (killing curves or flow cytometry) methodologies. A peritoneal sepsis murine model was used to evaluate in vivo impact. Suppression of the SOS response was capable of resensitizing mutant strains with genes encoding three or four different resistance mechanisms (up to 15-fold reductions in MICs). Killing curve assays showed a clear disadvantage for survival (Δlog10 CFU per milliliter [CFU/ml] of 8 log units after 24 h), and the in vivo efficacy of ciprofloxacin was significantly enhanced (Δlog10 CFU/g of 1.76 log units) in resistant strains with a suppressed SOS response. This effect was evident even after short periods (60 min) of exposure. Suppression of the SOS response reverses antimicrobial resistance across a range of E. coli phenotypes from reduced susceptibility to highly resistant, playing a significant role in increasing the in vivo efficacy.IMPORTANCE The rapid rise of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is now considered a major global health crisis. New strategies are needed to block the development of resistance and to extend the life of antibiotics. The SOS response is a promising target for developing therapeutics to reduce the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and enhance the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents such as quinolones. Significant questions remain regarding its impact as a strategy for the reversion or resensitization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. To address this

  4. The Emergence of Quinolone Resistant Shigella sonnei, Pondicherry, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Das

    Full Text Available Ciprofloxacin resistant Shigella sonnei across the globe have been increasing alarmingly. In order to understand the emergence of S.sonnei with respect to ciprofloxacin resistance in our patient population, the following study was carried out. Of the 184 Shigella sp. Isolated from 2012 to 2015, 34 S.sonnei which were confirmed by standard methods and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing were selected. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of 16/34 quinolone resistant isolates tested ranged from 4micrograms/ml to 16micrograms/ml for ciprofloxacin, from 16 micrograms/ml to 64 micrograms/ml for ofloxacin and from 16micrograms/ml to 64micrograms/ml for levofloxacin. Sequence determination of the quinolone resistance determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes showed mutations in GyrA at Gln69/Trp, Phe71/Ser, Ser72/Pro, Met75/Leu, Ser90/Cys, Met94/Leu, His106/Pro, Asn161/His, Thr163/Ala and in ParC at Ala64/Asp. Among the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQRs targets investigated,qnrB was the most (93.7% prevalent followed by qnrC (18.7%. None hadqnrA, qnrS and qepA. Two (0.1% of the isolates harboured theaac(6'-lb gene. Drug accumulation assay detected the presence of efflux pump activity in 9/15 (60% among ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. All isolates harboured the ipaH gene followed by ial (17.6%, sen (11.7%, set1A&set1B (5.8% genes. None had stx1 element. PCR for Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC sequences resulted in 4 unique clusters, of which Type III was the most (44% dominant but there was no correlation between the ERIC types and the antibiotic resistance pattern or the virulence profile. A documented increase in S.sonnei harbouring the qnrgenes and some unusual genes like set1Aand indicate an ongoing process of horizontal gene transfer. The accumulation of novel mutations in GyrA and ParC in the presence of efflux pump and PMQR genes contributed to the raised MIC to quinolones

  5. Differential distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in clinical enterobacteria with unusual phenotypes of quinolone susceptibility from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Patricia; Lucero, Celeste; Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Guerriero, Leonor; Albornoz, Ezequiel; Tran, Tung; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Galas, Marcelo; Corso, Alejandra; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Petroni, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    We studied a collection of 105 clinical enterobacteria with unusual phenotypes of quinolone susceptibility to analyze the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and oqx genes and their implications for quinolone susceptibility. The oqxA and oqxB genes were found in 31/34 (91%) Klebsiella pneumoniae and 1/3 Klebsiella oxytoca isolates. However, the oqxA- and oqxB-harboring isolates lacking other known quinolone resistance determinants showed wide ranges of susceptibility to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Sixty of the 105 isolates (57%) harbored at least one PMQR gene [qnrB19, qnrB10, qnrB2, qnrB1, qnrS1, or aac(6')-Ib-cr)], belong to 8 enterobacterial species, and were disseminated throughout the country, and most of them were categorized as susceptible by the current clinical quinolone susceptibility breakpoints. We developed a disk diffusion-based method to improve the phenotypic detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr. The most common PMQR genes in our collection [qnrB19, qnrB10, and aac(6')-Ib-cr] were differentially distributed among enterobacterial species, and two different epidemiological settings were evident. First, the species associated with community-acquired infections (Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli) mainly harbored qnrB19 (a unique PMQR gene) located in small ColE1-type plasmids that might constitute its natural reservoirs. qnrB19 was not associated with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype. Second, the species associated with hospital-acquired infections (Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., and Serratia marcescens) mainly harbored qnrB10 in ISCR1-containing class 1 integrons that may also have aac(6')-Ib-cr as a cassette within the variable region. These two PMQR genes were strongly associated with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype. Therefore, this differential distribution of PMQR genes is strongly influenced by their linkage or lack of linkage to integrons.

  6. Wildlife Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Karstoft, Henrik

    This report contains a progress report for the ph.d. project titled “Wildlife Communication”. The project focuses on investigating how signal processing and pattern recognition can be used to improve wildlife management in agriculture. Wildlife management systems used today experience habituation...... from wild animals which makes them ineffective. An intelligent wildlife management system could monitor its own effectiveness and alter its scaring strategy based on this...

  7. Wildlife Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Beth; And Others

    This pocket folder of instructional materials is designed to introduce youths aged 9 to 12 to the nature and needs of wildlife and to give children the opportunity to search for wildlife and their signs. The document includes a member's guide, a leader's guide, field record forms, and wildlife project materials. The illustrated 4-H member's guide…

  8. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni DNA gyrase as the target of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Usui, Masaru; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Changkaew, Kanjana; Nakajima, Chie; Tamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones have long been used as the first-line treatment for Campylobacter infections. However, an increased resistance to quinolones has raised public health concerns. The development of new quinolone-based antibiotics with high activity is critical for effective, as DNA gyrase, the target of quinolones, is an essential enzyme for bacterial growth in several mechanisms. The evaluation of antibiotic activity against Campylobacter jejuni largely relies on drug susceptibility tests, which require at least 2 days to produce results. Thus, an in vitro method for studying the activity of quinolones against the C. jejuni DNA gyrase is preferred. To identify potent quinolones, we investigated the interaction of C. jejuni DNA gyrase with a number of quinolones using recombinant subunits. The combination of purified subunits exhibited DNA supercoiling activity in an ATP dependent manner. Drug concentrations that inhibit DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50s) of 10 different quinolones were estimated to range from 0.4 (sitafloxacin) to >100 μg/mL (nalidixic acid). Sitafloxacin showed the highest inhibitory activity, and the analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated that a fluorine atom at R-6 might play the important role in the inhibitory activity against C. jejuni gyrase. Measured quinolone IC50s correlated well with minimum inhibitory concentrations (R = 0.9943). These suggest that the in vitro supercoiling inhibition assay on purified recombinant C. jejuni DNA gyrase is a useful and predictive technique to monitor the antibacterial potency of quinolones. And furthermore, these data suggested that sitafloxacin might be a good candidate for clinical trials on campylobacteriosis. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of Emergence of Quinolone-Resistant Gonococci in Greece by Combined Use of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Multiantigen Sequence Typing and Multilocus Sequence Typing▿†§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidi, Angeliki; Tzelepi, Eva; Siatravani, Eirini; Godoy, Daniel; Miriagou, Vivi; Spratt, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) in Greece remained low from 1997 to 2003 but increased dramatically from 11% to 56% between 2004 and 2007. N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to investigate trends in quinolone resistance from 1997 to 2007 and explore the origins of the recent increase in QRNG. We characterized 295 QRNG isolates from the study period and 233 quinolone-susceptible (QS) gonococci from 2004 and 2005, when the rapid increase in QRNG occurred. From 1997 to 1999, an outbreak of QRNG was due to the dissemination of isolates of serovar Arst that belonged to two closely related genotypes. Few QRNG isolates, of diverse genotypes, were present between 2001 and 2003, whereas the sharp increase in QRNG from 2004 onwards was due to the appearance of serovar Bropyst isolates of several major NG-MAST sequence type (STs) that previously had not been identified in Greece. These isolates were shown by MLST to be variants of a single multiply antibiotic-resistant QRNG strain (ST1901) that appeared in Greece and rapidly diversified into 31 NG-MAST STs. There were no isolates of MLST ST1901 or any of the 31 NG-MAST STs among QS isolates from 2004 and 2005 or among 8 representatives of multiresistant but quinolone-susceptible serovar Bropyst isolates circulating in Greece during the 1990s, supporting the view that the recent increase in QRNG was due to importation of a QRNG strain(s) of MLST ST1901 into Greece. Recently, multiresistant QRNG isolates of ST1901 with reduced susceptibility to the newer cephalosporins have appeared in Greece. PMID:21248096

  10. Dynorphin activates quorum sensing quinolone signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Zaborina

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488 and endogenous (dynorphin kappa-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to kappa-opioids. The in vivo significance of kappa-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence.

  11. Quinolone Resistance Reversion by Targeting the SOS Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Recacha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of the SOS response has been postulated as a therapeutic strategy for potentiating antimicrobial agents. We aimed to evaluate the impact of its suppression on reversing resistance using a model of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli representing multiple levels of quinolone resistance. E. coli mutants exhibiting a spectrum of SOS activity were constructed from isogenic strains carrying quinolone resistance mechanisms with susceptible and resistant phenotypes. Changes in susceptibility were evaluated by static (MICs and dynamic (killing curves or flow cytometry methodologies. A peritoneal sepsis murine model was used to evaluate in vivo impact. Suppression of the SOS response was capable of resensitizing mutant strains with genes encoding three or four different resistance mechanisms (up to 15-fold reductions in MICs. Killing curve assays showed a clear disadvantage for survival (Δlog10 CFU per milliliter [CFU/ml] of 8 log units after 24 h, and the in vivo efficacy of ciprofloxacin was significantly enhanced (Δlog10 CFU/g of 1.76 log units in resistant strains with a suppressed SOS response. This effect was evident even after short periods (60 min of exposure. Suppression of the SOS response reverses antimicrobial resistance across a range of E. coli phenotypes from reduced susceptibility to highly resistant, playing a significant role in increasing the in vivo efficacy.

  12. Quinolone resistant campylobacter infections in Denmark: risk factors and clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Neimann, J.; Nielsen, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    ) than for 381 patients with quinolone-sensitive C. jejuni infections (median 10.3 days, p = 0.001). Foreign travel, eating fresh poultry other than chicken and turkey, and swimming were associated with increased risk for quinolone-resistant C. jejuni infection. Eating fresh chicken (of presumably Danish...... origin) was associated with a decreased risk. Typing data showed an association between strains from retail food products and broiler chickens and quinolone-sensitive domestically acquired C. jejuni infections. An association between treatment with a fluoroquinolone before stool-specimen collection...

  13. Physicochemical properties of quinolone antibiotics in various environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Ryun; Kim, Tae Heung; Bark, Ki-Min

    2002-06-01

    The progress and photosensitivity of quinolone antibiotics are briefly described. By the photolysis of nalidixic acid, the loss of -COOH group is observed. The photoreaction of fluoroquinolones involves heterolytic C-F bond fragmentation. The protonation and divalent cation complexation equilibria are also examined. The spectroscopic properties of these drugs are intensively investigated in biological mimetic systems such as AOT reverse micelle, and H(2)O-CH(3)OH and H(2)O-CH(3)CN mixed solvents. For ofloxacin and norfloxacin, the excited-state intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) is observed. So, fluorescence spectra exhibit reverse solvatochromism in mixed solvents. The change of radiative and non-radiative rate constant can also be explained using this ICT. The influence of dielectric effects of solvent is more significant compared with the specific hydrogen bonding interaction. Theoretical treatments support all of these results.

  14. New luminophor-activators based on (fluoro)quinolone antibacterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, A.V. [Joint Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, BioCity 6A, FIN-20520 Turku (Finland); Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Karaseva, E.T. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Korpela, T. [Joint Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, BioCity 6A, FIN-20520 Turku (Finland); Karasev, V.E. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: karasev@ich.dvo.ru

    2008-11-15

    It was shown that (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics form strongly fluorescent solid-state complexes with Eu(III) and Tb(III) lanthanide ions, with a wavelength red-shift beneficial for applications to greenhouse-cover polymers. Complexes with optimal properties were prepared by the mechanical activation of fine-dispersed composite mixtures with the lanthanide salts. The spectral properties, photo-stability to UV-light, and compatibility with the polyethylene matrix were investigated. The formulation additives of the tablet forms of the antibiotic medicines did not quench the fluorescence from the lanthanide ions. Therefore, the outdated drug forms of the antibiotics can serve as cheap recyclable sources for the covering material of greenhouses. In addition, diphenylguanidine (DPG) was investigated as a coligand. DPG enhanced fluorescence of the fluoroquinolone complexes by decreasing the non-radiative energy loss through O-H vibration of H{sub 2}O.

  15. Antimalarial therapy selection for quinolone resistance among Escherichia coli in the absence of quinolone exposure, in tropical South America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J Davidson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is thought to develop only in the presence of antibiotic pressure. Here we show evidence to suggest that fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli has developed in the absence of fluoroquinolone use. METHODS: Over 4 years, outreach clinic attendees in one moderately remote and five very remote villages in rural Guyana were surveyed for the presence of rectal carriage of ciprofloxacin-resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB. Drinking water was tested for the presence of resistant GNB by culture, and the presence of antibacterial agents and chloroquine by HPLC. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli was examined after serial exposure to chloroquine. Patient and laboratory isolates of E. coli resistant to ciprofloxacin were assessed by PCR-sequencing for quinolone-resistance-determining-region (QRDR mutations. RESULTS: In the very remote villages, 4.8% of patients carried ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli with QRDR mutations despite no local availability of quinolones. However, there had been extensive local use of chloroquine, with higher prevalence of resistance seen in the villages shortly after a Plasmodium vivax epidemic (p<0.01. Antibacterial agents were not found in the drinking water, but chloroquine was demonstrated to be present. Chloroquine was found to inhibit the growth of E. coli in vitro. Replica plating demonstrated that 2-step QRDR mutations could be induced in E. coli in response to chloroquine. CONCLUSIONS: In these remote communities, the heavy use of chloroquine to treat malaria likely selected for ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli. This may be an important public health problem in malarious areas.

  16. The DNA gyrase-quinolone complex. ATP hydrolysis and the mechanism of DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    Quinolone binding to the gyrase-DNA complex induces a conformational change that results in the blocking of supercoiling. Under these conditions gyrase is still capable of ATP hydrolysis which now proceeds through an alternative pathway involving two different conformations of the enzyme (Kampranis......, S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 22606-22614). The kinetics of ATP hydrolysis via this pathway have been studied and found to differ from those of the reaction of the drug-free enzyme. The quinolone-characteristic ATPase rate is DNA-dependent and can be induced in the presence...... of DNA fragments as small as 20 base pairs. By observing the conversion of the ATPase rate to the quinolone characteristic rate, the formation and dissociation of the gyrase-DNA-quinolone complex can be monitored. Comparison of the time dependence of the conversion of the gyrase ATPase with that of DNA...

  17. Auditing wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    B.K. Reilly; Y. Reillly

    2003-01-01

    Reilly B.K. and Y. Reilly. 2003. Auditing wildlife. Koedoe 46(2): 97–102. Pretoria. ISSN 0075-6458. Accountants and auditors are increasingly confronted with the problem of auditing wildlife populations on game ranches as their clients' asset base expands into this industry. This paper aims to provide guidelines on these actions based on case study data and research in the field of wildlife monitoring. Parties entering into dispute on numbers of animals on a property often resort to their au...

  18. Impact of mutations in DNA gyrase genes on quinolone resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Changkaew, Kanjana; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Usui, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Amino acid substitutions providing quinolone resistance to Campyloabcter jejuni have been found in the quinolone resistance-determining region of protein DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA), with the highest frequency at position 86 followed by position 90. In this study, wild-type and mutant recombinant DNA gyrase subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. Soluble 97 kDa GyrA and 87 kDa DNA gyrase subunit B were shown to reconstitute ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. A quinolone-inhibited supercoiling assay demonstrated the roles of Thr86Ile, Thr86Ala, Thr86Lys, Asp90Asn, and Asp90Tyr amino acid substitutions in reducing sensitivity to quinolones. The marked effect of Thr86Ile on all examined quinolones suggested the advantage of this substitution in concordance with recurring isolation of quinolone-resistant C. jejuni. An analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed the importance of the substituent at position 8 in quinolones to overcome the effect of Thr86Ile. Sitafloxacin (SIT), which has a fluorinate cyclopropyl ring at R-1 and a chloride substituent at R-8, a characteristic not found in other quinolones, showed the highest inhibitory activity against all mutant C. jejuni gyrases including ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. The results suggest SIT as a promising drug for the treatment of campylobacteriosis caused by CIP-resistant C. jejuni. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Antimutagenic Effects of Vitamin C Against Oxidative Changes Induced by Quinolones

    OpenAIRE

    Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Rivera-Sánchez, Roberto; Flores-Paz, Rocio; Torres-Ramos, Yessica Dorin; Olivares-Corichi, Ivonne María; Hicks, Juan José

    2008-01-01

    Quinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by quinolones may damage cell structures and could be a risk to health. The use of vitamin C to reduce such risks may have the opposite effects: vitamin C in the presence of divalent metal ions can induce the Fenton reaction, leading to hydroxyl radical (HO˙) generation and oxidative damage. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antioxidant ...

  20. Wildlife Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Wildlife Districts layer is part of a larger dataset contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes feature...

  1. Actualidad de las quinolonas Present situation of quinolones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cué Brugueras

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Las quinolonas son los antimicrobianos que han tenido un mayor desarrollo en los últimos años. Después de obtenerse el ácido nalidíxico, en 1962, se desarrollaron varios compuestos con características muy similares, que solo se establecieron como antisépticos urinarios, y que constituyeron la primera generación de quinolonas, hasta que en 1978, mediante la adición de un grupo piperacinil en posición 7 y un átomo de flúor en posición 6 comenzó a desarrollarse un conjunto de agentes antibacterianos llamados piperacinil fluoroquinolonas o simplemente fluoroquinolonas. El primero de ellos fue el norfloxacino, con el cual se logró una mayor actividad antimicrobiana del grupo y su uso sistémico. Durante años las fluroquinolonas fueron consideradas como un grupo homogéneo de antibióticos, con propiedades semejantes y, por tanto, como la segunda y última posibilidad de generación de quinolonas, pero las posibilidades de transformación de su estructura química ha producido un desarrollo vertiginoso de este grupo, que lo ha convertido en el más acelerado dentro de los antibióticos, con compuestos de mayor espectro antibacteriano, penetración tisular y seguridad, y con menor manifestación de resistencia antimicrobiana, demostrada hasta el presente, lo cual ha hecho que actualmente existan 4 generaciones de quinolonas, que se haya ampliado su uso y que continúe su desarrollo. Por tal motivo, se presenta una revisión que incluye espectro y mecanismo de acción, resistencia bacteriana, farmacodinamia y farmacocinética, interacciones medicamentosas, efectos adversos, indicaciones y dosificación de las más usadas.The quinolones are antimicrobial agents that have attained their highest development in the last years. After obtaining nalidixic acid, in 1962, several compounds were developed with similar characteristics that were only established as urinary antiseptics and that were the first generation of quinolones until 1978, when

  2. Association of Transferable Quinolone Resistance Determinant qnrB19 with Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases in Salmonella Give and Salmonella Heidelberg in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four nontyphoidal Salmonella strains with resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and nonclassical quinolone resistance phenotype were studied. Two S. Give were isolated from pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis, and two S. Heidelberg were recovered from raw chicken meat. Phenotypic characterization included antimicrobial susceptibility testing and detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs by the double-disc synergy method. The detection of quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, and gyrC genes, blaESBLs genes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR determinants was carried out by molecular methods. Plasmid analysis included Southern blot and restriction patterns. Transferability of resistance genes was examined by transformation. blaTEM-1 + blaSHV-12 genes were detected in S. Give SG9611 and blaTEM-1 + blaCTX-M-2 in the other three strains: S. Give SG9811, S. Heidelberg SH7511, and SH7911. Regardless of origin and serovars, the qnrB19 gene was detected in the 4 strains studied. All determinants of resistance were localized in plasmids and successfully transferred by transformation. This study highlights the circulation of qnrB19 associated with blaTEM-1, blaSHV-12, and blaCTX-M-2 in S. Give and S. Heidelberg in Venezuela. The recognition of factors associated with increasing resistance and the study of the molecular mechanisms involved can lead to a more focused use of antimicrobial agents.

  3. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Mingo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Mingo NWR outlines procedures for monitoring the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of the species of wildlife...

  4. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Malheur NWR summarizes Refuge objectives, policies on wildlife inventory procedures, biological habitat units, physical facility...

  5. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance and implications for human and animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolone antibiotics have been widely used in human and veterinary medicine. This has caused the development of resistance and difficulties in the treatment of complicated bacterial infections in humans. The resistance to quinolones develops due to chromosome mutations and it can also be transferred by plasmids. The target enzyme for quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria is Gyrasa A, while the target enzyme in Grampositive bacteria is mostly topoisomerase IV. Gyrase A consists of two subunits encoded by genes gyrA and gyrB. The function of the enzyme is to introduce negative super coiling in DNA and therefore is essential for the replication of bacteria. Quinolone resistance develops if point mutations at 83 and/or 87 codon are introduced on gyrA. Establishing a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC to this group of antimicrobials will reveal possible mutations. Recently it was discovered that quinolone resistance is transmittable by plasmid termed PMQR (plasmid mediated quinolone resistance. The target gene marked qnr encodes a pentapeptide repeat family protein. Pentapeptide repeats form sheets, involved in protein-protein interactions. Qnr protein binds to GyrA protecting the enzyme from the inhibitory effect of ciprofloxacin. The distribution of qnr related resistance is higher in humans than in animals. In poultry, however, this type of resistance is present more than in other animals. Plasmid mediated resistance contributes to the faster spread of quinolone resistance. Proper food handling will significantly contribute to decreasing the risk from infection to which people are exposed. In medical and veterinary laboratories antimicrobial resistance monitoring in clinical and environmental isolates is advised. Since correlation between antibiotics application and antimicrobial resistance is often suggested, antimicrobial use must be under strict control of the authorities both in human and in veterinary medicine. .

  6. Quinolone susceptibility and genetic characterization of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, B C J; Hossain, Sabrina; Wimalasena, S H M P; Pathirana, H N K S; Wendt, Mitchell; Heo, Gang-Joon

    2017-06-01

    Turtle-borne Salmonella enterica owns significance as a leading cause in human salmonellosis. The current study aimed to determine the quinolone susceptibility and the genetic characteristics of 21 strains of S. enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles. Susceptibility of four antimicrobials including nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin was examined in disk diffusion and MIC tests where the majority of the isolates were susceptible to all tested quinolones. In genetic characterization, none of the isolates were positive for qnr or aac(6')-Ib genes and no any target site mutations could be detected in gyrA, gyrB, and parC quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDR). In addition, neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree derived using gyrA gene sequences exhibited two distinct clads comprising; first, current study isolates, and second, quinolone-resistant isolates of human and animal origin. All results suggest that studied strains of S. enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles are susceptible to quinolones and genetically more conserved with regards to gyrA gene region.

  7. Novel variants of the Smqnr family of quinolone resistance genes in clinical isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, N C; Wareham, D W

    2010-03-01

    Recent analysis of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has identified a novel family of resistance genes (Smqnr) encoding pentapeptide repeat proteins, which confer low-level resistance to quinolones. This study describes further novel variants present in clinical isolates of S. maltophilia and investigates their effect on resistance to a number of quinolones in an Escherichia coli host. PCR for Smqnr alleles was carried out on a selection of S. maltophilia from clinical specimens, and amplicons were cloned and transformed in E. coli TOP10 cells. Transformed colonies carrying the plasmid were tested for susceptibility to a range of quinolones by MIC determination. DNA sequences were determined and translated peptide sequences compared with known SmQnr sequences. Thirteen isolates were found to contain Smqnr alleles, of which six corresponded to previously identified Smqnr sequences, while seven were novel variants. Increases in quinolone MICs compared with wild-type E. coli TOP10 were seen for all strains transformed with Smqnr alleles. There is considerable diversity within Smqnr alleles. S. maltophilia may be a significant reservoir for the dissemination of quinolone resistance elements to Enterobacteriaceae.

  8. Severe pneumococcal pneumonia: impact of new quinolones on prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meybeck Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most guidelines have been proposing, for more than 15 years, a β-lactam combined with either a quinolone or a macrolide as empirical, first-line therapy of severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP requiring ICU admission. Our goal was to evaluate the outcome of patients with severe CAP, focusing on the impact of new rather than old fluoroquinolones combined with β-lactam in the empirical antimicrobial treatments. Methods Retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted in a 16-bed general intensive care unit (ICU, between January 1996 and January 2009, for severe (Pneumonia Severity Index > or = 4 community-acquired pneumonia due to non penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with a β-lactam combined with a fluoroquinolone. Results We included 70 patients of whom 38 received a β-lactam combined with ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin and 32 combined with levofloxacin. Twenty six patients (37.1% died in the ICU. Three independent factors associated with decreased survival in ICU were identified: septic shock on ICU admission (AOR = 10.6; 95% CI 2.87-39.3; p = 0.0004, age > 70 yrs. (AOR = 4.88; 95% CI 1.41-16.9; p = 0.01 and initial treatment with a β-lactam combined with ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (AOR = 4.1; 95% CI 1.13-15.13; p = 0.03. Conclusion Our results suggest that, when combined to a β-lactam, levofloxacin is associated with lower mortality than ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin in severe pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia.

  9. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodstream infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Öztel Ocak, Hikmet; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Aydın, Faruk

    2016-04-01

    One of the treatment options of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. infections which are the most common opportunistic pathogens of gram-negative sepsis is quinolones. Resistance to quinolones which act by disrupting DNA synthesis has been increasing. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes play an important role in the spread of resistance. The data about the prevalence of PMQR genes in our country is quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of known PMQR genes namely qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA and oqxAB amongst quinolone-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from blood cultures. One hundred twenty seven E.coli and 66 Klebsiella isolates detected as nalidixic acid- and/or ciprofloxacin-resistant by phenotypical methods, from 193 blood samples of 187 patients admitted to Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Bacteriology Unit of Patient Service Laboratory between January 2012 to August 2013 were included in the study. The presence of PMQR genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr variants PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used. The positive bands were sequenced using the same primers, and aligned with formerly defined resistance gene sequences, and confirmed. In the study, 56.7% (72/127) of E.coli and 19.7% (13/66) of Klebsiella spp. isolates, with a total of 44% (85/193) of all the isolates were found to be phenotypically resistant to quinolones. Of the 13 resistant Klebsiella isolates, 11 were K.pneumoniae, and two were K.oxytoca. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates showed higher resistance (50/80, 62.5%) to quinolones than the negative ones (35/113, 30.9%). The prevalence of quinolone resistance genes among resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates was determined as qnrA, 1.4% and 15.4%; qnrB, 4

  10. A “Double-Edged” Scaffold: Antitumor Power within the 
Antibacterial Quinolone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisacchi, Gregory S.; Hale, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1980s, reports emerged describing experimental antibacterial quinolones having significant potency against eukaryotic Type II topoisomerases (topo II) and showing cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines. As a result, several pharmaceutical companies initiated quinolone anticancer programs to explore the potential of this class in comparison to conventional human topo II inhibiting antitumor drugs such as doxorubicin and etoposide. In this review, we present a modern re-evaluation of the anticancer potential of the quinolone class in the context of today’s predominantly pathway-based (rather than cytotoxicity-based) oncology drug R&D environment. The quinolone eukaryotic SAR is comprehensively discussed, contrasted with the corresponding prokaryotic data, and merged with recent structural biology information which is now beginning to help explain the basis for that SAR. Quinolone topo II inhibitors appear to be much less susceptible to efflux-mediated resistance, a current limitation of therapy with conventional agents. Recent advances in the biological understanding of human topo II isoforms suggest that significant progress might now be made in overcoming two other treatment-limiting disadvantages of conventional topo II inhibitors, namely cardiotoxicity and drug-induced secondary leukemias. We propose that quinolone class topo II inhibitors could have a useful future therapeutic role due to the continued need for effective topo II drugs in many cancer treatment settings, and due to the recent biological and structural advances which can now provide, for the first time, specific guidance for the design of a new class of inhibitors potentially superior to existing agents. PMID:26695512

  11. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Giovanna Rincon; Radice, Marcela; Sennati, Samantha; Pallecchi, Lucia; Rossolini, Gian María; Gutkind, Gabriel; Conza, Jose Alejandro Di

    2013-01-01

    High quinolone resistance rates were observed among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria. In the present study, we searched for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes within the 55 oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria collected in a previous survey. The main PMQR determinants were aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrB, which had prevalence rates of 42.4% and 33.3%, respectively. The aac(6')-Ib-cr gene was more frequently found in CTX-M-15-producing isolates, while qnrB was homogeneously distributed among all CTX-M producers. PMID:24037111

  12. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Rincon Cruz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High quinolone resistance rates were observed among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria. In the present study, we searched for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes within the 55 oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria collected in a previous survey. The main PMQR determinants were aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB, which had prevalence rates of 42.4% and 33.3%, respectively. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was more frequently found in CTX-M-15-producing isolates, while qnrB was homogeneously distributed among all CTX-M producers.

  13. Wildlife Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Spash, Clive L.; Aldred, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we consider how conservation has arisen as a key aspect of the reaction to human-initiated degradation and disappearance of ecosystems, wild lands. and wildlife. Concern over species extinction is given an historical perspective which shows the way in which pressure on wild and natural aspects of global ecology have changed in recent centuries. The role of conservation in the struggle to protect the environment is then analysed using underlying ethical arguments behind the econo...

  14. [Determination of 25 quinolones in cosmetics by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Xiaoke; Xie, Liqi; Yue, Zhenfeng; Kang, Haining; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Yao

    2015-03-01

    An analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 25 quinolones, including danofloxacin mesylate, enrofloxacin, flumequine, oxloinic acid, ciprofloxacin, sarafloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin etc in cosmetics using direct extraction and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Cosmetic sample was extracted by acidified acetonitrile, defatted by n-hexane and separated on Poroshell EC-C18 column with gradient elution program using acetonitrile and water (both containing 0. 1% formic acid) as the mobile phases and analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS under the positive mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The interference of matrix was reduced by the matrix-matched calibration standard curve. The method showed good linearities over the range of 1-200 mg/kg for the 25 quinolones with good linear correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.999). The method detection limit of the 25 quinolones was 1.0 mg/kg, and the recoveries of all analytes in lotion, milky and cream cosmetics matrices ranged from 87.4% to 105% at the spiked levels of 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 4.54%-19.7% (n = 6). The results indicated that this method is simple, fast and credible, and suitable for the simultaneous determination of the quinolones in the above three types of cosmetics.

  15. Chemistry of Nitroquinolones and Synthetic Application to Unnatural 1-Methyl-2-quinolone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagatoshi Nishiwaki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The 1-methyl-2-quinolone (MeQone framework is often found in alkaloids and recently attention was drawn to unnatural MeQone derivatives with the aim of finding new biologically active compounds, however, low reactivity of the MeQone framework prevents the syntheses of versatile derivatives. A nitro group is one of the useful activating groups for this framework that enables a concise chemical transformation. Among nitroquinolones, 1-methyl-3,6,8-trinitro-2-quinolone (TNQ exhibits unusual reactivity favoring region-selective cine-substitutions that afford 4-substituted 1-methyl-6,8-dinitro-2-quinolones upon treatment with nucleophilic reagents. Contrary to this, 1-methyl-3,6-dinitro-2-quinolone (3,6-DNQ does not undergo any reaction under the same conditions. The unusual reactivity of TNQ is caused by steric repulsion between the methyl group at the 1-position and the nitro group at the 8-position, which distorts the MeQone framework. As a result, the pyridone ring of TNQ loses aromaticity and acts rather as an activated nitroalkene. Indeed, the pyridone moiety of TNQ undergoes cycloaddition with electron-rich alkenes or dienes under mild conditions, whereby a new fused ring is constructed on the [c]-face of the MeQone. Consequently, TNQ can be used as a new scaffold leading to versatile unnatural MeQone derivatives.

  16. Distinguishing importation from diversification of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae by molecular evolutionary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distinguishing the recent introduction of quinolone resistant gonococci into a population from diversification of resistant strains already in the population is important for planning effective infection control strategies. We applied molecular evolutionary analyses to DNA sequences from 9 housekeeping genes and gyrA, parC and porB of 24 quinolone resistant N. gonorrhoeae (QRNG and 24 quinolone sensitive isolates collected in Israel during 2000–2001. Results Phylogenetic and eBURST analyses and estimates of divergence time indicated QRNG were introduced on 3 separate occasions and underwent limited diversification by mutation, deletion and horizontal gene transfer. Reconstruction of N. gonorrhoeae demography showed a slowly declining effective strain population size from 1976 to 1993, rapid decline between 1994 and 1999, and an increase from 1999 to 2001. This is partially attributable to declining gonorrhea case rates from 1973 to 1994. Additional contributing factors are selective sweeps of antibiotic resistant gonococci and increased transmission from sex workers. The abrupt decline in the mid-1990s heralded an increased incidence of gonorrhea from 1997 to the present. The subsequent increase in effective strain population size since 1999 reflects the increased gonococcal census population and introduction of quinolone resistance strains. Conclusion Our study demonstrates the effective use of population genetic approaches to assess recent and historical population dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae.

  17. Detection of quinolone-resistance mutations in Salmonella spp. strains of epidemic and poultry origin

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Barreiros de Souza; Marciane Magnani; Rafaela Gomes Ferrari; Luciana Bill Mikito Kottwitz; Daniele Sartori; Maria Cristina Bronharo Tognim; Tereza Cristina R.M. de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Mutations into codons Aspartate-87 (62%) and Serine-83 (38%) in QRDR of gyrA were identified in 105 Salmonella strains resistant to nalidixic acid (94 epidemic and 11 of poultry origin). The results show a high incidence of mutations associated to quinolone resistance but suggest association with others mechanisms of resistance.

  18. Detection of quinolone-resistance mutations in Salmonella spp. strains of epidemic and poultry origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Barreiros de Souza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations into codons Aspartate-87 (62% and Serine-83 (38% in QRDR of gyrA were identified in 105 Salmonella strains resistant to nalidixic acid (94 epidemic and 11 of poultry origin. The results show a high incidence of mutations associated to quinolone resistance but suggest association with others mechanisms of resistance.

  19. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 130 Salmonella isolates were obtained from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in the Shandong Province of China. All isolate serotypes were tested according to the Kauf...

  20. Effects of gyrA and parC Mutations in Quinolones Resistant Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most important of fluoroquinolones resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of mutations in the bacterial enzymes targeted by fluoroquinolones; DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV. The effect of gyrase and Topoisomerase IV enzymes mutations on quinolones resistance in clinical Gram negative bacteria in ...

  1. Four Specific Hapten Conformations Dominating Antibody Specificity: Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis for Quinolone Immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiahong; Wang, Lanteng; Lu, Lanlan; Shen, Xing; Huang, Xin-An; Liu, Yingju; Sun, Xiulan; Wang, Zhanhui; Eremin, Sergei Alexandrovich; Sun, Yuanming; Xu, Zhenlin; Lei, Hongtao

    2017-06-20

    Antibody-based immunoassay methods have been important tools for monitoring drug residues in animal foods. However, because of limited knowledge about the quantitative structure-activity relationships between a hapten and its resultant antibody specificity, antibody production with the desired specificity is still a huge challenge. In this study, the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) was analyzed in accordance with the cross-reactivity of quinolone drugs reacting with the antibody raised by pipemidic acid as the immunizing hapten and compared with the reported cross-reactivity data and their hapten structures. It was found that the specificity of a quinolone antibody was strongly related to the conformation of the hapten used and that hapten conformations shaped like the letters "I", "P", and "Φ" were essential for the desired high specificity with low cross-reactivity, but that the hapten conformation shaped like the letter "Y" led to an antibody with broad specificity and high cross-reactivity. Almost all of the antibodies against quinolones could result from these four hapten conformations. It was first found that the concrete conformations dominated the specificity of the antibody to quinolone, which will be of significance for the accurate hapten design, predictable antibody specificity, and better understanding the recognition mechanism between haptens and the antibodies for immunoassays.

  2. Improved microbial screning assay for the detection of quinolone residues in poultry and eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikkemaat, M.G.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Elferink, J.W.A.; Cocq, A.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Egmond, van H.J.

    2007-01-01

    An improved microbiological screening assay is reported for the detection of quinolone residues in poultry muscle and eggs. The method was validated using fortified tissue samples and is the first microbial assay to effectively detect enrofloxacin, difloxacin, danofloxacin, as well as flumequine and

  3. 'Teenage Wildlife'

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Curatorial videotheque project for the exhibition 'Nothing in the World But Youth' at Turner Contemporary, Margate, 17 September 2011 – 8 January 2012\\ud Article included in exhibition catalogue for 'Nothing in the World But Youth' Turner Contemporary pp. 17-25 \\ud \\ud Accompanying catalogue Text:\\ud \\ud TEENAGE WILDLIFE\\ud “You're tearing me apart!...You say one thing, he says another, and everybody changes back again”. \\ud – James Dean as Jim Stark in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) directed b...

  4. Wildlife conservation on farmland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macdonald, David W; Feber, R. (Ruth)

    2015-01-01

    ...: Integrates more than 30 years of research by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at Oxford to reveal how agricultural systems and wildlife interact, presenting examples from scales varying...

  5. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary objective at Shiawassee is to provide food and cover for migratory birds, with emphasis on waterfowl, during spring and fall migrations. A Wildlife...

  6. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Horicon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Horicon NWR describes procedures for the following surveys: weekly aerial goose survey, migratory bird survey, breeding population...

  7. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Ottawa NWR describes the inventory program’s relation to Refuge objectives and outlines the program’s policies and administration....

  8. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Muscatatuck NWR Wildlife Inventory Plan summarizes procedures for monitoring wood duck production, monitoring Canada goose and mallard production, and conducting...

  9. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin prevent quinolone-resistance in a penicillin-resistant isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreillon Philippe

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continuous spread of penicillin-resistant pneumococci represents a permanent threat in the treatment of pneumococcal infections, especially when strains show additional resistance to quinolones. The main objective of this study was to determine a treatment modality impeding the emergence of quinolone resistance. Results Exposure of a penicillin-resistant pneumococcus to increasing concentrations of trovafloxacin or ciprofloxacin selected for mutants resistant to these drugs. In the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin, development of trovafloxacin-resistance and high-level ciprofloxacin-resistance were prevented. Conclusions Considering the risk of quinolone-resistance in pneumococci, the observation might be of clinical importance.

  10. Peripheral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M Harold; Davis, Michael J; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Simmons, Grant H; Bender, Shawn B; Padilla, Jaume; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow (BF) increases with increasing exercise intensity in skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle. In humans during maximal exercise intensities, 85% to 90% of total cardiac output is distributed to skeletal and cardiac muscle. During exercise BF increases modestly and heterogeneously to brain and decreases in gastrointestinal, reproductive, and renal tissues and shows little to no change in skin. If the duration of exercise is sufficient to increase body/core temperature, skin BF is also increased in humans. Because blood pressure changes little during exercise, changes in distribution of BF with incremental exercise result from changes in vascular conductance. These changes in distribution of BF throughout the body contribute to decreases in mixed venous oxygen content, serve to supply adequate oxygen to the active skeletal muscles, and support metabolism of other tissues while maintaining homeostasis. This review discusses the response of the peripheral circulation of humans to acute and chronic dynamic exercise and mechanisms responsible for these responses. This is accomplished in the context of leading the reader on a tour through the peripheral circulation during dynamic exercise. During this tour, we consider what is known about how each vascular bed controls BF during exercise and how these control mechanisms are modified by chronic physical activity/exercise training. The tour ends by comparing responses of the systemic circulation to those of the pulmonary circulation relative to the effects of exercise on the regional distribution of BF and mechanisms responsible for control of resistance/conductance in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  11. Molecular evidence of the close relatedness of clinical, gull and wastewater isolates of quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Varela, Ana Rita; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Guimarães, M. Augusta; Costa,Paulo Martins da; Caniça, Manuela; Manaia, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility to quinolones isolated from different environmental sources (urban wastewater treatment plants, n = 61; hospital effluent, n = 10; urban streams, n = 9; gulls, n = 18; birds of prey, n = 17) and from hospitalised patients (n = 28) were compared based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The habitats with the most diversified genotypes of quinolone-resistant E. coli, corresponding to the highe...

  12. Comparative Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese Children and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P>0.05. The double mutation Ser83→Leu + Asp87→Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P=0.5444. Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance.

  13. Resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from Danish broilers at farm level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Wedderkopp, A.

    2003-01-01

    Aims : To investigate the prevalence of quinolone resistance among Campylobacter jejuni and Camp. coli isolates from Danish poultry at the farm level, as well as for the whole country. Methods and Results : Data and isolates were collected from a national surveillance of Campylobacter in poultry......-resistant variant. Conclusions : Overall, quinolone resistance among Campylobacter isolates from Danish broilers was 7.5% in 1998 and 1999; it was higher among Camp. coli than Camp. jejuni . Genetic diversity among resistant isolates was lower than among susceptible isolates, and certain clones existed in both...... a resistant and a susceptible variant. Some resistant clones appeared to persist on the farms and were repeatedly isolated from poultry flocks. Significance and Impact of the Study : The study is important for the understanding of persistence and dynamics of Campylobacter in broiler houses. It also highlights...

  14. Quantitative retention-activity relationship models for quinolones using biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Ping; Chen, Yu; Wang, Shu-Rong; Chen, Cong; Ye, Li-Ming

    2008-01-01

    A simple and reproducible quantitative retention-activity relationship (QRAR) model utilizing biopartitioning micellar chromatography was developed for the biological parameter estimation of drugs. The correlation between retention factors of quinolones obtained in physiological conditions (pH, ionic strength) and biological activities was investigated using different second-order polynomial models. The predictive and interpretative ability of the chromatographic models was evaluated in terms of cross-validated data (RMSEC, RMSECV and RMSECVi). The aim was to obtain adequate QRAR models of half-life, clearance, volume of distribution, plasma protein combination rate, area under concentration-time curve and toxicity (LD50) of quinolones, and to elucidate the advantages and limitations of using a single parameter as independent variable for describing and estimating the activities. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. "Changes in cartilage of rats after treatment with Quinolone and in Magnesium-deficient diet "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakibaei M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural changes in immature articular carilage were studied after treatment of 5-weeks-old rats with ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, and in magnesium deficiency.We concluded that quinolone-induced arthropathy is probably due to chelation of functionally available magnesium in joint cartilage as magnesium deficiency in joint cartilage could impair chondrocyte-matrix- interaction which is mediated by cation-dependent integrin-receptors of the β1-subfamily. With immuno-histochemical methods using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies we showed that B1 integrins were expressed in rat joint cartilage. Joint cartilage lesions were detected in ofloxacin-treated and magnesium-deficient rats. Lesions were more pronounced in the quinolone-treated group. Expression of several integrins was reduced in the vicinity of lesions after oral treatment with 2×600 mg ofloxacin/kg body wt for one day. Gross-structural lesions (e.g. cleft formation, unmasked collagen fibres in magnesium deficient rats were very similar but changes in intergrin expression were less pronounced. Alterations observed on the ultrastructural level showed striking similarities in magnesium-deficient rats and in rats treated with single doses of 600 mg ofloxacin per kg body wt.Typical observation were: bundle shaped, electron-dense aggregates on the surface and in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes, detachement of the cell membrance from the matrix and necrotic chondrocytes, reduced synthesis and/or reduced of extracellular matrix and swelling of cell organelles such as mitochondria.The results of this study confirm our previously reported finding that quinolone-induced arthropathy probably is caued by a reduction of functionally available magnesium (ionized Mg2+ in cartilage. Furthermore, they provide a basis for aimed studies with human cartilage samples from quinolone-treated patients which might be available postmortal or after hip replacement surgery

  16. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Clinical Enterobacteria from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Ezequiel; Lucero, Celeste; Romero, Genara; Quiroga, María Paula; Rapoport, Melina; Guerriero, Leonor; Andres, Patricia; Rodriguez, Cecilia; Galas, Marcelo; Centrón, Daniela; Corso, Alejandra; Petroni, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    This first nationwide study was conducted to analyze the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in phenotypically unselected (consecutive) clinical enterobacteria. We studied 1,058 isolates that had been consecutively collected in 66 hospitals of the WHONET-Argentina Resistance Surveillance Network. Overall, 26% of isolates were nonsusceptible to at least one of the three quinolones tested (nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin). The overall prevalence of PMQR genes was 8.1% (4.6% for aac(6')-Ib-cr; 3.9% for qnr genes; and 0.4% for oqxA and oqxB, which were not previously reported in enterobacteria other than Klebsiella spp. from Argentina). The PMQR prevalence was highly variable among the enterobacterial species or when the different genes were considered. The prevalent PMQR genes were located in class 1 integrons [qnrB2, qnrB10, and aac(6')-Ib-cr]; in the ColE1-type plasmid pPAB19-1 or Tn2012-like transposons (qnrB19); and in Tn6238 or bracketed by IS26 and blaOXA-1 [aac(6')-Ib-cr]. The mutations associated with quinolone resistance that were located in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR mutations) of gyrA, parC, and gyrB were also investigated. The occurrence of QRDR mutations was significantly associated with the presence of PMQR genes: At least one QRDR mutation was present in 82% of the PMQR-harboring isolates but in only 23% of those without PMQR genes (p enterobacteria where all the genes currently known have been screened.

  17. Dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of finishing pigs after ciprofloxacin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; Xia, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; Lei, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2014-09-01

    Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided into 2 equal groups: the experimental (EP) group and control (CP) group. Pigs in the EP group were orally treated daily with 5 mg ciprofloxacin/kg of body weight for 30 days, and pigs in the CP group were fed a normal diet. Fresh feces were collected at 16 time points from day 0 to day 61. At each time point, ten E. coli clones were tested for susceptibility to quinolones and mutations of gyrA and parC. The results showed that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin increased 16-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin administration for 3 days and decreased 256-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin withdrawal for 26 days. GyrA (S83L, D87N/ D87Y) and parC (S80I) substitutions were observed in all quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) clones with an MIC ≥8 µg/ml. This study provides scientific theoretical guidance for the rational use of antimicrobials and the control of bacterial resistance.

  18. Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans and swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hasman, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) were investigated in 124 Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n = 85) and swine (n = 39) in Denmark. The collection included 59 high-level CIP-resistant...... isolates (MIC >= 4) from human (n = 51) and pig origin (n = 8) and 65 low-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >= 0.125) from human (n = 34) and pig origin (n = 31). Resistance by target modification was screened by PCR amplification and sequencing, of the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs......) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. QRDR mutations occurred in all except two isolates (98%). All high-level CIP-resistant E. coli had one or two mutations in gyrA in combination with mutations in parC or parE. Mutations in parC and parE were only found in combination with gyrA mutations, and no mutations...

  19. [Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to quinolones and injectables in Colombia, 2012-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, Claudia; Zabaleta, Angie; Valbuena, Angélica; Murcia, Martha

    2017-01-24

    Tuberculosis is a health problem worldwide. The World Health Organization estimated 9.6 million new cases and 480,000 multirresistant cases for 2014. The assessment of resistance to quinolones and injectables was implemented only a few years ago, so its prevalence is not known. To determine the prevalence of resistance to amikacin, capreomycin and ofloxacin in cases of tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and/or rifampin during 2012-2013. This was a cross-sectional study of 489 isolates resistant to isoniazid and/or rifampin. We used the Bactec MGITTM technique for susceptibility tests. For analyzing the rate of resistance, we grouped cases according to the history of treatment with second line drugs. In the 438 new cases, the drug that showed greater overall resistance was kanamycin with 7.1 % (95% CI: 4.6 to 9.6). In 51 previously treated cases, this highest resistance was 27.5 % (95% CI:14.2 to 40.7). The overall resistance was higher in cases with a history of treatment with quinolones and injectables. We found seven cases of extremely resistant tuberculosis. This study demonstrates the presence of resistance to second line drugs in people with drug-resistant tuberculosis with and without previous treatment with quinolones and/or injectables, these latter having a higher percentage of resistance. For that reason, it is essential to perform susceptibility testing and analyze this information routinely.

  20. Synthesis and anti-HSV-1 activity of quinolonic acyclovir analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Bianca d'A; Gomes, Claudia Regina B; Frugulhetti, Izabel Christina de P P; Faro, Letícia V; Alvarenga, Lise; de Souza, Maria Cecília B V; de Souza, Thiago M L; Ferreira, Vitor F

    2006-02-15

    Several 1-[(2-hydroxy-ethoxy)methyl]-3-carbethoxy-4(1H)quinolones (2a-l) and l-[(2-hydroxy-ethoxy)methyl]-4(1H)quinolone-3-carboxylic acids (3a-j and 3l) were synthesized and 2a-j, 2l and 3a-j, 3l were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), employing a one-pot reaction: silylation of the desired quinolone (BSTFA 1% TMCS) followed by equimolar amount addition of 1,3-dioxolane, chlorotrimethylsilane and KI, at room temperature. The acyclonucleosides 2a-l were obtained in 40-77% yields. The esters 2a-j and 2l were subsequently converted into the corresponding hydroxyacids 3 in 40-70% yields. Attempts of hydrolysis of 2k produced only a mixture of degradation products. Antiviral activity of 2 and 3 on HSV-1 virus infection was assessed by the virus yield assay. Except for compounds 2i and 3e, the acyclonucleosides were found to reduce the virus yield by 70-99% at the concentration of 50 microM, being the acids, in general, more effective inhibitors than their corresponding esters. Compounds 3j and 2d exhibited antiviral activity against HSV-1 virus with EC50 of 0.7+/-0.04 and 0.8+/-0.09 microM, respectively. Both compounds were not toxic towards the Vero cell line.

  1. Wildlife inventory plan, Becharof National Wildlife Refuge, King Salmon, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan for Becharof National Wildlife Refuge outlines the different projects and surveys that will help conserve fish and wildlife populations...

  2. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Inventory Plan outlines the strategy, techniques and purpose of a wildlife inventory on the Refuge. Futhermore the...

  3. The Urban Wildlife Institute: Exploring Chicago's wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    Magle, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The Lincoln Park Zoo founded the Urban Wildlife Institute (UWI) in 2008, with the goal of conducting science to minimize conflict between humans and wildlife in cities around the world. UWI has since created a massive and unprecedented urban wildlife biodiversity monitoring network throughout the Chicagoland region. We will briefly summarize some of our findings on Chicago’s mammal, bat, arthropod, and bird populations, with special emphasis on our database of over 200,000 images of urban wil...

  4. Dismal Swamp Wildlife

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Conceived and constructed by nature the Great Swamp is the most gigantic filtration plant ever built; and more. To protect the health of the wildlife, for which-...

  5. VT Wildlife Linkage Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Wildlife Linkage Habitat Analysis uses landscape scale data to identify or predict the location of potentially significant wildlife linkage...

  6. Wildlife inventory plan [1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1938, and presently contains 37,631 acres. The refuge marshes provide production, resting, and feeding habitat...

  7. Miscellaneous Wildlife Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of species donated to ADF&G and the Alaska Zoo from Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Animals include sockeye salmon eggs, rainbow trout eggs,...

  8. Circulation economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Stig; Jakobsen, Ove

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - This paper is an attempt to advance the critical discussion regarding environmental and societal responsibility in economics and business. Design/methodology/approach - The paper presents and discusses as a holistic, organic perspective enabling innovative solutions to challenges...... concerning the responsible and efficient use of natural resources and the constructive interplay with culture. To reach the goal of sustainable development, the paper argues that it is necessary to make changes in several dimensions in mainstream economics. This change of perspective is called a turn towards...... presupposes a perspective integrating economic, natural and cultural values. Third, to organize the interplay between all stakeholders we introduce an arena for communicative cooperation. Originality/value - The paper concludes that circulation economics presupposes a change in paradigm, from a mechanistic...

  9. Genetic analysis of a pediatric clinical isolate of Moraxella catarrhalis with resistance to macrolides and quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2015-04-01

    During the surveillance conducted in 2012 by the Drug-resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease, we isolated a strain of Moraxella catarrhalis that demonstrated resistance to both macrolides and quinolones from a male pediatric patient aged 1.5 years who had developed acute bronchitis. Then we evaluated the susceptibility of this strain to different types of antibacterial agents and conducted a genetic analysis. The results of the susceptibility evaluation showed that the MIC values of azithromycin, clarithromycin, and rokitamycin were >64 μg/mL, >64 μg/mL, and 4 μg/mL, respectively; clearly demonstrating resistance to macrolides. The MIC values of the quinolones levofloxacin, tosufloxacin, and garenoxacin were 4 μg/mL, 2 μg/mL, and 1 μg/mL, respectively; indicating decreased susceptibility. The genetic analysis of this strain revealed one mutation in 23s rRNA with a replacement of adenine by thymine at nucleotide position 2330 (A2330T) and another mutation in gyrB at nucleotide position 1481 by replacement of adenine with guanine (A1481G) that caused a substitution of the 494 th asparagine acid by glycine, as being associated with the observed resistance to macrolides and quinolones, respectively. Similar to drug-resistant bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, the prevalence of which has recently increased, the treatment of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis infections is considered difficult due to the development of resistance to different types of antibacterial agents. It is vital to maintain an unwavering focus on the trend toward an increasing number of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis strains and ensure the proper use of each antibacterial agent. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Polyamines induce resistance to cationic peptide, aminoglycoside, and quinolone antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dong H; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2006-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of human pathogens, is noted for its environmental versatility, enormous metabolic capacity, and resistance to antibiotics. Overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH and increased resistance to polycationic peptide antibiotics (e.g., polymyxin B) mediated by the PhoPQ two-component system on induction of a putative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification operon (PA3552-PA3559) have been reported as part of the adaptive responses to magnesium limitation in P. aeruginosa. Induction of the oprH-phoPQ operon and the LPS modification operon by exogenous spermidine was revealed from GeneChip analysis during studies of polyamine metabolism and was confirmed by the lacZ fusions of affected promoters. From the results of MIC measurements, it was found that addition of spermidine or other polyamines to the growth medium increased the MIC values of multiple antibiotics, including polycationic antibiotics, aminoglycosides, quinolones, and fluorescent dyes. MIC values of these compounds in the transposon insertion mutants of oprH, phoP, phoQ, and pmrB were also determined in the presence and absence of spermidine. The results showed that the spermidine effect on cationic peptide antibiotic and quinolone resistance was diminished in the phoP mutant only. The spermidine effect on antibiotics was not influenced by magnesium concentrations, as demonstrated by MICs and oprH::lacZ fusion studies in the presence of 20 muM or 2 mM magnesium. Furthermore, in spermidine uptake mutants, MICs of cationic peptide antibiotics and fluorescent dyes, but not of aminoglycosides and quinolones, were increased by spermidine. These results suggested the presence of a complicated molecular mechanism for polyamine-mediated resistance to multiple antibiotics in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Hawtin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research.Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more potent.As a first-in-class anticancer

  12. Lanthanum triflate triggered synthesis of tetrahydroquinazolinone derivatives of N-allyl quinolone and their biological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jardosh Hardik H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 24 derivatives of tetrahydroquinazolinone has been synthesized by one-pot cyclocondensation reaction of N-allyl quinolones, cyclic β-diketones and (thiourea/N-phenylthiourea in presence of lanthanum triflate catalyst. This methodology allowed us to achieve the products in excellent yield by stirring at room temperature. All the synthesized compounds were investigated against a representative panel of pathogenic strains using broth microdilution MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration method for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Amongst these sets of heterocyclic compounds 5h, 6b, 6h, 5f, 5l, 5n and 6g found to have admirable activity.

  13. Affinity of 3-acyl substituted 4-quinolones at the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lager, Erik; Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard

    2008-01-01

    The finding that alkyl 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate and N-alkyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives may be high-affinity ligands at the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, prompted a study of 3-acyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (3-acyl-4-quinolones......). In general, the affinity of the 3-acyl derivatives was found to be comparable with the 3-carboxylate and the 3-carboxamide derivatives, and certain substituents (e.g., benzyl) in position 6 were again shown to be important. As it is believed that the benzodiazepine binding site is situated between an alpha...

  14. Coxiella burnetii Genotypes in Iberian Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Barrio, David; Hagen, Ferry; Tilburg, Jeroen J H C; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    To investigate if Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, genotypes circulating in wildlife are associated with those infecting livestock and humans, multiple-locus variable number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA-6-marker) was carried out over C. burnetii obtained from red deer (Cervus elaphus), Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), black rat (Rattus rattus), and wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus). MLVA typing was performed by using six variable loci in C. burnetii: Ms23, Ms24, Ms27, Ms28, Ms33, and Ms34. The C. burnetii cooperative database from MLVABank 5.0 was employed to compare genotypes found in this study with 344 isolates of diverse origin. Twenty-two genotypes from wildlife and two genotypes from domestic goats were identified. Some MLVA genotypes identified in wildlife or in farmed game clustered with genotypes of human Q fever clinical cases, supporting the idea that humans and wildlife share C. burnetii genotypes. The major part of genotypes identified in coexisting red deer and rabbits clustered according to their host of origin, suggesting host specificity for particular C. burnetii genotypes. These findings provide important insights to understand the epidemiology of C. burnetii at the wildlife-livestock-human interface.

  15. Why are ototopical aminoglycosides still first-line therapy for chronic suppurative otitis media? A systematic review and discussion of aminoglycosides versus quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A S; Elhassan, H A; Flook, E P

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish that quinolones are as effective as aminoglycosides when used to treat chronic suppurative otitis media. The review included good quality, randomised, controlled trials on human subjects, published in English, that compared topical aminoglycosides with topical quinolones for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media. Nine trials met the criteria. Two studies showed a higher clinical cure rate in the quinolone group (93 per cent vs 71 per cent, p = 0.04, and 76 per cent vs 52 per cent, p = 0.009). Four studies showed no statistically significant difference in clinical outcome. A significant difference in microbiological clearance in favour of quinolones was shown in two studies (88 per cent vs 30 per cent, p otitis media and when used as prophylaxis post-myringotomy. Topical quinolones should be considered a first-line treatment for these patients.

  16. Quinolone Resistance among Salmonella enterica from Cattle, Broilers and Swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Madsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility to nalidixic acid and fluoroquinolones of Salmonella Dublin, S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium isolates from cattle, broilers, and pigs over time in Denmark and to characterise the gyrA, gyrB, and parC genes in quinolone-resistant isolates...... to quinolones. A single (1.1%) S. Typhimurium isolate from 1995 and three (5.9%) from 1998 were resistant to nalidixic acid. Six (9.0%) S. Dublin isolates from 1996, four (4.2%) from 1997, and one (1.7%) from 1998 were resistant to nalidixic acid. Resistance was not observed among isolates from cattle in 1999....... All broiler isolates from 1997 except for one were susceptible to nalidixic acid, whereas seven (6.2%) S. Enteritidis and two (6.3%) of the S. Typhimurium isolates from 1998 and 9 S. Enteritidis (26.5%) from 1999 were resistant. Among isolates from pigs, four isolates from 1997, three from 1998...

  17. Increasing resistance to quinolones: A four-year prospective study of urinary tract infection pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhiosefe Omigie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Orhiosefe Omigie, Lawrence Okoror, Patience Umolu, Gladys IkuuhDepartment of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, NigeriaAbstract: A four-year prospective study was carried out to determine the incidence and rate of development of resistance by common urinary tract infection (UTI pathogens to quinolone antimicrobial agents. Results show that there is high intrinsic resistance to the quinolones among strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (43.4%, Escherichia coli (26.3%, and Proteus spp. (17.1%. Over four years, rising rates of resistance were observed in P. aeruginosa (14.6% increase, Staphylococcus aureus (9.8%, and E. coli (9.7%. The highest potency was exhibited by ciprofloxacin (91.2%, levofloxacin (89.2%, and moxifloxacin (85.1%, while there were high rates of resistance to nalidixic acid (51.7% and pefloxacin (29.0%. Coliforms, particularly E. coli (>45%, remain the most prevalent causative agents of UTI while females within the age range of 20–50 years were most vulnerable to UTI.Keywords: UTI, microorganisms, antibiotics, resistance

  18. Adsorption of quinolone, tetracycline, and penicillin antibiotics from aqueous solution using activated carbons: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Muthanna J

    2017-03-01

    Antibiotics, an important type of pharmaceutical pollutant, have attracted many researchers to the study of their removal from aqueous solutions. Activated carbon (AC) has been widely used as highly effective adsorbent for antibiotics because of its large specific surface area, high porosity, and favorable pore size distribution. In this article, the adsorption performance of AC towards three major types of antibiotics such as tetracyclines, quinolones, and penicillins were reviewed. According to collected data, maximum adsorption capacities of 1340.8, 638.6, and 570.4mg/g were reported for tetracyclines, quinolones, and penicillins, respectively. The values of 1/n for Freundlich isotherm were less than unity, suggesting that the adsorption was nonlinear and favorable. Adsorption kinetics followed closely the pseudo-second-order model and analysis using the Weber-Morris model revealed that the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate controlling step. AC adsorption demonstrated superior performance for all selected drugs, thus being efficient technology for treatment of these pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eBaucheron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e. in gyrA, gyrB, or parC correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications.

  20. Multiresidue determination of quinolone antibacterials in eggs of laying hens by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouan, M K; Ballesteros, O; Taoufiki, J; Vílchez, J L; Cabrera-Aguilera, M; Navalón, A

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of seven quinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, flumequine, oxolinic acid and sarafloxacin) in egg samples of laying hens was developed. Their use is totally prohibited in animals from which eggs are produced for human consumption. Protein precipitation was achieved by addition of acetonitrile and ammonia, removal of acetonitrile with dichloromethane, the quinolones remaining in the basic aqueous extract. The aqueous extract was analysed by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FD). The mobile phase was composed of acetonitrile and 10 mM citrate buffer solution of pH 4.5, with an initial composition of acetonitrile-water (12:88, v/v) and using linear gradient elution. Norfloxacin was used as an internal standard. The limits of detection found were 4-12 ng g(-1). These values were lower than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established by the European Union for these compounds in different tissues of eggs-producing animals.

  1. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan describes wildlife inventory in Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge in 1983. This plan helps achieve refuge objectives by detailing the plan, purpose, and...

  2. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Including Stillwater Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge (Stillwater NWR) and Stillwater Wildlife Management Area (Stillwater WMA) are located in western Nevada within Churchill...

  3. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge Including Stillwater Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) and Stillwater Wildlife Management Area (SWMA) are located in western Nevada within Churchill County, approximately 70...

  4. Reelfoot and Lake Isom National Wildlife Refuges : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan for Reelfoot and Lake Isom National Wildlife Refuges includes survey procedure forms that represent cost effective inventory of the...

  5. Brucellosis in terrestrial wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroid, J; Garin-Bastuji, B; Saegerman, C; Blasco, J M

    2013-04-01

    The epidemiological link between brucellosis in wildlife and brucellosis in livestock and people is widely recognised. When studying brucellosis in wildlife, three questions arise: (i) Is this the result of a spillover from livestock or a sustainable infection in one or more host species of wildlife? (ii) Does wildlife brucellosis represent a reservoir of Brucella strains for livestock? (iii) Is it of zoonotic concern? Despite their different host preferences, B. abortus and B. suis have been isolated from a variety of wildlife species, whereas B. melitensis is rarely reported in wildlife. The pathogenesis of Brucella spp. in wildlife reservoirs is not yet fully defined. The prevalence of brucellosis in some wildlife species is very low and thus the behaviour of individual animals, and interactions between wildlife and livestock, may be the most important drivers for transmission. Since signs of the disease are non-pathognomonic, definitive diagnosis depends on laboratory testing, including indirect tests that can be applied to blood or milk, as well as direct tests (classical bacteriology and methods based on the polymerase chain reaction [PCR]). However, serological tests cannot determine which Brucella species has induced anti-Brucella antibodies in the host. Only the isolation of Brucella spp. (or specific DNA detection by PCR) allows a definitive diagnosis, using classical or molecular techniques to identify and type specific strains. There is as yet no brucellosis vaccine that demonstrates satisfactory safety and efficacy in wildlife. Therefore, controlling brucellosis in wildlife should be based on good management practices. At present, transmission of Brucella spp. from wildlife to humans seems to be linked to the butchering of meat and dressing of infected wild or feral pig carcasses in thedeveloped world, and infected African buffalo in the developing world. In the Arctic, the traditional consumption of raw bone marrow and the internal organs of freshly

  6. Wildlife value orientations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    This article examined value orientations toward wildlife among the adult general Danish public in relation to age, sex, past and present residence, education, and income, using a U.S. survey instrument on Wildlife Value Orientations (WVO). The study used an Internet-based questionnaire sent...... the general public’s WVO can be used to check against the orientation of other specific groups such as landowners and hunters. It can also prove useful for developing specific hunting and wildlife policies such as certification of wildlife managers....

  7. Marais Des Cygnes Wildlife Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This brochure is for the Marais des Cygnes Wildlife Area, managed by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, and located in the floodplain of the Marais...

  8. Analysis of quinolone antibiotics in eggs: preparation and characterization of a raw material for method validation and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, V; Companyó, R; Guiteras, J

    2012-10-01

    A quality control material for the analysis of quinolone residues in egg samples has been prepared. Homogenized fresh whole egg spiked with nine quinolones (marbofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin, oxolinic acid and flumequine), at the concentration level of 500 μg kg(-1) was lyophilized and homogenized to obtain the reference material. The homogeneity of both the bulk and the packed material was verified. Two different strategies, classical and isochronous, were used for the stability study. Conclusions obtained with the classical and isochronous approaches were similar, but the variability of the isochronous results was lower and this led to lower material uncertainty. The reference material was found to be stable for at least 1 year when stored at either room temperature, 4 °C or -20 °C; -80 °C was taken as reference temperature in all cases. The determination of quinolones in eggs was carried out by a previously developed and validated method making use of a pressurized liquid extraction followed by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The suitability of the material prepared was demonstrated by using a lyophilized egg material spiked with nine quinolones as sample in a proficiency test. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of mutations in mtrR gene in quinolone resistant strains of N.gonorrhoeae isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emergence of multi-drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae resulting from new genetic mutation is a serious threat in controlling gonorrhea. This study was undertaken to identify and characterise mutations in the mtrR genes in N.gonorrhoeae isolates resistant to six different antibiotics in the quinolone group. Materials and Methods: The Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of five quinolones for 64 N.gonorrhoeae isolates isolated during Jan 2007-Jun 2009 were determined by E-test method. Mutations in MtrR loci were examined by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing. Results: The proportion of N.gonorrhoeae strains resistant to anti-microbials was 98.4% for norfloxacin and ofloxacin, 96.8% for enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, 95.3% for lomefloxacin. Thirty-one (48.4% strains showed mutation (single/multiple in mtrR gene. Ten different mutations were observed and Gly-45 → Asp, Tyr-105 → His being the most common observed mutation. Conclusion: This is the first report from India on quinolone resistance mutations in MtrRCDE efflux system in N.gonorrhoeae. In conclusion, the high level of resistance to quinolone and single or multiple mutations in mtrR gene could limit the drug choices for gonorrhoea.

  10. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro)quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, A-C; Charlier, C; Singh, G; Godefroy, S Benrejeb; Leivo, J; Vehniäinen, M; Nielen, M W F; Weigel, S; Delahaut, Ph

    2008-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various quinolone derivatives on the sensor chip and tested binding of a range of different antibodies (polyclonal and one engineered antibody) in the presence and absence of free (fluoro)quinolones. The main challenge was to detect flumequine in an assay giving good results for the other compounds. One antigen-antibody combination proved satisfactory: polyclonal antibodies raised against a dual immunogen and, on the sensor chip, a fluoroquinolone derivative. It was the first time that this concept of the bi-active antibody was described in the literature. The assay, optimised for detection in three matrices (poultry muscle, fish, and egg), was tested on incurred samples prepared by liquid extraction followed by two washing steps. This rapid, simple method proved adequate for detecting at least 13 (fluoro)quinolones at concentrations below established maximum residue levels (MRLs). The reference molecule norfloxacin could be detected in the range of 0.1-10 microg kg(-1) in extracts of egg and poultry meat and in the range of 0.1-100 microg kg(-1) in extracts of fish. The determined midpoints of these calibration curves were about 1, 1.5 and 3 microg kg(-1) in poultry meat, egg and fish, respectively.

  11. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro) quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Singh, G.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Leivo, J.; Vehniainen, M.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Weigel, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various

  12. Analysis of the gyrA gene of clinical Yersinia ruckeri isolates with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibello, Alicia; Porrero, M Concepción; Blanco, M Mar; Vela, Ana I; Liébana, Pilar; Moreno, Miguel A; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility of seven clinical strains of Yersinia ruckeri representative of those isolated between 1994 and 2002 from a fish farm with endemic enteric redmouth disease was studied. All isolates displayed indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis restriction patterns, indicating that they represented a single strain. However, considering both inhibition zone diameters (IZD) and MICs, the isolates recovered in 2001-2002 formed a separate cluster with lower levels of susceptibility to all the quinolones tested, especially nalidixic acid (NA) and oxolinic acid (OA), compared with the isolates recovered between 1994 and 1998. Analysis of the PCR product of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene from clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to OA and NA revealed a single amino acid substitution, Ser-83 to Arg-83 (Escherichia coli numbering). Identical substitution was observed in induced OA-resistant mutant strains, which displayed IZD and MICs of quinolones similar to those of the clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to these antimicrobial agents. These data indicate in that for Y. ruckeri, the substitution of Ser by Arg at position 83 of the gyrA gene is associated with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

  13. Quinolone- and ß-lactam-resistance in Escherichia coli from Danish and Italian broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    Frederiksberg C, Denmark 2Dipartimento di Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria e Patologia Animale, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università di Bologna, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (BO), Italy   The prevalence of quinolone- and ß-lactam-resistant E. coli was investigated among broiler flocks in Denmark and Italy. In Denmark...

  14. Emergence of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the Central African Republic: genetic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-resistance to quinolones and beta-lactams is frequent in Enterobacteriaceae, due to the wide use of these antibiotics clinically and in the food industry. Prescription of one of these categories of antibiotic may consequently select for bacteria resistant to both categories. Genetic mechanisms of resistance may be secondary to a chromosomal mutation located in quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV or to a plasmid acquisition. The insertion sequence ISCR1 is often associated with qnr and may favour its dissemination in Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic mechanism of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains in the Central African Republic. Findings Among seventeen ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from urine, pus or stool between January 2003 and October 2005 in the Central African Republic, nine were resistant to ciprofloxacin (seven from community patients and two from hospitalized patients. The ESBL were previously characterized as CTX-M-15 and SHV-12. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations of these drugs were determined by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods, respectively. The presence of plasmid-borne ISCR1-qnrA region was determined by PCR and amplicons, if any, were sent for sequencing. Quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase gyrA gene was amplified by PCR and then sequenced for mutation characterization. We found that all CTX-M-producing strains were resistant to the tested quinolones. All the isolates had the same nucleotide mutation at codon 83 of gyrA. Two Escherichia coli strains with the highest MICs were shown to harbour an ISCR1-qnrA1 sequence. This genetic association might favour dissemination of resistance to quinolone and perhaps other antibiotics among Enterobacteriaceae

  15. qnrA6 genetic environment and quinolone resistance conferred on Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayol, Aurélie; Janvier, Frédéric; Guillard, Thomas; Chau, Françoise; Mérens, Audrey; Robert, Jérôme; Fantin, Bruno; Berçot, Béatrice; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    To determine the genetic location and environment of the qnrA6 gene in Proteus mirabilis PS16 where it was first described and to characterize the quinolone resistance qnrA6 confers. Transformation experiments and Southern blotting were performed for plasmid and genomic DNA of P. mirabilis PS16 to determine the qnrA6 location. Combinatorial PCRs with primers in qnrA6 and genes usually surrounding qnrA genes were used to determine the genetic environment. The qnrA6 coding region, including or not the promoter region, was cloned into vectors pTOPO and pBR322 and the MICs of six quinolones were measured for transformants of Escherichia coli TOP10 and P. mirabilis ATCC 29906 Rif(R). qnrA6 was shown to be chromosomally encoded in P. mirabilis PS16 and its genetic environment was 81%-87% similar to that of qnrA2 in the Shewanella algae chromosome. The 5138 bp region up- and downstream of qnrA6 contained an IS10 sequence surrounded by two ISCR1. This resulted in qnrA6 being displaced 1.9 kb from its native promoter but supplied a promoter present in ISCR1. qnrA6 cloned into pTOPO and pBR322 conferred a 4-32-fold increase in fluoroquinolone MICs when expressed in E. coli but only 2-3-fold in P. mirabilis. When including the promoter region, a further increase in resistance was observed in both species, reaching MIC values above clinical breakpoints for only P. mirabilis. qnrA6 is the first chromosomally located qnrA gene described in Enterobacteriaceae. The quinolone resistance conferred by qnrA6 depends on the proximity of an efficient promoter and the host strain where it is expressed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Wildlife and wildlife management in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Tim; Davenport, Tim R B

    2016-08-01

    Tanzania, arguably mainland Africa's most important nation for conservation, is losing habitat and natural resources rapidly. Moving away from a charcoal energy base and developing sustainable finance mechanisms for natural forests are critical to slowing persistent deforestation. Addressing governance and capacity deficits, including law enforcement, technical skills, and funding, across parts of the wildlife sector are key to effective wildlife protection. These changes could occur in tandem with bringing new models of natural resource management into play that include capacity building, corporate payment for ecosystem services, empowering nongovernmental organizations in law enforcement, greater private-sector involvement, and novel community conservation strategies. The future of Tanzania's wildlife looks uncertain-as epitomized by the current elephant crisis-unless the country confronts issues of governance, embraces innovation, and fosters greater collaboration with the international community. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Effects of the 1976 Seney National Wildlife Refuge wildfire on wildlife and wildlife habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In the summer of 1976 a wildfire burned 260 square-km on the Seney National Wildlife Refuge in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  18. Wildlife Management Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Parker River National Wildlife Refuge provided an average of 1,411,000 duck use days during the 7-year period (1954-1960), with a high of 2,270,000 use days in...

  19. Plantings for wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel B. Kirby; Claude L. Ponder; Donald J. Smith

    1989-01-01

    Grains, forages, and other vegetation can be planted to provide critical habitat for desired wildlife species or to increase habitat diversity. Plantings may be in openings created in the forest (see Note 9.11 Wildlife Openings) or along the forest edge in cultivated or pastured fields if protected from domestic livestock. The first step in determining if and what type...

  20. Massive wildlife project outlined

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — News article on the Chase Lake Prairie Project that is centered on the Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Over the next 11 years the project aims to support 1.3...

  1. Wildlife and Tamarix

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this chapter, we present a synthesis of published literature and preliminary reports on the use of Tamarix by wildlife in riparian systems. We discuss how several groups of wildlife; specifically herpetofauna, birds, and mammals utilize or avoid Tamarix and discuss the impacts of methods for cont...

  2. Occurrence of quinolone- and beta-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli in danish broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    ). In Denmark, antimicrobial resistance is annually monitored in both clinical and indicator E. coli isolated from poultry (DANMAP, 2006). However, very little is known on the prevalence of resistance at the flock level. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of flocks positive for E. coli....../ml), ampicillin (32 µg/ml), cefotaxime (2 µg/ml) or ceftiofur (8 µg/ml). Repeated sampling was performed: five plates for each type of antibiotic were used for each sample in order to increase precision of the method. The ß-glucuronidase test was used for verification of presumptive E. coli. Ampicillin...... and nalidixic acid resistances were detected in all flocks. The numbers of E. coli resistant to these drugs were higher in plates from parent flocks than in those from offspring flocks. A broiler parent flock without any history of quinolone usage tested positive for ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, although...

  3. Interactions of oxovanadium(IV) and the quinolone family member--ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turel, Iztok; Golobic, Amalija; Klavzar, Ales; Pihlar, Boris; Buglyó, Péter; Tolis, Evangelos; Rehder, Dieter; Sepcić, Kristina

    2003-06-01

    The interactions of quinolone ciprofloxacin (cfH) and oxovanadium(IV) were studied by various methods. Green crystals of a complex [V(IV)O(cf)(2)(H(2)O)] were isolated and the molecular connectivities established, although the crystal structure was not perfectly refined due to the instability of the crystals. Based on a plausible interpretation of the data sets, two cf anions bidentately coordinate to a vanadyl cation through carboxylate and carbonyl oxygen atoms; in addition, there is a water molecule in the coordination sphere. Solution techniques (cyclic voltammetry, electronic and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, potentiometric measurements) confirmed the presence of various species in the solution, the composition of which strongly depends on the conditions in the system. The antibacterial activity of the complex against various microorganisms was tested and it was established that its activity is similar to that of free ciprofloxacin.

  4. Resistance patterns to beta-lactams and quinolones in clinical isolates of bacteria from Cuban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzáles, I; Niebla, A; Vallin, C

    1995-01-01

    The resistance patterns to 26 beta-lactams and 8 quinolones of clinical isolates from Cuban hospitals were evaluated using the disk susceptibility test, according to the NCCLS guidelines (1992). The genera studied were Escherichia sp (320), Enterobacter sp (10), Klebsiella sp (90), Proteus sp (10), Pseudomonas sp (90), Serratia sp (20), and Staphylococcus sp (80). Higher resistance to beta-lactams was observed in the genera Pseudomonas, Escherichia and Klebsiella. For fluoroquinolones we found no significant resistance, with the exception of the genus Klebsiella. The most effective antibiotics were cephalosporins of the second and third generations, fluoroquinolones, and non-classical beta-lactams (cephamycins, moxalactam and monobactams). On the contrary, a pronounced resistance was found to penicillin, oxacillin, ticarcillin, ampicillin, methicillin, nalidixic acid and cinoxacin. These resistance patterns correspond to the high consumption of these antibiotics throughout the country.

  5. Laser diode thermal desorption mass spectrometry for the analysis of quinolone antibiotic residues in aquacultured seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohne, Jack J; Andersen, Wendy C; Clark, Susan B; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Madson, Mark R

    2012-12-30

    Veterinary drug residue analysis of meat and seafood products is an important part of national regulatory agency food safety programs to ensure that consumers are not exposed to potentially dangerous substances. Complex tissue matrices often require lengthy extraction and analysis procedures to identify improper animal drug treatment. Direct and rapid analysis mass spectrometry techniques have the potential to increase regulatory sample analysis speed by eliminating liquid chromatographic separation. Flumequine, oxolinic acid, and nalidixic acid were extracted from catfish, shrimp, and salmon using acidified acetonitrile. Extracts were concentrated, dried onto metal sample wells, then rapidly desorbed (6 s) with an infrared diode laser for analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-MS/MS). Analysis was conducted in selected reaction monitoring mode using piromidic acid as internal standard. Six-point calibration curves for each compound in extracted matrix were linear with r(2) correlation greater than 0.99. The method was validated by analyzing 23 negative samples and 116 fortified samples at concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100, and 600 ng/g. Average recoveries of fortified samples were greater than 77% with method detection levels ranging from 2 to 7 /g. Three product ion transitions were acquired per analyte to identify each residue. A rapid method for quinolone analysis in fish muscle was developed using LDTD-MS/MS. The total analysis time was less than 30 s per sample; quinolone residues were detected below 10 ng/g and in most cases residue identity was confirmed. This represents the first application of LDTD to tissue extract analysis. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Correia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104 is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B, recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene, aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6'-Ib-cr4 gene, was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6'-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen.

  7. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Susana; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio D.; Pinto, Luís; Santos, Hugo M.; de Toro, María; Sáenz, Yolanda; Torres, Carmen; Capelo, José Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B), recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene), aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene), was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen. PMID:25196519

  8. QUINOLONE- AND ETA-LACTAM- RESISTANCE IN Escherichia coli FROM DANISH AND ITALIAN BROILER FLOCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trevisani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of quinolone- and -lactam-resistant E. coli was investigated among healthy broiler flocks in Denmark and Italy. In Denmark, sock samples were collected from 10 parent flocks and 10 offspring flocks, according to the procedure currently used for the surveillance of Salmonella in the EU. Samples were enriched in McConkey broth and streaked on McConkey agar plates added with nalidixic acid (32 g/ml, ciprofloxacin (2 g/ml, ampicillin (32 g/ml, cefotaxime (2 g/ml or ceftiofur (8 g/ml. The -glucuronidase test was performed for verification of presumptive E. coli. The same methods were used to analyse sock samples collected from 6 Italian broiler flocks. PCR with primers for the CTX-M-type extended-spectrum -lactamases (ESBLs was performed on cephalosporin-resistant isolates. While resistance to ampicillin and nalidixic acid was widespread in both countries, resistance to ciprofloxacin and cephalosporins was more common among Italian flocks. In Denmark, ciprofloxacin resistance was only detected in 1 parent flock without any history of quinolone usage and none of the flocks was positive for cephalosporin-resistant E. coli. In Italy, resistance to ciprofloxacin was detected in all flocks and resistance to ceftiofur and cefotaxime were detected in 5 flocks. Primers specific for the CTX-M-type ESBLs generated PCR amplicons from isolates from 3 of these flocks. In industrialized countries, the poultry production system is highly standardized, and therefore comparable. However, the use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials is particularly limited in Danish poultry production. Accordingly, the results of this study could reflect the different policies in antimicrobial usage between the two countries.

  9. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tilting at wildlife: reconsidering human-wildlife conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Redpath, Stephen Mark; Bhatia, Saloni; Young, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts between people over wildlife are widespread and damaging to both the wildlife and people involved. Such issues are often termed human–wildlife conflicts. We argue that this term is misleading and may exacerbate the problems and hinder resolution. A review of 100 recent articles on human–wildlife conflicts reveals that 97 were between conservation and other human activities, particularly those associated with livelihoods. We suggest that we should distinguish between human–wildlife i...

  11. Coexistence of blaOXA-23 with armA in quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Min; Luan, Guangxin; Wang, Yanhong; Chang, Yaowen; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Jingni; Deng, Shanshan; Ling, Baodong; Jia, Xu

    2016-03-01

    A total of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were collected to determine the mechanisms of quinolone resistance and investigate the occurrence of carbapenem and high-level aminoglycoside resistance genes among quinolone-resistant strains. Among 77 quinolone-resistant A. baumannii harbored mutations of gyrA and parC, 41 isolates, which belonged to European clone II, had resistance to aminoglycosides and carbapenems due to the expression of armA and acquisition of blaOXA-23. Most of sequence type belonged to clonal complex 92. These results suggested hospital dissemination of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii carrying blaOXA-23, armA, and mutations of quinolone resistance-determining regions in western China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. History of the Wildlife Areas Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Oak Orchard Wildlife Management Area, Tonawanda Wildlife Management Area, John White Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a history of four management areas in Western New York: Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Oak Orchard Management Area, Tonawanda Wildlife...

  13. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica food and animal isolates from Colombia: identification of a qnrB19-mediated quinolone resistance marker in two novel serovars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczmarczyk, M.; Martins, M.; McCusker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-three Salmonella isolates recovered from commercial foods and exotic animals in Colombia were studied. The serotypes, resistance profiles and where applicable the quinolone resistance genes were determined. Salmonella Anatum (n=14), Uganda (19), Braenderup (10) and Newport (10) were the most...... hitherto unrecognized in various Salmonella serovars in Colombia. We also report unusual high-level quinolone resistance in the absence of any DNA gyrase mutations in serovars S. Carrau, Muenchen and Uganda....

  14. Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan is intended to standardize procedures to the extent that accurate and meaningful data will be obtained and recorded on a continuing basis at Bowdoin NWR...

  15. National Wildlife Refuge System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When President Theodore Roosevelt made Florida's tiny Pelican Island a refuge for birds in 1903, he wrote the ¬first chapter of a great American conservation success...

  16. VT Wildlife Crossing Value

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) WCV describes the value of the Wildlife Habitat Suitability as it approaches the state highway system. This analysis was designed to use the...

  17. Where the Wildlife Is.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingling, Phyllis S.

    1983-01-01

    A teacher of junior high hearing impaired students describes learning experiences in which wildlife (mice, garden snakes, grasshoppers, etc.) were used to develop understanding in life cycle concepts and stimulated language development. (CL)

  18. Foodborne parasites from wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    The majority of wild foods consumed by humans are sourced from intensively managed or semi-farmed populations. Management practices inevitably affect wildlife density and habitat characteristics, which are key elements in the transmission of parasites. We consider the risk of transmission...... of foodborne parasites to humans from wildlife maintained under natural or semi-natural conditions. A deeper understanding will be useful in counteracting foodborne parasites arising from the growing industry of novel and exotic foods....

  19. Human–wildlife interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Rosell, C. (Carlos); Llimona, F.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of wildlife management throughout the world is changing. The increase in the world’s human population has been accompanied by a rapid expansion of agricultural and urban areas and infrastructures, especially road and railway networks. Worldwide, wildlife habitats are being transformed and fragmented by human activities, and the behavior of several species has changed as a result of human activities. Some species have adapted easily to urban or peri–urban habitats and take advantage...

  20. Fish and wildlife surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the monitoring of radioactive contaminants in fish and wildlife species that inhabit the Colombia River and Hanford Site. Wildlife have access to areas of the Site containing radioactive contamination, and fish can be exposed to contamination in spring water entering the river along the shoreline. Therefore, samples are collected at various locations annually, generally during the hunting or fishing season, for selected species.

  1. Tuberculosis in Tanzanian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaveland, S; Mlengeya, T; Kazwala, R R; Michel, A; Kaare, M T; Jones, S L; Eblate, E; Shirima, G M; Packer, C

    2005-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a pathogen of growing concern in free-ranging wildlife in Africa, but little is known about the disease in Tanzanian wildlife. Here, we report the infection status of Mycobacterium bovis in a range of wildlife species sampled from protected areas in northern Tanzania. M. bovis was isolated from 11.1% (2/18) migratory wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and 11.1% (1/9) topi (Damaliscus lunatus) sampled systematically in 2000 during a meat cropping program in the Serengeti ecosystem, and from one wildebeest and one lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) killed by sport hunters adjacent to Tarangire National Park. A tuberculosis antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to screen serum samples collected from 184 Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) and 19 lions from Ngorongoro Crater sampled between 1985 and 2000. Samples from 212 ungulates collected throughout the protected area network between 1998 and 2001 also were tested by EIA. Serological assays detected antibodies to M. bovis in 4% of Serengeti lions; one positive lion was sampled in 1984. Antibodies were detected in one of 17 (6%) buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Tarangire and one of 41 (2%) wildebeest in the Serengeti. This study confirms for the first time the presence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife of northern Tanzania, but further investigation is required to assess the impact on wildlife populations and the role of different wildlife species in maintenance and transmission.

  2. Identification of a Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Gene in Salmonella Isolates from Texas Dairy Farm Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, K J; Rodriguez-Rivera, L D; Norman, K N; Ohta, N; Scott, H M

    2017-06-01

    A recent increase in plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) has been detected among Salmonella isolated from humans in the United States, and it is necessary to determine the sources of human infection. We had previously isolated Salmonella from dairy farm environmental samples collected in Texas, and isolates were tested for anti-microbial susceptibility. Two isolates, serotyped as Salmonella Muenster, showed the discordant pattern of nalidixic acid susceptibility and intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. For this project, whole-genome sequencing of both isolates was performed to detect genes associated with quinolone resistance. The plasmid-mediated qnrB19 gene and IncR plasmid type were identified in both isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PMQR in Salmonella isolated from food animals or agricultural environments in the United States. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Effects of EDP-420 on penicillin-resistant and quinolone- and penicillin-resistant pneumococci in the rabbit meningitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Armin; Gerber, Peter; Acosta, Fernando; Cottagnoud, Marianne; Cottagnoud, Philippe; Jiang, Lijiang; Nguyen, Phong; Wachtel, Derek; Wang, Guoqiang; Phan, Ly T

    2008-03-01

    To test the efficacy of EDP-420, a new ketolide, in experimental pneumococcal meningitis and to determine its penetration into the CSF. The experimental rabbit model was used in this study and EDP-420 was tested against a penicillin-resistant and a penicillin- and quinolone-resistant mutant. EDP-420 was also tested against both strains in time-killing assays over 8 h in vitro. In experimental meningitis, EDP-420 produced a bactericidal activity comparable to the standard regimen based on a combination of vancomycin with ceftriaxone against a penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and a penicillin- and quinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate. The penetration of EDP-420 into inflamed meninges was 38% after an i.v. injection of 10 mg/kg. The bactericidal activity of EDP-420 was also confirmed in in vitro time-killing assays. EDP-420 is an efficacious alternative treatment in pneumococcal meningitis, especially when resistant strains are suspected.

  4. Enterobacteriaceae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones in fresh culinary herbs imported from Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Kees; Kant, Arie; Dierikx, Cindy; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Wit, Ben; Mevius, Dik

    2014-05-02

    Since multidrug resistant bacteria are frequently reported from Southeast Asia, our study focused on the occurrence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in fresh imported herbs from Thailand, Vietnam and Malaysia. Samples were collected from fresh culinary herbs imported from Southeast Asia in which ESBL-suspected isolates were obtained by selective culturing. Analysis included identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, susceptibility testing, XbaI-PFGE, microarray, PCR and sequencing of specific ESBL genes, PCR based replicon typing (PBRT) of plasmids and Southern blot hybridization. In addition, the quinolone resistance genotype was characterized by screening for plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC. The study encompassed fifty samples of ten batches of culinary herbs (5 samples per batch) comprising nine different herb variants. The herbs originated from Thailand (Water morning glory, Acacia and Betel leaf), Vietnam (Parsley, Asian pennywort, Houttuynia leaf and Mint) and Malaysia (Holy basil and Parsley). By selective culturing 21 cefotaxime resistant Enterobacteriaceae were retrieved. Array analysis revealed 18 isolates with ESBL genes and one isolate with solely non-ESBL beta-lactamase genes. Mutations in the ampC promoter region were determined in two isolates with PCR and sequencing. The isolates were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=9), Escherichia coli (n=6), Enterobacter cloacae complex (n=5) and Enterobacter spp. (n=1). All isolates tested were multidrug resistant. Variants of CTX-M enzymes were predominantly found followed by SHV enzymes. PMQR genes (including aac(6')-1b-cr, qnrB and qnrS) were also frequently detected. In almost all cases ESBL and quinolone resistance genes were located on the same plasmid. Imported fresh culinary herbs from Southeast Asia are a potential source for contamination of food with multidrug resistant bacteria

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Sparfloxacin in the Serum and Vitreous Humor of Rabbits: Physicochemical Properties That Regulate Penetration of Quinolone Antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Qing Feng; Perkins, Ruth; Drusano, George; Louie, Arnold; Madu, Assumpta; Mian, Umar; Mayers, Martin; Miller, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a recently described animal model to characterize the ocular pharmacokinetics of sparfloxacin in vitreous humor of uninfected albino rabbits following systemic administration and direct intraocular injection. The relationships of lipophilicity, protein binding, and molecular weight to the penetration and elimination of sparfloxacin were compared to those of ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and ofloxacin. To determine whether elimination was active, elimination rates following direct injection with and without probenecid or heat-killed bacteria were compared. Sparfloxacin concentrations were measured in the serum and vitreous humor by a biological assay. Protein binding and lipophilicity were determined, respectively, by ultrafiltration and oil-water partitioning. Pharmacokinetic parameters were characterized with RSTRIP, an iterative, nonlinear, weighted, least-squares-regression program. The relationship between each independent variable and mean quinolone concentration or elimination rate in the vitreous humor was determined by multiple linear regression. The mean concentration of sparfloxacin in the vitreous humor was 59.4% ± 12.2% of that in serum. Penetration of sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and ofloxacin into, and elimination from, the vitreous humor correlated with lipophilicity (r2 > 0.999). The linear-regression equation describing this relationship was not improved by including the inverse of the square root of the molecular weight and/or the degree of protein binding. Elimination rates for each quinolone were decreased by the intraocular administration of probenecid. Heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis decreased the rate of elimination of fleroxacin. Penetration of sparfloxacin into the noninflamed vitreous humor was greater than that of any quinolone previously examined. There was an excellent correlation between lipophilicity and vitreous entry or elimination for sparfloxacin as well as ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and ofloxacin

  6. Contribution of OqxAB efflux pumps to quinolone resistance in extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, J M; Díaz de Alba, P; Briales, A; Machuca, J; Lossa, M; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Rodríguez Baño, J; Martínez-Martínez, L; Pascual, Á

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse the presence of oqxA and oqxB genes in a collection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, to determine their chromosomal and/or plasmidic locations and to analyse expression levels in relation to susceptibility or resistance to quinolones. A collection of 114 non-repetitive isolates of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae was used. K. pneumoniae ATCC 27799 and K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 were also included. Detection of oqxA and oqxB genes was performed by PCR. Testing for chromosomal and/or plasmidic location was carried out using plasmid DNA and subsequent hybridization. oqxA gene expression was analysed using real-time RT-PCR. Transfer of the plasmid-encoded OqxAB was evaluated. The prevalence of both oqxA and oqxB detected in K. pneumoniae was high: 76% and 75%, respectively. Hybridization assays showed that oqxA (16%) and oqxB (13%) were simultaneously present in locations on the chromosome and on large plasmids. The plasmids were transferable by transformation into K. pneumoniae. RT-PCR assays showed higher expression (4-fold) in strains with reduced susceptibility to quinolones than in susceptible strains. Interestingly, K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 showed an 18-fold higher expression than K. pneumoniae ATCC 27799. These differences were in accordance with quinolone susceptibility. The prevalence of the OqxAB efflux pump (both chromosomal and plasmid encoded) in ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae is high in Spain and represents a potential reservoir for the spread of these genes. High expression of this pump contributes to reduced susceptibility to quinolones in clinical isolates of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae.

  7. Source attribution of human Campylobacter isolates by MLST and fla-typing and association of genotypes with quinolone resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kittl

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is the most frequent zoonosis in developed countries and various domestic animals can function as reservoir for the main pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. In the present study we compared population structures of 730 C. jejuni and C. coli from human cases, 610 chicken, 159 dog, 360 pig and 23 cattle isolates collected between 2001 and 2012 in Switzerland. All isolates had been typed with multi locus sequence typing (MLST and flaB-typing and their genotypic resistance to quinolones was determined. We used complementary approaches by testing for differences between isolates from different hosts with the proportion similarity as well as the fixation index and by attributing the source of the human isolates with Bayesian assignment using the software STRUCTURE. Analyses were done with MLST and flaB data in parallel and both typing methods were tested for associations of genotypes with quinolone resistance. Results obtained with MLST and flaB data corresponded remarkably well, both indicating chickens as the main source for human infection for both Campylobacter species. Based on MLST, 70.9% of the human cases were attributed to chickens, 19.3% to cattle, 8.6% to dogs and 1.2% to pigs. Furthermore we found a host independent association between sequence type (ST and quinolone resistance. The most notable were ST-45, all isolates of which were susceptible, while for ST-464 all were resistant.

  8. Electrochemical characteristics of five quinolone drugs and their effect on DNA damage and repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A; Tocher, J; Edwards, D I

    1990-05-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether 4-quinolone antimicrobials were reduced under biologically attainable redox conditions and whether they had any effect on DNA in the absence of the DNA gyrase enzyme. Electrochemical characteristics of the drugs were investigated using d c polarography, differential pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry. The ability of the drugs to interact with, and cause damage to, naked DNA was investigated by a phi X174 DNA double transfection assay. Induction of DNA SOS repair was assessed using a stain of Escherichia coli in which the synthesis of beta-galactosidase was under the control of the su1A gene. Growth studies were performed using a conductimetric method in a Malthus system. All five 4-quinolones examined had redox potentials lower (more negative) than -1.2 V and thus were incapable of being reduced in biological systems, even under strict anaerobiosis. Exposure of all drugs to single-stranded phi X174 DNA for up to 50 h engendered no detectable damage. However, all the drugs induced DNA SOS repair, in the order ciprofloxacin greater than fleroxacin = pefloxacin greater than norfloxacin greater than nalidixic acid. This rank order corresponds approximately with antibacterial efficiency. The growth studies indicated that redoxyendonuclease III and excision repair enzymes may be involved in the fixation of quinolone-induced damage.

  9. Source attribution of human Campylobacter isolates by MLST and fla-typing and association of genotypes with quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittl, Sonja; Heckel, Gerald; Korczak, Bożena M; Kuhnert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most frequent zoonosis in developed countries and various domestic animals can function as reservoir for the main pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. In the present study we compared population structures of 730 C. jejuni and C. coli from human cases, 610 chicken, 159 dog, 360 pig and 23 cattle isolates collected between 2001 and 2012 in Switzerland. All isolates had been typed with multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and flaB-typing and their genotypic resistance to quinolones was determined. We used complementary approaches by testing for differences between isolates from different hosts with the proportion similarity as well as the fixation index and by attributing the source of the human isolates with Bayesian assignment using the software STRUCTURE. Analyses were done with MLST and flaB data in parallel and both typing methods were tested for associations of genotypes with quinolone resistance. Results obtained with MLST and flaB data corresponded remarkably well, both indicating chickens as the main source for human infection for both Campylobacter species. Based on MLST, 70.9% of the human cases were attributed to chickens, 19.3% to cattle, 8.6% to dogs and 1.2% to pigs. Furthermore we found a host independent association between sequence type (ST) and quinolone resistance. The most notable were ST-45, all isolates of which were susceptible, while for ST-464 all were resistant.

  10. Master Plan : Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge : Part III wildlife inventory plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge was designed to guide continued development of the refuge and wildlife management. Wildlife...

  11. Removal of quinolone antibiotics from wastewaters by sorption and biological degradation in laboratory-scale membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorival-García, N; Zafra-Gómez, A; Navalón, A; González, J; Vílchez, J L

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory-scale batch experiments were developed to investigate the main removal routes for 6 commonly found quinolones (ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pipemidic acid, and piromidic acid), in wastewaters from a wastewater treatment plant, at μg L(-1) levels in an aerobic sludge system from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant. It was demonstrated that sorption and biotransformation were the main removal routes for the target antibiotics over other possible pathways, as volatilization or hydrolysis, under the experimental conditions. Mass balances indicated that sorption on sludge played a dominant role in the elimination of antibiotics from waters. The sorption coefficient K(d) depended strongly on temperature and on the quinolone type and were higher at lower temperatures and for piperazinylic quinolones. K(d) values were between 516 and 3746 L kg(-1) in the temperature range of 9-38°C. Higher mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) increased quinolone removal efficiency mainly by sorption. Quinolone biodegradation constituted a secondary pathway, and could be described by first-order kinetics with degradation-rate constants ranging from 8.0 × 10(-4)h(-1) to 1.4 × 10(-2)h(-1) within the same temperature range and MLSS from 7000 to 15,000 mg L(-1). Biodegradation depended on the MLSS and temperature, but also on the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD). Higher biodegradation rates were observed at higher MLSS and temperature, as well as at low initial COD. Ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin registered the highest biodegradation percentages (52.8% and 47.2%, respectively, at 38°C and 15,000 mg L(-1) MLSS), which is evidence that, despite the known persistence of this group of antibiotics and removal from waters mainly by sorption, it was possible to improve their removal by biodegradation, with an appropriate selection of conditions and control of process variables, as a preliminary step towards the elimination of these antibiotics from the

  12. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge : Wapello District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goal of wildlife inventories is to provide sufficient data needed to manage the refuge toward its stated objectives, and to compile population data for...

  13. [Wildlife inventory plan : Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan describes methods for collecting migratory birds, upland birds, big game, predator, and small mammal surveys at Des Lacs National...

  14. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goals for this Wildlife Inventory Plan for Minnesota Valley NWR are: (1) to provide as good a survey method as possible to estimate population levels of key...

  15. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Santee National Wildlife Refuge, 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an unpublished report by the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study of the Parasitology College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia....

  16. Wildlife Inventory Plan Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge was established for the preservation of the waterfowl resource. The refuge is still managed principally for the benefit of ducks...

  17. Wildlife Inventory Plan Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge was established for the preservation of the waterfowl resource. The refuge is still managed principally for the benefit of ducks...

  18. Monitoring pesticides in wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustman, E.H.; Martin, W.E.; Heath, R.G.; Reichel, W.L.

    1971-01-01

    Early in the development of the wildlife monitoring program, certain criteria were recognized as being important in the selection of species of wild animals suitable for pesticide monitoring purposes. Ideally, the forms selected should be geographically well distributed, and they should be reasonably abundant and readily available for sampling. In addition, animals occurring near the top of food chains have the capacity to reflect residues in organisms occurring at lower levels in the same food chains. Based on these criteria, species chosen for monitoring include the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and black ducks (Anas rubripes), and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The black duck is substituted for the mallard in States where suitable numbers of mallards cannot be obtained. The Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife is held responsible for the execution of the wildlife portion of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program. The primary objective is to ascertain on a nationwide basis and independent of specific treatments the levels and trends of certain pesticidal chemicals and other pollutants in the bodies of selected forms of wildlife. The program was first described by Johnson et al. (4) in 1967. The purpose of this report is to update and redescribe the wildlife monitoring program and briefly review accomplishments.

  19. The pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS balances life and death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Häussler

    Full Text Available When environmental conditions deteriorate and become inhospitable, generic survival strategies for populations of bacteria may be to enter a dormant state that slows down metabolism, to develop a general tolerance to hostile parameters that characterize the habitat, and to impose a regime to eliminate damaged members. Here, we provide evidence that the pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS mediates induction of all of these phenotypes. For individual cells, PQS, an interbacterial signaling molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has both deleterious and beneficial activities: on the one hand, it acts as a pro-oxidant and sensitizes the bacteria towards oxidative and other stresses and, on the other, it efficiently induces a protective anti-oxidative stress response. We propose that this dual function fragments populations into less and more stress tolerant members which respond differentially to developing stresses in deteriorating habitats. This suggests that a little poison may be generically beneficial to populations, in promoting survival of the fittest, and in contributing to bacterial multi-cellular behavior. It further identifies PQS as an essential mediator of the shaping of the population structure of Pseudomonas and of its response to and survival in hostile environmental conditions.

  20. Application of Sigmoidal Transformation Functions in Optimization of Micellar Liquid Chromatographic Separation of Six Quinolone Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Salary, Mina

    2016-03-01

    A chemometrics approach has been used to optimize the separation of six quinolone compounds by micellar liquid chromatography (MLC). A Derringer's desirability function, a multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) method, was tested for evaluation of two different measures of chromatographic performance (resolution and analysis time). The effect of three experimental parameters on a chromatographic response function (CRF) expressed as a product of two sigmoidal desirability functions was investigated. The sigmoidal functions were used to transform the optimization criteria, resolution and analysis time into the desirability values. The factors studied were the concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate, butanol content and pH of the mobile phase. The experiments were done according to the face-centered cube central composite design, and the calculated CRF values were fitted to a polynomial model to correlate the CRF values with the variables and their interactions. The developed regression model showed good descriptive and predictive ability (R(2) = 0.815, F = 6.919, SE = 0.038, [Formula: see text]) and used, by a grid search algorithm, to optimize the chromatographic conditions for the separation of the mixture. The efficiency of prediction of polynomial model was confirmed by performing the experiment under the optimal conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial drug gatifloxacin: Synthesis, structure and biological evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-08-01

    Three metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial agent gatifloxacin (GFLX) with Y(ΙΙΙ), Zr(ΙV) and U(VΙ) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, gatifloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry. The kinetic parameters for gatifloxacin and the three prepared complexes have been evaluated from TGA curves by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(U dbnd O), for the UO 2 bond in uranyl complex are 1.7522 Å and 639.46 N m -1. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against microorganisms, three bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and two fungi species, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.), showing that they exhibit higher activity than free ligand.

  2. Activated carbon adsorption of quinolone antibiotics in water: Performance, mechanism, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hao; Li, Xuebing; Wang, Jun; Lin, Pengfei; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Suffet, I H Mel

    2017-06-01

    The extensive use of antibiotics has led to their presence in the aquatic environment, and introduces potential impacts on human and ecological health. The capability of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to remove six frequently used quinolone (QN) antibiotics during water treatment was evaluated to improve drinking water safety. The kinetics of QN adsorption by PAC was best described by a pseudo second-order equation, and the adsorption capacity was well described by the Freundlich isotherm equation. Isotherms measured at different pH showed that hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, and π-π dispersion force were the main mechanisms for adsorption of QNs by PAC. A pH-dependent isotherm model based on the Freundlich equation was developed to predict the adsorption capacity of QNs by PAC at different pH values. This model had excellent prediction capabilities under different laboratory scenarios. Small relative standard derivations (RSDs), i.e., 0.59%-0.92% for ciprofloxacin and 0.09%-3.89% for enrofloxacin, were observed for equilibrium concentrations above the 0.3mg/L level. The RSDs increased to 11.9% for ciprofloxacin and 32.1% for enrofloxacin at μg/L equilibrium levels, which is still acceptable. This model could be applied to predict the adsorption of other chemicals having different ionized forms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Broad dissemination of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in sediments of two urban coastal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David E; Archer, Karisa F; Arriola, David J; Baker, Pieter A; Faucett, K Grace; Laroya, Jonathan B; Pfeil, Kelly L; Ryan, Cody R; Ryan, Kelsey R U; Zuill, Douglas E

    2011-01-15

    Contamination of soil and water with antibiotic-resistant bacteria may create reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes that have the potential to negatively impact future public health through horizontal gene transfer. The plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were detected by PCR amplification of metagenomic DNA from surface sediments of the Tijuana River Estuary, a sewage-impacted coastal wetland along the U.S.-Mexico border; sediments of Famosa Slough, a nearby urban wetland that is largely unaffected by sewage, contained only qnrB, qnrS, and qepA. The number of PCR-positive sites and replicates increased in both wetlands after rainfall. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed a significant increase (p 0.1). Nucleotide sequences of cloned qnrA amplicons were all affiliated with qnrA genes found on plasmids of clinical isolates with one exception that was most similar to the chromosomal qnrA gene found in Shewanella algae. Our results suggest that urban wetlands may become reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, particularly where wastewater is improperly managed.

  4. Fishery management plan: Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan was prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge. Data was provided by the Refuge and Area Office Wildlife...

  5. Quinolone co-resistance in ESBL- or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from an Indian urban aquatic environment and their public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Kanaujia, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Nambram Somendro; Sharma, Shalu; Kumar, Shakti; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam antibiotics constitute major mainstay of treatment against infections caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli. Presence of E. coli strains expressing co-resistance to both these antibiotic classes in urban aquatic environments which are consistently being used for various anthropogenic activities represents a serious public health concern. From a heterogeneous collection of 61 E. coli strains isolated from the river Yamuna traversing through the National Capital Territory of Delhi (India), those harboring blaCTX-M-15 (n = 10) or blaCMY-42 (n = 2) were investigated for co-resistance to quinolones and the molecular mechanisms thereof. Resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L ± D87N) and ParC (S80I ± E84K). One of the E. coli strains, viz., IPE, also carried substitutions in GyrB and ParE at positions Ser492→Asn and Ser458→Ala, respectively. The phenotypically susceptible strains nevertheless carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene, viz., qnrS, which showed co-transfer to the recipient quinolone-sensitive E. coli J53 along with the genes encoding β-lactamases and led to increase in minimal inhibitory concentrations of quinolone antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this represents first report of molecular characterization of quinolone co-resistance in E. coli harboring genes for ESBLs or AmpC β-lactamases from a natural aquatic environment of India. The study warrants true appreciation of the potential of urban aquatic environments in the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistance and underscores the need to characterize resistance genetic elements vis-à-vis their public health implications, irrespective of apparent phenotypic resistance.

  6. Microwave circulator design

    CERN Document Server

    Linkhart, Douglas K

    2014-01-01

    Circulator design has advanced significantly since the first edition of this book was published 25 years ago. The objective of this second edition is to present theory, information, and design procedures that will enable microwave engineers and technicians to design and build circulators successfully. This resource contains a discussion of the various units used in the circulator design computations, as well as covers the theory of operation. This book presents numerous applications, giving microwave engineers new ideas about how to solve problems using circulators. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate how to apply the information to real-world design tasks.

  7. Blackwater National Wildlife Complex: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Susquehanna National Wildlife Refuge, Martin National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative Report: 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  8. NORTHWOODS Wildlife Habitat Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Nelson; Janine M. Benyus; Richard R. Buech

    1992-01-01

    Wildlife habitat data from seven Great Lakes National Forests were combined into a wildlife-habitat matrix named NORTHWOODS. Several electronic file formats of NORTHWOODS data base and documentation are available on floppy disks for microcomputers.

  9. Wildlife forestry: Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife forestry is management of forest resources, within sites and across landscapes, to provide sustainable, desirable habitat conditions for all forest-dependent (silvicolous) fauna while concurrently yielding economically viable, quality timber products. In practice, however, management decisions associated with wildlife forestry often reflect a desire to provide suitable habitat for rare species, species with declining populations, and exploitable (i.e., game) species. Collectively, these species are deemed priority species and they are assumed to benefit from habitat conditions that result from prescribed silvicultural management actions.

  10. Wildlife specimen collection, preservation, and shipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. LeAnn; Dusek, Robert J.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Specimens are used to provide supporting information leading to the determination of the cause of disease or death in wildlife and for disease monitoring or surveillance. Commonly used specimens for wildlife disease investigations include intact carcasses, tissues from carcasses, euthanized or moribund animals, parasites, ingested food, feces, or environmental samples. Samples from live animals or the environment (e.g., contaminated feed) in the same vicinity as a mortality event also may be helpful. The type of specimen collected is determined by availability of samples and biological objectives. Multiple fresh, intact carcasses from affected species are the most useful in establishing a cause for a mortality event. Submission of entire carcasses allows observation of gross lesions and abnormalities, as well as disease testing of multiple tissues. Samples from live animals may be more appropriate when sick animals cannot be euthanized (e.g., threatened or endangered species) or for research and monitoring projects examining disease or agents circulating in apparently healthy animals or those not exhibiting clinical signs. Samples from live animals may include collections of blood, hair, feathers, feces, or ectoparasites, or samples obtained by swabbing lesions or orifices. Photographs and videos are useful additions for recording field and clinical signs and conveying conditions at the site. Collection of environmental samples (e.g., feces, water, feed, or soil) may be appropriate when animals cannot be captured for sampling or the disease agent may persist in the environment. If lethal collection is considered necessary, biologists should refer to the policies, procedures, and permit requirements of their institution/facility and the agency responsible for species management (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or State natural resource agency) prior to use in the field. If threatened or endangered species are found dead, or there is evidence of illegal take, field

  11. The Wildlife in Your Backyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDruff, Larry

    1979-01-01

    Urban environments often provide wildlife habitat. In addition to such open areas as parks and cemeteries, and such natural areas as may exist along rivers and streams, manmade structures may approximate habitat sought by some species and may attract wildlife. Actions to attract wildlife in the urban setting are suggested. (RE)

  12. Great Basin wildlife disease concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ Mason

    2008-01-01

    In the Great Basin, wildlife diseases have always represented a significant challenge to wildlife managers, agricultural production, and human health and safety. One of the first priorities of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Division of Fish and Wildlife Services was Congressionally directed action to eradicate vectors for zoonotic disease, particularly rabies, in...

  13. Science and Civics: Sustaining Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Environmental Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Project WILD's new high school curriculum, "Science and Civics: Sustaining Wildlife", is designed to serve as a guide for involving students in environmental action projects aimed at benefitting the local wildlife found in a community. It involves young people in decisions affecting people, wildlife, and their shared habitat in the community. The…

  14. Genetic markers associated with resistance to beta-lactam and quinolone antimicrobials in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates from humans and animals in central Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadesse Eguale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-lactam and quinolone antimicrobials are commonly used for treatment of infections caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS and other pathogens. Resistance to these classes of antimicrobials has increased significantly in the recent years. However, little is known on the genetic basis of resistance to these drugs in Salmonella isolates from Ethiopia. Methods Salmonella isolates with reduced susceptibility to beta-lactams (n = 43 were tested for genes encoding for beta-lactamase enzymes, and those resistant to quinolones (n = 29 for mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR as well as plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes using PCR and sequencing. Results Beta-lactamase genes (bla were detected in 34 (79.1% of the isolates. The dominant bla gene was blaTEM, recovered from 33 (76.7% of the isolates, majority being TEM-1 (24, 72.7% followed by TEM-57, (10, 30.3%. The blaOXA-10 and blaCTX-M-15 were detected only in a single S. Concord human isolate. Double substitutions in gyrA (Ser83-Phe + Asp87-Gly as well as parC (Thr57-Ser + Ser80-Ile subunits of the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR were detected in all S. Kentucky isolates with high level resistance to both nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Single amino acid substitutions, Ser83-Phe (n = 4 and Ser83-Tyr (n = 1 were also detected in the gyrA gene. An isolate of S. Miami susceptible to nalidixic acid but intermediately resistant to ciprofloxacin had Thr57-Ser and an additional novel mutation (Tyr83-Phe in the parC gene. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes investigated were not detected in any of the isolates. In some isolates with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and/or nalidixic acid, no mutations in QRDR or PMQR genes were detected. Over half of the quinolone resistant isolates in the current study 17 (58.6% were also resistant to at least one of the beta-lactam antimicrobials

  15. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge and Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The major thrust of wildlife inventory on the refuges is towardscensusing waterfowl. During the spring and fall waterfowl, baldeagle and cormorant use is based...

  16. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Weather conditions for the year were near normal and had no significant effect on refuge outputs or operations. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area was plagued with...

  17. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in Fallon,...

  18. Experimental circulation loss study

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Sigurd

    2013-01-01

    Circulation losses could occur during any operation that involves pumping into a well. As of today, it is recognized as one of the most costly drilling problems. In some situation it might be hard to stop, and usually takes precious rig time to deal with the problem. In order to mitigate the risk of circulation loss solid pa...

  19. Relationship between mutations in the gyrA gene and quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Corynebacterium striatum and Corynebacterium amycolatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Josep M; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Vázquez, Fernando; Giralt, Ernest; Vila, Jordi

    2005-05-01

    Quinolone susceptibility was analyzed in 17 clinical isolates of Corynebacterium striatum and 9 strains of Corynebacterium amycolatum by the E-test method in Mueller-Hinton agar plates. The C. striatum ATCC 6940 strain was used as a control strain. The amplified quinolone resistance determining regions of the gyrA genes of C. amycolatum and C. striatum were characterized. Four in vitro quinolone-resistant mutants of C. amycolatum were selected and analyzed. Both in vivo and in vitro quinolone-resistant strains of C. amycolatum showed high levels of fluoroquinolone resistance in strains with a double mutation leading to an amino acid change in positions 87 and 91 or positions 87 and 88 (unusual mutation) of GyrA, whereas the same concomitant mutations at amino acid positions 87 and 91 in GyrA of C. striatum produced high levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin but only showed a moderate increase in the MIC of moxifloxacin, suggesting that other mechanism(s) of quinolone resistance could be involved in moxifloxacin resistance in C. amycolatum. Moreover, a PCR-RFLP-NcoI of the gyrA gene was developed to distinguish between C. amycolatum and C. striatum species.

  20. Characterization of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinants in High-Level Quinolone-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolates from the Community: First Report of qnrD Gene in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanat, Betitera; Machuca, Jesús; Díaz-De-Alba, Paula; Mezhoud, Halima; Touati, Abdelaziz; Pascual, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to assess the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR)-producing isolates in a collection of quinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae of community origin isolated in Bejaia, Algeria. A total of 141 nalidixic acid-resistant Enterobacteriaceae community isolates were collected in Bejaia (Northern Algeria) and screened for PMQR genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For PMQR-positive strains, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution and disk diffusion. Mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the target genes, gyrA and parC, were detected with a PCR-based method and sequencing. Southern blotting, conjugation and transformation assays and molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing were also performed. The prevalence of PMQR-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates was 13.5% (19/141); 11 of these isolates produced Aac(6')-Ib-cr and 8 were qnr-positive (4 qnrB1-like, 2 qnrS1-like, and 2 qnrD1-like), including the association with aac(6')-Ib-cr gene in three cases. PMQR gene transfer by conjugation was successful in 6 of 19 isolates tested. PFGE revealed that most of the PMQR-positive Escherichia coli isolates were unrelated, except for two groups comprising two and four isolates, respectively, including the virulent multidrug-resistant clone E. coli ST131 that were clonally related. Our findings indicate that PMQR determinants are prevalent in Enterobacteriaceae isolates from the community studied. We describe the first report of the qnrD gene in Algeria.

  1. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  2. QUANTIFYING WILDLIFE ORIENTATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urban Ecology. Vol . 8 pp.209 - 228. LA HART, D.E. & TILLIS, C. R. 197 4 : Using. Wildlife to teach Environmental Values. Journal of Environ11ental Education. Vo1.6 No.1 pp.43- 48. MALONEY , M.P. & WARD, M.P. 1975: A revised scale for the Measurement of Ecological. At t i tudes and Know 1 edge . American.

  3. Boiler circulation calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Natural circulation water tube and fire tube boilers are widely used in the chemical process industry. These are preferred to forced-circulation boilers where a circulation pump ensures flow of a steam/water mixture through the tubes. In addition to being an operating expense, a pump failure can have serious consequences in such systems. The motive force driving the steam/water mixture through the tubes (water tube boilers) or over tubes (fire tube boilers) in natural-circulation systems is the difference in density between cooler water in the downcomer circuits and the steam/water mixture in the riser tubes. This flow must be adequate to cool the tubes and prevent overheating. This article explains how circulation ratio or the ratio of steam/water mixture to steam flow may be evaluated.

  4. Occurrence and fate of quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics in a municipal sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ai; Wan, Yi; Xiao, Yang; Hu, Jianying

    2012-02-01

    This study developed a method for analysis of nineteen quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) in sludge samples, and investigated the occurrence and fate of the FQs in a municipal sewage treatment plant (STP) with anaerobic, anoxic, and aerobic treatment processes. Eleven compounds, including pipemidic acid, fleroxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, lomefloxacin, sparfloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, and sarafloxacin (only in sludge), were detected in the STP. The predominance of ofloxacin and norfloxacin, followed by lomefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin, were found in wastewater, suspended solids, and sludge. The total concentrations of FQs were 2573 ± 241 ng/L, 1013 ± 218 ng/L, and 18.4 ± 0.9 mg/kg in raw sewage, secondary effluent, and sludge, respectively. Extremely low mass change percentages were observed for FQs in anaerobic, anoxic, and aerobic treatment units, suggesting biodegradation to be of minor importance in the removal of FQs in STPs. 50-87% of the initial FQs loadings (except for pipemidic acid (36%)) were ultimately found in the dewatered sludge. Mean removal efficiencies of FQs in the STP were 56-75%, except for new generation drugs such as moxifloxacin (40 ± 5%) and gatifloxacin (43 ± 13%). A significant positive correlation was found between removal efficiencies and K(d) of FQs. The major factor in the removal of FQs in the STP was sorption to sludge, which was not governed by hydrophobic interactions. The long-term cycling and persistence of FQs in the STP has made activated sludge as a huge reservoir of FQ antibiotics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antigiardial activity of novel triazolyl quinolone-based chalcone derivatives: when oxygen makes the difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay eBahadur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Giardiasis is a common diarrheal disease worldwide caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia (G. intestinalis. It is urgent to develop novel drugs to treat giardiasis, due to increasing clinical resistance to the gold standard drug metronidazole (MTZ. New potential antiparasitic compounds are usually tested for their killing efficacy against G. intestinalis under anaerobic conditions, in which MTZ is maximally effective. On the other hand, though commonly regarded as an ‘anaerobic pathogen’, G. intestinalis is exposed to relatively high O2 levels in vivo, living attached to the mucosa of the proximal small intestine. It is thus important to test the effect of O2 when searching for novel potential antigiardial agents, as outlined in a previous study (Bahadur, Mastronicola et al. (2014 Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 58, 543. Here, forty-five novel chalcone derivatives with triazolyl-quinolone scaffold were synthesized, purified and characterized by high resolution mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Efficacy of the compounds against G. intestinalis trophozoites was tested under both anaerobic and microaerobic conditions, and selectivity was assessed in a counter-screen on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. MTZ was used as a positive control in the assays. All the tested compounds proved to be more effective against the parasite in the presence of O2, with the exception of MTZ that was less effective. Under anaerobiosis eighteen compounds were found to be as effective as MTZ or more (up to 3-4 fold; the same compounds proved to be up to > 100 fold more effective than MTZ under microaerobic conditions. Four of them represent potential candidates for the design of novel antigiardial drugs, being highly selective against Giardia trophozoites. This study further underlines the importance of taking O2 into account when testing novel potential antigiardial compounds.

  6. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR and mutations in the topoisomerase genes of Salmonella enterica strains from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Ferrari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the Quinolone Resistance Determining sources Regions (QRDR of the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes and to determine if any of the qnr variants or the aac(6'-Ib-cr variant were present in strains of Salmonella spp. isolated in Brazil. A total of 126 Salmonella spp. strains from epidemic (n = 114 and poultry (n = 12 origin were evaluated. One hundred and twelve strains (88.8% were resistant to nalidixic acid (NAL and 29 (23.01% showed a reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (Cip. The mutations identified were substitutions limited to the QRDR of the gyrA gene in the codons for Serine 83, Aspartate 87 and Alanine 131. The sensitivity to NAL seems to be a good phenotypic indication of distinguishing mutated and nonmutated strains in the QRDR, however the double mutation in gyrA did not cause resistance to ciprofloxacin. The qnrA1 and qnrB19 genes were detected, respectively, in one epidemic strain of S. Enteritidis and one strain of S. Corvallis of poultry origin. Despite previous detection of qnr genes in Brazil, this is the first report of qnr gene detection in Salmonella, and also the first detection of qnrB19 gene in this country. The results alert for the continuous monitoring of quinolone resistance determinants in order to minimize the emergence and selection of Salmonella spp. strains showing reduced susceptibility or resistance to quinolones.

  7. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and mutations in the topoisomerase genes of Salmonella enterica strains from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rafaela; Galiana, Antonio; Cremades, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Magnani, Marciane; Tognim, M C B; Oliveira, Tereza C R M; Royo, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the Quinolone Resistance Determining sources Regions (QRDR) of the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes and to determine if any of the qnr variants or the aac(6')-Ib-cr variant were present in strains of Salmonella spp. isolated in Brazil. A total of 126 Salmonella spp. strains from epidemic (n = 114) and poultry (n = 12) origin were evaluated. One hundred and twelve strains (88.8%) were resistant to nalidixic acid (NAL) and 29 (23.01%) showed a reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (Cip). The mutations identified were substitutions limited to the QRDR of the gyrA gene in the codons for Serine 83, Aspartate 87 and Alanine 131. The sensitivity to NAL seems to be a good phenotypic indication of distinguishing mutated and non-mutated strains in the QRDR, however the double mutation in gyrA did not cause resistance to ciprofloxacin. The qnrA1 and qnrB19 genes were detected, respectively, in one epidemic strain of S. Enteritidis and one strain of S. Corvallis of poultry origin. Despite previous detection of qnr genes in Brazil, this is the first report of qnr gene detection in Salmonella, and also the first detection of qnrB19 gene in this country. The results alert for the continuous monitoring of quinolone resistance determinants in order to minimize the emergence and selection of Salmonella spp. strains showing reduced susceptibility or resistance to quinolones.

  8. Coastal seawater bacteria harbor a large reservoir of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Dang, Hongyue

    2012-07-01

    Diversity and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants were investigated in environmental bacteria isolated from surface seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, China. Five qnr gene alleles were identified in 34 isolates by PCR amplification, including qnrA3 gene in a Shewanella algae isolate, qnrB9 gene in a Citrobacter freundii isolate, qnrD gene in 22 Proteus vulgaris isolates, qnrS1 gene in 1 Enterobacter sp. and 4 Klebsiella spp. isolates, and qnrS2 gene in 1 Pseudomonas sp. and 4 Pseudoalteromonas sp. isolates. The qnrC, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA genes could not be detected in this study. The 22 qnrD-positive Proteus vulgaris isolates could be differentiated into four genotypes based on ERIC-PCR assay. The qnrS1 and qnrD genes could be transferred to Escherichia coli J53 Azi(R) or E. coli TOP10 recipient strains using conjugation or transformation methods. Among the 34 qnr-positive isolates, 30 had a single point mutation in the QRDRs of GyrA protein (Ala67Ser, Ser83Ile, or Ser83Thr), indicating that cooperation of chromosome- and plasmid-mediated resistance contributed to the spread and evolution of quinolone resistance in this coastal bay. Eighty-five percent of the isolates were also found to be resistant to ampicillin, and bla(CMY), bla(OXY), bla(SHV), and bla(TEM) genes were detected in five isolates that also harbored the qnrB9 or qnrS1 gene. Our current study is the first identification of qnrS2 gene in Pseudoalteromonas and Pseudomonas strains, and qnrD gene in Proteus vulgaris strains. High prevalence of diverse qnr genes in Jiaozhou Bay indicates that coastal seawater may serve as an important reservoir, natural source, and dissemination vehicle of quinolone resistance determinants.

  9. New plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene, qnrC, found in a clinical isolate of Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghua; Guo, Qinglan; Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Xiaoying; Ye, Xinyu; Wu, Shi; Hooper, David C; Wang, Minggui

    2009-05-01

    Since the discovery of qnrA in 1998, two additional qnr genes, qnrB and qnrS, have been described. These three plasmid-mediated genes contribute to quinolone resistance in gram-negative pathogens worldwide. A clinical strain of Proteus mirabilis was isolated from an outpatient with a urinary tract infection and was susceptible to most antimicrobials but resistant to ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim. Plasmid pHS10, harbored by this strain, was transferred to azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 by conjugation. A transconjugant with pHS10 had low-level quinolone resistance but was negative by PCR for the known qnr genes, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qepA. The ciprofloxacin MIC for the clinical strain and a J53/pHS10 transconjugant was 0.25 microg/ml, representing an increase of 32-fold relative to that for the recipient, J53. The plasmid was digested with HindIII, and a 4.4-kb DNA fragment containing the new gene was cloned into pUC18 and transformed into E. coli TOP10. Sequencing showed that the responsible 666-bp gene, designated qnrC, encoded a 221-amino-acid protein, QnrC, which shared 64%, 42%, 59%, and 43% amino acid identity with QnrA1, QnrB1, QnrS1, and QnrD, respectively. Upstream of qnrC there existed a new IS3 family insertion sequence, ISPmi1, which encoded a frameshifted transposase. qnrC could not be detected by PCR, however, in 2,020 strains of Enterobacteriaceae. A new quinolone resistance gene, qnrC, was thus characterized from plasmid pHS10 carried by a clinical isolate of P. mirabilis.

  10. Ageloline A, new antioxidant and antichlamydial quinolone from the marine sponge-derived bacterium Streptomyces sp. SBT345

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Cheng; Othman, Eman M.; Reimer, Anastasija; Grüne, Matthias; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Stopper, Helga; Hentschel, Ute; Abdelmohsen, Usama R.

    2016-01-01

    A new chlorinated quinolone, ageloline A, was isolated from the broth culture of Streptomyces sp. SBT345 that was cultivated from the Mediterranean sponge Agelas oroides. The structure of this compound was determined by spectroscopic analysis including 1D and 2D NMR as well as HR-ESI-MS experiments. Ageloline A exhibited antioxidant potential using cell-free and cell-based assays and was further able to reduce oxidative stress and genomic damage induced by the oxidative stress inducer 4-nitro...

  11. Isolation, molecular identification and quinolone-susceptibility testing of Arcobacter spp. isolated from fresh vegetables in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana; Bayas Morejón, Isidro Favián; Ferrús, María Antonia

    2017-08-01

    Some species of the Arcobacter genus are considered emerging foodborne and waterborne enteropathogens. However, the presence of Arcobacter spp. in vegetables very little is known, because most studies have focused on foods of animal origin. On the other hand, quinolones are considered as first-line drugs for the treatment of infection by campylobacteria in human patients, but few data are currently available about the resistance levels to these antibiotics among Arcobacter species. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the presence and diversity of arcobacters isolated from fresh vegetables such as lettuces, spinaches, chards and cabbages. Resistance to quinolones of the isolates was also investigated. One hundred fresh vegetables samples purchased from seven local retail markets in Valencia (Spain) during eight months were analysed. The study included 41 lettuces, 21 spinaches, 34 chards and 4 cabbages. Samples were analysed by culture and by molecular methods before and after enrichment. By culture, 17 out of 100 analysed samples were Arcobacter positive and twenty-five isolates were obtained from them. Direct detection by PCR was low, with only 4% Arcobacter spp. positive samples. This percentage increased considerably, up 20%, after 48 h enrichment. By polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), 17 out of the 25 isolates were identified as A. butzleri and 8 as A. cryaerophilus. Only two A. butzleri isolates showed resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The sequencing of a fragment of the QRDR region of the gyrA gene from the quinolones-resistant isolates revealed the presence of a mutation in position 254 of this gene (C-T transition). This study is the first report about the presence of pathogenic species of Arcobacter spp. in chards and cabbages and confirms that fresh vegetables can act as transmission vehicle to humans. Moreover, the presence of A. butzleri quinolone resistant in vegetables could

  12. Metal complex of the first-generation quinolone antimicrobial drug nalidixic acid: structure and its biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anamika; Mogha, Navin Kumar; Masram, Dhanraj T

    2015-03-01

    A novel binuclear squire planar complex of nalidixic acid with Ag(I) metal ion with the formula [Ag(Nal)2] has been synthesized. The synthesized metal complex was characterized using CHN analysis, Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), ultra violet-visible (Uv-vis) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The newly synthesized complex shows more advanced antifungal activity compared to the parent quinolone against four fungi, namely Pythium aphanidermatum, Sclerotinia rolfsii, Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizoctonia bataticola.

  13. Synthesis of Fused Pyrimidinone and Quinolone Derivatives in an Automated High-Temperature and High-Pressure Flow Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoung, Jennifer; Bogdan, Andrew R; Kantor, Stanislaw; Wang, Ying; Charaschanya, Manwika; Djuric, Stevan W

    2017-01-20

    Fused pyrimidinone and quinolone derivatives that are of potential interest to pharmaceutical research were synthesized within minutes in up to 96% yield in an automated Phoenix high-temperature and high-pressure continuous flow reactor. Heterocyclic scaffolds that are either hard to synthesize or require multisteps are readily accessible using a common set of reaction conditions. The use of low-boiling solvents along with the high conversions of these reactions allowed for facile workup and isolation. The methods reported herein are highly amenable for fast and efficient heterocycle synthesis as well as compound scale-ups.

  14. Changes of the Quinolones Resistance to Gram-positive Cocci Isolated during the Past 8 Years in the First Bethune Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiancheng; Chen, Qihui; Yao, Hanxin; Zhou, Qi

    This study was to investigate the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci isolated in the First Bethune Hospital during the past 8 years. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) were 50.8%∼83.3% and 79.4%∼81.5%during the past 8 years, respectively. In recent 8 years, the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci had increased. Monitoring of the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci should be strengthened. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to guide rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  15. Molecular Identification of Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes and Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates Recovered from Egyptian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. El-Badawy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of antibiotics in clinical settings is thought to have led to the global emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens. The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of genes encoding aminoglycoside resistance and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. All K. pneumoniae isolates were phenotypically identified using API 20E and then confirmed genotypically through amplification of the specific K. pneumoniae phoE gene. All isolates were genotyped by the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction technique (ERIC-PCR. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done by a modified Kirby-Bauer method and broth microdilution. All resistant or intermediate-resistant isolates to either gentamicin or amikacin were screened for 7 different genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs. In addition, all resistant or intermediate-resistant isolates to either ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin were screened for 5 genes encoding the quinolone resistance protein (Qnr, 1 gene encoding quinolone-modifying enzyme, and 3 genes encoding quinolone efflux pumps. Biotyping using API 20E revealed 13 different biotypes. Genotyping demonstrated that all isolates were related to 2 main phylogenetic groups. Susceptibility testing revealed that carbapenems and tigecycline were the most effective agents. Investigation of genes encoding AMEs revealed that acc(6′-Ib was the most prevalent, followed by acc(3′-II, aph(3′-IV, and ant(3′′-I. Examination of genes encoding Qnr proteins demonstrated that qnrB was the most prevalent, followed by qnrS, qnrD, and qnrC. It was found that 61%, 26%, and 12% of quinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates harbored acc(6′-Ib-cr, oqxAB, and qebA, respectively. The current study demonstrated a high prevalence of aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance genes among clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae.

  16. In vitro activities of garenoxacin (BMS-284756) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans group streptococci, and Enterococcus faecalis compared to those of six other quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohs, Patrick; Houssaye, Serge; Aubert, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2003-11-01

    The activity of garenoxacin, a new quinolone, was determined in comparison with other quinolones against different strains of S. pneumoniae, viridans group streptococci (VGS), and Enterococcus faecalis. Strains were quinolone-susceptible clinical isolates and quinolone-resistant strains with defined mechanisms of resistance obtained from either clinical isolates or derivatives of S. pneumoniae R6. Clinical quinolone-susceptible strains of S. pneumoniae, VGS and E. faecalis showed garenoxacin MICs within a range of 0.03 microg/ml to 0.25 micro g/ml. Garenoxacin MICs increased two- to eightfold when one mutation was present in the ParC quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR), fourfold when one mutation was present in the GyrA QRDR (S. pneumoniae), 8- to 64-fold when two or three mutations were associated in ParC and GyrA QRDR, and 2,048-fold when two mutations were present in both the GyrA and ParC QRDRs (Streptococcus pneumoniae). Increased active efflux had a moderate effect on garenoxacin MICs for S. pneumoniae and VGS. Against S. pneumoniae, garenoxacin behaved like moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin, being more affected by a single gyrA mutation than by a single parC mutation. Although garenoxacin was generally two- to fourfold more active than moxifloxacin against the different wild-type or mutant strains of S. pneumoniae, VGS, and E. faecalis, it was two- to fourfold less active than gemifloxacin. At four times the respective MIC for each strain, the bactericidal effect of garenoxacin, observed at 6 h for S. pneumoniae and at 24 h for S. oralis and E. faecalis, was not influenced by the presence of mutation either in the ParC or in both the ParC and GyrA QRDRs.

  17. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  18. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  19. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  20. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  1. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife refuge : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  2. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Area : Fish and Wildlife Management Plan : Fiscal year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was prepared to guide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) study and work...

  3. Neospora caninum and Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almería, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Bovine neosporosis caused by Neospora caninum is among the main causes of abortion in cattle nowadays. At present there is no effective treatment or vaccine. Serological evidence in domestic, wild, and zoo animals indicates that many species have been exposed to this parasite. However, many aspects of the life cycle of N. caninum are unknown and the role of wildlife in the life cycle of N. caninum is still not completely elucidated. In North America, there are data consistent with a sylvatic cycle involving white tailed-deer and canids and in Australia a plausible sylvatic cycle could be occurring between wild dogs and their macropod preys. In Europe, a similar sylvatic cycle has not been established but is very likely. The present review is a comprehensive and up to date summary of the current knowledge on the sylvatic cycle of N. caninum, species affected and their geographical distribution. These findings could have important implications in both sylvatic and domestic cycles since infected wildlife may influence the prevalence of infection in cattle farms in the same areas. Wildlife will need to be taken into account in the control measures to reduce the economical losses associated with this important disease in cattle farms. PMID:27335866

  4. Breakage-reunion domain of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV: crystal structure of a gram-positive quinolone target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Laponogov

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The 2.7 A crystal structure of the 55-kDa N-terminal breakage-reunion domain of topoisomerase (topo IV subunit A (ParC from Streptococcus pneumoniae, the first for the quinolone targets from a gram-positive bacterium, has been solved and reveals a 'closed' dimer similar in fold to Escherichia coli DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA, but distinct from the 'open' gate structure of Escherichia coli ParC. Unlike GyrA whose DNA binding groove is largely positively charged, the DNA binding site of ParC exhibits a distinct pattern of alternating positively and negatively charged regions coincident with the predicted positions of the grooves and phosphate backbone of DNA. Based on the ParC structure, a new induced-fit model for sequence-specific recognition of the gate (G segment by ParC has been proposed. These features may account for the unique DNA recognition and quinolone targeting properties of pneumococcal type II topoisomerases compared to their gram-negative counterparts.

  5. Efficacy of trovafloxacin, a new quinolone antibiotic, in experimental staphylococcal endocarditis due to oxacillin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, A S; Li, C; Ing, M

    1998-07-01

    Therapeutic options for severe infections caused by strains of oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (ORSE) are very limited. With the increasing resistance of such strains to aminoglycosides, rifampin, and currently available quinolone agents, as well as the recent documentation of increasing resistance of ORSA to vancomycin (VANCO), new treatment alternatives are imperative. The in vivo efficacy of trovafloxacin (TROVA), a new quinolone agent with excellent antistaphylococcal activity in vitro, against experimental endocarditis (IE) due to beta-lactamase-producing ORSA and ORSE strains (ORSA and ORSE IE) was evaluated. TROVA (25 mg/kg of body weight intravenously [i.v.] twice daily [b.i.d]) was compared to VANCO (20 mg/kg i.v. b.i.d.) and two regimens of ampicillin-sulbactam (AMP-SUL; 200 mg/kg intramuscularly [i.m.] three times a day [t.i.d.] and 20 mg/kg i.m. b.i.d.), with all agents given for 3 or 6 days. AMP-SUL was included as a comparative treatment regimen because of its proven efficacy against experimental ORSA and ORSE IE. For both ORSA and ORSE IE, TROVA, AMP-SUL, and VANCO each reduced staphylococcal densities in vegetations compared to untreated controls (P TROVA was the most rapidly bactericidal agent--although not to a statistically significant degree--correlating with its superior bactericidal effect in vitro compared to those of VANCO and AMP-SUL.

  6. Identification of the main quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by MAMA-DEG PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormeño, Lorena; Palomo, Gonzalo; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Porrero, M Concepción; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Domínguez, Lucas; Campos, Maria J; Quesada, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Among zoonotic diseases, campylobacteriosis stands out as the major bacterial infection producing human gastroenteritis. Antimicrobial therapy, only recommended in critical cases, is challenged by resistance mechanisms that should be unambiguously detected for achievement of effective treatments. Quinolone (ciprofloxacin) resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, the 2 main Campylobacter detected in humans, is conferred by the mutation gyrA C-257-T, which can be genotyped by several methods that require a previous identification of the pathogen species to circumvent the sequence polymorphism of the gene. A multiplex PCR, based on degenerated oligonucleotides, has been designed for unambiguous identification of the quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter spp. isolates. The method was verified with 249 Campylobacter strains isolated from humans (141 isolates) and from the 3 most important animal sources for this zoonosis: poultry (34 isolates), swine (38 isolates), and cattle (36 isolates). High resistance to ciprofloxacin, MIC above 4μg/mL, linked to the mutated genotype predicted by MAMA-DEG PCR (mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR with degenerated primers) was found frequently among isolates from the different hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Quinolone Resistance Genes Among Extended-Spectrum B-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harifi Mood, Elnaz; Meshkat, Zahra; Izadi, Nafiseh; Rezaei, Maryam; Amel Jamehdar, Saeid; Naderi Nasab, Mahboubeh

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is an important bacterial species based on incidence and associated infection severity. Some E. coli strains produce extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) and are called ESBL-producing E. coli. These strains are resistant to most classes of cephalosporin and a number of other classes of antibiotics. Plasmids carrying qnr genes have been found to transmit quinolone resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of qnr genes in ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli isolated from outpatient and hospitalized patient clinical specimens from Imam Reza hospital in Mashhad, Iran. Two hundred E. coli strains, isolated from different clinical specimens were used. ESBL-producing E. coli were detected by determining susceptibility to ceftazidime, cefotaxime, and cefpodoxime with the phenotypic confirmatory test (PCT). PCR analysis was employed to detect the qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, bla TEM , and bla SHV genes. Eighty-six (43%) isolates were ciprofloxacin-resistant. The PCT identified 85 (42.5%) of 200 E. coli isolates as ESBL-producing. The bla TEM , bla SHV , qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS gene were found in 65 (76.47%), 23 (27%), 63 (31%), 34 (17%), and 14 (7%) isolates, respectively. The high prevalence of quinolone resistance genes, which indicates antibiotic resistance, in the Imam Reza Hospital of Mashhad is a major concern. Hence, the antibiotics prescription policy should be revised, and infection control measures should be improved.

  8. 50 CFR 216.87 - Wildlife research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife research. 216.87 Section 216.87 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.87 Wildlife research. (a) Wildlife research, other than research on...

  9. 75 FR 54649 - Endangered Wildlife; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Wildlife; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... Wildlife Service (Service), invite the public to comment on applications for permits to conduct enhancement..., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 911 NE. 11th Avenue, Portland, OR 97232-4181. FOR FURTHER...

  10. Diagnosis of Brucellosis in Livestock and Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroid, Jacques; Nielsen, Klaus; Saegerman, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Aim To describe and discuss the merits of various direct and indirect methods applied in vitro (mainly on blood or milk) or in vivo (allergic test) for the diagnosis of brucellosis in animals. Methods The recent literature on brucellosis diagnostic tests was reviewed. These diagnostic tests are applied with different goals, such as national screening, confirmatory diagnosis, certification, and international trade. The validation of such diagnostic tests is still an issue, particularly in wildlife. The choice of the testing strategy depends on the prevailing brucellosis epidemiological situation and the goal of testing. Results Measuring the kinetics of antibody production after Brucella spp. infection is essential for analyzing serological results correctly and may help to predict abortion. Indirect ELISAs help to discriminate 1) between false positive serological reactions and true brucellosis and 2) between vaccination and infection. Biotyping of Brucella spp. provides valuable epidemiological information that allows tracing an infection back to the sources in instances where several biotypes of a given Brucella species are circulating. Polymerase chain reaction and new molecular methods are likely to be used as routine typing and fingerprinting methods in the coming years. Conclusion The diagnosis of brucellosis in livestock and wildlife is complex and serological results need to be carefully analyzed. The B. abortus S19 and B. melitensis Rev. 1 vaccines are the cornerstones of control programs in cattle and small ruminants, respectively. There is no vaccine available for pigs or for wildlife. In the absence of a human brucellosis vaccine, prevention of human brucellosis depends on the control of the disease in animals. PMID:20718082

  11. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document lists the objectives of Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Topics outlined in this plan include wildlife-wildlands interpretation,...

  12. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Law Enforcement Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides...

  13. Cropland Management Plan: Louisa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Louisa National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan focuses to the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at...

  14. Guidelines for wildlife disease risk analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2014-01-01

    Provides an overview of science-based processes and tools for wildlife disease risk analysis and their application to contemporary issues such as human-wildlife interactions, domestic animal-wildlife...

  15. Arctic National Wildlife Range, Annual Narrative Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Arctic National Wildlife Range (ANWR) was established by executive order in 1960 for the purpose of preserving unique wildlife, wilderness and recreational...

  16. Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge : Cropland Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan focuses on the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at...

  17. Fishery Management Recommendations : Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These management recommendations were prepared by the Winona Fishery Resources Office of the U.S. Fish Wildlife Service for the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge....

  18. Contaminants investigation at Grulla National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In August, 2003, a contaminants investigation was initiated at Grulla National Wildlife Refuge (Grulla NWR) by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service personnel. The purpose...

  19. US Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Boundaries of the management Regions of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is organized into 8 geographic Regions.

  20. African Wildlife Policy : Protecting Wildlife Herbivores on Private Game Ranches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinyua, P.; Kooten, van G.C.; Bulte, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    In large parts of Africa, wildlife herbivores spill over onto private lands, competing with domestic livestock for forage resources. To encourage private landowners to take into account the externality benefits of wildlife, game cropping is increasingly considered as an important component of

  1. Exploring Wildlife, Unit 1, Colorado Division of Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jon K.; Smith, Dwight R.

    This booklet on wildlife is part of a series to encourage youth to pursue environmental projects. The booklet discusses various aspects of wildlife management such as life zones, pollution, predator control, game stocking, habitat improvement, hunting, legislation, and careers. Key words are defined, and suggested activities are listed. (MR)

  2. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  3. Wildlife trade and global disease emergence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karesh, William B; Cook, Robert A; Bennett, Elizabeth L; Newcomb, James

    2005-01-01

    The global trade in wildlife provides disease transmission mechanisms that not only cause human disease outbreaks but also threaten livestock, international trade, rural livelihoods, native wildlife...

  4. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. / Mecanismos de resistência às quinolonas em Salmonella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Rocha Moreira de Oliveira

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a common and widespread zoonotic disease of humans and a frequent cause of foodborne disease. Treatment of severe and systemic salmonellosis is usually done with fluoroquinolones. In this review resistance mechanisms of Salmonella to quinolones are discussed. Single point mutations in the quinolone resistant determining region (QRDR of the gyrA gene may be sufficient to generate high levels of resistance to non-fluorated quinolones and also may decrease the fluoroquinolones susceptibility. Other resistance mechanisms that should be considered are mutations in parC gene, the possibility of acquiring resistance through plasmidial transference and hyper-expression of efflux pumps. Fluoroquinolones resistance is still relatively uncommon in Salmonella compared to other species belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. However, the more careful use of fluoroquinolones in veterinary and human medicine is essential to decrease the selective pressure which can avoid the emergence and spread of resistant clones and consequently maintain the clinical efficacy of this group of antibiotics.A salmonelose é uma zoonose de importância mundial e uma das mais freqüentes doenças de origem alimentar. As fluoroquinolonas são a principal opção para o tratamento de salmoneloses graves ou sistêmicas. Esta revisão de literatura teve como objetivo apresentar os principais mecanismos envolvidos na resistência de Salmonella spp a estes antimicrobianos. Mutações de ponto na Região Determinante de Resistência à Quinolona (QRDR do gene gyrA podem gerar altos níveis de resistência a quinolonas não-fluoradas, além de reduzir a suscetibilidade as fluoroquinolonas. Outros mecanismos de resistência que também precisam ser considerados são as mutações no gene parC, a possibilidade do envolvimento de plasmídios de resistência e o sistema de efluxo ativo. A resistência às fluoroquinolonas ainda é incomum em Salmonella spp., quando

  5. Renewable energy and wildlife conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mona

    2016-09-09

    The renewable energy sector is rapidly expanding and diversifying the power supply of the country. Yet, as our Nation works to advance renewable energy and to conserve wildlife, some conflicts arise. To address these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting innovative research and developing workable solutions to reduce impacts of renewable energy production on wildlife.

  6. Wildlife Emergency and Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jennifer; Barron, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Wildlife patients often present as emergencies. For veterinarians who do not typically treat wildlife, it is important to be able to stabilize and determine the underlying cause of the animal's signs. This article discusses initial assessment, stabilization, and treatment of common emergency presentations in wild birds, reptiles, and mammals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental circulation loss study

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Sigurd

    2013-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering Circulation losses could occur during any operation that involves pumping into a well. As of today, it is recognized as one of the most costly drilling problems. In some situation it might be hard to stop, and usually takes precious rig time to deal with the problem. In order to mitigate the risk...

  8. Arctic circulation regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Fontan Circulation over Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Djoeke; van Melle, Joost P.; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Ridderbos, Floris-Jan S.; Eshuis, Graziella; van Stratum, Elisabeth B. H. J.; Recinos, Salvador J.; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Hillege, Hans; Willems, Tineke P.; Ebels, Tjark; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    2017-01-01

    The unique, unphysiological Fontan circulation is associated with an impaired functional status of the patients that is suggested to deteriorate over time. Unfortunately, previous studies did not integrate both pulmonary and cardiac determinants of functional status. In addition, a comparison with

  10. Simultaneous determination of eleven quinolones in animal feed by liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarini, Roberta; Fioroni, Laura; Angelucci, Federico; Tovo, Gloria R; Cristofani, Elisa

    2009-11-13

    A rapid and simple multi-residue procedure is described for assaying eleven quinolones (cinoxacin, ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, marbofloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, oxolinic acid and sarafloxacin) in feeds at sub-additive levels (1-5 mg kg(-1)). Five grams of sample were extracted by a metaphosphoric acid/acetonitrile mixture (70/30, v/v) and purified onto OASIS HLB cartridges. The determination was achieved by liquid chromatography (LC) using a GEMINI C18 analytical column both with fluorescence detection (FD) and photodiode-array (DAD). Limits of detection for each drug were in the range 0.04-0.8 mg kg(-1). Above the limit of quantification (LOQ), in poultry feed the recoveries were from 69 to 98% with relative standard deviations less than or equal 10%. Finally the measurement uncertainty was estimated using the bottom-up approach.

  11. Macrolide and quinolone-resistant Mycoplasma genitalium in a man with persistent urethritis: the tip of the British iceberg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Suneeta; Parkhouse, Andy; Dean, Gillian

    2017-12-01

    There is growing concern worldwide for macrolide resistance in M. genitalium following liberal use of 1 g azithromycin to treat non-gonococcal urethritis and confirmed C. trachomatis infection. Moxifloxacin is the second-line treatment for M. genitalium and still has excellent efficacy against it. However, recent reports indicating that quinolone resistance is more prevalent than previously thought are worrying. Routine testing of symptomatic men and women for M. genitalium is not currently recommended in BASHH guidelines, and attempts to implement such testing have been hampered by a lack of commercially available assays. We present a case of M. genitalium urethritis which failed to respond to four different antibiotic regimens, resulting in multiple visits to the clinic and anxiety for the patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Structure of the Dioxygenase AsqJ: Mechanistic Insights into a One-Pot Multistep Quinolone Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Bräuer, Alois

    2015-11-10

    © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Multienzymatic cascades are responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products and represent a source of inspiration for synthetic chemists. The FeII/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase AsqJ from Aspergillus nidulans is outstanding because it stereoselectively catalyzes both a ferryl-induced desaturation reaction and epoxidation on a benzodiazepinedione. Interestingly, the enzymatically formed spiro epoxide spring-loads the 6,7-bicyclic skeleton for non-enzymatic rearrangement into the 6,6-bicyclic scaffold of the quinolone alkaloid 4′-methoxyviridicatin. Herein, we report different crystal structures of the protein in the absence and presence of synthesized substrates, surrogates, and intermediates that mimic the various stages of the reaction cycle of this exceptional dioxygenase.

  13. Technetium-99m Tricarbonyl Labeled a Broad-spectrum Quinolone as a Specific Imaging Agent in Infection Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramrouz, Seyed Javad; Erfani, Mostafa; Athari Allaf, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging has been used to localize infection sites, and efforts have been continued to develop modified infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. In this study gemifloxacin as a broad-spectrum quinolone has been labeled with [(99m)Tc (CO)3 (H2O)3](+) core in order to evaluate its feasibility as an infection imaging agent for in-vivo use. The stability of radioconjugate was checked in human serum at 37 °C and biodistribution was studied in mice. Labeling yield of > 95% was obtained corresponding to a specific activity of 0.14 GBq/μmol. The radioconjugate showed good stability in human serum. Our main achievement was the high accumulation in the infected muscle in mice (T/NT = 2.93 ± 0.3 at 1 h post injection), which may diagnostically be beneficial for differentiate sites of infection from sites of inflammation.

  14. High prevalence of Streptococcus agalactiae from vaginas of women in Taiwan and its mechanisms of macrolide and quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Tsung; Lai, Mei-Chin

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS), is the most common pathogen causing infections among perinatal women and neonatal babies. Nonetheless, there are few studies on the occurrence of GBS among the pregnant women and the mechanisms of GBS resistance to quinolones and macrolides in Taiwan. GBS were isolated from vaginas of the pregnant and non-pregnant symptomatic women in Taiwan. The prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility, and mechanisms of resistance against erythromycin and quinolone of total 188 isolates were studied. The isolation rate of GBS from pregnant women was significantly higher at 21.8% compare with the non-pregnant women of 13.2%. Antibiotic susceptibility test of the 188 GBS isolates revealed a high non-susceptible rate for erythromycin (50.0%) while the rate for levofloxacin was only 4.8%. Among 94 erythromycin non-susceptible GBS isolates, ermB gene was detected 83.1% (59/71) for those GBS that were non-susceptible to both clindamycin and tetracycline, which was significantly higher than GBS that are susceptible to clindamycin but resistant to tetracycline at 43.8% (7/16). No ermA or mef gene was detected in any isolate. Mutations were detected in the parC and gyrA genes in 14 out of 18 levofloxacin non-susceptible isolates. The predominant mutation type was the combination of Ser79Tyr in parC and Ser81Leu mutations in gyrA. GBS is the most common isolated pathogens in vaginal infections in Taiwan, resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin is higher than the rate observed for other regions of the world, while the resistance rate for levofloxacin was relatively lower in Taiwan. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbolu, David Olusoga; Alli, Armstrong Oyebode; Anorue, Michael C; Daini, Oluwole Adebayo; Oluwadun, Afolabi

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, mechanisms of resistance to quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria were believed to be only chromosome encoded. However, emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) has been reported worldwide. This study investigated distribution of PMQR in Gram-negative bacteria from a tertiary hospital in eastern part of Nigeria. Seventy-one nonduplicate Gram-negative bacterial isolates of eight species were analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility, genotypic detection of various PMQRs, typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and analysis of plasmids present, including replicon typing. The minimum inhibitory concentrations showed MIC90values as high as 256 μg/ml for fluoroquinolones. Carriage of PMQR was found to be 35.2%. Twenty (28.2%) isolates carried various qnr genes, of which seven (9.9%) qnrA1; four (5.6%) qnrB1; eight (11.3%) qnrS1 while one (1.4%) encoded qnrD1. Eighteen (25.4%) isolates were positive for aac(6')-Ib-cr while carriage of multiple genes exists in some strains. Similarly, 13 isolates (18.7%) were found to carry PMQR efflux pump gene, qepA. Conjugation experiments revealed that the plasmids once transferred coded for fluoroquinolone resistance. The transconjugant strains carried a common plasmid estimated to be 65 kb. These plasmids were untypable for replicon/incompatibility. Typing revealed high diversity among all species tested with no identical RAPD pattern seen. This study further confirms high level resistance to many antimicrobials in different species of Gram-negative bacteria including fluoroquinolones and spread of PMQR genes in Southern Nigeria.

  16. Occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and virulence genes in avian Escherichia coli isolates from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarem, Meradi; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Nayme, Kaotar; Akila, Abdi; Zerouali, Khalid; El Mdaghri, Naima; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2017-02-28

    The emergence and spread of quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in poultry products puts consumers at risk of exposure to the strains of E. coli that resist antibiotic treatment. The objective of this study was to define the prevalence and virulence potential of poultry-associated nalidixic acid (NAL)-resistant E. coli in the Annaba city, Algeria. In total, 33 samples of retail chicken meat were purchased from various butcher shops and examined for bacterial contamination with NAL-resistant E. coli. These isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and were also investigated for the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and virulence genes using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic grouping of the NAL-resistant E. coli isolates was determined by the conventional multiplex PCR method. Twenty-nine (87.8%) products yielded NAL-resistant E. coli. Antibiograms revealed that 96.55% of NAL-resistant E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR). Resistance was most frequently observed against sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (96.6%), tetracycline (96.6%), ciprofloxacin (72%), and amoxicillin (65.5%). Group A was the most prevalent phylogenetic group, followed by groups D, B1, and B2. The PMQR determinants were detected in three isolates with qnrB72 and qnrS1 type identified. Four (13.8%) isolates carried one of the Shiga toxin E. coli-associated genes stx1, stx2, and ehxA alleles. The high prevalence of NAL-resistant E. coli isolated from retail chicken meat with detection of MDR E. coli harboring Shiga toxin genes in this study gives a warning signal for possible occurrence of foodborne infections with failure in antibiotic treatment.

  17. Mercury poisoning in wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, G.H.; Fairbrother, Anne; Locke, Louis N.; Hoff, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    Mercury is an intriguing contaminant because it has complex chemical properties, a wide range of harmful effects, and an infinite persistence in the environment. Die-offs of wildlife due to mercury have occurred in many countries, especially before mercury seed dressings were banned. Today, most mercury problems are associated with aquatic environments. Methylmercury, the most toxic chemical form, attacks many organ systems, but damage to the central nervous system is most severe. Harmful wet-weight concentrations of mercury, as methylmercury, in the tissues of adult birds and mammals range from about 8-30 ppm in the brain, 20-60 ppm in liver, 20-60 ppm in kidney, and 15-30 ppm in muscle. Young animals may be more sensitive.

  18. Eating to save wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, Mickey; Birkved, Morten; Gamborg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    .e. from cradle to gate) and across a multitude of impact categories (i.e. including and beyond climate change), of typical food items sold in zoos and aquariums. It describes the impacts on wildlife and nature that these products may have. Further we link this analysis to different ideas of sustainability......, could be: Does it make sense to work for conservation by preserving animal species in captivity while selling food to visitors that may be undermining this effort? Complicating the issue is that zoos and aquariums are dependent on generating a profit from “non-core” services such as cafeterias...... and the like to generate funds for running the zoo, and conceivably, in turn for conservation purposes - funds that might diminish if zoos and aquariums do not sell a variety of food products, including animal-based ones to their visitors. The main question addressed by this paper is: If zoos and aquariums...

  19. Light Pollution and Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffek, J.

    2008-12-01

    for Educational Program IYA Dark Skies Education Session Fall American Geophysical Union San Francisco, December 15-19, 2008 Light Pollution and Wildlife This is a very exciting time to be a part of the mission to keep the nighttime skies natural. The International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009 is developing programs for all areas of Dark Skies Awareness. For many years the issue of light pollution focused on the impact to the astronomy industry. While this is an important area, research has shown that light pollution negatively impacts wildlife, their habitat, human health, and is a significant waste of energy. Since the message and impact of the effects of light pollution are much broader now, the message conveyed to the public must also be broader. Education programs directed at youth are a new frontier to reach out to a new audience about the adverse effects of too much artificial light at night. The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) has developed educational presentations using the National Science Teachers Association Education Standards. These programs focus on youth between the ages of 5 to 17exploring new territory in the education of light pollution. The IDA education programs are broken down into three age groups; ages 5-9, 8-13, 12 and older. The presentations come complete with PowerPoint slides, discussion notes for each slide, and workbooks including age appropriate games to keep young audiences involved. A new presentation reflects the growing area of interest regarding the effects of too much artificial light at night on wildlife. This presentation outlines the known problems for ecosystems caused by artificial light at night. Insects are attracted to artificial lights and may stay near that light all night. This attraction interferes with their ability to migrate, mate, and look for food. Such behavior leads to smaller insect populations. Fewer insects in turn affect birds and bats, because they rely on insects as a food source. The IDA

  20. 7 CFR 371.6 - Wildlife Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wildlife Services. 371.6 Section 371.6 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 371.6 Wildlife Services. (a) General statement. Wildlife Services (WS) manages problems caused by wildlife. (b) Deputy Administrator of...

  1. 36 CFR 1002.2 - Wildlife protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wildlife protection. 1002.2... RECREATION § 1002.2 Wildlife protection. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) The taking of wildlife. (2) The feeding, touching, teasing, frightening or intentional disturbing of wildlife nesting, breeding or...

  2. Wildlife reserves, populations, and hunting outcome with smart wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Strange, Niels

    2014-01-01

    We consider a hunting area and a wildlife reserve and answer the question: How does clever migration decision affect the social optimal and the private optimal hunting levels and population stocks? We analyze this in a model allowing for two-way migration between hunting and reserve areas, where...... the populations’ migration decisions depend on both hunting pressure and relative population densities. In the social optimum a pure stress effect on the behavior of smart wildlife exists. This implies that the population level in the wildlife reserve tends to increase and the population level in the hunting area...... and hunting levels tend to decrease. On the other hand, the effect on stock tends to reduce the population in the wildlife reserve and increase the population in the hunting area and thereby also increase hunting. In the case of the private optimum, open-access is assumed and we find that the same qualitative...

  3. Wildlife Management Objectives for Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report details both the management objectives and refuge usage for the following: waterfowl, upland game birds, white-tailed deer, furbearers, water, and the...

  4. INTERNAL CIRCULATION ENVELOPES

    CERN Multimedia

    Mail Office

    2001-01-01

    Internal mail envelopes often finish up in large piles in certain offices, thus creating a shortage for other users of the mail service, who would be grateful if everyone with an unused stock could deposit them in their mail box, after attaching them together with an elastic band or a piece of string. The messengers will then collect them so that the Mail Office can put them back in circulation. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration.

  5. Substitutions of Ser83Leu in GyrA and Ser80Leu in ParC Associated with Quinolone Resistance in Acinetobacter pittii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dan-xia; Hu, Yun-jian; Zhou, Hong-wei; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Gong-xiang

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the mechanism of quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter pittii, 634 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates were collected throughout Zhejiang Province. Identification of isolates was conducted by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), blaOXA-51-like gene, and partial RNA polymerase β-subunit (rpoB) amplification. Twenty-seven isolates of A. pittii were identified. Among the 634 isolates, A. baumannii, A. pittii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, and A. calcoaceticus counted for 87.22%, 4.26%, 8.20%, and 0.32%, respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility of nalidixic acid, ofloxacin, enoxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin for 27 A. pittii were determined by the agar dilution method. Detection of quinolone-resistant determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE was performed for the A. pittii isolates. In addition, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, oqxA, and oqxB) were investigated. All the 27 isolates demonstrated a higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to old quinolones than the new fluoroquinolones. No mutation in gyrA, gyrB, parC, or parE was detected in 20 ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates. Seven ciprofloxacin-resistant A. pittii were identified with a Ser83Leu mutation in GyrA. Among them, six isolates with simultaneous Ser83Leu amino acid substitution in GyrA and Ser80Leu in ParC displayed higher MIC values against ciprofloxacin. Additionally, three were identified with a Met370Ile substitution in ParE, and two were detected with a Tyr317His mutation in ParE, which were reported for the first time. No PMQR determinants were identified in the 27 A. pittii isolates. In conclusion, mutations in chromosome play a major role in quinolone resistance in A. pittii, while resistance mechanisms mediated by plasmid have

  6. Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae producing acquired AmpC β-lactamases and/or carbapenemases in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Jesús; Agüero, Jesús; Miró, Elisenda; Conejo, María Del Carmen; Oteo, Jesús; Bou, Germán; González-López, Juan José; Oliver, Antonio; Navarro, Ferran; Pascual, Álvaro; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae species has increased over the past few years, and is significantly associated to beta-lactam resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of chromosomal- and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in acquired AmpC β-lactamase and/or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The presence of chromosomal- and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms [mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC and qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qepA genes] was evaluated in 289 isolates of acquired AmpC β-lactamase- and/or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae collected between February and July 2009 in 35 Spanish hospitals. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes were detected in 92 isolates (31.8%), qnr genes were detected in 83 isolates (28.7%), and the aac(6')-Ib-cr gene was detected in 20 isolates (7%). qnrB4 gene was the most prevalent qnr gene detected (20%), associated, in most cases, with DHA-1. Only 14.6% of isolates showed no mutations in gyrA or parC with a ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.5mg/L or higher, whereas PMQR genes were detected in 90% of such isolates. qnrB4 gene was the most prevalent PMQR gene detected, and was significantly associated with acquired AmpC β-lactamase DHA-1. PMQR determinants in association with other chromosomal-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms, different to mutations in gyrA and parC (increased energy-dependent efflux, altered lipopolysaccharide or porin loss), could lead to ciprofloxacin MIC values that exceed breakpoints established by the main international committees to define clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. International collaborative study on the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolated from animals, humans, food and the environment in 13 European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldman, Kees; Cavaco, Lina; Mevius, Dik

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was initiated to collect retrospective information on the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolates in Europe and to identify the responsible genes. METHODS: Databases of national reference laboratories...

  8. A Look at Circulation Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzius, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Nearly all academic libraries keep circulation statistics which are often shared with their parent university, library consortia, and national organizations. This study attempted to discover what goes into circulation statistics by surveying Southeastern research libraries. Libraries were asked what they count in their circulation statistics and…

  9. 50 CFR 31.12 - Sale of wildlife specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sale of wildlife specimens. 31.12 Section 31.12 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDLIFE SPECIES MANAGEMENT Terms and Conditions of Wildlife...

  10. Animal behaviour and wildlife conservation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Festa-Bianchet, M; Appollonio, M

    2003-01-01

    .... The contributions discuss the conservation of free-living but exploited animals. Efforts to conserve wildlife populations and preserve biological diversity are often hampered by an inadequate understanding of animal behaviour...

  11. Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains an overview of the location, landscape, objectives, management, public uses, and problems of Holla Bend NWR. A map of the refuge is included,...

  12. History Kern National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Details the location, physiography, relief, and drainage, vegetation, settlement and population, transportation and markets, climate, soils, acquisition history, and...

  13. Changing patterns of wildlife diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was not to analyze the effects of global warming on wildlife disease patterns, but to serve as a springboard for future efforts to identify those wildlife diseases, including zoonotic diseases, that could be influenced the most by warming climates and to encourage the development of models to examine the potential effects. Hales et al. (1999) examined the relationship of the incidence of a vector-borne human disease, Dengue fever, and El Nino southern oscillations for South Pacific Island nations. The development of similar models on specific wildlife diseases which have environmental factors strongly associated with transmission would provide information and options for the future management of our wildlife resources.

  14. Simulated nests in wildlife management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Many of us have studied game bird nests. Usually we hoped to learn something about nesting cover, cover management and the birds and animals which seemed to eat the...

  15. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1961 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Reufge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District IV...

  16. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1959 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District IV...

  17. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1958 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District IV...

  18. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1959 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District IV...

  19. Wildlife cancer: a conservation perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAloose, Denise; Newton, Alisa L

    2009-07-01

    Until recently, cancer in wildlife was not considered to be a conservation concern. However, with the identification of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease, sea turtle fibropapillomatosis and sea lion genital carcinoma, it has become apparent that neoplasia can be highly prevalent and have considerable effects on some species. It is also clear that anthropogenic activities contribute to the development of neoplasia in wildlife species, such as beluga whales and bottom-dwelling fish, making them sensitive sentinels of disturbed environments.

  20. Presquile National Wildlife Refuge, James River National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Presquile National Wildlife Refuge and James River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar...

  1. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  2. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  3. Management of bison in the National Wildlife Refuge System, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report, from the region 6 Wildlife Health Office, discusses management of bison (Bison bison) within the National Wildlife Refuge System, and future management...

  4. Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar...

  5. Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar...

  6. Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Annual narrative report: Fiscal year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge and Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge Complex outlines accomplishments during the 2000 fiscal...

  7. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment for Kern National Wildlife Refuge and Tulare Basin Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Kern National Wildlife Refuge and Tulare Basin Wildlife Management Area describes hydrologic information,...

  8. Presquile National Wildlife Refuge, James River National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Presquile National Wildlife Refuge and James River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar...

  9. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: La Crosse District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - La Crosse District. Refuge background, physical...

  10. Evaluating Environmental Contaminants at Tijuana Slough National Wildlife Refuge and Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It appears that in comparison, Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge had higher levels of environmental contaminants than did Tijuana Slough National Wildlife...

  11. Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Annual narrative report: Fiscal year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge and Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge Complex outlines accomplishments during the 2001 fiscal...

  12. Exposure and effects of metal accumulation by wildlife on Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Three topics concerning trace element contamination in wildlife at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge are summarized below: Cadmium, chromium and mercury...

  13. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance by genes qnrA1 and qnrB19 in Salmonella strains isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rafaela; Galiana, Antonio; Cremades, Rosa; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Magnani, Marciane; Tognim, Maria Cristina B; Oliveira, Tereza C R M; Royo, Gloria

    2011-07-04

    Considering the importance of the mechanisms involved in quinolone resistance, this study evaluate the presence of PMQR in 126 epidemic and not epidemic strains of Salmonella spp. It was noted that presence of PMQR, by itself, did not generate resistance to ciprofloxacin; but detection of qnr genes in Salmonella spp. and the identification of the qnrB19 variant in a strain of poultry origin alert for the indiscriminate use of quinolones in poultry production, that can result in a pressure for mutant selection of resistant strains with a clinical limitation use of FQs in the near future. And last but not least, is the need to continued study of resistance mechanisms and to monitor the microbial resistance profile of epidemiological strains.

  14. Trypanosome Diversity in Wildlife Species from the Serengeti and Luangwa Valley Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, Harriet; Anderson, Neil E.; Picozzi, Kim; Lembo, Tiziana; Mubanga, Joseph; Hoare, Richard; Fyumagwa, Robert D.; Mable, Barbara; Hamill, Louise; Cleaveland, Sarah; Welburn, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The importance of wildlife as reservoirs of African trypanosomes pathogenic to man and livestock is well recognised. While new species of trypanosomes and their variants have been identified in tsetse populations, our knowledge of trypanosome species that are circulating in wildlife populations and their genetic diversity is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Molecular phylogenetic methods were used to examine the genetic diversity and species composition of trypanosomes circulating in wildlife from two ecosystems that exhibit high host species diversity: the Serengeti in Tanzania and the Luangwa Valley in Zambia. Phylogenetic relationships were assessed by alignment of partial 18S, 5.8S and 28S trypanosomal nuclear ribosomal DNA array sequences within the Trypanosomatidae and using ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 for more detailed analysis of the T. vivax clade. In addition to Trypanosoma brucei, T. congolense, T. simiae, T. simiae (Tsavo), T. godfreyi and T. theileri, three variants of T. vivax were identified from three different wildlife species within one ecosystem, including sequences from trypanosomes from a giraffe and a waterbuck that differed from all published sequences and from each other, and did not amplify with conventional primers for T. vivax. Conclusions/Significance Wildlife carries a wide range of trypanosome species. The failure of the diverse T. vivax in this study to amplify with conventional primers suggests that T. vivax may have been under-diagnosed in Tanzania. Since conventional species-specific primers may not amplify all trypanosomes of interest, the use of ITS PCR primers followed by sequencing is a valuable approach to investigate diversity of trypanosome infections in wildlife; amplification of sequences outside the T. brucei clade raises concerns regarding ITS primer specificity for wildlife samples if sequence confirmation is not also undertaken. PMID:23094115

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Quinolone-Containing Rescue Therapies After the Failure of Non-Bismuth Quadruple Treatments for Helicobacter pylori Eradication: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alicia C; Nyssen, Olga P; McNicholl, Adrian G; Gisbert, Javier P

    2017-05-01

    Anti-Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment fails in a significant percentage of cases. Although this percentage has been reduced to 5-15% with the use of non-bismuth quadruple therapies, limited data exist regarding rescue after failure of these treatments. The aim of this study was to systematically review the efficacy and safety of quinolone-containing therapies after the failure of non-bismuth quadruple regimens. Studies evaluating the efficacy of second-line quinolone-containing therapies after the failure of non-bismuth sequential or concomitant regimens were selected. Efficacy (by intention to treat) was analyzed using the inverse variance method; safety data were recorded as the occurrence of any adverse event. The risk of bias of each primary study was evaluated using the Risk of Bias in Non-randomized Studies-of Interventions (ROBINS-I) tool. The quality of the evidence was summarized using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Sixteen studies were included. The 10-day levofloxacin/amoxicillin/proton pump inhibitor (PPI) triple therapy (LT) achieved eradication rates of 80% (95% CI 71-88). Regarding the moxifloxacin/amoxicillin/PPI triple therapy (MT), its efficacy was higher when administered for 14 days instead of 7 days (80 vs 63%). Two studies investigated the levofloxacin/bismuth-containing quadruple therapies (LBQ) obtaining eradication rates over 90%. Safety was similar in all treatments. The sensitivity analyses showed that results for LT were robust, but MT had weak evidence. Quinolone-containing triple therapies reported eradication rates ≤80%, but LBQ therapies showed encouraging rates. However, the strength of the evidence was very low. The efficacy of LBQ should be corroborated in more studies, and the usefulness of quinolones needs to be evaluated in areas with moderate to high bacterial resistances.

  16. Levels of quinolones resistance and other antimicrobial in non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in children from the periurban area of Lima, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Pons, María J.; Barcelona Centre fot International Health Researh (CRESIB, Hospital Clinic-Universitat de Barcelona). Barcelona, España. Bióloga, magister en biomedicina.; Mosquito, Susan; Instituto de Medicina Tropical, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. bióloga, magister en Microbiología.; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Instituto de Medicina Tropical, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. University of Texas School of Public Health. Houston, EE.UU. médico, pediatra infectólogo.; Vargas, Martha; Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clínic. Barcelona, España. biólogo, posdoctorado en biología.; Molina, Margarita; Instituto de Investigación Nutricional. Lima, Perú. microbióloga.; Lluque, Angela; Instituto de Medicina Tropical, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. bióloga, magister en Microbiología.; Gil, Ana I.; Instituto de Investigación Nutricional. Lima, Perú. microbióloga.; Ecker, Lucie; Instituto de Investigación Nutricional. Lima, Perú. médico epidemiólogo.; Barletta, Francesca; Instituto de Medicina Tropical, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. bióloga molecular.; Lanata, Claudio F; Instituto de Investigación Nutricional. Lima, Perú. Escuela de Medicina, Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas. Lima, Perú. Médico epidemiólogo.; Del Valle, Luis J.; Departament d’Enginyeria Química, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. Barcelona, España. biólogo, posdoctorado en biología.; Ruiz, Joaquim; Barcelona Centre fot International Health Researh (CRESIB, Hospital Clinic-Universitat de Barcelona). Barcelona, España. CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP). Barcelona, España biólogo, posdoctorado en biología.

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to establish the resistance levels to antimicrobial agents, in 222 non-pathogenic E. Coli strains of fecal origin in Peru. The proportion of resistance found to the evaluated antimicrobials was ampicillin (62.6%), cotrimoxazole (48,6%), tetracycline (43,0%) and chloramphenicol (15,8%). We emphasize the high resistance levels found for quinolones: 32% for nalidixic acid (NAL) and 12% for ciprofloxacin (CIP). These high levels of quinoloneresistance in non-pathoge...

  17. High Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinants in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Pediatric Patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guanhua; Li, Jing; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Wenjian; Li, Shaoli; Yan, Chao; Zhao, Hanqing; Sun, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes among pediatric clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was investigated. A total of 243 nonduplicate clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae collected between January 2010 and December 2012 from Beijing, China, were studied. In total, 55 isolates (22.63%) were positive for PMQR genes, the most frequently detected gene was qnrS (13.2%), followed by aac(6')-Ib-cr (6.2%) and qnrB (3.7%). The qnrA and qepA genes were not detected. Furthermore, 92.73% (51/55) produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and 21.82% (12/55) were resistant to quinolones. DNA sequencing results showed that 14.55% (8/55) of isolates possessed gyrA mutations, while 1.82% (1/55) had parC mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). Nalidixic acid or ciprofloxacin resistance of the transconjugants increased from 2- to 32-fold. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence polymerase chain reaction typing indicated that most isolates were not clonally related. Our findings showed that the PMQR detection rate among pediatric clinical isolates of E. coli and K. pneumoniae was high in China. PMQR-positive strains were more common among ESBL-producing and ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates. Conjugation experiments showed that these isolates could be transferred horizontally. The present study highlights the high prevalence of PMQR in Chinese pediatrics who are not treated with quinolones.

  18. National wildlife refuge raptor electrocution surveys and training sessions for Two Ponds National Wildlife Refuge, Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge, Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge, Alamosa and Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this project is to inspect electric distribution lines on four United States Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) National Wildlife Refuges (NWR)...

  19. Determination of five quinolone antibiotic residues in foods by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with quantum dot indirect laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hong-Lian; Chen, Guan-Hua; Guo, Xin; Chen, Ping; Cai, Qing-Hong; Tian, Yi-Fang

    2014-05-01

    A new assay was developed for the determination of five quinolone antibiotic residues in foods, loxacin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, and norfloxacin, by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with indirect laser-induced fluorescence, in which cadmium telluride quantum dots were used as a fluorescent background substance. Some factors that affected the peak height and the resolution were examined. The optimized running buffer was composed of 20 mM SDS, 7.2 mg/L quantum dots, and 10 mM borate at pH 8.8. The separation voltage was 20 kV. Under these conditions, five quinolone antibiotic residues were separated successfully within 8 min. The detection limits ranged from 0.003 to 0.008 mg/kg; the linear dynamic ranges were all 0.01 ∼ 10 mg/kg; and the average recoveries of the spiked samples were 81.4 ∼ 94.6 %. The assay can meet the requirement of maximum residue limits to these five quinolone antibiotics in the regulations of the European Union and Japan and has been applied for determining their residues in animal-derived food.

  20. Quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from birds of prey in Portugal are genetically distinct from those isolated from water environments and gulls in Portugal, Spain and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenburg, Jana; Varela, Ana Rita; Hasan, Badrul; Bertilsson, Stefan; Olsen, Björn; Narciso-da-Rocha, Carlos; Bonnedahl, Jonas; Stedt, Johan; Da Costa, Paulo Martins; Manaia, Célia M

    2014-04-01

    The influence of geographic distribution and type of habitat on the molecular epidemiology of ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli was investigated. Ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli from wastewater, urban water with faecal contamination and faeces of gulls, pigeons and birds of prey, from Portugal, Spain and Sweden were compared based on multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and quinolone resistance genetic determinants. Multi-locus sequence typing allowed the differentiation of E. coli lineages associated with birds of prey from those inhabiting gulls and waters. E. coli lineages of clinical relevance, such as the complex ST131, were detected in wastewater, streams and gulls in Portugal, Spain and Sweden. Quinolone resistance was due to gyrA and parC mutations, although distinct mutations were detected in birds of prey and in wastewater, streams and gulls isolates. These differences were correlated with specific MLST lineages, suggesting resistance inheritance. Among the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, only aac(6')-ib-cr and qnrS were detected in wastewater, streams and gulls isolates, but not in birds of prey. The horizontal transfer of the gene aac(6')-ib-cr could be inferred from its occurrence in different MLST lineages. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Characteristics of Quinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Humans, Animals, and the Environment in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röderova, Magdalena; Halova, Dana; Papousek, Ivo; Dolejska, Monika; Masarikova, Martina; Hanulik, Vojtech; Pudova, Vendula; Broz, Petr; Htoutou-Sedlakova, Miroslava; Sauer, Pavel; Bardon, Jan; Cizek, Alois; Kolar, Milan; Literak, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a common commensal bacterial species of humans and animals that may become a troublesome pathogen causing serious diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance phenotypes and genotypes in E. coli isolates of different origin from one area of the Czech Republic. E. coli isolates were obtained from hospitalized patients and outpatients, chicken farms, retailed turkeys, rooks wintering in the area, and wastewaters. Susceptibility of the isolates grown on the MacConkey agar with ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg/L) to 23 antimicrobial agents was determined. The presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and ESBL genes was tested by PCR and sequencing. Specific mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE were also examined. Multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were performed to assess the clonal relationship. In total, 1050 E. coli isolates were obtained, including 303 isolates from humans, 156 from chickens, 105 from turkeys, 114 from the rooks, and 372 from wastewater samples. PMQR genes were detected in 262 (25%) isolates. The highest occurrence was observed in isolates from retailed turkey (49% of the isolates were positive) and inpatients (32%). The qnrS1 gene was the most common PMQR determinant identified in 146 (56%) followed by aac(6′)-Ib-cr in 77 (29%), qnrB19 in 41 (16%), and qnrB1 in 9 (3%) isolates. All isolates with high level of ciprofloxacin resistance (>32 mg/L) carried double or triple mutations in gyrA combined with single or double mutations in parC. The most frequently identified substitutions were Ser(83)Leu; Asp(87)Asn in GyrA, together with Ser(80)Ile, or Glu(84)Val in ParC. Majority of these isolates showed resistance to beta-lactams and multiresistance phenotype was found in 95% isolates. Forty-eight different sequence types among 144 isolates analyzed were found, including five major clones ST131 (26), ST355 (19), ST48 (13), ST95 (10), and ST10 (5). No isolates

  2. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  3. Efficient quantum circuits for dense circulant and circulant like operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S S; Wang, J B

    2017-05-01

    Circulant matrices are an important family of operators, which have a wide range of applications in science and engineering-related fields. They are, in general, non-sparse and non-unitary. In this paper, we present efficient quantum circuits to implement circulant operators using fewer resources and with lower complexity than existing methods. Moreover, our quantum circuits can be readily extended to the implementation of Toeplitz, Hankel and block circulant matrices. Efficient quantum algorithms to implement the inverses and products of circulant operators are also provided, and an example application in solving the equation of motion for cyclic systems is discussed.

  4. Quadcopter applications for wildlife monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiansyah, S.; Kusrini, M. D.; Prasetyo, L. B.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) had been use as an instrument for wildlife research. Most of that, using an airplane type which need space for runaway. Copter is UAV type that can fly at canopy space and do not need runaway. The research aims are to examine quadcopter application for wildlife monitoring, measure the accuracy of data generated and determine effective, efficient and appropriate technical recommendation in accordance with the ethics of wildlife photography. Flight trials with a camera 12 - 24 MP at altitude ranges from 50-200 m above ground level (agl), producing aerial photographs with spatial resolution of 0.85 - 4.79 cm/pixel. Aerial photos quality depends on the type and setting of camera, vibration damper system, flight altitude and punctuality of the shooting. For wildlife monitoring the copter is recommended to take off at least 300 m from the target, and flies at 50 - 100 m agl with flight speed of 5 - 7 m/sec on fine weather. Quadcopter presence with a distance more than 30 m from White-bellied Sea Eagles (Haliaeetus leucogaster) nest and Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus) did not cause negative response. Quadcopter application should pay attention to the behaviour and characteristic of wildlife.

  5. Pseudomonas quinolone signalling system: a component of quorum sensing cascade is a crucial player in the acute urinary tract infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Anju; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which employs quorum sensing system to regulate several genes required for its survival and pathogenicity within the host. Besides acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) mediated las and rhl systems, this organism possesses Pseudomonas quinolone signalling (PQS) system based on alkyl quinolone signal molecules. The quinolone system represents another layer of sophistication in the complex quorum sensing cascade. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the contribution of the PQS system in the establishment of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in the mouse model. For this, wild-type parent strain of P. aeruginosa MPAO1 and its isogenic single transposon mutant strains pqsH and pqsA were employed to induce UTI in mice. PQS molecules in the tissue homogenates of mice were detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC) method. Virulence of strains was assessed in terms of bacteriological count, histopathological lesions in the renal and bladder tissue and generation of pathological index markers like reactive nitrogen intermediates and malondialdehyde. HP-TLC analysis showed presence of PQS molecules in the renal and bladder tissue of mice infected with MPAO1 while no PQS was detected in case of pqsH and pqsA mutant strains. Results indicated that MPAO1 possessing fully functional PQS biosynthetic genes was highly virulent and caused acute pyelonephritis with severe inflammation and tissue destruction. On the contrary, significant reduction in the log count, mild tissue damage and declined levels of pathological markers were observed in mice infected with mutant strains as compared to MPAO1. Further among mutants, all these parameters were maximally impaired in the pqsA mutant in which synthesis of alkyl quinolones was completely abolished due to the transposon mutation in respective gene. Virulence of the pqsH mutant strain was lesser than that of the MPAO1 but higher than pqsA mutant. In addition, the

  6. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge Annual Narrative Report: 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in Fallon,...

  7. Synthesis and in-vitro antibacterial activity of N-piperazinyl quinolone derivatives with 5-chloro-2-thienyl group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Fluoroquinolones are an important group of antimicrobial agents that are used widely in the treatment of various infectious diseases. The purpose of the present study was to synthesize new N-piperazinyl quinolone derivatives with 5-chloro-2-theinyl group having possible antimicrobial activity. Methods: Reaction of ciprofloxacin (1, norfloxacin (2 and enoxacin (3 with α-bromoketone 10 or α-bromooxime derivatives 11a-c in DMF, in the presence of NaHCO3 at room temperature, afforded corresponding ketones 4a-c or oxime derivatives 5-7(a-c, respectively. Results and major conclusion: The synthesized compounds were tested against a series of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The results of MIC tests against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria revealed that ciprofloxacin derivatives (compounds 4a, 5a, 6a and 7a were more active than norfloxacin and enoxacin analogues. Compound 5a, containing N-[2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl-2-hydroxyiminoethyl] residue provided a high in vitro antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with MIC of 0.06, 0.125, 0.5 and 0.125 μg/mL against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. feacalis and B. subtilis, respectively. Its activity was found to be 4 to 8 times better than reference drug (ciprofloxacin against all Gram-positive bacteria with the exception of E. feacalis.

  8. Occurrence of sulfonamide-, tetracycline-, plasmid-mediated quinolone- and macrolide-resistance genes in livestock feedlots in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Quanhua; Li, Jin; Sun, Yingxue; Mao, Daqing; Wang, Qing; Luo, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in livestock feedlots deserve attention because they are prone to transfer to human pathogens and thus pose threats to human health. In this study, the occurrence of 21 ARGs, including tetracycline (tet)-, sulfonamide (sul)-, plasmid-mediated quinolone (PMQR)- and macrolide-resistance (erm) genes were investigated in feces and adjacent soils from chicken, swine, and cattle feedlots in Northern China. PMQR and sul ARGs were the most prevalent and account for over 90.0 % of the total ARGs in fecal samples. Specifically, PMQR genes were the most prevalent, accounting for 59.6 % of the total ARGs, followed by sul ARGs (34.2 %). The percentage of tet ARGs was 3.4 %, and erm ARGs accounted for only 1.9 %. Prevalence of PMQR and sul ARGs was also found in swine and cattle feces. The overall trend of ARG concentrations in feces of different feeding animals was chicken > swine > beef cattle in the studied area. In soils, sul ARGs had the highest concentration and account for 71.1 to 80.2 % of the total ARGs, which is possibly due to the widely distributed molecular carriers (i.e., class one integrons), facilitating sul ARG propagation. Overall, this study provides integrated profiles of various types of ARGs in livestock feedlots and thus provides a reference for the management of antibiotic use in livestock farming.

  9. Effects of DU-6859a, a New Quinolone Antimicrobial, on Theophylline Metabolism in In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Yoshihito; Itokawa, Kenichi; Okazaki, Osamu

    1998-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to investigate the drug interaction between a new quinolone antimicrobial, DU-6859a, and theophylline (TP). The effect of DU-6859a on TP metabolism was evaluated in vitro by measuring the rate of TP metabolite formation by using human liver microsomes. DU-6859a inhibited the metabolism of TP, especially the formation of 1-methylxanthine, in vitro, but to a lesser extent than other drugs that are known to interact with TP. TP was administered alone (200 mg twice a day [b.i.d.] for 9 days) or in combination with DU-6859a (50 or 100 mg b.i.d. for 5 days) to six healthy subjects. DU-6859a administered at a dose of 50 mg resulted in no changes in serum TP concentrations, and slight increases in serum TP concentrations were observed at a dose of 100 mg. Moreover, the administration of 100 mg of DU-6859a resulted in decreases in all urinary TP metabolites, with significant differences. It appears that although DU-6859a has a weak inhibitory effect on TP metabolism in vitro, its concomitant use with TP at clinical dosage levels does not cause any adverse effects, showing only a slight increase in blood TP concentrations and a decrease in urinary metabolites. PMID:9661016

  10. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from companion animals, pet-owners, and non-pet-owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yeon Soo; Hu, Yoon Sung; Shin, Sook; Lim, Suk Kyung; Yang, Soo Jin; Park, Yong Ho; Park, Kun Taek

    2017-12-31

    The present study investigated the prevalence and mechanisms of fluoroquinolone (FQ)/quinolone (Q) resistance in Escherichia (E.) coli isolates from companion animals, pet-owners, and non-pet-owners. A total of 63 E. coli isolates were collected from 104 anal swab samples, and 27 nalidixic acid (NA)-resistant isolates were identified. Of those, 10 showed ciprofloxacin (CIP) resistance. A plasmid-mediated Q resistance gene was detected in one isolate. Increased efflux pump activity, as measured by organic solvent tolerance assay, was detected in 18 NA-resistant isolates (66.7%), but was not correlated with an increase in minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Target gene mutations in Q resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) were the main cause of (FQ)Q resistance in E. coli. Point mutations in QRDRs were detected in all NA-resistant isolates, and the number of mutations was strongly correlated with increased MIC (R = 0.878 for NA and 0.954 for CIP). All CIP-resistant isolates (n = 10) had double mutations in the gyrA gene, with additional mutations in parC and parE. Interestingly, (FQ)Q resistance mechanisms in isolates from companion animals were the same as those in humans. Therefore, prudent use of (FQ)Q in veterinary medicine is warranted to prevent the dissemination of (FQ)Q-resistant bacteria from animals to humans.

  11. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanisms in an Escherichia coli Isolate, HUE1, Without Quinolone Resistance-Determining Region Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyotaka eSato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone resistance can cause major clinical problems. Here, we investigated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms in a clinical Escherichia coli isolate, HUE1, which had no mutations quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. HUE1 demonstrated MICs that exceeded the breakpoints for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and norfloxacin. HUE1 harbored oqxAB and qnrS1 on distinct plasmids. In addition, it exhibited lower intracellular ciprofloxacin concentrations and higher mRNA expression levels of efflux pumps and their global activators than did reference strains. The genes encoding AcrR (local AcrAB repressor and MarR (MarA repressor were disrupted by insertion of the transposon IS3-IS629 and a frameshift mutation, respectively. A series of mutants derived from HUE1 were obtained by plasmid curing and gene knockout using homologous recombination. Compared to the MICs of the parent strain HUE1, the fluoroquinolone MICs of these mutants indicated that qnrS1, oqxAB, acrAB, acrF, acrD, mdtK, mdfA, and tolC contributed to the reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolone in HUE1. Therefore, fluoroquinolone resistance in HUE1 is caused by concomitant acquisition of QnrS1 and OqxAB and overexpression of AcrAB−TolC and other chromosome-encoded efflux pumps. Thus, we have demonstrated that QRDR mutations are not absolutely necessary for acquiring fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli.

  12. 1,2-Substituted 4-(1H-Quinolones: Synthesis, Antimalarial and Antitrypanosomal Activities in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Wube

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A diverse array of 4-(1H-quinolone derivatives bearing substituents at positions 1 and 2 were synthesized and evaluated for antiprotozoal activities against Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, and cytotoxicity against L-6 cells in vitro. Furthermore, selectivity indices were also determined for both parasites. All compounds tested showed antimalarial activity at low micromolar concentrations, with varied degrees of selectivity against L-6 cells. Compound 5a was found to be the most active against P. falciparum, with an IC50 value of 90 nM and good selectivity for the malarial parasite compared to the L-6 cells. Compound 10a, on the other hand, showed a strong antitrypanosomal effect with an IC50 value of 1.25 µM. In this study side chain diversity was explored by varying the side chain length and substitution pattern on the aliphatic group at position-2 and a structure-antiprotozoal activity study revealed that the aromatic ring introduced at C-2 contributed significantly to the antiprotozoal activities.

  13. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report summarizes activities for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Kirtland’s Warbler National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife...

  14. Audubon National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Audubon National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Nettie National Wildlife Refuge, McLean National Wildlife Refuge, Strawberry Lake Refuge, Lake Otis...

  15. Technical Report: Master Plan Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The National Wildlife Refuge System is a network of lands and waters managed specifically for the protection of wildlife and wildlife habitat. Refuges are also...

  16. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report summarizes activities for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Kirtland’s Warbler National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife...

  17. Resource needs for regulations on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is one unit of the national wildlife refuge system. Its large size (1.97 million acres), wilderness dependent wildlife, and...

  18. Ocean General Circulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  19. Lost Circulation Technology Development Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, David A.; Schafer, Diane M.; Loeppke, Glen E.; Scott, Douglas D.; Wernig, Marcus D.; Wright, Elton K.

    1992-03-24

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30-50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1991-March, 1992.

  20. Lost circulation technology development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D.; Wright, E.K.

    1992-07-01

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April 1991--March 1992. 8 refs.

  1. Lost circulation technology development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D.; Wright, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April 1991--March 1992. 8 refs.

  2. Percutaneous interventions in Fontan circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Franco

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Interventional catheterization procedures are often necessary to reach and maintain the fragile Fontan circulation, mainly in patients with right morphology systemic ventricles and fenestrated Fontan conduits.

  3. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showman, A. P.; Cho, J. Y.-K.; Menou, K.

    2010-12-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from solar system studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and simple scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics are given particular attention, as these close-in planets have been the subject of most of the concrete developments in the study of exoplanetary atmospheres. We then turn to the basic elements of circulation on terrestrial planets as inferred from solar system studies, including Hadley cells, jet streams, processes that govern the large-scale horizontal temperature contrasts, and climate, and we discuss how these insights may apply to terrestrial exoplanets. Although exoplanets surely possess a greater diversity of circulation regimes than seen on the planets in our solar system, our guiding philosophy is that the multidecade study of solar system planets reviewed here provides a foundation upon which our understanding of more exotic exoplanetary meteorology must build.

  4. Circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of the “liquid biopsy” using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity. PMID:24521660

  5. [Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1976 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to...

  6. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Wildlife Habitat Models for Terrestrial Vertebrates

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project developed habitat capability models for representative wildlife species. It was part of a project led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst to...

  8. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge: January - April, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Annual Narrative Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Malheur Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  11. Furbearer Trapping Plan : Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge Trapping Plan outlines trapping areas, species, regulations, equipment and seasons. This plan will allow harvest of a...

  12. Law Enforcement Plan : Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Necedah NWR Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides information about problems,...

  13. Law Enforcement Plan : Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa NWR Complex Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides information about...

  14. Law Enforcement Plan: Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Sherburne NWR Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides information about problems,...

  15. Monomy National Wildlife Refuge Alternative Transportation Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) Alternative Transportation Study is to explore potential alternative transportation options that can...

  16. Law Enforcement Plan : Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Agassiz Law Enforcement Plan clarifies Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to Agassiz Refuge. It provides information about problems,...

  17. Fish passage report : Baca National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fish passage report was prepared for the Colorado Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office to inform them of possible fish passage issues on streams that provide...

  18. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), species lists, weed control, ecological and plant...

  19. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (including wading birds, waterfowl, turkeys, black bears, raccoons, white-tailed deer, river otters, and other...

  20. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, big game mammals, and alligators), weed control (water hyacinth and water...

  1. Avian protection plan : Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge (LNWR) initiated this Avian Protection Plan (APP) in 2003 to protect birds from potential electrocution hazards on the...

  2. [Wyandotte National Wildlife Refuge : Resource Problems

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During a December 1981 Threats and Conflicts survey, twenty-five resource problems were identified for Wyandotte National Wildlife Refuge. This plan summarizes...

  3. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in Fallon,...

  4. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Sign Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is...

  5. Annual Narrative: Canaan National Wildlife Refuge 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2005 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  6. Monthly Narrative: Canaan National Wildlife Refuge 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This monthly narrative report for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments month by month in 2007 from January through July. The report...

  7. Fish and wildlife research in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Problems, information needs, research facilities, current research, and documents related to long term planning of fish and wildlife research in Alaska. Appendices...

  8. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. Mingo National Wildlife Refuge contaminants survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fishes and turtles were collected from Stanley and Linn Creeks, Ditches 1 and 2, and Mingo Ditch of Mingo National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) near Puxico, Stoddard and...

  12. Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  13. Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Kootenai Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision...

  14. Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  15. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  16. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge Complex : 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 1980 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  17. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding birds, mammals, salamanders, lizards, and snakes), and Breeding Bird Census events occurring on the refuge in...

  18. Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  19. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge habitat map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Habitat map for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This habitat map was created along with the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) map of the refuge. Refuge...

  20. Narrative Report : Amagansett National Wildlife Refuge : 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Amagansett National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  1. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, burn study, pine survival, species lists,...

  2. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, species lists, ecological and plant...

  3. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, prairie ecology, ecological and plant...

  4. Narrative report 1977: Audubon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Audubon National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Nettie Refuge, McLean Refuge, Hiddenwood Refuge, Lake Otis Refuge, Strawberry Lake Refuge, Sheyenne...

  5. Narrative report 1979: Audubon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Audubon National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Nettie Refuge, McLean Refuge, Hiddenwood Refuge, Lake Otis Refuge, Strawberry Lake Refuge, Sheyenne...

  6. Narrative report 1978: Audubon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Audubon National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Nettie Refuge, McLean Refuge, Hiddenwood Refuge, Lake Otis Refuge, Strawberry Lake Refuge, Sheyenne...

  7. Hunting Plan : Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge Hunting Plan provides guidance for the management of hunting on the refuge. Hunting program objectives include providing a...

  8. Hunting plan amendment: Choctaw National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This amendment allows the hunting plan for Choctaw National Wildlife Refuge to add raccoon and opossum hunting to the existing small game hunting program.

  9. Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge Habitat Management Plan provides a long-term vision and specific guidance on managing habitats for the resources of concern at...

  10. Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge : Fiscal Year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2001 fiscal year. The report begins with an introduction...

  11. St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge : Visitation Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Visual inspections of all five lakes and the Oyster Pond on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge were made in 1979. It appeared that infestation of the lakes and the...

  12. Beaver Census on the Erie Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this study was to determine an approximate population number for beaver (castor canadensis) on the Sugar Lake division of the Erie Wildlife Refuge....

  13. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Susquehanna National Wildlife Refuge, Martin National Wildlife Refuge annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  14. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Susquehanna National Wildlife Refuge, Martin National Wildlife Refuge annual narrative report: Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  15. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Susquehanna National Wildlife Refuge, Martin National Wildlife Refuge annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  16. Search & Rescue Plan: Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Necedah National Wildlife Refuge is located in a rural environment approximately 150 miles northwest of Milwaukee, 100 miles northwest of Madison, and 150 miles...

  17. Pablo National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Pablo National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Ouray National Wildlife Refuge Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ouray National Wildlife Refuge (ONWR) was established in 1960 as an inviolate sanctuary for migratory birds and any other management purpose. In 2000, the Refuge...

  19. Annual Narrative Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1976 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to...

  20. Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a collection of maps pertaining to the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge. The maps include an overview of the refuge, the proposed wilderness...

  1. Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge : Fiscal Year 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge summarizes Refuge activities during the 2002 fiscal year. The report begins with an introduction...

  2. San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge contaminant study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1982 for the protection and management of endangered desert fishes which are indigenous to the Rio...

  3. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge RAMOS correspondence

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains correspondence between John Findlay of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and P. H. Kutschenreuter of the National Weather Service....

  4. Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge in Atlanta. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  5. Elizabeth Morton National Wildlife Refuge Information Book

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This booklet provides a biological overview of the Elizabeth Morton National Wildlife Refuge in 1969. It also presents the refuge objectives and recreational...

  6. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge Annual Narrative 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by...

  7. Annual Narrative Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by...

  8. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge Annual Narrative 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by...

  9. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge Annual Narrative 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by...

  10. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), nest predation, weed control, ecological and plant...

  11. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), water movement studies, cover type studies, species lists,...

  12. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, black bears, raccoons, white-tailed deer), Christmas Bird Count, weed control,...

  13. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Biological Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual summary of wildlife population assessments (inlcuding wading birds, waterfowl, and other species), weed control, ecological and plant succession, and public...

  14. Cropland Management Plan: Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Necedah NWR Cropland Management Plan focuses on the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at approved objective...

  15. Development Plan : St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A number of development projects for St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge are listed in this plan. These include support facilities- such as an administration...

  16. Forest Management Plan Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge Forest Management Plan is a general plan which outlines the Refuge management objectives, forest description, forest management...

  17. Refuge objectives Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides management objectives for Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge. The following are included; Refuge objective statement, qualitative objectives,...

  18. Cropland Management Plan Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Hatchie NWR Cropland Management Plan focuses to the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at approved objective...

  19. Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge Evaluation Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes and evaluate Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge management activities. This purpose of this evaluation was to determine if present management...

  20. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Safety Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Safety Plan discusses policies for the safety of the station employees, volunteers, and public. This plan seeks to identify...

  1. Safety Plan : Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge Safety Plan discusses policies for the safety of the station employees, volunteers, and public. This plan seeks to...

  2. Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge : Station Safety Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge Safety Plan discusses policies for the safety of the station employees, volunteers, and public. This plan seeks to identify and...

  3. [Station Safety Plan: Louisa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Louisa National Wildlife Refuge Safety plan discusses policies for the safety of the station employees, volunteers and public. This plan seeks to identify and...

  4. Safety Plan : Trempaleau National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge Safety Plan discusses policies for the safety of the station employees, volunteers, and public. This plan seeks to identify...

  5. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Master Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located in the city of Virginia Beach, Virginia, comprises 4,608 acres of barrier beach, fresh and brackish marsh, small...

  6. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge visitor survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The US Fish and Wildlife Service and the US Geological Survey are conducting this survey to learn more about refuge visitors in order to improve the management of...

  7. Final wilderness recommendation : Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter to the legislative counsel containing a final recommendation of wilderness designation for part of the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge.

  8. Wapack National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Wapack National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  9. Trapping Plan Amendment: Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge proposes to amend the present trapping plan in order to improve the quality of this program by providing more explicit direction...

  10. 36 CFR 2.2 - Wildlife protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... wildlife nesting, breeding or other activities. (3) Possessing unlawfully taken wildlife or portions... principles. Such hunting shall be allowed pursuant to special regulations. (3) Trapping shall be allowed in...

  11. Ravalli National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ravalli National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in Fallon,...

  14. 1988 Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Contaminant Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides partial lists of both freshwater algae and benthic invertebrates found at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge and in Black Brook, a principle...

  15. Alaska Maritime Resources National Wildlife Refuge Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Alaska Marine Resources National Wildlife Refuge, containing the approximately two million nine hundred and eighty thousand acres of the existing refuge specified in...

  16. Ravalli National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ravalli National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Susquehanna National Wildlife Refuge, Martin National Wildlife Refuge annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  18. Crop Management Plan: Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Sherburne NWR Cropland Management Plan focuses on the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at approved objective...

  19. Narrative report 1966 Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge: September - December, 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1948. The report begins by...

  1. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Animal Control Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary objectives of the Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge complex are to provide optimum conditions for resting, migrating waterfowl and to perpetuate...

  2. Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge Research Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Overall, there is a need to bring all refuges in line with the new National Wildlife Refuge System mission, goals, and policies, as described in the National...

  3. Fire Management Plan : Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge both from the standpoint of its value as a tool for management, and as a potential problem to be dealt...

  4. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Sport Fishing Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Sport Fishing Plans covers the assesment and managment strategies for sport fishing in the Refuge. Focus is on bass, crappie,...

  5. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge boundaries correspondence

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a collection of letters and attached documents between the director of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the director of region 1. The...

  6. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge Alternative Transportation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR) is located along Virginia's Eastern Shore in Accomack County. The CNWR is comprised of several barrier beach islands, of which the Virginia portion of Assateague Is...

  7. Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge alternative transportation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This study for the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) identifies and analyzes options for enhancing alternative transportation access to the Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge (Nantucket NWR) at Great Point in Nantucket, Massachusetts. The study team de...

  8. Master Plan Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Master Plan is to give overall guidance for the protection, use, and development of Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge during the next ten to...

  9. Reforming Wildlife Law: The Law Commission Proposals for Wildlife Law and Wildlife Sanctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article critically examines a an ongoing review commenced in 2012 by the United Kingdom’s Law Commission into new wildlife laws for England and Wales by considering four interlinked elements of the process. First, it outlines the underlying subject matter and regulatory aims of wildlife law.  It then describes the scope of the Law Commission’s Wildlife Law Project, identifying some of the key problem areas it sought to address and referencing its consultation process conducted in the later part of 2012. Next the article summarises the Law Commission’s view for a new wildlife law regime. The fourth element explores the current and potential roles of criminalising and non-criminalising sanctions. With a continued focus on the underlying subject matter and regulatory aims, discussion centres on the greater use of non-criminalising civil sanctions in wildlife law. The paper supports the Law Commission’s argument that the creation of a civil sanctions regime is not tantamount to decriminalisation in its true sense but simply widens the available regulatory enforcement options.

  10. Wildlife management using the AHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Fatti

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Two applications of Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process towards solving decision problems in Wildlife Management are discussed. The first involves structuring the management objectives of a National Park and establishing priorities for the implementation of various possible strategic management plans in the Park. The second deals with the problem faced by the various non-governmental organisations concerned with the conservation of the Rhino and Elephant populations in Southern Africa, of deciding how best to allocate their funds towards this purpose. General conclusions are drawn concerning the use of analytical techniques, particularly the AHP, in planning and decision making in Wildlife Management.

  11. 50 CFR 31.1 - Determination of surplus wildlife populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination of surplus wildlife populations. 31.1 Section 31.1 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM WILDLIFE SPECIES MANAGEMENT Surplus...

  12. 50 CFR 36.32 - Taking of fish and wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Taking of fish and wildlife. 36.32 Section 36.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Other Refuge Uses § 36.32...

  13. Blurred Boundaries in Wildlife Management Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman-Berson, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflicts have been increasing at alarming rates over the last few decades. Wildlife management practices deal with preventing and disentangling these conflicts. However, which approach should be taken is widely disputed in research, policy, in-the-field-wildlife management and local

  14. 32 CFR 644.429 - Wildlife purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Wildlife purposes. 644.429 Section 644.429... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.429 Wildlife... for wildlife conservation purposes by the agency of the state exercising administration over the...

  15. Forestation of surface mines for wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas G. Zarger

    1980-01-01

    This report reviews TVA program efforts to promote the use of wildlife shrubs in mined-land reclamation including work on plant materials development, demonstrations to acquaint landowners with a variety of food and cover plants, and action programs to incorporate wildlife plants into postmining land use. It deals briefly with wildlife considerations under Public Law...

  16. Sino-Danish Brain Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Du, Xiangyun; Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2014-01-01

    China is faced with urgent needs to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable economy based on innovation and knowledge. Brain circulation and research and business investments from the outside are central for this development. Sino-American brain circulation and research...... and investment by overseas researchers and entrepreneurs are well described. In that case, the US is the center of global R&D and S&T. However, the brain circulation and research and investments between a small open Scandinavian economy, such as Denmark, and the huge developing economy of China are not well...... understood. In this case, Denmark is very highly developed, but a satellite in the global R&D and S&T system. With time and the growth of China as a R&D and S&T power house, both Denmark and China will benefit from brain circulation between them. Such brain circulation is likely to play a key role in flows...

  17. Journal of Wildlife Management guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    William M. Block; Frank R. Thompson; Dawn Hanseder; Allison Cox; Anna Knipps

    2011-01-01

    These Guidelines apply to all Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM, The Journal) submissions. Publishing a professional manuscript proceeds most smoothly if authors understand the policy, procedures, format, and style of the outlet to which they are submitting a manuscript. These instructions supersede all previous guidelines. Manuscripts that clearly deviate from this...

  18. Wildlife reservoirs of canine distemper virus resulted in a major outbreak in Danish farmed mink (Neovison vison).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Chriel, Mariann; Struve, Tina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Gitte; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2014-01-01

    A major outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) in Danish farmed mink (Neovison vison) started in the late summer period of 2012. At the same time, a high number of diseased and dead wildlife species such as foxes, raccoon dogs, and ferrets were observed. To track the origin of the outbreak virus full-length sequencing of the receptor binding surface protein hemagglutinin (H) was performed on 26 CDV's collected from mink and 10 CDV's collected from wildlife species. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses showed that the virus circulating in the mink farms and wildlife were highly identical with an identity at the nucleotide level of 99.45% to 100%. The sequences could be grouped by single nucleotide polymorphisms according to geographical distribution of mink farms and wildlife. The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor binding region in most viruses from both mink and wildlife contained G at position 530 and Y at position 549; however, three mink viruses had an Y549H substitution. The outbreak viruses clustered phylogenetically in the European lineage and were highly identical to wildlife viruses from Germany and Hungary (99.29% - 99.62%). The study furthermore revealed that fleas (Ceratophyllus sciurorum) contained CDV and that vertical transmission of CDV occurred in a wild ferret. The study provides evidence that wildlife species, such as foxes, play an important role in the transmission of CDV to farmed mink and that the virus may be maintained in the wild animal reservoir between outbreaks.

  19. Wildlife reservoirs of canine distemper virus resulted in a major outbreak in Danish farmed mink (Neovison vison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Trebbien

    Full Text Available A major outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV in Danish farmed mink (Neovison vison started in the late summer period of 2012. At the same time, a high number of diseased and dead wildlife species such as foxes, raccoon dogs, and ferrets were observed. To track the origin of the outbreak virus full-length sequencing of the receptor binding surface protein hemagglutinin (H was performed on 26 CDV's collected from mink and 10 CDV's collected from wildlife species. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses showed that the virus circulating in the mink farms and wildlife were highly identical with an identity at the nucleotide level of 99.45% to 100%. The sequences could be grouped by single nucleotide polymorphisms according to geographical distribution of mink farms and wildlife. The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM receptor binding region in most viruses from both mink and wildlife contained G at position 530 and Y at position 549; however, three mink viruses had an Y549H substitution. The outbreak viruses clustered phylogenetically in the European lineage and were highly identical to wildlife viruses from Germany and Hungary (99.29% - 99.62%. The study furthermore revealed that fleas (Ceratophyllus sciurorum contained CDV and that vertical transmission of CDV occurred in a wild ferret. The study provides evidence that wildlife species, such as foxes, play an important role in the transmission of CDV to farmed mink and that the virus may be maintained in the wild animal reservoir between outbreaks.

  20. Geographic range of vector-borne infections and their vectors: the role of African wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, M; Penzhorn, B L

    2015-04-01

    The role of African wildlife in the occurrence of vector-borne infections in domestic animals has gained renewed interest as emerging and re-emerging infections occur worldwide at an increasing rate. In Africa, biodiversity conservation and the expansion of livestock production have increased the risk of transmitting vector-borne infections between wildlife and livestock. The indigenous African pathogens with transboundary potential, such as Rift Valley fever virus, African horse sickness virus, bluetongue virus, lumpy skin disease virus, African swine fever virus, and blood-borne parasites have received the most attention. There is no evidence for persistent vector-borne viral infections in African wildlife. For some viral infections, wildlife may act as a reservoir through the inter-epidemic circulation of viruses with mild or subclinical manifestations. Wildlife may also act as introductory or transporting hosts when moved to new regions, e.g. for lumpy skin disease virus, Rift Valley fever virus and West Nile virus. Wildlife may also act as amplifying hosts when exposed to viruses in the early part of the warm season when vectors are active, with spillover to domestic animals later in the season, e.g. with bluetongue and African horse sickness. Some tick species found on domestic animals are more abundant on wildlife hosts; some depend on wildlife hosts to complete their life cycle. Since the endemic stability of a disease depends on a sufficiently large tick population to ensure that domestic animals become infected at an early age, the presence of wildlife hosts that augment tick numbers may be beneficial. Many wild ungulate species are reservoirs of Anaplasma spp., while the role of wildlife in the epidemiology of heartwater (Ehrlichia ruminantium infection) has not been elucidated. Wild ungulates are not usually reservoirs of piroplasms that affect livestock; however, there are two exceptions: zebra, which are reservoirs of Babesia caballi and Theileria

  1. Wildlife trade and global disease emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karesh, William B; Cook, Robert A; Bennett, Elizabeth L; Newcomb, James

    2005-07-01

    The global trade in wildlife provides disease transmission mechanisms that not only cause human disease outbreaks but also threaten livestock, international trade, rural livelihoods, native wildlife populations, and the health of ecosystems. Outbreaks resulting from wildlife trade have caused hundreds of billions of dollars of economic damage globally. Rather than attempting to eradicate pathogens or the wild species that may harbor them, a practical approach would include decreasing the contact rate among species, including humans, at the interface created by the wildlife trade. Since wildlife marketing functions as a system of scale-free networks with major hubs, these points provide control opportunities to maximize the effects of regulatory efforts.

  2. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Wild Birds and Chickens in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Young; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Tamang, Migma Dorji; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Jeong, Ok-Mi; Lee, Hee-Soo; Kang, Min-Su

    2016-01-01

    A total of 2,423 nonduplicate isolates of Escherichia coli recovered from wild birds (n=793) and chickens (n=1,630) in South Korea were investigated for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. Altogether, 56 isolates with PMQR genes were identified, including 25 (3.2%) from wild birds and 31 (1.9%) from chickens, which were further characterized using molecular methods. Among them, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrB, and qepA genes were detected in 47 (1.9%), 6 (0.24%), 2 (0.08%), and 1 (0.04%) isolates, respectively. The most prevalent gene, qnrS, was identified in 21 (0.9%) and 26 (1.1%) isolates from wild birds and chickens, respectively. The qnrB gene was identified in two chicken isolates, which included qnrB19 and a novel qnrB44 gene. Plasmid isolation and Southern hybridization revealed that qnrS1 was located on a large (>200 kbp) plasmid. The spread of the PMQR genes was attributed to a combination of horizontal dissemination and clonal expansion. The horizontal dissemination of PMQR genes was mostly mediated by IncK plasmids. Molecular typing demonstrated that the majority of the PMQR-positive isolates were genetically diverse. Only one chicken isolate belonged to ST131, which harbored an additional CMY-2 gene. Our findings suggest that the wild birds could serve as reservoirs of PMQR genes and spread them over long distances through migration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PMQR genes in Korean wild birds. This study also reports qnrS2, qnrB19, qnrB44, and qepA genes for the first time in animal E. coli isolates from South Korea.

  3. Plasmid-mediated resistance to cephalosporins and quinolones in Escherichia coli from American crows in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamborova, Ivana; Dolejska, Monika; Zurek, Ludek; Townsend, Andrea K; Clark, Anne B; Ellis, Julie C; Papousek, Ivo; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) faeces were tested for Escherichia coli with plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR), extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and AmpC beta-lactamases. A total of 590 faecal samples were collected at four roosting sites in the USA and cultivated on selective media. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were performed to assess clonality. Transferability of resistance genes was studied using conjugation and transformation bioassays. In total, 78 (13%, n = 590) cefotaxime-resistant isolates were obtained, of which 66 and 12 displayed AmpC and ESBL phenotypes, respectively. Fifty-four AmpC-producing isolates carried bla CMY-2 . Isolates producing ESBLs contained genes bla CTX-M-27 (5 isolates), bla CTX-M-15 (4), bla CTX-M-14 (2) and bla CTX-M-1 (1). Ninety isolates (15%, n = 590) with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were obtained, among which 14 harboured PMQR genes aac(6')-Ib-cr (4 isolates), qnrB19 (3), qnrS1 (2), qnrA1 (2), qnrB2 (1), qnrB6 (1) and qnrD3 (1). High genetic diversity was revealed by PFGE and MLST. Epidemiologically important E. coli clones (e.g., ST131, ST405) were identified. Plasmids carrying bla CMY-2 were assigned predominantly to IncA/C (8 plasmids), IncI1/ST23 (5) and IncI1/ST12 (3). The study demonstrates a widespread occurrence of E. coli with ESBL, AmpC and PMQR genes associated with clinically important multidrug-resistant clones and epidemic plasmids, in American crows. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Emergence of quinolone-resistant, topoisomerase-mutant Brucella after treatment with fluoroquinolones in a macrophage experimental infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Tarazona, Elisa; García Rodríguez, José Ángel; Muñoz Bellido, Juan Luis

    2015-04-01

    To determine the activity of fluoroquinolones (FQ) and the selection of FQ-resistant mutants in a macrophage experimental infection model (MEIM). Canine macrophages were inoculated with Brucella melitensis ATCC 23457 (WT), achieving intracellular counts of around 105 CFU/mL. Cell cultures were incubated in the presence of ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin (LEV), moxifloxacin (MOX), and doxycycline (DOX). After cell lysis, surviving microorganisms were plated for count purposes, and plated onto antibiotics-containing media for mutant selection. Topoisomerases mutations were detected by PCR and sequencing. Bacterial counts after cell lysis were 14.3% (CIP), 65.3% (LEV), and 75% (MOX) lower compared to the control. Quinolone-resistant mutants emerged in cell cultures containing CIP and LEV with a frequency of around 0.5×10(-3). All mutants showed an Ala87Val change in GyrA. Mutants had FQs MICs around 10×WT. The ability of these mutants for infecting new macrophages and the intracellular lysis after antibiotic exposure did not change significantly. No 2nd step FQ-resistant mutants were selected from 1st step mutants. Intracellular activity of FQs is low against WT and gyrA-mutant Brucella. FQs easily select gyrA mutants in MEIM. The ability of mutants for infecting new macrophages remains unchanged. In this MEIM, 2nd step mutants do not emerge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. The YebC family protein PA0964 negatively regulates the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal system and pyocyanin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haihua; Li, Lingling; Dong, Zhaolin; Surette, Michael G; Duan, Kangmin

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity is often manifested by the expression of various cell-associated and secreted virulence factors, such as exoenzymes, protease, and toxins. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of virulence genes is coordinately controlled by the global regulatory quorum-sensing systems, which includes the las and rhl systems as well as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) system. Phenazine compounds are among the virulence factors under the control of both the rhl and PQS systems. In this study, regulation of the phzA1B1C1D1E1 (phzA1) operon, which is involved in phenazine synthesis, was investigated. In an initial study of inducing conditions, we observed that phzA1 was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline. Screening of 13,000 mutants revealed 32 genes that altered phzA1 expression in the presence of subinhibitory tetracycline concentrations. Among them, the gene PA0964, designated pmpR (pqsR-mediated PQS regulator), has been identified as a novel regulator of the PQS system. It belongs to a large group of widespread conserved hypothetical proteins with unknown function, the YebC protein family (Pfam family DUF28). It negatively regulates the quorum-sensing response regulator pqsR of the PQS system by binding at its promoter region. Alongside phzA1 expression and phenazine and pyocyanin production, a set of virulence factors genes controlled by both rhl and the PQS were shown to be modulated by PmpR. Swarming motility and biofilm formation were also significantly affected. The results added another layer of regulation in the rather complex quorum-sensing systems in P. aeruginosa and demonstrated a clear functional clue for the YebC family proteins.

  6. Analysis of quinolone antibiotic derivatives in sewage sludge samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: comparison of the efficiency of three extraction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorival-García, N; Zafra-Gómez, A; Camino-Sánchez, F J; Navalón, A; Vílchez, J L

    2013-03-15

    This work presents a comparison of three extraction techniques -ultrasound-assisted extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) - and evaluates their efficiency in the determination of quinolone antibiotics in sewage sludge samples. Extraction parameters for each technique were optimized using design of experiments, and the compounds were detected and quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), operating in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. The use of two selected reaction monitoring transitions for each compound allowed simultaneous quantification and identification in one run. Analytes were separated in less than 10 min. Marbofloxacin and cincophen were used as surrogates for amphoteric and acid quinolones, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 2 and 5 ng g(-1), and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 4 and 18 ng g(-1) for the various analytes. The inter- and intra-day variability was <7%. Due to the absence of certified reference materials (CRMs), the method was validated using matrix-matched calibration and a recovery assay with spiked samples. Recovery rates were between 97.9% and 104.8%. Statistical comparison demonstrated no significant differences between the three extraction techniques. The methods were successfully applied for the determination of quinolones in sewage sludge samples collected from different wastewater treatments plants (WWTPs) located in the province of Granada (Spain). The analytical methods developed here may be useful for the development of more in-depth studies on the occurrence and fate of these commonly used pharmaceuticals in WWTPs and in the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of nfxB and cfxB, two mutant resistance loci decreasing norfloxacin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, D C; Wolfson, J S; Souza, K S; Ng, E Y; McHugh, G L; Swartz, M N

    1989-03-01

    Two genetic loci selected for norfloxacin (nfxB) and ciprofloxacin (cfxB) resistance were characterized. Both mutations have previously been shown to confer pleiotropic resistance to quinolones, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline and to decrease expression of porin outer-membrane protein OmpF. nfxB was shown to map at about 19 min and thus to be genetically distinct from ompF (21 min), and cfxB was shown to be very closely linked to marA (34 min). cfxB was dominant over cfxB+ in merodiploids, in contrast to other quinolone resistance mutations. The two loci appear to interact functionally, because nfxB was not expressed in the presence of marA::Tn5. Both nfxB and cfxB decreased the expression of ompF up to 50-fold at the posttranscriptional level as determined in strains containing ompF-lacZ operon and protein fusions. Both mutations also decreased norfloxacin accumulation in intact cells. This decrease in accumulation was abolished by energy inhibitors and by removal of the outer membrane. These findings, in conjunction with those of Cohen et al. (S. P. Cohen, D. C. Hooper, J. S. Wolfson, K. S. Souza, L. M. McMurry, and S. B. Levy, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1187-1191, 1988), suggest a model for quinolone resistance by decreased permeation in which decreased diffusion through porin channels in the outer membrane interacts with a saturable drug efflux system at the inner membrane.

  8. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of nfxB and cfxB, two mutant resistance loci decreasing norfloxacin accumulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, D C; Wolfson, J S; Souza, K S; Ng, E Y; McHugh, G L; Swartz, M N

    1989-01-01

    Two genetic loci selected for norfloxacin (nfxB) and ciprofloxacin (cfxB) resistance were characterized. Both mutations have previously been shown to confer pleiotropic resistance to quinolones, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline and to decrease expression of porin outer-membrane protein OmpF. nfxB was shown to map at about 19 min and thus to be genetically distinct from ompF (21 min), and cfxB was shown to be very closely linked to marA (34 min). cfxB was dominant over cfxB+ in merodiploids, ...

  9. Managing the livestock– Wildlife interface on rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Johan T.; Cross, Paul C.; Valeix, Marion

    2017-01-01

    On rangelands the livestock–wildlife interface is mostly characterized by management actions aimed at controlling problems associated with competition, disease, and depredation. Wildlife communities (especially the large vertebrate species) are typically incompatible with agricultural development because the opportunity costs of wildlife conservation are unaffordable except in arid and semi-arid regions. Ecological factors including the provision of supplementary food and water for livestock, together with the persecution of large predators, result in livestock replacing wildlife at biomass densities far exceeding those of indigenous ungulates. Diseases are difficult to eradicate from free-ranging wildlife populations and so veterinary controls usually focus on separating commercial livestock herds from wildlife. Persecution of large carnivores due to their depredation of livestock has caused the virtual eradication of apex predators from most rangelands. However, recent research points to a broad range of solutions to reduce conflict at the livestock–wildlife interface. Conserving wildlife bolsters the adaptive capacity of a rangeland by providing stakeholders with options for dealing with environmental change. This is contingent upon local communities being empowered to benefit directly from their wildlife resources within a management framework that integrates land-use sectors at the landscape scale. As rangelands undergo irreversible changes caused by species invasions and climate forcings, the future perspective favors a proactive shift in attitude towards the livestock–wildlife interface, from problem control to asset management.

  10. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  11. Coexisting with wildlife in transfrontier conservation areas in Zimbabwe: cattle owners' awareness of disease risks and perceptions of the role played by wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garine-Wichatitsky, M; Miguel, E; Mukamuri, B; Garine-Wichatitsky, E; Wencelius, J; Pfukenyi, D M; Caron, A

    2013-05-01

    Diseases transmitted between wildlife and livestock may have significant impacts on local farmers' health, livestock health and productivity, overall national economies, and conservation initiatives, such as Transfrontier Conservation Areas in Southern Africa. However, little is known on local farmers' awareness of the potential risks, and how they perceive the role played by wildlife in the epidemiology of these diseases. We investigated the knowledge base regarding livestock diseases of local cattle owners living at the periphery of conservation areas within the Great Limpopo TFCA and the Kavango-Zambezi TFCA in Zimbabwe, using free-listing and semi-structured questionnaires during dipping sessions. The results suggest that information related to cattle diseases circulates widely between cattle farmers, including between different socio-cultural groups, using English and vernacular languages. Most respondents had an accurate perception of the epidemiology of diseases affecting their livestock, and their perception of the potential role played by wildlife species was usually in agreement with current state of veterinary knowledge. However, we found significant variations in the cultural importance of livestock diseases between sites, and owners' perceptions were not directly related with the local abundance of wildlife. As the establishment of TFCAs will potentially increase the risk of Transboundary Animal Diseases, we recommend an increased participation of communities at a local level in the prioritisation of livestock diseases control and surveillance, including zoonoses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of wildlife in bluetongue virus maintenance in Europe: lessons learned after the natural infection in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Sánchez-Matamoros, Almudena; Gortázar, Christian; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a re-emergent vector-borne viral disease of domestic and wild ruminants caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), a member of the genus Orbivirus. A complex multi-host, multi-vector and multi-pathogen (26 serotypes) transmission and maintenance network has recently emerged in Europe, and wild ruminants are regarded as an important node in this network. This review analyses the reservoir role of wild ruminants in Europe, identifying gaps in knowledge and proposing actions. Wild ruminant species are indicators of BTV circulation. Excepting the mouflon (Ovis aries musimon), European wild ungulates do not develop clinical disease. Diagnostic techniques used in wildlife do not differ from those used in domestic ruminants provided they are validated. Demographic, behavioural and physiological traits of wild hosts modulate their relationship with BTV vectors and with the virus itself. While BTV has been eradicated from central and northern Europe, it is still circulating in the Mediterranean Basin. We propose that currently two BTV cycles coexist in certain regions of the Mediterranean Basin, a wild one largely driven by deer of the subfamily Cervinae and a domestic one. These are probably linked through shared Culicoides vectors of several species. We suggest that wildlife might be contributing to this situation through vector maintenance and virus maintenance. Additionally, differences in temperature and other environmental factors add complexity to the Mediterranean habitats as compared to central and northern European ones. Intervention options in wildlife populations are limited. There is a need to know the role of wildlife in maintaining Culicoides populations, and to know which Culicoides species mediate the wildlife-livestock-BTV transmission events. There is also a clear need to study more in depth the links between Cervinae deer densities, environmental factors and BTV maintenance. Regarding disease control, we suggest that research efforts should be

  13. 76 FR 39433 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council... February 2010, the Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat conservation endeavors that: (a...

  14. 76 FR 66955 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February 2010...

  15. 78 FR 42104 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed in...

  16. 77 FR 74864 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting.... App., we announce that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting...

  17. 77 FR 15386 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed...

  18. 76 FR 3155 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in...

  19. 77 FR 38317 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed...

  20. 75 FR 57292 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in...

  1. 77 FR 4575 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February 2010...

  2. 77 FR 25191 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed in...

  3. 78 FR 48460 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage...

  4. 76 FR 30192 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council...

  5. 77 FR 57577 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage...

  6. 50 CFR 70.9 - Wildlife species management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife species management. 70.9 Section 70.9 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) MANAGEMENT OF FISHERIES CONSERVATION AREAS NATIONAL FISH HATCHERIES § 70.9 Wildlife species...

  7. 78 FR 10200 - Proposed Information Collection; Captive Wildlife Safety Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Captive Wildlife Safety Act AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: We (U.S. Fish and Wildlife... Service Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS 2042- PDM, 4401 North...

  8. 50 CFR 16.22 - Injurious wildlife permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Injurious wildlife permits. 16.22 Section 16.22 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND...

  9. 50 CFR 14.52 - Clearance of imported wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clearance of imported wildlife. 14.52 Section 14.52 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND...

  10. 50 CFR 14.51 - Inspection of wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspection of wildlife. 14.51 Section 14.51 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS...

  11. Antibiotic therapy for inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacilli: what are the alternatives to carbapenems, quinolones and aminoglycosides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P N A; Ferguson, J K

    2012-10-01

    Some bacteria that possess chromosomally determined AmpC β-lactamases may express these enzymes at a high level following exposure to β-lactams, either by induction or selection for derepressed mutants. This may lead to clinical failure even if an isolate initially tests susceptible in vitro, a phenomenon best characterised by third-generation cephalosporin therapy for Enterobacter bacteraemia or meningitis. Several other Enterobacteriaceae, such as Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, Providencia spp. and Morganella morganii (often termed the 'ESCPM' group), may also express high levels of AmpC. However, the risk of clinical failure with β-lactams that test susceptible in vitro is less clear in these species than for Enterobacter. Laboratories frequently do not report β-lactam or β-lactamase inhibitor combination drug susceptibilities for ESCPM organisms, encouraging alternative therapy with quinolones, aminoglycosides or carbapenems. However, quinolones and carbapenems present problems with selective pressure for multiresistant organisms, and aminoglycosides with potential toxicity. The risk of emergent AmpC-mediated resistance for non-Enterobacter spp. appears rare in clinical studies. Piperacillin/tazobactam may remain effective and may be less selective for AmpC derepressed mutants than cephalosporins. The potential roles for agents such as cefepime or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole are also discussed. Clinical studies that better define optimal treatment for this group of bacteria are required. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Staphylococcal bacteremia in cancer patients: risk factors and outcome in 134 episodes prior to and after introduction of quinolones into infection prevention in neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuckova, E; Spanik, S; Ilavska, I; Helpianska, L; Oravcova, E; Lacka, J; Krupova, I; Grausova, S; Koren, P; Bezakova, I; Grey, E; Balaz, M; Studena, M; Kunova, A; Torfs, K; Trupl, J; Korec, S; Stopkova, K; Krcmery, V

    1996-11-01

    A total of 134 episodes of staphylococcal bacteremia (SBE) appearing among 9987 admissions, and 979 episodes of bacteremia in cancer patients within 5 years, were analyzed for risk factors, clinical course and outcome; 64 were monomicrobial and 70 polymicrobial. The most frequent risk factors were acute leukemia, catheter insertion, long-lasting neutropenia, and prior prophylaxis with quinolones. There was no significant difference between polymicrobial and monomicrobial SBE in risk factors. The two groups differed only in the source of bacteremia (gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract infections were more common in monomicrobial SBE) and etiology-Staphylococcus aureus appeared more frequently in monomicrobial than in polymicrobial bacteremia (20.3% compared to 4.3%, P < 0.05). More complications (14.3%) such as abscesses, endocarditis, etc. appeared in the group of polymicrobial SBE (P < 0.05). No difference was observed in clinical course and outcome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial SBE. The incidence of SBE has increased since 1991, when quinolones were first used in prophylaxis in afebrile neutropenia at our center; however, the infection-associated mortality in monomicrobial SBE was low (4.3%).

  13. Structural requirements of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolones as potential antimalarials from 2D and 3D QSAR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Bai, Chongliang; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a fatal tropical and subtropical disease caused by the protozoal species Plasmodium. Many commonly available antimalarial drugs and therapies are becoming ineffective because of the emergence of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, which drives the need for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Recently, a series of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolone analogs, derived from the famous compound endochin, were reported as promising candidates for orally efficacious antimalarials. In this study, to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these quinolones and investigate the structural requirements for antimalarial activity, the 2D multiple linear regressions (MLR) method and 3D comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods are employed to evolve different QSAR models. All these models give satisfactory results with highly accurate fitting and strong external predictive abilities for chemicals not used in model development. Furthermore, the contour maps from 3D models can provide an intuitive understanding of the key structure features responsible for the antimalarial activities. In conclusion, we summarize the detailed position-specific structural requirements of these derivatives accordingly. All these results are helpful for the rational design of new compounds with higher antimalarial bioactivities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and characterisation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and mutations in the gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes among Shigella isolates from Henan, China, between 2001 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Duan, Guangcai; Zhu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yuanlin; Fan, Qingtang

    2013-08-01

    A total of 293 Shigella isolates were isolated from patients with diarrhoea in four villages of Henan, China. This study investigated the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA and aac(6')-Ib-cr and compared the polymorphic quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE. Of the isolates, 292 were found to be resistant to nalidixic acid and pipemidic acid, whereas 77 were resistant to ciprofloxacin (resistance rate of 26.3%). Resistance of the Shigella isolates to ciprofloxacin significantly increased from 2001 to 2008 (PShigella isolates are common in China. This study found that there was a significant increase in mutation rates of the QRDR and the resistant rates to ciprofloxacin. Other mechanisms may be present in the isolates that also contribute to their resistance to ciprofloxacin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiresidue confirmatory method for determination of quinolones in milk by HPLC: method development and validation according to the criteria of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Ostorero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary drugs have become an integral part of the livestock production and play an important role in maintaining animal welfare. The use of veterinary medicines may be cause of the presence of drug residues in animal food products if appropriate withdrawal periods are not respected or if contaminated feeds are used. This work presents the development of an high performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn fluorescence derivatization (HPLC-FLD method for the quantitative detection of eight quinolones – norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, difloxacin, oxolinic acid, nalidixic acid, and flumequine – in bovine milk. After deproteination and extraction with a metaphosphoric acid 1% w/v/methanol/acetonitrile (60/20/20 v/v/v solution, the sample is partially evaporated and cleaned up on a reversed phase solid phase extraction (SPE cartridge. The extract is analyzed using an HPLC-FLD. Mean recovery ranged between 65-88%. The method is validated as a confirmatory method according to Decision 2002/657/EC. All the verified parameters (linearity, selectivity/specificity, trueness, precision, CC, ruggedness and stability were satisfactory and the method is able to quantify all the analytes in milk in the concentration range 15-60 μg/Kg for danofloxacin and 25-150 μg/Kg for the other quinolones.

  16. Synthesis, characterization of some novel 1,3,4-oxadiazole compounds containing 8-hydroxy quinolone moiety as potential antibacterial and anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Mahadev Adimule

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a series of novel derivatives of 8-hydroxy quinolone substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazole compounds were synthesized by convergent synthetic method and studied for their antibacterial and anticancer properties. The cell lines used for cytotoxic evaluation were HeLa, Caco-2 and MCF7. The synthetic chemistry involved conversion of various substituted aromatic acids into ethyl ester 2a-e. The ethyl ester was converted into corresponding carbohydrazide 3a-e. Carbohydrazides are reacted with chloroacetic acid, phosphorous oxytrichloride and irradiated with microwave in order to obtain the various key intermediates 2-(chloromethyl-5-(substituted phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole 4a-e. The 2-(chloromethyl-5-(substituted phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole was reacted with 8-hydroxy quinolone in presence of sodium hydride and obtained a series of 8-hydroxy quinoline substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazoles 5a-e. Among the synthesised compounds, the cytotoxicity of the compound 5b i.e. 8-{[5-(2,4-dichlorophenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]methoxy}quinoline against MCF7 with IC50 of 5.3µM and the compound 5e i.e. 8-{[5-(4-bromophenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]methoxy}quinoline showed MIC of < 6.25µg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus which is comparable with the known standards. The standards used for cytotoxic evaluation was 5-fluorouracil and for antibacterial was nitrofurazone

  17. Minidoka Dam Wildlife Impact Assessment: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Robert C.; Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1989-03-01

    A wildlife impact assessment has been developed for the US Bureau of Reclamation's Minidoka Dam and Reservoir in south central Idaho. This assessment was conducted to fulfill requirements of the Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of this study included the following: select target wildlife species, and identify their current status and management goals; estimate the net effects on target wildlife species resulting from hydroelectric development and operation; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals for target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation; and consult and coordinate impact assessment activities with the Northwest Power Planning Council, Bonneville Power Administration, US Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Land Management, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee, and other entities expressing interest in the project. 62 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Quivira NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  19. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge and Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report begins with Refuge...

  20. Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge and Featherstone National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Mason Neck and Featherstone National Wildlife Refuges for the next 15 years. This plan...

  1. Construction of a geographic information system for wildlife refuge planning: Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Working cooperatively with the USFWS, the University of Minnesota Department of Forest Resources has been compiling geo-referenced data for each national wildlife...

  2. Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Currituck National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Mackay Island and Currituck National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report...

  3. Modoc National Wildlife Refuge wildlife and habitat management review June 30 [ to ] July 3 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings and recommendations from an evaluation of the wildlife and habitat management program conducted by a review team during June 30...

  4. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Alligator River and Pea Island National Wildlife Refuges summarizes refuge activities during 1993. The report begins with an...

  5. Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Alligator River and Pea Island National Wildlife Refuges summarizes refuge activities during 2003. The report begins with an...

  6. Deer Population Health Evaluation for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge from Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The letter and enclosed report discusses the health evaluation of 5 deer taken randomly from Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge population. Herd health appears...

  7. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge wildlife and habitat management review : November 13-17, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of a wildlife and habitat management review conducted by a review team during November 13-17, 2000 at the...

  8. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Necedah NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  9. Wildlife refuge staff works to curb deadly disease [Monte Vista and Alamosa National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This magazine article is on the work to reduce losses from the waterfowl disease avian cholera, on the Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge and Monte Vista National...

  10. Southeastern Cooperative wildlife disease study: Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge deer herd health checks

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Enclosed are our reports on the deer herd health checks we conducted on the Duck River and Big Sandy Units, Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge, Humphrey and Henry...

  11. Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Currituck National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Mackay Island and Currituck National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report...

  12. Water Management Program - 1991 [Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge and Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this plan is to establish a schedule of operations for manipulation of managed waters of the Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge and the Delair,...

  13. Seney National Wildlife Refuge and Huron Islands National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge and Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins with Refuge...

  15. Environmental contaminants in fish and wildlife of Havasu National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, vegetation, clams, fish, waterbirds and waterbird eggs were collected at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) during April-August 1993 for organochlorine...

  16. Infections shared with wildlife: an updated perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gortázar, Christian; Ruiz Fons, Francisco; Höfle, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Infections shared with wildlife matter because many are zoonotic, because of their impact on animal health and in consequence on livestock production, and due to their adverse effects on conservation and on the sustainable use of wildlife. We describe recent environmental and societal changes that contribute to explain the current wildlife disease scenario, propose an updated list and ranking of relevant shared disease agents, illustrate key risk factors which often underlay shared infections...

  17. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 2. Winter circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2014-04-01

    The shallow winter overturning circulation in the Red Sea is studied using a 50 year high-resolution MITgcm (MIT general circulation model) simulation with realistic atmospheric forcing. The overturning circulation for a typical year, represented by 1980, and the climatological mean are analyzed using model output to delineate the three-dimensional structure and to investigate the underlying dynamical mechanisms. The horizontal model circulation in the winter of 1980 is dominated by energetic eddies. The climatological model mean results suggest that the surface inflow intensifies in a western boundary current in the southern Red Sea that switches to an eastern boundary current north of 24N. The overturning is accomplished through a cyclonic recirculation and a cross-basin overturning circulation in the northern Red Sea, with major sinking occurring along a narrow band of width about 20 km along the eastern boundary and weaker upwelling along the western boundary. The northward pressure gradient force, strong vertical mixing, and horizontal mixing near the boundary are the essential dynamical components in the model\\'s winter overturning circulation. The simulated water exchange is not hydraulically controlled in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb; instead, the exchange is limited by bottom and lateral boundary friction and, to a lesser extent, by interfacial friction due to the vertical viscosity at the interface between the inflow and the outflow. Key Points Sinking occurs in a narrow boundary layer along the eastern boundary Surface western boundary current switches into an eastern boundary current Water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is not hydraulically controlled © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Wildlife Corridors - San Joaquin Valley [ds423

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The California Departments of Fish and Game, Parks and Recreation, and Transportation (Caltrans) are collaborating to improve planning information for wildlife...

  19. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  20. Wildlife Linkages - San Joaquin Valley [ds417

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The California Departments of Fish and Game, Parks and Recreation, and Transportation (Caltrans) are collaborating to improve planning information for wildlife...

  1. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan : Executive Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Allen B.; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon.

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Northwest Power Act directs the NPPC to develop a program to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance'' fish and wildlife of the Columbia River and its tributaries. The overarching goals include: A Columbia River ecosystem that sustains an abundant, productive, and diverse community of fish and wildlife; Mitigation across the basin for the adverse effects to fish and wildlife caused by the development and operation of the hydrosystem; Sufficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest and for non-tribal harvest; and Recovery of the fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the hydrosystem that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.

  2. 78 FR 3909 - Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, IN; Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, MN; Northern...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, IN; Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge... conservation plans (CCP) and associated environmental documents for the Big Oaks, Glacial Ridge, Northern... refuge at the following addresses: Attention: Refuge Manager, Big Oaks NWR, 1661 West JPG Niblo Road...

  3. A Conceptual Model for Circulation Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.; Coleridge, F.

    1977-01-01

    A semimathematical model for library circulation control. The application is intended to contribute to a more structured yet flexible approach to library circulation management. It includes provisions for circulation policy analysis and management, recording, and controlling of circulation transactions. (Author/KP)

  4. The Invertibility, Explicit Determinants, and Inverses of Circulant and Left Circulant and g-Circulant Matrices Involving Any Continuous Fibonacci and Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices play an important role in solving delay differential equations. In this paper, circulant type matrices including the circulant and left circulant and g-circulant matrices with any continuous Fibonacci and Lucas numbers are considered. Firstly, the invertibility of the circulant matrix is discussed and the explicit determinant and the inverse matrices by constructing the transformation matrices are presented. Furthermore, the invertibility of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices is also studied. We obtain the explicit determinants and the inverse matrices of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices by utilizing the relationship between left circulant, g-circulant matrices and circulant matrix, respectively.

  5. Circulating Fibronectin Controls Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja von Au

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibronectin is ubiquitously expressed in the extracellular matrix, and experimental evidence has shown that it modulates blood vessel formation. The relative contribution of local and circulating fibronectin to blood vessel formation in vivo remains unknown despite evidence for unexpected roles of circulating fibronectin in various diseases. Using transgenic mouse models, we established that circulating fibronectin facilitates the growth of bone metastases by enhancing blood vessel formation and maturation. This effect is more relevant than that of fibronectin produced by endothelial cells and pericytes, which only exert a small additive effect on vessel maturation. Circulating fibronectin enhances its local production in tumors through a positive feedback loop and increases the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF retained in the matrix. Both fibronectin and VEGF then cooperate to stimulate blood vessel formation. Fibronectin content in the tumor correlates with the number of blood vessels and tumor growth in the mouse models. Consistent with these results, examination of three separate arrays from patients with breast and prostate cancers revealed that a high staining intensity for fibronectin in tumors is associated with increased mortality. These results establish that circulating fibronectin modulates blood vessel formation and tumor growth by modifying the amount of and the response to VEGF. Furthermore, determination of the fibronectin content can serve as a prognostic biomarker for breast and prostate cancers and possibly other cancers.

  6. 1980 annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Hailstone National Wildlife Refuge, Halfbreed National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Mason National Wildlife Refuge, War Horse National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge (including the satellite refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980 calendar...

  7. Land Acquisition Priority Plan for Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan discusses land acquisition priorities for Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge). The proposed alternatives...

  8. Animal Control Management Plan: Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Animal Control Management Plan for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge outlines the procedures for controlling wildlife and fish populations to keep them...

  9. 77 FR 16051 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Office of the Secretary Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Office of the... Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). The Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat... nominations to Joshua Winchell, Coordinator, Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council, Division of...

  10. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area : Hunting and fishing plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1960 hunting and fishing plan for Stillwater Wildlife Management Area and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge. The plan describes the waterfowl that uses the...

  11. Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan focuses on the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations...

  12. Narrative report Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. Wildlife- including migratory...

  13. An Assessment of Fishery Resources on Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A qualitative assessment of the fishery resources on Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge was conducted by Fish and Wildlife Service personnel in September 1993. This...

  14. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1932-1935

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Malheur National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from July of 1932 through March of 1395. The report covers wildlife-...

  15. Wilderness study summary : Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This summary describes the Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge which has been studied by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife at the direction of the...

  16. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : May -- August 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge and Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from May through August of...

  17. Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, Iowa Contaminants Investigation Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document serves as the final report for the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) (formerly known as the Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge)...

  18. Presquile National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Presquile National Wildlife Refuge and James River National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar...

  19. Wilderness study area appraisal [Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a message sent from the chief of the Division of Wildlife Research to the chief of the Division of Wildlife Refuges. It discusses the use of college...

  20. Fire Management Plan Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The resource objectives of this unit are: 1) Protect wildlife habitat by reducing the fuel loading of forest stands. 2) Maintain forest openings for wildlife by...