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Sample records for whole-brain cerebral metabolic

  1. Efficacy and toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy in patients with multiple cerebral metastases from malignant melanoma

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    Hauswald Henrik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To retrospectively access outcome and toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT in patients with multiple brain metastases (BM from malignant melanoma (MM. Patients and methods Results of 87 patients (median age 58 years; 35 female, 52 male treated by WBRT for BM of MM between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed. Total dose applied was either 30 Gy in 10 fractions (n = 56 or 40 Gy in 20 fractions (n = 31. All but 9 patients suffered from extra-cerebral metastases. Prior surgical resection of BM was performed in 18 patients, salvage stereotactic radiosurgery in 13 patients. Results Mean follow-up was 8 months (range, 0–57 months, the 6- and 12-months overall-(OS survival rates were 29.2% and 16.5%, respectively. The median OS was 3.5 months. In cerebral follow-up imaging 6 (11 patients showed a complete (partial remission, while 11 (17 patients had stable disease (intra-cerebral tumor progression. In comparison of total dose, the group treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions achieved a significant longer OS (p = 0.003, median 3.1 vs. 5.6 months. Furthermore, DS-GPA score (p  Conclusion Treatment of BM from MM with WBRT is tolerated well and some remissions of BM could be achieved. An advantage for higher treatment total doses was seen. However, outcome is non-satisfying, and further improvements in treatment of BM from MM are warranted.

  2. Cerebral white matter injury and damage to myelin sheath following whole-brain ischemia.

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    Chen, Yingzhu; Yi, Qiong; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xue; Xuan, Lihui; Tian, Ye

    2013-02-07

    Myelin sheath, either in white matter or in other regions of brain, is vulnerable to ischemia. The specific events involved in the progression of ischemia in white matter have not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine histopathological alterations in cerebral white matter and levels of myelin basic protein (MBP) in ischemia-injured brain tissue during the acute and subacute phases of central nervous injury following whole-brain ischemia. The whole cerebral ischemia model (four-vessel occlusion (4-VO)) was established in adult Sprague-Dawley rats and MBP gene expression and protein levels in the brain tissue were measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 2 days, 4 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days following ischemia. Demyelination was determined by Luxol fast blue myelin staining, routine histopathological staining, and electron microscopy in injured brain tissue. Results showed that edema, vascular dilation, focal necrosis, demyelination, adjacent reactive gliosis and inflammation occurred 7 days after ischemia in HE staining and recovered to control levels at 28 days. The absence of Luxol fast blue staining and vacuolation was clearly visible at 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Semiquantitative analysis showed that the transparency of myelin had decreased significantly by 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Demyelination and ultrastructual changes were detected 7 days after ischemia. The relative levels of MBP mRNA decreased 2 days after ischemia and this trend continued throughout the remaining four points in time. The MBP levels measured using ELISA also decreased significantly at 2 days and 4 days, but they recovered by 7 days and returned to control levels by 14 days. These results suggest that the impact of ischemia on cerebral white matter is time-sensitive and that different effects may follow different courses over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel ex vivo method for measuring whole brain metabolism in model systems.

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    Neville, Kathryn E; Bosse, Timothy L; Klekos, Mia; Mills, John F; Weicksel, Steven E; Waters, James S; Tipping, Marla

    2018-02-15

    Many neuronal and glial diseases have been associated with changes in metabolism. Therefore, metabolic reprogramming has become an important area of research to better understand disease at the cellular level, as well as to identify targets for treatment. Model systems are ideal for interrogating metabolic questions in a tissue dependent context. However, while new tools have been developed to study metabolism in cultured cells there has been less progress towards studies in vivo and ex vivo. We have developed a method using newly designed tissue restraints to adapt the Agilent XFe96 metabolic analyzer for whole brain analysis. These restraints create a chamber for Drosophila brains and other small model system tissues to reside undisrupted, while still remaining in the zone for measurements by sensor probes. This method generates reproducible oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification rate data for Drosophila larval and adult brains. Single brains are effectively treated with inhibitors and expected metabolic readings are observed. Measuring metabolic changes, such as glycolytic rate, in transgenic larval brains demonstrates the potential for studying how genotype affects metabolism. Current methodology either utilizes whole animal chambers to measure respiration, not allowing for targeted tissue analysis, or uses technically challenging MRI technology for in vivo analysis that is not suitable for smaller model systems. This new method allows for novel metabolic investigation of intact brains and other tissues ex vivo in a quick, and simplistic way with the potential for large-scale studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial patterns of whole brain grey and white matter injury in patients with occult spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

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    Mu, Xuetao; Nie, Binbin; Wang, Hong; Duan, Shaofeng; Zhang, Zan; Dai, Guanghui; Ma, Qiaozhi; Shan, Baoci; Ma, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (SDCP) is a common type of cerebral palsy (CP), which presents as a group of motor-impairment syndromes. Previous conventional MRI studies have reported abnormal structural changes in SDCP, such as periventricular leucomalacia. However, there are roughly 27.8% SDCP patients presenting normal appearance in conventional MRI, which were considered as occult SDCP. In this study, sixteen patients with occult SDCP and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were collected and the data were acquired on a 3T MR system. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis to investigate whole brain grey and white matter injury in occult SDCP. By using VBM method, the grey matter volume reduction was revealed in the bilateral basal ganglia regions, thalamus, insula, and left cerebral peduncle, whereas the white matter atrophy was found to be located in the posterior part of corpus callosum and right posterior corona radiata in the occult SDCP patients. By using TBSS, reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values were detected in multiple white matter regions, including bilateral white matter tracts in prefrontal lobe, temporal lobe, internal and external capsule, corpus callosum, cingulum, thalamus, brainstem and cerebellum. Additionally, several regions of white matter tracts injury were found to be significantly correlated with motor dysfunction. These results collectively revealed the spatial patterns of whole brain grey and white matter injury in occult SDCP.

  5. Positive selection in ASPM is correlated with cerebral cortex evolution across primates but not with whole-brain size.

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    Ali, Farhan; Meier, Rudolf

    2008-11-01

    The rapid increase of brain size is a key event in human evolution. Abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated (ASPM) is discussed as a major candidate gene for explaining the exceptionally large brain in humans but ASPM's role remains controversial. Here we use codon-specific models and a comparative approach to test this candidate gene that was initially identified in Homo-chimp comparisons. We demonstrate that accelerated evolution of ASPM (omega = 4.7) at 16 amino acid sites occurred in 9 primate lineages with major changes in relative cerebral cortex size. However, ASPM's evolution is not correlated with major changes in relative whole-brain or cerebellum sizes. Our results suggest that a single candidate gene such as ASPM can influence a specific component of the brain across large clades through changes in a few amino acid sites. We furthermore illustrate the power of using continuous phenotypic variability across primates to rigorously test candidate genes that have been implicated in the evolution of key human traits.

  6. Whole-brain structural connectivity in dyskinetic cerebral palsy and its association with motor and cognitive function.

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    Ballester-Plané, Júlia; Schmidt, Ruben; Laporta-Hoyos, Olga; Junqué, Carme; Vázquez, Élida; Delgado, Ignacio; Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Macaya, Alfons; Póo, Pilar; Toro, Esther; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Pueyo, Roser

    2017-09-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP) has long been associated with basal ganglia and thalamus lesions. Recent evidence further points at white matter (WM) damage. This study aims to identify altered WM pathways in dyskinetic CP from a standardized, connectome-based approach, and to assess structure-function relationship in WM pathways for clinical outcomes. Individual connectome maps of 25 subjects with dyskinetic CP and 24 healthy controls were obtained combining a structural parcellation scheme with whole-brain deterministic tractography. Graph theoretical metrics and the network-based statistic were applied to compare groups and to correlate WM state with motor and cognitive performance. Results showed a widespread reduction of WM volume in CP subjects compared to controls and a more localized decrease in degree (number of links per node) and fractional anisotropy (FA), comprising parieto-occipital regions and the hippocampus. However, supramarginal gyrus showed a significantly higher degree. At the network level, CP subjects showed a bilateral pathway with reduced FA, comprising sensorimotor, intraparietal and fronto-parietal connections. Gross and fine motor functions correlated with FA in a pathway comprising the sensorimotor system, but gross motor also correlated with prefrontal, temporal and occipital connections. Intelligence correlated with FA in a network with fronto-striatal and parieto-frontal connections, and visuoperception was related to right occipital connections. These findings demonstrate a disruption in structural brain connectivity in dyskinetic CP, revealing general involvement of posterior brain regions with relative preservation of prefrontal areas. We identified pathways in which WM integrity is related to clinical features, including but not limited to the sensorimotor system. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4594-4612, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Using multiple imputation to efficiently correct cerebral MRI whole brain lesion and atrophy data in patients with multiple sclerosis.

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    Chua, Alicia S; Egorova, Svetlana; Anderson, Mark C; Polgar-Turcsanyi, Mariann; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Guttmann, Charles R G; Bakshi, Rohit; Healy, Brian C

    2015-10-01

    Automated segmentation of brain MRI scans into tissue classes is commonly used for the assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, manual correction of the resulting brain tissue label maps by an expert reader remains necessary in many cases. Since automated segmentation data awaiting manual correction are "missing", we proposed to use multiple imputation (MI) to fill-in the missing manually-corrected MRI data for measures of normalized whole brain volume (brain parenchymal fraction-BPF) and T2 hyperintense lesion volume (T2LV). Automated and manually corrected MRI measures from 1300 patients enrolled in the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB) were identified. Simulation studies were conducted to assess the performance of MI with missing data both missing completely at random and missing at random. An imputation model including the concurrent automated data as well as clinical and demographic variables explained a high proportion of the variance in the manually corrected BPF (R(2)=0.97) and T2LV (R(2)=0.89), demonstrating the potential to accurately impute the missing data. Further, our results demonstrate that MI allows for the accurate estimation of group differences with little to no bias and with similar precision compared to an analysis with no missing data. We believe that our findings provide important insights for efficient correction of automated MRI measures to obviate the need to perform manual correction on all cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Whole-brain structural connectivity in dyskinetic cerebral palsy and its association with motor and cognitive function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballester-Plané, Júlia; Schmidt, Ruben; Laporta-Hoyos, Olga; Junqué, Carme; Vázquez, Élida; Delgado, Ignacio; Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Macaya, Alfons; Póo, Pilar; Toro, Esther; de Reus, Marcel A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413970728; van den Heuvel, Martijn P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304820466; Pueyo, Roser

    2017-01-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP) has long been associated with basal ganglia and thalamus lesions. Recent evidence further points at white matter (WM) damage. This study aims to identify altered WM pathways in dyskinetic CP from a standardized, connectome-based approach, and to assess

  9. Whole-Brain DTI Assessment of White Matter Damage in Children with Bilateral Cerebral Palsy: Evidence of Involvement beyond the Primary Target of the Anoxic Insult.

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    Arrigoni, F; Peruzzo, D; Gagliardi, C; Maghini, C; Colombo, P; Iammarrone, F Servodio; Pierpaoli, C; Triulzi, F; Turconi, A C

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral palsy is frequently associated with both motor and nonmotor symptoms. DTI can characterize the damage at the level of motor tracts but provides less consistent results in nonmotor areas. We used a standardized pipeline of analysis to describe and quantify the pattern of DTI white matter abnormalities of the whole brain in a group of children with chronic bilateral cerebral palsy and periventricular leukomalacia. We also explored potential correlations between DTI and clinical scale metrics. Twenty-five patients (mean age, 11.8 years) and 25 healthy children (mean age, 11.8 years) were studied at 3T with a 2-mm isotropic DTI sequence. Differences between patients and controls were assessed both voxelwise and in ROIs obtained from an existing DTI atlas. Clinical metrics included the Gross Motor Function Classification System, the Manual Ability Classification System, and intelligence quotient. The voxel-level and ROI-level analyses demonstrated highly significant (P < .001) modifications of DTI measurements in patients at several levels: cerebellar peduncles, corticospinal tracts and posterior thalamic radiations, posterior corpus callosum, external capsule, anterior thalamic radiation, superior longitudinal fasciculi and corona radiata, optic nerves, and chiasm. The reduction of fractional anisotropy values in significant tracts was between 8% and 30%. Statistically significant correlations were found between motor impairment and fractional anisotropy in corticospinal tracts and commissural and associative tracts of the supratentorial brain. We demonstrated the involvement of several motor and nonmotor areas in the chronic damage associated with periventricular leukomalacia and showed new correlations between motor skills and DTI metrics. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  10. The Whole-Brain “Global” Signal from Resting State fMRI as a Potential Biomarker of Quantitative State Changes in Glucose Metabolism

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    Thompson, Garth J.; Grimmer, Timo; Drzezga, Alexander; Herman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The evolution of functional magnetic resonance imaging to resting state (R-fMRI) allows measurement of changes in brain networks attributed to state changes, such as in neuropsychiatric diseases versus healthy controls. Since these networks are observed by comparing normalized R-fMRI signals, it is difficult to determine the metabolic basis of such group differences. To investigate the metabolic basis of R-fMRI network differences within a normal range, eyes open versus eyes closed in healthy human subjects was used. R-fMRI was recorded simultaneously with fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Higher baseline FDG was observed in the eyes open state. Variance-based metrics calculated from R-fMRI did not match the baseline shift in FDG. Functional connectivity density (FCD)-based metrics showed a shift similar to the baseline shift of FDG, however, this was lost if R-fMRI “nuisance signals” were regressed before FCD calculation. Average correlation with the mean R-fMRI signal across the whole brain, generally regarded as a “nuisance signal,” also showed a shift similar to the baseline of FDG. Thus, despite lacking a baseline itself, changes in whole-brain correlation may reflect changes in baseline brain metabolism. Conversely, variance-based metrics may remain similar between states due to inherent region-to-region differences overwhelming the differences between normal physiological states. As most previous studies have excluded the spatial means of R-fMRI metrics from their analysis, this work presents the first evidence of a potential R-fMRI biomarker for baseline shifts in quantifiable metabolism between brain states. PMID:27029438

  11. Lipid Metabolism, Abdominal Adiposity, and Cerebral Health in the Amish.

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    Ryan, Meghann; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Fieremans, Els; Veraart, Jelle; Novikov, Dmitry S; Du, Xiaoming; Adhikari, Bhim; Fisseha, Feven; Bruce, Heather; Chiappelli, Joshua; Sampath, Hemalatha; Ament, Seth; O'Connell, Jeffrey; Shuldiner, Alan R; Hong, L Elliot

    2017-11-01

    To assess the association between peripheral lipid/fat profiles and cerebral gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) in healthy Old Order Amish (OOA). Blood lipids, abdominal adiposity, liver lipid contents, and cerebral microstructure were assessed in OOA (N = 64, 31 males/33 females, ages 18-77). Orthogonal factors were extracted from lipid and imaging adiposity measures. GM assessment used the Human Connectome Project protocol to measure whole-brain average cortical thickness. Diffusion-weighted imaging was used to derive WM fractional anisotropy and kurtosis anisotropy measurements. Lipid/fat measures were captured by three orthogonal factors explaining 80% of the variance. Factor one loaded on cholesterol and/or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol measurements; factor two loaded on triglyceride/liver measurements; and factor three loaded on abdominal fat measurements. A two-stage regression including age/sex (first stage) and the three factors (second stage) examined the peripheral lipid/fat effects. Factors two and three significantly contributed to WM measures after Bonferroni corrections (P < 0.007). No factor significantly contributed to GM. Blood pressure (BP) inclusion did not meaningfully alter the lipid/fat-WM relationship. Peripheral lipid/fat indicators were significantly and negatively associated with cerebral WM rather than with GM, independent of age and BP level. Dissecting the fat/lipid components contributing to different brain imaging parameters may open a new understanding of the body-brain connection through lipid metabolism. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  12. Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism During Resection of Brain Lesions.

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    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Merkel, Andreas; Zimmermann, Max; Sommer, Björn; Buchfelder, Michael; Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Rössler, Karl

    2017-04-01

    Tissue oxygen tension is an important parameter for brain tissue viability and its noninvasive intraoperative monitoring in the whole brain is of highly clinical relevance. The purpose of this study was the introduction of a multiparametric quantitative blood oxygenation dependent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach for intraoperative examination of oxygen metabolism during the resection of brain lesions. Sixteen patients suffering from brain lesions were examined intraoperatively twice (before craniotomy and after gross-total resection) via the quantitative blood oxygenation dependent technique and a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner, which is installed in an operating room. The MRI protocol included T2*- and T2 mapping and dynamic susceptibility weighted perfusion. Data analysis was performed with a custom-made, in-house MatLab software for calculation of maps of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) as well as of cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow. Perilesional edema showed a significant increase in both perfusion (cerebral blood volume +21%, cerebral blood flow +13%) and oxygen metabolism (OEF +32%, CMRO 2  +16%) after resection of the lesions. In perilesional nonedematous tissue only, however, oxygen metabolism (OEF +19%, CMRO 2  +11%) was significantly increased, but not perfusion. No changes were found in normal brain. Fortunately, no neurovascular adverse events were observed. This approach for intraoperative examination of oxygen metabolism in the whole brain is a new application of intraoperative MRI additionally to resection control (residual tumor detection) and updating of neuronavigation (brain shift detection). It may help to detect neurovascular adverse events early during surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance...... imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N......-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0...

  14. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

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    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  15. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome.

  16. Purine Metabolism in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Oreshnikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of purine metabolism in clinically significant acute cerebral ischemia. Subjects and materials. Three hundred and fifty patients with the acutest cerebral ischemic stroke were examined. The parameters of gas and electrolyte composition, acid-base balance, the levels of malonic dialdehyde, adenine, guanine, hypox-anthine, xanthine, and uric acid, and the activity of xanthine oxidase were determined in arterial and venous bloods and spinal fluid. Results. In ischemic stroke, hyperuricemia reflects the severity of cerebral metabolic disturbances, hemodynamic instability, hypercoagulation susceptiility, and the extent of neurological deficit. In ischemic stroke, hyperuri-corachia is accompanied by the higher spinal fluid levels of adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine and it is an indirect indicator of respiratory disorders of central genesis, systemic acidosis, hypercoagulation susceptibility, free radical oxidation activation, the intensity of a stressor response to cerebral ischemia, cerebral metabolic disturbances, the depth of reduced consciousness, and the severity of neurological deficit. Conclusion. The high venous blood activity of xanthine oxidase in ischemic stroke is associated with the better neurological parameters in all follow-up periods, the better early functional outcome, and lower mortality rates. Key words: hyperuricemia, stroke, xanthine oxidase, uric acid, cerebral ischemia.

  17. Altered whole-brain connectivity in albinism.

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    Welton, Thomas; Ather, Sarim; Proudlock, Frank A; Gottlob, Irene; Dineen, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    Albinism is a group of congenital disorders of the melanin synthesis pathway. Multiple ocular, white matter and cortical abnormalities occur in albinism, including a greater decussation of nerve fibres at the optic chiasm, foveal hypoplasia and nystagmus. Despite this, visual perception is largely preserved. It was proposed that this may be attributable to reorganisation among cerebral networks, including an increased interhemispheric connectivity of the primary visual areas. A graph-theoretic model was applied to explore brain connectivity networks derived from resting-state functional and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging data in 23 people with albinism and 20 controls. They tested for group differences in connectivity between primary visual areas and in summary network organisation descriptors. Main findings were supplemented with analyses of control regions, brain volumes and white matter microstructure. Significant functional interhemispheric hyperconnectivity of the primary visual areas in the albinism group were found (P = 0.012). Tests of interhemispheric connectivity based on the diffusion-tensor data showed no significant group difference (P = 0.713). Second, it was found that a range of functional whole-brain network metrics were abnormal in people with albinism, including the clustering coefficient (P = 0.005), although this may have been driven partly by overall differences in connectivity, rather than reorganisation. Based on the results, it was suggested that changes occur in albinism at the whole-brain level, and not just within the visual processing pathways. It was proposed that their findings may reflect compensatory adaptations to increased chiasmic decussation, foveal hypoplasia and nystagmus. Hum Brain Mapp 38:740-752, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

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    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes in...

  19. Sleep Slow-Wave Activity Regulates Cerebral Glycolytic Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wisor, Jonathan P; Rempe, Michael J; Schmidt, Michelle A.; Moore, Michele E.; Clegern, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) onset is characterized by a reduction in cerebral metabolism and an increase in slow waves, 1–4-Hz oscillations between relatively depolarized and hyperpolarized states in the cerebral cortex. The metabolic consequences of slow-wave activity (SWA) at the cellular level remain uncertain. We sought to determine whether SWA modulates the rate of glycolysis within the cerebral cortex. The real-time measurement of lactate concentration in the mouse cerebral cor...

  20. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Lund; Vorstrup, S

    1991-01-01

    A review of the current literature regarding sleep-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) is presented. Early investigations have led to the notion that dreamless sleep was characterized by global values of CBF and CMR practically at the level of wakefulness......, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (dream sleep) was a state characterized by a dramatically increased level of CBF and possibly also of CMR. However, recent investigations firmly contradict this notion. Investigations on CBF and CMR performed during non-REM sleep, taking the effect of different...... levels of sleep into consideration, show that light sleep (stage II) is characterized by global levels of CBF and CMR only slightly reduced by 3-10% below the level associated with wakefulness, whereas CBF and CMR during deep sleep (stage III-IV) is dramatically reduced by 25-44%. Furthermore, recent...

  1. Effects of Hyperglycemia and Effects of Ketosis on Cerebral Perfusion, Cerebral Water Distribution, and Cerebral Metabolism

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    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O’Donnell, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury. PMID:22498698

  2. Vascular damage after fractionated whole-brain irradiation in rats.

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    Brown, William R; Thore, Clara R; Moody, Dixon M; Robbins, Michael E; Wheeler, Kenneth T

    2005-11-01

    Whole-brain irradiation of animals and humans has been reported to lead to late delayed structural (vascular damage, demyelination, white matter necrosis) and functional (cognitive impairment) alterations. However, most of the experimental data on late delayed radiation-induced brain injury have been generated with large single doses or short fractionation schemes that may provide a less accurate indication of the events that occur after clinical whole-brain radiotherapy. The pilot study reported here investigates cerebral vascular pathology in male Fischer 344 rats after whole-brain irradiation with a fractionated total dose of 137Cs gamma rays that is expected to be biologically similar to that given to brain tumor patients. The brains of young adult rats (4 months old) were irradiated with a total dose of 40 Gy, given as eight 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4 weeks. Brain capillary and arteriole pathology was studied using an alkaline phosphatase enzyme histochemistry method; vessel density and length were quantified using a stereology method with computerized image processing and analysis. Vessel density and length were unchanged 24 h after the last dose, but at 10 weeks postirradiation, both were substantially decreased. After 20 weeks, the rate of decline in the vessel density and length in irradiated rats was similar to that in unirradiated age-matched controls. No gross gliosis or demyelination was observed 12 months postirradiation using conventional histopathology techniques. We suggest that the early (10-week) and persistent vascular damage that occurs after a prolonged whole-brain irradiation fractionation scheme may play an important role in the development of late delayed radiation-induced brain injury.

  3. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    . They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  4. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  5. Effect of Hyperosmolar Solutions on Cerebral Oxygenation and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Petrikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the time course of changes in the parameters of cerebral oxygenation and metabolism in the correction of intracranial hypertension with hyperosmolar solutions. Material and methods. 39 episodes of elevated intracranial pressure correction with 15% mannitol solution and HyperHAES solution were analyzed in 9 patients with intracranial hemorrhages. Changes in intracranial pressure and systemic hemodynamic, cerebral oxygenation, and metabolic parameters were studied. Results: A great difference was found in the effects of the test solutions on intracranial, cerebral perfusion pressure, and cerebral metabolism. Administration of 15% mannitol solution caused no cerebral metabolic changes. Infusion of HyperHAES solution induced a significant elevation in the concentrations of glucose and pyruvate in the interstitial fluid of both the arbitrarily intact and afflicted cerebral matter. Conclusion: The administration of 15% mannitol solution and HyperHAES solution is an effective method for correcting intracranial hypertension; however, the use of HyperHAES solution results in a more prolonged decrease in intracranial pressure, an increase in cerebral perfusion pressure, and an improvement of cerebral metabolism. Brain lesion due to intracranial hemorrhage may be accompanied by the development of mitochondrial dysfunction. Key words: intracranial hypertension, intracranial pressure, hyperosmolar solutions, tissue microdialysis.

  6. Sleep slow-wave activity regulates cerebral glycolytic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisor, Jonathan P; Rempe, Michael J; Schmidt, Michelle A; Moore, Michele E; Clegern, William C

    2013-08-01

    Non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) onset is characterized by a reduction in cerebral metabolism and an increase in slow waves, 1-4-Hz oscillations between relatively depolarized and hyperpolarized states in the cerebral cortex. The metabolic consequences of slow-wave activity (SWA) at the cellular level remain uncertain. We sought to determine whether SWA modulates the rate of glycolysis within the cerebral cortex. The real-time measurement of lactate concentration in the mouse cerebral cortex demonstrates that it increases during enforced wakefulness. In spontaneous sleep/wake cycles, lactate concentration builds during wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep and declines during NREMS. The rate at which lactate concentration declines during NREMS is proportional to the magnitude of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity at frequencies of cerebral SWA promotes a decline in the rate of glycolysis in the cerebral cortex. These results demonstrate a cellular energetic function for sleep SWA, which may contribute to its restorative effects on brain function.

  7. Cerebral vascular control and metabolism in heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    temperature, and potentiates a condition whereby cerebral oxygenation may be compromised. With levels of experimentally viable passive hyperthermia (up to 39.5-40.0°C core temperature), the associated reduction in CBF (∼30%) and increase in cerebral metabolic demand (∼10%) is likely compensated by increases...

  8. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Weon Wook; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Ku, Ja Gyung; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Lee, Jung Sub

    2008-01-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with ...

  9. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard...... polysomnography. Unlike our previous study in man showing a highly significant 25% decrease in CMRO2 during deep sleep (stage 3-4) we found a modest but statistically significant decrease of 5% in CMRO2 during stage 2 sleep. Deep and light sleep are both characterized by an almost complete lack of mental activity....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  10. The Coupling of Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Glucose and Cerebral Blood Flow In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Steen; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    and metabolism was originally performed using the Kety-Schmidt method and this method still represent the gold standard by which subsequent methods have been evaluated. However, in its classical setting, the method overestimates cerebral blood flow. Studies of metabolic changes during activation must take......The energy supplied to the brain by metabolic substrate is largely utilized for maintaining synaptic transmission. In this regulation cerebral blood flow and glucose consumption is tightly coupled as well in the resting condition as during activation. Quantification of cerebral blood flow...... this into account, and subsequent methods for measurement of regional glucose metabolism must be corrected accordingly in order to allow reliable quantitative comparisons of metabolite changes in activation studies. For studies of regional metabolic changes during activation quantification poses further...

  11. Plasma pH does not influence the cerebral metabolic ratio during maximal whole body exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volianitis, Stefanos; Rasmussen, Peter; Seifert, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Exercise lowers the cerebral metabolic ratio of O2 to carbohydrate (glucose + 1/2 lactate) and metabolic acidosis appears to promote cerebral lactate uptake. However, the influence of pH on cerebral lactate uptake and, in turn, on the cerebral metabolic ratio during exercise is not known. Sodium ...

  12. Alterations in Cerebral Cortical Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism Precedes Amyloid Plaques in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Aldana, Blanca I

    2017-01-01

    in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque formation. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of 3-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9 and wild-type control mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]glutamine, and tissue extracts were analyzed...... slices of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose. No changes in glial [1,2-(13)C]acetate metabolism were observed. Cerebral cortical slices from APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice exhibited a reduced capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamine. Furthermore, the ATP synthesis...... rate tended to be decreased in isolated whole-brain mitochondria of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Thus, several cerebral metabolic changes are evident in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque deposition, including altered glucose metabolism, hampered glutamine processing and mitochondrial...

  13. Bayesian Modelling of Functional Whole Brain Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Rasmus

    the prevalent strategy of standardizing of fMRI time series and model data using directional statistics or we model the variability in the signal across the brain and across multiple subjects. In either case, we use Bayesian nonparametric modeling to automatically learn from the fMRI data the number......This thesis deals with parcellation of whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using Bayesian inference with mixture models tailored to the fMRI data. In the three included papers and manuscripts, we analyze two different approaches to modeling fMRI signal; either we accept...... of funcional units, i.e. parcels. We benchmark the proposed mixture models against state of the art methods of brain parcellation, both probabilistic and non-probabilistic. The time series of each voxel are most often standardized using z-scoring which projects the time series data onto a hypersphere...

  14. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate that ...

  15. Whole-brain dynamic CT angiography and perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrison, W.W. [CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Department of Medical Education, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV (United States); Snyder, K.V.; Hopkins, L.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roach, C.J. [School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringdahl, E.N. [Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nazir, R. [Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan); Hanson, E.H., E-mail: eric.hanson@amigenics.co [College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The availability of whole brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion has expanded the opportunities for analysing the haemodynamic parameters associated with varied neurological conditions. Examples demonstrating the clinical utility of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging in selected acute and chronic ischaemic arterial neurovascular conditions are presented. Whole-brain CT perfusion enables the detection and focused haemodynamic analyses of acute and chronic arterial conditions in the central nervous system without the limitation of partial anatomical coverage of the brain.

  16. Pair bond formation leads to a sustained increase in global cerebral glucose metabolism in monogamous male titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maninger, Nicole; Hinde, Katie; Mendoza, Sally P; Mason, William A; Larke, Rebecca H; Ragen, Benjamin J; Jarcho, Michael R; Cherry, Simon R; Rowland, Douglas J; Ferrer, Emilio; Bales, Karen L

    2017-04-21

    Social bonds, especially attachment relationships, are crucial to our health and happiness. However, what we know about the neural substrates of these bonds is almost exclusively limited to rodent models and correlational experiments in humans. Here, we used socially monogamous non-human primates, titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) to experimentally examine changes in regional and global cerebral glucose metabolism (GCGM) during the formation and maintenance of pair bonds. Baseline positron emission tomography (PET) scans were taken of thirteen unpaired male titi monkeys. Seven males were then experimentally paired with females, scanned and compared, after one week, to six age-matched control males. Five of the six control males were then also paired and scanned after one week. Scans were repeated on all males after four months of pairing. PET scans were coregistered with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and region of interest (ROI) analysis was carried out. A primary finding was that paired males showed a significant increase in [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in whole brain following one week of pairing, which is maintained out to four months. Dopaminergic, "motivational" areas and those involved in social behavior showed the greatest change in glucose uptake. In contrast, control areas changed only marginally more than GCGM. These findings confirm the large effects of social bonds on GCGM. They also suggest that more studies should examine how social manipulations affect whole-brain FDG uptake, as opposed to assuming that it does not change across condition. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the Rett syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hideto; Fueki, Noboru; Suzuki, Hisaharu; Sakuragawa, Norio; Iio, Masaaki (National Central Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on six patients with the Rett syndrome and the results were compared with the concurrent clinical status of the patients. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) was low in five patients, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was low in four patients; both had a tendency to decline with advancing age. Although the cause is unknown, it is suggested that impaired oxidative metabolism exists in the Rett syndrome. An analysis of the distribution among brain regions showed that the ratios of values for the frontal cortex to those for the temporal cortex for both the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CMRO{sub 2} were lower than those for the controls, which may indicate the loss of of hyperfrontality in the Rett syndrome. Distribution of brain metabolism may be immature in the Rett syndrome. (author).

  18. Brain Gym. Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Paul E.; Dennison, Gail E.

    This booklet contains simple movements and activities that are used with students in Educational Kinesiology to enhance their experience of whole brain learning. Whole brain learning through movement repatterning and Brain Gym activities enable students to access those parts of the brain previously unavailable to them. These movements of body and…

  19. Cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic changes in fulminant hepatic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mendes Paschoal Junior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intracranial hypertension and brain swelling are a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from fulminant hepatic failure (FHF. The pathogenesis of these complications has been investigated in man, in experimental models and in isolated cell systems. Currently, the mechanism underlying cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension in the presence of FHF is multi-factorial in etiology and only partially understood. The aim of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of cerebral hemodynamic and metabolism changes in FHF in order to improve understanding of intracranial dynamics complication in FHF.

  20. Developmental venous anomalies: appearance on whole-brain CT digital subtraction angiography and CT perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Eric H. [Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine, Henderson, NV (United States); University of Nevada Las Vegas, Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 453037, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Amigenics, Inc, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Roach, Cayce J. [Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); University of Nevada Las Vegas, School of Life Sciences, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringdahl, Erik N. [University of Nevada Las Vegas, Department of Psychology, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Wynn, Brad L. [Family Medicine Spokane, Spokane, WA (United States); DeChancie, Sean M.; Mann, Nathan D. [Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine, Henderson, NV (United States); Diamond, Alan S. [CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Orrison, William W. [Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine, Henderson, NV (United States); University of Nevada Las Vegas, Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 453037, Las Vegas, NV (United States); CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); University of Nevada School of Medicine, Department of Medical Education, Reno, NV (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) consist of dilated intramedullary veins that converge into a large collecting vein. The appearance of these anomalies was evaluated on whole-brain computed tomography (CT) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and CT perfusion (CTP) studies. CT data sets of ten anonymized patients were retrospectively analyzed. Five patients had evidence of DVA and five age- and sex-matched controls were without known neurovascular abnormalities. CT angiograms, CT arterial-venous views, 4-D CT DSA and CTP maps were acquired on a dynamic volume imaging protocol on a 320-detector row CT scanner. Whole-brain CTP parameters were evaluated for cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT), and delay. DSA was utilized to visualize DVA anatomy. Radiation dose was recorded from the scanner console. Increased CTP values were present in the DVA relative to the unaffected contralateral hemisphere of 48%, 32%, and 26%; and for the control group with matched hemispheric comparisons of 2%, -10%, and 9% for CBF, CBV, and MTT, respectively. Average effective radiation dose was 4.4 mSv. Whole-brain DSA and CTP imaging can demonstrate a characteristic appearance of altered DVA hemodynamic parameters and capture the anomalies in superior cortices of the cerebrum and the cerebellum. Future research may identify the rare subsets of patients at increased risk of adverse outcomes secondary to the altered hemodynamics to facilitate tailored imaging surveillance and application of appropriate preventive therapeutic measures. (orig.)

  1. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 ) mapping with hyperventilation challenge using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Zhou, Dong; Nguyen, Thanh D; Spincemaille, Pascal; Gupta, Ajay; Wang, Yi

    2017-05-01

    Our objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of using hyperventilation as an efficient vasoconstrictive challenge and prior knowledge as denoising constraints for cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2 ) mapping based upon quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Three-dimensional (3D) multi-echo gradient echo and arterial spin labeling imaging were performed to calculate QSM and perfusion maps before and after a hyperventilation challenge in 11 healthy subjects. For comparison, this was repeated using a caffeine challenge. Whole-brain CMRO2 and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) maps were computed using constrained optimization. Hyperventilation scans were repeated to measure reproducibility. Regional agreement of CMRO2 and OEF maps was analyzed within the cortical gray matter (CGM) using t-test and Bland-Altman plots. Hyperventilation challenge eliminates the 30-min waiting time needed for caffeine to exert its vasoconstrictive effects. Mean CMRO2 (in µmol/100g/min) obtained in CGM using the caffeine and repeated hyperventilation scans were 149 ± 16, 153 ± 19, and 150 ± 20, respectively. This corresponded to an OEF of 33.6 ± 3.4%, 32.3 ± 3.2%, and 34.1 ± 3.8% at baseline state and 39.8 ± 4.8%, 43.6 ± 6.2%, and 42.8 ± 6.8% at challenged state, respectively. Hyperventilation scans produced a good agreement of CMRO2 and OEF values. Hyperventilation is a feasible, reproducible, and efficient vasoconstrictive challenge for QSM-based quantitative CMRO2 mapping. Magn Reson Med 77:1762-1773, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  3. Positron emission tomography makes cerebral metabolism visible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meermann, H.

    1982-05-12

    In the present publication the principle and advantage of positron emission topography as a nuclear medical method for the diagnosis of brain diseases are described. By this method the metabolic processes in the brain are measured using labelled compounds which are actively metabolized in the brain. These are for instance glucose, aminoacids and psychopharmaceutics, whose main site of action is in the brain. Thus not only tumorous processes but also regional blood circulation, oxygen absorption, regional protein synthesis, distribution and utilization of carrier substances and the absorption of drugs can be established.

  4. History of International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Kanno, Iwao; Reivich, Martin; Sokoloff, Louis

    2012-07-01

    Interest in the brain's circulation dates back more than a century and has been steadily growing. Quantitative methods for measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and energy metabolism became available in the middle of the 20th century and gave a new boost to the research. Scientific meetings dealing with CBF and metabolism were arranged, and the fast growing research led to a demand for a specialized journal. In this scientific environment, the International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism (ISCBFM) and its official Journal of Cerebral Metabolism were established in 1981 and has since then been a major success. The development of new brain imaging methods has had a major impact. Regulation of CBF and ischemia has been the main topics at the meetings. A new field of brain mapping research emerged and has now its own society and meetings. Brain emission tomography research has grown within the society and is now an integrated part. The ISCBFM is a sound society, and support of young scientists is among its goals. Several awards have been established. Other activities including summer schools, courses, satellite meetings, and Gordon conferences have contributed to the success of the society and strengthened the research.

  5. Cerebral oxygenation and energy metabolism in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lykke

    Introduction: In a recent retrospective study of patients with severe bacterial meningitis we demonstrated that cerebral oxidative metabolism was affected in approximately 50% of the cases. An increase of lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio above the upper normal limit, defined according to according...... bacterial meningitis; secondly to examine whether it is correct to separate the diagnosis of cerebral ischemia from mitochondrial dysfunction based exclusively on the biochemical pattern obtained during intracerebral microdialysis. Method: A prospective clinical study including patients with severe...... community acquired bacterial meningitis admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, during the period January 2014 to June 2016. We relate data from measurements of brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) to simultaneously recorded data reflecting cerebral cytoplasmic redox...

  6. Ventilatory response in metabolic acidosis and cerebral blood volume in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, M.T.P. van de; Colier, W.N.J.M.; Sluijs, M.C. van der; Oeseburg, B.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between alterations in cerebral blood volume (CBV) and central chemosensitivity regulation was studied under neutral metabolic conditions and during metabolic acidosis. Fifteen healthy subjects (5610 years) were investigated. To induce metabolic acidosis, ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl)

  7. [Impact of xenon anesthesia on cerebral oxygenation and metabolism in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the background for xenon anesthesia implementation in neurosurgery has been created. A variety of researches have been conducted though very few of them concerned xenon effect upon cerebral metabolism. We assessed cerebral oxygenation and cerebral metabolism during propofol anesthesia followed by xenon closed circuit anesthesia in neurosurgical patients. Xenon inhalation was marked by higher jugular vein saturation, oxygen content and glucose level and lower arterio-venous difference. We conclude that compared to propofol xenon improves cerebral oxygenation and decreases cerebral metabolism in neurosurgical patients.

  8. Cerebral glucose metabolism in the course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, M.; Herholz, K.; Pawlik, G.; Szelies, B.; Juergens, R.H.; Heiss, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was studied in a 15-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis before and after therapy with human interferon beta, using positron emission tomography of fluorine 18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose. At first examination, metabolism was symmetrically decreased in the thalamus, cerebellum, and all cortical areas except prerolandic motor cortex, but increased in lentiform nucleus. A computed tomographic scan was normal. Six months later, bilateral focal necrosis centered in the previously hypermetabolic putamen was demonstrated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The caudate nucleus and the superoposterior part of the putamen were spared, still showing increased metabolism. Corresponding with some clinical improvement, cortical glucose consumption rates had returned to a normal level.

  9. Unchanged cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism after acclimatization to high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Paulson, Olaf B; Hornbein, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    . Global cerebral blood flow at rest and during exercise on a bicycle ergometer was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique. Cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were calculated by the Fick principle. Cerebral function was assessed by a computer-based measurement of reaction time...... and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose also remained unchanged, whereas cerebral metabolic rates of lactate increased slightly but nonsignificantly at high altitude during exercise compared with high altitude at rest. Reaction time was unchanged. The data indicate that cerebral blood flow......The authors investigated the effect of acclimatization to high altitude on cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism at rest and during exercise. Nine healthy, native sea-level residents were studied 3 weeks after arrival at Chacaltaya, Bolivia (5,260 m) and after reacclimatization to sea level...

  10. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, H. Y.; Seo, G. T.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, I. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Jeon, S. M. [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The mean mini-mental status exam score in the congenital scoliosis group was significantly lower than that in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis group. Group analysis found that various brain areas of patients with congenital scoliosis showed glucose hypometabolisms in the left prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10), right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9), left anterior cingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 24) and pulvinar of the left thalamus. From this study, we could find the metabolic abnormalities of brain in patients with congenital scoliosis and suggest the possible role of voxel-based analysis of brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

  11. Regional specific changes of cerebral metabolism in systemic lupus erythematosus identified by positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, BM; Pruim, J; Sinnige, LGF; Beintema, KD; Spronk, PE; Bootsma, H; Kallenberg, CGM; van Zomeren, AH; Haaxma-Reiche, H

    1999-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis whether the pathogenesis of cerebral systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may include an immune-mediated deficit in specific vulnerable brain regions, the regional cerebral metabolism in 9 patients with diffuse as well as focal cerebral symptoms was compared with that

  12. The cerebral metabolic ratio is not affected by oxygen availability during maximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volianitis, S.; Fabricius-Bjerre, A.; Overgaard, A.

    2008-01-01

    Intense exercise decreases the cerebral metabolic ratio of O(2) to carbohydrates (glucose + (1/2) lactate) and the cerebral lactate uptake depends on its arterial concentration, but whether these variables are influenced by O(2) availability is not known. In six males, maximal ergometer rowing.......05) in the immediate recovery. During exercise, the cerebral metabolic ratio decreased from 5.67 +/- 0.52 at rest to 1.70 +/- 0.23 (P exercise with room air, and it reached 87.6 +/- 1.0% and 98.9 +/- 0.......2% during exercise with an inspired O(2) fraction of 0.17 and 0.30, respectively. Whilst the increase in a-v lactate difference was attenuated by manipulation of cerebral O(2) availability, the cerebral metabolic ratio was not affected significantly. During maximal rowing, the cerebral metabolic ratio...

  13. Large Scale Computing for the Modelling of Whole Brain Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Kristoffer Jon

    of nodes with a shared connectivity pattern. Modelling the brain in great detail on a whole-brain scale is essential to fully understand the underlying organization of the brain and reveal the relations between structure and function, that allows sophisticated cognitive behaviour to emerge from ensembles...... of neurons. Relying on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations as the workhorse in Bayesian inference however poses significant computational challenges, especially when modelling networks at the scale and complexity supported by high-resolution whole-brain MRI. In this thesis, we present how to overcome...... these computational limitations and apply Bayesian stochastic block models for un-supervised data-driven clustering of whole-brain connectivity in full image resolution. We implement high-performance software that allows us to efficiently apply stochastic blockmodelling with MCMC sampling on large complex networks...

  14. Multimodality 3D Superposition and Automated Whole Brain Tractography: Comprehensive Printing of the Functional Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Brimley, Cameron J; Sublett, Jesna Mathew; Stefanowicz, Edward; Flora, Sarah; Mongelluzzo, Gino; Schirmer, Clemens M

    2017-09-29

    Whole brain tractography using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences can be used to map cerebral connectivity; however, this can be time-consuming due to the manual component of image manipulation required, calling for the need for a standardized, automated, and accurate fiber tracking protocol with automatic whole brain tractography (AWBT). Interpreting conventional two-dimensional (2D) images, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as an intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) environment is a difficult task with recognized inter-operator variability. Three-dimensional printing in neurosurgery has gained significant traction in the past decade, and as software, equipment, and practices become more refined, trainee education, surgical skills, research endeavors, innovation, patient education, and outcomes via valued care is projected to improve. We describe a novel multimodality 3D superposition (MMTS) technique, which fuses multiple imaging sequences alongside cerebral tractography into one patient-specific 3D printed model. Inferences on cost and improved outcomes fueled by encouraging patient engagement are explored.

  15. Cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in patients with moyamoya disease not demonstrating either cerebral infarct or hemorrhage on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Sasaki, Masayuki; Akashi, Yuko; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Masuda, Kouji; Matsushima, Toshio; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-12-01

    We evaluated the cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in moyamoya patients who did not demonstrate either cerebral infarct or hemorrhage on MRI. The subjects consisted of 5 patients with moyamoya disease (4 females and one male, aged from 15 to 40 ears). The CBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} of the moyamoya patients did not differ from those of the normal control subjects. The CBV did increase significantly in the cerebral cortices and striatum, but not in the cerebellum. The TT was also significantly prolonged in the frontal and parietal regions. The cerebrovascular CO{sub 2} response was markedly impaired in the frontal, temporal and parietal cortices. However, it was relatively preserved in the occipital cortex, thalamus and cerebellum. Thus, the cerebral hemodynamic reserve capacity decreased even in the moyamoya patients not demonstrating either cerebral infarct or hemorrhage on MRI, and it should be considered in the management of these patients. (author).

  16. Whole brain C-arm computed tomography parenchymal blood volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V

    2016-04-01

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) imaging in the neuro-interventional suite is a new technique for which detailed whole brain measurements have not been previously reported. This study aims to create a catalogue of PBV measurements for various anatomical regions encompassing the whole brain, using a three-dimensional volume-of-interest (3D-VOI) analysis. We acquired and analysed 30 C-arm FDCT datasets from 26 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), as part of a prospective study comparing C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV with magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging (MR-PWI). We calculated the PBV values for various brain regions with an automated analysis, using 58 pre-defined atlas-based 3D-VOIs encompassing the whole brain. VOIs partially or completely overlapping regions of magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging (MR-DWI) abnormality or magnetic resonance cerebral blood flow (MR-CBF) asymmetry were excluded from the analysis. Of the 30 C-arm CT PBV datasets, 14 (54%; 12 patients) had areas of restricted diffusion, the majority of which were focal. The PBV values for the cerebral cortex and cerebral white matter were 4.01 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) and 3.01 ± 0.39 ml per 100 ml. Lobar PBV values were: frontal lobe 4.2 ± 0.8, temporal lobe 4.2 ± 0.9, parietal lobe 3.9 ± 0.7 and occipital lobe 4.3 ± 0.8 ml/100 ml. The basal ganglia and brainstem PBV values were 3.4 ± 0.7 and 4.6 ± 0.6 ml/100 ml, respectively. Compared with the typical reference cerebral blood volume (CBV) values reported in the literature for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), the PBV values were relatively high for the white matter and relatively low for the cortical grey matter. The reported catalogue of PBV values for various brain regions would be useful to inform future studies and could be used in clinical practice, when interpreting PBV maps. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Regulation of cerebral metabolism during cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Delphine; Backes, Heiko; Gramer, Markus; Takagaki, Masatoshi; Gabel, Paula; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Graf, Rudolf

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed the metabolic response to cortical spreading depression that drastically increases local energy demand to restore ion homeostasis. During single and multiple cortical spreading depressions in the rat cortex, we simultaneously monitored extracellular levels of glucose and lactate using rapid sampling microdialysis and glucose influx using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography while tracking cortical spreading depression using laser speckle imaging. Combining the acquired data with steady-state requirements we developed a mass-conserving compartment model including neurons and glia that was consistent with the observed data. In summary, our findings are: (1) Early breakdown of glial glycogen provides a major source of energy during increased energy demand and leaves 80% of blood-borne glucose to neurons. (2) Lactate is used solely by neurons and only if extracellular lactate levels are >80% above normal. (3) Although the ratio of oxygen and glucose consumption transiently reaches levels 90%) of the overall energy supply is from oxidative metabolism. (4) During cortical spreading depression, brain release of lactate exceeds its consumption suggesting that lactate is only a circumstantial energy substrate. Our findings provide a general scenario for the metabolic response to increased cerebral energy demand. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in children with congenital oculomotor apraxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sung June; Kim, Yu Kyoong; Oh, Yeong Mi; Song, Yoo Sung; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Congenital ocular motor apraxia (COMA) is a rare impairment of saccadic eye movement in horizontal direction. The typical symptom is poor vision or compensatory head thrusting movement. In this study, we investigate the brain metabolic changes in children with COMA using FDG PET. Brain FDG PET studies were performed in 6 children (mean age: 5.82.1 years, M: F=5: 1) with typical COMA by clinical diagnosis. For comparison purpose, age-matched healthy subjects (mean age: 6.42.2 years, M: F = 4: 1) were selected among sibling. Measures of significant difference in cerebral metabolism between the patients and control group were determined using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). Four of six had the structural abnormalities limited in the cerebellar vermis, and the other two had no structural lesion. FDG PET of patients revealed the significant regional hypometabolism in the left inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) and the bilateral occipital cortices as well as cerebellar vermis (P < 0.005, k=100) in comparison with healthy control group. Meanwhile, hypermetabolism was observed in the right precentral gyrus (BA 6), bilateral frontal gyri (BA 8/BA 10). FDG PET could demonstrate the regional metabolic changes in patients with congenital motor apraxia, which may indicate the functional disturbance in the brain regions related with saccadic eye movement and the compensatory hyperfunction in their head motion.

  19. Development of a Model for Whole Brain Learning of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Saramarie; Muller, Anton

    2011-01-01

    In this report, a model was developed for whole brain learning based on Curry's onion model. Curry described the effect of personality traits as the inner layer of learning, information-processing styles as the middle layer of learning, and environmental and instructional preferences as the outer layer of learning. The model that was developed…

  20. Cerebral O2 metabolism and cerebral blood flow in humans during deep and rapid-eye-movement sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    It could be expected that the various stages of sleep were reflected in variation of the overall level of cerebral activity and thereby in the magnitude of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). The elusive nature of sleep imposes major methodological restrictions...... on examination of this question. We have now measured CBF and CMRO2 in young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep sleep (stage 3/4), and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep as verified by standard polysomnography...

  1. History of International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Kanno, Iwao; Reivich, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the brain's circulation dates back more than a century and has been steadily growing. Quantitative methods for measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and energy metabolism became available in the middle of the 20th century and gave a new boost to the research. Scientific meetings...... since then been a major success. The development of new brain imaging methods has had a major impact. Regulation of CBF and ischemia has been the main topics at the meetings. A new field of brain mapping research emerged and has now its own society and meetings. Brain emission tomography research has...... grown within the society and is now an integrated part. The ISCBFM is a sound society, and support of young scientists is among its goals. Several awards have been established. Other activities including summer schools, courses, satellite meetings, and Gordon conferences have contributed to the success...

  2. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in adults with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The intense intrathecal inflammation observed in acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is associated with pronounced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. In seven substudies, CBF and metabolism were measured in adults with ABM as well as healthy volunteers during various interventions....... The studies provide new information about pathophysiological changes, in particular regarding CBF, cerebral oxidative metabolism, and certain aspects of the inflammatory response during ABM. These findings may be important for supportive treatment of patients with this life-threatening disease....

  3. Changes in cerebral oxidative metabolism in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, P N; Larsen, F S

    2013-01-01

    acid cycle, induces substrate depletion through marked glutamate utilization for glutamine synthesis and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. In patients with acute liver failure cerebral microdialysis studies show a linear correlation between the lactate to pyruvate ratio and the glutamine...... concentration, as well as to some of the adenosine triphosphate degradation products. However, clinical observations of cerebral exchange rates of oxygen, glucose, lactate and amino acids challenge the interpretation of these findings. In this review the conflicting data of cerebral metabolism during acute...

  4. Whole-brain functional connectivity predicted by indirect structural connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Rasmus; Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø; Albers, Kristoffer Jon

    2017-01-01

    Modern functional and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and dMRI) provide data from which macro-scale networks of functional and structural whole brain connectivity can be estimated. Although networks derived from these two modalities describe different properties of the human brain......, they emerge from the same underlying brain organization, and functional communication is presumably mediated by structural connections. In this paper, we assess the structure-function relationship by evaluating how well functional connectivity can be predicted from structural graphs. Using high......-resolution whole brain networks generated with varying density, we contrast the performance of several non-parametric link predictors that measure structural communication flow. While functional connectivity is not well predicted directly by structural connections, we show that superior predictions can be achieved...

  5. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during isoflurane-induced hypotension in patients subjected to surgery for cerebral aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J B; Cold, G E; Hansen, E S

    1987-01-01

    ). Controlled hypotension to an average MAP of 50-55 mm Hg was induced by increasing the dose of isoflurane, and maintained at an inspired concentration of 2.2 +/- 0.2%. This resulted in a significant decrease in CMRO2 (to 1.73 +/- 0.16 ml/100 g min-1), while CBF was unchanged. After the clipping......Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification...... of the aneurysm the isoflurane concentration was reduced to 0.75%. There was a significant increase in CBF, although CMRO2 was unchanged, compared with pre-hypotensive values. These changes might offer protection to brain tissue during periods of induced hypotension....

  6. Cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in young and elderly individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, James P.; Hartwich, Doreen; Seifert, Thomas; Olesen, Niels D.; McNulty, Clare L.; Nielsen, Henning B.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Secher, Niels H.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism in 11 young (22 ± 1 years) and nine older (66 ± 2 years) individuals at rest and during cycling exercise at low (25% W(max)), moderate (50% Wmax), high (75% W(max)) and exhaustive (100% W(max)) workloads. Mean middle cerebral artery blood

  7. Prefrontal vulnerabilities and whole brain connectivity in aging and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Melissa; Charlton, Rebecca A; Ajilore, Olusola; Zhang, Aifeng; Yang, Shaolin; Barrick, Thomas R; Rhodes, Emma; Kumar, Anand

    2013-07-01

    Studies exploring the underpinnings of age-related neurodegeneration suggest fronto-limbic alterations that are increasingly vulnerable in the presence of disease including late life depression. Less work has assessed the impact of this specific vulnerability on widespread brain circuitry. Seventy-nine older adults (healthy controls=45; late life depression=34) completed translational tasks shown in non-human primates to rely on fronto-limbic networks involving dorsolateral (Self-Ordered Pointing Task) or orbitofrontal (Object Alternation Task) cortices. A sub-sample of participants also completed diffusion tensor imaging for white matter tract quantification (uncinate and cingulum bundle; n=58) and whole brain tract-based spatial statistics (n=62). Despite task associations to specific white matter tracts across both groups, only healthy controls demonstrated significant correlations between widespread tract integrity and cognition. Thus, increasing Object Alternation Task errors were associated with decreasing fractional anisotropy in the uncinate in late life depression; however, only in healthy controls was the uncinate incorporated into a larger network of white matter vulnerability associating fractional anisotropy with Object Alternation Task errors using whole brain tract-based spatial statistics. It appears that the whole brain impact of specific fronto-limbic vulnerabilities in aging may be eclipsed in the presence of disease-specific neuropathology like that seen in late life depression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Late effects of whole brain irradiation within the therapeutic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caveness, W.F.; Carsten, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    Whole brain exposure with supervoltage x irradiation was carried out in three sets of Macaca mulatta. Two sets of 12 monkeys each, at puberty, received single and fractionated exposures, respectively. One set of 21 monkeys in adulthood received a fractionated exposure. Exposure to 1000 rads in a single dose, at puberty, caused no late effects. Exposure to 1500 rads caused small areas of necrosis in the forebrain white matter at 26 weeks, but a much more extensive involvement at and beyond 52 weeks that included confluent areas of necrosis in gray and white matter. Brain loss resulted in ventricular dilatation. Gliomas appeared in two out of three monkeys at or beyond 52 weeks. Exposure to 2000 rads caused such a wide scatter of focal areas of necrosis, including those in the brain stem, that survival beyond 20 to 26 weeks was not possible. All showed enlarged ventricular systems. Whole brain exposure, 200 rads a day, five days a week, for a course of 4000 rads, at puberty, resulted in no delayed effects. Whole brain exposure to 6000 rads in a six weeks course, in the adult, produced less effects than the same dose at puberty. The onset of the scattered necrotic lesions was later than expected, appearing in one out of three animals at 33 weeks, two out of three animals at 52 weeks, and two out of three at 104 weeks. The lesions at 104 weeks were predominantly mineralized, but were accompanied by a greater extent of telangiectasia than seen in the pubescent monkeys.

  9. SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN CEREBRAL ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF NUTRIENT TRANSPORTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Ian A.; Carruthers, Anthony; Vannucci, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose is the obligate energetic fuel for the mammalian brain and most studies of cerebral energy metabolism assume that the vast majority of cerebral glucose utilization fuels neuronal activity via oxidative metabolism, both in the basal and activated state. Glucose transporter proteins (GLUTs) deliver glucose from the circulation to the brain: GLUT1 in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and glia; GLUT3 in neurons. Lactate, the glycolytic product of glucose...

  10. Effect of the acquisition enhancing drug piracetam on rat cerebral energy metabolism. Comparison with naftidrofuryl and methamphetamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nickolson, V.J.; Wolthuis, O.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of Piracetam, Naftidrofuryl and methamphetamine on several parameters of cerebral energy metabolism have been studied. At variance with some reports in the literature neither Piracetam nor Naftidrofuryl affected the cerebral contents of adenine nucleotides and, accordingly, both

  11. Cerebral metabolism of ammonia and amino acids in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauss, Gitte Irene; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos; Kondrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: High circulating levels of ammonia have been suggested to be involved in the development of cerebral edema and herniation in fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). The aim of this study was to measure cerebral metabolism of ammonia and amino acids, with special emphasis on glutamine...... metabolism. METHODS: The study consisted of patients with FHF (n = 16) or cirrhosis (n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 8). Cerebral blood flow was measured by the 133Xe washout technique. Blood samples for determination of ammonia and amino acids were drawn simultaneously from the radial artery...

  12. Global cerebral blood flow and metabolism during acute hyperketonemia in the awake and anesthetized rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Rasmus; Hasselbalch, Steen G.; Topp, Simon

    2006-01-01

    In the human setting, it has been shown that acute increase in the concentration of ketone bodies by infusion of beta-hydroxybutyrate increased the cerebral blood flow (CBF) without affecting the overall cerebral metabolic activity. The mechanism by which this effect of ketone bodies was mediated...... and during infusion of ketone bodies. During acute hyperketonemia (average concentration of beta-hydroxybutyrate: 6 mmol/L), global CBF increased 65% from 108 to 178 mL/100 g min and the cerebral metabolic rates for both oxygen and glucose remained constant. This resetting of the relation between CBF...

  13. Whole brain and brain regional coexpression network interactions associated with predisposition to alcohol consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A Vanderlinden

    Full Text Available To identify brain transcriptional networks that may predispose an animal to consume alcohol, we used weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA. Candidate coexpression modules are those with an eigengene expression level that correlates significantly with the level of alcohol consumption across a panel of BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains, and that share a genomic region that regulates the module transcript expression levels (mQTL with a genomic region that regulates alcohol consumption (bQTL. To address a controversy regarding utility of gene expression profiles from whole brain, vs specific brain regions, as indicators of the relationship of gene expression to phenotype, we compared candidate coexpression modules from whole brain gene expression data (gathered with Affymetrix 430 v2 arrays in the Colorado laboratories and from gene expression data from 6 brain regions (nucleus accumbens (NA; prefrontal cortex (PFC; ventral tegmental area (VTA; striatum (ST; hippocampus (HP; cerebellum (CB available from GeneNetwork. The candidate modules were used to construct candidate eigengene networks across brain regions, resulting in three "meta-modules", composed of candidate modules from two or more brain regions (NA, PFC, ST, VTA and whole brain. To mitigate the potential influence of chromosomal location of transcripts and cis-eQTLs in linkage disequilibrium, we calculated a semi-partial correlation of the transcripts in the meta-modules with alcohol consumption conditional on the transcripts' cis-eQTLs. The function of transcripts that retained the correlation with the phenotype after correction for the strong genetic influence, implicates processes of protein metabolism in the ER and Golgi as influencing susceptibility to variation in alcohol consumption. Integration of these data with human GWAS provides further information on the function of polymorphisms associated with alcohol-related traits.

  14. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    as evidenced by pharmacological manipulation of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors. Cholinergic blockade by glycopyrrolate blocks the exercise-induced increase in the transcranial Doppler determined mean flow velocity (MCA Vmean). Conversely, alpha-adrenergic activation increases that expression of cerebral......This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF...... perfusion and reduces the near-infrared determined cerebral oxygenation at rest, but not during exercise associated with an increased cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO(2)), suggesting competition between CMRO(2) and sympathetic control of CBF. CMRO(2) does not change during even intense handgrip...

  15. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Shin; Ujike, Takashi; Kuroki, Soemu; Sakamoto, Shizuki; Soeda, Toshiyuki; Terashi, Akiro; Iio, Masaaki.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine functional changes in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/) were determined using 0-15 positron emission tomography in 10 PD patients and five age-matched healthy volunteers. There was a tendency among PD patients towards a decreased CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These values were significantly lower in the frontal cortex in the PD group than the control group. There was no difference in OEF between the groups. A more decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was observed in patients staged as severer on the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. There was no correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesis. A decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was associated with mental disorders, such as depression, hallucination, and dementia. These results may provide an important clue for the understanding of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway and the relationship between PD and dementia. (N.K.).

  16. The Kety-Schmidt Technique for Quantitative Perfusion and Oxygen Metabolism Measurements in the MR Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John J.; Powers, William J.; Faulkner, Chad B.; Boyle, Patrick J.; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    The Kety-Schmidt technique provides quantitative measurement of whole brain cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF is measured as the area between the arterial and venous washout curves of a diffusible tracer. Oxygen extraction and metabolism may be calculated from arterial and venous samples. In this report we present a method for performing these measurements in an MR environment. This technique could be useful for validation of MR methods of hemodynamic and metabolic measurements in humans. PMID:22997166

  17. Sympathetic influence on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the possibility that autonomic activity influences cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism during exercise in humans. Apart from cerebral autoregulation, the arterial carbon dioxide tension, and neuronal activation, it may be that the autonomic nervous system influences CBF......-oxidative carbohydrate uptake during exercise. Adrenaline appears to accelerate cerebral glycolysis through a beta2-adrenergic receptor mechanism since noradrenaline is without such an effect. In addition, the exercise-induced cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake is blocked by combined beta 1/2-adrenergic blockade......, but not by beta1-adrenergic blockade. Furthermore, endurance training appears to lower the cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate uptake and preserve cerebral oxygenation during submaximal exercise. This is possibly related to an attenuated catecholamine response. Finally, exercise promotes brain health as evidenced...

  18. The value of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography using a 320-slice CT scanner in the diagnosis of MCI and AD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Gu, Guo-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Yi; Shen, Xing; Li, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2017-06-02

    To validate the value of whole-brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whole-brain CTP and four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) images were acquired in 30 MCI, 35 mild AD patients, 35 moderate AD patients, 30 severe AD patients and 50 normal controls (NC). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time to peak (TTP), and correlation between CTP and 4D-CTA were analysed. Elevated CBF in the left frontal and temporal cortex was found in MCI compared with the NC group. However, TTP was increased in the left hippocampus in mild AD patients compared with NC. In moderate and severe AD patients, hypoperfusion was found in multiple brain areas compared with NC. Finally, we found that the extent of arterial stenosis was negatively correlated with CBF in partial cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and positively correlated with TTP in these areas of AD and MCI patients. Our findings suggest that whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA could serve as a diagnostic modality in distinguishing MCI and AD, and predicting conversion from MCI based on TTP of left hippocampus. • Whole-brain perfusion using the full 160-mm width of 320 detector rows • Provide clinical experience of 320-row CT in cerebrovascular disorders of Alzheimer's disease • Initial combined 4D CTA-CTP data analysed perfusion and correlated with CT angiography • Whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA have high value for monitoring MCI to AD progression • TTP in the left hippocampus may predict the transition from MCI to AD.

  19. Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on cerebral oxygen and glucose metabolism in elderly patients with pre-existing cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Hu, Zhiyong; Shen, Jianjun; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral injury caused by hypoperfusion during the perioperative period is one of the main causes of disability and death in patients after major surgery. No effective protective or preventative strategies have been identified. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on cerebral oxygen and glucose metabolism in elderly patients with known, pre-existing cerebral ischemia. Sixty ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) II-III patients, diagnosed with vertebral artery ischemia by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD), and scheduled for elective total hip replacement surgery, were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to receive either 1mg/kg Ginkgo biloba extract (G group n=30) or normal saline (D group n=30) after induction of anesthesia. Blood samples were collected from radial artery and jugular venous bulb catheters for blood gas analysis and determination of glucose and lactate concentrations preoperatively, before surgical incision, at the end of surgery, and on post-op day 1. Arterial O2 content (CaO2), jugular venous O2 content (CjvO2), arteriovenous O2 content difference (Da-jvO2), cerebral oxygen extraction rate (CEO2), and arteriovenous glucose and lactate content differences (Da-jvGlu and Da-jvLac) were calculated. There were no significant differences in CaO2 or Da-jvGlu during surgery between groups (p>0.05). However, the Ginkgo group had higher CjvO2, internal jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2) and lower CEO2, Da-jvO2 and Da-jvLac at the end of surgery (T2) and on post-op day 1 (T3) than those in the control group (pGinkgo biloba extract can improve cerebral oxygen supply, decrease cerebral oxygen extraction rate and consumption, and help maintain the balance between cerebral oxygen supply and consumption. It has no effect, however, on cerebral glucose metabolism in elderly patients with known, pre-existing cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging cerebral 2-ketoisocaproate metabolism with hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Sadia Asghar; Søgaard, Lise Vejby-Christensen; Magnusson, Peter O.

    2012-01-01

    The branched chain amino acid transaminase (BCAT) has an important role in nitrogen shuttling and glutamate metabolism in the brain. The purpose of this study was to describe the cerebral distribution and metabolism of hyperpolarized 2-keto[1-(13)C]isocaproate (KIC) in the normal rat using magnetic...

  1. Development of a model for whole brain learning of physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Saramarie; Muller, Anton

    2011-12-01

    In this report, a model was developed for whole brain learning based on Curry's onion model. Curry described the effect of personality traits as the inner layer of learning, information-processing styles as the middle layer of learning, and environmental and instructional preferences as the outer layer of learning. The model that was developed elaborates on these layers by relating the personality traits central to learning to the different quadrants of brain preference, as described by Neethling's brain profile, as the inner layer of the onion. This layer is encircled by the learning styles that describe different information-processing preferences for each brain quadrant. For the middle layer, the different stages of Kolb's learning cycle are classified into the four brain quadrants associated with the different brain processing strategies within the information processing circle. Each of the stages of Kolb's learning cycle is also associated with a specific cognitive learning strategy. These two inner circles are enclosed by the circle representing the role of the environment and instruction on learning. It relates environmental factors that affect learning and distinguishes between face-to-face and technology-assisted learning. This model informs on the design of instructional interventions for physiology to encourage whole brain learning.

  2. Whole-brain functional connectivity identification of functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Jiaofen; Liu, Jixin; Li, Guoying; Xiong, Shiwei; Yan, Xuemei; Yin, Qing; Zeng, Fang; von Deneen, Karen M; Liang, Fanrong; Gong, Qiyong; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have shown local brain aberrations in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients, yet little attention has been paid to the whole-brain resting-state functional network abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether FD disrupts the patterns of whole-brain networks and the abnormal functional connectivity could reflect the severity of the disease. The dysfunctional interactions between brain regions at rest were investigated in FD patients as compared with 40 age- and gender- matched healthy controls. Multivariate pattern analysis was used to evaluate the discriminative power of our results for classifying patients from controls. In our findings, the abnormal brain functional connections were mainly situated within or across the limbic/paralimbic system, the prefrontal cortex, the tempo-parietal areas and the visual cortex. About 96% of the subjects among the original dataset were correctly classified by a leave one-out cross-validation approach, and 88% accuracy was also validated in a replication dataset. The classification features were significantly associated with the patients' dyspepsia symptoms, the self-rating depression scale and self-rating anxiety scale, but it was not correlated with duration of FD patients (p>0.05). Our results may indicate the effectiveness of the altered brain functional connections reflecting the disease pathophysiology underling FD. These dysfunctional connections may be the epiphenomena or causative agents of FD, which may be affected by clinical severity and its related emotional dimension of the disease rather than the clinical course.

  3. Cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in young and elderly individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Hartwich, Doreen; Seifert, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral perfusion, oxygenation, and metabolism in eleven young (age 22 ± 1 years) and nine older (age 66 ± 2 years) individuals at rest and during cycling exercise at low (25% W(max)), moderate (50% W(max)), high (75% W(ma)) and exhaustive (100% W(max)) workloads. Mean middle cerebral...... artery blood velocity (MCA V(mean)), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO) and the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) were measured. Blood samples were obtained from the right internal jugular vein and brachial artery to determine concentration differences for oxygen (O(2......)), glucose and lactate across the brain. The molar ratio between the cerebral uptake of O(2) versus carbohydrate (O(2)-carbohydrate index; O(2) / [glucose + 0.5 lactate]; OCI), the cerebral metabolic rate of O(2) (CMRO(2)) and changes in mitochondrial O(2) tension (P(mito)O(2)) were calculated. W...

  4. A suspected case of autoinduction of voriconazole metabolism in a patient with cerebral aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson MJ; Randles ML; de Freitas DG

    2017-01-01

    Martin J Ferguson,1 Maria L Randles,2 Declan G de Freitas3 1Pharmacy Department, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont, Dublin, 2Pharmacy Department, Wexford General Hospital, Wexford, 3Department of Transplantation, Urology and Nephrology, Beaumont Hospital Kidney Centre, Dublin, Ireland Objective: This study aims to report a case of accelerated metabolism of voriconazole in a patient with cerebral aspergillosis.Case summary: A 36-year-old woman developed cerebral aspergillosis after immunosuppressive...

  5. Effect of drugs used in psychoses on cerebral dopamine metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Ruth; Sharman, D. F.; Vogt, Marthe

    1970-01-01

    1. Chlorpromazine 15 mg/kg, given daily to cats for 2 weeks, produced a rise in homovanillic acid (HVA) content of the caudate nucleus, whereas the same dose of thioridazine lacked this effect. Of these two drugs, only chlorpromazine causes a high incidence of drug-induced Parkinsonism in man. 2. In the mouse, chlorpromazine, thioridazine and haloperidol increased striatal concentrations of HVA and accelerated the disappearance of dopamine (DA) after inhibition of catecholamine synthesis with α-methyltyrosine. Low doses of the three compounds increased, whereas high doses reduced, the concentration of DA in the striatum. In their effects on the DA metabolism of the mouse, chlorpromazine and thioridazine had the same potency, but haloperidol was between 10 and 100 times more active than the other two drugs. In producing hypothermia and sedation, the three compounds were equiactive. 3. Oxypertine, another drug apt to produce Parkinsonism in man, caused a severe reduction in striatal DA and hypothalamic noradrenaline (NA). Though the clinical signs produced in the mouse were indistinguishable from those seen after the same dose of chlorpromazine, the biochemical changes in the brain were thus quite different. 4. Though all the drugs used caused temporary motor disabilities in animals, these bore no resemblance to human Parkinsonism, even when treatment was continued for 7 weeks or more as it was in cats and monkeys. The latter were treated with chlorpromazine 7·5 mg/kg daily, a dose chosen to avoid loss of weight and which may have been too small to produce toxic side-effects. It caused no changes in striatal DA turnover. 5. Even at the high dose of 50 mg/kg, phenoxybenzamine did not increase DA turnover in mouse brain, but it sedated the mice as did the tranquillizers. 6. Atropine sulphate, 25 mg/kg, reduced the HVA content of mouse striatum and partially antagonized the rise in HVA produced by phenothiazines. The effect was surmountable. Possible modes of action

  6. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-13C]glucose, [1,2-13C]acetate or [U-13C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-13C]acetate and [U-13C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism.

  7. Whole brain imaging with Serial Two-Photon Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Amato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging entire mouse brains at submicron resolution has historically been a challenging undertaking and largely confined to the province of dedicated atlasing initiatives. The has limited systematic investigations into important areas of neuroscience, such as neural circuits, brain mapping and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we describe in detail Serial Two-Photon (STP tomography, a robust, reliable method for imaging entire brains with histological detail. We provide examples of how the basic methodology can be extended to other imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography, in order to provide unique contrast mechanisms. Furthermore we provide a survey of the research that STP tomography has enabled in the field of neuroscience, provide examples of how this technology enables quantitative whole brain studies, and discuss the current limitations of STP tomography-based approaches

  8. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ren; Kong, Wei; Shang, Jun; Zhe, Hong; Wang, Yan-Yang

    2017-03-01

    Brain metastases occur in 20% to 40% of lung cancer patients. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) has long been considered the treatment of choice for many patients with lung cancer, because of its wide availability, ease of delivery, and effectiveness in prolonging survival. However, WBRT is also associated with several side effects, such as decline in memory and other cognitive functions. There exists significant preclinical and clinical evidence that radiation-induced injury to the hippocampus correlates with neurocognitive decline of patients who receive WBRT. Technological advances in treatment planning and delivery facilitate the use of hippocampal-sparing (HS) WBRT as prophylactic cranial irradiation or the primary treatment modality for lung cancer patients with brain metastases. In this review, we provide a detailed and comprehensive discussion of the safety profile, techniques for hippocampus-sparing, and the clinical evidence of HS-WBRT for lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R

    2003-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differe......During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio......-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy...... young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P

  10. Retrieving binary answers using whole-brain activity pattern classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Eiji Nawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA has been successfully employed to advance our understanding of where and how information regarding different mental states is represented in the human brain, bringing new insights into how these states come to fruition, and providing a promising complement to the mass-univariate approach. Here, we employed MVPA to classify whole-brain activity patterns occurring in single fMRI scans, in order to retrieve binary answers from experiment participants. Five healthy volunteers performed two types of mental task while in the MRI scanner: counting down numbers and recalling positive autobiographical events. Data from these runs were used to train individual machine learning based classifiers that predicted which mental task was being performed based on the voxel-based brain activity patterns. On a different day, the same volunteers reentered the scanner and listened to six statements (e.g., the month you were born is an odd number, and were told to countdown numbers if the statement was true (yes or recall positive events otherwise (no. The previously trained classifiers were then used to assign labels (yes/no to the scans collected during the 24-second response periods following each one of the statements. Mean classification accuracies at the single scan level were in the range of 73.6% to 80.8%, significantly above chance for all participants. When applying a majority vote on the scans within each response period, i.e., the most frequent label (yes/no in the response period becomes the answer to the previous statement, 5.0 to 5.8 sentences, out of 6, were correctly classified in each one of the runs, on average. These results indicate that binary answers can be retrieved from whole-brain activity patterns, suggesting that MVPA provides an alternative way to establish basic communication with unresponsive patients when other techniques are not successful.

  11. Hippocampus sparing in whole-brain radiotherapy. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskan, F. [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology and CCC Neuro-Oncology, Munich (Germany); Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ganswindt, U.; Schwarz, S.B.; Manapov, F.; Belka, C.; Niyazi, M. [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology and CCC Neuro-Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Radiation treatment techniques for whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) have not changed significantly since development of the procedure. However, the recent development of novel techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy, as well as an increasing body of evidence concerning neural stem cells (NSCs) have altered the conventional WBRT treatment paradigm. In this regard, hippocampus-sparing WBRT is a novel technique that aims to spare critical hippocampus regions without compromising tumour control. Published data on this new technique are limited to planning and feasibility studies; data on patient outcome are still lacking. However, several prospective trials to analyse the feasibility of this technique and to document clinical outcome in terms of reduced neurotoxicity are ongoing. (orig.) [German] Die Technik der Ganzhirnbestrahlung (''whole-brain radiation therapy'', WBRT) hat sich seit der Entwicklung nicht wesentlich veraendert. Allerdings stellten die Neuentwicklung von Techniken wie die intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapie (IMRT), die volumenmodulierte Arc-Therapie (VMAT) oder die helikale Tomotherapie sowie immer groesseres Wissen ueber das neurale Stammzellkompartiment (NSCs) das herkoemmliche Ganzhirn-Paradigma in Frage. Die hippocampusschonende Ganzhirnbestrahlung ist eine neuartige Technik, welche die kritische Region des Hippocampus schont, ohne die Tumorkontrolle zu gefaehrden. Ueber diese Technik gibt es bisher nur eine begrenzte Datenlage im Sinne von Planungs- und Machbarkeitsstudien. Klinische Daten bzgl. der Behandlungsergebnisse fehlen nach wie vor, aber einige prospektive Studien sind im Gange, um nicht nur die Machbarkeit zu belegen, sondern auch das klinische Outcome im Sinne einer verringerten Neurotoxizitaet nachzuweisen. (orig.)

  12. The value of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography using a 320-slice CT scanner in the diagnosis of MCI and AD patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo; Gu, Guo-jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Yi [Medical School of Tongji University, Department of Medical Imaging, Tongji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Xing [Traditional Chinese Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kun Shan, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Bo; Zhang, Wei [Medical School of Jiaotong University, Department of Medical Imaging, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2017-11-15

    To validate the value of whole-brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whole-brain CTP and four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) images were acquired in 30 MCI, 35 mild AD patients, 35 moderate AD patients, 30 severe AD patients and 50 normal controls (NC). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time to peak (TTP), and correlation between CTP and 4D-CTA were analysed. Elevated CBF in the left frontal and temporal cortex was found in MCI compared with the NC group. However, TTP was increased in the left hippocampus in mild AD patients compared with NC. In moderate and severe AD patients, hypoperfusion was found in multiple brain areas compared with NC. Finally, we found that the extent of arterial stenosis was negatively correlated with CBF in partial cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and positively correlated with TTP in these areas of AD and MCI patients. Our findings suggest that whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA could serve as a diagnostic modality in distinguishing MCI and AD, and predicting conversion from MCI based on TTP of left hippocampus. (orig.)

  13. Cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism during human endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Qvist, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    and catecholamines was investigated in eight healthy young volunteers. Cerebral blood flow was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique at baseline (during normocapnia and voluntary hyperventilation for calculation of subject-specific cerebrovascular CO reactivity), and 90 minutes after an intravenous bolus...

  14. Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism during seizure in spontaneously epileptic El mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Chisa; Ochi, Hironobu; Yamagami, Sakae; Kawabe, Joji; Kobashi, Toshiko; Okamura, Terue; Yamada, Ryusaku [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-09-01

    Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism were examined in spontaneously epileptic El mice using autoradiography with {sup 125}I-IMP and {sup 14}C-DG in the interictal phase and during seizure. El (+) mice that developed generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and El (-) mice that received no stimulation and had no history of epileptic seizures were examined. The seizure non-susceptible, maternal strain ddY mice were used as control. Uptake ratios for IMP and DG in mouse brain were calculated using the autoradiographic density. In the interictal phase, the pattern of local cerebral blood flow of El (+) mice was similar to that of ddY and El (-) mice, and glucose metabolism in the hippocampus was higher in El (+) mice than in El (-) and ddY mice, but flow and metabolism were nearly matched. During seizure, no significant changed blood flow and increased glucose metabolism in the hippocampus, the epileptic focus, and no markedly changed blood flow and depressed glucose metabolism in other brain regions were observed and considered to be flow-metabolism uncoupling. These observations have never been reported in clinical or experimental studies of epilepsy. Seizures did not cause large regional differences in cerebral blood flow. Therefore, only glucose metabolism is useful for detection of the focus of secondary generalized seizures in El mice, and appeared possibly to be related to the pathophysiology of secondary generalized epilepsy in El mice. (author).

  15. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D

    2017-01-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate ...... metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism....... for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue...... extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice...

  16. Pyruvate treatment attenuates cerebral metabolic depression and neuronal loss after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Nobuhiro; Ghavim, Sima S; Harris, Neil G; Hovda, David A; Sutton, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to produce an acute increase in cerebral glucose utilization, followed rapidly by a generalized cerebral metabolic depression. The current studies determined effects of single or multiple treatments with sodium pyruvate (SP; 1000mg/kg, i.p.) or ethyl pyruvate (EP; 40mg/kg, i.p.) on cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal injury in rats with unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In Experiment 1 a single treatment was given immediately after CCI. SP significantly improved glucose metabolism in 3 of 13 brain regions while EP improved metabolism in 7 regions compared to saline-treated controls at 24h post-injury. Both SP and EP produced equivalent and significant reductions in dead/dying neurons in cortex and hippocampus at 24h post-CCI. In Experiment 2 SP or EP were administered immediately (time 0) and at 1, 3 and 6h post-CCI. Multiple SP treatments also significantly attenuated TBI-induced reductions in cerebral glucose metabolism (in 4 brain regions) 24h post-CCI, as did multiple injections of EP (in 4 regions). The four pyruvate treatments produced significant neuroprotection in cortex and hippocampus 1day after CCI, similar to that found with a single SP or EP treatment. Thus, early administration of pyruvate compounds enhanced cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal survival, with 40mg/kg of EP being as effective as 1000mg/kg of SP, and multiple treatments within 6h of injury did not improve upon outcomes seen following a single treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A longitudinal study of cerebral glucose metabolism, MRI, and disability in patients with MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, M; Jensen, C.V.; Holm, S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the time-related changes in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) in MS patients and to correlate these with changes in MRI lesion load and disability. BACKGROUND: Measurements of MRI lesion load and neurologic disability are used widely to monitor disease progression...... in longitudinal studies of MS patients, but little is known about the associated changes in cerebral neural function. METHODS: The authors studied 10 patients with clinically definite MS who underwent serial measurements of CMRglc, MRI T2-weighted total lesion area (TLA), and clinical evaluation of disability...... and parietal cortical areas. There was a statistically significant increase of disability (pstudy, but changes in CMRglc were not correlated to changes in TLA and EDSS. CONCLUSIONS: Global cortical cerebral metabolism in MS is decreased significantly during a 2...

  18. Effects of hyperthermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Møller, Kirsten; Volianitis, Stefanos

    2002-01-01

    ergometer. The gCBF and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were determined with the Kety-Schmidt technique after 15 min of exercise when core temperature was similar across trials, and at the end of exercise, either when subjects remained normothermic (core temperature = 37.9 degrees C......The development of hyperthermia during prolonged exercise in humans is associated with various changes in the brain, but it is not known whether the cerebral metabolism or the global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) is affected. Eight endurance-trained subjects completed two exercise bouts on a cycle......; control) or when severe hyperthermia had developed (core temperature = 39.5 degrees C; hyperthermia). The gCBF was similar after 15 min in the two trials, and it remained stable throughout control. In contrast, during hyperthermia gCBF decreased by 18% and was therefore lower in hyperthermia compared...

  19. Cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with early Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Østergaard, Karen

    2011-01-01

    -normalized values. RESULTS: No group differences were detected in regional magnitudes of CMRO(2) or CBF. Upon normalization using the reference cluster method, significant relative CMRO(2) decreases were evident in widespread prefrontal, parieto-occipital, and lateral temporal regions. Sensory-motor and subcortical......) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) PET scans from PD patients and healthy controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy age-matched controls underwent PET scans for quantitative mapping of CMRO(2) and CBF. Between-group differences were evaluated for absolute data and intensity...... relative CMRO(2) decreases in cerebral cortex. The detected pattern was very similar to that reported in earlier CBF and CMRglc studies of PD, and in the CBF images from the same subjects. Thus, the present results are consistent with the occurrence of parallel declines in CMRO(2), CBF, and CMRglc...

  20. Hepatic encephalopathy is associated with decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow, not increased ammonia uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) and blood flow (CBF) in patients with cirrhosis with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). It remains unclear, however, whether these disturbances are associated with HE or with cirrhosis itself and how they may relate to arterial blood amm...

  1. Photoacoustic microscopy of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic responses to anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Li, Jun; Ning, Bo; Sun, Naidi; Wang, Tianxiong; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    General anesthetics are known to have profound effects on cerebral hemodynamics and neuronal activities. However, it remains a challenge to directly assess anesthetics-induced hemodynamic and oxygen-metabolic changes from the true baseline under wakefulness at the microscopic level, due to the lack of an enabling technology for high-resolution functional imaging of the awake mouse brain. To address this challenge, we have developed head-restrained photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which enables simultaneous imaging of the cerebrovascular anatomy, total concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (CHb and sO2), and blood flow in awake mice. From these hemodynamic measurements, two important metabolic parameters, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), can be derived. Side-by-side comparison of the mouse brain under wakefulness and anesthesia revealed multifaceted cerebral responses to isoflurane, a volatile anesthetic widely used in preclinical research and clinical practice. Key observations include elevated cerebral blood flow (CBF) and reduced oxygen extraction and metabolism.

  2. Cerebral metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cognitive dysfunction in early multiple sclerosis: an exploratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Mathiesen, Henrik K; Tscherning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown that cortical cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) normalized to creatine (NAA/Cr) assess neuronal...

  3. Comparison Between Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Tension and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Subdural Hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Engell, Susanne I; Johnsen, Rikke Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An experimental swine model (n = 7) simulating an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) was employed (1) to explore the relation between the brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) and the regional cerebral energy metabolism as obtained by microdialysis, and (2) to define the lowest level of PbtO...

  4. Diagnostic performance of whole brain volume perfusion CT in intra-axial brain tumors: Preoperative classification accuracy and histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xyda, Argyro, E-mail: argyro.xyda@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Department of Radialogy, University Hospital of Heraklion, Voutes, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Haberland, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.haberland@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Klotz, Ernst, E-mail: ernst.klotz@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Jung, Klaus, E-mail: kjung1@uni-goettingen.de [Department of Medical Statistics, Georg-August University, Humboldtallee 32, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Bock, Hans Christoph, E-mail: cbock@gmx.de [Department of Neurosurgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital of Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55101 Mainz (Germany); Schramm, Ramona, E-mail: ramona.schramm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Knauth, Michael, E-mail: michael.knauth@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Schramm, Peter, E-mail: p.schramm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Background: To evaluate the preoperative diagnostic power and classification accuracy of perfusion parameters derived from whole brain volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in patients with cerebral tumors. Methods: Sixty-three patients (31 male, 32 female; mean age 55.6 ± 13.9 years), with MRI findings suspected of cerebral lesions, underwent VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were marked circumscript around the tumor according to maximum intensity projection volumes, and then mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability Ktrans perfusion datasets. A second VOI was placed in the contra lateral cortex, as control. Correlations among perfusion values, tumor grade, cerebral hemisphere and VOIs were evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic power of VPCT parameters, by means of positive and negative predictive value, was analyzed. Results: Our cohort included 32 high-grade gliomas WHO III/IV, 18 low-grade I/II, 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, 4 metastases and 3 tumor-like lesions. Ktrans demonstrated the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value, with a cut-off point of 2.21 mL/100 mL/min, for both the comparisons between high-grade versus low-grade and low-grade versus primary cerebral lymphomas. However, for the differentiation between high-grade and primary cerebral lymphomas, CBF and CBV proved to have 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value, identifying preoperatively all the histopathologically proven high-grade gliomas. Conclusion: Volumetric perfusion data enable the hemodynamic assessment of the entire tumor extent and provide a method of preoperative differentiation among intra-axial cerebral tumors with promising diagnostic accuracy.

  5. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during exercise: implications for fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, T.; Lieshout, J.J. van; Secher, Niels

    2008-01-01

    , and data support the theory that glycogen depletion in astrocytes limits the ability of the brain to accelerate its metabolism during activation. The release of interleukin-6 from the brain when exercise is prolonged may represent a signaling pathway in matching the metabolic response of the brain...

  6. Changes in whole-brain functional networks and memory performance in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Llonch, Roser; Junqué, Carme; Arenaza-Urquijo, Eider M; Vidal-Piñeiro, Dídac; Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Palacios, Eva M; Domènech, Sara; Salvà, Antoni; Bargalló, Nuria; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2014-10-01

    We used resting-functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 98 healthy older adults to analyze how local and global measures of functional brain connectivity are affected by age, and whether they are related to differences in memory performance. Whole-brain networks were created individually by parcellating the brain into 90 cerebral regions and obtaining pairwise connectivity. First, we studied age-associations in interregional connectivity and their relationship with the length of the connections. Aging was associated with less connectivity in the long-range connections of fronto-parietal and fronto-occipital systems and with higher connectivity of the short-range connections within frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes. We also used the graph theory to measure functional integration and segregation. The pattern of the overall age-related correlations presented positive correlations of average minimum path length (r = 0.380, p = 0.008) and of global clustering coefficients (r = 0.454, p memory functions. In conclusion, we found that older participants showed lower connectivity of long-range connections together with higher functional segregation of these same connections, which appeared to indicate a more local clustering of information processing. Higher local clustering in older participants was negatively related to memory performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Whole-brain atrophy rate and cognitive decline: longitudinal MR study of memory clinic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluimer, J.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Karas, G.B.; Fox, N.C.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.; Vrenken, H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whole-brain atrophy rate in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) and its association with cognitive decline, and investigate the risk of progression to dementia in initially non-demented patients given baseline brain volume and whole-brain

  8. Whole-brain CT perfusion and CT angiography assessment of Moyamoya disease before and after surgical revascularization: preliminary study with 256-slice CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The 256-slice CT enables the entire brain to be scanned in a single examination. We evaluated the application of 256-slice whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP in determining graft patency as well as investigating cerebral hemodynamic changes in Moyamoya disease before and after surgical revascularization. METHODS: Thirty-nine cases of Moyamoya disease were evaluated before and after surgical revascularization with 256-slice CT. Whole-brain perfusion images and dynamic 3D CT angiographic images generated from perfusion source data were obtained in all patients. Cerebral blood flow (CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV, time to peak (TTP and mean transit time (MTT of one hemisphere in the region of middle cerebral artery (MCA distribution and contralateral mirroring areas were measured. Relative CTP values (rCBF, rCBV, rTTP, rMTT were also obtained. Differences in pre- and post- operation perfusion CT values were assessed with paired t test or matched-pairs signed-ranks test. RESULTS: Preoperative CBF, MTT and TTP of potential surgical side were significantly different from those of contralateral side (P<0.01 for all. All graft patencies were displayed using the 3D-CTA images. Postoperative CBF, rCBF and rCBV values of surgical side in the region of MCA were significantly higher than those before operation (P<0.01 for all. Postoperative MTT, TTP, rMTT and rTTP values of the surgical side in the region of MCA were significantly lower than those before operation (P<0.05 for all. CONCLUSION: The 256-slice whole-brain CTP can be used to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes in Moyamoya disease before and after surgery and the 3D-CTA is useful for assessing the abnormalities of intracranial arteries and graft patencies.

  9. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  10. Marked reduction of cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with advanced cirrhosis; A positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawatoko, Toshiharu; Murai, Koichiro; Ibayashi, Setsurou; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nomiyama, Kensuke; Sadoshima, Seizo; Eujishima, Masatoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO{sub 2}), and oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) were measured using positron emission tomography (PET) in four patients with cirrhosis (two males and two females, aged 57 to 69 years) in comparison with those in five age matched controls with previous transient global amnesia. PET studies were carried out when the patients were fully alert and oriented after the episodes of encephalopathy. In the patients, rCBF tended to be lower, while rCMRO{sub 2} was significantly lowered in almost all hemisphere cortices, more markedly in the frontal cortex. Our results suggest that the brain oxygen metabolism is diffusely impaired in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and the frontal cortex seems to be more susceptible to the systemic metabolic derangements induced by chronic liver disease. (author).

  11. SU-E-QI-12: Morphometry Based Measurements of the Structural Response to Whole Brain Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, D; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Guerrero, T [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although state of the art radiation therapy techniques for treating intracranial malignancies have eliminated acute brain injury, cognitive impairment occurs in 50–90% of patients who survive >6mo post irradiation. Quantitative characterization of therapy response is needed to facilitate therapeutic strategies to minimize radiation induced cognitive impairment [1]. Deformation based morphometry techniques [2, 3] are presented as a quantitative imaging biomarker of therapy response in patients receiving whole brain radiation for treating medulloblastoma. Methods: Post-irradiation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets were retrospectively analyzed in N=15 patients, >60 MR image datasets. As seen in Fig 1(a), volume changes at multiple time points post-irradiation were quantitatively measured in the cerebrum and ventricles with respect to pre-irradiation MRI. A high resolution image Template, was registered to the pre-irradiation MRI of each patient to create a brain atlas for the cerebrum, cerebellum, and ventricles. Skull stripped images for each patient were registered to the initial pre-treatment scan. Average volume changes in the labeled regions were measured using the determinant of the displacement field Jacobian. Results: Longitudinal measurements, Fig 1(b-c), show a negative correlation p=.06, of the cerebral volume change with the time interval from irradiation. A corresponding positive correlation, p=.01, between ventricular volume change and time interval from irradiation is seen. One sample t-test for correlations were computed using a Spearman method. An average decrease in cerebral volume, p=.08, and increase in ventricular volume, p<.001, was observed. The radiation dose was seen directly proportional to the induced volume changes in the cerebrum, r=−.44, p<.001, Fig 1(d). Conclusion: Results indicate that morphometric monitoring of brain tissue volume changes may potentially be used to quantitatively assess toxicity and response to

  12. APP Metabolism Regulates Tau Proteostasis in Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Moore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, all of which increase the release of pathogenic Aβ peptides. We identified marked increases in intracellular tau in genetic forms of AD that either mutated APP or increased its dosage, suggesting that APP metabolism is coupled to changes in tau proteostasis. Manipulating APP metabolism by β-secretase and γ-secretase inhibition, as well as γ-secretase modulation, results in specific increases and decreases in tau protein levels. These data demonstrate that APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis and suggest that the relationship between APP processing and tau is not mediated solely through extracellular Aβ signaling to neurons.

  13. Cerebral glucose metabolic differences in patients with panic disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordahl, T.E.; Semple, W.E.; Gross, M.; Mellman, T.A.; Stein, M.B.; Goyer, P.; King, A.C.; Uhde, T.W.; Cohen, R.M. (NIMH, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rates were measured in patients with panic disorder during the performance of auditory discrimination. Those regions examined by Reiman and colleagues in their blood flow study of panic disorder were examined with a higher resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and with the tracer (F-18)-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In contrast to the blood flow findings of Reiman et al., we did not find global gray metabolic differences between patients with panic disorder and normal controls. Consistent with the findings of Reiman et al., we found hippocampal region asymmetry. We also found metabolic decreases in the left inferior parietal lobule and in the anterior cingulate (trend), as well as an increase in the metabolic rate of the medial orbital frontal cortex (trend) of panic disorder patients. It is unclear whether the continuous performance task (CPT) enhanced or diminished findings that would have been noted in a study performed without task.

  14. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... and hyperventilation with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (14 patients) and/or the Kety-Schmidt technique (KS) (11 patients and all controls). In KS studies, CMR was measured by multiplying the arterial to jugular venous concentration difference (a-v D) by CBF. RESULTS: CBF did not differ...

  15. A suspected case of autoinduction of voriconazole metabolism in a patient with cerebral aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson MJ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin J Ferguson,1 Maria L Randles,2 Declan G de Freitas3 1Pharmacy Department, Beaumont Hospital, Beaumont, Dublin, 2Pharmacy Department, Wexford General Hospital, Wexford, 3Department of Transplantation, Urology and Nephrology, Beaumont Hospital Kidney Centre, Dublin, Ireland Objective: This study aims to report a case of accelerated metabolism of voriconazole in a patient with cerebral aspergillosis.Case summary: A 36-year-old woman developed cerebral aspergillosis after immunosuppressive treatment for suspected atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. She was treated with voriconazole using therapeutic drug monitoring to guide dosing. After an initial high level, her dose was reduced, but over the following weeks, she required several dose increases in order to achieve a voriconazole level within the target range. The patient’s dose requirements eventually stabilized at 700 mg twice daily. Cimetidine and omeprazole were added in an effort to inhibit the metabolism of voriconazole.Discussion: The metabolism of voriconazole is known to be highly variable among different patients depending on pharmacogenetic factors; however, an increasing rate of voriconazole metabolism in a single patient over time is not well recognized. Therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole in this case facilitated the use of large doses while controlling for toxicity.Conclusion: This case is further evidence of autoinduction in voriconazole metabolism. Therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole is useful in detecting variation in a patient’s metabolism of voriconazole over time. Keywords: voriconazole, therapeutic drug monitoring, metabolism, enzyme inhibition, autoinduction 

  16. Determination of patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in normal aging and dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, A.; Chawluk, J.; Hurtig, H.; Dann, R.; Rosen, M.; Kushner, M.; Silver, F.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRGlc) were measured using 18F-FDG and positron emission tomography (PET) in 14 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (age=64), 9 elderly controls (age=61), and 9 young controls (age=28). PET studies were performed without sensory stimulation or deprivation. Metabolic rates in individual brain regions were determined using an atlas overlay. Relative metabolic rates (rCMRGl c/global CMRGlc) were determined for all subjects. Comparison of young and elderly controls demonstrated significant decreases in frontal metabolism (rho<0.005) and right inferior parietal (IP) metabolism (rho<0.02) with normal aging. Patients with mild-moderate AD (NMAD) (n=8) when compared to age-matched controls, showed further reduction in right IP metabolism (rho<0.02). SAD patients also demonstrated metabolic decrements in left hemisphere language areas (rho<0.01). This latter finding is consistent with language disturbance observed late in the course of the disease. Out data reveal progressive changes in patterns of cerebral glucose utilization with aging and demential with reflect salient clinical features of these processes.

  17. Whole brain radiotherapy with radiosensitizer for brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viani Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the efficacy of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT with radiosensitizer in comparison with WBRT alone for patients with brain metastases in terms of overall survival, disease progression, response to treatment and adverse effects of treatment. Methods A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT was performed in order to compare WBRT with radiosensitizer for brain metastases and WBRT alone. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cochrane Library databases, in addition to Trial registers, bibliographic databases, and recent issues of relevant journals were researched. Significant reports were reviewed by two reviewers independently. Results A total of 8 RCTs, yielding 2317 patients were analyzed. Pooled results from this 8 RCTs of WBRT with radiosensitizer have not shown a meaningful improvement on overall survival compared to WBRT alone OR = 1.03 (95% CI0.84–1.25, p = 0.77. Also, there was no difference in local brain tumor response OR = 0.8(95% CI 0.5 – 1.03 and brain tumor progression (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.9 – 1.3 when the two arms were compared. Conclusion Our data show that WBRT with the following radiosentizers (ionidamine, metronidazole, misonodazole, motexafin gadolinium, BUdr, efaproxiral, thalidomide, have not improved significatively the overall survival, local control and tumor response compared to WBRT alone for brain metastases. However, 2 of them, motexafin- gadolinium and efaproxiral have been shown in recent publications (lung and breast to have positive action in lung and breast carcinoma brain metastases in association with WBRT.

  18. Non-invasive optical measurement of cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Roche-Labarbe, Nadege; Dehaes, Mathieu; Carp, Stefan; Fenoglio, Angela; Barbieri, Beniamino; Hagan, Katherine; Grant, P Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2013-03-14

    Perinatal brain injury remains a significant cause of infant mortality and morbidity, but there is not yet an effective bedside tool that can accurately screen for brain injury, monitor injury evolution, or assess response to therapy. The energy used by neurons is derived largely from tissue oxidative metabolism, and neural hyperactivity and cell death are reflected by corresponding changes in cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO₂). Thus, measures of CMRO₂ are reflective of neuronal viability and provide critical diagnostic information, making CMRO₂ an ideal target for bedside measurement of brain health. Brain-imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) yield measures of cerebral glucose and oxygen metabolism, but these techniques require the administration of radionucleotides, so they are used in only the most acute cases. Continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) provides non-invasive and non-ionizing radiation measures of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO₂) as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen consumption. However, SO₂ is less than ideal as a surrogate for cerebral oxygen metabolism as it is influenced by both oxygen delivery and consumption. Furthermore, measurements of SO₂ are not sensitive enough to detect brain injury hours after the insult, because oxygen consumption and delivery reach equilibrium after acute transients. We investigated the possibility of using more sophisticated NIRS optical methods to quantify cerebral oxygen metabolism at the bedside in healthy and brain-injured newborns. More specifically, we combined the frequency-domain NIRS (FDNIRS) measure of SO2 with the diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measure of blood flow index (CBFi) to yield an index of CMRO₂ (CMRO₂i). With the combined FDNIRS/DCS system we are able to quantify cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics. This represents an improvement over CWNIRS for detecting brain health, brain

  19. Cerebral oxygenation and metabolism during exercise following three months of endurance training in healthy overweight males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, T; Rasmussen, P; Brassard, P

    2009-01-01

    Endurance training improves muscular and cardiovascular fitness, but the effect on cerebral oxygenation and metabolism remains unknown. We hypothesized that 3 mo of endurance training would reduce cerebral carbohydrate uptake with maintained cerebral oxygenation during submaximal exercise. Healthy...... overweight males were included in a randomized, controlled study (training: n = 10; control: n = 7). Arterial and internal jugular venous catheterization was used to determine concentration differences for oxygen, glucose, and lactate across the brain and the oxygen-carbohydrate index [molar uptake of oxygen...... with a lower plasma epinephrine concentration (P exercising at 70% of maximal oxygen uptake (approximately 211 W). Before training, both OCI (3.9 +/- 0.9) and DeltaP(Mito)O(2) (-22 mmHg) decreased (P

  20. Understanding cerebral L-lysine metabolism: the role of L-pipecolate metabolism in Gcdh-deficient mice as a model for glutaric aciduria type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posset, R.; Opp, S.; Struys, E.A.; Volkl, A.; Mohr, H.; Hoffmann, G.F.; Kolker, S.; Sauer, S.W.; Okun, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited deficiencies of the L-lysine catabolic pathway cause glutaric aciduria type I and pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy. Dietary modulation of cerebral L-lysine metabolism is thought to be an important therapeutic intervention for these diseases. To better understand cerebral L-lysine degradation,

  1. Cerebral glucose metabolism in childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swedo, S.E.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Cheslow, D.L.; Leonard, H.L.; Kumar, A.; Friedland, R.; Rapoport, S.I.; Rapoport, J.L.

    1989-06-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in 18 adults with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and in age- and sex-matched controls using positron emission tomography and fludeoxyglucose F 18. Both groups were scanned during rest, with reduced auditory and visual stimulation. The group with OCD showed an increased glucose metabolism in the left orbital frontal, right sensorimotor, and bilateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate regions as compared with controls. Ratios of regional activity to mean cortical gray matter metabolism were increased for the right prefrontal and left anterior cingulate regions in the group with OCD as a whole. Correlations between glucose metabolism and clinical assessment measures showed a significant relationship between metabolic activity and both state and trait measurements of OCD and anxiety as well as the response to clomipramine hydrochloride therapy. These results are consistent with the suggestion that OCD may result from a functional disturbance in the frontal-limbic-basal ganglia system.

  2. Cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in hypothyroidism: a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, E L; de Volder, A G; Ivanoiu, A; Bol, A; Labar, D; Seghers, A; Cosnard, G; Melin, J; Daumerie, C

    2001-08-01

    Hypothyroidism is often associated with defective memory, psychomotor slowing, and depression. However, the relationship between thyroid status and cognitive or psychiatric disturbances remains unclear. Using psychometric scales, 10 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma were evaluated for depression, anxiety, and psychomotor slowing; they were examined both when euthyroid and hypothyroid after thyroid hormone withdrawal. Positron emission tomography was used, with oxygen-15-labeled water and fluorine-18F-labeled 2-deoxy-2fluoro-D-glucose as the tracers, to correlate the regional cerebral blood flow and cerebral glucose metabolism with the mental state in patients. Two different image analysis techniques (regions of interest and statistical parametric maps) were applied. In hypothyroidism, there was a generalized decrease in regional cerebral blood flow (23.4%, P < 0.001) and in cerebral glucose metabolism (12.1%, P < 0.001) and there were no specific local defects. Patients were also significantly more depressed (P < 0.001), anxious (P < 0.001) and psychomotor slowed (P < 0.005) in hypo than in euthyroid status. These results indicate that the brain activity was globally reduced in severe hypothyroidism of short duration without the regional modifications usually observed in primary depression.

  3. Cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by cyanide in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Olsen, N.V.; Toft, P

    2013-01-01

    variables related to energy metabolism. METHODS: Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced in piglets and evaluated by monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2 ) and cerebral levels of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol bilaterally. The biochemical variables were obtained by microdialysis...... and immediate enzymatic analysis. Mitochondrial function was blocked by unilateral infusion of NaCN/KCN (0.5 mol/L) through the microdialysis catheter (N = 5). As a reference, NaCl (0.5 mol/L) was infused by intracerebral microdialysis in one group of animals (N = 3). RESULTS: PbtO2 increased during cyanide...... metabolism and degradation of cellular membranes, respectively. CONCLUSION: Mitochondrial dysfunction is characterised by an increased LP ratio signifying a shift in cytoplasmatic redox state at normal or elevated PbtO2 . The condition is biochemically characterised by a marked increase in cerebral lactate...

  4. Imaging cerebral tryptophan metabolism in brain tumor-associated depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Behen, Michael E; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Depression in patients with brain tumors is associated with impaired quality of life and shorter survival. Altered metabolism of tryptophan to serotonin and kynurenine metabolites may play a role in tumor-associated depression. Our recent studies with alpha[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET in brain tumor patients indicated abnormal tryptophan metabolism not only in the tumor mass but also in normal-appearing contralateral brain. In the present study, we explored if tryptophan metabolism in such brain regions is associated with depression. Twenty-one patients (mean age: 57 years) with a brain tumor (10 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, and 3 brain metastases) underwent AMT-PET scanning. MRI and AMT-PET images were co-registered, and AMT kinetic parameters, including volume of distribution (VD', an estimate of net tryptophan transport) and K (unidirectional uptake, related to tryptophan metabolism), were measured in the tumor mass and in unaffected cortical and subcortical regions contralateral to the tumor. Depression scores (based on the Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II]) were correlated with tumor size, grade, type, and AMT-PET variables. The mean BDI-II score was 12 ± 10 (range: 2-33); clinical levels of depression were identified in seven patients (33 %). High BDI-II scores were most strongly associated with high thalamic AMT K values both in the whole group (Spearman's rho = 0.63, p = 0.004) and in the subgroup of 18 primary brain tumors (r = 0.68, p = 0.004). Frontal and striatal VD' values were higher in the depressed subgroup than in non-depressed patients (p Tumor size, grade, and tumor type were not related to depression scores. Abnormalities of tryptophan transport and metabolism in the thalamus, striatum, and frontal cortex, measured by PET, are associated with depression in patients with brain tumor. These changes may indicate an imbalance between the serotonin and kynurenine pathways and serve as a molecular imaging marker of

  5. Developmental Sex Differences in the Metabolism of Cardiolipin in Mouse Cerebral Cortex Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Acaz-Fonseca, Estefan?a; Ortiz-Rodriguez, Ana; Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana B.; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Astiz, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial-specific phospholipid. CL content and acyl chain composition are crucial for energy production. Given that estradiol induces CL synthesis in neurons, we aimed to assess CL metabolism in the cerebral cortex (CC) of male and female mice during early postnatal life, when sex steroids induce sex-dimorphic maturation of the brain. Despite the fact that total amount of CL was similar, its fatty acid composition differed between males and females at birth. In male...

  6. [A study on the cerebral glucose metabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ai-jun; Guo, Xiao-jun; Li, Da-cheng; Zhang, Ben-shu; Pan, Xu-dong

    2012-11-01

    To study the regional cerebral glucose utilization with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET and to investigate the correlation between cerebral glucose metabolism and the clinical characteristic of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). A total of 13 patients with PSP and 30 matched healthy controls were performed (18)F-FDG PET imaging at rest state. Visual inspection and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) were used to investigate regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc). Based on the visual inspection, PET imaging in the PSP patients showed that the focal hypometabolic areas mainly included the bilateral frontal cortex, midbrain and subcortical structures. Compared to the controls, voxel-based analysis showed that the regional glucose metabolism decreased in bilateral superior, middle frontal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, midbrain and subcortical structures including basal ganglion and thalamus, which were consisted with the clinical characteristics, such as vertical gaze palsy, pseudobulbar palsy, postural instability, axial rigidity, dementia and so on. (18)F-FDG PET imaging is helpful for the early diagnosis of PSP.

  7. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA)); Gillin, J.C. (Univ. of California, San Diego (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep.

  8. Cerebral metabolic effects of exogenous lactate supplementation on the injured human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Pierre; Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Feihl, François; Bloch, Jocelyne; Messerer, Mahmoud; Levivier, Marc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-03-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that lactate is neuroprotective after acute brain injury; however, data in humans are lacking. We examined whether exogenous lactate supplementation improves cerebral energy metabolism in humans with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We prospectively studied 15 consecutive patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD), brain tissue PO2 (PbtO2), and intracranial pressure (ICP). Intervention consisted of a 3-h intravenous infusion of hypertonic sodium lactate (aiming to increase systemic lactate to ca. 5 mmol/L), administered in the early phase following TBI. We examined the effect of sodium lactate on neurochemistry (CMD lactate, pyruvate, glucose, and glutamate), PbtO2, and ICP. Treatment was started on average 33 ± 16 h after TBI. A mixed-effects multilevel regression model revealed that sodium lactate therapy was associated with a significant increase in CMD concentrations of lactate [coefficient 0.47 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.63 mmol/L], pyruvate [13.1 (8.78-17.4) μmol/L], and glucose [0.1 (0.04-0.16) mmol/L; all p < 0.01]. A concomitant reduction of CMD glutamate [-0.95 (-1.94 to 0.06) mmol/L, p = 0.06] and ICP [-0.86 (-1.47 to -0.24) mmHg, p < 0.01] was also observed. Exogenous supplemental lactate can be utilized aerobically as a preferential energy substrate by the injured human brain, with sparing of cerebral glucose. Increased availability of cerebral extracellular pyruvate and glucose, coupled with a reduction of brain glutamate and ICP, suggests that hypertonic lactate therapy has beneficial cerebral metabolic and hemodynamic effects after TBI.

  9. Aberrant whole-brain functional connectivity and intelligence structure in children with primary nocturnal enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Sun, Hongbin; Ma, Hongwei; Peng, Miao; Kong, Fanxing; Meng, Fanxing; Liu, Na; Guo, Qiyong

    2013-01-01

    To assess the potential relationship between intelligence structure abnormalities and whole-brain functional connectivity in children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to provide insights into the association between these two seemingly unrelated conditions. Intelligence testing and fMRI data were obtained from 133 right-handed children, including 67 PNE children (M/F, 39:28; age, 10.5 ± 1.2 y) and 66 age-matched healthy controls (M/F, 37:29; age, 10.1 ± 1.1 y). All intelligence tests were performed using the China-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (C-WISC). Each subject's full intelligence quotient (FIQ), verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), and memory/caution (M/C) factor was measured and recorded. Resting state fMRI scans were performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner and post-processed using REST software. Comparisons of z-score correlation coefficients between distinct cerebral regions were used to identify altered functional connectivity in PNE children. The PNE group had normal FIQ, VIQ, and PIQ values, indicating no significant variation from the control group. However, the M/C factor was significantly lower in the PNE group. Compared to the control group, PNE children exhibited overall lower levels of functional connectivity that were most apparent in the cerebello-thalamo-frontal pathway. The M/C factor significantly correlated with z-scores representing connectivity between Cerebellum_Crus1_L and Frontal_Mid_R. PNE children exhibit intelligence structure imbalance and attention deficits. Our findings suggest that cerebello-thalamo-frontal circuit abnormalities are likely to be involved in the onset and progression of attention impairment in PNE children.

  10. Aberrant whole-brain functional connectivity and intelligence structure in children with primary nocturnal enuresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Yu

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the potential relationship between intelligence structure abnormalities and whole-brain functional connectivity in children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to provide insights into the association between these two seemingly unrelated conditions. METHODS: Intelligence testing and fMRI data were obtained from 133 right-handed children, including 67 PNE children (M/F, 39:28; age, 10.5 ± 1.2 y and 66 age-matched healthy controls (M/F, 37:29; age, 10.1 ± 1.1 y. All intelligence tests were performed using the China-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (C-WISC. Each subject's full intelligence quotient (FIQ, verbal IQ (VIQ, performance IQ (PIQ, and memory/caution (M/C factor was measured and recorded. Resting state fMRI scans were performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner and post-processed using REST software. Comparisons of z-score correlation coefficients between distinct cerebral regions were used to identify altered functional connectivity in PNE children. RESULTS: The PNE group had normal FIQ, VIQ, and PIQ values, indicating no significant variation from the control group. However, the M/C factor was significantly lower in the PNE group. Compared to the control group, PNE children exhibited overall lower levels of functional connectivity that were most apparent in the cerebello-thalamo-frontal pathway. The M/C factor significantly correlated with z-scores representing connectivity between Cerebellum_Crus1_L and Frontal_Mid_R. CONCLUSION: PNE children exhibit intelligence structure imbalance and attention deficits. Our findings suggest that cerebello-thalamo-frontal circuit abnormalities are likely to be involved in the onset and progression of attention impairment in PNE children.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of whole-brain CT perfusion in the detection of acute infratentorial infarctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollwein, Christine; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Plate, Annika; Straube, Andreas; Baumgarten, Louisa von [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Hendrik [South Nuremberg Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Although the diagnostic performance of whole-brain computed tomographic perfusion (WB-CTP) in the detection of supratentorial infarctions is well established, its value in the detection of infratentorial strokes remains less well defined. We examined its diagnostic accuracy in the detection of infratentorial infarctions and compared it to nonenhanced computed tomography (NECT), aiming to identify factors influencing its detection rate. Out of a cohort of 1380 patients who underwent WB-CTP due to suspected stroke, we retrospectively included all patients with MRI-confirmed infratentorial strokes and compared it to control patients without infratentorial strokes. Two blinded readers evaluated NECT and four different CTP maps independently for the presence and location of infratentorial ischemic perfusion deficits. The study was designed as a retrospective case-control study and included 280 patients (cases/controls = 1/3). WB-CTP revealed a greater diagnostic sensitivity than NECT (41.4 vs. 17.1 %, P = 0.003). The specificity, however, was comparable (93.3 vs. 95.0 %). Mean transit time (MTT) and time to drain (TTD) were the most sensitive (41.4 and 40.0 %) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) the most specific (99.5 %) perfusion maps. Infarctions detected using WB-CTP were significantly larger than those not detected (15.0 vs. 2.2 ml; P = 0.0007); infarct location, however, did not influence the detection rate. The detection of infratentorial infarctions can be improved by assessing WB-CTP as part of the multimodal stroke workup. However, it remains a diagnostic challenge, especially small volume infarctions in the brainstem are likely to be missed. (orig.)

  12. Neurodynamics of abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and structure in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, J L

    1993-01-01

    Much evidence points to the importance of intrauterine events in the etiology of schizophrenia and suggests a complex interplay between dysfunctional and intact neurons in the pathophysiology of the disorder. This article contrasts what is known of the topographies of metabolic and structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia at differing stages of the illness. From these contrasts, a schema is elaborated by which subtle neurodevelopmental perturbation in early to middle gestation might give rise to functional and structural abnormalities that ultimately release the diagnostic symptoms of schizophrenia. An interaction between those mechanisms mediating the expression of psychosis and the initially subtle stages of normal aging is posited to act on the substrate of a brain that is already developmentally compromised. Such a process might masquerade as "progression" in the absence of any active disease directly attributable to the original etiological event.

  13. Improved Stability of Whole Brain Surface Parcellation with Multi-Atlas Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Huo, Yuankai; Bao, Shunxing; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-01-01

    Whole brain segmentation and cortical surface parcellation are essential in understanding the anatomical-functional relationships of the brain. Multi-atlas segmentation has been regarded as one of the leading segmentation methods for the whole brain segmentation. In our recent work, the multi-atlas technique has been adapted to surface reconstruction using a method called Multi-atlas CRUISE (MaCRUISE). The MaCRUISE method not only performed consistent volume-surface analyses but also showed a...

  14. Metabolism of biogenic amines in acute cerebral ischemia: Influence of systemic hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are biogenic amines which are transmitters of the central nervous system. The effects of ischemia on the brain parenchyma depends on many factors, such is the mechanism of blood flow interruption, velocity of the occurring blood flow interruption, duration of an ischemic episode, organization of anatomical structures of the brain blood vessels etc., which all influence the final outcome. During interruption of the brain circulation in experimental or clinical conditions, neurotransmitter metabolism, primarily of biogenic amines, is disturbed. Many researches with various experimental models of complete ischemia reported a decrease in the content of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the CNS tissue. It was proven that hyperglycemia can drastically increase cerebral injury followed by short-term cerebral ischemia. Considering the fact that biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin influence the size of neurologic damage, as well as the fact that in hyperglycemic conditions infarct size (from the morphological aspect is larger relative to normoglycemic status, the intention was to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in occurrence of damage in conditions of hyperglycemia, i.e. in the case of brain apoplexia in diabetics. Analysis of biogenic amines metabolism in states of acute hyperglycemia, as well as analysis of the effects of reversible and irreversible brain ischemia on metabolism of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, showed that acute hyperglycemia slows down serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine metabolism in the cerebral cortex and n. caudatus. Brain ischemia in normoglycemic animals by itself has no influence on biogenic amines metabolism, but the effect of ischemia becomes apparent during reperfusion. In recirculation, which corresponds to the occurrences in penumbra, release of biogenic amines is uncontrolled and increased. Brain ischemia in acute hyperglycemic animals

  15. Ozone autohemotherapy induces long-term cerebral metabolic changes in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, F; Simonetti, V; Franzini, M; Pandolfi, S; Vaiano, F; Valdenassi, L; Liboni, W

    2014-01-01

    Ozone autohemotherapy is an emerging therapeutic technique that is gaining increasing importance in treating neurological disorders. A validated and standard methodology to assess the effect of such therapy on brain metabolism and circulation is however still lacking. We used a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system to monitor the cerebral metabolism and a transcranial Doppler (TCD) to monitor the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. Fifty-four subjects (32 neurological patients and 22 controls) were tested before, during, and after ozone autohemotherapy. We monitored the concentration changes in the level of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin, and in the level of the Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CYT-c). As a primary endpoint of the work, we showed the changes in the brain metabolism and circulation of the entire population. The concentration of oxygenated haemoglobin increased after the reinjection of the ozoned blood and remained higher than the beginning for another 1.5 hours. The concentration of the deoxygenated haemoglobin decreased during the therapy and the CYT-c concentration markedly increased about 1 hour after the reinjection. No significant changes were observed on the blood flow velocity. As secondary endpoint, we compared the NIRS metabolic pattern of 20 remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients against 20 controls. We showed that by using only 7 NIRS variables it was possible to characterize the metabolic brain pattern of the two groups of subjects. The MS subjects showed a marked increase of the CYT-c activity and concentration about 40 minutes after the end of the autohemotherapy, possibly revealing a reduction of the chronic oxidative stress level typical of MS sufferers. From a technical point of view, this preliminary study showed that NIRS could be useful to show the effects of ozone autohemotherapy at cerebral level, in a long-term monitoring. The clinical result of this study is the quantitative measurement of the

  16. The Impact of Venoarterial and Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation on Cerebral Metabolism in the Newborn Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J Reitman

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is an effective therapy for supporting infants with reversible cardiopulmonary failure. Still, survivors are at risk for long-term neurodevelopmental impairments, the cause of which is not fully understood.To elucidate the effects of ECMO on the newborn brain. We hypothesized that the cerebral metabolic profile of neonates who received ECMO would differ from neonates who did not receive ECMO. To address this, we used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS to investigate the effects of venoarterial and venovenous ECMO on cerebral metabolism.41 neonates treated with ECMO were contrasted to 38 age-matched neonates.All 1H-MRS data were acquired from standardized grey matter and white matter regions of interest using a short-echo (TE = 35 milliseconds, point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS and quantitated using LCModel. Metabolite concentrations (mmol/kg were compared across groups using multivariate analysis of covariance. Elevated creatine (p = 0.002 and choline (p = 0.005 concentrations were observed in the grey matter among neonates treated with ECMO relative to the reference group. Likewise, choline concentrations were elevated in the white matter (p = 0.003 while glutamate was reduced (p = 0.03. Contrasts between ECMO groups revealed lower osmolite concentrations (e.g. myoinositol among the venovenous ECMO group.Neonates who underwent ECMO were found to have an abnormal cerebral metabolic profile, with the pattern of abnormalities suggestive of an underlying inflammatory process. Additionally, neonates who underwent venovenous ECMO had low cerebral osmolite concentrations as seen in vasogenic edema.

  17. Fast whole-brain optical tomography capable of automated slice-collection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Lei; Long, Beng; Peng, Jie; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Acquiring brain-wide composite information of neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping is crucial to understand brain functions. However, current whole-brain imaging methods based on mechnical sectioning haven't achieved brain-wide acquisition of both neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping due to the lack of appropriate whole-brain immunostaining of embedded samples. Here, we present a novel strategy of acquiring brain-wide structural and molecular maps in the same brain, combining whole-brain imaging and subsequent immunostaining of automated-collected slices. We developed a whole-brain imaging system capable of automatically imaging and then collecting imaged tissue slices in order. The system contains three parts: structured illumination microscopy for high-throughput optical sectioning, vibratome for high-precision sectioning and slice-collection device for automated collecting of tissue slices. Through our system, we could acquire a whole-brain dataset of agarose-embedded mouse brain at lateral resolution of 0.33 µm with z-interval sampling of 100 µm in 9 h, and automatically collect the imaged slices in sequence. Subsequently, we performed immunohistochemistry of the collected slices in the routine way. We acquired mouse whole-brain imaging datasets of multiple specific types of neurons, proteins and gene expression profiles. We believe our method could accelerate systematic analysis of brain anatomical structure with specific proteins or genes expression information and understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior.

  18. Clinical and metabolic correlates of cerebral calcifications in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Vinod K; Behen, Michael E; Hu, Jiani; Xuan, Yang; Janisse, James; Chugani, Harry T; Juhász, Csaba

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate clinical and metabolic correlates of cerebral calcifications in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). Fifteen children (11 females, four males; age range 7mo-9y, mean 4y 1mo) with unilateral SWS underwent baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), glucose metabolism positron emission tomography (PET), and neurocognitive assessment (mean follow-up 1y 8mo). Calcified brain volumes measured on SWI were correlated with areas of abnormal glucose metabolism, seizure variables, and cognitive function (IQ). Ten children had brain calcification at baseline and 11 at follow-up. Mean calcified brain volume increased from 1.69 to 2.47cm3 (p=0.003) in these children; the rate of interval calcified volume increase was associated with early onset of epilepsy (Spearman's rho [rs ]=-0.63, p=0.036). Calcified brain regions showed a variable degree of glucose hypometabolism with the metabolic abnormalities often extending to non-calcified cerebral lobes. Larger calcified brain volumes at baseline were associated with longer duration of epilepsy (rs =0.69, p=0.004) and lower outcome IQ (rs =-0.53, p=0.042). Brain calcifications are common and progress faster in children with SWS with early epilepsy onset, and are associated with a variable degree of hypometabolism, which is typically more extensive than the calcified area. Higher calcified brain volumes may indicate a risk for poorer neurocognitive outcome. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Modafinil Reverses Phencyclidine-Induced Deficits in Cognitive Flexibility, Cerebral Metabolism, and Functional Brain Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Neil; Thompson, Rhiannon J.; McVie, Allan; Thomson, David M.; Morris, Brian J.; Pratt, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we employ mathematical modeling (partial least squares regression, PLSR) to elucidate the functional connectivity signatures of discrete brain regions in order to identify the functional networks subserving PCP-induced disruption of distinct cognitive functions and their restoration by the procognitive drug modafinil. Methods: We examine the functional connectivity signatures of discrete brain regions that show overt alterations in metabolism, as measured by semiquantitative 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography, in an animal model (subchronic phencyclidine [PCP] treatment), which shows cognitive inflexibility with relevance to the cognitive deficits seen in schizophrenia. Results: We identify the specific components of functional connectivity that contribute to the rescue of this cognitive inflexibility and to the restoration of overt cerebral metabolism by modafinil. We demonstrate that modafinil reversed both the PCP-induced deficit in the ability to switch attentional set and the PCP-induced hypometabolism in the prefrontal (anterior prelimbic) and retrosplenial cortices. Furthermore, modafinil selectively enhanced metabolism in the medial prelimbic cortex. The functional connectivity signatures of these regions identified a unifying functional subsystem underlying the influence of modafinil on cerebral metabolism and cognitive flexibility that included the nucleus accumbens core and locus coeruleus. In addition, these functional connectivity signatures identified coupling events specific to each brain region, which relate to known anatomical connectivity. Conclusions: These data support clinical evidence that modafinil may alleviate cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and also demonstrate the benefit of applying PLSR modeling to characterize functional brain networks in translational models relevant to central nervous system dysfunction. PMID:20810469

  20. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiduschat, Nora; Kaufmann, Petra; Mao, Xiangling; Engelstad, Kristin Marie; Hinton, Veronica; DiMauro, Salvatore; De Vivo, Darryl; Shungu, Dikoma

    2014-03-04

    To establish cerebral metabolic features associated with the A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI) and to assess their potential as prognostic biomarkers. In this prospective cohort study, we investigated 135 clinically heterogeneous A3243G mutation carriers and 30 healthy volunteers (HVs) with (1)H MRSI. Mutation carriers included 45 patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS); 11 participants who would develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (converters); and 79 participants who would not develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (nonconverters). The groups were compared with respect to MRSI metabolic indices of 1) anaerobic energy metabolism (lactate), 2) neuronal integrity (N-acetyl-l-aspartate [NAA]), 3) mitochondrial function (NAA; lactate), 4) cell energetics (total creatine), and 5) membrane biosynthesis and turnover (total choline [tCho]). Consistent with prior studies, the patients with MELAS had higher lactate (p mutation carriers to develop the MELAS phenotype. (1)H MRSI assessment of cerebral metabolism in A3243G mutation carriers shows promise in identifying disease biomarkers as well as individuals at risk of developing the MELAS phenotype.

  1. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreased pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.

  2. Cerebral oxygen and glucose metabolism in patients with mitochondrial m.3243A>G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, Markus M; Borra, Ronald J; Parkkola, Riitta; Virtanen, Sami M; Lepomäki, Virva; Bucci, Marco; Virta, Jere R; Rinne, Juha O; Nuutila, Pirjo; Majamaa, Kari

    2009-12-01

    The m.3243A>G mutation is the most common pathogenic mutation in mitochondrial DNA. It leads to defective oxidative phosphorylation, decreased oxygen consumption and increased glucose utilization and lactate production in vitro. However, oxygen and glucose metabolism has not been studied in the brain of patients harbouring the m.3243A>G mutation. Therefore, 14 patients with the m.3243A>G mutation, not experiencing acute stroke-like episodes and 14 age-matched controls underwent positron emission tomography using 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose, [(15)O]H(2)O and [(15)O]O(2) as the tracers during normoglycaemia. The metabolic rate of oxygen and glucose were determined using a quantitative region of interest analysis. Metabolites in unaffected periventricular tissue were measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was decreased by 26% (range 18%-29%) in the grey as well as the white matter of patients with the m.3243A>G mutation. A decrease in the metabolic rate of glucose was found with predilection to the posterior part of the brain. No major changes were detected in cerebral blood flow or the number of white matter lesions. Our results show that the m.3243A>G mutation leads to a global decrease in oxygen consumption in the grey matter including areas where no other signs of disease were present.

  3. Factor analysis of regional cerebral glucose metabolic rates in healthy men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Z.; Camargo, E.E.; Sostre, S.; Shafique, I.; Sadzot, B.; Links, J.M.; Dannals, R.F.; Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MA (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MA (United States). Div. of Radiation Health Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Cerebral glucose utilization measured with fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose is characterized by considerable variability both among different persons and for the same person examined on different occasions. The goal of this study was to explore whether some regions of the brain were more variable than others with respect to glucose utilization and whether there was a pattern in their covariance. The global and regional cerebral utilization of glucose was measured in 12 healthy young volunteers on 3 or 4 occasions. In all, 24 regions were examined. The interrelation of the glucose utilization rates of the brain regions was investigated by factor analysis of the metabolic rates. Some 70% of the total variance was attributable to only 1 factor, while 80% of the total variance could be attributed to 2 factors. Regions making up the first factor were the frontal and temporal cortex, cingulate gyrus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and putamen. These regions are functionally related to the limbic system. Regions of the second factor were the parietal cortex, occipital cortex and cerebellum, regions more clearly related to sensory and motor functions. The 2-factor pattern was highly reproducible, being found with different algorithms for factor extraction and rotation. Under resting conditions, the variance of cerebral metabolism seems to be primarily related to regions which are closely involved with the limbic system. Cortical regions involved primarily in motor and sensory functions have less influence on the variance. (orig.).

  4. Effects of nitrous oxide on cerebral haemodynamics and metabolism during isoflurane anaesthesia in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K. (Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Rosen, I. (Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Holmin, T. (Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden))

    1992-01-01

    Seven normoventilated and five hyperventilated healthy adults undergoing cholecystectomy and anaesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl and pancuronium were studied with measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cereal metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRo[sub 2]), and quantified electroencephalography (EEG) under two sets of conditions: (1) 1.7% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in air/oxygen: (2) 0.85% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in nitrous oxide (N[sub 2]O)/oxygen. The object was to study the effects of N[sub 2]O during isoflurane anaesthesia on cerebral circulation, metabolism and neuroelectric activity. N[sub 2]O in the anaesthetic gas mixture caused a 43% (P<0.05) increase in CBF during normocarbic conditions but no significant change during hypocapnia. CMRo[sub 2] was not significantly altered by N[sub 2]O. EEG demonstrated an activated pattern with decreased low frequency activity and increased high frequency activity. The results confirm that N[sub 2]O is a potent cerebral vasodilator in man, although the mechanisms underlying the effects on CBF are still unclear. (au).

  5. Effect of desipramine and fluoxetine on energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella; Brunello, Nicoletta; Tascedda, Fabio

    2016-08-25

    Brain bioenergetic abnormalities in mood disorders were detected by neuroimaging in vivo studies in humans. Because of the increasing importance of mitochondrial pathogenetic hypothesis of Depression, in this study the effects of sub-chronic treatment (21days) with desipramine (15mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg) were evaluated on brain energy metabolism. On mitochondria in vivo located in neuronal soma (somatic) and on mitochondria of synapses (synaptic), the catalytic activities of regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial energy-yielding metabolic pathways were assayed. Antidepressants in vivo treatment modified the activities of selected enzymes of different mitochondria, leading to metabolic modifications in the energy metabolism of brain cortex: (a) the enhancement of cytochrome oxidase activity on somatic mitochondria; (b) the decrease of malate, succinate dehydrogenase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities of synaptic mitochondria; (c) the selective effect of fluoxetine on enzymes related to glutamate metabolism. These results overcome the conflicting data so far obtained with antidepressants on brain energy metabolism, because the enzymatic analyses were made on mitochondria with diversified neuronal in vivo localization, i.e. on somatic and synaptic. This research is the first investigation on the pharmacodynamics of antidepressants studied at subcellular level, in the perspective of (i) assessing the role of energy metabolism of cerebral mitochondria in animal models of mood disorders, and (ii) highlighting new therapeutical strategies for antidepressants targeting brain bioenergetics. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Early cerebral metabolic crisis after TBI influences outcome despite adequate hemodynamic resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Nathan R; McArthur, David L; Etchepare, Maria; Vespa, Paul M

    2012-08-01

    Optimal resuscitation after traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains uncertain. We hypothesize that cerebral metabolic crisis is frequent despite adequate resuscitation of the TBI patient and that metabolic crisis negatively influences outcome. We assessed the effectiveness of a standardized trauma resuscitation protocol in 89 patients with moderate to severe TBI, and determined the frequency of adequate resuscitation. Prospective hourly values of heart rate, blood pressure, pulse oximetry, intracranial pressure (ICP), respiratory rate, jugular venous oximetry, and brain extracellular values of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and glutamate were obtained. The incidence during the initial 72 h after injury of low brain glucose 25, and metabolic crisis, defined as the simultaneous occurrence of both low glucose and high LPR, were determined for the group. 5 patients were inadequately resuscitated and eight patients had intractable ICP. In patients with successful resuscitation and controlled ICP (n = 76), within 72 h of trauma, 76% had low glucose, 93% had elevated LPR, and 74% were in metabolic crisis. The duration of metabolic crisis was longer in those patients with unfavorable (GOSe ≤ 6) versus favorable (GOSe ≥ 7) outcome at 6 months (P = 0.011). In four multivariate models the burden of metabolic crisis was a powerful independent predictor of poor outcome. Metabolic crisis occurs frequently after TBI despite adequate resuscitation and controlled ICP, and is a strong independent predictor of poor outcome at 6 months.

  7. Cerebral blood flow and metabolic abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan). National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous, and Muscular Disorders

    2001-04-01

    In this review I summarize observations of PET and SPECT studies about cerebral blood flow and metabolic abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In very early AD flow or metabolism reduces first in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus. This reduction may arise from functional deafferentation caused by primary neural degeneration in the remote area of the entorhinal cortex that is the first to be pathologically affected in AD. Then medial temporal structures and parietotemporal association cortex show flow or metabolic reduction as disease processes. The reason why flow or metabolism in medial temporal structures shows delay in starting to reduce in spite of the earliest pathological affection remains to be elucidated. It is likely that anterior cingulate gyrus is functionally involved, since attention is the first non-memory domain to be affected, before deficits in language and visuospatial functions. However few reports have described involvement in the anterior cingulate gyrus. Relationship between cerebral blood flow or metabolism and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been investigated. Especially, the APOE{epsilon}4 allele has been reported to increase risk and to lower onset age as a function of the inherited dose of the {epsilon}4 allele. Reduction of flow or metabolism in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus has been reported even in presymptomatic nondemented subjects who were cognitively normal and had at least a single {epsilon}4 allele. On the contrary the relation of {epsilon}4 allele to the progression rate of AD has been controversial from neuroimaging approaches. PET and SPECT imaging has become to be quite useful for assessing therapeutical effects of newly introduced treatment for AD. Recent investigations observed significant regional flow increase after donepezil hydrochloride treatment. Most of these observations have been made by applying computer assisted analysis of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection

  8. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, R.M.; Parker, E.S.; Clark, C.M.; Martin, P.R.; George, D.T.; Weingartner, H.; Sokoloff, L.; Ebert, M.H.; Mishkin, M.

    1985-05-01

    Seven alcoholic male subjects diagnosed as having Korsakoff's syndrome and eight age-matched male normal volunteers were studied with /sup 18/F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2/sup 18/FDG). All subjects were examined at rest with eyes covered in a quiet, darkened room. Serial plasma samples were obtained following injection of 4 to 5 mCi of 2/sup 18/FDG. Tomographic slices spaced at 10mm axial increments were obtained (in-plane resolution = 1.75 cm, axial resolution = 1.78 cm). Four planes were selected from each subject, and a total of 46 regions of interest were sampled and glucose metabolic rates for each region calculated. The mean glucose metalbolic rate for the 46 regions in the Korsakoff subjects was significantly lower than that in the normal controls (5.17 +- .43 versus 6.6 +- 1.31). A Q-component analysis, which examined each subject's regional rates relative to his mean rate, revealed two distinct patterns in the Korsakoff group. Glucose metabolism was significantly reduced in 37 of the 46 regions sampled. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in a nondemented group of subjects has not previously been reported. The reduction in cortical metabolism may be the result of damage to sub-cortical projecting systems. The differing patterns of cerebral metabolism in Korsakoff's syndrome suggests subgroups with differing neuropathology. Regions implicated in memory function, medial temporal, thalamic and medial prefrontal were among the regions reduced in metabolism.

  9. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with aphasia due to basal ganglionic lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Shin; Kato, Toshiaki; Ujike, Takashi; Kuroki, Soemu; Terashi, Akiro

    1987-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in right handed eight patients with subcortical lesion and aphasia were measured to investigate the correlation between aphasia and functional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/) in the cortex and the basal ganglionic region. All patients had no lesion in the cortex, but in the basal ganglionic region (putamen, caudate nucleus, internal capsule, and periventricular white matter) on CT images. Patients with bilateral lesion were excluded in this study. Six patients with cerebral infarction in the left basal ganglionic region and two patients with the left putammal hemorrhage were examined. Five patients had non fluent Broca's type speech, two patients had poor comprehension, fluent Wernicke-type speech and one patient was globally aphasic. CBF, CMRO/sub 2/, and oxygen extraction fraction were measured by the positron emission tomography using /sup 15/O/sub 2/, C/sup 15/O/sub 2/ inhalation technique. In addition to reduction of CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ in the basal ganglionic region, CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ decreased in the left frontal cortex especially posterior part in four patients with Broca's aphasia. In two patients with Wernicke type aphasia, CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ decreased in the basal ganglionic region and the left temporal cortex. In a globally aphasic patient, marked reduction of CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ was observed in the left frontal and temporal cortex, in addition to the basal ganglionic region. These results suggest that dysfunction of cortex as well as that of basal ganglionic region might be related to the occurence of aphasia. However, in one patient with Broca's ahasia, CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were preserved in the cortex and metabolic reduction was observed in only basal ganglia. This case indicates the relation between basal ganglionic lesion and the occurrence of aphasia.

  10. Cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic patients undergoing haemodialysis: in vivo proton MR spectroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Ming-Lun; Chiang, I. Chan [Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China); Li, Chun-Wei [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Health Science (China); Chang, Jer-Ming [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Hsiao-Kang Municipal Hospital (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Nephrology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Ko, Chih-Hung [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry (China); Chuang, Hung-Yi [Kaohsiung Medical University, Faculty of Public Health, College of Health Science (China); Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (China); Sheu, Reu-Sheng [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Lee, Chen-Chang [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Health Science (China); Kaohsiung Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (China); Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi [Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China)

    2010-06-15

    To prospectively investigate and detect early cerebral metabolic changes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). We enrolled 32 patients with ESRD and 32 healthy controls between the ages of 26 and 50 years. Short echo time single-voxel proton MRS was acquired from volumes of interest (VOIs) located in the frontal grey and white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia. The choline/phospatidylcholine (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) peaks were measured and the metabolic ratios with respect to tCr were calculated. In the ESRD group, significant elevations of the Cho/tCr and mI/tCr ratios were observed for the frontal grey matter, frontal white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia as compared with controls. There was no significant difference in the NAA/tCr ratios at all VOIs between the ESRD patients and the healthy controls. Proton MRS is a useful and non-invasive imaging tool for the detection of early cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic ESRD patients. (orig.)

  11. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in frontotemporal dementia: a study with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. S.; Jeong, J.; Kang, S. J.; Na, D. L.; Choe, Y. S.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a common cause of presenile dementia. We investigated the regional cerebral glucose metabolic impairments in patients with FTD using FDG PET. We analysed the regional metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 30 patients with FTD and age- and sex-matched 15 patients with Alzheimers disease (AD) and 11 healthy subjects using SPM99. We also compared the inter-hemispheric metabolic asymmetry among the three groups by counting the total metabolic activity of each hemisphere and computing asymmetry index (AL) between hemispheres. The hypometabolic brain regions in FTD patients compared with healthy controls were as follows: superior middle and medial frontal lobules, superior and middle temporal lobules, anterior and posterior cingulate gyri, uncus, insula, lateral globus pallidus and thalamus. The regions with decreased metabolism in FTD patients compared with AD patients were as follows: superior, inferior and medial frontal lobules, anterior cingulate gyrus, and caudate nucleus. Twenty-five (83%) out of the 30 FTD patients had AI values that was beyond the 95% confidence interval of the AI values obtained from healthy controls; 10 patients had hypometabolism more severe on the right and 15 patients had the opposite pattern. In comparison, 10 (67%) out of the 15 AD patients had asymmetric metabolism. Our SPM analysis of FDG PET revealed additional areas of decreased metabolism in FTD patients compared with prior studies using the ROI method, involving frontal, temporal, cingulate gyrus, corpus callosum, uncus, insula, and some subcortical areas. The inter-hemispheric metabolic asymmetry was common in FTD patients, which can be another metabolic feature that helps differentiate FTD from AD.

  12. Whole brain analysis of postmortem density changes of grey and white matter on computed tomography by statistical parametric mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Katsube, Takashi; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kanayama, Hidekazu; Tada, Keiji; Yamamoto, Yasushi [Shimane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Takeshita, Haruo [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Legal Medicine, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kawakami, Kazunori [Fujifilm RI Pharma, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    This study examined the usefulness of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for investigating postmortem changes on brain computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study included 128 patients (23 - 100 years old) without cerebral abnormalities who underwent unenhanced brain CT before and after death. The antemortem CT (AMCT) scans and postmortem CT (PMCT) scans were spatially normalized using our original brain CT template, and postmortem changes of CT values (in Hounsfield units; HU) were analysed by the SPM technique. Compared with AMCT scans, 58.6 % and 98.4 % of PMCT scans showed loss of the cerebral sulci and an unclear grey matter (GM)-white matter (WM) interface, respectively. SPM analysis revealed a significant decrease in cortical GM density within 70 min after death on PMCT scans, suggesting cytotoxic brain oedema. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the density of the WM, lenticular nucleus and thalamus more than 120 min after death. The SPM technique demonstrated typical postmortem changes on brain CT scans, and revealed that the unclear GM-WM interface on early PMCT scans is caused by a rapid decrease in cortical GM density combined with a delayed increase in WM density. SPM may be useful for assessment of whole brain postmortem changes. (orig.)

  13. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism during sevoflurane anaesthesia in healthy subjects studied with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlünzen, L; Juul, N; Hansen, K V

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism by which sevoflurane exerts its effects in the human brain remains unknown. In the present study, we quantified the effects of sevoflurane on regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rGMR) in the human brain measured with positron emission tomography. METHODS: Eight...... monitored and bispectral index responses were registered. Statistical parametric maps and conventional regions of interest analysis were used to determine rGMR differences. RESULTS: All subjects were unconsciousness at 1.0 MAC sevoflurane. Cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were constant over time...

  14. Effects of erythropoietin administration on cerebral metabolism and exercise capacity in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Foged, Eva M; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2010-01-01

    exercise capacity independent of erythropoiesis. To test this hypothesis, 15 healthy young males (18-34 yo., 74 +/- 7 kg) received either 3 days of high dose (30,000 IU day(-1), N=7) double-blinded placebo controlled or 3 months of low dose (5,000 IU week(-1), N=8) counter-balanced open but controlled...... activation by transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced twitch force were evaluated. Although EPO in a high dose increased cerebrospinal fluid EPO concentration ~20-fold and affected ventilation and cerebral glucose and lactate metabolism (P... on cognition, voluntary activation or exercise capacity but ratings of perceived exertion increased (P

  15. Cerebral autoregulation and flow/metabolism coupling during cardiopulmonary bypass: the influence of PaCO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murkin, J.M.; Farrar, J.K.; Tweed, W.A.; McKenzie, F.N.; Guiraudon, G.

    1987-09-01

    Measurement of /sup 133/Xe clearance and effluent cerebral venous blood sampling were used in 38 patients to determine the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass, and of maintaining temperature corrected or noncorrected PaCO/sub 2/ at 40 mm Hg on regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and flow/metabolism coupling. After induction of anesthesia with diazepam and fentanyl, mean CBF was 25 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 and cerebral oxygen consumption, 1.67 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1. Cerebral oxygen consumption during nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass at 26 degrees C was reduced to 0.42 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in both groups. CBF was reduced to 14-15 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1 in the non-temperature-corrected group (n = 21), was independent of cerebral perfusion pressure over the range of 20-100 mm Hg, but correlated with cerebral oxygen consumption. In the temperature-corrected group (n = 17), CBF varied from 22 to 32 ml X 100 g-1 X min-1, and flow/metabolism coupling was not maintained (i.e., CBF and cerebral oxygen consumption varied independently). However, variation in CBF correlated significantly with cerebral perfusion pressure over the pressure range of 15-95 mm Hg. This study demonstrates a profound reduction in cerebral oxygen consumption during hypothermic nonpulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass. When a non-temperature-corrected PaCO/sub 2/ of approximately 40 mm Hg was maintained, CBF was lower, and analysis of pooled data suggested that CBF regulation was better preserved, i.e., CBF was independent of pressure changes and dependent upon cerebral oxygen consumption.

  16. Subcortical cerebral blood flow and metabolic changes elicited by cortical spreading depression in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mraovitch, S.; Calando, Y.; Goadsby, P.J.; Seylaz, J. (Laboratoire de Recherches Cerebrovasculaire, Paris (France))

    1992-06-01

    Changes in cerebral cortical perfusion (CBF{sub LDF}), local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) elicited by unilateral cortical spreading depression (SD) were monitored and measured in separate groups of rats anesthetized with {alpha}-chloralose. CBF{sub LDF} was recorded with laser Doppler flowmetry, while lCBF and lCGU were measured by the quantitative autoradiographic ({sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine and ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose methods, respectively. SD elicited a wave of hyperemia after a latency of 2 to 3 min followed by an oligemic phase. Ninety minutes following the onset of SD cortical lCBF and lCGU were essentially the same as on the contralateral side and in sham-treated rats. However, alteration in the lCBF and lCGU in upper and lower brainstem persisted. The present results demonstrate that long-lasting cerebrovascular and metabolic alterations take place within the subcortical regions following SD. These regions provide an attractive site to integrate observations in man concerning spreading depression and the aura of migraine with the other features of the syndrome. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Subcortical cerebral blood flow and metabolic changes elicited by cortical spreading depression in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraovitch, S; Calando, Y; Goadsby, P J; Seylaz, J

    1992-06-01

    Changes in cerebral cortical perfusion (CBFLDF), local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) elicited by unilateral cortical spreading depression (SD) were monitored and measured in separate groups of rats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. CBFLDF was recorded with laser Doppler flowmetry, while lCBF and lCGU were measured by the quantitative autoradiographic [14C]iodoantipyrine and [14C]-2-deoxyglucose methods, respectively. SD elicited a wave of hyperemia after a latency of 2 to 3 min followed by an oligemic phase. Ninety minutes following the onset of SD cortical (frontal, parietal and occipital) lCBF and lCGU were essentially the same as on the contralateral side and in sham-treated rats. However, alteration in the lCBF and lCGU in upper and lower brainstem persisted. The present results demonstrate, for the first time, that long-lasting cerebrovascular and metabolic alterations take place within the subcortical regions following SD. These regions provide an attractive site to integrate observations in man concerning spreading depression and the aura of migraine with the other features of the syndrome.

  18. Preoperative cerebral metabolic difference related to the outcome of cochlear implantation in prelingually deaf children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Lim, G. C.; Ahn, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Kim, J. S. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The outcome of cochlear implantation (CI) has known to be variable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative regional glucose metabolism difference related to the speech perception outcome after CI in prelingually deaf children. Forty-one prelingually deaf children who underwent CI at age 2{approx}10 years were included. All patients underwent F-18 FDG brain PET within one month before CI and measured speech perception using the institute version of the CID at 2 years after CI. Patients were classified into younger (2{approx}6 years) and older (7{approx}10 years) groups. Each group was also divided into a GOOD (CID scores>80) and a BAD (CID scores<60) subgroup. We assessed regional metabolic difference according to CID scores and age by voxel based analysis (SPM2) comparing normal controls (n =8, 20{approx}30 years). Speech perception was good in 19 (68%) of 28 younger patients and 5 (38%) of 13 older patients after CI. Regional metabolism of both younger and older GOOD subgroup was significantly decreased in right temporal, left cerebellar and right frontal regions compared to normal controls (uncorrected p<0.001). In younger GOOD subgroup, left frontotemporal and both parietal regions showed decreased metabolism and right frontal, left temporal and anterior cingulate regions showed increased metabolism compared to BAD subgroup (uncorrected p<0.005). In younger group, regional metabolism in left superior frontal, right temporal and right occipital regions showed a significant negative correlation with CID scores (uncorrected p<0.005). In older group, the pattern of regional metabolic difference correlated with CID score was not similar to that of younger group. Preoperative regional cerebral metabolism is decreased in several brain regions related to the language in preligually deaf patients and the neuralplasty of younger patients are different according to the outcome of speech perception after CI.

  19. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment alters cerebral metabolism in dopaminergic reward regions. Bromocriptine enhances recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clow, D.W.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. (Univ. of Hawaii School of Medicine, Honolulu (USA))

    1991-01-01

    2-(14C)deoxyglucose autoradiography was used to determine local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) in rats following chronic cocaine treatment and subsequent abstinence. lCGU was examined in 43 discrete brain regions in animals which had received daily injections of cocaine for 14 days (10 mg/kg) followed by 3 days of saline or bromocriptine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment significantly reduced lCGU in several regions including mesocorticolimbic structures such as ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Within the NAc, however, only the rostral pole showed significant reduction. In contrast, when bromocriptine treatment accompanied abstinence, lCGU was no longer reduced in mesocorticolimbic and most other regions, implying that metabolic recovery was enhanced by bromocriptine treatment during early abstinence following chronic cocaine treatment. These data suggest that cerebral metabolism is decreased during cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment in critical brain regions, and that this alteration can be prevented by treatment with direct-acting dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine.

  20. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in dementia with Lewy bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yoshitomo; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) and the oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) were measured using the steady-state {sup 15}O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and compared with ten patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and six normal controls. In the AD patients, rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were significantly decreased in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices compared with controls. In DLB patients, rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were decreased in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices compared with controls, and were decreased more diffusely than in AD patients. rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were significantly decreased in occipital cortex compared with AD patients. rOEF was significantly increased in the parieto-temporal cortex in AD patients compared with controls. In DLB patients, rOEF was significantly increased not only in the parieto-temporal cortex but also in the occipital and frontal cortices compared with controls, and was significantly increased in the occipital cortex compared with AD patients. The diffuse reduction of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism including the occipital cortex may be related to visual hallucination and other visuospatial deficits frequently seen in DLB patients. The increase in rOEF may be mainly due to the reduction in the vascular bed associated with decreased activity in the vasodilatory cholinergic system. (author)

  1. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  2. Clinical significance of reduced cerebral metabolism in multiple sclerosis. A combined PET and MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiayan; Tanaka, Makoto; Kondo, Susumu; Okamoto, Koichi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Hirai, Shunsaku

    1998-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has provided major insights into the disease`s natural history, and many studies have focussed on possible correlations between MRI findings and the clinical manifestations of MS. In contrast, there are few reports on possible relationships between functional imaging data and cognitive function. The present study assessed the relationship between clinical presentation and combined anatomical and functional imaging data in MS. Twenty patients with definite MS underwent MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) to evaluate cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}). The relationships between these neuroimaging findings and clinical data, including the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Mini-mental status scale, Hasegawa Dementia Scale and relapse time, were evaluated with Spearman`s rank correlation coefficients. A general reduction in rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} in the gray and white matter were found in the MS patients. EDSS was correlated with the number and size of the lesions on MRI and was negatively correlated with rCMRO{sub 2}. A correlation between the decrease in rCMRO{sub 2} and the level of cognitive impairment was also found. The severity of cerebral hypometabolism was also related to the number of relapses. Morphological and functional findings obtained by MRI and PET are closely related to the clinical status in MS. Our results suggest that measurement of cerebral metabolism in MS has the potential to be an objective marker for monitoring disease activity and to provide prognostic information. (author)

  3. Sociability trait and regional cerebral oxidative metabolism in rats: Predominantly nonlinear relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarik, Margus; Harro, Jaanus

    2018-01-30

    Deficits in social behaviour are common in psychopathological conditions e.g., depression, autism and schizophrenia. In rats, sociability, defined as the engagement of an animal in non-aggressive social contact with a conspecific in a neutral arena, is as a persistent trait. To elucidate the neuroanatomy of social behaviour in animal models, long term neuronal energy metabolism was studied in rats preselected for sociability levels. Rats were divided into groups with high, medium and low sociability levels (HS, MS and LS) according to the average score of three social interaction tests, and cerebral long-term energy metabolism was assayed with cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. In the dorsomedial caudate putamen oxidative metabolism was linearly dependent on sociability, with LS-rats having the highest levels. In median preoptic nucleus, posterior paraventricular thalamus and median raphe, nonlinear relations appeared, HS- and LS-rats having lower oxidative activity than MS-animals. In the supraoptic nucleus MS-rats displayed lower oxidative activity than HS- and LS-animals. Intra-individual variability in social interaction on different testing occasions correlated positively with oxidative metabolism in the prelimbic cortex, bed nucleus of stria terminalis and caudate putamen, and negatively in the nucleus accumbens core. Conclusively, rats with different sociability levels are distinguished by long-term energy metabolism in nuclei involved in motivational behaviour, fear and vigilance; the relationship between energy metabolism and sociability appears to be predominantly nonlinear - animals with high and low expression of sociability are similarly deviant from the average; and intra-individual variability in social interaction is related to brain areas controlling motivation, stress reactivity and anxiety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Early cerebral hemodynamic, metabolic and histological changes in hypoxic-ischemic fetal lambs during postnatal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eRey-Santano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic, metabolic and biochemical changes produce during transition from fetal to neonatal life could be aggravated if asphyctic event occur during fetal life. The aim of the study was to examine the regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF, histological changes, and cerebral brain metabolism in preterm lambs, and to analyze the role of oxidative stress for the first hours of postnatal life following severe fetal asphyxia. 18 chronically instrumented fetal lambs were assigned to: hypoxic-ischemic group, following fetal asphyxia animals were delivered and maintained on intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation for 3 hours, and non-injured animals that were managed similarly to the previous group and used as control group. During hypoxic-ischemic insult, injured group developed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia, latacidaemia and tachycardia in comparison to control group, without hypotension. Intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation transiently improved gas exchange and cardiovascular parameters. After HI injury and during ventilation-support, the increased RCBF in inner zones was maintained for hypoxic-ischemic group, but cortical flow did not exhibit differences compared to the control group. Also, the increase of TUNEL positive cells (apoptosis and antioxidant enzymes, and decrease of ATP reserves was significantly higher in the brain regions where the RCBF were not increased.In conclusion, early metabolic, histological and hemodynamic changes involved in brain damage have been intensively investigated and reported in premature asphyctic lambs for the first 3 hours of postnatal life. Those changes have been described in human neonates, so our model could be useful to test the security and the effectiveness of different neuroprotective or ventilatory strategies when are applied in the first hours after fetal hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  5. A whole brain approach to teaching and learning in higher education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knowledge pertaining to the educators' preferred thinking styles was used as a point of departure to foster an awareness for the whole brain concept and the existence of diversity in thinking style preferences. This diversity poses challenges for all classroom practices. South African Journal of Higher Education Vol.15(3) ...

  6. Improving the Students' Spiritual Intelligence in English Writing through Whole Brain Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Didik

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to improve the students' spiritual intelligence in English writing through Whole Brain Learning strategy. Therefore, this study was conducted as a classroom action research. The research pocedure followed the cyclonic process of planning, action, observation, and reflection. This process was preceeded by…

  7. Abnormal whole-brain functional networks in homogeneous acute mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shumskaya, E.; Andriessen, T.; Norris, David Gordon; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the whole-brain resting-state networks in a homogeneous group of patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and to identify alterations in functional connectivity induced by MTBI. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute MTBI and 35 healthy control subjects,

  8. Parameterization of the Age-Dependent Whole Brain Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Klose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The distribution of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values in the brain can be used to characterize age effects and pathological changes of the brain tissue. The aim of this study was the parameterization of the whole brain ADC histogram by an advanced model with influence of age considered. Methods. Whole brain ADC histograms were calculated for all data and for seven age groups between 10 and 80 years. Modeling of the histograms was performed for two parts of the histogram separately: the brain tissue part was modeled by two Gaussian curves, while the remaining part was fitted by the sum of a Gaussian curve, a biexponential decay, and a straight line. Results. A consistent fitting of the histograms of all age groups was possible with the proposed model. Conclusions. This study confirms the strong dependence of the whole brain ADC histograms on the age of the examined subjects. The proposed model can be used to characterize changes of the whole brain ADC histogram in certain diseases under consideration of age effects.

  9. The role of non-rapid eye movement slow-wave activity in prefrontal metabolism across young and middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilckens, Kristine A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Nofzinger, Eric A; James, Jeffrey A; Hasler, Brant P; Rosario-Rivera, Bedda L; Franzen, Peter L; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Kupfer, David J; Price, Julie C; Siegle, Greg J; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is a marker for cortical reorganization, particularly within the prefrontal cortex. Greater slow wave activity during sleep may promote greater waking prefrontal metabolic rate and, in turn, executive function. However, this process may be affected by age. Here we examined whether greater NREM slow wave activity was associated with higher prefrontal metabolism during wakefulness and whether this relationship interacted with age. Fifty-two participants aged 25-61 years were enrolled into studies that included polysomnography and a (18) [F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography scan during wakefulness. Absolute and relative measures of NREM slow wave activity were assessed. Semiquantitative and relative measures of cerebral metabolism were collected to assess whole brain and regional metabolism, focusing on two regions of interest: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. Greater relative slow wave activity was associated with greater dorsolateral prefrontal metabolism. Age and slow wave activity interacted significantly in predicting semiquantitative whole brain metabolism and outside regions of interest in the posterior cingulate, middle temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, such that greater slow-wave activity was associated with lower metabolism in the younger participants and greater metabolism in the older participants. These results suggest that slow-wave activity is associated with cerebral metabolism during wakefulness across the adult lifespan within regions important for executive function. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals an impaired brain metabolic profile in mice resistant to cerebral malaria infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Kober, Frank; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Dalmasso, Christiane; Coltel, Nicolas; Liprandi, Agnès; Gulian, Jean-Marc; Grau, Georges E; Cozzone, Patrick J; Viola, Angèle

    2007-05-11

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with an annual death toll exceeding one million. Severe malaria is a complex multisystem disorder, including one or more of the following complications: cerebral malaria, anemia, acidosis, jaundice, respiratory distress, renal insufficiency, coagulation anomalies, and hyperparasitemia. Using a combined in vivo/in vitro metabolic-based approach, we investigated the putative pathogenic effects of Plasmodium berghei ANKA on brain, in a mouse strain developing malaria but resistant to cerebral malaria. The purpose was to determine whether the infection could cause a brain dysfunction distinct from the classic cerebral syndrome. Mice resistant to cerebral malaria were infected with P. berghei ANKA and explored during both the symptomless and the severe stage of the disease by using in vivo brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. The infected mice did not present the lesional and metabolic hallmarks of cerebral malaria. However, brain dysfunction caused by anemia, parasite burden, and hepatic damage was evidenced. We report an increase in cerebral blood flow, a process allowing temporary maintenance of oxygen supply to brain despite anemia. Besides, we document metabolic anomalies affecting choline-derived compounds, myo-inositol, glutamine, glycine, and alanine. The choline decrease appears related to parasite proliferation. Glutamine, myo-inositol, glycine, and alanine variations together indicate a hepatic encephalopathy, a finding in agreement with the liver damage detected in mice, which is also a feature of the human disease. These results reveal the vulnerability of brain to malaria infection at the severe stage of the disease even in the absence of cerebral malaria.

  11. Whole-brain functional networks in cognitively normal, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hyun Seo

    Full Text Available The conceptual significance of understanding functional brain alterations and cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD process has been widely established. However, the whole-brain functional networks of AD and its prodromal stage, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, are not well clarified yet. In this study, we compared the characteristics of the whole-brain functional networks among cognitively normal (CN, MCI, and AD individuals by applying graph theoretical analyses to [(18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET data. Ninety-four CN elderly, 183 with MCI, and 216 with AD underwent clinical evaluation and FDG-PET scan. The overall small-world property as seen in the CN whole-brain network was preserved in MCI and AD. In contrast, individual parameters of the network were altered with the following patterns of changes: local clustering of networks was lower in both MCI and AD compared to CN, while path length was not different among the three groups. Then, MCI had a lower level of local clustering than AD. Subgroup analyses for AD also revealed that very mild AD had lower local clustering and shorter path length compared to mild AD. Regarding the local properties of the whole-brain networks, MCI and AD had significantly decreased normalized betweenness centrality in several hubs regionally associated with the default mode network compared to CN. Our results suggest that the functional integration in whole-brain network progressively declines due to the AD process. On the other hand, functional relatedness between neighboring brain regions may not gradually decrease, but be the most severely altered in MCI stage and gradually re-increase in clinical AD stages.

  12. Serum homocysteine level in patients with acute cerebral infarction and its correlation with inflammatory factors, nerve factors and NO metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Guo Li1

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the serum homocysteine (Hcy level in patients with acute cerebral infarction and its correlation with inflammatory factors, nerve factors and NO metabolism. Methods: A total of 118 patients with acute cerebral infarction were selected as observation group and 50 healthy volunteers who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as the normal control group. Serum levels of Hcy in two groups were detected, and the median of Hcy levels in observation group was referred to further divide them into high Hcy group and low Hcy group, 59 cases in each group. Serum contents of inflammatory factors, nerve factors and NO metabolism markers were compared between acute cerebral infarction patients with different levels of Hcy. Results: Serum Hcy level in observation group was higher than that in control group. Serum contents of inflammatory factors such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and hs-CRP in high Hcy group were higher than those in low Hcy group, contents of nerve factors such as Copeptin, NT-proBNP, NSE and S-100B in high Hcy group were higher than those in low Hcy group, and contents of NO metabolism indexes such as NO and NOS in high Hcy group were higher than those in low Hcy group. Conclusion: Serum Hcy level increases in patients with acute cerebral infarction, and the level of Hcy is directly related to inflammatory factors, nerve factors and NO metabolism.

  13. Effects of high amphetamine dose on mood and cerebral glucose metabolism in normal volunteers using positron emission tomography (PET)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollenweider, FX; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Mathys, K; Angst, J

    1998-01-01

    The effects of high euphorigenic doses of D-amphetamine (0.9-1.0 mg/kg p.o.) on regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglu) and psychological measures were investigated in 10 healthy human volunteers using a within-subject design and [F-18]-fluorodeoxygrucose positron emission tomography

  14. Cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia: two sides of the same coin?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verfaillie, S.C.J.; Adriaanse, S.M.; Binnewijzend, M.A.A.; Benedictus, M.R.; Ossenkoppele, R.; Wattjes, M.P.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; van der Flier, W.M.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Kuijer, J.P.A.; Boellaard, R.; Scheltens, P.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Barkhof, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal (FTD) dementia can be differentiated using [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET. Since cerebral blood flow (CBF) is related to glucose metabolism, our aim was to investigate the extent of overlap of abnormalities between AD and FTD.

  15. Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D M; Evans, K A; James, P E

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function would be compromised in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subsequent to a hypoxia-mediated alteration in systemic free radical metabolism. Eighteen male lowlanders were examined in normoxia (21% O...

  16. Pharmacologic modulation of cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity in a porcine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwabejire, John O; Jin, Guang; Imam, Ayesha M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity play critical roles in the evolution of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We have shown previously that treatment with large doses of valproic acid (VPA) decreases the size of brain lesion. The goal of this experiment was to determine whether this eff...

  17. Investigation of cerebral metabolism by positron CT in Japanese following musical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakasugi, Naotoshi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-02-01

    Cerebral metabolic responses to Japanese and Western instrumental music were examined using [sup 11]C-glucose and positron CT. Eight right-handed subjects were studied in both Japanese and Western music-stimulated states. Biaural musical stimulation with a Japanese instrument, the 'shakuhachi', produced diffuse metabolic changes in the left temporal lobe in all subjects. Biaural musical stimulation with a Western instrument, the 'violin', produced metabolic changes in the right temporal lobe in 3 subjects, changes in the left in 4, and changes on both sides in one. It was considered previously that all musical stimulation led to hypermetabolism in the right hemisphere of human beings. However, the present results indicated that Japanese music produced activation of the left hemisphere in Japanese. On the other hand, Western music produced right hemispheric hypermetabolism in Japanese with no emotion. The laterality of the hemisphere stimulated by Western music was apparently incidentally changed according to the state of mind the Japanese subjects. (author).

  18. Developmental trajectories of cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism at baseline and during working memory tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Mayank A; Yan, Lirong; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; LeClair, Holly; Elashoff, David; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-07-01

    The neurobiological interpretation of developmental BOLD fMRI findings remains difficult due to the confounding issues of potentially varied baseline of brain function and varied strength of neurovascular coupling across age groups. The central theme of the present research is to study the development of brain function and neuronal activity through in vivo assessments of cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) both at baseline and during the performance of a working memory task in a cohort of typically developing children aged 7 to 18years. Using a suite of 4 emerging MRI technologies including MR blood oximetry, phase-contrast MRI, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) perfusion MRI and concurrent CBF/BOLD fMRI, we found: 1) At baseline, both global CBF and CMRO2 showed an age related decline while global OEF was stable across the age group; 2) During the working memory task, neither BOLD nor CBF responses showed significant variations with age in the activated fronto-parietal brain regions. Nevertheless, detailed voxel-wise analyses revealed sub-regions within the activated fronto-parietal regions that show significant decline of fractional CMRO2 responses with age. These findings suggest that the brain may become more "energy efficient" with age during development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Nutrition on Cerebral Circulation and Cognition in the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mellendijk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS, defined as the clustering of abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia, appears to be driving the global epidemics cardiovascular disease (CVD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Nutrition has a major impact on MetS and plays an important role in the prevention, development, and treatment of its features. Structural and functional alterations in the vasculature, associated with MetS, might form the link between MetS and the increased risk of developing CVD and T2DM. Not only does the peripheral vasculature seem to be affected, but the syndrome has a profound impact on the cerebral circulation and thence brain structure as well. Furthermore, strong associations are shown with stroke, cognitive impairment, and dementia. In this review the impact of nutrition on the individual components of MetS, the effects of MetS on peripheral and cerebral vasculature, and its consequences for brain structure and function will be discussed.

  20. Interaction of aluminum ions with phosphoinositide metabolism in rat cerebral cortical membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candura, S.M.; Castoldi, A.F.; Costa, L.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States) Fondazione Clinica del Lavoro, Pavia (Italy)); Manzo, L. (Univ. of Pavia (Italy) Fondazione Clinica del Lavoro, Pavia (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    Al, complexed with fluoride to form fluoroaluminate (AlF{sub 4}-), can activate the GTP-binding (G) proteins of the adenylate cyclase and retinal cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase systems. Since an involvement of G-proteins with cerebral phosphoinositide (PtdIns) metabolism has also been suggested, in this study the authors investigated the interaction of the stable GTP analogue GTP(S), Al salts and NaF with this system. In rat cerebral cortical membranes, GTP(S) dose-dependently stimulated ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates (({sup 3}H)InsPs) accumulation. This effect was potentiated by carbachol and was partially prevented by the GTP-binding antagonist GDP(S), indicating that CNS muscarinic receptor activation is coupled to PtdIns hydrolysis via putative G-protein(s). GTP(S) stimulation was also inhibited by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both Al salts and NaF mimicked the action of GTP(S) in stimulating PtdIns turnover. Their actions were highly synergistic. However, the stimulatory effects of AlCl{sub 3} and/or NaF were not potentiated by carbachol and were not inhibited by GDP(S) and PMA. In the nervous tissue, activation of PtdIns hydrolysis by Al may be mediated by activating a regulatory G-protein at a location distinct from the GTP-binding site or by a direct stimulation of phospholipase C.

  1. Maintained exercise-enhanced brain executive function related to cerebral lactate metabolism in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Takenaka, Saki; Olesen, Niels D; Petersen, Lonnie G; Sørensen, Henrik; Nielsen, Henning B; Secher, Niels H; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2018-01-03

    High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) improves cerebral executive function (EF), but the improvement in EF is attenuated after repeated HIIE, perhaps because of lower lactate availability for the brain. This investigation examined whether improved EF after exercise relates to brain lactate uptake. Fourteen healthy, male subjects performed 2 HIIE protocols separated by 60 min of rest. Blood samples were obtained from the right internal jugular venous bulb and from the brachial artery to determine differences across the brain for lactate (a-v diff lactate ), glucose (diff glucose ), oxygen (diff oxygen ), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; diff BDNF ). EF was evaluated by the color-word Stroop task. The first HIIE improved EF for 40 min, whereas the second HIIE improved EF only immediately after exercise. The a-v diff glucose was unchanged, whereas the a-v diff BDNF increased similarly after both HIIEs, and the a-v diff lactate increased, but the increase was attenuated after the second HIIE, compared with the first HIIE ( P Hashimoto, T., Tsukamoto, H., Takenaka, S., Olesen, N. D., Petersen, L. G., Sørensen, H., Nielsen, H. B., Secher, N. H., Ogoh, S. Maintained exercise-enhanced brain executive function related to cerebral lactate metabolism in men.

  2. Optical measurement of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with congenital heart defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Buckley, Erin M.; Kim, Meeri N.; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Gaynor, J. William; Spray, Thomas L.; Durning, Suzanne M.; Mason, Stefanie E.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Putt, Mary E.; Wang, Jiongjiong; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-05-01

    We employ a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitor for neonates with congenital heart disease (n=33). The NIRS-DCS device measured changes during hypercapnia of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentrations; cerebral blood flow (rCBFDCS); and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). Concurrent measurements with arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging (rCBFASL-MRI, n=12) cross-validate rCBFDCS against rCBFASL-MRI, showing good agreement (R=0.7, p=0.01). The study demonstrates use of NIRS-DCS on a critically ill neonatal population, and the results indicate that the optical technology is a promising clinical method for monitoring this population.

  3. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Miyabayashi, Shigeaki; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tada, Keiya; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masatoshi; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1987-06-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites were measured in two cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) with different clinical courses. A marked decrease in rCMRglu was found in the cortical gray matter of a patient with rapidly developing SSPE (3.6 - 4.2 mg/100 g brain tissue/min). However, the rCMRglu was preserved in the caudate and lenticular nuclei of the patient (7.7 mg/100 g/min). The rCMRglu in a patient with slowly developing SSPE revealed patterns and values similar to those of the control. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites ; homovanilic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in both rapidly and slowly developing SSPE. These data indicated that rCMRglu correlated better with the neurological and psychological status and that dopaminergic and serotonergic abnormalities have been implicated in pathophysiology of SSPE.

  4. Features of Metabolic Processes in Children Born by Caesarean Section in the Early Adaptation Period: the Role of Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. S. Tumaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The postnatal adaptation comprises alteration of metabolic processes of a newborn, the disturbance of which can lead to dysfunction, and later — to the development of diseases. Objective: Our aim was to study the bond of cerebral ischemia in full-term children born by Caesarean section with the course of metabolic processes in the early neonatal period. Methods: A retrospective comparative study was conducted. Children born by Caesarean section, who had cerebral ischemia (n =120 and who didn't have it, (n = 150 were examined. Complex examination included an assessment of a number of factors: clinical, biochemical blood tests, acidbase balance, concentration of some hormones. Results: In children after Caesarean section with cerebral ischemia in the early period of adaptation we noted disturbances of the acid-base balance (BE 0.3 ± 1.9 mmol/l; р = 0.038, blood oxygenation (SaO2 79.7 ± 2.8%; р = 0.001, frank lactataemia (4.3 ± 1.8 mmol/l; р = 0.002, signs of a catabolic orientation of metabolism (hypoproteinemia, increased protein metabolism products, frank primary loss of body weight. The considerable changes of activity of the blood enzymes, disturbance of glucose metabolism indicated the lack of energy-dependent processes. Due to this, the hyperbilirubinemia and a hormonal imbalance were more often formed. Conclusion: Cerebral ischemia in children born by Caesarean section is a reason for the development of a metabolic disadaptation. The detection of disturbances of metabolic processes in the early neonatal period is necessary for a timely start of the correctional therapy in order to prevent the development of diseases in more distant periods of a child's life. 

  5. Alterations in cerebral metabolism observed in living rodents using fluorescence lifetime microscopy of intrinsic NADH (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral energy metabolism at a cellular level is essential to improve our understanding of healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. In this study, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism utilizing minimally-invasive 2-Photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence, collected in vivo from anesthetized rats and mice. Time-resolved lifetime measurements enables distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. These components reportedly represent different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. Our observations from this study confirm the hypothesis that NADH FLIM can identify specific alterations in cerebral metabolism. Using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) equipment and a custom-built multimodal imaging system, 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) was performed in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Multi-exponential fits for NADH fluorescence lifetimes indicate 4 distinct components, or 'species.' We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic oxidative metabolism. Classification models developed with experimental data correctly predict the metabolic impairments associated with bicuculline-induced focal seizures in separate experiments. Compared to traditional intensity-based NADH measurements, lifetime imaging of NADH is less susceptible to the adverse effects of overlying blood vessels. Evaluating NADH measurements will ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cerebral energetics and its pathology-related alterations. Such knowledge will likely aid development of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke.

  6. Relationship between salivary cortisol levels and regional cerebral glucose metabolism in nondemented elderly subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Young Bin; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Ha; Chey, Jean Yung; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Cortisol is a primary stress hormone for flight-or-fight response in human. Increased levels of cortisol have been associated with memory and learning impairments. However, little is known about the role of cortisol on brain/cognitive functions in older adults. We compared regional cerebral glucose metabolism between elderly subjects with high and low cortisol levels using FDG PET. Salivary cortisol levels were measured four times during a day, and an average of the four measurements was used as the standard cortisol level for the analyses. From a population of 120 nondemented elderly subjects, 19 (mean age, 70.1{+-}4.9 y: 2 males and 17 females) were identified as the high (> mean + 1 SD of the total population) cortisol subjects (mean cortisol, 0.69{+-}0.09 {mu} g/dL), while 14 (mean age, 67.2{+-}4.5 y: all females) as the low (< mean 1 SD) cortisol (mean cortisol, 0.27{+-}0.03 {mu} g/dL). A voxel-wise comparison of FDG PET images from the high and low cortisol subjects was performed using SPM99. When compared with the low cortisol group, the high cortisol group had significant hypometabolism in the right middle temporal gyrus, left precuneus, right parahippocampal gyrus, right inferior temporal and superior temporal gyri (P < 0.01 uncorrected, k = 100). There was no significant increase of glucose metabolism in the high cortisol group compared with the low cortisol group (P < 0.01 uncorrected, k = 100). The high cortisol elderly subjects had hypometabolism in the parahippocampal and temporal gyri and precuneus, regions involved in memory and other cognitive functions. This may represent the preclinical metabolic correlates of forthcoming cognitive dysfunction associated with stress in the elderly. Longitudinal studies of brain metabolism and cognitive function are warranted.

  7. Effects of caprylic triglyceride on cognitive performance and cerebral glucose metabolism in mild Alzheimer's disease: a single-case observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Brian Andrew

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of 109 days of caprylic triglyceride (CT) in a 70-year-old male with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebral metabolism is limited to glucose under most conditions, and diminished cerebral glucose metabolism is a characteristic feature of AD. Another substrate available for cerebral metabolism is ketone bodies. Ketone bodies (KB) are normally derived from fat stores under conditions of low glucose availability as an alternative energy substrate to glucose. KB can also be produced by oral administration of CT. Prior studies suggest that the alternative energy source of CT may improve cognitive function due to mild to moderate AD, by circumventing the diminished glucose metabolism. The effect of CT was analyzed in a single-case of mild AD with cognitive alterations in an open label study. Study outcomes included the Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA), mini mental state exam (MMSE), and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scans. After 109 days of CT, MoCA scores changed from a baseline value of 24-28, and MMSE scores changed from 23 to 28. No changes were observed on FDG PET scans. The results suggest that, in a case of mild AD, CT may have affected cognitive function, assessed by means of MMSE and MoCA, although glucose uptake and metabolism remained unchanged.

  8. Maintained cerebral metabolic ratio during exercise in patients with beta-adrenergic blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gam, Christiane M B; Rasmussen, Peter; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decreased cerebral metabolic ratio (CMR) [molar uptake of O(2) versus molar uptake of (glucose + (1/2) lactate)] during exercise is attenuated by intravenous administration of the non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol. We evaluated to what extent cirrhotic...... patients in oral treatment with propranolol are able to mobilize brain non-oxidative carbohydrate metabolism. METHODS: Incremental cycle ergometry to exhaustion (86 +/- 4.2 W; mean +/- SD) was performed in eight cirrhotic patients instrumented with a catheter in the brachial artery and one retrograde...... and during exercise, respectively. During exercise the glucose a-v diff of 0.46 +/- 0.06 mM remained at a level similar to rest (0.54 +/- 0.03 mM) and at exhaustion the CMR was not significantly changed (5.8 +/- 1.1 versus 6.0 +/- 0.6). In controls, CMR decreased from 5.6 +/- 0.9 at rest to 3.4 +/- 0.7 (P

  9. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakata, Hideki; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ken-ichiro; Hirakata, Eriko; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Deenitchna, S.S.; Fujishima, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49{+-}3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113{+-}26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61{+-}2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3{+-}1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62{+-}2 years old, SCr of 0.9{+-}0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p<0.02) and the hemoglobin (Hb) levels in both HD (10.5{+-}0.5 g/dl) and CRF (9.8{+-}0.9) were significantly lower than that in Control (13.3{+-}0.3) (p<0.02). In the hemisphere, rCMRO{sub 2} in both HD (1.82{+-}0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95{+-}0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23{+-}0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6{+-}2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1{+-}2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8{+-}1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7{+-}1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5{+-}1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7{+-}1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure

  10. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry of white matter in medial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Aihong [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China)], E-mail: Likuncheng@vip.sina.com; Li Lin; Shan Baoci [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang Yuping; Xue Sufang [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whole-brain white matter changes in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Materials and methods: We studied 23 patients with MTLE and 13 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on T1-weighted 3D datasets. The seizure focus was right sided in 11 patients and left sided in 12. The data were collected on a 1.5 T MR system and analyzed by SPM 99 to generate white matter density maps. Results: Voxel-based morphometry revealed diffusively reduced white matter in MTLE prominently including bilateral frontal lobes, bilateral temporal lobes and corpus callosum. White matter reduction was also found in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in the left MTLE group. Conclusion: VBM is a simple and automated approach that is able to identify diffuse whole-brain white matter reduction in MTLE.

  11. Simultaneous Whole-Brain Segmentation and White Matter Lesion Detection Using Contrast-Adaptive Probabilistic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new generative model for simultaneous brain parcellation and white matter lesion segmentation from multi-contrast magnetic resonance images. The method combines an existing whole-brain segmentation technique with a novel spatial lesion model based on a convolutional...... in multiple sclerosis indicate that the method’s lesion segmentation accuracy compares well to that of the current state-of-the-art in the field, while additionally providing robust whole-brain segmentations....... restricted Boltzmann machine. Unlike current state-of-the-art lesion detection techniques based on discriminative modeling, the proposed method is not tuned to one specific scanner or imaging protocol, and simultaneously segments dozens of neuroanatomical structures. Experiments on a public benchmark dataset...

  12. Management of patients with ≥4 brain metastases using stereotactic radiosurgery boost after whole brain irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincoglan, Ferrat; Sager, Omer; Gamsiz, Hakan; Uysal, Bora; Demiral, Selcuk; Oysul, Kaan; Sirin, Sait; Caglan, Ayca; Beyzadeoglu, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastases are a prevalent consequence of systemic cancer, and patients suffering from brain metastases usually present with multiple metastatic lesions. An overwhelming majority of the available literature assessing the role of stereotactic radiosurgery in brain metastasis management includes patients with up to 4 metastases. Given the significant benefit of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of 1 to 3 brain metastases, we evaluated the use of stereotactic radiosurgery boost after whole brain irradiation in the management of patients with ≥4 brain metastases. In this retrospective analysis, outcomes of 50 patients who underwent linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery boost within 4 to 6 weeks of whole brain irradiation for ≥4 brain metastases were assessed in terms of local control, overall survival, primary involved organ, recursive partitioning analysis class and Karnofsky performance status at the time of stereotactic radiosurgery, number of lesions, age, status of the primary cancer (controlled vs uncontrolled), presence of extracranial disease and toxicity. Fifty patients with ≥4 brain metastases were treated using linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery boost after whole brain irradiation between April 1998 and April 2013. Mean and median number of intracranial lesions was 6.02 and 6, respectively. Median lesion volume was 10.9 cc (range, 0.05-32.6). Median survival time after radiosurgery was 10.1 months (range, 1-25). Status of the primary cancer (controlled vs uncontrolled), recursive partitioning analysis class, Karnofsky performance status, and extracranial metastasis showed statistically significant correlations with overall survival (P stereotactic radiosurgery included temporary edema (n = 14, 28%), hemiparesis (n = 1, 2%), seizure (n = 1, 2%), leukoencephalopathy (n = 2, 4%), and radiation necrosis (n = 6, 12%). Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery boost within 4 to 6 weeks after whole brain

  13. Whole-brain atrophy differences between progressive supranuclear palsy and idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Guevara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The absence of markers for ante-mortem diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP results in this disorder’s being commonly mistaken for other conditions, such as idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD. Such mistakes occur particularly in the initial stages, when ‘plus syndrome’ has not yet clinically emerged.Objective. To investigate global brain volume and tissue loss in patients with PSP relative to patients with IPD and healthy controls and correlations between clinical parameters and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-derived brain volume estimates.Methods: T1-weighted images were obtained from three groups of Chilean Latin American adults: 21 patients with IPD, 18 patients with PSP and 14 healthy controls. We used Structural Imaging Evaluation with Normalization of Atrophy (SIENAX to assess white matter, gray matter and whole-brain volumes (normalized to cranial volume. Imaging data were used to analyze putative correlations with the clinical status of PSP and IPD patients using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part III, Hoehn and Yahr, the Clinical Global Impression for Disease Severity Scale and the Frontal Assessment Battery.Results: PSP patients had significantly lower whole brain volume than both IPD patients and controls. Whole brain volume reduction in PSP patients was primarily attributable to gray matter volume reduction. We found a significant correlation between brain volume reduction and clinical status in the PSP group.Conclusions: At the group level, whole brain and gray matter volumes differentiated patients with PSP from patients with IPD. There was also significant clinical-imaging correlations with motor disturbances in PSP.

  14. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  15. Brain-computer interfaces increase whole-brain signal to noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, T Dorina; Lisinski, Jonathan M; McHenry, Monica A; White, Jason P; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-08-13

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can convert mental states into signals to drive real-world devices, but it is not known if a given covert task is the same when performed with and without BCI-based control. Using a BCI likely involves additional cognitive processes, such as multitasking, attention, and conflict monitoring. In addition, it is challenging to measure the quality of covert task performance. We used whole-brain classifier-based real-time functional MRI to address these issues, because the method provides both classifier-based maps to examine the neural requirements of BCI and classification accuracy to quantify the quality of task performance. Subjects performed a covert counting task at fast and slow rates to control a visual interface. Compared with the same task when viewing but not controlling the interface, we observed that being in control of a BCI improved task classification of fast and slow counting states. Additional BCI control increased subjects' whole-brain signal-to-noise ratio compared with the absence of control. The neural pattern for control consisted of a positive network comprised of dorsal parietal and frontal regions and the anterior insula of the right hemisphere as well as an expansive negative network of regions. These findings suggest that real-time functional MRI can serve as a platform for exploring information processing and frontoparietal and insula network-based regulation of whole-brain task signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. The death of whole-brain death: the plague of the disaggregators, somaticists, and mentalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Robert M

    2005-08-01

    In its October 2001 issue, this journal published a series of articles questioning the Whole-Brain-based definition of death. Much of the concern focused on whether somatic integration-a commonly understood basis for the whole-brain death view-can survive the brain's death. The present article accepts that there are insurmountable problems with whole-brain death views, but challenges the assumption that loss of somatic integration is the proper basis for pronouncing death. It examines three major themes. First, it accepts the claim of the "disaggregators" that some behaviors traditionally associated with death can be unbundled, but argues that other behaviors (including organ procurement) must continue to be associated. Second, it rejects the claims of the "somaticists," that the integration of the body is critical, arguing instead for equating death with the irreversible loss of "embodied consciousness," that is, the loss of integration of bodily and mental function. Third, it defends higher-brain views against the charge that they are necessarily "mentalist," that is, that they equate death with losing some mental function such as consciousness or personhood. It argues, instead, for the integration of bodily and mental function as the critical feature of human life and that its irreversible loss constitutes death.

  17. Revealing the cerebral regions and networks mediating vulnerability to depression: oxidative metabolism mapping of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Kaart, Tanel; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Mällo, Tanel; Del Río, Joaquin; Tordera, Rosa M; Ramirez, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    The large variety of available animal models has revealed much on the neurobiology of depression, but each model appears as specific to a significant extent, and distinction between stress response, pathogenesis of depression and underlying vulnerability is difficult to make. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that depression occurs in biologically predisposed subjects under impact of adverse life events. We applied the diathesis-stress concept to reveal brain regions and functional networks that mediate vulnerability to depression and response to chronic stress by collapsing data on cerebral long term neuronal activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in distinct animal models. Rats were rendered vulnerable to depression either by partial serotonergic lesion or by maternal deprivation, or selected for a vulnerable phenotype (low positive affect, low novelty-related activity or high hedonic response). Environmental adversity was brought about by applying chronic variable stress or chronic social defeat. Several brain regions, most significantly median raphe, habenula, retrosplenial cortex and reticular thalamus, were universally implicated in long-term metabolic stress response, vulnerability to depression, or both. Vulnerability was associated with higher oxidative metabolism levels as compared to resilience to chronic stress. Chronic stress, in contrast, had three distinct patterns of effect on oxidative metabolism in vulnerable vs. resilient animals. In general, associations between regional activities in several brain circuits were strongest in vulnerable animals, and chronic stress disrupted this interrelatedness. These findings highlight networks that underlie resilience to stress, and the distinct response to stress that occurs in vulnerable subjects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Cerebral Glucose Metabolism between Possible and Probable Multiple System Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyum-Yil Kwon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the relationship between presenting clinical manifestations and imaging features of multisystem neuronal dysfunction in MSA patients, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET. Methods: We studied 50 consecutive MSA patients with characteristic brain MRI findings of MSA, including 34 patients with early MSA-parkinsonian (MSA-P and 16 with early MSA-cerebellar (MSA-C. The cerebral glucose metabolism of all MSA patients was evaluated in comparison with 25 age-matched controls. 18F-FDG PET results were assessed by the Statistic Parametric Mapping (SPM analysis and the regions of interest (ROI method. Results: The mean time from disease onset to 18F-FDG PET was 25.9±13.0 months in 34 MSA-P patients and 20.1±11.1 months in 16 MSA-C patients. Glucose metabolism of the putamen showed a greater decrease in possible MSA-P than in probable MSA-P (p=0.031. Although the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS score did not differ between possible MSA-P and probable MSA-P, the subscores of rigidity (p=0.04 and bradykinesia (p= 0.008 were significantly higher in possible MSA-P than in probable MSA-P. Possible MSA-C showed a greater decrease in glucose metabolism of the cerebellum than probable MSA-C (p=0.016. Conclusions: Our results may suggest that the early neuropathological pattern of possible MSA with a predilection for the striatonigral or olivopontocerebellar system differs from that of probable MSA, which has prominent involvement of the autonomic nervous system in addition to the striatonigral or olivopontocerebellar system.

  19. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled...... to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples...... were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined...

  20. Cerebral glucose metabolism in long-term survivors of childhood primary brain tumors treated with surgery and radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Krabbe, Katja; Leffers, Anne M.

    2003-01-01

    Delayed structural cerebral sequelae has been reported following cranial radiation therapy (CRT) to children with primary brain tumors, but little is known about potential functional changes. Twenty-four patients were included, diagnosed and treated at a median age of 11 years, and examined after...... a median recurrence free survival of 16 years by MRI and Positron Emission Tomography using the glucose analog 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG). Three patients were not analyzed further due to diffuse cerebral atrophy, which might be related to previous hydrocephalus. Twenty-one patients were...... evaluable and regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) was estimated in nontumoral brain regions in 12 patients treated with surgery alone and 9 patients treated with both surgery and CRT. Furthermore 10 normal controls matched for age at examination were included. Patients treated with both...

  1. Activating whole brain® innovation: A means of nourishing multiple intelligence in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Louise De Boer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The interconnectedness of the constructs ‘whole brain® thinking’ and ‘multiple intelligence’ forms the epicentre of this article. We depart from the premise that when whole brain® thinking is activated multiple intelligence can be nourished. When this becomes evident in a higher education practice it can be claimed that such a practice is innovative. Whole brain® thinking that informs intelligence and vice versa is inevitable when it comes to facilitating learning with a view to promoting quality learning in the context of higher education. If higher education is concerned about the expectations of industry and the world of work there is no other option as to prepare students in such a way that they develo as holistic – whole brained and intelligent – employers, employees and entrepreneurs who take responsibility for maximising their full potential. Becoming a self-regulated professional and being reflexive are some of the attributes of the 21st century which should be cultivated in all students. Research on whole brain® thinking and multiple intelligence shows that these human attributes form an integral part of one’s interaction with life – one’s environment and especially people as integral part of the environment. This focus on people highlights the need for developing soft skills within every curriculum. The epistemological underpinning of our reporting of experience in practice and research of the application of the principals of the constructs is meta- reflective in nature. Instead of a typical traditional stance to research we do not report on the numerous sets of data obtained over a period of more than 15 years. Our approach is that of a meta-reflective narrative as most of the studies we were involved in and still are, are reflective as it is most often than not action research-driven. And action research is a reflective process. We report on evidence-based practice that includes fields of specialisation such as

  2. Interferon-α acutely impairs whole-brain functional connectivity network architecture - A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, Ottavia; Cooper, Ella A; Tibble, Jeremy; Voon, Valerie; Baglio, Francesca; Baselli, Giuseppe; Cercignani, Mara; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-11-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is a key mediator of antiviral immune responses used to treat Hepatitis C infection. Though clinically effective, IFN-α rapidly impairs mood, motivation and cognition, effects that can appear indistinguishable from major depression and provide powerful empirical support for the inflammation theory of depression. Though inflammation has been shown to modulate activity within discrete brain regions, how it affects distributed information processing and the architecture of whole brain functional connectivity networks have not previously been investigated. Here we use a graph theoretic analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) to investigate acute effects of systemic interferon-alpha (IFN-α) on whole brain functional connectivity architecture and its relationship to IFN-α-induced mood change. Twenty-two patients with Hepatitis-C infection, initiating IFN-α-based therapy were scanned at baseline and 4h after their first IFN-α dose. The whole brain network was parcellated into 110 cortical and sub-cortical nodes based on the Oxford-Harvard Atlas and effects assessed on higher-level graph metrics, including node degree, betweenness centrality, global and local efficiency. IFN-α was associated with a significant reduction in global network connectivity (node degree) (p=0.033) and efficiency (p=0.013), indicating a global reduction of information transfer among the nodes forming the whole brain network. Effects were similar for highly connected (hub) and non-hub nodes, with no effect on betweenness centrality (p>0.1). At a local level, we identified regions with reduced efficiency of information exchange and a sub-network with decreased functional connectivity after IFN-α. Changes in local and particularly global functional connectivity correlated with associated changes in mood measured on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire. IFN-α rapidly induced a profound shift in whole brain network structure

  3. [Effect of hyperventilation on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in man; continuous monitoring of arterio-cerebral venous glucose differences (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, U; Zahn, U; Held, K; Gabriel, F H; Textor, T; Berghoff, W

    1976-04-15

    CBF decreases when arterial PCO2 is lowered by physiological, pathological or therapeutically induced hyperventilation. This is accompanied by an undelayed compensatory increase of oxygen-av-differences. Continuous monitoring of enzymatically determined glucose-av-differences of the brain during hyperventilation has for the first time shown that there is an undelayed fall of the cerebral venous glucose content, too. This indicates that the brain cells extract an augmented amount of glucose per ml blood during decreased CBF. Therefore glucose metabolism of the brain is not impaired during non-critical CBF reduction. However, when arterial PCO2 falls below 25 mmHg a detrimental effect on CBF and cerebral metabolism has to be expected. CBF will then decrease below the critical threshold for an undisturbed oxygen supply, and the respiratory alcalosis will lead to a disturbed oxygen delivery due to the Bohr-effect. As a consequence both of these factors will reduce the energy-yielding oxydative glycolysis and augment the little energy producing anaerobic glycolysis with a concomitant increase of lactate formation, resulting in a tissue and spinal fluid lactate acidosis. From our results it is therefore concluded that induced hyperventilation should be avoided, and that central hyperventilation in diseased states has to be considered as an additional threat to the brain.

  4. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism for Broca's aphasia using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Toshiaki

    1987-12-01

    A total of 11 patients with Broca's aphasia (BA) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) with the purpose of investigating the responsible region and the symptomatic flow and metabolism thresholds for BA. Computed tomography (CT) was concurrently performed. In the group of 3 patients undergoing PET with C-11 glucose, both PET and CT provided abnormal findings in the region that is thought to be responsible for BA (Broca's area), including the cortex and subcortex in the anterior region to Sylvian fissure. The Broca's area in the remaining one was shown as low C-11 accumulation area on PET and as isodensity on CT. The second group, consisting of 8 BA patients and 30 control patients without BA, underwent PET using O-15 steady method. PET showed reduction of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolic rate (rCMRO/sub 2/) in the Broca's area in all BA patients. Computed tomography showed abnormal low density in the Broca's area in 3 patients, and abnormal findings in the basal ganglionic region and subcortex without evidence for abnormal low density in the Broca's area in the other 5 patients. Comparison of rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in BA patients with those in control patients may show the symptomatic thresholds to be 20 - 27 ml100 gmin for rCBF and 2.0 ml100 gmin for rCMRO/sub 2/. (Namekawa, K.).

  5. The Role of Exercise – Rehabilitation on Energy Cost and Metabolic Efficiency in Dipelegic Spastic Cerebral Palsy Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Izadi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the resting energy expenditure and metabolic efficiency before and after of aerobic exercise in spastic cerebral palsy children (mean age of 11 years and also to compare with those of normal children. Materials & Methods : Fifteen dipelegia spastic cerebral palsy children (experimental group participated in exercise–rehabilitation program by voluntarily and the peers eighteen able body children(control group were selected randomly. The experimental group(cp performed rehabilitation program for 3 months,3 session in week with work intensity(%HRR=462.5equal to144bpm of heart rate. The values were measured on tantory cycle ergometer according to Macmaster protocol.Results: Rest and exercise heart rate and exercise intensity(%HRR in patients decreased after rehabilitation program(P<0.05. The resting energy expenditure was similar in cp and normal groups. The rate of oxygen cost of patients decreased in post test(P<0.05 that showed increasing in metabolic efficiency.Conclusion: cerebral palsy children have greater exercise energy cost and lower cardiovascular fitness than normal children and exercise–rehabilitation leads to enhance of metabolic efficiency in this patients that is remarkable from clinical perception.

  6. Visual and SPM analysis of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in adult patients with neurofibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee; An, Young Sil; Hong, Seon Pyo; Joh, Chul Woo; Yoon, Seok Nam [Ajou University, School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We evaluated the regional cerebral glucose metabolism in adult patients with neurofibromatosis (NF) using visual and SPM analysis, and compared with MRI findings. A total of 11 adult patients with NF type I were prospectively included in the study. All patients underwent F-18 FDG PET and brain MRI within 2 month of each other. All hypometabolic areas on PET were determined visually by 2 nuclear medicine physician and compared with MRI findings. SPM analysis was done using 42 normal controls with p = 0.005. Seven of 11 PET images showed 10 hypometabolic areas and 4 of 11 MRIs showed 6 areas of signal change brain parenchyma. Hypometabolic areas were bilateral thalamus (n=5), left temporal cortex (n=4) and dentate nucleus (n=1). In only 2 lesions (thalamus and dentate nucleus), hypometabolic foci were consistently related to signal change on MRI. SPM analysis revealed significantly decreased area in bilateral thalamus and left temporal cortex. F-18 FDG PET revealed significant hypometabolism in bilateral thalamus and left temporal cortex in adult patients with NF, and it might be helpful in understanding developmental abnormality of NF.

  7. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyners, Thekla; Heisterkamp, Christine; Kueter, Jan-Dirk; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Schild, Steven E.; Rades, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the

  8. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyners, T.; Heisterkamp, C.; Kueter, J.D.; Veninga, T.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Schild, S.E.; Rades, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from

  9. Stability of whole brain and regional network topology within and between resting and cognitive states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna K Rzucidlo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graph-theory based analyses of resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI data have been used to map the network organization of the brain. While numerous analyses of resting state brain organization exist, many questions remain unexplored. The present study examines the stability of findings based on this approach over repeated resting state and working memory state sessions within the same individuals. This allows assessment of stability of network topology within the same state for both rest and working memory, and between rest and working memory as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: fMRI scans were performed on five participants while at rest and while performing the 2-back working memory task five times each, with task state alternating while they were in the scanner. Voxel-based whole brain network analyses were performed on the resulting data along with analyses of functional connectivity in regions associated with resting state and working memory. Network topology was fairly stable across repeated sessions of the same task, but varied significantly between rest and working memory. In the whole brain analysis, local efficiency, Eloc, differed significantly between rest and working memory. Analyses of network statistics for the precuneus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex revealed significant differences in degree as a function of task state for both regions and in local efficiency for the precuneus. Conversely, no significant differences were observed across repeated sessions of the same state. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that network topology is fairly stable within individuals across time for the same state, but also fluid between states. Whole brain voxel-based network analyses may prove to be a valuable tool for exploring how functional connectivity changes in response to task demands.

  10. Disruption of functional networks in dyslexia: A whole-brain, data-driven analysis of connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Emily S.; Shen, Xilin; Holahan, John M.; Scheinost, Dustin; Lacadie, Cheryl; Papademetris, Xenophon; Shaywitz, Sally E.; Shaywitz, Bennett A.; Constable, R. Todd

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional connectivity analyses of fMRI data are a powerful tool for characterizing brain networks and how they are disrupted in neural disorders. However, many such analyses examine only one or a small number of a priori seed regions. Studies that consider the whole brain frequently rely on anatomic atlases to define network nodes, which may result in mixing distinct activation timecourses within a single node. Here, we improve upon previous methods by using a data-driven brain parcellation to compare connectivity profiles of dyslexic (DYS) versus non-impaired (NI) readers in the first whole-brain functional connectivity analysis of dyslexia. Methods Whole-brain connectivity was assessed in children (n = 75; 43 NI, 32 DYS) and adult (n = 104; 64 NI, 40 DYS) readers. Results Compared to NI readers, DYS readers showed divergent connectivity within the visual pathway and between visual association areas and prefrontal attention areas; increased right-hemisphere connectivity; reduced connectivity in the visual word-form area (part of the left fusiform gyrus specialized for printed words); and persistent connectivity to anterior language regions around the inferior frontal gyrus. Conclusions Together, findings suggest that NI readers are better able to integrate visual information and modulate their attention to visual stimuli, allowing them to recognize words based on their visual properties, while DYS readers recruit altered reading circuits and rely on laborious phonology-based “sounding out” strategies into adulthood. These results deepen our understanding of the neural basis of dyslexia and highlight the importance of synchrony between diverse brain regions for successful reading. PMID:24124929

  11. Abnormal whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with primary insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chao Li, Mengshi Dong, Yi Yin, Kelei Hua, Shishun Fu, Guihua Jiang Department of Medical Imaging, The Affiliated Guangdong No 2 Provincial People’s Hospital of Southern Medical University, The Third Clinical Medical College of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The investigation of the mechanism of insomnia could provide the basis for improved understanding and treatment of insomnia. The aim of this study is to investigate the abnormal functional connectivity throughout the entire brain of insomnia patients, and analyze the global distribution of these abnormalities. Whole brains of 50 patients with insomnia and 40 healthy controls were divided into 116 regions and abnormal connectivities were identified by comparing the Pearson’s correlation coefficients of each pair using general linear model analyses with covariates of age, sex, and duration of education. In patients with insomnia, regions that relate to wakefulness, emotion, worry/rumination, saliency/attention, and sensory-motor showed increased positive connectivity with each other; however, regions that often restrain each other, such as regions in salience network with regions in default mode network, showed decreased positive connectivity. Correlation analysis indicated that some increased positive functional connectivity was associated with the Self-Rating Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. According to our findings, increased and decreased positive connectivities suggest function strengthening and function disinhibition, respectively, which offers a parsimonious explanation for the hyperarousal hypothesis in the level of the whole-brain functional connectivity in patients with insomnia. Keywords: primary insomnia, hyperarousal hypothesis, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional connectivity, whole brain

  12. Stability of whole brain and regional network topology within and between resting and cognitive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzucidlo, Justyna K; Roseman, Paige L; Laurienti, Paul J; Dagenbach, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Graph-theory based analyses of resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data have been used to map the network organization of the brain. While numerous analyses of resting state brain organization exist, many questions remain unexplored. The present study examines the stability of findings based on this approach over repeated resting state and working memory state sessions within the same individuals. This allows assessment of stability of network topology within the same state for both rest and working memory, and between rest and working memory as well. fMRI scans were performed on five participants while at rest and while performing the 2-back working memory task five times each, with task state alternating while they were in the scanner. Voxel-based whole brain network analyses were performed on the resulting data along with analyses of functional connectivity in regions associated with resting state and working memory. Network topology was fairly stable across repeated sessions of the same task, but varied significantly between rest and working memory. In the whole brain analysis, local efficiency, Eloc, differed significantly between rest and working memory. Analyses of network statistics for the precuneus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex revealed significant differences in degree as a function of task state for both regions and in local efficiency for the precuneus. Conversely, no significant differences were observed across repeated sessions of the same state. These findings suggest that network topology is fairly stable within individuals across time for the same state, but also fluid between states. Whole brain voxel-based network analyses may prove to be a valuable tool for exploring how functional connectivity changes in response to task demands.

  13. From hippocampus to whole-brain: The role of integrative processing in episodic memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Benjamin R; Stanley, Matthew L; Dennis, Nancy A; Woldorff, Marty G; Cabeza, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Multivariate functional connectivity analyses of neuroimaging data have revealed the importance of complex, distributed interactions between disparate yet interdependent brain regions. Recent work has shown that topological properties of functional brain networks are associated with individual and group differences in cognitive performance, including in episodic memory. After constructing functional whole-brain networks derived from an event-related fMRI study of memory retrieval, we examined differences in functional brain network architecture between forgotten and remembered words. This study yielded three main findings. First, graph theory analyses showed that successfully remembering compared to forgetting was associated with significant changes in the connectivity profile of the left hippocampus and a corresponding increase in efficient communication with the rest of the brain. Second, bivariate functional connectivity analyses indicated stronger interactions between the left hippocampus and a retrieval assembly for remembered versus forgotten items. This assembly included the left precuneus, left caudate, bilateral supramarginal gyrus, and the bilateral dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus. Integrative properties of the retrieval assembly were greater for remembered than forgotten items. Third, whole-brain modularity analyses revealed that successful memory retrieval was marginally significantly associated with a less segregated modular architecture in the network. The magnitude of the decreases in modularity between remembered and forgotten conditions was related to memory performance. These findings indicate that increases in integrative properties at the nodal, retrieval assembly, and whole-brain topological levels facilitate memory retrieval, while also underscoring the potential of multivariate brain connectivity approaches for providing valuable new insights into the neural bases of memory processes. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2242-2259, 2017. © 2017 Wiley

  14. Relating resting-state fMRI and EEG whole-brain connectomes across frequency bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligianni, Fani; Centeno, Maria; Carmichael, David W.; Clayden, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Whole brain functional connectomes hold promise for understanding human brain activity across a range of cognitive, developmental and pathological states. So called resting-state (rs) functional MRI studies have contributed to the brain being considered at a macroscopic scale as a set of interacting regions. Interactions are defined as correlation-based signal measurements driven by blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast. Understanding the neurophysiological basis of these measurements is important in conveying useful information about brain function. Local coupling between BOLD fMRI and neurophysiological measurements is relatively well defined, with evidence that gamma (range) frequency EEG signals are the closest correlate of BOLD fMRI changes during cognitive processing. However, it is less clear how whole-brain network interactions relate during rest where lower frequency signals have been suggested to play a key role. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI offers the opportunity to observe brain network dynamics with high spatio-temporal resolution. We utilize these measurements to compare the connectomes derived from rs-fMRI and EEG band limited power (BLP). Merging this multi-modal information requires the development of an appropriate statistical framework. We relate the covariance matrices of the Hilbert envelope of the source localized EEG signal across bands to the covariance matrices derived from rs-fMRI with the means of statistical prediction based on sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis (sCCA). Subsequently, we identify the most prominent connections that contribute to this relationship. We compare whole-brain functional connectomes based on their geodesic distance to reliably estimate the performance of the prediction. The performance of predicting fMRI from EEG connectomes is considerably better than predicting EEG from fMRI across all bands, whereas the connectomes derived in low frequency EEG bands resemble best rs-fMRI connectivity. PMID:25221467

  15. Studying cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism using simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler ultrasound: a hyperventilation and caffeine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runze; Brugniaux, Julien; Dhaliwal, Harinder; Beaudin, Andrew E; Eliasziw, Misha; Poulin, Marc J; Dunn, Jeff F

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psycho-stimulants in the world, yet little is known about its effects on brain oxygenation and metabolism. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study design, we combined transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to study caffeine's effect on middle cerebral artery peak blood flow velocity (Vp), brain tissue oxygenation (StO2), total hemoglobin (tHb), and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in five subjects. Hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia served as a control to verify the sensitivity of our measurements. During hypocapnia (∼16 mmHg below resting values), Vp decreased by 40.0 ± 2.4% (95% CI, P < 0.001), while StO2 and tHb decreased by 2.9 ± 0.3% and 2.6 ± 0.4%, respectively (P = 0.003 and P = 0.002, respectively). CMRO2, calculated using the Fick equation, was reduced by 29.3 ± 9% compared to the isocapnic-euoxia baseline (P < 0.001). In the pharmacological experiments, there was a significant decrease in Vp, StO2, and tHb after ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between caffeine and placebo. Both showed a CMRO2 decline compared to baseline showing the importance of a placebo control. In conclusion, this study showed that profound hypocapnia impairs cerebral oxidative metabolism. We provide new insight into the effects of caffeine on cerebral hemodynamics. Moreover, this study showed that multimodal NIRS/TCD is an excellent tool for studying brain hemodynamic responses to pharmacological interventions and physiological challenges. PMID:25907789

  16. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  17. Alterations in regional cerebral glucose metabolism across waking and non-rapid eye movement sleep in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Miewald, Jean M; Kupfer, David J

    2005-04-01

    Depression is associated with sleep disturbances, including alterations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Non-rapid eye movement sleep is associated with decreases in frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex metabolic activity compared with wakefulness. To show that depressed patients would have less of a decrease than controls in frontal metabolism between waking and NREM sleep and to show that during NREM sleep, they would have increased activity in structures that promote arousal. Subjects completed electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral glucose metabolism assessments during both waking and NREM sleep using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography. General clinical research center. The study included 29 unmedicated patients who met the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV criteria for current major depression and who had a score of 15 or greater on a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and 28 medically healthy subjects of comparable age and sex who were free of mental disorders. Electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral metabolism during waking and NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed smaller decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in broad regions of the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex from waking to NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed larger decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in the left amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum, parahippocampal cortex, fusiform gyrus, and occipital cortex. However, in post hoc analyses, depressed patients showed hypermetabolism in these areas during both waking and NREM sleep. The smaller decrease in frontal metabolism from waking to NREM sleep in depressed patients is further evidence for a dynamic sleep-wake alteration in prefrontal cortex function in depression. Hypermetabolism in a ventral emotional neural system during waking in depressed patients persists into NREM sleep.

  18. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268 ± 0.8340 mLO2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  19. Whole-brain MRI phenotyping in dysplasia-related frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok-Jun; Bernhardt, Boris C; Schrader, Dewi S; Bernasconi, Neda; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2016-02-16

    To perform whole-brain morphometry in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy and evaluate the utility of group-level patterns for individualized diagnosis and prognosis. We compared MRI-based cortical thickness and folding complexity between 2 frontal lobe epilepsy cohorts with histologically verified focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) (13 type I; 28 type II) and 41 closely matched controls. Pattern learning algorithms evaluated the utility of group-level findings to predict histologic FCD subtype, the side of the seizure focus, and postsurgical seizure outcome in single individuals. Relative to controls, FCD type I displayed multilobar cortical thinning that was most marked in ipsilateral frontal cortices. Conversely, type II showed thickening in temporal and postcentral cortices. Cortical folding also diverged, with increased complexity in prefrontal cortices in type I and decreases in type II. Group-level findings successfully guided automated FCD subtype classification (type I: 100%; type II: 96%), seizure focus lateralization (type I: 92%; type II: 86%), and outcome prediction (type I: 92%; type II: 82%). FCD subtypes relate to diverse whole-brain structural phenotypes. While cortical thickening in type II may indicate delayed pruning, a thin cortex in type I likely results from combined effects of seizure excitotoxicity and the primary malformation. Group-level patterns have a high translational value in guiding individualized diagnostics. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Whole brain white matter changes revealed by multiple diffusion metrics in multiple sclerosis: A TBSS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan, Yunyun, E-mail: xiaoyun81.love@163.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); He, Yong, E-mail: yong.h.he@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yu, Chunshui, E-mail: csyuster@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: jun_wang@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Huang, Jing, E-mail: sainthj@126.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Ye, Jing, E-mail: jingye.2007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Parizel, Paul M., E-mail: paul.parizel@ua.ac.be [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, 8 Belgium (Belgium); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shu, Ni, E-mail: nshu55@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To investigate whole brain white matter changes in multiple sclerosis (MS) by multiple diffusion indices, we examined patients with diffusion tensor imaging and utilized tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method to analyze the data. Methods: Forty-one relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 41 age- and gender-matched normal controls were included in this study. Diffusion weighted images were acquired by employing a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence on a 1.5 T MR scanner. Voxel-wise analyses of multiple diffusion metrics, including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were performed with TBSS. Results: The MS patients had significantly decreased FA (9.11%), increased MD (8.26%), AD (3.48%) and RD (13.17%) in their white matter skeletons compared with the controls. Through TBSS analyses, we found abnormal diffusion changes in widespread white matter regions in MS patients. Specifically, decreased FA, increased MD and increased RD were involved in whole-brain white matter, while several regions exhibited increased AD. Furthermore, white matter regions with significant correlations between the diffusion metrics and the clinical variables (the EDSS scores, disease durations and white matter lesion loads) in MS patients were identified. Conclusion: Widespread white matter abnormalities were observed in MS patients revealed by multiple diffusion metrics. The diffusion changes and correlations with clinical variables were mainly attributed to increased RD, implying the predominant role of RD in reflecting the subtle pathological changes in MS.

  1. Voxel-based analysis of whole brain FLAIR at 3T detects focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Niels K; Symms, Mark R; Burdett, Jane L; Duncan, John S

    2008-05-01

    Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) is an important cause for pharmacoresistant epilepsy that can be treated surgically. The identification of the abnormal cortex on standard MRI can be difficult and computational techniques have been developed to increase sensitivity. In this study we evaluate the potential of a novel whole-brain voxel-based technique using normalized FLAIR signal intensity (nFSI) at 3 Tesla. Twenty-five patients with neuroradiologically reported FCD were included and compared to 25 healthy control subjects using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM5). T2 FLAIR scans were intensity normalized and each individual patient was compared against the control group. Each control subject was compared against the remaining control group. SPM correctly identified the FCD in 88% of cases (22/25) with only one false positive finding in the control group. In all but one of these cases the FCD was the most significant finding in the whole brain. All three missing cases could be detected at lower threshold levels but this would give rise to more false positive findings and thus reduce specificity. We present a novel technique that uses standard clinical T2 FLAIR scans to automatically detect FCDs. It can give supplementary information to the established T1-based automated techniques and could be useful for additional screening test, to complement the visual reading and clinical interpretation of MRI scans.

  2. Improving Functional MRI Registration Using Whole-Brain Functional Correlation Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yujia; Yap, Pew-Thian; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Lichi; Feng, Qianjin; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-09-01

    Population studies of brain function with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) largely rely on the accurate inter-subject registration of functional areas. This is typically achieved through registration of the corresponding T1-weighted MR images with more structural details. However, accumulating evidence has suggested that such strategy cannot well-align functional regions which are not necessarily confined by the anatomical boundaries defined by the T1-weighted MR images. To mitigate this problem, various registration algorithms based directly on rs-fMRI data have been developed, most of which have utilized functional connectivity (FC) as features for registration. However, most of the FC-based registration methods usually extract the functional features only from the thin and highly curved cortical grey matter (GM), posing a great challenge in accurately estimating the whole-brain deformation field. In this paper, we demonstrate that the additional useful functional features can be extracted from brain regions beyond the GM, particularly, white-matter (WM) based on rs-fMRI, for improving the overall functional registration. Specifically, we quantify the local anisotropic correlation patterns of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, modeled by functional correlation tensors (FCTs), in both GM and WM. Functional registration is then performed based on multiple components of the whole-brain FCTs using a multichannel Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (mLDDMM) algorithm. Experimental results show that our proposed method achieves superior functional registration performance, compared with other conventional registration methods.

  3. A hierarchical method for whole-brain connectivity-based parcellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Dominguez, David; Anwander, Alfred; Knösche, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    In modern neuroscience there is general agreement that brain function relies on networks and that connectivity is therefore of paramount importance for brain function. Accordingly, the delineation of functional brain areas on the basis of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and tractography may lead to highly relevant brain maps. Existing methods typically aim to find a predefined number of areas and/or are limited to small regions of grey matter. However, it is in general not likely that a single parcellation dividing the brain into a finite number of areas is an adequate representation of the function-anatomical organization of the brain. In this work, we propose hierarchical clustering as a solution to overcome these limitations and achieve whole-brain parcellation. We demonstrate that this method encodes the information of the underlying structure at all granularity levels in a hierarchical tree or dendrogram. We develop an optimal tree building and processing pipeline that reduces the complexity of the tree with minimal information loss. We show how these trees can be used to compare the similarity structure of different subjects or recordings and how to extract parcellations from them. Our novel approach yields a more exhaustive representation of the real underlying structure and successfully tackles the challenge of whole-brain parcellation. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Automated diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease with multi-atlas based whole brain segmentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Tang, Xiaoying

    2017-03-01

    Voxel-based analysis is widely used in quantitative analysis of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and automated disease detection, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, noise at the voxel level may cause low sensitivity to AD-induced structural abnormalities. This can be addressed with the use of a whole brain structural segmentation approach which greatly reduces the dimension of features (the number of voxels). In this paper, we propose an automatic AD diagnosis system that combines such whole brain segmen- tations with advanced machine learning methods. We used a multi-atlas segmentation technique to parcellate T1-weighted images into 54 distinct brain regions and extract their structural volumes to serve as the features for principal-component-analysis-based dimension reduction and support-vector-machine-based classification. The relationship between the number of retained principal components (PCs) and the diagnosis accuracy was systematically evaluated, in a leave-one-out fashion, based on 28 AD subjects and 23 age-matched healthy subjects. Our approach yielded pretty good classification results with 96.08% overall accuracy being achieved using the three foremost PCs. In addition, our approach yielded 96.43% specificity, 100% sensitivity, and 0.9891 area under the receiver operating characteristic curve.

  5. Sources and implications of whole-brain fMRI signals in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jonathan D; Plitt, Mark; Laumann, Timothy O; Martin, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Whole-brain fMRI signals are a subject of intense interest: variance in the global fMRI signal (the spatial mean of all signals in the brain) indexes subject arousal, and psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and autism have been characterized by differences in the global fMRI signal. Further, vigorous debates exist on whether global signals ought to be removed from fMRI data. However, surprisingly little research has focused on the empirical properties of whole-brain fMRI signals. Here we map the spatial and temporal properties of the global signal, individually, in 1000+ fMRI scans. Variance in the global fMRI signal is strongly linked to head motion, to hardware artifacts, and to respiratory patterns and their attendant physiologic changes. Many techniques used to prepare fMRI data for analysis fail to remove these uninteresting kinds of global signal fluctuations. Thus, many studies include, at the time of analysis, prominent global effects of yawns, breathing changes, and head motion, among other signals. Such artifacts will mimic dynamic neural activity and will spuriously alter signal covariance throughout the brain. Methods capable of isolating and removing global artifactual variance while preserving putative "neural" variance are needed; this paper adopts no position on the topic of global signal regression. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Whole Brain Functional Connectivity Using Phase Locking Measures Of Resting State Magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T Schmidt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of spontaneous functional connectivity reveals the statistical connections between regions of the brain consistent with underlying functional communication networks within the brain. In this work, we describe the implementation of a complete all-to-all network analysis of resting state neuronal activity from magnetoencephalography (MEG. Using graph theory to define networks at the dipole level, we established functionally defined regions by k-means clustering cortical surface locations using Eigenvector centrality scores from the all-to-all adjacency model. Permutation testing was used to estimate regions with statistically significant connections compared to empty room data, which adjusts for spatial dependencies introduced by the MEG inverse problem. In order to test this model, we preformed a series of numerical simulations investigating the effects of the MEG reconstruction on connectivity estimates. We subsequently applied the approach to subject data to investigate the effectiveness of our method in obtaining whole brain networks. Our findings indicated that our model provides statistically robust estimates of functional region networks. Application of our phase locking network methodology to real data produced networks with similar connectivity to previously published findings, specifically, we found connections between contralateral areas of the arcuate fasciculus that have been previously investigated. The use of data-driven methods for neuroscientific investigations provides a new tool for researchers in identifying and characterizing whole brain functional connectivity networks.

  7. Whole brain functional connectivity using phase locking measures of resting state magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Benjamin T; Ghuman, Avniel S; Huppert, Theodore J

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of spontaneous functional connectivity (sFC) reveals the statistical connections between regions of the brain consistent with underlying functional communication networks within the brain. In this work, we describe the implementation of a complete all-to-all network analysis of resting state neuronal activity from magnetoencephalography (MEG). Using graph theory to define networks at the dipole level, we established functionally defined regions by k-means clustering cortical surface locations using Eigenvector centrality (EVC) scores from the all-to-all adjacency model. Permutation testing was used to estimate regions with statistically significant connections compared to empty room data, which adjusts for spatial dependencies introduced by the MEG inverse problem. In order to test this model, we performed a series of numerical simulations investigating the effects of the MEG reconstruction on connectivity estimates. We subsequently applied the approach to subject data to investigate the effectiveness of our method in obtaining whole brain networks. Our findings indicated that our model provides statistically robust estimates of functional region networks. Application of our phase locking network methodology to real data produced networks with similar connectivity to previously published findings, specifically, we found connections between contralateral areas of the arcuate fasciculus that have been previously investigated. The use of data-driven methods for neuroscientific investigations provides a new tool for researchers in identifying and characterizing whole brain functional connectivity networks.

  8. Pencilbeam irradiation technique for whole brain radiotherapy: technical and biological challenges in a small animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Trippel, Michael; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Renier, Michel; Bartzsch, Stefan; Requardt, Herwig; Döbrössy, Máté D; Nikkhah, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted the first in-vivo experiments in pencilbeam irradiation, a new synchrotron radiation technique based on the principle of microbeam irradiation, a concept of spatially fractionated high-dose irradiation. In an animal model of adult C57 BL/6J mice we have determined technical and physiological limitations with the present technical setup of the technique. Fifty-eight animals were distributed in eleven experimental groups, ten groups receiving whole brain radiotherapy with arrays of 50 µm wide beams. We have tested peak doses ranging between 172 Gy and 2,298 Gy at 3 mm depth. Animals in five groups received whole brain radiotherapy with a center-to-center (ctc) distance of 200 µm and a peak-to-valley ratio (PVDR) of ∼ 100, in the other five groups the ctc was 400 µm (PVDR ∼ 400). Motor and memory abilities were assessed during a six months observation period following irradiation. The lower dose limit, determined by the technical equipment, was at 172 Gy. The LD50 was about 1,164 Gy for a ctc of 200 µm and higher than 2,298 Gy for a ctc of 400 µm. Age-dependent loss in motor and memory performance was seen in all groups. Better overall performance (close to that of healthy controls) was seen in the groups irradiated with a ctc of 400 µm.

  9. Amygdala and whole brain activity to emotional faces distinguishes major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jay C.; Keener, Matthew T.; Almeida, Jorge; Kronhaus, Dina M.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It can be clinically difficult to distinguish depressed individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). To examine potential biomarkers of difference between the two disorders, the current study examined differences in the functioning of emotion processing neural regions during a dynamic emotional faces task. Methods During functional magnetic resonance imaging, healthy control adults (HC) (n = 29) and depressed adults with MDD (n = 30) and BD (n = 22) performed an implicit emotional-faces task in which they identified a color label superimposed on neutral faces that dynamically morphed into one of four emotional faces (angry, fearful, sad, happy). We compared neural activation between the groups in an amygdala region-of-interest and at the whole brain level. Results Adults with MDD showed significantly greater activity than adults with BD in the left amygdala to the anger condition (p = 0.01). Results of whole brain analyses (at p emotional faces. Those with BD showed greater activity during mood-congruent (i.e., sad) faces, whereas, those with MDD showed greater activity for mood-incongruent (i.e., fear, anger, and happy) faces. Such findings may reflect markers of differences between BD and MDD depression in underlying pathophysiological processes. PMID:23911154

  10. Amygdala and whole-brain activity to emotional faces distinguishes major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jay C; Keener, Matthew T; Almeida, Jorge; Kronhaus, Dina M; Phillips, Mary L

    2013-11-01

    It can be clinically difficult to distinguish depressed individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). To examine potential biomarkers of difference between the two disorders, the current study examined differences in the functioning of emotion-processing neural regions during a dynamic emotional faces task. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, healthy control adults (HC) (n = 29) and depressed adults with MDD (n = 30) and BD (n = 22) performed an implicit emotional-faces task in which they identified a color label superimposed on neutral faces that dynamically morphed into one of four emotional faces (angry, fearful, sad, happy). We compared neural activation between the groups in an amygdala region-of-interest and at the whole-brain level. Adults with MDD showed significantly greater activity than adults with BD in the left amygdala to the anger condition (p = 0.01). Results of whole-brain analyses (at p depressed adults with BD and MDD in the processing of emerging emotional faces. Those with BD showed greater activity during mood-congruent (i.e., sad) faces, whereas those with MDD showed greater activity for mood-incongruent (i.e., fear, anger, and happy) faces. Such findings may reflect markers of differences between BD and MDD depression in underlying pathophysiological processes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High resolution whole brain diffusion imaging at 7 T for the Human Connectome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, AT; Auerbach, E; Lenglet, C; Moeller, S; Sotiropoulos, SN; Jbabdi, S; Andersson, J; Yacoub, E; Ugurbil, K

    2015-01-01

    Mapping structural connectivity in healthy adults for the Human Connectome Project (HCP) benefits from high quality, high resolution, multiband (MB)-accelerated whole brain diffusion MRI (dMRI). Acquiring such data at ultrahigh fields (7 T and above) can improve intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), but suffers from shorter T2 and T2* relaxation times, increased B1+ inhomogeneity (resulting in signal loss in cerebellar and temporal lobe regions), and increased power deposition (i.e. Specific Absorption Rate (SAR)), thereby limiting our ability to reduce the repetition time (TR). Here, we present recent developments and optimizations in 7 T image acquisitions for the HCP that allow us to efficiently obtain high-quality, high-resolution whole brain in-vivo dMRI data at 7 T. These data show spatial details typically seen only in ex-vivo studies and complement already very high quality 3 T HCP data in the same subjects. The advances are the result of intensive pilot studies aimed at mitigating the limitations of dMRI at 7 T. The data quality and methods described here are representative of the datasets that will be made freely available to the community in 2015. PMID:26260428

  12. Effect of STA-proximal MCA bypass. Improvement of cerebral blood flow and metabolism and neuropsychological function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Akira; Funayama, Masayuki; Miura, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Kuroda, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Toshiaki [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-11-01

    We investigated cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism in patients with hemodynamic ischemia by positron emission tomography (PET) and thermal diffusion flow meter. We also studied neuropsychological functions to evaluate the effects of surgical revascularization. Bypass surgery of the superficial temporal artery to the proximal middle cerebral artery was performed on 26 patients satisfying the following categories: stenosis or occlusive lesion in main cerebral arteries; no marked focus of infarction on CT or MRI. PET was performed before and 1 month after the operation, and CBF, the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were analyzed. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) was also calculated after acetazolamide challenge. CBF during the operation was continuously measured with a thermal diffusion flow meter. CO{sub 2} response of CBF was analyzed before and after anastomosis. Neuropsychological functions were evaluated by Hasegawa dementia scale revised (HDS-R), mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and Wechsler adult intelligence scale revised (WAIS-R). Before the operation, increase in OEF accorded with the decrease in CBF, and a significant relationship between both CBF and CVRC, and OEF and CVRC was found. A decrease in CVRC was noted prior to a decrease in CBF and elevation of OEF. CVRC caused by acetazolamide might reflect CO{sub 2} reactivity. Significant improvement of CBF and CVRC, and normalization of OEF were observed after the operation. Also, significant improvement of neuropsychological function was observed by HDS-R and WAIS-R. Disturbance in neuropsychological function might reflect elevation of OEF. (author)

  13. Monitoring of cerebral blood flow and metabolism bedside in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage - A Xenon-CT and microdialysis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham eRostami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Although 70% of the patients show angiographic vasospasm only 30% develop symptomatic vasospasm defined as Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI. Early detection and management of reversible ischemia is of critical importance in patients with SAH.Xenon computerized tomography (Xenon-CT using a bedside CT scanner makes it possible to measure quantitative regional Cerebral blood flow (CBF bedside in the neurointensive care (NIC setting and intracerebral microdialysis is a method that offers the possibility to monitor the metabolic state of the brain continuously. Here we present results on nine SAH patients with both microdialysis monitoring and bedside Xenon-CT measurements.CBF measurements were performed within the first 72h following bleeding. Six out of nine patients developed DCI at a later stage. Five out of six patients who developed DCI had initial global CBF below 26 ml/100g/min whereas one had 53 ml/100g/min. The 3 patients who did not develop clinical vasospasm all had initial global CBF above 27 ml/100g/min. High Lactate/Pyruvate ratio was associated with lower CBF values in the area surrounding the catheter. Five out of nine patients had Lactate/Pyruvate ratio ≥ 25 and four of these patients had CBF ≤ 22 ml/100g/min.These preliminary results suggest that patients with initially low global CBF on Xenon-CT may be more likely to develop DCI. Initially low global CBF was accompanied by metabolic disturbances determined by the microdialysis. Most importantly, pathological findings on the Xenon-CT and microdialysis could be observed before any clinical signs of DCI. Combining bedside Xenon-CT and microdialysis was found to be useful and feasible. Further studies are needed to evaluate if delayed cerebral ischemia can be detected before any other signs of DCI to prevent progress to infarction.

  14. Unusual acute and delayed skin reactions during and after whole-brain radiotherapy in combination with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. Two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, B.; Roedel, C.; Weiss, C. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Meissner, M.; Wolter, M. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Besides radiotherapy (RT) and surgery, the introduction of BRAF inhibitors like vemurafenib has provided new opportunities for treatment of patients with metastasized malignant melanomas. RT and vemurafenib are being increasingly used concurrently, although little is known about the potential side effects of this combination. Vemurafenib is known to cause severe cutaneous skin reactions such as phototoxicity and evidence is accumulating that RT may further enhance these side effects. We report two cases of unusual skin reactions occurring during and after treatment with a combination of vemurafenib and whole-brain irradiation in patients with cerebral metastases arising from malignant melanomas. One case report describes excessive acute radiodermatitis which arose during whole-brain irradiation in combination with vemurafenib. The second describes a late skin reaction occurring approximately 30 days after completion of RT. These two case reports show that combination of both treatment modalities is possible, but requires close monitoring of patients and good interdisciplinary collaboration. (orig.) [German] Neben der Strahlentherapie und Chirurgie stellt die Einfuehrung von BRAF-Inhibitoren wie Vemurafenib eine neue Moeglichkeit zur Behandlung von metastasierten malignen Melanomen dar und immer haeufiger kommt eine Kombination aus Strahlentherapie und Vemurafenib zum Einsatz. Bislang ist wenig bekannt ueber potentielle Nebenwirkungen, die sich aus einer Kombination beider Therapieoptionen ergeben koennen. Vemurafenib kann zu schweren kutanen Nebenwirkungen wie z. B. Phototoxizitaet fuehren und es haeufen sich Hinweise, dass die Strahlentherapie diese Nebenwirkungen verstaerken kann. Wir berichten ueber zwei Faelle ungewoehnlicher Hautreaktionen waehrend und nach einer Ganzhirnbestrahlung in Kombination mit Vemurafenib. Ein Fall beschreibt eine akute und ueberschiessende Radiodermatitis unter fortlaufender Radiotherapie und der andere Fall beschreibt eine spaete

  15. Pharmacologic modulation of cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity in a porcine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwabejire, John O; Jin, Guang; Imam, Ayesha M; Duggan, Michael; Sillesen, Martin; Deperalta, Danielle; Jepsen, Cecilie H; Lu, Jennifer; Li, Yongqing; deMoya, Marc A; Alam, Hasan B

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity play critical roles in the evolution of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We have shown previously that treatment with large doses of valproic acid (VPA) decreases the size of brain lesion. The goal of this experiment was to determine whether this effect was owing to metabolic modulation. Yorkshire swine (n = 9) underwent a protocol of computer-controlled TBI and 40% hemorrhage and were resuscitated randomly with either fresh frozen plasma equal to the volume of shed blood (FFP; n = 4) or VPA (300 mg/kg) and FFP (FFP+VPA; n = 5). Hemodynamics, brain oxygenation, and blood glucose were monitored continuously for 6 hours after resuscitation. Cerebral microdialysis was used to measure glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol levels at baseline, 1 and 2 hours post-shock, post-resuscitation (PR), and at 2, 4, and 6 hours PR. Brain samples from the injured side were then separated into mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions, and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) was measured using a dipstick assay kit. At baseline, there was no difference in brain lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and glutamate concentrations between the groups. At all time points, there were no differences between the groups in brain oxygenation, cerebral perfusion pressure, or blood and brain glucose concentrations. After VPA infusion (PR time point), however, there was sustained decrease in lactate (0.91 ± 0.47 vs 2.54 ± 0.59 mmol/L; P glucose utilization for ATP production. There was also a decrease in concentrations of glutamate (6.64 ± 3.68 vs 42.25 ± 27.07 mmol/L; P = .02) and glycerol (19.20 ± 6.76 vs 69.75 ± 30.07 mmol/L; P = .01), in the FFP+VPA group, signifying lesser degree of excitotoxicity and brain damage, respectively. Brain PDH activity was greater in the mitochondrial fractions (5,984 ± 504 adjusted volume intensity [INT] × mm(2) vs 4,332 ± 1,055 INT × mm(2); P = .04) and lower in cytosolic fractions in the FFP

  16. Quantitative Rates of Brain Glucose Metabolism Distinguish Minimally Conscious from Vegetative State Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Kupers, Ron; Rodell, Anders

    2015-01-01

    of these patients. However, no quantitative comparisons of cerebral glucose metabolism in VS/UWS and MCS have yet been reported. We calculated the regional and whole-brain CMRglc of 41 patients in the states of VS/UWS (n=14), MCS (n=21) or emergence from MCS (EMCS, n=6), and healthy volunteers (n=29). Global...... cortical CMRglc in VS/UWS and MCS averaged 42% and 55% of normal, respectively. Differences between VS/UWS and MCS were most pronounced in the frontoparietal cortex, at 42% and 60% of normal. In brainstem and thalamus, metabolism declined equally in the two conditions. In EMCS, metabolic rates were...... indistinguishable from those of MCS. Ordinal logistic regression predicted that patients are likely to emerge into MCS at CMRglc above 45% of normal. Receiver-operating characteristics showed that patients in MCS and VS/UWS can be differentiated with 82% accuracy, based on cortical metabolism. Together...

  17. Changes of metabolism and functional connectivity in late-onset deafness: Evidence from cerebral 18F-FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; Roman, Stéphane; Chaudat, Rose-May; Felician, Olivier; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Didic, Mira; Guedj, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Hearing loss is known to impact brain function. The aim of this study was to characterize cerebral metabolic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) changes in elderly patients fulfilling criteria for cochlear implant and investigate the impact of hearing loss on functional connectivity. Statistical Parametric Mapping-T-scores-maps comparisons of 18F-FDG-PET of 27 elderly patients fulfilling criteria for cochlear implant for hearing loss (best-aided speech intelligibility lower or equal to 50%) and 27 matched healthy subjects (p < 0.005, corrected for volume extent) were performed. Metabolic connectivity was evaluated through interregional correlation analysis. Patients were found to have decreased metabolism within the right associative auditory cortex, while increased metabolism was found in prefrontal areas, pre- and post-central areas, the cingulum and the left inferior parietal gyrus. The right associative auditory cortex was integrated into a network of increased metabolic connectivity that included pre- and post-central areas, the cingulum, the right inferior parietal gyrus, as well as the striatum on both sides. Metabolic values of the right associative auditory cortex and left inferior parietal gyrus were positively correlated with performance on neuropsychological test scores. These findings provide further insight into the reorganization of the connectome through sensory loss and compensatory mechanisms in elderly patients with severe hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites as studied by {sup 13}C and {sup 14}C labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, B.

    1995-11-01

    The present investigations show the feasibility of analyzing the cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites by {sup 13}C-and {sup 14}C-labelling using labelled acetate and glucose as markers for glial and neuronal metabolism, respectively. Using [{sup 13}C]acetate, it was shown that glial cells export {approx}60% of their TCA cycle intermediates, mostly as glutamine, and that this glutamine is used by neurons partly as an energy reserve, and partly it is converted directly to glutamate and GABA. Using [{sup 13}C]glucose, the glial process or pyruvate carboxylation was shown to compensate fully for the loss of glutamine. The mechanism of action of two neurotoxins, fluorocitrate and 3-nitropropionate was elucidated. The latter toxin was shown to inhibit the TCA cycle of GABAergic neurons selectively. Formation of pyruvate and lactate from glial TCA cycle intermediates was demonstrated in vivo. This pathway may be important for glial inactivation of transmitter glutamate and GABA. The results illustrate glianeuronal interactions, and they suggest the applicability of {sup 13}CNMR spectroscopy to the detailed study of the cerebral metabolism of amino acids in the intact, unanesthetized human brain. 174 refs.

  19. Non-selective beta-adrenergic blockade prevents reduction of the cerebral metabolic ratio during exhaustive exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Rasmussen, P.; Overgaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Intense exercise decreases the cerebral metabolic ratio of oxygen to carbohydrates [O(2)/(glucose + (1/2)lactate)], but whether this ratio is influenced by adrenergic stimulation is not known. In eight males, incremental cycle ergometry increased arterial lactate to 15.3 +/- 4.2 mm (mean +/- s...... of a non-selective beta-adrenergic (beta(1) + beta(2)) receptor antagonist (propranolol) reduced heart rate (69 +/- 8 to 58 +/- 6 beats min(-1)) and exercise capacity (239 +/- 42 to 209 +/- 31 W; P exercise with propranolol, the increase in a......-v lactate difference (to 0.5 +/- 0.5 mm; P exercise with administration of the beta(1...

  20. Network functional connectivity and whole-brain functional connectomics to investigate cognitive decline in neurodegenerative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, O; Cercignani, Mara

    Non-invasive mapping of brain functional connectivity (FC) has played a fundamental role in neuroscience, and numerous scientists have been fascinated by its ability to reveal the brain's intricate morphology and functional properties. In recent years, two different techniques have been developed that are able to explore FC in pathophysiological conditions and to provide simple and non-invasive biomarkers for the detection of disease onset, severity and progression. These techniques are independent component analysis, which allows a network-based functional exploration of the brain, and graph theory, which provides a quantitative characterization of the whole-brain FC. In this paper we provide an overview of these two techniques and some examples of their clinical applications in the most common neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive decline, including mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy Bodies and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

  1. Whole-brain ex-vivo quantitative MRI of the cuprizone mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias C. Wood

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is a critical component of the nervous system and a major contributor to contrast in Magnetic Resonance (MR images. However, the precise contribution of myelination to multiple MR modalities is still under debate. The cuprizone mouse is a well-established model of demyelination that has been used in several MR studies, but these have often imaged only a single slice and analysed a small region of interest in the corpus callosum. We imaged and analyzed the whole brain of the cuprizone mouse ex-vivo using high-resolution quantitative MR methods (multi-component relaxometry, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI and morphometry and found changes in multiple regions, including the corpus callosum, cerebellum, thalamus and hippocampus. The presence of inflammation, confirmed with histology, presents difficulties in isolating the sensitivity and specificity of these MR methods to demyelination using this model.

  2. Physics strategies for sparing neural stem cells during whole-brain radiation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean; Hwang, Andrew; Barani, Igor J

    2011-10-01

    Currently, there are no successful long-term treatments or preventive strategies for radiation-induced cognitive impairments, and only a few possibilities have been suggested. One such approach involves reducing the dose to neural stem cell compartments (within and outside of the hippocampus) during whole-brain radiation treatments for brain metastases. This study investigates the fundamental physics issues associated with the sparing of neural stem cells during photon radiotherapy for brain metastases. Several factors influence the stem cell dose: intracranial scattering, collimator leakage, beam energy, and total number of beams. The relative importance of these factors is investigated through a set of radiation therapy plans, which are all variations of an initial 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan designed to simultaneously deliver a whole-brain dose of 30 Gy and maximally reduce stem cell compartment dose. Additionally, an in-house leaf segmentation algorithm was developed that utilizes jaw motion to minimize the collimator leakage. The plans are all normalized such that 50% of the PTV receives 30 Gy. For the initial 6 MV IMRT plan, 50% of the stem cells receive a dose greater than 6.3 Gy. Calculations indicate that 3.6 Gy of this dose originates from intracranial scattering. The jaw-tracking segmentation algorithm, used in conjunction with direct machine parameter optimization, reduces the 50% stem cell dose to 4.3 and 3.7 Gy for 6 and 10 MV treatment beams, respectively. Intracranial scattering alone is responsible for a large dose contribution to the stem cell compartment. It is, therefore, important to minimize other contributing factors, particularly the collimator leakage, to maximally reduce dose to these critical structures. The use of collimator jaw tracking in conjunction with modern collimators can minimize this leakage.

  3. Sleep, Plasticity and Memory from Molecules to Whole-Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Ted; Havekes, Robbert; Saletin, Jared M.; Walker, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep across phylogeny, its function remains elusive. In this review, we consider one compelling candidate: brain plasticity associated with memory processing. Focusing largely on hippocampus-dependent memory in rodents and humans, we describe molecular, cellular, network, whole-brain and behavioral evidence establishing a role for sleep both in preparation for initial memory encoding, and in the subsequent offline consolidation ofmemory. Sleep and sleep deprivation bidirectionally alter molecular signaling pathways that regulate synaptic strength and control plasticity-related gene transcription and protein translation. At the cellular level, sleep deprivation impairs cellular excitability necessary for inducing synaptic potentiation and accelerates the decay of long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. In contrast, NREM and REM sleep enhance previously induced synaptic potentiation, although synaptic de-potentiation during sleep has also been observed. Beyond single cell dynamics, large-scale cell ensembles express coordinated replay of prior learning-related firing patterns during subsequent sleep. This occurs in the hippocampus, in the cortex, and between the hippocampus and cortex, commonly in association with specific NREM sleep oscillations. At the whole-brain level, somewhat analogous learning-associated hippocampal (re)activation during NREM sleep has been reported in humans. Moreover, the same cortical NREM oscillations associated with replay in rodents also promote human hippocampal memory consolidation, and this process can be manipulated using exogenous reactivation cues during sleep. Mirroring molecular findings in rodents, specific NREM sleep oscillations before encoding refresh human hippocampal learning capacity, while deprivation of sleep conversely impairs subsequent hippocampal activity and associated encoding. Together, these cross-descriptive level findings demonstrate that the unique neurobiology of sleep exert

  4. Fast high resolution whole brain T2* weighted imaging using echo planar imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Versluis, Maarten J; Luijten, Peter R; Petridou, Natalia

    2011-06-15

    Magnetic susceptibility based (T(2)* weighted) contrast in MRI at high magnetic field strength is of great value in research on brain structure and cortical architecture, but its use is hampered by the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency of the conventional spoiled gradient echo sequence (GRE) leading to long scan times even for a limited number of slices. In this work, we show that high resolution (0.5mm isotropic) T(2)* weighted images of the whole brain can be obtained in 6min by utilizing the high SNR efficiency of echo-planar imaging (EPI). A volumetric (3D) EPI protocol is presented and compared to conventional 3D GRE images acquired with the same resolution, amount of T(2)* weighting, and imaging duration. Spatial coverage in 3D EPI was increased by a factor of 4.5 compared to 3D GRE, while also the SNR was increased by a factor of 2. Image contrast for both magnitude and phase between gray and white matter was similar for both sequences, with enhanced conspicuity of anatomic details in the 3D EPI images due to the increased SNR. Even at 7T, image blurring and distortion is limited if the EPI train length remains short (not longer than the T(2)* of the imaged tissue). 3D EPI provides steps (speed, whole brain coverage, and high isotropic resolution) that are necessary to utilize the benefits of high field MRI in research that employs T(2)* weighted imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sleep, plasticity and memory from molecules to whole-brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Ted; Havekes, Robbert; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2013-09-09

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep across phylogeny, its function remains elusive. In this review, we consider one compelling candidate: brain plasticity associated with memory processing. Focusing largely on hippocampus-dependent memory in rodents and humans, we describe molecular, cellular, network, whole-brain and behavioral evidence establishing a role for sleep both in preparation for initial memory encoding, and in the subsequent offline consolidation of memory. Sleep and sleep deprivation bidirectionally alter molecular signaling pathways that regulate synaptic strength and control plasticity-related gene transcription and protein translation. At the cellular level, sleep deprivation impairs cellular excitability necessary for inducing synaptic potentiation and accelerates the decay of long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. In contrast, rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep enhance previously induced synaptic potentiation, although synaptic de-potentiation during sleep has also been observed. Beyond single cell dynamics, large-scale cell ensembles express coordinated replay of prior learning-related firing patterns during subsequent NREM sleep. At the whole-brain level, somewhat analogous learning-associated hippocampal (re)activation during NREM sleep has been reported in humans. Moreover, the same cortical NREM oscillations associated with replay in rodents also promote human hippocampal memory consolidation, and this process can be manipulated using exogenous reactivation cues during sleep. Mirroring molecular findings in rodents, specific NREM sleep oscillations before encoding refresh human hippocampal learning capacity, while deprivation of sleep conversely impairs subsequent hippocampal activity and associated encoding. Together, these cross-descriptive level findings demonstrate that the unique neurobiology of sleep exerts powerful effects on molecular, cellular and network mechanisms of plasticity that govern both initial

  6. Physics strategies for sparing neural stem cells during whole-brain radiation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean; Hwang, Andrew; Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Currently, there are no successful long-term treatments or preventive strategies for radiation-induced cognitive impairments, and only a few possibilities have been suggested. One such approach involves reducing the dose to neural stem cell compartments (within and outside of the hippocampus) during whole-brain radiation treatments for brain metastases. This study investigates the fundamental physics issues associated with the sparing of neural stem cells during photon radiotherapy for brain metastases. Methods: Several factors influence the stem cell dose: intracranial scattering, collimator leakage, beam energy, and total number of beams. The relative importance of these factors is investigated through a set of radiation therapy plans, which are all variations of an initial 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan designed to simultaneously deliver a whole-brain dose of 30 Gy and maximally reduce stem cell compartment dose. Additionally, an in-house leaf segmentation algorithm was developed that utilizes jaw motion to minimize the collimator leakage. Results: The plans are all normalized such that 50% of the PTV receives 30 Gy. For the initial 6 MV IMRT plan, 50% of the stem cells receive a dose greater than 6.3 Gy. Calculations indicate that 3.6 Gy of this dose originates from intracranial scattering. The jaw-tracking segmentation algorithm, used in conjunction with direct machine parameter optimization, reduces the 50% stem cell dose to 4.3 and 3.7 Gy for 6 and 10 MV treatment beams, respectively. Conclusions: Intracranial scattering alone is responsible for a large dose contribution to the stem cell compartment. It is, therefore, important to minimize other contributing factors, particularly the collimator leakage, to maximally reduce dose to these critical structures. The use of collimator jaw tracking in conjunction with modern collimators can minimize this leakage.

  7. Whole brain 3D T2-weighted BOLD fMRI at 7T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Pekar, James J.; Jones, Craig K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. Methods It employs a T2-preparation module to induce BOLD contrast, followed by a single-shot 3D fast gradient-echo readout with short TE. It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the “dead time” due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed “3D T2prep-GRE”, was implemented at 7T with a typical spatial (2.5×2.5×2.5mm3) and temporal (TR=2.3s) resolution for fMRI and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. Results In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. Conclusion This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. PMID:24338901

  8. Effect of graded hyperventilation on cerebral metabolism in a cisterna magna blood injection model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Bay-Hansen, Rikke; Hauerberg, John

    2006-01-01

    In subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with cerebrovascular instability, hyperventilation may induce a risk of inducing or aggravating cerebral ischemia. We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen (CMRO2), glucose (CMRglc), and lactate (CMRlac) at different PaCO2 levels...... after experimental SAH in rats (injection of 0.07 mL of autologous blood into the cisterna magna). Four groups of Sprague-Dawley male rats were studied at predetermined PaCO2 levels: group A: normocapnia (5.01-5.66 kPa [38.0-42.0 mm Hg]); group B: slight hyperventilation (4.34-5.00 kPa [32.5-37.5 mm Hg......]); group C: moderate hyperventilation (3.67-4.33 kPa [27.5-32.4 mm Hg]); group D: profound hyperventilation (3.00-3.66 kPa [22.5-27.4 mm Hg]). Each of the four groups included eight rats with SAH and eight sham-operated controls. CBF was determined by the intracarotid Xe method; CMRo2, CMRglc, and CMRlac...

  9. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 . Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Do patients with very few brain metastases from breast cancer benefit from whole-brain radiotherapy in addition to radiosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Hornung, Dagmar; Blanck, Oliver; Schild, Steven E; Fischer, Dorothea

    2014-12-04

    An important issue in palliative radiation oncology is the whether whole-brain radiotherapy should be added to radiosurgery when treating a limited number of brain metastases. To optimize personalized treatment of cancer patients with brain metastases, the value of whole-brain radiotherapy should be described separately for each tumor entity. This study investigated the role of whole-brain radiotherapy added to radiosurgery in breast cancer patients. Fifty-eight patients with 1-3 brain metastases from breast cancer were included in this retrospective study. Of these patients, 30 were treated with radiosurgery alone and 28 with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Both groups were compared for local control of the irradiated metastases, freedom from new brain metastases and survival. Furthermore, eight additional factors were analyzed including dose of radiosurgery, age at radiotherapy, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score, number of brain metastases, maximum diameter of all brain metastases, site of brain metastases, extra-cranial metastases and the time from breast cancer diagnosis to radiotherapy. The treatment regimen had no significant impact on local control in the univariate analysis (p=0.59). Age ≤59 years showed a trend towards improved local control on univariate (p=0.066) and multivariate analysis (p=0.07). On univariate analysis, radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy (p=0.040) and ECOG 0-1 (p=0.012) showed positive associations with freedom from new brain metastases. Both treatment regimen (p=0.039) and performance status (p=0.028) maintained significance on multivariate analysis. ECOG 0-1 was positively correlated with survival on univariate analysis (pbreast cancer patients with few brain metastases, radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy resulted in significantly better freedom from new brain metastases than radiosurgery alone. However, this advantage did not lead to significantly better survival.

  11. Novel MRI methodology to detect human whole-brain connectivity changes after ingestion of fructose or glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Wilkins, Bryce; Page, Kathleen A.; Singh, Manbir

    2012-03-01

    A novel MRI protocol has been developed to investigate the differential effects of glucose or fructose consumption on whole-brain functional brain connectivity. A previous study has reported a decrease in the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal of the hypothalamus following glucose ingestion, but due to technical limitations, was restricted to a single slice covering the hypothalamus, and thus unable to detect whole-brain connectivity. In another previous study, a protocol was devised to acquire whole-brain fMRI data following food intake, but only after restricting image acquisition to an MR sampling or repetition time (TR) of 20s, making the protocol unsuitable to detect functional connectivity above 0.025Hz. We have successfully implemented a continuous 36-min, 40 contiguous slices, whole-brain BOLD acquisition protocol on a 3T scanner with TR=4.5s to ensure detection of up to 0.1Hz frequencies for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis. Human data were acquired first with ingestion of water only, followed by a glucose or fructose drink within the scanner, without interrupting the scanning. Whole-brain connectivity was analyzed using standard correlation methodology in the 0.01-0.1 Hz range. The correlation coefficient differences between fructose and glucose ingestion among targeted regions were converted to t-scores using the water-only correlation coefficients as a null condition. Results show a dramatic increase in the hypothalamic connectivity to the hippocampus, amygdala, insula, caudate and the nucleus accumben for fructose over glucose. As these regions are known to be key components of the feeding and reward brain circuits, these results suggest a preference for fructose ingestion.

  12. Bilingualism as a contributor to cognitive reserve?Evidence from cerebral glucose metabolism in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Eva Kowoll

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bilingualism is discussed as one factor contributing to ‘cognitive reserve’ (CR as it enhances executive control functions. To elucidate the underlying cerebral correlates regional glucose uptake was compared between bilinguals and monolinguals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and beginning Alzheimer´s disease (AD by using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET. Methods: 30 patients (73.2 ± 7.4 diagnosed with MCI or probable AD received physical and neuropsychological examinations, blood tests and FDG-PET scans. 16 patients were classified as lifelong bilinguals following the criterion of Bialystok et al.; groups were matched for age, sex and MMSE scores. Analyses were conducted using SPM 8 using the whole brain as reference region for intensity normalization controlling for years of education.Results: Bilingual patient groups showed substantially greater impairment of glucose uptake in frontotemporal and parietal regions (including Brodmann areas 9, 47, 40 and 21 and in the left cerebellum relative to monolingual patients.Conclusions: Bilingualism is likely to contribute to CR given that bilingual patients showed more severe brain changes than monolinguals when adjusting for severity of cognitive impairment . The latter did not only comprise Brodmann areas relevant to speech and language but also structures typically involved in AD pathology such as the temporal and the parietal cortices.

  13. Correlation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism with Hcy metabolism and inflammatory response in patients with recurrent cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Zhuang Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphism with Hcy metabolism and inflammatory response in patients with recurrent cerebral infarction. Methods: 40 patients with recurrent cerebral infarction who were treated in Yulin Third Hospital between December 2013 and December 2016 were selected as recurrent group, 58 patients with primary cerebral infarction were selected as primary group, and 60 healthy volunteers were selected as control group. Peripheral blood MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism and serum levels of Hcy metabolism indexes and inflammatory response indicators were determined. Results: CC genotype constituent ratio of recurrent group was significantly lower than that of primary group and control group while CT genotype and TT genotype constituent ratio were significantly higher than those of primary group and control group; serum Hcy, HMGB1, sCD40L, YKL-40, Lp-PLA2 and MMP-9 levels in recurrent group and primary group were significantly higher than those in control group while VitB12 and FA levels were significantly lower than those in control group; serum Hcy, HMGB1, sCD40L, YKL-40, Lp-PLA2 and MMP-9 levels in recurrent group were significantly higher than those in primary group while VitB12 and FA levels were significantly lower than those in primary group. Serum Hcy, HMGB1, sCD40L, YKL-40, Lp-PLA2 and MMP-9 levels in patients with CC genotype were significantly lower than those in patients with CT genotype and TT genotype while VitB12 and FA levels were significantly higher than those in patients with CT genotype and TT genotype; serum Hcy, HMGB1, sCD40L, YKL-40, Lp-PLA2 and MMP-9 levels in patients with CT genotype were significantly lower than those in patients with TT genotype while VitB12 and FA levels were significantly higher than those in patients with TT genotype. Conclusion: MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism is closely related to the recurrence of cerebral infarction, and allele C

  14. The Influence Of Implementation Brain-Friendly Learning Through The Whole Brain Teaching To Students’ Response and Creative Character In Learning Mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Winarso, Widodo; Karimah, Siti Asri

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the application of brain-friendly learning through whole brain teaching gives a positive effect on the creative character of students, to know the response of the students against the application of brain-friendly learning through whole brain teaching, and to find out if the student response against the application of brain-friendly learning through whole brain teaching correlates positively with the creative character of students in learning mathematics. ...

  15. Metabolic Characterization of Acutely Isolated Hippocampal and Cerebral Cortical Slices Using [U-13C]Glucose and [1,2-13C]Acetate as Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Laura F; Kornfelt, Rasmus; Walls, Anne B; Andersen, Jens V; Aldana, Blanca I; Nissen, Jakob D; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    Brain slice preparations from rats, mice and guinea pigs have served as important tools for studies of neurotransmission and metabolism. While hippocampal slices routinely have been used for electrophysiology studies, metabolic processes have mostly been studied in cerebral cortical slices. Few comparative characterization studies exist for acute hippocampal and cerebral cortical slices, hence, the aim of the current study was to characterize and compare glucose and acetate metabolism in these slice preparations in a newly established incubation design. Cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices prepared from 16 to 18-week-old mice were incubated for 15-90 min with unlabeled glucose in combination with [U-13C]glucose or [1,2-13C]acetate. Our newly developed incubation apparatus allows accurate control of temperature and is designed to avoid evaporation of the incubation medium. Subsequent to incubation, slices were extracted and extracts analyzed for 13C-labeling (%) and total amino acid contents (µmol/mg protein) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Release of lactate from the slices was quantified by analysis of the incubation media. Based on the measured 13C-labeling (%), total amino acid contents and relative activity of metabolic enzymes/pathways, we conclude that the slice preparations in the current incubation apparatus exhibited a high degree of metabolic integrity. Comparison of 13C-labeling observed with [U-13C]glucose in slices from cerebral cortex and hippocampus revealed no significant regional differences regarding glycolytic or total TCA cycle activities. On the contrary, results from the incubations with [1,2-13C]acetate suggest a higher capacity of the astrocytic TCA cycle in hippocampus compared to cerebral cortex. Finally, we propose a new approach for assessing compartmentation of metabolite pools between astrocytes and neurons using 13C-labeling (%) data obtained from mass

  16. The effect of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption on cerebral amino acid metabolism and oxidative metabolism during acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Hauerberg, John; Frederiksen, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Patients with acute liver failure have a disturbed amino acid metabolism and a compromised oxidative metabolism in the brain. A limited number of clinically neuroprotective interventions are available. This study aimed at assessing the effect of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA...

  17. Cerebral metabolic changes (F-18-FDG PET) during selective anterior temporal lobe amobarbital test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N; Hajek, M; Antonini, A; Maguire, P; Muller, S; Valavanis, A; Leenders, KL; Regard, M; Schiess, R; Wieser, HG

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral glucose utilisation using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-18-FDG PET) was measured in 4 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy during a selective anterior temporal lobe (TL) amobarbital test (ATLAT) and compared with their baseline values. F-18-FDG was injected

  18. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: After whole brain irradiation followed by IMRT or 3DCRT treatment, TN phenotype breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis had high objective response rates but shorter survival time. With respect to survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis, the TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor.

  19. Comparison of short-course versus long-course whole-brain radiotherapy in the treatment of brain metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, Dirk; Bohlen, Guenther; Dunst, Juergen; Lohynska, Radka; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas; Schild, Steven E.; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the most common treatment for brain metastases. Most of these patients have a poor survival prognosis. Therefore, a short radiation program is preferred, if it provides a similar outcome as longer programs. This study compares 20 Gy in five fractions (treatment

  20. Blast overpressure waves induce transient anxiety and regional changes in cerebral glucose metabolism and delayed hyperarousal in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibah Omar Awwad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiological alterations, anxiety and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p<0.05; n=8-11. Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed hyperactivity and increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p<0.05; n=4-6 and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p<0.05; n=5-6.

  1. A combination of physical activity and computerized brain training improves verbal memory and increases cerebral glucose metabolism in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, T; Verdile, G; Sohrabi, H; Campbell, A; Putland, E; Cheetham, C; Dhaliwal, S; Weinborn, M; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Martins, R N

    2014-12-02

    Physical exercise interventions and cognitive training programs have individually been reported to improve cognition in the healthy elderly population; however, the clinical significance of using a combined approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated whether physical activity (PA), computerized cognitive training and/or a combination of both could improve cognition. In this nonrandomized study, 224 healthy community-dwelling older adults (60-85 years) were assigned to 16 weeks home-based PA (n=64), computerized cognitive stimulation (n=62), a combination of both (combined, n=51) or a control group (n=47). Cognition was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test and the CogState computerized battery at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks post intervention. Physical fitness assessments were performed at all time points. A subset (total n=45) of participants underwent [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans at 16 weeks (post-intervention). One hundred and ninety-one participants completed the study and the data of 172 participants were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control group, the combined group showed improved verbal episodic memory and significantly higher brain glucose metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex after controlling for age, sex, premorbid IQ, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status and history of head injury. The higher cerebral glucose metabolism in this brain region was positively associated with improved verbal memory seen in the combined group only. Our study provides evidence that a specific combination of physical and mental exercises for 16 weeks can improve cognition and increase cerebral glucose metabolism in cognitively intact healthy older adults.

  2. Typical cerebral metabolic patterns in various types of dementia: an SPM analysis of 18F-FDG PET images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-xue CUI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To delineate the cerebral metabolic patterns presented in 18F-FDG PET images in various types of dementia with SPM analysis.  Methods Patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET scanning with a retrospectively confirmed diagnosis according to strictly defined clinical research criteria were studied. Clinical follow-up enabled appropriate patient inclusion. A total of 62 patients were included, of which 20 patients were diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (AD, 20 frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 10 dementia with Lewy body (DLB, 7 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, 3 primary progressive aphasia (PPA, 1 corticobasal ganglionic degeneration (CBD, 1 multiple system atrophy (MSA. 18F-FDG PET images of each group were analyzed and compared to 20 healthy controls using SPM5. Results Disease-specific patterns of relatively decreased metabolic activity were found in AD (bilateral parietotemporal regions and frontal regions sparing sensorimotor cortex, FTD (asymmetric frontotemporal regions, DLB (occipital lobe, visual cortex and bilateral superior temporal gyrus, PSP (bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterolateral temporal regions, caudate nucleus and mesencephalon, PPA (Broca's area in left frontal lobe, left temporal cortex excepting posterior superior temporal gyrus, CBD (asymmetricly involved cortical regions, prodominately on right side, around bilateral central sulcus and right basal ganglia, MSA (bilateral cerebellum dorsolateral cortex and left putamen, and right medial temporal cortex.  Conclusions Specific dementia related cerebral metabolic patterns in 18F-FDG PET might assist in early differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.04.008

  3. The evaluation of lens absorbed dose according to the optimold for whole brain radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong Mo; Park, Byoung Suk; Ahn, Jong Ho; Song, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In the current whole brain Radiation Therapy, Optimold was used to immobilize the head. However, skin dose was increased about 22% due to the scattering radiation by the Optimold. Since the minimum dose causing cataracts was 2 Gy, it could be seen that the effects were large especially on the lens. Therefore, in the whole brain Radiation Therapy, it was to compare and to evaluate the lens absorbed dose according to the presence of Optimold in the eyeball part. In order to compare and to evaluate the lens absorbed dose according to the presence of Optimold in the eyeball part, the Optimold mask was made up to 5 mm bolus on the part of the eye lens in the human model phantom (Anderson Rando Phantom, USA). In the practice treatment, to measure the lens dose, the simulation therapy was processed by placing the GafChromic EBT3 film under bolus, and after the treatment plan was set up through the treatment planning system (Pinnacle, PHILIPS, USA), the treatments were measured repeatedly three times in the same way. After removing the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, it was measured in the same way as above. After scanning the film and measuring the dose by using the Digital Flatbed Scanner (Expression 10000XL, EPSON, USA), the doses were compared and evaluated according to the presence of Optimold mask in the eyeball part. When there was the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, it was measured at 10.2cGy ± 1.5 in the simulation therapy, and at 24.8cGy ± 2.7 in the treatment, and when the Optimold mask was removed in the eye part, it was measured at 12.9cGy ± 2.2 in the simulation therapy, and at 17.6cGy ± 1.5 in the treatment. In case of removing the Optimold mask in the eyeball part, the dose was increased approximately 3cGy in the simulation therapy and was reduced approximately 7cGy in the treatment in comparison to the case that the Optimold mask was not removed. During the whole treatment, since the lens absorbed dose was reduced about 27%, the chance to cause

  4. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor blockade prevents fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Jopson, Timothy D; Paladini, Maria Serena; Liu, Sharon; West, Brian L; Gupta, Nalin; Rosi, Susanna

    2016-08-30

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms and brain metastases are routinely treated with whole-brain radiation. Long-term survival occurs in many patients, but their quality of life is severely affected by the development of cognitive deficits, and there is no treatment to prevent these adverse effects. Neuroinflammation, associated with activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltrating monocytes, plays a pivotal role in loss of neurological function and has been shown to be associated with acute and long-term effects of brain irradiation. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) signaling is essential for the survival and differentiation of microglia and monocytes. Here, we tested the effects of CSF-1R blockade by PLX5622 on cognitive function in mice treated with three fractions of 3.3 Gy whole-brain irradiation. Young adult C57BL/6J mice were given three fractions of 3.3 Gy whole-brain irradiation while they were on diet supplemented with PLX5622, and the effects on periphery monocyte accumulation, microglia numbers, and neuronal functions were assessed. The mice developed hippocampal-dependent cognitive deficits at 1 and 3 months after they received fractionated whole-brain irradiation. The impaired cognitive function correlated with increased number of periphery monocyte accumulation in the CNS and decreased dendritic spine density in hippocampal granule neurons. PLX5622 treatment caused temporary reduction of microglia numbers, inhibited monocyte accumulation in the brain, and prevented radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Blockade of CSF-1R by PLX5622 prevents fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced memory deficits. Therapeutic targeting of CSF-1R may provide a new avenue for protection from radiation-induced memory deficits.

  5. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum (LS, central amygdala (CeA, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVH, dorsal raphe (DRN and parabrachial nucleus (PBN. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal-hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function.

  6. Neurocognitive function impairment after whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases: actual assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tallet Agnes V

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT is an effective treatment in brain metastases and, when combined with local treatments such as surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery, gives the best brain control. Nonetheless, WBRT is often omitted after local treatment due to its potential late neurocognitive effects. Publications on radiation-induced neurotoxicity have used different assessment methods, time to assessment, and definition of impairment, thus making it difficult to accurately assess the rate and magnitude of the neurocognitive decline that can be expected. In this context, and to help therapeutic decision making, we have conducted this literature review, with the aim of providing an average incidence, magnitude and time to occurrence of radio-induced neurocognitive decline. We reviewed all English language published articles on neurocognitive effects of WBRT for newly diagnosed brain metastases or with a preventive goal in adult patients, with any methodology (MMSE, battery of neurcognitive tests with which baseline status was provided. We concluded that neurocognitive decline is predominant at 4 months, strongly dependant on brain metastases control, partially solved at later time, graded 1 on a SOMA-LENT scale (only 8% of grade 2 and more, insufficiently assessed in long-term survivors, thus justifying all efforts to reduce it through irradiation modulation.

  7. Whole brain magnetization transfer histogram analysis of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving intrathecal methotrexate therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akira [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: mikiy@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Souichi [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: sadachi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp (and others)

    2006-03-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the hypothesis that magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram analysis of the whole brain could detect early and subtle brain changes nonapparent on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Materials and methods: Subjects in this prospective study comprised 10 children with ALL (mean age, 6 years; range, 0-16 years). In addition to conventional MRI, magnetization transfer images were obtained before and after intrathecal and intravenous MTX therapy. MTR values were calculated and plotted as a histogram, and peak height and location were calculated. Differences in peak height and location between pre- and post-MTX therapy scans were statistically analyzed. Conventional MRI was evaluated for abnormal signal area in white matter. Results: MTR peak height was significantly lower on post-MTX therapy scans than on pre-MTX therapy scans (p = 0.002). No significant differences in peak location were identified between pre- and post-chemotherapy imaging. No abnormal signals were noted in white matter on either pre- or post-MTX therapy conventional MRI. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that MTR histogram analysis allows better detection of early and subtle brain changes in ALL patients who receive MTX therapy than conventional MRI.

  8. Whole-brain mapping of neuronal activity in the learned helplessness model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo eKim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some individuals are resilient, whereas others succumb to despair in repeated stressful situations. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying such divergent behavioral responses remain unclear. Here, we employed an automated method for mapping neuronal activity in search of signatures of stress responses in the entire mouse brain. We used serial two-photon tomography to detect expression of c-FosGFP – a marker of neuronal activation – in c-fosGFP transgenic mice subjected to the learned helplessness (LH procedure, a widely used model of stress-induced depression-like phenotype in laboratory animals. We found that mice showing helpless behavior had an overall brain-wide reduction in the level of neuronal activation compared with mice showing resilient behavior, with the exception of a few brain areas, including the locus coeruleus, that were more activated in the helpless mice. In addition, the helpless mice showed a strong trend of having higher similarity in whole brain activity profile among individuals, suggesting that helplessness is represented by a more stereotypic brain-wide activation pattern. This latter effect was confirmed in rats subjected to the LH procedure, using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography to assess neural activity. Our findings reveal distinct brain activity markings that correlate with adaptive and maladaptive behavioral responses to stress, and provide a framework for further studies investigating the contribution of specific brain regions to maladaptive stress responses.

  9. Whole-Brain Susceptibility-Weighted Thrombus Imaging in Stroke: Fragmented Thrombi Predict Worse Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, P P; Schroth, G; Gralla, J; Mattle, H P; Fischer, U; Jung, S; Mordasini, P; Hsieh, K; Verma, R K; Weisstanner, C; El-Koussy, M

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence and clinical importance of primarily fragmented thrombi in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains elusive. Whole-brain SWI was used to detect multiple thrombus fragments, and their clinical significance was analyzed. Pretreatment SWI was analyzed for the presence of a single intracranial thrombus or multiple intracranial thrombi. Associations with baseline clinical characteristics, complications, and clinical outcome were studied. Single intracranial thrombi were detected in 300 (92.6%), and multiple thrombi, in 24 of 324 patients (7.4%). In 23 patients with multiple thrombi, all thrombus fragments were located in the vascular territory distal to the primary occluding thrombus; in 1 patient, thrombi were found both in the anterior and posterior circulation. Only a minority of thrombus fragments were detected on TOF-MRA, first-pass gadolinium-enhanced MRA, or DSA. Patients with multiple intracranial thrombi presented with more severe symptoms (median NIHSS scores, 15 versus 11; P = .014) and larger ischemic areas (median DWI ASPECTS, 5 versus 7; P = .006); good collaterals, rated on DSA, were fewer than those in patients with a single thrombus (21.1% versus 44.2%, P = .051). The presence of multiple thrombi was a predictor of unfavorable outcome at 3 months (P = .040; OR, 0.251; 95% CI, 0.067-0.939). Patients with multiple intracranial thrombus fragments constitute a small subgroup of patients with stroke with a worse outcome than patients with single thrombi. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  10. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor as a treatment for cognitive deficits postfractionated whole-brain irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Rosi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole-brain irradiation (WBI is commonly used to treat primary tumors of the central nervous systems tumors as well as brain metastases. While this technique has increased survival among brain tumor patients, the side effects of including a decline in cognitive abilities that are generally progressive. In an effort to combat WBI side effects, researchers explored the treatment of colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R inhibitor. Data show that when a CSF-1R inhibitor is administered with fractionated WBI treatment, there is a decline in the number of resident and peripheral mononuclear phagocytes, a decrease in dendritic spine loss and a reduction in functional and memory deficits. CSFR-1R inhibitors have displayed promising results as an effective counter-treatment for WBI-induced deficits. Further research is required to optimize treatment strategies, establish a treatment timeline and gain a better understanding of the long-term side effects of targeting CSF-1R as a treatment strategy for WBI symptoms. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the references section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  11. Cognitive dysfunction and histological findings in adult rats one year after whole brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Sato, Mitsuya; Takeda, Norio [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.

    2001-12-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and histological changes in the brain were investigated following irradiation in 20 Fischer 344 rats aged 6 months treated with whole brain irradiation (WBR) (25 Gy/single dose), and compared with the same number of sham-irradiated rats as controls. Performance of the Morris water maze task and the passive avoidance task were examined one year after WBR. Finally, histological and immunohistochemical examinations using antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neurofilament (NF) were performed of the rat brains. The irradiated rats continued to gain weight 7 months after WBR whereas the control rats stopped gaining weight. Cognitive functions in both the water maze task and the passive avoidance task were lower in the irradiated rats than in the control rats. Brain damage consisting of demyelination only or with necrosis was found mainly in the body of the corpus callosum and the parietal white matter near the corpus callosum in the irradiated rats. Immunohistochemical examination of the brains without necrosis found MBP-positive fibers were markedly decreased in the affected areas by irradiation; NF-positive fibers were moderately decreased and irregularly dispersed in various shapes in the affected areas; and GFAP-positive fibers were increased, with gliosis in those areas. These findings are similar to those in clinically accelerated brain aging in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Binswanger's disease, and multiple sclerosis. (author)

  12. Overall Survival After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Intracerebral Metastases from Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Dziggel, Liesa; Veninga, Theo; Bajrovic, Amira; Schild, Steven E

    2016-09-01

    To identify predictors and develop a score for overall survival of patients with intracerebral metastasis from testicular cancer. Whole-brain radiation therapy program, age, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), number of intracerebral metastases, number of other metastatic sites and time between testicular cancer diagnosis and radiation therapy were analyzed for their association with overall survival in eight patients. KPS of 80-90% was significantly associated with better overall survival (p=0.006), one or no other metastatic sites showed a trend for a better outcome (p=0.10). The following scores were assigned: KPS 60-70%=0 points, KPS 80-90%=1 point, ≥2 other metastatic sites=0 points, 0-1 other metastatic sites=1 point. Two groups, with 0 and with 1-2 points, were formed. Overall survival rates were 33% vs. 100% at 6 months and 0% vs. 100% at 12 months (p=0.006), respectively. A simple instrument enabling physicians to judge the overall survival of patients with intracerebral metastasis from testicular cancer is provided. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. A Bayesian network meta-analysis of whole brain radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xi; Liu, Wen-Jie; Li, Bing; Shen, Ze-Tian; Shen, Jun-Shu; Zhu, Xi-Xu

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRS) in treatment of brain metastasis.A systematical retrieval in PubMed and Embase databases was performed for relative literatures on the effects of WBRT and SRS in treatment of brain metastasis. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed by using the ADDIS software. The effect sizes included odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). A random effects model was used for the pooled analysis for all the outcome measures, including 1-year distant control rate, 1-year local control rate, 1-year survival rate, and complication. The consistency was tested by using node-splitting analysis and inconsistency standard deviation. The convergence was estimated according to the Brooks-Gelman-Rubin method.A total of 12 literatures were included in this meta-analysis. WBRT + SRS showed higher 1-year distant control rate than SRS. WBRT + SRS was better for the 1-year local control rate than WBRT. SRS and WBRT + SRS had higher 1-year survival rate than the WBRT. In addition, there was no difference in complication among the three therapies.Comprehensively, WBRT + SRS might be the choice of treatment for brain metastasis.

  14. Optimization of CLARITY for Clearing Whole-Brain and Other Intact Organs1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niibori, Yosuke; (Liz) Hsiang, Hwa-Lin; Mercaldo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The development, refinement, and use of techniques that allow high-throughput imaging of whole brains with cellular resolution will help us understand the complex functions of the brain. Such techniques are crucial for the analysis of complete neuronal morphology—anatomical and functional—connectivity, and repeated molecular phenotyping. CLARITY is a recently introduced technique that produces structurally intact, yet optically transparent tissue, which may be labeled and imaged without sectioning. However, the utility of this technique depends on several procedural variables during the process in which the light-scattering lipids in a tissue are replaced by a transparent hydrogel matrix. Here, we systematically varied a number of factors (including temperature, hydrogel composition, and polymerization conditions) to provide an optimized, highly replicable CLARITY procedure for clearing mouse brains. We found that for these preparations optimal tissue clearing requires electrophoresis (and cannot be achieved with passive clearing alone) for 5 d with a combination of 37 and 55°C temperature. Although this protocol is optimized for brains, we also show that it can be used to clear and analyze a variety of organs. Brain or other tissue prepared using this protocol is suitable for high-throughput imaging with confocal or single-plane illumination microscopy. PMID:26464982

  15. Optimization of CLARITY for Clearing Whole-Brain and Other Intact Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Jonathan R; Niibori, Yosuke; Liz Hsiang, Hwa-Lin; Mercaldo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl; Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    The development, refinement, and use of techniques that allow high-throughput imaging of whole brains with cellular resolution will help us understand the complex functions of the brain. Such techniques are crucial for the analysis of complete neuronal morphology-anatomical and functional-connectivity, and repeated molecular phenotyping. CLARITY is a recently introduced technique that produces structurally intact, yet optically transparent tissue, which may be labeled and imaged without sectioning. However, the utility of this technique depends on several procedural variables during the process in which the light-scattering lipids in a tissue are replaced by a transparent hydrogel matrix. Here, we systematically varied a number of factors (including temperature, hydrogel composition, and polymerization conditions) to provide an optimized, highly replicable CLARITY procedure for clearing mouse brains. We found that for these preparations optimal tissue clearing requires electrophoresis (and cannot be achieved with passive clearing alone) for 5 d with a combination of 37 and 55°C temperature. Although this protocol is optimized for brains, we also show that it can be used to clear and analyze a variety of organs. Brain or other tissue prepared using this protocol is suitable for high-throughput imaging with confocal or single-plane illumination microscopy.

  16. Outcome after whole brain radiotherapy alone in intracranial leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gani, C.; Mueller, A.C.; Eckert, F.; Schroeder, C.; Bamberg, M.; Berger, B. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bender, B. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostics and Interventional Neuroradiology; Pantazis, G. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate outcome after whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone as a palliative treatment without concomitant chemotherapy for intracranial leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC). Overall survival and treatment response were retrospectively analyzed in 27 consecutive patients with LMC from breast and lung cancer. All patients had evidence of intracranial manifestations of LMC. Seven potential prognostic factors were evaluated. Median overall survival (OS) for the entire group was 8.1 weeks. OS rates after 6 and 12 months were 26% and 15%, respectively. Improvement of neurological deficits was observed in 3 patients. In 3 of 4 patients with follow-up MRI studies, a decreased size of contrast-enhanced lesions was observed. Prognostic factors for improved OS on univariate analysis were absence of cranial nerve dysfunction, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) > 60%, and time interval > 35 months between the initial diagnosis of malignant disease and development of LMC. On multivariate analysis, absence of cranial nerve dysfunction remained the only significant prognosticator for OS (median 3.7 vs. 19.4 weeks, p < 0.001). WBRT alone is an effective palliative treatment for patients unfit/unsuitable for chemotherapy and low performance status suffering from intracranial LMC. However, prognostic factors should be considered in order to identify patients who are likely to benefit from WBRT. (orig.)

  17. Pathology of fractionated whole-brain irradiation in rhesus monkeys ( Macaca mulatta ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbury, David B; Robbins, Mike E; Bourland, J Daniel; Wheeler, Kenneth T; Peiffer, Ann M; Mitchell, Erin L; Daunais, James B; Deadwyler, Samuel A; Cline, J Mark

    2015-03-01

    Fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI), used to treat brain metastases, often leads to neurologic injury and cognitive impairment. The cognitive effects of irradiation in nonhuman primates (NHP) have been previously published; this report focuses on corresponding neuropathologic changes that could have served as the basis for those effects in the same study. Four rhesus monkeys were exposed to 40 Gy of fWBI [5 Gy × 8 fraction (fx), 2 fx/week for four weeks] and received anatomical MRI prior to, and 14 months after fWBI. Neurologic and histologic sequelae were studied posthumously. Three of the NHPs underwent cognitive assessments, and each exhibited radiation-induced impairment associated with various degrees of vascular and inflammatory neuropathology. Two NHPs had severe multifocal necrosis of the forebrain, midbrain and brainstem. Histologic and MRI findings were in agreement, and the severity of cognitive decrement previously reported corresponded to the degree of observed pathology in two of the animals. In response to fWBI, the NHPs showed pathology similar to humans exposed to radiation and show comparable cognitive decline. These results provide a basis for implementing NHPs to examine and treat adverse cognitive and neurophysiologic sequelae of radiation exposure in humans.

  18. Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of 70 kVp whole brain volumetric CT perfusion imaging: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xiao Kun; Ni, Qian Qian; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Chen, Guo Zhong; Luo, Song; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Ashley River Tower, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States); Fuller, Stephen R.; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Ashley River Tower, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy for acute infarct detection and radiation dose of 70 kVp whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) reconstructed from CTP source data. Patients were divided into three groups (n = 50 each): group A, 80 kVp, 21 scanning time points; groups B, 70 kVp, 21 scanning time points; group C, 70 kVp, 17 scanning time points. Objective and subjective image quality of CTP and CTA were compared. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and cerebral artery stenosis ≥ 50 % was calculated for CTP and CTA with diffusion weighted imaging and digital subtraction angiography as reference standards. Effective radiation dose was compared. There were no differences in any perfusion parameter value between three groups (P > 0.05). No difference was found in subjective image quality between three groups (P > 0.05). Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and vascular stenosis showed no difference between three groups (P > 0.05). Compared with group A, radiation doses of groups B and C were decreased by 28 % and 37 % (both P < 0.001), respectively. Compared with 80 kVp protocol, 70 kVp brain CTP allows comparable vascular and perfusion assessment and lower radiation dose while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy in detecting acute infarct. (orig.)

  19. Comparing fludeoxyglucose F18-PET assessment of regional cerebral glucose metabolism and [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine-PET in evaluation of early dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Roger L; Koeppe, Robert A; Burke, James F; Giordani, Bruno; Kilbourn, Michael R; Gilman, Sid; Frey, Kirk A

    2010-04-01

    To compare assessment of regional cerebral metabolic changes with [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ)-positron emission tomography (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (K(1)) and fludeoxyglucose F18 (FDG)-PET measurement of regional cerebral glucose uptake (CMR(glc)) in a clinically representative sample of subjects with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). [(11)C]Dihydrotetrabenazine-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were performed. University-based cognitive disorders clinic. Fifty subjects with either mild dementia (Mini-Mental State Examination score > or = 18) or MCI. Their results were compared with those of 80 normal control subjects. The DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were compared with standard correlation analysis. The overall patterns of DTBZ-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) deficits were assessed with stereotaxic surface projections (SSPs) of parametric images. The DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were highly correlated, both within and between subjects. The SSP maps of deficits in DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were markedly similar. The DTBZ-PET K(1) SSP maps exhibited a mild decrease in sensitivity relative to FDG-PET CMR(glc) maps. Both DTBZ-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements provide comparable information in assessment of regional cerebral metabolic deficits in mild dementia and MCI. Blood flow measures can assess regional cerebral metabolism deficits accurately in mild dementia and MCI. Blood flow assessments of regional cerebral metabolic deficits can be combined with tracer binding results to improve utility of PET imaging in mild dementia and MCI.

  20. The metabolism of C-glucose by neurons and astrocytes in brain subregions following focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoren, Anna E; Helps, Stephen C; Nilsson, Michael; Sims, Neil R

    2006-05-01

    To provide insights into the effects of temporary focal ischemia on the function of neurons and astrocytes in vivo, we measured the incorporation of radiolabel from [U-14C]glucose into both glutamate and glutamine in brain subregions at 1 h of reperfusion following occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 2 or 3 h. Under the experimental conditions used, 14C-glutamate is mainly produced in neurons whereas 14C-glutamine is generated in astrocytes from 14C-glutamate of both neuronal and astrocytic origin. Radiolabel incorporation into both amino acids was greatly decreased. The change in 14C-glutamate accumulation provides strong evidence for substantial reductions in neuronal glucose metabolism. The resulting decrease in delivery of 14C-glutamate from the neurons to astrocytes was probably also the major contributor to the change in 14C-glutamine content. These alterations probably result in part from a marked depression of glycolytic activity in the neurons, as suggested by previous studies assessing deoxyglucose utilization. Alterations in 14C-glucose metabolism were not restricted to tissue that would subsequently become infarcted. Thus, these changes did not inevitably lead to death of the affected cells. The ATP : ADP ratio and phosphocreatine content were essentially preserved during recirculation following 2 h of ischemia and showed at most only moderate losses in some subregions following 3 h of ischemia. This retention of energy reserves despite the decreases in 14C-glucose metabolism in neurons suggests that energy needs were substantially reduced in the post-ischemic brain. Marked increases in tissue lactate accumulation during recirculation, particularly following 3 h of ischemia, provided evidence that impaired pyruvate oxidation probably also contributed to the altered 14C-glucose metabolism. These findings indicate the presence of complex changes in energy metabolism that are likely to greatly influence the responses of neurons and astrocytes to

  1. Altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in internet game overusers: a 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Hee; Bang, Seong Ae; Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2010-03-01

    Internet game overuse is an emerging disorder and features diminished impulse control and poor reward-processing. In an attempt to understand the neurobiological bases of Internet game overuse, we investigated the differences in regional cerebral glucose metabolism at resting state between young individuals with Internet game overuse and those with normal use using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study. Twenty right-handed male participants (9 normal users: 24.7+/-2.4 years of age, 11 overusers: 23.5+/-2.9 years of age) participated. A trait measure of impulsivity was also completed after scanning. Internet game overusers showed greater impulsiveness than the normal users and there was a positive correlation between the severity of Internet game overuse and impulsiveness. Imaging data showed that the overusers had increased glucose metabolism in the right middle orbitofrontal gyrus, left caudate nucleus, and right insula, and decreased metabolism in the bilateral postcentral gyrus, left precentral gyrus, and bilateral occipital regions compared to normal users. Internet game overuse may be associated with abnormal neurobiological mechanisms in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, and sensory regions, which are implicated in impulse control, reward processing, and somatic representation of previous experiences. Our results support the idea that Internet game overuse shares psychological and neural mechanisms with other types of impulse control disorders and substance/non-substance-related addiction.

  2. Effects of laser acupoint irradiation on energy metabolism of brain tissue of rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guoxin; Li, Xinzhong

    2017-12-01

    The protective effect and mechanism of low-intensity laser acupoint irradiation on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (CIR) injury in rats were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham group, a CIR model (model) group, and a model plus laser irradiation (laser) group. The focal CIR model was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in all except the rats in the sham group. After modeling, the Baihui, Mingmen, and left Zusanli points of the rats in the laser group were irradiated with 15 mW using a semiconductor laser, and each point was irradiated for 15 min once a day for 7 d. The treatments used in the sham and model groups were the same as in the laser group except that the laser output power was zero. After treatment, the expressions of serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and serum malonaldehyde (MDA) content, the expression of growth-associated protein (GAP-43), the activities of succinic dehydrogenase and lactic dehydrogenase in brain tissue, were measured. The results showed that acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can improve energy metabolism, enhance the expression of GAP-43, increase the levels of expression of serum SOD, and decrease the serum MDA content in a rat model of focal CIR, suggesting the mechanism for reduction of CIR injury.

  3. A matched-pair study comparing whole-brain irradiation alone to radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy alone in patients irradiated for up to three brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rades, Dirk; Janssen, Stefan; Dziggel, Liesa; Blanck, Oliver; Bajrovic, Amira; Veninga, Theo; Schild, Steven E

    2017-01-06

    This matched-pair study was initiated to validate the results of a retrospective study of 186 patients published in 2007 that compared whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone and radiosurgery (RS) alone for up to three brain metastases. One-hundred-fifty-two patients receiving WBI alone for up to three brain metastases were matched with 152 patients treated with RS of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) alone 1:1 for each of eight factors (age, gender, Eastern Oncology Cooperative Group (ECOG)-performance score, nature of tumor, brain metastases number, extra-cerebral spread, period from cancer detection to irradiation of brain metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA)-class. Groups were analyzed regarding intracerebral control (IC) and overall survival (OS). On univariate analysis of IC, type of irradiation did not significantly affect outcomes (p = 0.84). On Cox regression, brain metastases number (p irradiation of brain metastases (p = 0.013) were significantly associated with IC. On univariate analysis of OS, type of irradiation showed no significant association with outcomes (p = 0.63). On multivariate analyses, OS was significantly associated with ECOG performance score (p = 0.011), nature of tumor (p = 0.035), brain metastases number (p = 0.048), extra-cerebral spread (p = 0.002) and RPA-class (p < 0.001). In this matched-pair study, RS/FSRT alone was not superior to WBI alone regarding IC and OS. These results can be considered a revision of the findings from our retrospective previous study without matched-pair design, where RS alone resulted in significantly better IC than WBI alone on multivariate analysis.

  4. Apparent brain temperature imaging with multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy compared with cerebral blood flow and metabolism imaging on positron emission tomography in patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanba, Takamasa; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate (Japan); Yoshioka, Yoshichika [Osaka University, Open and Transdisciplinary Research Initiatives, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko [Iwate Medical University, Institute for Biomedical Science, Iwate (Japan); Terasaki, Kazunori [Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy correlates with cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. Apparent brain temperature and CBF and metabolism imaging were measured using proton MR spectroscopy and {sup 15}O-positron emission tomography (PET), respectively, in 35 patients. A set of regions of interest (ROIs) of 5 x 5 voxels was placed on an MR image so that the voxel row at each edge was located in the deep white matter of the centrum semiovale in each cerebral hemisphere. PET images were co-registered with MR images with these ROIs and were re-sliced automatically using image analysis software. In 175 voxel pairs located in the deep white matter, the brain temperature difference (affected hemisphere - contralateral hemisphere: ΔBT) was correlated with cerebral blood volume (CBV) (r = 0.570) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) ratios (affected hemisphere/contralateral hemisphere) (r = 0.641). We excluded voxels that contained ischemic lesions or cerebrospinal fluid and calculated the mean values of voxel pairs in each patient. The mean ΔBT was correlated with the mean CBF (r = - 0.376), mean CBV (r = 0.702), and mean OEF ratio (r = 0.774). Apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton MR spectroscopy was correlated with CBF and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. (orig.)

  5. Maintained exercise-enhanced brain executive function related to cerebral lactate metabolism in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Takenaka, Saki

    2018-01-01

    High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) improves cerebral executive function (EF), but the improvement in EF is attenuated after repeated HIIE, perhaps because of lower lactate availability for the brain. This investigation examined whether improved EF after exercise relates to brain lactate uptake....... Fourteen healthy, male subjects performed 2 HIIE protocols separated by 60 min of rest. Blood samples were obtained from the right internal jugular venous bulb and from the brachial artery to determine differences across the brain for lactate (a-v difflactate), glucose (diffglucose), oxygen (diffoxygen...

  6. Decreased regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the prefrontal regions in adults' with internet game addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Bang, Soong Ae; Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Hee; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Internet Game Addiction (IGA) is known to be associated with poor decision-making and diminished impulse control; however, the underlying neural substrates of IGA have not been identified. To investigate the neural substrates of IGA, we compared regional cerebral glucose metabolism between adults with and without IGA, primarily in the prefrontal brain regions, which have been implicated in inhibitory control. We studied 10 right-handed participants (5 controls: male, 23.8{+-}0.75 y, 5 IGAs: male, 22.6{+-}2.42 y) with FDG PET. A standardized questionnaire was used to assess the severity of IGA. Before scanning, all subjects carried out a computerized version of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), as measures of behavioral inhibitory control. Statistical Parametric Mapping 2 (SPM2) was used to analyze differences in regional brain glucose metabolism between adults with and without IGA. Consistent with our predictions, compared to controls, significant reductions in FDG uptake in individuals with IGA were found in the bilateral orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 11, 47), bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44, 48), cingulate cortex (BA 24), and bilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) (BA 6); whereas increases were found in the bilateral hippocampus. Correlation analyses within the IGA group further showed that the level of glucose metabolism in the right orbitofrontal gyrus was marginally positively correlated with task scores in BART. Our results showed that IGA is associated with reduced glucose metabolism in the prefrontal regions involved in inhibitory control. This finding highlights dysfunctional inhibitory brain systems in individuals with IGA and offers implications for the development for therapeutic paradigms for IGA.

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment attenuated the decrease in regional glucose metabolism of rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia: a high resolution positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, M; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Wen, S-Q; Tang, Z-Q; Chen, Y-Z; Yan, W-Q; Ding, M-P

    2007-05-11

    Cerebral hypoxia may be the main component of cell damage caused by ischemia. Previous studies demonstrated a neuroprotective effect of early hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment in various animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. Neuropathologic study showed that exposure of HBO may prevent cell death in ischemic cortex. In the present study, we aimed to assess cellular function of ischemic rat brain after HBO treatment by means of a high-resolution positron emission tomography scanner (microPET) used specifically for small animal imaging. The male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), with the regional cerebral blood flow monitored in vivo by laser Doppler flowmetry. One hour after ischemia, HBO therapy (3 atm absolute, 1 h) was initiated. Local cerebral glucose utilization in the ischemic area was measured before, 1 h and 3 h after ischemia, with 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) as a tracer. Neurological deficits and infarct volumes were assessed at 24 h after ischemia. Our study showed that early HBO therapy significantly reduced infarct volume of brain 24 h after ischemia. Moreover, glucose utilization in the ischemic area underwent a severe decrease during 1-3 h after MCAO, while the early HBO treatment significantly attenuated the decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in the ischemic core of the cortex compared with controls. We report for the first time the application of microPET to quantify the rates of glucose metabolism in the ischemic core of rats exposed to HBO. Our results suggest that the early exposure of HBO can partially reverse the downward trend for glucose utilization in the ischemic core, which might contribute to the reported beneficial effects of early HBO therapy on permanent cerebral ischemia.

  8. Effects of caprylic triglyceride on cognitive performance and cerebral glucose metabolism in mild Alzheimer’s disease: a single-case observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Andrew Farah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the effect of 109 days of caprylic triglyceride (CT in a 70 year-old male with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Background: Cerebral metabolism is limited to glucose under most conditions, and diminished cerebral glucose metabolism is a characteristic feature of AD. Another substrate available for cerebral metabolism is ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are normally derived from fat stores under conditions of low glucose availability as an alternative energy substrate to glucose. Ketone bodies can also be produced by oral administration of CT. Prior studies suggest that the alternative energy source of CT may improve cognitive function due to mild to moderate AD, by circumventing the diminished glucose metabolism. Method: The effect of CT was analyzed in a single-case of mild AD with cognitive alterations in an open label study. Study outcomes included the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET scans. Results: After 109 days of CT, MoCA scores changed from a baseline value of 24 to 28, and MMSE scores changed from 23 to 28. No changes were observed on FDG PET scans. Conclusion: The results suggest that, in a case of mild AD, CT may have affected cognitive function, assessed by means of MMSE and MoCA, although glucose uptake and metabolism remained unchanged.

  9. Scalp Dose Evaluation According Radiation Therapy Technique of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joon Yung; Park, Soo Yun; Kim, Jong Sik; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Opposing portal irradiation with helmet field shape that has been given to a patient with brain metastasis can cause excess dose in patient's scalp, resulting in hair loss. For this reason, this study is to quantitatively analyze scalp dose for effective prevention of hair loss by comparing opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy designed to protect patient's scalp with conventional radiation therapy. Scalp dose was measured by using three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO) after five thermo-luminescence dosimeters were positioned along center line of frontal lobe by using RANDO Phantom. Scalp dose and change in dose distribution were compared and analyzed with DVH after radiation therapy plan was made by using Radiation Treatment Planning System (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical System, USA) and 6 MV X-ray (Clinac 6EX, VARIAN, USA). When surface dose of scalp by using thermo-luminescence dosimeters was measured, it was revealed that scalp dose decreased by average 87.44% at each point in MLC technique and that scalp dose decreased by average 88.03% at each point in TOMO compared with HELMET field therapy. In addition, when percentage of volume (V95%, V100%, V105% of prescribed dose) was calculated by using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) in order to evaluate the existence or nonexistence of hotspot in scalp as to three therapies (HELMET, MLC, TOMO), it was revealed that MLC technique and TOMO plan had good dose coverage and did not have hot spot. Reducing hair loss of a patient who receives whole brain radiotherapy treatment can make a contribution to improve life quality of the patient. It is expected that making good use of opposing portal irradiation with scalp-shielding shape and tomotherapy to protect scalp of a patient based on this study will reduce hair loss of a patient.

  10. Changes in Imaging and Cognition in Juvenile Rats After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert J.; Jun, Brandon J. [Division of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Advanced Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California (United States); Cushman, Jesse D. [Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Nguyen, Christine; Beighley, Adam H.; Blanchard, Johnny; Iwamoto, Kei; Schaue, Dorthe [Division of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Harris, Neil G. [UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles, California (United States); Jentsch, James D. [Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bluml, Stefan [Advanced Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Rudi Schulte Research Institute, Santa Barbara, California (United States); McBride, William H., E-mail: wmcbride@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: In pediatric cancer survivors treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI), long-term cognitive deficits and morbidity develop that are poorly understood and for which there is no treatment. We describe similar cognitive defects in juvenile WBI rats and correlate them with alterations in diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) during brain development. Methods and Materials: Juvenile Fischer rats received clinically relevant fractionated doses of WBI or a high-dose exposure. Diffusion tensor imaging and MRS were performed at the time of WBI and during the subacute (3-month) and late (6-month) phases, before behavioral testing. Results: Fractional anisotropy in the splenium of the corpus callosum increased steadily over the study period, reflecting brain development. WBI did not alter the subacute response, but thereafter there was no further increase in fractional anisotropy, especially in the high-dose group. Similarly, the ratios of various MRS metabolites to creatine increased over the study period, and in general, the most significant changes after WBI were during the late phase and with the higher dose. The most dramatic changes observed were in glutamine-creatine ratios that failed to increase normally between 3 and 6 months after either radiation dose. WBI did not affect the ambulatory response to novel open field testing in the subacute phase, but locomotor habituation was impaired and anxiety-like behaviors increased. As for cognitive measures, the most dramatic impairments were in novel object recognition late after either dose of WBI. Conclusions: The developing brains of juvenile rats given clinically relevant fractionated doses of WBI show few abnormalities in the subacute phase but marked late cognitive alterations that may be linked with perturbed MRS signals measured in the corpus callosum. This pathomimetic phenotype of clinically relevant cranial irradiation effects may be useful for modeling, mechanistic

  11. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebi, Junko, E-mail: junkoe@fmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ≥6, ≥12, ≥24, and ≥36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (≥65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ≥6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  12. Whole brain white matter connectivity analysis using machine learning: An application to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Savadjiev, Peter; Cai, Weidong; Song, Yang; Rathi, Yogesh; Tunç, Birkan; Parker, Drew; Kapur, Tina; Schultz, Robert T; Makris, Nikos; Verma, Ragini; O'Donnell, Lauren J

    2017-10-25

    In this paper, we propose an automated white matter connectivity analysis method for machine learning classification and characterization of white matter abnormality via identification of discriminative fiber tracts. The proposed method uses diffusion MRI tractography and a data-driven approach to find fiber clusters corresponding to subdivisions of the white matter anatomy. Features extracted from each fiber cluster describe its diffusion properties and are used for machine learning. The method is demonstrated by application to a pediatric neuroimaging dataset from 149 individuals, including 70 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 79 typically developing controls (TDC). A classification accuracy of 78.33% is achieved in this cross-validation study. We investigate the discriminative diffusion features based on a two-tensor fiber tracking model. We observe that the mean fractional anisotropy from the second tensor (associated with crossing fibers) is most affected in ASD. We also find that local along-tract (central cores and endpoint regions) differences between ASD and TDC are helpful in differentiating the two groups. These altered diffusion properties in ASD are associated with multiple robustly discriminative fiber clusters, which belong to several major white matter tracts including the corpus callosum, arcuate fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus and aslant tract; and the white matter structures related to the cerebellum, brain stem, and ventral diencephalon. These discriminative fiber clusters, a small part of the whole brain tractography, represent the white matter connections that could be most affected in ASD. Our results indicate the potential of a machine learning pipeline based on white matter fiber clustering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Stress-free Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow: Comparisons among patients with metabolic cardiovascular disease, healthy subjects and placebo-treated subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryotokuji, Kenji; Ishimaru, Keisou; Kihara, Kazuhiko; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Nakashima, Takuma; Otani, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: We have developed a Stress-free Therapy® device wherein “Pinpoint Plantar Long-wavelength Infrared Light Irradiation (PP-LILI)” increases peripheral-deep body temperature and blood flow volume and stabilizes blood pressure as well as significantly reduces stress hormones such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone and cortisol without using drugs. Moreover, we have found this therapy to significantly improve blood glucose and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Based on this background of clinical efficacy, we validated changes in cerebral blood flow in patients with metabolic cardiovascular disease and examined the efficacy of Stress-free Therapy® on cerebral blood flow as compared to that in healthy control subjects and placebo-treated patients. Results: The change in cerebral blood flow volume during 15-minute PP-LILI was 5.1 ± 1.8 mL/min in patients with metabolic cardiovascular disease, showing a significant increase (P<0.05) of 3.1 mL/min as compared with the mean blood flow value after resting for 15 minutes. Conclusions: Our results suggested Stress-free Therapy® to significantly increase cerebral blood flow, possibly leading to the prevention of metabolic cardiovascular disease. PMID:24771966

  14. Age- and Sex-Associated Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Normal Healthy Subjects: Statistical Parametric Mapping Analysis of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Brain Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, Yong-Ki (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea); Medical Research Institute, Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea)). e-mail: growthkim@daum.net/growthkim@pusan.ac.kr)

    2009-12-15

    Background: The age- and sex-associated changes of brain development are unclear and controversial. Several previous studies showed conflicting results of a specific pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism or no differences of cerebral glucose metabolism in association with normal aging process and sex. Purpose: To investigate the effects of age and sex on changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) brain positron emission tomography (PET) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight healthy subjects (32 males, mean age 46.6+-18.2 years; 46 females, mean age 40.6+-19.8 years) underwent F-18 FDG brain PET. Using SPM, age- and sex-associated changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were investigated. Results: In males, a negative correlation existed in several gray matter areas, including the right temporopolar (Brodmann area [BA] 38), right orbitofrontal (BA 47), left orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 10), left dorsolateral frontal gyrus (BA 8), and left insula (BA 13) areas. A positive relationship existed in the left claustrum and left thalamus. In females, negative changes existed in the left caudate body, left temporopolar area (BA 38), right orbitofrontal gyri (BA 47 and BA 10), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46). A positive association was demonstrated in the left subthalamic nucleus and the left superior frontal gyrus. In white matter, an age-associated decrease in FDG uptake in males was shown in the left insula, and increased FDG uptake was found in the left corpus callosum. The female group had an age-associated negative correlation of FDG uptake only in the right corpus callosum. Conclusion: Using SPM, we found not only similar areas of brain, but also sex-specific cerebral areas of age-associated changes of FDG uptake

  15. Memory as the "whole brain work": a large-scale model based on "oscillations in super-synergy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, Erol

    2005-01-01

    According to recent trends, memory depends on several brain structures working in concert across many levels of neural organization; "memory is a constant work-in progress." The proposition of a brain theory based on super-synergy in neural populations is most pertinent for the understanding of this constant work in progress. This report introduces a new model on memory basing on the processes of EEG oscillations and Brain Dynamics. This model is shaped by the following conceptual and experimental steps: 1. The machineries of super-synergy in the whole brain are responsible for formation of sensory-cognitive percepts. 2. The expression "dynamic memory" is used for memory processes that evoke relevant changes in alpha, gamma, theta and delta activities. The concerted action of distributed multiple oscillatory processes provides a major key for understanding of distributed memory. It comprehends also the phyletic memory and reflexes. 3. The evolving memory, which incorporates reciprocal actions or reverberations in the APLR alliance and during working memory processes, is especially emphasized. 4. A new model related to "hierarchy of memories as a continuum" is introduced. 5. The notions of "longer activated memory" and "persistent memory" are proposed instead of long-term memory. 6. The new analysis to recognize faces emphasizes the importance of EEG oscillations in neurophysiology and Gestalt analysis. 7. The proposed basic framework called "Memory in the Whole Brain Work" emphasizes that memory and all brain functions are inseparable and are acting as a "whole" in the whole brain. 8. The role of genetic factors is fundamental in living system settings and oscillations and accordingly in memory, according to recent publications. 9. A link from the "whole brain" to "whole body," and incorporation of vegetative and neurological system, is proposed, EEG oscillations and ultraslow oscillations being a control parameter.

  16. Cerebral metabolic and structural alterations in hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum assessed by MRS and DTI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi [Georg August University, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Goettingen (Germany); Georg August University, MR Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Goettingen (Germany); Dechent, Peter; Helms, Gunther [Georg August University, MR Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Goettingen (Germany); Frahm, Jens [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany); Gaertner, Jutta; Brockmann, Knut [Georg August University, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum (HSP-TCC) is a complicated form of autosomal-recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia. Characteristic clinical features comprise progressive spastic gait, cognitive impairment, and ataxia. Diagnostic MRI findings include thinning of the corpus callosum and non-progressive white matter (WM) alterations. To study the extent of axonal involvement, we performed localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the cerebral WM and cortical grey matter (GM) in a patient with HSP-TCC at 20 and 25 years of age. The second investigation included diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While MRS of the GM was normal, affected WM was characterized by major metabolic alterations such as reduced concentrations of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate, creatine and phosphocreatine, and choline-containing compounds as well as elevated levels of myo-inositol. These abnormalities showed progression over a period of 5 years. DTI revealed increased mean diffusivity as well as reduced fractional anisotropy in periventricular WM. The metabolic and structural findings are consistent with progressive neuroaxonal loss in the WM accompanied by astrocytic proliferation - histopathological changes known to occur in HSP-TCC. Our results are in agreement with the hypothesis that the primary pathological process in HSP-TCC affects the axon, possibly due to impaired axonal trafficking. (orig.)

  17. Aberrant Functional Connectivity Architecture in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Whole-Brain, Data-Driven Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Yao, Hongxiang; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Zengqiang; Zhan, Yafeng; Ma, Jianhua; Xu, Kaibin; Wang, Luning; An, Ningyu; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate whether the whole-brain functional connectivity pattern exhibits disease severity-related alterations in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired in 27 MCI subjects, 35 AD patients, and 27 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal cognition (NC). Interregional functional connectivity was assessed based on a predefined template which parcellated the brain into 90 regions. Altered whole-brain functional connectivity patterns were identified via connectivity comparisons between the AD and NC subjects. Finally, the relationship between functional connectivity strength and cognitive ability according to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) was evaluated in the MCI and AD groups. Compared with the NC group, the AD group exhibited decreased functional connectivities throughout the brain. The most significantly affected regions included several important nodes of the default mode network and the temporal lobe. Moreover, changes in functional connectivity strength exhibited significant associations with disease severity-related alterations in the AD and MCI groups. The present study provides novel evidence and will facilitate meta-analysis of whole-brain analyses in AD and MCI, which will be critical to better understand the neural basis of AD.

  18. Visualization and quantification of cerebral metabolic fluxes of glucose in awake mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yuki; Honda, Kurara; Kajimura, Mayumi; Suematsu, Makoto

    2014-04-01

    Biotransformation of glucose in organs includes multiple pathways, while quantitative evaluation of percentages of its utilization for individual pathways and their spatial heterogeneity in vivo remain unknown. Imaging MS (IMS) and metabolomics combined with a focused microwave irradiation for rapidly fixing tissue metabolism allowed us to quantify and visualize metabolic fluxes of glucose-derived metabolites in the mouse brain in vivo. At 15 min after the intraperitoneal injection of (13) C6 -labeled glucose, the mouse brain was exposed to focused microwave irradiation, which can stop brain metabolism within 1 s. Quantification of metabolic intermediates containing (13) C atoms revealed that a majority of the (13) C6 -glucose was diverted into syntheses of glutamate, lactate, and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose. IMS showed that regions rich in glutaminergic neurons exhibited a large signal of (13) C2 -labeled glutamate. On the other hand, the midbrain region was enriched with an intensive (13) C6 -labeled UDP-glucose signal, suggesting an active glycogen synthesis. Collectively, application of the current method makes it possible to examine the fluxes of glucose metabolism in a region-specific manner. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Greater left cerebral hemispheric metabolism in bulimia assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.C.; Hagman, J.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Blinder, B.; Derrfler, M.; Tai, W.Y.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Eight women with bulimia and eight age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were studied with positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer of brain metabolic rate. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during FDG uptake. In control subjects, the metabolic rate was higher in the right hemisphere than in the left, but patients with bulimia did not have this normal asymmetry. Lower metabolic rates in the basal ganglia, found in studies of depressed subjects, and higher rates in the basal ganglia, reported in a study of anorexia nervosa, were not found. This is consistent with the suggestion that bulimia is a diagnostic grouping distinct from these disorders.

  20. Individual cerebral metabolic deficits in Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment: an FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Sole, Angelo; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni [Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital San Paolo, Institute of Radiological Sciences, University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Clerici, Francesca; Mariani, Claudio; Maggiore, Laura [University of Milan, Center for Research and Treatment on Cognitive Dysfunctions, Institute of Clinical Neurology, Department of Clinical Sciences, ' Luigi Sacco' Hospital, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Clinical Institute Humanitas, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); Mosconi, Lisa [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of the study was the identification of group and individual subject patterns of cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRGlu) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) studies and neuropsychological tests were performed in 16 aMCI patients (ten women, age 75 {+-} 8 years) and in 14 AD patients (ten women, age 75 {+-} 9 years). Comparisons between patient subgroups and with a control population were performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping. Clusters of low CMRGlu were observed bilaterally in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), in the precuneus, in the inferior parietal lobule and middle temporal gyrus of AD patients. In aMCI patients, reduced CMRGlu was found only in PCC. Areas of low CMRGlu in PCC were wider in AD compared to aMCI and extended to the precuneus, while low CMRGlu was found in the lateral parietal cortex in AD but not in aMCI patients. Individual subject pattern analysis revealed that 86% of AD patients had low CMRGlu in the PCC (including the precuneus in 71%), 71% in the temporal cortex, 64% in the parietal cortex and 35% in the frontal cortex. Among the aMCI patients, 56% had low CMRGlu in the PCC, 44% in the temporal cortex, 18% in the frontal cortex and none in the parietal cortex. This study demonstrates that both AD and aMCI patients have highly heterogeneous metabolic impairment. This potential of individual metabolic PET imaging in patients with AD and aMCI may allow timely identification of brain damage on individual basis and possibly help planning tailored early interventions. (orig.)

  1. Structural brain network: What is the effect of LiFE optimization of whole brain tractography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouliang eQi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural brain networks constructed based on diffusion-weighted MRI (dMRI have provided a systems perspective to explore the organization of the human brain. Some redundant and nonexistent fibers, however, are inevitably generated in whole brain tractography. We propose to add one critical step while constructing the networks to remove these fibers using the linear fascicle evaluation (LiFE method, and study the differences between the networks with and without LiFE optimization. For a cohort of 9 healthy adults and for 9 out of the 35 subjects from Human Connectome Project, the T1-weighted images and dMRI data are analyzed. Each brain is parcellated into 90 regions-of-interest, whilst a probabilistic tractography algorithm is applied to generate the original connectome. The elimination of redundant and nonexistent fibers from the original connectome by LiFE creates the optimized connectome, and the random selection of the same number of fibers as the optimized connectome creates the non-optimized connectome. The combination of parcellations and these connectomes leads to the optimized and non-optimized networks, respectively. The optimized networks are constructed with six weighting schemes, and the correlations of different weighting methods are analyzed. The fiber length distributions of the non-optimized and optimized connectomes are compared. The optimized and non-optimized networks are compared with regard to edges, nodes and networks, within a sparsity range of 0.75-0.95. It has been found that relatively more short fibers exist in the optimized connectome. About 24.0% edges of the optimized network are significantly different from those in the non-optimized network at a sparsity of 0.75. About 13.2% of edges are classified as false positives or the possible missing edges. The strength and betweenness centrality of some nodes are significantly different for the non-optimized and optimized networks, but not the node efficiency. The

  2. Risk of dry eye syndrome in patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Tavish; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Campbell, Ashley A; Bathras, Ryan M; Jani, Ashish; Kazim, Michael; Wang, Tony J C

    2017-08-04

    With improvements in systemic therapy, patients with cancer treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are living long enough to develop late toxicities, including dry eye syndrome. In general practice, dose to the lacrimal gland (LG) is not constrained (maximum constraint <40 Gy) in WBRT. The purpose of this study was to measure dose to the LG in WBRT and determine methods for reducing radiation exposure. We conducted a retrospective review of 70 3-dimensional (3D) conformal plans; thirty-six plans with a radiation prescription of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and 34 plans with a prescription of 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions. LGs were contoured in accordance with Freedman and Sidani (2015). Biological effective dose (BED)3 maximum constraints were calculated from 40 Gy and 20 Gy to be 32.17 Gy (30 Gy) and 36.70 Gy (37.5 Gy). Both regimens demonstrated supraorbital blocking by 3 methods: T1, bordering the supraorbital ridge; T2, no contact with supraorbital ridge; and T3, coverage of the supraorbital ridge. Mean dose for the plans with a 30-Gy prescription and the plans with a 37.5-Gy prescription was 27.5 Gy and 35.2 Gy, respectively (p ≤ 0.0001). BED3 maximum constraint (Dmax) was violated 16 of 26 (61.5%) in T1 (average Dmax: 32.2 Gy), 13 of 28 (46.4%) in T2 (average Dmax: 32.1 Gy), and 5 of 18 (27.8%) in T3 (average Dmax: 31.8 Gy) for the 30-Gy prescription. Dmax was violated in 32 of 32 (100%) in T1 (average Dmax: 40.1 Gy), 22 of 22 (100%) in T2 (average Dmax: 40.3 Gy), and 14 of 14 (100%) in T3 (average Dmax: 39.4) for the 37.5 Gy prescription. Average Dmax for the 37.5-Gy prescription was highly significant in favor of T3 (p = 0.0098). Patients who receive WBRT may develop dry eye syndrome as a late toxicity. Constraints are commonly violated with a prescription of 37.5 Gy. Methods to reduce dose include T3 supraorbital blocking, an easily implementable change that may dramatically improve patient quality of life. Copyright © 2017

  3. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of cerebral glycogen metabolism in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Ameer; Choi, In-Young; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Öz, Gülin

    2015-02-01

    Glycogen serves as an important energy reservoir in the human body. Despite the abundance of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles, its concentration in the brain is relatively low, hence its significance has been questioned. A major challenge in studying brain glycogen metabolism has been the lack of availability of non-invasive techniques for quantification of brain glycogen in vivo. Invasive methods for brain glycogen quantification such as post mortem extraction following high energy microwave irradiation are not applicable in the human brain. With the advent of (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), it has been possible to measure brain glycogen concentrations and turnover in physiological conditions, as well as under the influence of stressors such as hypoglycemia and visual stimulation. This review presents an overview of the principles of the (13)C MRS methodology and its applications in both animals and humans to further our understanding of glycogen metabolism under normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypoglycemia unawareness.

  4. Direct neuronal glucose uptake Heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    -photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anaesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover......Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using two......, hexokinase, which catalyses the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identify the neuron as the principal locus...

  5. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes in oculopalatal myoclonus: implication for neural pathways, underlying the disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Moon, So Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is characterized by rhythmic involuntary jerky movements of the soft palate of the throat. When associated with eye movements, it is called oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM). Ordinary PM is characterized by hypertrophic olivary degeneration, a trans-synaptic degeneration following loss of neuronal input to the inferior olivary nucleus due to an interruption of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle usually by a hemorrhage. However, the neural pathways underlying the disorder are uncertain. In an attempt to understand the pathologic neural pathways, we examined the metabolic correlates of this tremulous condition. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 patients with OPM (age, 49.9{+-}4.6 y: all males: 7 with pontine hemorrhage, 1 with diffuse brainstem infarction) and age-matched 50 healthy males (age, 50.7{+-} 9.0) and the regional glucose metabolism compared using SPM99. For group analysis, the hemispheres containing lesions were assigned to the right side of the brain. Patients with OPM had significant hypometabolism in the ipsilateral (to the lesion) brainstem and superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri (P < 0.05 corrected, k = 100). By contrast, there was significant hypermetabolism in the contralateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, thalamus, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus (P < 0.05 corrected, k=l00). Our data demonstrate the distinct metabolic changes between several ipsilateral and contralateral brain regions (hypometabolism vs. hypermetabolism) in patients with OPM. This may provide clues for understanding the neural pathways underlying the disorder.

  6. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) had revealed that both DBS and electroacupuncture at acupoints with electrical stimulation are related to the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture might be useful to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa.

  7. Differentiated effect of ageing on the enzymes of Krebs' cycle, electron transfer complexes and glutamate metabolism of non-synaptic and intra-synaptic mitochondria from cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, R F; Gorini, A; Hoyer, S

    2006-11-01

    The effect of ageing on the activity of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism was studied in three different types of mitochondria of cerebral cortex of 1-year old and 2-year old male Wistar rats. We assessed the maximum rate (V(max)) of the mitochondrial enzyme activities in non-synaptic perikaryal mitochondria, and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria. The results indicated that: (i) in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex the values of the catalytic activities of the enzymes markedly differed in the various populations of mitochondria; (ii) in intra-synaptic mitochondria, ageing affected the catalytic properties of the enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism; (iii) these changes were more evident in intra-synaptic "heavy" than "light" mitochondria. These results indicate a different age-related vulnerability of subpopulations of mitochondria in vivo located into synapses than non-synaptic ones.

  8. Is there an accurate method to measure metabolic requirement of institutionalized children with spastic cerebral palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Siu Pik Peggy; Cheung, Ka Ming; Ko, Chun Hung; Chiu, Heung Chin

    2011-07-01

    This study hypothesized that there is no difference between energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry (IC) and that estimated by predicted formulas compared with the actual intake of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Fifteen children aged 3 to 18 years with spastic CP and associated complications were recruited. IC was used to measure mean energy expenditure (MEE) compared with 3 predicted equations for energy expenditure (PEE), including body surface area (BSA), the recommended daily allowance (RDA), and an equation designed specifically for patients with CP. Friedman and paired t tests were used to examine the variance between PEE and MEE. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to explore the correlation between MEE and PEE. The pretest and posttest core temperatures were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Mean ± standard deviation MEE was 800.5 ± 295.7 kcal/d; BSA was 1,213.4 ± 171.2 kcal/d; RDA was 1,928.1 ± 341.0 kcal/d; and CP was 1,603.1 ± 215.8 kcal/d. The actual diet intake provided 935.3 ± 222.9 kcal/d. Post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between mean MEE and PEE (P children with spastic CP.

  9. The brain relaxation and cerebral metabolism in stroke volume variation-directed fluid therapy during supratentorial tumors resection: crystalloid solution versus colloid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Juan; He, Zhiyong; Cao, Xiaoying; Che, Xuehua; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Jun; Liang, Weimin

    2014-10-01

    Compared with goal-directed crystalloid therapy, goal-directed colloid therapy during high-risk surgery may improve postoperative outcome. Whether intraoperative fluid therapy based on goal-directed protocol with different types of fluid has distinctive effects on brain relaxation and cerebral metabolism during craniotomy remains unclear. Forty patients with supratentorial brain tumors undergoing craniotomy were randomly assigned to either a Ringer's Lactate-based goal-directed group (LR group, n=20) or a 6% hydroxyethyl starch-based goal-directed group (HES group, n=20). The goal was achieved by maintaining a target stroke volume variation (SVVcerebral metabolism variables (jugular venous oxygen saturation [SjvO(2)], arterial-jugular venous differences in oxygen [CajvO(2)], glucose [A-JvGD], lactate [A-JvLD], and cerebral extraction ratio for oxygen [CERO(2)]) and fluid volumes. There is no significant difference between the LR and HES groups on brain relaxation scales (P=0.845), or measures of cerebral oxygenation and metabolism. Intragroup comparisons showed that CERO(2) increased by 14.3% (P=0.009, LR group) and 13.2% (P=0.032, HES group), respectively, and SjvO(2) was decreased by 8.8% (P=0.016, LR group) and 8.1% (P=0.026, HES group), respectively, after tumor removal, compared with baseline. During surgery, the LR group (3070±1138 mL) received more fluid than the HES group (2041±758 mL, P=0.002). In patients undergoing supratentorial tumor resection, goal-directed HES therapy was not superior to goal-directed LR therapy for brain relaxation or cerebral metabolism, although less fluid was needed to maintain the target SVV in the HES-based group than in the LR-based group.

  10. A placebo-controlled, randomized phase II study of maintenance enzastaurin following whole brain radiation therapy in the treatment of brain metastases from lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Bjørn H; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Fløtten, Øystein

    2012-01-01

    Enzastaurin is a protein kinase C inhibitor with anti-tumor activity. This study was designed to determine if maintenance enzastaurin improved the outcome of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in lung cancer (LC) patients with brain metastases (BMs)....

  11. Cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia: two sides of the same coin?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfaillie, Sander C.J.; Adriaanse, Sofie M.; Binnewijzend, Maja A.A.; Benedictus, Marije R.; Ossenkoppele, Rik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre and Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wattjes, Mike P.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre and Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre and Department of Neurology, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijer, Joost P.A. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal (FTD) dementia can be differentiated using [{sup 18}F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET. Since cerebral blood flow (CBF) is related to glucose metabolism, our aim was to investigate the extent of overlap of abnormalities between AD and FTD. Normalized FDG-PET and arterial spin labelling (ASL-MRI)-derived CBF was measured in 18 AD patients (age, 64 ± 8), 12 FTD patients (age, 61 ± 8), and 10 controls (age, 56 ± 10). Voxel-wise comparisons, region-of-interest (ROI), correlation, and ROC curve analyses were performed. Voxel-wise comparisons showed decreased CBF and FDG uptake in AD compared with controls and FTD in both precuneus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Compared with controls and AD, FTD patients showed both hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). ASL and FDG were related in precuneus (r = 0.62, p < 0.001), IPL (r = 0.61, p < 0.001), and mPFC across groups (r = 0.74, p < 001). ROC analyses indicated comparable performance of perfusion and metabolism in the precuneus (AUC, 0.72 and 0.74), IPL (0.85 and 0.94) for AD relative to FTD, and in the mPFC in FTD relative to AD (both 0.68). Similar patterns of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism were observed in regions typically associated with AD and FTD, suggesting that ASL-MRI provides information comparable to FDG-PET. (orig.)

  12. Karnofsky Performance Status and Lactate Dehydrogenase Predict the Benefit of Palliative Whole-Brain Irradiation in Patients With Advanced Intra- and Extracranial Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partl, Richard, E-mail: richard.partl@medunigraz.at [Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Richtig, Erika [Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Avian, Alexander; Berghold, Andrea [Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Kapp, Karin S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors that allow the selection of melanoma patients with advanced intra- and extracerebral metastatic disease for palliative whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or best supportive care. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 87 patients who underwent palliative WBRT between 1988 and 2009 for progressive or multiple cerebral metastases at presentation. Uni- and multivariate analysis took into account the following patient- and tumor-associated factors: gender and age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), neurologic symptoms, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, number of intracranial metastases, previous resection or stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases, number of extracranial metastasis sites, and local recurrences as well as regional lymph node metastases at the time of WBRT. Results: In univariate analysis, KPS, LDH, number of intracranial metastases, and neurologic symptoms had a significant influence on overall survival. In multivariate survival analysis, KPS and LDH remained as significant prognostic factors, with hazard ratios of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-6.5) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.6-4.9), respectively. Patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH ≤240 U/L had a median survival of 191 days; patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH >240 U/L, 96 days; patients with KPS <70 and LDH ≤240 U/L, 47 days; and patients with KPS <70 and LDH >240 U/L, only 34 days. Conclusions: Karnofsky performance status and serum LDH values indicate whether patients with advanced intra- and extracranial tumor manifestations are candidates for palliative WBRT or best supportive care.

  13. Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep: Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Jobst, Beatrice M; Hindriks, Rikkert; Laufs, Helmut; Tagliazucchi, E; Hahn, Gerald; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Stevner, Angus B. A.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has found that the human sleep cycle is characterised by changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity. Yet, we are still missing a mechanistic explanation of the local neuronal dynamics underlying these changes. We used whole-brain computational modelling to study the differences in global brain functional connectivity and synchrony of fMRI activity in healthy humans during wakefulness and slow-wave sleep. We applied a whole-brain model based on the normal form of a su...

  14. Different cerebral metabolic features in dementia with lewy bodies with/without visual hallucination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yang, Young Soon; Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Yun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Reduction of glucose metabolism in the occipital cortex is well known in dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The aim of this study was to evaluate the different nature of FDG PET in DLB patients who had visual hallucination or not. Thirteen patients (729 yrs, m:f=6:7) with DLB participated. DLB patient were classified into two groups according to the presence of visual hallucination; seven DLB patients with visual hallucination and 6 patients without visual hallucination. No differences between patient with and without visual hallucination was found in their cognitive function measured by mini mental status exam (MMSE) and clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale. Age and gender matched 30 healthy subjects (age; 715 yrs, m: f = 13:17) served as controls for comparison purpose. Regional metabolic differences on FDG PET among the groups were tested using SPM. In DLB patients groups regardless of visual hallucination, significant regional hypometabolism were observed in the bilateral occipital cortices as well as bilateral parietotemporal and frontal association cortices when compared with healthy controls, as expected. In DLB patients with visual hallucination compared to patients without hallucination, regional hypometabolism over primary and secondary visual cortex (BA17, BA18) was more significant. Moreover, lower regional metabolism in the paracentral area (BA 6) and cerebellar vermis was also observed in DLB with visual hallucination than without hallucination. Profound hypometabolism in the visual cortex may be a feature in DLB patients with visual hallucination. Also, relative hypometabolism in the paracentral area and cerebellum could be neurobiological characteristics related with abnormal cognitive and motor process response to hallucination.

  15. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porrino, L.J.; Domer, F.R.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-05-01

    The 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  16. [Clinical effect of high pressure oxygen and Butylphthalide in the recovery of cerebral metabolism after carbon monoxide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Q; Guo, X T; Zhang, H H; Tian, R; Gao, X; Zhang, Z Q

    2017-08-20

    Objective: To study the clinical effect of high pressure oxygen and Butylphthalide in the recovery of cerebral metabolism after carbon monoxide poisoning. Methods: 84 patients treated from May 2014 to May 2016 in our hospital were selected. The subjects were randomly and equally divided into two groups. The control group adopted the conventional therapy and high pressure oxygen; on the basis, the observation group also took Butylphthalide. The clinical effect, duration of coma, recovery of consciousness, incidence rate of delayed encephalopathy was observed. After 1m of treatment, the HDS point was evaluated. Results: The total effective rate of control group (76.19%, 32/42) was lower than that of observation group (95.24%, 40/42) ( P incidence rate of delayed encephalopathy for observation group was better than that of control group ( P <0.05) . The HDS point for observation group was even higher than that of control group ( P <0.05) . Conclusion: The high pressure oxygen and butylphthalide can improve the clinical effective rate, shorten the duration of coma and promote the patient's recovery of consciousness. It is worthy of clinical promotion.

  17. Noninvasive quantification of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in rats using (18)F-FDG PET and standard input function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yuki; Ihara, Naoki; Teramoto, Noboru; Kunimi, Masako; Honda, Manabu; Kato, Koichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of arterial input function (AIF) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies is technically challenging. The present study aimed to develop a method based on a standard arterial input function (SIF) to estimate input function without blood sampling. We performed (18)F-fluolodeoxyglucose studies accompanied by continuous blood sampling for measurement of AIF in 11 rats. Standard arterial input function was calculated by averaging AIFs from eight anesthetized rats, after normalization with body mass (BM) and injected dose (ID). Then, the individual input function was estimated using two types of SIF: (1) SIF calibrated by the individual's BM and ID (estimated individual input function, EIF(NS)) and (2) SIF calibrated by a single blood sampling as proposed previously (EIF(1S)). No significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) or cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlc) were found across the AIF-, EIF(NS)-, and EIF(1S)-based methods using repeated measures analysis of variance. In the correlation analysis, AUC or CMRGlc derived from EIF(NS) was highly correlated with those derived from AIF and EIF(1S). Preliminary comparison between AIF and EIF(NS) in three awake rats supported an idea that the method might be applicable to behaving animals. The present study suggests that EIF(NS) method might serve as a noninvasive substitute for individual AIF measurement.

  18. The deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamic nucleus modifies the cerebral metabolism in {sup 18}FDG-Tep of obsessive compulsive patients; La stimulation cerebrale profonde du noyau sous thalamique modifie le metabolisme cerebral en 18FDG-TEP des patients obsessionnels compulsifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Jeune, F.; Garin, E. [Service de medecine nucleaire, centre Eugene-Marquis, Rennes, (France); Verin, M.; Peron, J. [service de neurologie, CHU Pontchaillou, Rennes, (France); Mallet, L.; Yelnik, J. [Inserm, Avenir Team, Behavior, Emotion and Basal Ganglia, IFR 70, Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris, (France); Kreps, M.O. [Inserm U796, service de psychiatrie, hopital Sainte-Anne, Paris, (France); Drapier, D.; Millet, B. [service de psychiatrie adulte, centre hospitalier Guillaume-Regnier, Rennes, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this work was to find again this orbito-frontal hyper metabolism among the resistant obsessive compulsive disorder patients that are going to benefit of a deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamus nucleus and to demonstrate that this new therapy approach leads a reduction of the metabolism in this area in correlation with the clinical improvement. It is about the first study realized in isotopic functional imaging on ten resistant compulsive disorder patients treated by bilateral deep cerebral stimulation of the under thalamus nucleus. It shows that the treatment efficiency is in relation with a reduction of the glucide metabolism in the right orbito-frontal cortex. It suggests equally that the under thalamus nucleus would be functionally linked to the orbito-frontal cortex. (N.C.)

  19. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  20. Investigation of whole-brain white matter identifies altered water mobility in the pathogenesis of high-altitude headache

    OpenAIRE

    Lawley, Justin S; Oliver, Samuel J; Mullins, Paul G; Macdonald, Jamie H

    2013-01-01

    Elevated brain water is a common finding in individuals with severe forms of altitude illness. However, the location, nature, and a causative link between brain edema and symptoms of acute mountain sickness such as headache remains unknown. We examined indices of brain white matter water mobility in 13 participants after 2 and 10 hours in normoxia (21% O2) and hypoxia (12% O2) using magnetic resonance imaging. Using a whole-brain analysis (tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS)), mean diffusiv...

  1. Effect of ageing and ischemia on enzymatic activities linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacids metabolism of free and intrasynaptic mitochondria of cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Gorini, Antonella; Hoyer, Siegfried

    2009-12-01

    The effect of ageing and the relationships between the catalytic properties of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacid metabolism of cerebral cortex, a functional area very sensitive to both age and ischemia, were studied on mitochondria of adult and aged rats, after complete ischemia of 15 minutes duration. The maximum rate (Vmax) of the following enzyme activities: citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase for Krebs' cycle; NADH-cytochrome c reductase as total (integrated activity of Complex I-III), rotenone sensitive (Complex I) and cytochrome oxidase (Complex IV) for electron transfer chain; glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-oxaloacetate-and glutamate-pyruvate transaminases for glutamate metabolism were assayed in non-synaptic, perikaryal mitochondria and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria, i.e., the light and heavy mitochondrial fraction. The results indicate that in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex, the value of the same enzyme activity markedly differs according (a) to the different populations of mitochondria, i.e., non-synaptic or intra-synaptic light and heavy, (b) and respect to ageing. After 15 min of complete ischemia, the enzyme activities of mitochondria located near the nucleus (perikaryal mitochondria) and in synaptic structures (intra-synaptic mitochondria) of the cerebral tissue were substantially modified by ischemia. Non-synaptic mitochondria seem to be more affected by ischemia in adult and particularly in aged animals than the intra-synaptic light and heavy mitochondria. The observed modifications in enzyme activities reflect the metabolic state of the tissue at each specific experimental condition, as shown by comparative evaluation with respect to the content of energy-linked metabolites and substrates. The derangements in enzyme activities due to ischemia is greater in aged than in adult animals and especially the non-synaptic and the intra-synaptic light

  2. Medical Image Processing for Fully Integrated Subject Specific Whole Brain Mesh Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yang Hsu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, anatomically consistent segmentation of vascular trees acquired with magnetic resonance imaging requires the use of multiple image processing steps, which, in turn, depend on manual intervention. In effect, segmentation of vascular trees from medical images is time consuming and error prone due to the tortuous geometry and weak signal in small blood vessels. To overcome errors and accelerate the image processing time, we introduce an automatic image processing pipeline for constructing subject specific computational meshes for entire cerebral vasculature, including segmentation of ancillary structures; the grey and white matter, cerebrospinal fluid space, skull, and scalp. To demonstrate the validity of the new pipeline, we segmented the entire intracranial compartment with special attention of the angioarchitecture from magnetic resonance imaging acquired for two healthy volunteers. The raw images were processed through our pipeline for automatic segmentation and mesh generation. Due to partial volume effect and finite resolution, the computational meshes intersect with each other at respective interfaces. To eliminate anatomically inconsistent overlap, we utilized morphological operations to separate the structures with a physiologically sound gap spaces. The resulting meshes exhibit anatomically correct spatial extent and relative positions without intersections. For validation, we computed critical biometrics of the angioarchitecture, the cortical surfaces, ventricular system, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF spaces and compared against literature values. Volumina and surface areas of the computational mesh were found to be in physiological ranges. In conclusion, we present an automatic image processing pipeline to automate the segmentation of the main intracranial compartments including a subject-specific vascular trees. These computational meshes can be used in 3D immersive visualization for diagnosis, surgery planning with haptics

  3. Acute effects of nimodipine on cerebral vasculature and brain metabolism in high grade subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H Alex; Ko, Sang-Bae; Chen, Huahiou; Gilmore, Emily; Carpenter, Amanda M; Lee, Danielle; Claassen, Jan; Mayer, Stephan A; Schmidt, J Michael; Lee, Kiwon; Connelly, E Sander; Paik, Myunghee; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2012-06-01

    Nimodipine is the only medication shown to improve outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Preliminary theories regarding the mechanism by which it prevents vasospasm have been challenged. The acute physiologic and metabolic effects of oral Nimodipine have not been examined in patients with poor-grade SAH. This is an observational study performed in 16 poor-grade SAH patients undergoing multimodality monitoring who received oral Nimodipine as part of routine clinical care. A total of 663 doses of Nimodipine were observed. Changes in physiologic measurements including MAP, CPP, ICP, P(bt)O(2), and CBF were examined. Administration of oral Nimodipine was associated with a 1.33 mmHg decrease in MAP (P Nimodipine was associated with MAP decreases, P(bt)O(2) (1.03 mmHg; P Nimodipine was associated with a decrease in MAP and CPP. When Nimodipine administration was associated with a decrease in MAP, there were concomitant drops in P(bt)O(2) and CBF. These findings suggest that MAP support after oral Nimodipine may be important to maintain adequate CBF in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  4. Bupropion and venlafaxine responders differ in pretreatment regional cerebral metabolism in unipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John T; Ketter, Terence A; Kimbrell, Tim A; Dunn, Robert T; Benson, Brenda E; Willis, Mark W; Luckenbaugh, David A; Post, Robert M

    2005-02-01

    Pretreatment functional brain imaging was examined for never-hospitalized outpatients with unipolar depression compared with control subjects in a crossover treatment trial involving bupropion or venlafaxine monotherapy. Patients (n = 20) with unipolar depression received baseline (medication-free) fluorine-18 deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan and then at least 6 weeks of bupropion or venlafaxine monotherapy in a single-blind crossover trial. Age-matched healthy control subjects (n = 20) also received baseline FDG PET scans. For each medication PET data from patients compared with control subjects was analyzed as a function of treatment response (defined as moderate to marked improvement on the Clinical Global Impression Scale). Treatment response rates were similar for buproprion (32%) and venlafaxine (33%). Compared with control subjects, responders but not nonresponders, to both drugs demonstrated frontal and left temporal hypometabolism. Selectively, compared with control subjects bupropion responders (n = 6) also had cerebellar hypermetabolism, whereas venlafaxine responders (n = 7) showed bilateral temporal and basal ganglia hypometabolism. These data suggest that pretreatment frontal and left temporal hypometabolism in never-hospitalized depressed outpatients compared with control subjects is linked to positive antidepressant response and that additional alterations in regional metabolism may be linked to differential responsivity to bupropion and venlafaxine monotherapy.

  5. A five-year longitudinal study of the regional cerebral metabolic changes of a schizophrenic patient from the first episode using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R Y; Chen, E; Ho, W Y

    2000-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the relationship between cerebral metabolic activity, clinical symptoms and treatment response in a schizophrenic patient for 5 years from the onset of her illness. Serial technetium-99m-HMPAO brain SPECT was used to measure regional cerebral metabolism. The Cambridge Neurological Inventory and neuropsychological tests (WAIS-R verbal subscales, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, semantic verbal fluency, logical memory in Weschler Memory Scale) were used for neurocognitive assessment. Under-activity of the left temporal area was observed in the course of patient illness despite remission of the psychotic symptoms. Bilateral prefrontal metabolic under-activity was noted at the emergence of negative symptoms, executive neurocognitive dysfunction and the treatment-resistant state. After response to clozapine, the right prefrontal activity returned to a normal level. Our findings suggested that persistent left temporal underactivity detected by SPECT despite clinical remission may indicate a vulnerability for further relapses and development of a treatment-resistant state. Treatment-resistant state, negative symptoms and executive neurocognitive deficit may involve abnormal prefrontal metabolic activity and can be alleviated in clozapine-responsive patients.

  6. Cerebral metabolism in dogs assessed by (18)F-FDG PET: a pilot study to understand physiological changes in behavioral disorders in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimajiri, Mami; Miller, Michael A; Green, Mark A; Jaeger, Christine B; Luescher, Andrew U; Hutchins, Gary D

    2010-01-01

    The positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique, which is utilized in human behavior and psychiatric disorder research, was performed on the brains of clinically normal mixed breed dogs, 3 hound-type (long floppy ears) mixed breed dogs and 3 non-hound retriever-type mixed breed dogs. Glucose metabolism was obtained with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and quantitative analysis was performed by standardized uptake value (SUV) measurement. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained in each dog, and these images were superimposed on PET images to identify anatomical locations. The glucose metabolism in each region of interest was compared between the three hound-type dogs and 3 non-hound-type dogs. The two anatomically different types of dog were compared to assess whether breed-typical behavioral tendencies (e.g., sniffing behavior in hound-type dogs, staring and retrieving in Labrador-type dogs) are reflected in baseline brain metabolic activity. There were no significant differences between the hound-type dogs and non-hound-type dogs in cerebral SUV values. These data might serve as normal canine cerebral metabolism data for FDG PET studies in dogs and form the basis for investigations into behavioral disorders in dogs such as compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders and cognitive dysfunction.

  7. Mapping Critical Language Sites in Children Performing Verb Generation: Whole-Brain Connectivity and Graph Theoretical Analysis in MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Williamson, Brady J; Kadis, Darren S

    2017-01-01

    A classic left frontal-temporal brain network is known to support language processes. However, the level of participation of constituent regions, and the contribution of extra-canonical areas, is not fully understood; this is particularly true in children, and in individuals who have experienced early neurological insult. In the present work, we propose whole-brain connectivity and graph-theoretical analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG) source estimates to provide robust maps of the pediatric expressive language network. We examined neuromagnetic data from a group of typically-developing young children (n = 15, ages 4-6 years) and adolescents (n = 14, 16-18 years) completing an auditory verb generation task in MEG. All source analyses were carried out using a linearly-constrained minimum-variance (LCMV) beamformer. Conventional differential analyses revealed significant (p eigenvector centrality (EVC). Hub analysis revealed the importance of left perisylvian sites, i.e., Broca's and Wernicke's areas, across groups. The hemispheric distribution of frontal and temporal lobe EVC values was asymmetrical in most subjects; left dominant EVC was observed in 20% of young children, and 71% of adolescents. Interestingly, the adolescent group demonstrated increased critical sites in the right cerebellum, left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and left putamen. Here, we show that whole brain connectivity and network analysis can be used to map critical language sites in typical development; these methods may be useful for defining the margins of eloquent tissue in neurosurgical candidates.

  8. Altered white matter integrity in whole brain and segments of corpus callosum, in young social drinkers with binge drinking pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen W; Gierski, Fabien; Andre, Judith; Dowell, Nicholas G; Cercignani, Mara; Naassila, Mickaël; Duka, Theodora

    2017-03-01

    Binge drinking is associated with impaired cognitive functioning, but the relationship of cognitive impairments and white matter integrity is less known. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the relationships of binge drinking, whole brain white matter integrity and cognitive performance during young adulthood (18 to 25 years), a period of continued brain development in two sessions 1 year apart. Binge drinkers (n = 20) and non-binge drinkers (n = 20) underwent DTI and completed measures of spatial working memory and motor impulsivity. Fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure derived from DTI, was estimated from whole brain and from five segments of the corpus callosum (CC): prefrontal, premotor/supplementary motor, motor, (SMA) sensory and parietal/temporal/occipital (PTO). FA was lower for binge than for non-binge men but not women at Session 1 and 2 for all measurements except for FA in the motor segment, which was significantly increased from Session 1 to Session 2. Lower FA in the prefrontal and PTO CC segments was associated with higher binge score, whereas lower FA in all five segments was associated with greater drug use in men and worse spatial working memory both in men and women. These findings extend the literature by showing that in early adulthood, binge drinking and drug use are linked with degradations in neural white matter and that compromised white matter at this period of brain development is linked with impaired cognitive functioning. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinhong; Luo, Bo; Wei, Shaozhong; Luo, Yan; Feng, Yaojun; Xu, Juan; Wei, Wei

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the treatment efficiency of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative (TN) phenotype breast cancer patients with brain metastases and their survival times. A total of 112 metastatic breast cancer patients treated with whole brain irradiation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were analyzed. Thirty-seven patients were of TN phenotype. Objective response rates were compared. Survival times were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival time difference between the TN and non-TN groups. Potential prognostic factors were determined by using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. The efficiency of radiotherapy treatment on TN and non-TN phenotypes was 96.2% and 97%, respectively. TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times than non-TN phenotype after radiotherapy (6.9 months vs. 17 months) (P brain irradiation followed by IMRT or 3DCRT treatment, TN phenotype breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis had high objective response rates but shorter survival time. With respect to survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis, the TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor.

  10. T1-weighted in vivo human whole brain MRI dataset with an ultrahigh isotropic resolution of 250 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüsebrink, Falk; Sciarra, Alessandro; Mattern, Hendrik; Yakupov, Renat; Speck, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    We present an ultrahigh resolution in vivo human brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset. It consists of T1-weighted whole brain anatomical data acquired at 7 Tesla with a nominal isotropic resolution of 250 μm of a single young healthy Caucasian subject and was recorded using prospective motion correction. The raw data amounts to approximately 1.2 TB and was acquired in eight hours total scan time. The resolution of this dataset is far beyond any previously published in vivo structural whole brain dataset. Its potential use is to build an in vivo MR brain atlas. Methods for image reconstruction and image restoration can be improved as the raw data is made available. Pre-processing and segmentation procedures can possibly be enhanced for high magnetic field strength and ultrahigh resolution data. Furthermore, potential resolution induced changes in quantitative data analysis can be assessed, e.g., cortical thickness or volumetric measures, as high quality images with an isotropic resolution of 1 and 0.5 mm of the same subject are included in the repository as well.

  11. Detection of whole-brain abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy using tensor-based morphometry with DARTEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Lv, Bin; Li, Meng; Jin, Zhengyu

    2009-10-01

    Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) is an automated technique for detecting the anatomical differences between populations by examining the gradients of the deformation fields used to nonlinearly warp MR images. The purpose of this study was to investigate the whole-brain volume changes between the patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and the controls using TBM with DARTEL, which could achieve more accurate inter-subject registration of brain images. T1-weighted images were acquired from 21 left-TLE patients, 21 right-TLE patients and 21 healthy controls, which were matched in age and gender. The determinants of the gradient of deformation fields at voxel level were obtained to quantify the expansion or contraction for individual images relative to the template, and then logarithmical transformation was applied on it. A whole brain analysis was performed using general lineal model (GLM), and the multiple comparison was corrected by false discovery rate (FDR) with p<0.05. For left-TLE patients, significant volume reductions were found in hippocampus, cingulate gyrus, precentral gyrus, right temporal lobe and cerebellum. These results potentially support the utility of TBM with DARTEL to study the structural changes between groups.

  12. [NOVEL STRATEGY IN THE RADIOTHERAPY OF METASTATIC BRAIN TUMORS: SIMULTANEOUS WHOLE BRAIN RADIOTHERAPY AND INTEGRATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalincsák, Judit; László, Zoltán; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Kovács, Péter; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Mangel László

    2015-11-30

    Treatment of central nervous system (CNS) tumors has always played an important role in development of radiotherapy techniques. Precise patient immobilisation, non-coplanar field arrangement, conformal treatment, arc therapy, radiosurgery, application of image fusion to radiation planning or re-irradiation were first introduced into clinical routine in the treatment of brain tumors. A modern multifunctional radiation instrument, Novalis TX has been installed at the University of Pécs two years ago. New methods, such as real time 3D image guided therapy, dynamic arc therapy and ultra-conformity offer further progress in treatment of CNS tumors. Whole brain irradiation and simultaneous fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery or integrated boost seem to be an optimal method in the treatment of not only soliter or oligo, but even a higher number (4-9) and not typically radiosensitive brain metastases. The new treatment strategy is illustrated by presentation of four case histories. Treatment protocol was completed in all cases. Treatment period of 1.5 to 3 weeks, and treatment time of only a few minutes were not stressful for the patients. A quite remarkable clinical improvement as to general condition of the patients was experienced in three cases. Follow-up images confirmed either remission or a stable disease. Simultaneous whole brain radiotherapy and integrated stereotactic radiosurgery is a reproducible, safe method that offers an effective irradiation with delivery of definitive dosage even in cases with radio-insensitive brain metastasis.

  13. Correlation between quantitative EEG and cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with dementia of Alzheimer type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudoh, Masako; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-05-01

    Quantitative scalp EEG and cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO{sub 2}) measured by the steady-state {sup 15}O technique and positron emission tomography were studied in 19 patients with mild to moderate dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) and age-matched controls (EEG=19, PET=6). Scalp electrodes were placed according to the international 10-20 method except for Cz, T3, and T4. To evaluate the relative changes in power for each frequency band between the two groups, the percentage power fraction (percentage power for each frequency band at a site compared to the total power at that site; %delta for 2.0-3.8 Hz, %theta for 4.0-7.8 Hz, %alpha for 8.0-12.8 Hz, %beta for 13.0-25.4 Hz) was calculated. Compared with controls, DAT patients showed a significant decrease in %alpha, while significant increases in %theta at all electrodes, and significant increases in %delta at the temporal, parietal and occipital electrodes were observed. The patient group displayed a significant decrease in rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} in the parietal, temporal and frontal cortices, but the reduction in rCMRO{sub 2} was less remarkable than that of rCBF. %Theta at P3, O1 and O2 showed a significant negative correlation with rCBF, and %theta at P3, O1showed a significant negative correlation with rCMRO{sub 2}. %Delta at P3, P4 and T5 was significantly negatively correlated with rCBF in the corresponding regions, and %alpha at almost all the electrodes (except O1, F3, P3) was significantly positively correlated with rCBF in the corresponding regions. %Delta and %alpha did not show any significant correlation with rCMRO{sub 2}. (author)

  14. Cerebral Glucose Metabolism is Associated with Verbal but not Visual Memory Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardener, Samantha L; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Shen, Kai-Kai; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Weinborn, Michael; Bates, Kristyn A; Shah, Tejal; Foster, Jonathan K; Lenzo, Nat; Salvado, Olivier; Laske, Christoph; Laws, Simon M; Taddei, Kevin; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N

    2016-03-31

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) sufferers show region-specific reductions in cerebral glucose metabolism, as measured by [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET). We investigated preclinical disease stage by cross-sectionally examining the association between global cognition, verbal and visual memory, and 18F-FDG PET standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) in 43 healthy control individuals, subsequently focusing on differences between subjective memory complainers and non-memory complainers. The 18F-FDG PET regions of interest investigated include the hippocampus, amygdala, posterior cingulate, superior parietal, entorhinal cortices, frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and inferior parietal region. In the cohort as a whole, verbal logical memory immediate recall was positively associated with 18F-FDG PET SUVR in both the left hippocampus and right amygdala. There were no associations observed between global cognition, delayed recall in logical memory, or visual reproduction and 18F-FDG PET SUVR. Following stratification of the cohort into subjective memory complainers and non-complainers, verbal logical memory immediate recall was positively associated with 18F-FDG PET SUVR in the right amygdala in those with subjective memory complaints. There were no significant associations observed in non-memory complainers between 18F-FDG PET SUVR in regions of interest and cognitive performance. We observed subjective memory complaint-specific associations between 18F-FDG PET SUVR and immediate verbal memory performance in our cohort, however found no associations between delayed recall of verbal memory performance or visual memory performance. It is here argued that the neural mechanisms underlying verbal and visual memory performance may in fact differ in their pathways, and the characteristic reduction of 18F-FDG PET SUVR observed in this and previous studies likely reflects the pathophysiological changes in specific

  15. Effect of postprandial hyperglycaemia in non-invasive measurement of cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in non-diabetic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Itoh, Harumi [Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University, Matsuoka (Japan); Sadato, Norihiro; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui Medical University (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of postprandial hyperglycaemia (HG) on the non-invasive measurement of cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRGlc). Five patients who had a meal within an hour before a fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) examination were recruited in this study. They underwent intermittent arterial blood sampling (measured input function), and, based on this sampling, CMRGlc was calculated using an autoradiographic method (CMRGlc{sub real}). Simulated input functions were generated based on standardised input function, body surface area and net injected dose of FDG, and simulated CMRGlc (CMRGlc{sub sim}) was also calculated. Percent error of the area under the curve (AUC) between measured (AUC{sub real}) and simulated input function (AUC{sub IFsim}) and percent error between CMRGlc{sub real} and CMRGlc{sub sim} were calculated. These values were compared with those obtained from a previous study conducted under fasting conditions (F). The serum glucose level in the HG group was significantly higher than that in the F group (165{+-}69 vs 100{+-}9 mg/dl, P=0.0007). Percent errors of AUC and CMRGlc in grey matter and white matter in HG were significantly higher than those in F (12.9%{+-}1.3% vs 3.5%{+-}2.2% in AUC, P=0.0015; 18.2%{+-}2.2% vs 2.9%{+-}1.9% in CMRGlc in grey matter, P=0.0028; 24.0%{+-}4.6% vs 3.4%{+-}2.2% in CMRGlc in white matter, P=0.0028). It is concluded that a non-invasive method of measuring CMRGlc should be applied only in non-diabetic subjects under fasting conditions. (orig.)

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with transient global amnesia. A study using SPECT and {sup 1}H-MRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Tetsuya; Hirata, Koichi; Tatsumoto, Muneto; Yamazaki, Kaoru [Dokkyo Univ., Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine; Sato, Toshihiko

    1997-06-01

    In 13 patients with transient global amnesia (TGA), we studied the clinical course and changes over time by means of imaging techniques such as SPECT. MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS). In the case of SPECT, a cerebral blood flow decrease at the time center of the temporal lobe persisted at least for more than one month. In many patients, no abnormal signs were found on MRI. Despite the presence of intracranial impairment of energy metabolism, no evidence of cerebral ischemia was obtained using {sup 1}H-MRS at the acute and subacute stages. There were thus discrepancies between the symptoms and the findings of SPECT as well as the findings of {sup 1}H-MRS. These data suggest that TGA may not necessarily be caused by cerebra1 ischemia. (author)

  17. Metabolic Characterization of Acutely Isolated Hippocampal and Cerebral Cortical Slices Using [U-(13)C]Glucose and [1,2-(13)C]Acetate as Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNair, Laura F; Kornfelt, Rasmus; Walls, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    comparative characterization studies exist for acute hippocampal and cerebral cortical slices, hence, the aim of the current study was to characterize and compare glucose and acetate metabolism in these slice preparations in a newly established incubation design. Cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices...... prepared from 16 to 18-week-old mice were incubated for 15-90 min with unlabeled glucose in combination with [U-(13)C]glucose or [1,2-(13)C]acetate. Our newly developed incubation apparatus allows accurate control of temperature and is designed to avoid evaporation of the incubation medium. Subsequent...... to incubation, slices were extracted and extracts analyzed for (13)C-labeling (%) and total amino acid contents (µmol/mg protein) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Release of lactate from the slices was quantified by analysis of the incubation...

  18. VERBOTONAL METHOD IN THE REHABILITATION OF CEREBRAL DAMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Marija PASKVALIN

    1997-01-01

    Verbotonal system demands for special, integral view to functional happening in the brain, to damage impact and to the rehabilitation of brain lesion impaired person.This integral view determines the complex. early, optimal and intensive rehabilitation. This is done by the engagement of the whole brain, by the correction of all dysfunction's and by making it possible for cerebral functioning to have more intact synchrony. Speech is human general capability that defines and characterizes think...

  19. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation enhances recovery of local glucose metabolism after cerebral infarction in rats: a serial 18F-FDG PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Michiyuki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Zhao, Songji; Magota, Keiichi; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess whether (18)F-FDG PET could serially monitor the beneficial effects of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) on cerebral glucose metabolism when transplanted into the infarct brain of rats. The BMSC from green fluorescent protein transgenic rats or vehicle was stereotactically transplanted into the ipsilateral striatum at 7 d after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion of rats. Local glucose metabolism was semiquantitatively measured at 6 and 35 d after ischemia using (18)F-FDG PET. Motor function was serially evaluated throughout the experiments. At 35 d after ischemia, immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the phenotype of BMSC and their effects on the expression of brain-type glucose transporters. BMSC transplantation not only enhanced functional recovery but also promoted the recovery of glucose utilization in the periinfarct area when stereotactically transplanted at 1 wk after ischemia. The engrafted cells were widely distributed, and most expressed a neuron-specific protein, NeuN. BMSC transplantation also prevented the pathologic upregulation of glucose transporters in the periinfarct neocortex. The present findings strongly suggest that the BMSC may enhance functional recovery by promoting the recovery of local glucose metabolism in the periinfarct area when directly transplanted into the infarct brain at clinically relevant timing. The BMSC also inhibit the pathologic upregulation of brain-isoform glucose transporters type 1 and 3. (18)F-FDG PET may be a valuable modality to scientifically prove the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation on the host brain in clinical situations.

  20. A whole brain atlas with sub-parcellation of cortical gyri using resting fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand A.; Choi, Soyoung; Sonkar, Gaurav; Chong, Minqi; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Nair, Dileep; Shattuck, David W.; Damasio, Hanna; Leahy, Richard M.

    2017-02-01

    The new hybrid-BCI-DNI atlas is a high-resolution MPRAGE, single-subject atlas, constructed using both anatomical and functional information to guide the parcellation of the cerebral cortex. Anatomical labeling was performed manually on coronal single-slice images guided by sulcal and gyral landmarks to generate the original (non-hybrid) BCI-DNI atlas. Functional sub-parcellations of the gyral ROIs were then generated from 40 minimally preprocessed resting fMRI datasets from the HCP database. Gyral ROIs were transferred from the BCI-DNI atlas to the 40 subjects using the HCP grayordinate space as a reference. For each subject, each gyral ROI was subdivided using the fMRI data by applying spectral clustering to a similarity matrix computed from the fMRI time-series correlations between each vertex pair. The sub-parcellations were then transferred back to the original cortical mesh to create the subparcellated hBCI-DNI atlas with a total of 67 cortical regions per hemisphere. To assess the stability of the gyral subdivisons, a separate set of 60 HCP datasets were processed as follows: 1) coregistration of the structural scans to the hBCI-DNI atlas; 2) coregistration of the anatomical BCI-DNI atlas without functional subdivisions, followed by sub-parcellation of each subject's resting fMRI data as described above. We then computed consistency between the anatomically-driven delineation of each gyral subdivision and that obtained per subject using individual fMRI data. The gyral sub-parcellations generated by atlas-based registration show variable but generally good overlap of the confidence intervals with the resting fMRI-based subdivisions. These consistency measures will provide a quantitative measure of reliability of each subdivision to users of the atlas.

  1. Cerebral metabolic changes accompanying conversion of mild cognitive impairment into Alzheimer's disease: a PET follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drzezga, Alexander; Willoch, Frode; Schwaiger, Markus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675, Muenchen (Germany); Lautenschlager, Nicola; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Kurz, Alexander [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Siebner, Hartwig [Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Minoshima, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2003-08-01

    A high percentage of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) develop clinical dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD) within 1 year. The aim of this longitudinal study was to identify characteristic patterns of cerebral metabolism at baseline in patients converting from MCI to AD, and to evaluate the changes in these patterns over time. Baseline and follow-up examinations after 1 year were performed in 22 MCI patients (12 males, 10 females, aged 69.8{+-}5.8 years); these examinations included neuropsychological testing, structural cranial magnetic resonance imaging and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation of relative cerebral glucose metabolic rate (rCMRglc). Individual PET scans were stereotactically normalised with NEUROSTAT software (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA). Subsequently, statistical comparison of PET data with an age-matched healthy control population and between patient subgroups was performed using SPM 99 (Wellcome Dept. of Neuroimaging Sciences, London, UK). After 1 year, eight patients (36%) had developed probable AD (referred to as MCI{sub AD}), whereas 12 (55%) were still classified as having stable MCI (referred to as MCI{sub MCI}). Compared with the healthy control group, a reduced rCMRglc in AD-typical regions, including the temporoparietal and posterior cingulate cortex, was detected at baseline in patients with MCI{sub AD}. Abnormalities in the posterior cingulate cortex reached significance even in comparison with the MCI{sub MCI} group. After 1 year, MCI{sub AD} patients demonstrated an additional bilateral reduction of rCMRglc in prefrontal areas, along with a further progression of the abnormalities in the parietal and posterior cingulate cortex. No such changes were observed in the MCI{sub MCI} group. In patients with MCI, characteristic cerebral metabolic differences can be delineated at the time of initial presentation, which helps to define prognostic subgroups. A newly emerging reduction

  2. Rationale for the Use of Upfront Whole Brain Irradiation in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes V. Tallet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastases and deserves particular attention in relation to current prolonged survival of patients with metastatic disease. Advances in both systemic therapies and brain local treatments (surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery have led to a reappraisal of brain metastases management. With respect to this, the literature review presented here was conducted in an attempt to collect medical evidence-based data on the use of whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer. In addition, this study discusses here the potential differences in outcomes between patients with brain metastases from breast cancer and those with brain metastases from other primary malignancies and the potential implications within a treatment strategy.

  3. Rationale for the use of upfront whole brain irradiation in patients with brain metastases from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallet, Agnes V; Azria, David; Le Rhun, Emilie; Barlesi, Fabrice; Carpentier, Antoine F; Gonçalves, Antony; Taillibert, Sophie; Dhermain, Frédéric; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Metellus, Philippe

    2014-05-08

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastases and deserves particular attention in relation to current prolonged survival of patients with metastatic disease. Advances in both systemic therapies and brain local treatments (surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery) have led to a reappraisal of brain metastases management. With respect to this, the literature review presented here was conducted in an attempt to collect medical evidence-based data on the use of whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer. In addition, this study discusses here the potential differences in outcomes between patients with brain metastases from breast cancer and those with brain metastases from other primary malignancies and the potential implications within a treatment strategy.

  4. Treatment of brain metastases of renal cell cancer with combined hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrána, David; Študentová, Hana; Matzenauer, Marcel; Vlachová, Zuzana; Cwiertka, Karel; Gremlica, David; Kalita, Ondřej

    2016-06-01

    Renal cell cancer patients with brain metastatic disease generally have poor prognosis. Treatment options include surgery, radiotherapy, targeted therapy or best supportive care with respect to disease burden, patient preference and performance status. In the present case report the radiotherapy technique combining whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing (hippocampal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy HA-WBRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of the brain metastases is performed in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. HA-WBRT was administered to 30 Gy in 10 fractions with sparing of the hippocampal structures and SRT of 21 Gy in 3 fractions to brain metastases which has preceded the HA-WBRT. Two single arc volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) plans were prepared using Monaco planning software. The HA-WBRT treatment plan achieved the following results: D2=33.91 Gy, D98=25.20 Gy, D100=14.18 Gy, D50=31.26 Gy. The homogeneity index was calculated as a deduction of the minimum dose in 2% and 98% of the planning target volume (PTV), divided by the minimum dose in 50% of the PTV. The maximum dose to the hippocampus was 17.50 Gy and mean dose was 11.59 Gy. The following doses to organs at risk (OAR) were achieved: Right opticus Dmax, 31.96 Gy; left opticus Dmax, 30.96 Gy; chiasma D max, 32,76 Gy. The volume of PTV for stereotactic radiotherapy was 3,736 cm3, with coverage D100=20.95 Gy and with only 0.11% of the PTV being irradiated to dose below the prescribed dose. HA-WBRT with SRT represents a feasible technique for radiotherapy of brain metastatic disease, however this technique is considerably demanding on departmental equipment and staff time/experience.

  5. Whole brain MP2RAGE-based mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time at 9.4T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, G E; Bause, J; Ethofer, T; Ehses, P; Dresler, T; Herbert, C; Pohmann, R; Shajan, G; Fallgatter, A; Pavlova, M A; Scheffler, K

    2017-01-01

    Mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) with high accuracy and precision is central for neuroscientific and clinical research, since it opens up the possibility to obtain accurate brain tissue segmentation and gain myelin-related information. An ideal, quantitative method should enable whole brain coverage within a limited scan time yet allow for detailed sampling with sub-millimeter voxel sizes. The use of ultra-high magnetic fields is well suited for this purpose, however the inhomogeneous transmit field potentially hampers its use. In the present work, we conducted whole brain T1 mapping based on the MP2RAGE sequence at 9.4T and explored potential pitfalls for automated tissue classification compared with 3T. Data accuracy and T2-dependent variation of the adiabatic inversion efficiency were investigated by single slice T1 mapping with inversion recovery EPI measurements, quantitative T2 mapping using multi-echo techniques and simulations of the Bloch equations. We found that the prominent spatial variation of the transmit field at 9.4T (yielding flip angles between 20% and 180% of nominal values) profoundly affected the result of image segmentation and T1 mapping. These effects could be mitigated by correcting for both flip angle and inversion efficiency deviations. Based on the corrected T1 maps, new, 'flattened', MP2RAGE contrast images were generated, that were no longer affected by variations of the transmit field. Unlike the uncorrected MP2RAGE contrast images acquired at 9.4T, these flattened images yielded image segmentations comparable to 3T, making bias-field correction prior to image segmentation and tissue classification unnecessary. In terms of the T1 estimates at high field, the proposed correction methods resulted in an improved precision, with test-retest variability below 1% and a coefficient-of-variation across 25 subjects below 3%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment planning and 3D dose verification of whole brain radiation therapy with hippocampal avoidance in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S. W.; Miles, D.; Cramer, C.; Reinsvold, M.; Kirsch, D.; Oldham, M.

    2017-05-01

    Despite increasing use of stereotactic radiosurgery, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) continues to have a therapeutic role in a selected subset of patients. Selectively avoiding the hippocampus during such treatment (HA-WBRT) emerged as a strategy to reduce the cognitive morbidity associated with WBRT and gave rise to a recently published the phase II trial (RTOG 0933) and now multiple ongoing clinical trials. While conceptually hippocampal avoidance is supported by pre-clinical evidence showing that the hippocampus plays a vital role in memory, there is minimal pre-clinic data showing that selectively avoiding the hippocampus will reduce radiation-induced cognitive decline. Largely the lack of pre-clinical evidence can be attributed to the technical hurdles associated with delivering precise conformal treatment the rat brain. In this work we develop a novel conformal HA-WBRT technique for Wistar rats, utilizing a 225kVp micro-irradiator with precise 3D-printed radiation blocks designed to spare hippocampus while delivering whole brain dose. The technique was verified on rodent-morphic Presage® 3D dosimeters created from micro-CT scans of Wistar rats with Duke Large Field-of-View Optical Scanner (DLOS) at 1mm isotropic voxel resolution. A 4-field box with parallel opposed AP-PA and two lateral opposed fields was explored with conformal hippocampal sparing aided by 3D-printed radiation blocks. The measured DVH aligned reasonably well with that calculated from SmART Plan Monte Carlo simulations with simulated blocks for 4-field HA-WBRT with both demonstrating hippocampal sparing of 20% volume receiving less than 30% the prescription dose.

  7. Individualized prediction of schizophrenia based on the whole-brain pattern of altered white matter tract integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Chih-Min; Hsu, Yung-Chin; Lo, Yu-Chun; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Lin, Yi-Tin; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2018-01-01

    A schizophrenia diagnosis relies on characteristic symptoms identified by trained physicians, and is thus prone to subjectivity. This study developed a procedure for the individualized prediction of schizophrenia based on whole-brain patterns of altered white matter tract integrity. The study comprised training (108 patients and 144 controls) and testing (60 patients and 60 controls) groups. Male and female participants were comparable in each group and were analyzed separately. All participants underwent diffusion spectrum imaging of the head, and the data were analyzed using the tract-based automatic analysis method to generate a standardized two-dimensional array of white matter tract integrity, called the connectogram. Unique patterns in the connectogram that most accurately identified schizophrenia were systematically reviewed in the training group. Then, the diagnostic performance of the patterns was individually verified in the testing group by using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. The performance was high in men (accuracy = 0.85) and satisfactory in women (accuracy = 0.75). In men, the pattern was located in discrete fiber tracts, as has been consistently reported in the literature; by contrast, the pattern was widespread over all tracts in women. These distinct patterns suggest that there is a higher variability in the microstructural alterations in female patients than in male patients. The individualized prediction of schizophrenia is feasible based on the different whole-brain patterns of tract integrity. The optimal masks and their corresponding regions in the fiber tracts could serve as potential imaging biomarkers for schizophrenia. Hum Brain Mapp 39:575-587, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Whole brain-based analysis of regional white matter tract alterations in rare motor neuron diseases by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrath, Alexander; Müller, Hans-Peter; Riecker, Axel; Ludolph, Albert C; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Kassubek, Jan

    2010-11-01

    Different motor neuron disorders (MNDs) are mainly defined by the clinical presentation based on the predominance of upper or lower motor neuron impairment and the course of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mostly serves as a tool to exclude other pathologies, but novel approaches such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have begun to add information on the underlying pathophysiological processes of these disorders in vivo. The present study was designed to investigate three different rare MNDs, i.e., primary lateral sclerosis (PLS, N = 25), hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP, N = 24), and X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (X-SBMA, N = 20), by use of whole-brain-based DTI analysis in comparison with matched controls. This analysis of white matter (WM) impairment revealed widespread and characteristic patterns of alterations within the motor system with a predominant deterioration of the corticospinal tract (CST) in HSP and PLS patients according to the clinical presentation and also in patients with X-SBMA to a lesser degree, but also WM changes in projections to the limbic system and within distinct areas of the corpus callosum (CC), the latter both for HSP and PLS. In summary, DTI was able to define a characteristic WM pathoanatomy in motor and extra-motor brain areas, such as the CC and the limbic projectional system, for different MNDs via whole brain-based FA assessment and quantitative fiber tracking. Future advanced MRI-based investigations might help to provide a fingerprint-identification of MNDs. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Whole-brain three-dimensional T2-weighted BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Jones, Craig K

    2014-12-01

    A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. It uses a T2-preparation module to induce blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, followed by a single-shot three-dimensional (3D) fast gradient-echo readout with short echo time (TE). It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the "dead time" due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed "3D T2prep-GRE," was implemented at 7 Tesla (T) with a typical spatial (2.5 × 2.5 × 2.5 mm(3) ) and temporal (TR = 2.3 s) resolution for functional MRI (fMRI) and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Quality of life and symptoms control in brain metastasis after palliative whole brain radiotherapy using two different protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Sohail; Kousar, Farzana; Fatmi, Shahab; Jabeen, Kaukab; Akhtar, Kalsoom

    2012-05-01

    To compare the quality of life and symptomatic improvement after palliative radiotherapy to brain metastasis using two different treatment protocols. Comparative study. Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to November 2010. Patients presenting with brain metastasis referred to Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology, Bahawalpur for whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) were included. Patients were divided in two groups. In group A WBRT 30 Gys in 10 fractions were given. While in group B 30 Gys in 15 fractions to whole brain followed by 20 Gys in 10 fractions boost to primary metastatic site with 2 cm margins were given. Follow-up was done at 1 and 3 months. A total of 46 patients with brain metastasis were enrolled with median Karnofsky performance score 50. Median age was 64 years. Most common presenting symptoms were headache, weakness, balance problem and early fatigability. Fifty percent of patients had improvement in their presenting symptoms after completion of palliative radiotherapy at one month and three months follow-up. There was a statistically significant improvement in headache, nausea or vomiting, focal weakness, dizziness, balance problem and problems with smell, hearing and tingling sensation in group B patients as compared to group A. More controlled and better quality of life was observed in patient given 30 Gys in 15 fractions followed by a boost of 20 fractions to primary metastatic site versus WBRT with 30 Gys in 10 fractions and in patients with metastatic sites are less than three and having difference not more than 2 cm apart between two metastatic sites.

  11. High-resolution whole-brain DCE-MRI using constrained reconstruction: Prospective clinical evaluation in brain tumor patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yi, E-mail: yiguo@usc.edu; Zhu, Yinghua; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Nayak, Krishna [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Lebel, R. Marc [GE Healthcare, Calgary, Alberta AB T2P 1G1 (Canada); Shiroishi, Mark S.; Law, Meng [Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate a highly accelerated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI technique that provides high spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage via undersampling and constrained reconstruction with multiple sparsity constraints. Methods: Conventional (rate-2 SENSE) and experimental DCE-MRI (rate-30) scans were performed 20 minutes apart in 15 brain tumor patients. The conventional clinical DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 1.3 × 7.0 mm{sup 3}, FOV 22 × 22 × 4.2 cm{sup 3}, and the experimental DCE-MRI had voxel dimensions 0.9 × 0.9 × 1.9 mm{sup 3}, and broader coverage 22 × 22 × 19 cm{sup 3}. Temporal resolution was 5 s for both protocols. Time-resolved images and blood–brain barrier permeability maps were qualitatively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: The experimental DCE-MRI scans showed no loss of qualitative information in any of the cases, while achieving substantially higher spatial resolution and whole-brain spatial coverage. Average qualitative scores (from 0 to 3) were 2.1 for the experimental scans and 1.1 for the conventional clinical scans. Conclusions: The proposed DCE-MRI approach provides clinically superior image quality with higher spatial resolution and coverage than currently available approaches. These advantages may allow comprehensive permeability mapping in the brain, which is especially valuable in the setting of large lesions or multiple lesions spread throughout the brain.

  12. Oxidative metabolism of astrocytes is not reduced in hepatic encephalopathy: A PET study with [11C]acetate in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eIversen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In patients with impaired liver function and hepatic encephalopathy (HE, consistent elevations of blood ammonia concentration suggest a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HE. Ammonia and acetate are metabolized in brain both primarily in astrocytes. Here, we used dynamic [11C]acetate PET of the brain to measure the contribution of astrocytes to the previously observed reduction of brain oxidative metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis and HE, compared to patients with cirrhosis without HE, and to healthy subjects. We used a new kinetic model to estimate uptake from blood to astrocytes and astrocyte metabolism of [11C]acetate. No significant differences of the rate constant of oxidation of [11C]acetate (k3 were found among the three groups of subjects. The net metabolic clearance of [11C]acetate from blood was lower in the group of patients with cirrhosis and HE than in the group of healthy subjects (P<0.05, which we interpret to be an effect of reduced cerebral blood flow rather than a reflection of low [11C]acetate metabolism. We conclude that the characteristic decline of whole-brain oxidative metabolism in patients with cirrhosis with HE is not due to malfunction of oxidative metabolism in astrocytes. Thus, the observed decline of brain oxidative metabolism implicates changes of neurons and their energy turnover in patients with HE.

  13. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Whole-brain background-suppressed pCASL MRI with 1D-accelerated 3D RARE Stack-Of-Spirals readout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vidorreta

    Full Text Available Arterial Spin Labeled (ASL perfusion MRI enables non-invasive, quantitative measurements of tissue perfusion, and has a broad range of applications including brain functional imaging. However, ASL suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, limiting image resolution. Acquisitions using 3D readouts are optimal for background-suppression of static signals, but can be SAR intensive and typically suffer from through-plane blurring. In this study, we investigated the use of accelerated 3D readouts to obtain whole-brain, high-SNR ASL perfusion maps and reduce SAR deposition. Parallel imaging was implemented along the partition-encoding direction in a pseudo-continuous ASL sequence with background-suppression and 3D RARE Stack-Of-Spirals readout, and its performance was evaluated in three small cohorts. First, both non-accelerated and two-fold accelerated single-shot versions of the sequence were evaluated in healthy volunteers during a motor-photic task, and the performance was compared in terms of temporal SNR, GM-WM contrast, and statistical significance of the detected activation. Secondly, single-shot 1D-accelerated imaging was compared to a two-shot accelerated version to assess benefits of SNR and spatial resolution for applications in which temporal resolution is not paramount. Third, the efficacy of this approach in clinical populations was assessed by applying the single-shot 1D-accelerated version to a larger cohort of elderly volunteers. Accelerated data demonstrated the ability to detect functional activation at the subject level, including cerebellar activity, without loss in the perfusion signal temporal stability and the statistical power of the activations. The use of acceleration also resulted in increased GM-WM contrast, likely due to reduced through-plane partial volume effects, that were further attenuated with the use of two-shot readouts. In a clinical cohort, image quality remained excellent, and expected effects of age and sex

  15. Significance of the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with asymptomatic arteriosclerosis affecting the aorta and the cerebral, extra-cranial carotid and coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Tomohide; Takahashi, Wakoh; Ohnuki, Youichi; Kawada, Shiaki; Takizawa, Shunya

    2013-01-01

    The presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is strongly associated with stroke and cardiovascular diseases. However, the relationship between MetS and the localization of atherosclerosis at various sites remains uncertain. In this study, in order to reveal the relevance of MetS to atherosclerosis at several sites, we investigated the relationships among vascular risk factors, asymptomatic cerebral infarction and atherosclerosis in the aorta and carotid and coronary arteries in adults without overtly symptomatic cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease. The subjects in this study included 2,759 Japanese participants (1,845 men and 914 women, mean age: 52 years) with no history of stroke or cardiovascular events. The diagnosis of MetS was made based on modifications to criteria obtained from the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel. In all subjects, the presence of cerebral infarction in the extra-cranial carotid, coronary and aortic arteries was investigated using MRI, B-mode ultrasonography and CT. Of the 2,759 subjects, 796 (28.9%) fulfilled the criteria for MetS. The presence of MetS increased the odds ratio (OR) to 1.89 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35-2.65, p-value arteriosclerosis, 2.07 (95% CI: 1.62-2.27, p-value arteriosclerosis in all regions, including the cerebral small-vessels, extra-cranial carotid arteries, coronary arteries and abdominal aorta. MetS might be a predictor for small and large vessel disease throughout the body.

  16. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only...

  17. Evaluation of cerebral metabolism in patients with unilateral carotid stenosis by proton MR spectroscopy: a correlative study with cerebral hemodynamics by acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT (acz-SPECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Kim, Geun Eun; Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Do Gyun; Kim, Sang Tae; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Carotid stenosis may lead not only to cerebral hemodynamic compromise but also cerebral metabolic changes without overt infarction. To investigate the brain metabolic changes as a result of hemodynamic compromise in pts with carotid stenosis, we compared the changes in metabolism of the gray and white matter detected by proton MRS with cortical hemodynamics measured by Acz-SPECT. We prospectively studied symptomatic 18 pts (M/F=15/3, mean ages: 64.4y) with unilateral carotid stenosis. All pts underwent Acz-SPECT and MRS with 3 days. rCBF and rCVR of MCA territory were assessed by Acz-SPECT. Hemodynamic compromise was graded as stage 0 (normal rCBF and rCVR), stage 1 (normal rCBF and reduced rCVR), and stage 2( reduced rCBF and rCVR). Brain metabolism was assessed by measuring the peaks of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and the sum of creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr) from noninfarcted white matter in the both centrum semiovales and gray matter in both MCA territories. On Acz-SPECT, 7 pts showed stage 2 were significantly lower than in pts with stage 0 (p<0.01). The asymmetric ratio of NAA/Cr in pts with state 2 was also significantly lower than in pts with stage 1(p<0.05). The asymmetric ratio of Cho/Cr was increased as hemodynamic stage increased but the differences were not statistically significant among 3 stages. In cortical gray matter, the asymmetric ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were decreased statistically significant among 3 stages. In cortical gray matter, the asymmetric ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were decreased and that of Cho/Cr was increased as hemodynamic stage increased. However, these differences were not statistically significant among 3 stages. The asymmetric ratios of NAA/Cho of centrum semiovale in pts with reduced rCBF and/or reduced rCVR were lower than in pts with normal perfusion. Our results indicate the metabolic changes detected by proton MRS in patients with carotid stenosis reflect a hemodynamic compromised state.

  18. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in senile dementia of Alzheimer`s type and vascular dementia with deep white matter changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohgi, H.; Yonezawa, H.; Takahashi, S.; Sato, N.; Kato, E.; Kudo, M. [Department of Neurology, Iwate Medical University (Japan); Hatano, K.; Sasaki, T. [Nishina Memorial Cyclotron Centre (Japan Radioisotope Association) and Cyclotron Research Centre, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO{sub 2}), oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF), and cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated using positron emission tomography (PET) in 16 patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer`s type (SDAT), and compared with those of 6 nondemented and 3 demented patients with deep white matter high signal (DWMH) on T2-weighted MRI and 6 controls. rCBF, rCMRO{sub 2} and rCBV were determined using C{sup 15}O{sub 2}, {sup 15}O{sub 2} and C{sup 15}O, respectively. rCBF and CMRO{sub 2} were significantly decreased in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex (P < 0.05) in patients with SDAT, and showed a significant correlation with the severity of dementia (P < 0.05). In patients with DWMH rCBF was significantly decreased in the parietal cortex and in the frontal white matter in nondemented patients, and in the cerebral cortex and white matter of most regions studied in demented patients (P < 0.05), whereas rCMRO{sub 2} was significantly reduced in only the frontal and temporal cortex of demented patients (P < 0.05). rOEF was significantly increased in the parietal cortex of patients with SDAT and in the white matter of patients with SDAT or DWMH (P < 0.05), and the increase in the frontal white matter significantly paralleled the progression of dementia in patients with SDAT (P < 0.05). rCBV was significantly decreased in the parietal and temporal cortex of patients with SDAT (P < 0.05), but not in any areas of those with DWMH. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 32 refs.

  19. Systemic, cerebral and skeletal muscle ketone body and energy metabolism during acute hyper-D-β-hydroxybutyratemia in post-absorptive healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Kristian H; Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Grøndal, Thomas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2015-02-01

    Ketone bodies are substrates during fasting and when on a ketogenic diet not the least for the brain and implicated in the management of epileptic seizures and dementia. Moreover, D-β-hydroxybutyrate (HOB) is suggested to reduce blood glucose and fatty acid levels. The objectives of this study were to quantitate systemic, cerebral, and skeletal muscle HOB utilization and its effect on energy metabolism. Single trial. Hospital. Healthy post-absorptive males (n = 6). Subjects were studied under basal condition and three consecutive 1-hour periods with a 3-, 6-, and 12-fold increased HOB concentration via HOB infusion. Systemic, cerebral, and skeletal muscle HOB kinetics, oxidation, glucose turnover, and lipolysis via arterial, jugular, and femoral venous differences in combination with stable isotopically labeled HOB, glucose, and glycerol, infusion. An increase in HOB from the basal 160-450 μmol/L elicited 14 ± 2% reduction (P = .03) in glucose appearance and 37 ± 4% decrease (P = .03) in lipolytic rate while insulin and glucagon were unchanged. Endogenous HOB appearance was reduced in a dose-dependent manner with complete inhibition at the highest HOB concentration (1.7 mmol/L). Cerebral HOB uptake and subsequent oxidation was linearly related to the arterial HOB concentration. Resting skeletal muscle HOB uptake showed saturation kinetics. A small increase in the HOB concentration decreases glucose production and lipolysis in post-absorptive healthy males. Moreover, cerebral HOB uptake and oxidation rates are linearly related to the arterial HOB concentration of importance for modifying brain energy utilization, potentially of relevance for patients with epileptic seizures and dementia.

  20. Exercise as an intervention for the age-related decline in brain metabolic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda J Anderson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To identify interventions for brain aging, we must first identify the processes in which we hope to intervene. Brain aging is a period of decreasing functional capacity and increasing vulnerability, which reflect a reduction in morphological organization and perhaps degeneration. Since life is ultimately dependent upon the ability to maintain cellular organization through metabolism, this review explores evidence for a decline in neural metabolic support during aging, which includes a reduction in whole brain cerebral blood flow, and cellular metabolic capacity. Capillary density may also decrease with age, although the results are less clear. Exercise may be a highly effective intervention for brain aging, because it improves the cardiovascular system as a whole, and increases regional capillary density and neuronal metabolic capacity. Although the evidence is strongest for motor regions, more work may yield additional evidence for exercise-related improvement in metabolic support in non-motor regions. The protective effects of exercise may be specific to brain region and the type of insult. For example, exercise protects striatal cells from ischemia, but it produces mixed results after hippocampal seizures. Exercise can improve metabolic support and bioenergetic capacity in adult animals, but it remains to be determined whether it has similar effects in aging animals. What is clear is that exercise can influence the multiple levels of support necessary for maintaining optimal neuronal function, which is unique among proposed interventions for aging.

  1. Repeated intravenous administration of gadobutrol does not lead to increased signal intensity on unenhanced T1-weighted images - a voxel-based whole brain analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Soenke; Kromrey, Marie-Luise [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Kuehn, Jens-Peter [University Medicine Greifswald, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); University Hospital, Carl Gustav Carus University Dresden, Institute for Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Grothe, Matthias [University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Neurology, Greifswald (Germany); Domin, Martin [University Medicine Greifswald, Functional Imaging Unit, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To identify a possible association between repeated intravenous administration of gadobutrol and increased signal intensity in the grey and white matter using voxel-based whole-brain analysis. In this retrospective single-centre study, 217 patients with a clinically isolated syndrome underwent baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging and at least one annual follow-up examination with intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of gadobutrol. Using the ''Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie algebra'' (DARTEL) normalisation process, tissue templates for grey matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were calculated, as were GM-CSF and WM-CSF ratios. Voxel-based whole-brain analysis was used to calculate the signal intensity for each voxel in each data set. Paired t-test was applied to test differences to baseline MRI for significance. Voxel-based whole-brain analysis demonstrated no significant changes in signal intensity of grey and white matter after up to five gadobutrol administrations. There was no significant change in GM-CSF and grey WM-CSF ratios. Voxel-based whole-brain analysis did not demonstrate increased signal intensity of GM and WM on unenhanced T1-weighted images after repeated gadobutrol administration. The molecular structure of gadolinium-based contrast agent preparations may be an essential factor causing SI increase on unenhanced T1-weighted images. (orig.)

  2. Experimental Study Comparing a Traditional Approach to Performance Appraisal Training to a Whole-Brain Training Method at C.B. Fleet Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Sally; Sherrier, Tom; Wooters, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a new approach to performance appraisal training. Motivated by split-brain theory and existing studies of cognitive information processing and performance appraisals, this exploratory study examined the effects of a whole-brain approach to training managers for implementing performance…

  3. Increased Stability and Breakdown of Brain Effective Connectivity During Slow-Wave Sleep : Mechanistic Insights from Whole-Brain Computational Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobst, Beatrice M; Hindriks, Rikkert; Laufs, Helmut; Tagliazucchi, E.; Hahn, Gerald; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Stevner, Angus B A; Kringelbach, Morten L; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has found that the human sleep cycle is characterised by changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity. Yet, we are still missing a mechanistic explanation of the local neuronal dynamics underlying these changes. We used whole-brain computational modelling to study the

  4. Cerebral glucose metabolism in long-term survivors of childhood primary brain tumors treated with surgery and radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Krabbe, Katja; Leffers, Anne M.

    2003-01-01

    Delayed structural cerebral sequelae has been reported following cranial radiation therapy (CRT) to children with primary brain tumors, but little is known about potential functional changes. Twenty-four patients were included, diagnosed and treated at a median age of 11 years, and examined after...

  5. Patterns of relapse and late toxicity after resection and whole-brain radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases

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    Nieder, C.; Schnabel, K. [Univ. Hospital, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Schwerdtfeger, K.; Steudel, W.I. [Univ. Hospital, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    1998-05-01

    From a total of 66 patients, 52 received 10 x 3 Gy and 10 were treated with 20 x 2 Gy whole-brain radiotherapy after resection of their brain metastases. The actuarial probablity of relapse was 27% and 55% after 1 and 2 year(s), respectively. The local relapse rate (at the original site of resected brain metastases) was rather high for melanoma, non-breast adenocarcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma. No local relapse occurred in breast cancer and small-cell carcinoma. Failure elsewhere in the brain seemed to be influenced by extracranial disease activity. Size of brain metastases and total dose showed no correlation with relapse rate. Occurrence of brain relapse was not associated with a reduced survival time, because 10/15 patients who developed a relapse received salvage therapy. Of the patients, 11 had symptoms of late radiation toxicity (the actuarial probability was 42% after 2 years). Most results of surgical and radiosurgical studies are comparable to ours. Several randomized trials investigate surgical resection versus radiosurgery, as well as the effects of additional whole-brain radiotherapy in order to define the treatment of choice. Some data support the adjuvant application of 10 x 3 Gy over 2 weeks as a reasonable compromise when local control, toxicity, and treatment time have to be considered. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Nach der Resektion der Hirnmetastase erhielten 52 von 66 Patienten eine Ganzhirnbestrahlung mit zehn Fraktionen von 3 Gy in zwei Wochen und zehn eine solche mit 20 Fraktionen von 2 Gy in vier Wochen. Die Kaplan-Meier-Analyse ergab eine Rezidivrate von insgesamt 27% nach einem bzw. 55% nach zwei Jahren. Rezidive im Bereich der resezierten Metastase wurden am haeufigsten bei Melanomen, Adenokarzinomen (mit Ausnahme der Mammakarzinome) und Plattenepithelkarzinomen beobachtet. Dagegen traten bei Mammakarzinomen und kleinzelligen Karzinomen keine solchen Rezidive auf. Das Auftreten von Hirnmetastasen anderer Lokalisation schien vom

  6. Clinical features of brain metastases in breast cancer: an implication for hippocampal-sparing whole-brain radiation therapy

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    Wu S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available San-Gang Wu,1,* Jia-Yuan Sun,2,* Qin Tong,3 Feng-Yan Li,2 Zhen-Yu He2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Xiamen Cancer Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objectives of this study were to describe the distribution of brain metastases (BM in breast cancer patients and investigate the risk factors for perihippocampal metastases (PHM. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of the clinicopathological characteristics and patterns of BM was performed. Associations between clinicopathological characteristics and PHM (the hippocampus plus 5 mm margin were evaluated using logistic regression analyses. Results: A total of 1,356 brain metastatic lesions were identified in 192 patients. Patients with 1–3 BM, 4–9 BM, and ≥10 BM accounted for 63.0%, 18.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. There were only 7 (3.6% patients with hippocampal metastases (HM and 14 (7.3% patients with PHM. On logistic regression, the number of BM was an independent risk factor for PHM. Patients with ≥10 BM had a significantly higher risk of PHM compared with those with <10 BM. Breast cancer subtype (BCS was not associated with PHM. The number of BM was significantly correlated with various BCSs. Patients with hormone receptor (HR+/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2+, HR-/HER2+, and HR-/HER2- subtypes had a higher probability of ≥10 BM, relative to patients with an HR+/HER2- subtype. Conclusion: Our study suggests that a low incidence of PHM may be acceptable to perform hippocampal-sparing whole-brain radiation therapy for breast cancer patients

  7. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Bender, Edward [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Basavatia, Amar; Hong, Linda; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Tomé, Wolfgang A., E-mail: wtome@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm{sup 3} ± 1.0 cm{sup 3} and 28.52 cm{sup 3} ± 3.22 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D{sub 2%} and D{sub 98%} were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D{sub 100%} mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met.

  8. A precision 3D conformal treatment technique in rats: Application to whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance.

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    Yoon, Suk W; Cramer, Christina K; Miles, Devin A; Reinsvold, Michael H; Joo, Kyeung M; Kirsch, David G; Oldham, Mark

    2017-08-24

    To develop and validate three-dimensional (3D) conformal hippocampal sparing whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) for Wistar rats utilizing precision 3D-printed immobilization and micro-blocks. This technique paves the way for future preclinical studies investigating brain treatments that reduce neurotoxicity. A novel preclinical treatment planning and delivery process was developed to enable precision 3D conformal treatment and hippocampal avoidance capability for the Xrad 225cx small animal irradiator. A range of conformal avoidance plans were evaluated consisting of equiangularly spaced coplanar axial beams, with plans containing 2, 4, 7, and 8 fields. The hippocampal sparing and coverage of these plans were investigated through Monte Carlo dose calculation (SmART-Plan Xrad 225cx planning system). Treatment delivery was implemented through a novel process where hippocampal block shapes were computer generated from an MRI rat atlas which was registered to on-board cone beam CT of the rat in treatment position. The blocks were 3D printed with a tungsten-doped filament at lateral resolution of 80 μm. Precision immobilization was achieved utilizing a 3D-printed support system which enabled angled positioning of the rat head in supine position and bite block to improve coverage of the central diencephalon. Treatment delivery was verified on rodent-morphic Presage(®) 3D dosimeters optically scanned at 0.2-mm isotropic resolution. Biological verification of hippocampal avoidance was performed with immunohistologic staining. All simulated plans spared the hippocampus while delivering high dose to the brain (22.5-26.2 Gy mean dose to brain at mean hippocampal dose of 7 Gy). No significant improvement in hippocampal sparing was observed by adding beams beyond four fields. Dosimetric sparing of hippocampal region of the four-field plan was verified with the Presage(®) dosimeter (mean dose = 9.6 Gy, D100% = 7.1 Gy). Simulation and dosimeter match at distance

  9. The effects of age and ketogenic diet on local cerebral metabolic rates of glucose after controlled cortical impact injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Mayumi L; Hovda, David A

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown the neuroprotective potential of ketones after TBI in the juvenile brain. It is our premise that acutely after TBI, glucose may not be the optimum fuel and decreasing metabolism of glucose in the presence of an alternative substrate will improve cellular metabolism and recovery. The current study addresses whether TBI will induce age-related differences in the cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (CMRglc) after cortical controlled impact (CCI) and whether ketone metabolism will further decrease CMRglc after injury. Postnatal day 35 (PND35; n = 48) and PND70 (n = 42) rats were given either sham or CCI injury and placed on either a standard or a ketogenic (KG) diet. CMRglc studies using (14)C-2 deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography were conducted on days 1, 3, or 7 post-injury. PND35 and PND70 standard-fed CCI-injured rats exhibited no significant neocortical differences in CMRglc magnitude or time course compared to controls. Measurement of contusion volume also indicated no age differences in response to TBI. However, PND35 subcortical structures showed earlier metabolic recovery compared to controls than PND70. Ketosis induced by the KG diet was shown to affect CMRglc in an age-dependent manner after TBI. The presence of ketones after injury further reduced CMRglc in PND35 and normalized CMRglc in PND70 rats at 7 days bilaterally after injury. The changes in CMRglc seen in PND35 TBI rats on the KG diet were associated with decreased contusion volume. These results suggest that conditions of reduced glucose utilization and increased alternative substrate metabolism may be preferable acutely after TBI in the younger rat.

  10. A survival score for patients with brain metastases from less radiosensitive tumors treated with whole-brain radiotherapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziggel, L.; Rades, D. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Segedin, B.; Podvrsnik, N.H.; Oblak, I. [Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiation Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This study aimed to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the survival of patients receiving whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone for brain metastases from less radiosensitive tumors. The study included data from 176 patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma or colorectal cancer. Patients were divided into a test group (N=88) and a validation group (N=88). In the multivariate analysis of the test group, age, Karnofsky Performance Status and extracranial metastasis were significantly associated with survival. These three factors were included in the scoring system. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 6-month survival rate (in %) by 10. The total score represented the sum of the three scores. According to the total scores - which ranged from 5 to14 points - three prognostic groups were created. The 6-month survival rates in the test group were 11% for 5-8 points (N=47, group A), 38% for 9-11 points (N=29, group B) and 83% for 12-14 points (N=12, group C). In the validation group the 6-month survival rates were 12, 31 and 75%, respectively. Comparisons between the prognostic groups A, B and C of the test group with those of the validation group did not reveal any significant differences. The new scoring system based on three independent prognostic factors can help to estimate the survival of patients with brain metastases from a less radiosensitive tumor. The score appears to be valid and reproducible. (orig.)

  11. Examination of the predictive factors of the response to whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases from lung cancer using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Shuri; Kanda, Tomonori; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Seki, Nobuhiko; Kawamura, Masafumi; Furui, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hideomi

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have been conducted on the prognostic factors for overall survival in patients with brain metastases (BMs) following whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). However, there have been a small number of studies regarding the prognostic factors for the response of tumor to WBRT. The aim of the present study was to identify the predictive factors for the response to WBRT from the point of view of reduction of tumor using magnetic resonance imaging. A retrospective analysis of 62 patients with BMs from primary lung cancer treated with WBRT was undertaken. The effects of the following factors on the response to WBRT were evaluated: Age; sex; performance status; lactate dehydrogenase; pathology; existence of extracranial metastases; activity of extracranial disease; chemo-history; chest radiotherapy history; treatment term; γ-knife radiotherapy; diffusion weighted image signal intensity; tumor diameter; extent of edema and the edema/tumor (E/T) ratio. The association between the reduction of tumors and clinical factors was evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Ppredictive factors for the reduction of tumor. The following 3 factors were significantly associated with the response of tumors to WBRT: The presence of SCLC; an E/T ratio of ≥1.5; and the presence of extracranial metastases. The E/T ratio is a novel index that provides a simple and easy predictive method for use in a clinical setting.

  12. Whole-brain in-vivo measurements of the axonal g-ratio in a group of 37 healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siawoosh eMohammadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The g-ratio, quantifying the ratio between the inner and outer diameters of a fiber, is an important microstructural characteristic of fiber pathways and is functionally related to conduction velocity. We introduce a novel method for estimating the MR g-ratio non-invasively across the whole brain using high-fidelity magnetization transfer (MT imaging and single-shell diffusion MRI. These methods enabled us to map the MR g-ratio in vivo across the brain’s prominent fiber pathways in a group of 37 healthy volunteers and to estimate the inter-subject variability. Effective correction of susceptibility-related distortion artifacts was essential before combining the MT and diffusion data, in order to reduce partial volume and edge artifacts. The MR g-ratio is in good qualitative agreement with histological findings despite the different resolution and spatial coverage of MRI and histology. The MR g-ratio holds promise as an important non-invasive biomarker due to its microstructural and functional relevance in neurodegeneration.

  13. A Case of Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer Treated with Whole-Brain Radiotherapy and Eribulin Mesylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Nieder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with triple receptor-negative breast cancer often develop aggressive metastatic disease, which also might involve the brain. In many cases, systemic and local treatment is needed. It is important to consider the toxicity of chemo- and radiotherapy, especially when newly approved drugs become available. Randomised studies leading to drug approval often exclude patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases. Here we report our initial experience with eribulin mesylate and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT in a heavily pretreated patient with multiple brain, lung, and bone metastases from triple receptor-negative breast cancer. Eribulin mesylate was given after 4 previous lines for metastatic disease. Two weeks after the initial dose, that is, during the first cycle, the patient was diagnosed with 5 brain metastases with a maximum size of approximately 4.5 cm. She continued chemotherapy and received concomitant WBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy. After 3 cycles of eribulin mesylate, treatment was discontinued because of newly diagnosed liver metastases and progression in the lungs. No unexpected acute toxicity was observed. The only relevant adverse reactions were haematological events after the third cycle (haemoglobin 9.5 g/dL, leukocytes 3.1×109/L. The patient died from respiratory failure 18.5 months from diagnosis of metastatic disease, and 2.7 months from diagnosis of brain metastases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on combined WBRT and eribulin mesylate.

  14. Whole-Brain In-vivo Measurements of the Axonal G-Ratio in a Group of 37 Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Carey, Daniel; Dick, Fred; Diedrichsen, Joern; Sereno, Martin I; Reisert, Marco; Callaghan, Martina F; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    The g-ratio, quantifying the ratio between the inner and outer diameters of a fiber, is an important microstructural characteristic of fiber pathways and is functionally related to conduction velocity. We introduce a novel method for estimating the MR g-ratio non-invasively across the whole brain using high-fidelity magnetization transfer (MT) imaging and single-shell diffusion MRI. These methods enabled us to map the MR g-ratio in vivo across the brain's prominent fiber pathways in a group of 37 healthy volunteers and to estimate the inter-subject variability. Effective correction of susceptibility-related distortion artifacts was essential before combining the MT and diffusion data, in order to reduce partial volume and edge artifacts. The MR g-ratio is in good qualitative agreement with histological findings despite the different resolution and spatial coverage of MRI and histology. The MR g-ratio holds promise as an important non-invasive biomarker due to its microstructural and functional relevance in neurodegeneration.

  15. Do patients with a limited number of brain metastases need whole-brain radiotherapy in addition to radiosurgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-08-15

    Background: About 40% of patients with brain metastases have a very limited number of lesions and may be candidates for radiosurgery. Radiosurgery alone is superior to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone for control of treated and new brain metastases. In patients with a good performance status, radiosurgery also resulted in better survival. However, the question is whether the results of radiosurgery alone can be further improved with additional WBRT. Methods: Information for this review was compiled by searching the PubMed and MEDLINE databases. Very important published meeting abstracts were also considered. Results: Based on both retrospective and prospective studies, the addition of WBRT to radiosurgery improved control of treated and new brain metastases but not survival. However, because a recurrence within the brain has a negative impact on neurocognitive function, it is important to achieve long-term control of brain metastases. Conclusion: The addition of WBRT provides significant benefits. Further randomized studies including adequate assessment of neurocognitive function and a follow-up period of at least 2 years are needed to help customize the treatment for individual patients. (orig.)

  16. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schild Steven E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the radiation dose was investigated. Methods Data from 220 patients were retrospectively analyzed for overall survival and local control. Nine potential prognostic factors were evaluated: tumor type, WBI schedule, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, interval from diagnosis of cancer to WBI, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA class. Results Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 32% and 19%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, WBI doses >30 Gy (p = 0.038, KPS ≥70 (p Conclusions Improved outcomes were associated with WBI doses >30 Gy, better performance status, fewer brain metastases, lack of extracerebral metastases, and lower RPA class. Patients receiving WBI alone appear to benefit from WBI doses >30 Gy. However, such a benefit is limited to RPA class 1 or 2 patients.

  17. Whole-brain structural topology in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Preserved global – disturbed local network organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justina Sidlauskaite

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies demonstrate altered organization of functional brain networks in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, the structural underpinnings of these functional disturbances are poorly understood. In the current study, we applied a graph-theoretic approach to whole-brain diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data to investigate the organization of structural brain networks in adults with ADHD and unaffected controls using deterministic fiber tractography. Groups did not differ in terms of global network metrics — small-worldness, global efficiency and clustering coefficient. However, there were widespread ADHD-related effects at the nodal level in relation to local efficiency and clustering. The affected nodes included superior occipital, supramarginal, superior temporal, inferior parietal, angular and inferior frontal gyri, as well as putamen, thalamus and posterior cerebellum. Lower local efficiency of left superior temporal and supramarginal gyri was associated with higher ADHD symptom scores. Also greater local clustering of right putamen and lower local clustering of left supramarginal gyrus correlated with ADHD symptom severity. Overall, the findings indicate preserved global but altered local network organization in adult ADHD implicating regions underpinning putative ADHD-related neuropsychological deficits.

  18. Whole-brain connectivity dynamics reflect both task-specific and individual-specific modulation: A multitask study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Calhoun, Vince D; Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Damaraju, Eswar; Miller, Robyn; Bandettini, Peter A; Mitra, Sunanda

    2017-05-23

    Functional connectivity (FC) has been widely used to study the functional organization of temporally correlated and spatially distributed brain regions. Recent studies of FC dynamics, quantified by windowed correlations, provide new insights to analyze dynamic, context-dependent reconfiguration of brain networks. A set of reoccurring whole-brain connectivity patterns at rest, referred to as FC states, have been identified, hypothetically reflecting underlying cognitive processes or mental states. We posit that the mean FC information for a given subject represents a significant contribution to the group-level FC dynamics. We show that the subject-specific FC profile, termed as FC individuality, can be removed to increase sensitivity to cognitively relevant FC states. To assess the impact of the FC individuality and task-specific FC modulation on the group-level FC dynamics analysis, we generate and analyze group studies of four subjects engaging in four cognitive conditions (rest, simple math, two-back memory, and visual attention task). We also propose a model to quantitatively evaluate the effect of two factors, namely, subject-specific and task-specific modulation on FC dynamics. We show that FC individuality is a predominant factor in group-level FC variability, and the embedded cognitively relevant FC states are clearly visible after removing the individual's connectivity profile. Our results challenge the current understanding of FC states and emphasize the importance of individual heterogeneity in connectivity dynamics analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of anticholinergic drugs on regional cerebral blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in previously untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Satoko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi; Sato, Yoshitomo [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured using the steady-state {sup 15}O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six previously untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease before and after trihexyphenidyl (THP) treatment. The patients comprised of 4 men and 2 women with Hoehn-Yahr stage II-III. Their ages at the onset of the study ranged from 46 to 57 years (mean{+-}SD, 51.8{+-}3.7) and the duration of the illness ranged from 10 to 48 months (mean{+-}SD, 28.8{+-}15.5). The PET study, assessments of the disability and cognitive function were undergone twice. The first time assessments were done was when the patients were not receiving any drugs, and the second time was one to three months after administration of 6 mg THP. All patients showed clinical improvement after THP treatment. The mean disability score of Unified Parkinson`s Disease Rating Scale decreased from 35.1 (SD{+-}11.3) to 25.7 (SD{+-}11.6). The cognitive function assessed by Hasegawa`s dementia rating scale-revised, Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, were not significantly different before and after the THP treatment. After the THP treatment, rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} decreased significantly in the striatum (about 15%) and all cerebral cortices (about 10%) on both sides contralateral and ipsilateral to the predominantly symptomatic limbs. We conclude that an anticholinergic THP decreases the rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} significantly in the cerebral cortices without cognitive impairment in early untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease. (author)

  20. Effects of constraint-induced movement therapy on brain glucose metabolism in a rat model of cerebral ischemia: a micro PET/CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Bei; Yu, Ke-Wei; Li, Ce; Xie, Hong-Yu; Bao, Wei-Qi; Kong, Yan-Yan; Jiao, Fang-Yang; Guan, Yi-Hui; Bai, Yu-Long

    2018-01-04

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) can improve motor functions in stroke patients and ischemic rats. This study examined the effect of CIMT in ischemic rats using positron emission tomography (PET). We used middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) procedure to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. Male rats were divided into a negative control group (Normal, n = 4), a sham-operated group (Sham, n = 6), an ischemic group (Control, n = 6) and an ischemic CIMT-treated group (CIMT, n = 6). CIMT started at postoperative day 8 (d8) and lasted for 2 weeks. We utilized 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) micro PET/CT imaging to evaluate glucose metabolism in different brain regions at baseline, before, and after treatment, respectively. CIMT improved behavioral performance in the ischemic CIMT group. At the end of treatment, the CIMT group showed lower standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the ipsilateral cingulate, motor and somatosensory cortex, respectively; as well as the anterodorsal hippocampus compared to the Control group (1.80% ± 0.10% vs. 1.92% ± 0.08%, 1.32% ± 0.14% vs. 1.48% ± 0.09%, 1.18% ± 0.14% vs. 1.42% ± 0.15%, 1.68% ± 0.09% vs. 1.79% ± 0.06%, P cerebral ischemic rats and this effect can be attributed to increased glucose utilization in the contralateral hemisphere.

  1. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial–venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12–23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction. PMID:24835170

  2. Changes in cerebral [18F]-FDG uptake induced by acute alcohol administration in a rat model of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gispert, Juan D; Figueiras, Francisca P; Vengeliene, Valentina; Herance, José R; Rojas, Santiago; Spanagel, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    Several [18F]-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) studies in alcoholics have consistently reported decreases in overall brain glucose metabolism at rest and following acute alcohol administration. However, changes in cerebral glucose utilization associated with the transition to addiction are not well understood and require longitudinal translational imaging studies in animal models of alcoholism. Here, we studied brain glucose uptake in alcohol drinking rats in order to provide convergent evidence to what has previously been reported in human studies. Brain glucose metabolism was measured by [18F]-FDG microPET imaging in different male Wistar rat groups: short-term drinking (three months), long-term drinking (twelve months) and alcohol-naïve. Global and regional cerebral glucose uptake was measured at rest and following acute alcohol administration. We showed that alcohol significantly reduced the whole-brain glucose metabolism. This effect was most pronounced in the parietal cortex and cerebellum. Alcohol-induced decreases in brain [18F]-FDG uptake was most apparent in alcohol-naïve rats, less intense in short-term drinkers and absent in long-term drinkers. The latter finding indicates the occurrence of tolerance to the intoxicating effects of alcohol in long-term drinking individuals. In contrast, some regions, like the ventral striatum and entorhinal cortex, showed enhanced metabolic activity, an effect that did not undergo tolerance during long-term alcohol consumption. Our findings are comparable to those described in human studies using the same methodology. We conclude that [18F]-FDG PET studies in rat models of alcoholism provide good translation and can be used for future longitudinal studies investigating alterations in brain function during different stages of the addiction cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Posterior Cingulate Glucose Metabolism, Hippocampal Glucose Metabolism, and Hippocampal Volume in Cognitively Normal, Late-Middle-Aged Persons at 3 Levels of Genetic Risk for Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protas, Hillary D.; Chen, Kewei; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Alexander, Gene E.; Lee, Wendy; Bandy, Daniel; de Leon, Mony J.; Mosconi, Lisa; Buckley, Shannon; Truran-Sacrey, Diana; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.; Caselli, Richard J.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize and compare measurements of the posterior cingulate glucose metabolism, the hippocampal glucose metabolism, and hippocampal volume so as to distinguish cognitively normal, late-middle-aged persons with 2, 1, or 0 copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, reflecting 3 levels of risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease. Design Cross-sectional comparison of measurements of cerebral glucose metabolism using 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography and measurements of brain volume using magnetic resonance imaging in cognitively normal ε4 homozygotes, ε4 heterozygotes, and noncarriers. Setting Academic medical center. Participants A total of 31 ε4 homozygotes, 42 ε4 heterozygotes, and 76 noncarriers, 49 to 67 years old, matched for sex, age, and educational level. Main Outcome Measures The measurements of posterior cingulate and hippocampal glucose metabolism were characterized using automated region-of-interest algorithms and normalized for whole-brain measurements. The hippocampal volume measurements were characterized using a semiautomated algorithm and normalized for total intracranial volume. Results Although there were no significant differences among the 3 groups of participants in their clinical ratings, neuropsychological test scores, hippocampal volumes (P=.60), or hippocampal glucose metabolism measurements (P = .12), there were significant group differences in their posterior cingulate glucose metabolism measurements (P=.001). The APOE ε4 gene dose was significantly associated with posterior cingulate glucose metabolism (r=0.29, P=.0003), and this association was significantly greater than those with hippocampal volume or hippocampal glucose metabolism (P<.05, determined by use of pairwise Fisher z tests). Conclusions Although our findings may depend in part on the analysis algorithms used, they suggest that a reduction in posterior cingulate glucose metabolism precedes a reduction in hippocampal volume or

  4. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  5. The effect of a metabolic inhibitor upon the properties of the cerebral vasculature during a whole-head saline perfusion of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthert, P J; Greenwood, J; Pratt, O E; Lantos, P L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the metabolic inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) has been assessed during a simple in situ Ringer solution perfusion of the rat brain. The preparation was perfused, with or without the addition of DNP, for periods ranging up to 30 min. Following this pre-test perfusion, both the vascular permeability and cerebral perfusate flow were assessed. In the absence of DNP significant barrier disruption had taken place by 10 min and the flow rates showed greater fluctuations with time. In the presence of DNP, however, perfusate flow remained constant and the blood-brain barrier remained intact to [14C]mannitol for at least 10 min, but subsequently the flow rate dropped and the barrier began to show evidence of disruption. The unbound visual marker, Evans Blue, was apparently excluded from all regions other than those that are known to lack a blood-brain barrier. The water content of the brain showed no significant increase until 20 min. Patency of the capillaries was demonstrated by direct visualization of the cerebral vasculature with an Indian ink-gelatin mixture and in some animals there was evidence of incomplete filling following 30 min of perfusion. It is concluded that the use of DNP in the perfusate provides a useful preparation for the short-term study of passive properties of the blood-brain barrier, such as carrier-facilitated diffusion, as well as mechanisms of barrier opening.

  6. [Nicergoline, an ergot alkaloid, improves ischemic brain damage by ameliorating the decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolism in spontaneously hypertensive rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, T; Ishikawa, T; Kawata, K; Setoyama, K; Maekawa, T; Sakabe, T; Takeshita, H

    1992-12-01

    Effects of ergot alkaloids, nicergoline (NIC), on survival rate, brain water content, local cerebral blood flow (LCBF: 14C-iodoantipyrine) and glucose utilization (LCGU: 14C-2-deoxyglucose) were examined after bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Two series of study were performed; the permanent BCAO and 3-hr-BCAO study. After permanent BCAO, the survival rate at 24 hrs of 32% (8 mg/kg, i.p.) or 38% (16mg/kg) in NIC group was higher than that in non-treated group (12%). At the end of 3-hr-BCAO, the increase in water content (dry-wet) in di-mesencephalon was less in NIC (100 micrograms/kg/min, i.v.) group than that in non-treated group. The decrease in LCBF in caudate-putamen (CP), parietal cortex (PC), thalamus (TH), hypothalamus (HT), and substantia nigra (SN) were less in NIC group than those in non-treated group. At the 2-hr-reperfusion after 3-hr-BCAO, the decrease in LCBF in TH and HT were less in NIC group than those in non-treated group. The LCGU in sensory motor cortex, CP, PC, HT, inferior colliculus and pons-reticular were higher in NIC group than those in non-treated group. From these results, it is concluded that nicergoline may have ameliorative effects on survival rate related to the prevention of decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolism following brain ischemia.

  7. Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Correlated to Compromised Cerebral Metabolism in Patients Suffering from Acute Bacterial Meningitis; An Observational Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Thelin, Eric Peter; Ghatan, Per Hamid

    2016-01-01

    in combination with serum samples of biomarkers indicating brain tissue injury, S100B and Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE), additional information might be provided. The aim of this study was to evaluate biomarkers in serum and MD parameters in patients with ABM. METHODS: From a prior study on patients (n = 52......INTRODUCTION: Patients suffering from acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) with a decreased level of consciousness have been shown to have an improved clinical outcome if treated with an intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy. By using intracranial microdialysis (MD) to monitor cerebral metabolism......) with a confirmed ABM and impaired consciousness (GCS ≤ 9, or GCS = 10 combined with lumbar spinal opening pressure > 400 mmH2O), a subgroup of patients (n = 21) monitored with intracerebral MD and biomarkers was included in the present study. All patients were treated in the NICU with intracranial pressure (ICP...

  8. Whole Brain Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Margaret

    1983-01-01

    The educational implications of recent brain research suggest that schools should emphasize activities that balance right and left hemisphere functions in order to encourage students' creativity. Some techniques currently in favor for achieving balance are synectics, multisensory and experiential learning, creative thinking methods, and the…

  9. Cerebral Blood Flow Measured with 3D Pseudocontinuous Arterial Spin-labeling MR Imaging in Alzheimer Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnewijzend, M.A.A.; Kuijer, J.P.A.; Benedictus, M.R.; van der Flier, W.M.; Wink, A.M.; Wattjes, M.P.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Scheltens, P.; Barkhof, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) values in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and subjects with subjective complaints by using a whole-brain three-dimensional (3D) pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling (ASL) technique at

  10. Reconstruction and flux analysis of coupling between metabolic pathways of astrocytes and neurons: application to cerebral hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akιn Ata

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a daunting task to identify all the metabolic pathways of brain energy metabolism and develop a dynamic simulation environment that will cover a time scale ranging from seconds to hours. To simplify this task and make it more practicable, we undertook stoichiometric modeling of brain energy metabolism with the major aim of including the main interacting pathways in and between astrocytes and neurons. Model The constructed model includes central metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, lipid metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS detoxification, amino acid metabolism (synthesis and catabolism, the well-known glutamate-glutamine cycle, other coupling reactions between astrocytes and neurons, and neurotransmitter metabolism. This is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive attempt at stoichiometric modeling of brain metabolism to date in terms of its coverage of a wide range of metabolic pathways. We then attempted to model the basal physiological behaviour and hypoxic behaviour of the brain cells where astrocytes and neurons are tightly coupled. Results The reconstructed stoichiometric reaction model included 217 reactions (184 internal, 33 exchange and 216 metabolites (183 internal, 33 external distributed in and between astrocytes and neurons. Flux balance analysis (FBA techniques were applied to the reconstructed model to elucidate the underlying cellular principles of neuron-astrocyte coupling. Simulation of resting conditions under the constraints of maximization of glutamate/glutamine/GABA cycle fluxes between the two cell types with subsequent minimization of Euclidean norm of fluxes resulted in a flux distribution in accordance with literature-based findings. As a further validation of our model, the effect of oxygen deprivation (hypoxia on fluxes was simulated using an FBA-derivative approach, known as minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA. The results show the power of the

  11. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Choi, Clara Y.H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, California (United States); Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Hancock, Steven L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  12. Microstructural changes of whole brain in patients with comitant strabismus: evidence from a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang X

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,2,* Hai-Jun Li,3,* Ying Zhang,1 De-Chang Peng,3 Pei-Hong Hu,1 Yu-Lin Zhong,1 Fu-Qing Zhou,3 Yi Shao1 1Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The First People’s Hospital of Jiujiang City, Jiujiang, 3Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD using a diffusion tensor imaging technique and whole-brain voxel-based analysis in patients with comitant strabismus.Patients and methods: A total of 19 (nine males and ten females patients with comitant strabismus and 19 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs underwent magnetic resonance imaging examination. Imaging data were analyzed using two-sample t-tests to identify group differences in FA and MD values. Patients with comitant strabismus were distinguishable from HCs by receiver operating characteristic curves.Results: Compared with HCs, patients with comitant strabismus exhibited significantly decreased FA values in the brain regions of the left superior temporal gyrus and increased values in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, right globus pallidus/brainstem, and bilateral precuneus. Meanwhile, MD value was significantly reduced in the brain regions of the bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe and left middle frontal gyrus but increased in the brain regions of the right middle frontal gyrus and left anterior cingulate.Conclusion: These results suggest significant brain abnormalities in comitant strabismus, which may underlie the pathologic mechanisms of fusion defects and ocular motility disorders in patients with comitant strabismus. Keywords: comitant strabismus, diffusion tensor imaging, mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, resting state

  13. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartford, Alan C., E-mail: Alan.C.Hartford@Hitchcock.org [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Paravati, Anthony J. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Spire, William J. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Li, Zhongze [Biostatistics Shared Resource, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Jarvis, Lesley A. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Fadul, Camilo E. [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Rhodes, C. Harker [Department of Pathology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Erkmen, Kadir [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Friedman, Jonathan [Department of Surgery, Texas A and M College of Medicine, College Station, Texas (United States); Gladstone, David J. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Hug, Eugen B. [ProCure, New York, New York (United States); Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  14. Multi-institutional Nomogram Predicting Survival Free From Salvage Whole Brain Radiation After Radiosurgery in Patients With Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorovets, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Perlmutter Cancer Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Ayala-Peacock, Diandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Tybor, David J. [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rava, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Ebner, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Cielo, Deus; Norén, Georg [Department of Neurosurgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Chan, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Hepel, Jaroslaw T., E-mail: jhepel@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Optimal patient selection for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as the initial treatment for brain metastases is complicated and controversial. This study aimed to develop a nomogram that predicts survival without salvage whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) after upfront SRS. Methods and Materials: Multi-institutional data were analyzed from 895 patients with 2095 lesions treated with SRS without prior or planned WBRT. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to identify independent pre-SRS predictors of WBRT-free survival, which were integrated to build a nomogram that was subjected to bootstrap validation. Results: Median WBRT-free survival was 8 months (range, 0.1-139 months). Significant independent predictors for inferior WBRT-free survival were age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.1 for each 10-year increase), HER2(−) breast cancer (HR 1.6 relative to other histologic features), colorectal cancer (HR 1.4 relative to other histologic features), increasing number of brain metastases (HR 1.09, 1.32, 1.37, and 1.87 for 2, 3, 4, and 5+ lesions, respectively), presence of neurologic symptoms (HR 1.26), progressive systemic disease (HR 1.35), and increasing extracranial disease burden (HR 1.31 for oligometastatic and HR 1.56 for widespread). Additionally, HER2(+) breast cancer (HR 0.81) and melanoma (HR 1.11) trended toward significance. The independently weighted hazard ratios were used to create a nomogram to display estimated probabilities of 6-month and 12-month WBRT-free survival with a corrected Harrell's C concordance statistic of 0.62. Conclusions: Our nomogram can be used at initial evaluation to help select patients best suited for upfront SRS for brain metastases while reducing expense and morbidity in patients who derive minimal or no benefit.

  15. Prognostic factors in patients with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer treated with whole-brain radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Mori, Keita; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Nakasu, Yoko; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors associated with overall survival (OS) in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastasis who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). This study included 264 consecutive NSCLC patients with brain metastasis who received WBRT. Patients with leptomeningeal metastasis and those who underwent craniotomy or stereotactic radiotherapy before WBRT were excluded. The evaluated prognostic factors for OS included gender, neurological deficit, histology, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status, previous cytotoxic chemotherapy, previous EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) score. All factors with a P < 0.05 in univariate analysis were entered into multivariate analysis using Cox regression and a confidence interval of 99%. Two hundred thirty patients had died, 14 patients were alive, and 20 patients were lost to follow-up. The median follow-up time was 20.9 months. The median survival time was 5.5 months (95% confidence interval; 4.8-6.3). Univariate analysis showed that gender, neurological deficit, histology, EGFR mutation status, RPA class, and DS-GPA score were significant prognostic factors for OS. In multivariate analysis, RPA class and histology were found to be significant prognostic factors for OS, with P values of 0.0039 and 0.0014, respectively. RPA Class I or II (Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70) and adenocarcinoma histology were associated with longer OS. These factors should be taken into account when considering indication for WBRT.

  16. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junie P Warrington

    Full Text Available Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia or 21% oxygen (normoxia for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  17. Accelerated whole brain intracranial vessel wall imaging using black blood fast spin echo with compressed sensing (CS-SPACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Tian, Bing; Chen, Luguang; Eisenmenger, Laura; Raithel, Esther; Forman, Christoph; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Jing; Hess, Christopher; Saloner, David

    2017-12-05

    Develop and optimize an accelerated, high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic) 3D black blood MRI technique to reduce scan time for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall imaging. A 3D accelerated T 1 -weighted fast-spin-echo prototype sequence using compressed sensing (CS-SPACE) was developed at 3T. Both the acquisition [echo train length (ETL), under-sampling factor] and reconstruction parameters (regularization parameter, number of iterations) were first optimized in 5 healthy volunteers. Ten patients with a variety of intracranial vascular disease presentations (aneurysm, atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis) were imaged with SPACE and optimized CS-SPACE, pre and post Gd contrast. Lumen/wall area, wall-to-lumen contrast ratio (CR), enhancement ratio (ER), sharpness, and qualitative scores (1-4) by two radiologists were recorded. The optimized CS-SPACE protocol has ETL 60, 20% k-space under-sampling, 0.002 regularization factor with 20 iterations. In patient studies, CS-SPACE and conventional SPACE had comparable image scores both pre- (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 3.54 ± 0.65, p = 0.13) and post-contrast (3.72 ± 0.58 vs. 3.53 ± 0.57, p = 0.15), but the CS-SPACE acquisition was 37% faster (6:48 vs. 10:50). CS-SPACE agreed with SPACE for lumen/wall area, ER measurements and sharpness, but marginally reduced the CR. In the evaluation of intracranial vascular disease, CS-SPACE provides a substantial reduction in scan time compared to conventional T 1 -weighted SPACE while maintaining good image quality.

  18. Whole-brain grey matter density predicts balance stability irrespective of age and protects older adults from falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P; Cheval, Boris; van Ruitenbeek, Peter; Levin, Oron; Renaud, Olivier; Chanal, Julien; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2016-03-01

    Functional and structural imaging studies have demonstrated the involvement of the brain in balance control. Nevertheless, how decisive grey matter density and white matter microstructural organisation are in predicting balance stability, and especially when linked to the effects of ageing, remains unclear. Standing balance was tested on a platform moving at different frequencies and amplitudes in 30 young and 30 older adults, with eyes open and with eyes closed. Centre of pressure variance was used as an indicator of balance instability. The mean density of grey matter and mean white matter microstructural organisation were measured using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging, respectively. Mixed-effects models were built to analyse the extent to which age, grey matter density, and white matter microstructural organisation predicted balance instability. Results showed that both grey matter density and age independently predicted balance instability. These predictions were reinforced when the level of difficulty of the conditions increased. Furthermore, grey matter predicted balance instability beyond age and at least as consistently as age across conditions. In other words, for balance stability, the level of whole-brain grey matter density is at least as decisive as being young or old. Finally, brain grey matter appeared to be protective against falls in older adults as age increased the probability of losing balance in older adults with low, but not moderate or high grey matter density. No such results were observed for white matter microstructural organisation, thereby reinforcing the specificity of our grey matter findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Folate receptor alpha defect causes cerebral folate transport deficiency: a treatable neurodegenerative disorder associated with disturbed myelin metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinfeld, R.; Grapp, M.; Kraetzner, R.; Dreha-Kulaczewski, S.; Helms, G.; Dechent, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Grosso, S.; Gartner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Sufficient folate supplementation is essential for a multitude of biological processes and diverse organ systems. At least five distinct inherited disorders of folate transport and metabolism are presently known, all of which cause systemic folate deficiency. We identified an inherited

  20. A whole-brain computational modeling approach to explain the alterations in resting-state functional connectivity during progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, Murat; Falcon, Carles; Tucholka, Alan; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Molinuevo, José Luis; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementia with dramatic consequences. The research in structural and functional neuroimaging showed altered brain connectivity in AD. In this study, we investigated the whole-brain resting state functional connectivity (FC) of the subjects with preclinical Alzheimer's disease (PAD), mild cognitive impairment due to AD (MCI) and mild dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD), the impact of APOE4 carriership, as well as in relation to variations in core AD CSF biomarkers. The synchronization in the whole-brain was monotonously decreasing during the course of the disease progression. Furthermore, in AD patients we found widespread significant decreases in functional connectivity (FC) strengths particularly in the brain regions with high global connectivity. We employed a whole-brain computational modeling approach to study the mechanisms underlying these alterations. To characterize the causal interactions between brain regions, we estimated the effective connectivity (EC) in the model. We found that the significant EC differences in AD were primarily located in left temporal lobe. Then, we systematically manipulated the underlying dynamics of the model to investigate simulated changes in FC based on the healthy control subjects. Furthermore, we found distinct patterns involving CSF biomarkers of amyloid-beta (Aβ1 - 42) total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). CSF Aβ1 - 42 was associated to the contrast between healthy control subjects and clinical groups. Nevertheless, tau CSF biomarkers were associated to the variability in whole-brain synchronization and sensory integration regions. These associations were robust across clinical groups, unlike the associations that were found for CSF Aβ1 - 42. APOE4 carriership showed no significant correlations with the connectivity measures.

  1. Voxel-based analysis of whole-brain effects of age and gender on dopamine transporter SPECT imaging in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eusebio, Alexandre; Azulay, Jean-Philippe [APHM, Hopital de la Timone, Service de Neurologie et Pathologie du Mouvement, Marseille (France); CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ, Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone, Marseille (France); Ceccaldi, Mathieu [APHM, Hopital de la Timone, Service de Neurologie et de Neuropsychologie, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille Univ, UMR Inserm 1106, Institut de Neurosciences des Systemes, Marseille (France); Girard, Nadine [APHM, Hopital de la Timone, Service de Neuroradiologie diagnostique et interventionnelle, Marseille (France); Mundler, Olivier [APHM, Hopital de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille Univ, CERIMED, Marseille (France); Guedj, Eric [CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ, Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone, Marseille (France); APHM, Hopital de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille Univ, CERIMED, Marseille (France)

    2012-11-15

    Several studies have shown age- and gender-related differences in striatal dopamine transporter (DaT) binding. These studies were based on a striatal region on interest approach that may have underestimated these effects and could not evaluate extrastriatal regions. Our aim was to determine the effects at the voxel level of age and gender on whole-brain DaT distribution using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT in healthy subjects. We performed a whole-brain [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT voxel-based analysis using SPM8 and a standardized normalization template (p < 0.05, corrected using the false discovery rate method) in 51 healthy subjects aged from 21 to 79 years. We found an age-related DaT binding decrease in the striatum, anterior cingulate/medial frontal cortices and insulo-opercular cortices. Also DaT binding ratios were higher in women than men in the striatum and opercular cortices. This study showed both striatal and extrastriatal age-related and gender-related differences in DaT binding in healthy subjects using a whole-brain voxel-based non-a priori approach. These differences highlight the need for careful age and gender matching in DaT analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders. (orig.)

  2. Design and implementation of embedded 8-channel receive-only arrays for whole-brain MRI and fMRI of conscious awake marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoti, Daniel; Yen, Cecil Chern-Chyi; Hung, Chia-Chun; Ciuchta, Jennifer; Leopold, David A; Silva, Afonso C

    2017-07-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate of increasing interest to neuroscience and in translational brain research. The present work describes the design and implementation of individualized 8-channel receive-only radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays that provide whole-brain coverage and allow anatomical and functional MRI experiments in conscious, awake marmosets. The coil arrays were designed with their elements embedded inside individualized restraint helmets. The size, geometry, and arrangement of the coil elements were optimized to allow whole-brain coverage. Coil-to-coil decoupling was achieved by a combination of geometric decoupling and low input impedance preamplifiers. The performance of the embedded arrays was compared against that of one 8-channel receive-only array built to fit the external surface of the helmets. Three individualized helmets with embedded coil arrays were built for three marmosets. Whole-brain coverage was achieved with high sensitivity extending over the entire cortex. Visual stimulation of conscious awake marmosets elicited robust BOLD fMRI responses in both primary and higher order visual areas of the occipitotemporal cortex. The high sensitivity provided by embedded receive-only coil arrays allows both anatomical and functional MRI data to be obtained with high spatial resolution in conscious, awake marmosets. Magn Reson Med 78:387-398, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Aberrant Functional Connectivity Architecture in Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Whole-Brain, Data-Driven Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to investigate whether the whole-brain functional connectivity pattern exhibits disease severity-related alterations in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired in 27 MCI subjects, 35 AD patients, and 27 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal cognition (NC. Interregional functional connectivity was assessed based on a predefined template which parcellated the brain into 90 regions. Altered whole-brain functional connectivity patterns were identified via connectivity comparisons between the AD and NC subjects. Finally, the relationship between functional connectivity strength and cognitive ability according to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE was evaluated in the MCI and AD groups. Compared with the NC group, the AD group exhibited decreased functional connectivities throughout the brain. The most significantly affected regions included several important nodes of the default mode network and the temporal lobe. Moreover, changes in functional connectivity strength exhibited significant associations with disease severity-related alterations in the AD and MCI groups. The present study provides novel evidence and will facilitate meta-analysis of whole-brain analyses in AD and MCI, which will be critical to better understand the neural basis of AD.

  4. Differential regional cerebral glucose metabolism in clinical syndromes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a study with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. M.; Cho, S. S.; Na, D. L.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E. [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration( FTLD) is the third most common dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neurobehavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patient with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. We analysed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral premotor are was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical features of FTLD syndromes. These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD.

  5. Rhinal hypometabolism on FDG PET in healthy APO-E4 carriers: impact on memory function and metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didic, Mira; Felician, Olivier; Gour, Natalina; Ceccaldi, Mathieu [Pole de Neurosciences Cliniques, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, AP-HM, Service de Neurologie and Neuropsychologie, Marseille (France); Aix Marseille Universite, Inserm, INS UMRS 1106, Marseille (France); Bernard, Rafaelle; Pecheux, Christophe [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, AP-HM, et INSERM UMRS 910: ' ' Genetique Medicale et Genomique fonctionnelle' ' , Departement de Genetique Medicale, Marseille (France); Mundler, Olivier; Guedj, Eric [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, AP-HM, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France); Aix Marseille Universite, CERIMED, CNRS UMR7289, INT, Marseille (France); Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS UMR7289, INT, Marseille (France)

    2015-09-15

    The ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APO-E4) gene, a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), also modulates brain metabolism and function in healthy subjects. The aim of the present study was to explore cerebral metabolism using FDG PET in healthy APO-E4 carriers by comparing cognitively normal APO-E4 carriers to noncarriers and to assess if patterns of metabolism are correlated with performance on cognitive tasks. Moreover, metabolic connectivity patterns were established in order to assess if the organization of neural networks is influenced by genetic factors. Whole-brain PET statistical analysis was performed at voxel-level using SPM8 with a threshold of p < 0.005, corrected for volume, with age, gender and level of education as nuisance variables. Significant hypometabolism between APO-E4 carriers (n = 11) and noncarriers (n = 30) was first determined. Mean metabolic values with clinical/neuropsychological data were extracted at the individual level, and correlations were searched using Spearman's rank test in the whole group. To evaluate metabolic connectivity from metabolic cluster(s) previously identified in the intergroup comparison, voxel-wise interregional correlation analysis (IRCA) was performed between groups of subjects. APO-E4 carriers had reduced metabolism within the left anterior medial temporal lobe (MTL), where neuropathological changes first appear in AD, including the entorhinal and perirhinal cortices. A correlation between metabolism in this area and performance on the DMS48 (delayed matching to sample-48 items) was found, in line with converging evidence involving the perirhinal cortex in object-based memory. Finally, a voxel-wise IRCA revealed stronger metabolic connectivity of the MTL cluster with neocortical frontoparietal regions in carriers than in noncarriers, suggesting compensatory metabolic networks. Exploring cerebral metabolism using FDG PET can contribute to a better understanding of the influence of

  6. A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, Michigan (United States); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II' , Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Carrozza, Francesco [Department of Oncology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [Madre Teresa di Calcutta Hospice, Larino (Italy); Cantore, Giampaolo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Pozzilli (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Department of Radiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala (Uganda); and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

  7. Phase I/II trial of simultaneous whole-brain irradiation and dose-escalating topotecan for brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Eich, H.T.; Semrau, R.; Guener, S.A.; Mueller, R.P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: topotecan penetrates the blood-brain barrier and sensitizes tumor cells against radiation. A phase I/II dose-escalating trial of repetitive daily i.v. topotecan application simultaneously with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) was conducted to estimate toxicity, maximum tolerated dose and survival in patients with inoperable brain metastases. Patients and methods: in 47 patients suffering from previously untreated brain metastases, topotecan was applied on a daily i.v. schedule simultaneously with WBRT (36 Gy/3-Gy fractions). The infusion schedule started at the beginning of WBRT and was discontinued during weekends. Each infusion was completed within 1-2 h before irradiation. In a dose-finding study, topotecan was escalated from 5 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 8 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 12 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2} to 12 x 0.6 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: altogether, 38/47 patients (81%) completed the prescribed schedule. Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were dose-limiting. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity occurred in 5/32 chemonaive patients (16%) and 7/15 patients (47%) with previous chemotherapy. At 12 x 0.6 mg/m{sup 2}, 2/4 patients experienced grade 4 leukopenia/thrombopenia. Nonhematologic toxicities were generally mild to moderate and unrelated to topotecan. Response evaluation was possible in 26/47 patients, overall response rate was 58% (CR [complete remission] 5/26, PR [partial remission] 10/26, NC [no change] 8/26). Median survival amounted to 5.1 months. In 15/42 patients (36%), brain metastases were the dominant cause of death. Conclusion: for a daily topotecan schedule simultaneous to WBRT, the maximum tolerated dose is 12 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2} in chemonaive patients. For chemo-pretreated patients, daily doses should be reduced to 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}. A phase III trial has now been started to find out whether WBRT + topotecan increases survival compared to WBRT alone. (orig.)

  8. Radiological distribution of brain metastases and its implication for the hippocampus avoidance in whole brain radiotherapy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi-Min; Cai, Gang; Chai, Wei-Min; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Lu; Ou, Dan; Chen, Jia-Yi; Kirova, Youlia M

    2017-11-01

    Hippocampus avoidance in whole brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) offers the feasibility of less-impaired cognitive function than conventional WBRT. The study aims to assess the radiological distribution of brain metastases (BMs) with relation to the hippocampus and peri-hippocampus region as defined by the RTOG 0933 for better understanding of margin definition in HA-WBRT treatment planning. Consecutive patients with diagnosis of BM from enhanced MRI between March 2011 and July 2016 were analysed. The pre-treatment T1 weighted, T2 weighted, T2 flair, three-dimensional spoiled gradient axial and contrast-enhanced axial cranial MR images of 226 patients are examined. The closest distances between the edge of hippocampus and the margin of tumours on different planes were measured. A total of 226 patients with 1080 visible metastatic sites were reviewed. The origin of the primary tumors was in 72.6% lung (n = 164), in 45 cases (19.9%) breast cancer and in 7.5% other malignancies (n = 17). There were 758 (70.2%) lesions situated beyond the tentorium. The median size of single lesion was 13.9 ± 14.7 mm. Impossible, it seems that more of the patients are with only one lesion, to verify. The hippocampus involvement was found in 3.1% (n = 7, 95% CI 0.01-0.05) within 5 mm, 5.7% (n = 13, 95% CI 0.03-0.09) within 10mm and 8.4% (n = 19, 95% CI 0.05-0.12) within 20 mm. In multivariate analysis, the number 6 BM or higher was found to be an independent risk factor for hippocampal involvement (HI) (OR: 5.2, 5.38 and 3.84 in 5, 10 and 20 mm). This radiological study found that the incidence of hippocampus involvement is low in patients with BM. HA-WBRT can be delivered under the context of complete radiological diagnosis after careful delineation, proper margin definition and individual planning optimization. Advances in knowledge: The incidence of HI in patients with initial diagnosis of BM from solid tumours impacts the radiotherapeutic decision. Our radiological data analysed the

  9. Elevated global cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction and unchanged metabolic rate of oxygen in young adults with end-stage renal disease: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang; Lou, Yaxian; Pan, Zhiying; Liu, Ya [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, College of Aivil Aviation, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wen, Jiqiu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe [Medical School of Nanjing University, National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lu, Hanzhang [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Advanced Imaging Research Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Liu, Wei [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Liu, Hui [Siemens MR NEA Collaboration, Siemens Ltd., Shanghai (China); Chen, Huijuan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Jiang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-06-15

    To noninvasively assess global cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) in young adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-six patients and 38 healthy volunteers were included and took part in MR examinations, blood and neuropsychological tests. CBF and OEF were measured by phase-contrast and T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI techniques, respectively. CMRO{sub 2} was computed from CBF, OEF and hematocrit according to Fick's principle. Correlations were performed between MR measurements, blood biochemistry measurements and neuropsychological test scores. Compared with controls, ESRD patients had elevated CBF (72.9 ± 12.5 vs. 63.8 ± 8.5 ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P < 0.001), elevated OEF (47.2 ± 10.2 vs. 35.8 ± 5.4 %, P < 0.001), but unaffected CMRO{sub 2} (199.5 ± 36.4 vs. 193.8 ± 28.6 μmol O{sub 2} min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P = 0.879). Hematocrit negatively correlated with CBF (r = -0.640, P < 0.001) and OEF (r = -0.701, P < 0.001), but not with CMRO{sub 2}. Altered neuropsychological test scores of ESRD patients were associated with OEF and CBF, but not with CMRO{sub 2}. There were weak relationships between eGFR and hematocrit (r = 0.308, P = 0.068) or CBF (r = 0.318, P = 0.059). Our findings suggested that anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF to maintain a normal CMRO{sub 2}. Despite this compensatory process, however, cognitive function was still impaired and its severity was correlated with their CBF and OEF abnormality. (orig.)

  10. Scaling of brain metabolism with a fixed energy budget per neuron: implications for neuronal activity, plasticity and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    Full Text Available It is usually considered that larger brains have larger neurons, which consume more energy individually, and are therefore accompanied by a larger number of glial cells per neuron. These notions, however, have never been tested. Based on glucose and oxygen metabolic rates in awake animals and their recently determined numbers of neurons, here I show that, contrary to the expected, the estimated glucose use per neuron is remarkably constant, varying only by 40% across the six species of rodents and primates (including humans. The estimated average glucose use per neuron does not correlate with neuronal density in any structure. This suggests that the energy budget of the whole brain per neuron is fixed across species and brain sizes, such that total glucose use by the brain as a whole, by the cerebral cortex and also by the cerebellum alone are linear functions of the number of neurons in the structures across the species (although the average glucose consumption per neuron is at least 10× higher in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum. These results indicate that the apparently remarkable use in humans of 20% of the whole body energy budget by a brain that represents only 2% of body mass is explained simply by its large number of neurons. Because synaptic activity is considered the major determinant of metabolic cost, a conserved energy budget per neuron has several profound implications for synaptic homeostasis and the regulation of firing rates, synaptic plasticity, brain imaging, pathologies, and for brain scaling in evolution.

  11. Mapping of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen using dynamic susceptibility contrast and blood oxygen level dependent MR imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersing, Alexandra S.; Schwaiger, Benedikt J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ankenbrank, Monika; Toth, Vivien; Bauer, Jan S.; Zimmer, Claus [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Insa [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Kooijman, Hendrik [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Wunderlich, Silke [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Preibisch, Christine [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    MR-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO{sub 2}) has been suggested to be analogous to PET-derived CMRO{sub 2} and therefore may be used for detection of viable tissue at risk for infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} mapping in acute ischemic stroke in relation to established diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. In 23 patients (mean age 63 ± 18.7 years, 11 women) with imaging findings for acute ischemic stroke, relative oxygen extraction fraction was calculated from quantitative transverse relaxation times (T2, T2*) and relative cerebral blood volume using a quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) approach in order to detect a local increase of deoxyhemoglobin. Relative CMRO{sub 2} (rCMRO{sub 2}) maps were calculated by multiplying relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) by cerebral blood flow, derived from PWI. After co-registration, rCMRO{sub 2} maps were evaluated in comparison with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps. Mean rCMRO{sub 2} values in areas with diffusion-restriction or TTP/ADC mismatch were compared with rCMRO{sub 2} values in the contralateral tissue. In tissue with diffusion restriction, mean rCMRO{sub 2} values were significantly decreased compared to perfusion-impaired (17.9 [95 % confidence interval 10.3, 25.0] vs. 58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3]; P < 0.001) and tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (68.2 [95 % confidence interval 61.4, 75.0]; P < 0.001). rCMRO{sub 2} in perfusion-impaired tissue showed no significant change compared to tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3] vs. 66.7 [95 % confidence interval 53.4, 73.4]; P = 0.34). MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} was decreased within diffusion-restricted tissue and stable within perfusion-impaired tissue, suggesting that this technique may be adequate to reveal different pathophysiological stages in acute stroke. (orig.)

  12. Ataque cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi Tan, Yuri; Fundación Valle de Lili

    1998-01-01

    ¿Qué es un ataque cerebral?/¿Qué tipos de ataque cerebral existen?/¿Cuáles son los síntomas de un ataque cerebral?/Factores de riesgo para un ataque cerebral/Tratamiento médico del ataque cerebral/¿por qué es importante acudir temprano cuando se presentan las señales de alarma?/ Manejo preventivo del ataque cerebral isquémico/Tratamiento quirúrgico del ataque cerebral/Enfermedad vascular cerebral hemorrágica/¿Cómo está constituido el grupo de ataque cerebral de la fundación Clínica Valle d...

  13. Changes of Cerebral Perfusion and Functional Brain Network Organization in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Wutao; Shi, Lin; Wong, Adrian; Chu, Winnie C W; Mok, Vincent C T; Wang, Defeng

    2016-08-10

    Disruptions of the functional brain network and cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been revealed in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the neurophysiological mechanism of hypoperfusion as well as the reorganization of the intrinsic whole brain network due to the neuropathology of MCI are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the changes of CBF and the whole brain network organization in MCI by using a multimodal MRI approach. Resting state ASL MRI and BOLD MRI were used to evaluate disruptions of CBF and underlying functional connectivity in 27 patients with MCI and 35 cognitive normal controls (NC). The eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) was used to assess the whole brain network reorganization in MCI, and a seed-based ECM approach was proposed to reveal the contributions of the whole brain network on the ECM alterations. Significantly decreased perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex as well as its connectivity within the default mode network and occipital cortex were found in the MCI group compared to the NC group. The ECM analysis revealed decreased EC in the middle cingulate cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, and increased EC in the right calcarine sulcus, superior temporal gyrus, and supplementary motor area in the MCI group. The results of this study indicate that there are deficits in cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity in the default mode network, and that sensory-processing networks might play a compensatory role to make up for the decreased connections in MCI.

  14. ''Ecstasy''-induced changes of cerebral glucose metabolism and their correlation to acute psychopathology. A 18-FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreckenberger, M.; Sabri, O.; Arning, C.; Zimny, M.; Zeggel, T.; Wagenknecht, G.; Kaiser, H.J.; Buell, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E.; Sass, H. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Psychiatry

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute effects of the 'Ecstasy' analogue MDE (3,4-methylene dioxyethamphetamine) on cerebral glucose metabolism (rMRGlu) of healthy volunteers and to correlate neurometabolism with acute psychopathology. In a radomized double-blind trial, 15 healthy volunteers without a history of drug abuse were examined with fluorine-18-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) 110-120 min after oral administration of 2 mg/kg MDE (n=7) or placebo (n=8). Two minutes prior to radiotracer injection, constant cognitive stimulation was started and maintained for 32 min using a word repetition paradigm to ensure constant and comparable mental conditions during cerebral glucose uptake. Individual brain anatomy was represented using T1-weighted 3D flash magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), followed by manual regionalization into 108 regions of interest and PET/MRI overlay. After absolute quantification of rMR-Glu and normalization to global metabolism, normalized rMRGlu under MDE was compared to placebo using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Acute psychopathology was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and rMRGlu was correlated to PANSS scores according to Spearman. MDE subjects showed significantly decreased rMRGlu in the bilateral frontal cortex: left frontal posterior (-7.1%, P<0.05) and right prefrontal superior (-4.6%, P<0.05). On the other hand, rMR-Glu was significantly increased in the bilateral cerebellum (right: +10.1%, P<0.05; left: +7.6%, P<0.05) and in the right putamen (+6.2%, P<0.05). There were positive correlations between rMRGlu in the middle right cingulate and grandiosity (r=0.87; P<0.05), both the right amygadala (r=0.90, P<0.01) and the left posterior cingulate (r=0.90, P<0.01) to difficulties in abstract thinking, and the right frontal inferior (r=0.85, P<0.05), right anterior cingulate (r=0.93, P<0.01), and left anterior cingulate (r=0.85, P<0.05) to attentional deficits. A

  15. Brain docosahexaenoic acid [DHA] incorporation and blood flow are increased in chronic alcoholics: a positron emission tomography study corrected for cerebral atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Umhau

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol dependence has been associated with disturbed behavior, cerebral atrophy and a low plasma concentration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22∶6n-3, particularly if liver disease is present. In animal models, excessive alcohol consumption is reported to reduce brain DHA concentration, suggesting disturbed brain DHA metabolism. We hypothesized that brain DHA metabolism also is abnormal in chronic alcoholics.We compared 15 non-smoking chronic alcoholics, studied within 7 days of their last drink, with 22 non-smoking healthy controls. Using published neuroimaging methods with positron emission tomography (PET, we measured regional coefficients (K* and rates (J(in of DHA incorporation from plasma into the brain of each group using [1-(11C]DHA, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF using [(15O]water. Data were partial volume error corrected for brain atrophy. Plasma unesterified DHA concentration also was quantified.Mean K* for DHA was significantly and widely elevated by 10-20%, and rCBF was elevated by 7%-34%, in alcoholics compared with controls. Unesterified plasma DHA did not differ significantly between groups nor did whole brain J(in, the product of K* and unesterified plasma DHA concentration.Significantly higher values of K* for DHA in alcoholics indicate increased brain avidity for DHA, thus a brain DHA metabolic deficit vis-à-vis plasma DHA availability. Higher rCBF in alcoholics suggests increased energy consumption. These changes may reflect a hypermetabolic state related to early alcohol withdrawal, or a general brain metabolic change in chronic alcoholics.

  16. [Changes after dynamic observation of ultrastructural cerebral infarction in renovascular hypertensive rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y; Huang, R; Su, Z; Lin, J; Li, J

    2000-06-01

    To study the ultrastructural damages of brain tissues dynamically after middle cerebral artery obstruction (MCAO). A middle cerebral artery obstruction (MCAO) model was reproduced in renal vascular hypertensive rats (RHR). Brain tissues in different locations were collected for eight times in row, from two hours to seven days after establishment of the animal model. The changes occurred in the whole brain after focal cerebral ischemia. The severity of impairment and time of emergence differed with the location sampled. The earliest in the infarcted region with necrosis was considered the major change and completely irreversible damage. The next was seen in marginal regions, mainly with microvascular collapse, formation of microthrombi, and partial necrosis of brain cells and was considered partially reversible damage. The last was in distant and contralateral hemisphere, mainly with reversible swelling of endothelial cells and astrocytes. Changes in the MCAO models reproduced by RHR models were much similar to the clinical pathological changes in cerebral infarction based on the hypertensive cerebrovascular impairment, and it was regarded as a relatively ideal model for studying focal ischemic cerebral impairment. Dynamic changes of cerebral ultrastructure in which microvascular impairment plays an important role suggest that clinical therapy cannot only be focused on infarction foci, but also on the whole brain with comprehensively effective measurements.

  17. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle.......3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12-23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast...... venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However...

  18. Whole-brain 320-detector row dynamic volume CT perfusion detected crossed cerebellar diaschisis after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jun; Chen, Wei-jian; Wang, Mei-hao; Li, Jian-ce; Zhang, Qian; Xia, Neng-zhi; Yang, Yun-jun [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou (China); Wu, Gui-yun [Cleveland Clinics Foundation, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cheng, Jing-liang; Zhang, Yong [Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou (China); Zhuge, Qichuan [Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou (China)

    2014-11-09

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of 320-detector row CT used to detect crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) in patients with unilateral supratentorial spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH). We investigated 62 of 156 patients with unilateral supratentorial SICH using 320-detector row CT scanning. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (rMTT), and time to peak (rTTP) levels were measured in different regions of interest (ROIs) that were manually outlined on computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for the cerebrum, including normal-appearing brain tissue that surrounded the perilesional low-density area (NA) and the perihematomal low-density area (PA) in all patients and the cerebellum (ipsilateral and contralateral) in CCD-positive patients. Of 62 cases, a total of 14 met the criteria for CCD due to cerebellar perfusion asymmetry on CTP maps. In the quantitative analysis, significant differences were found in the perfusion parameters between the contralateral and ipsilateral cerebellum in CCD-positive cases. No significant differences were found between the CCD-positive group and the CCD-negative group according to the hematoma volume, NIHSS scores, and cerebral perfusion abnormality (each P > 0.05). The correlation analysis of the degree of NA, PA perfusion abnormality, and the degree of CCD severity showed negative and significant linear correlations (R, -0.66∝-0.56; P < 0.05). 320-detector row CT is a robust and practicable method for the comprehensive primary imaging work-up of CCD in unilateral supratentorial SICH patients. (orig.)

  19. Whole brain irradiation in case of brain metastases in from 2005 to 2011 in the clinic for nuclear medicine of the university hospital Freiburg; Ganzhirnbestrahlung bei Hirnmetastasen von 2005 bis 2011 in der Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde des Universitaetsklinikums Freiburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintz, Mandy

    2017-10-01

    Brain metastases are the largest group of brain tumors. Their occurrence influences the overall survival and the quality of life. The retrospective study deals with the overall survival, the local tumor control and the prognostic factors of patients treated with whole brain irradiation. The data were evaluated using multivariate analysis. Whole brain irradiation has shown to be an efficient therapy option for patients with brain metastases and has the possibility to improve the overall progress-free survival and the symptom control.

  20. Whole brain irradiation with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Local tumour control and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlke, Oliver; Wucherpfennig, David; Prokic, Vesna [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Fels, Franziska [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); St. Josefs Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenburg (Germany); Frings, Lars [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Freiburg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Egger, Karl [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Weyerbrock, Astrid [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg (Germany); Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-01-16

    Hippocampal-avoidance whole brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT) for multiple brain metastases may prevent treatment-related cognitive decline, compared to standard WBRT. Additionally, simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) on individual metastases may further improve the outcome. Here, we present initial data concerning local tumour control (LTC), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity and safety for this new irradiation technique. Twenty patients, enrolled between 2011 and 2013, were treated with HA-WBRT (30 Gy in 12 fractions, D{sub 98} {sub %} to hippocampus ≤ 9 Gy) and a SIB (51 Gy) on multiple (2-13) metastases using a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) approach based on 2-4 arcs. Metastases were evaluated bidimensionally along the two largest diameters in contrast-enhanced three-dimensional T1-weighed MRI. Median follow-up was 40 weeks. The median time to progression of boosted metastases has not been reached yet, corresponding to a LTC rate of 73 %. Median intracranial PFS was 40 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year PFS of 45.3 %. Median OS was 71.5 weeks, corresponding to a 1-year OS of 60 %. No obvious acute or late toxicities grade > 2 (NCI CTCAE v4.03) were observed. D{sub mean} to the bilateral hippocampi was 6.585 Gy ± 0.847 (α/β = 2 Gy). Two patients developed a new metastasis in the area of hippocampal avoidance. HA-WBRT (simultaneous integrated protection, SIP) with SIB to metastases is a safe and tolerable regime that shows favorable LTC for patients with multiple brain metastases, while it has the potential to minimize the side-effect of cognitive deterioration. (orig.) [German] Die Hippocampus-schonende Ganzhirnbestrahlung (HS-GHB) kann im Vergleich zur Standard-GHB die Verschlechterung der neurokognitiven Funktion verhindern. Zusaetzlich vermag ein simultan integrierter Boost (SIB) auf die Metastasen die Prognose der betroffenen Patienten weiter zu verbessern. In dieser Studie praesentieren wir erste Ergebnisse

  1. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  2. Moderate hyperventilation during intravenous anesthesia increases net cerebral lactate efflux

    OpenAIRE

    Grüne, Frank; Kazmaier, Stephan; Sonntag, Barbara; Stolker, Robert; Weyland, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND:: Hyperventilation is known to decrease cerebral blood flow (CBF) and to impair cerebral metabolism, but the threshold in patients undergoing intravenous anesthesia is unknown. The authors hypothesized that reduced CBF associated with moderate hyperventilation might impair cerebral aerobic metabolism in patients undergoing intravenous anesthesia. METHODS:: Thirty male patients scheduled for coronary surgery were included in a prospective, controlled crossover trial. Mea...

  3. Changes in cerebral metabolism during ketogenic diet in patients with primary brain tumors: 1H-MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzi, Moran; Liberman, Gilad; Vaisman, Nachum; Bokstein, Felix; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2017-04-01

    Normal brain cells depend on glucose metabolism, yet they have the flexibility to switch to the usage of ketone bodies during caloric restriction. In contrast, tumor cells lack genomic and metabolic flexibility and are largely dependent on glucose. Ketogenic-diet (KD) was suggested as a therapeutic option for malignant brain cancer. This study aimed to detect metabolic brain changes in patients with malignant brain gliomas on KD using proton magnetic-resonance-spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Fifty MR scans were performed longitudinally in nine patients: four patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GB) treated with KD in addition to bevacizumab; one patient with gliomatosis-cerebri treated with KD only; and four patients with recurrent GB who did not receive KD. MR scans included conventional imaging and 1H-MRS acquired from normal appearing-white-matter (NAWM) and lesion. High adherence to KD was obtained only in two patients, based on high urine ketones; in these two patients ketone bodies, Acetone and Acetoacetate were detected in four MR spectra-three within the NAWM and one in the lesion area -4 and 25 months following initiation of the diet. No ketone-bodies were detected in the control group. In one patient with gliomatosis-cerebri, who adhered to the diet for 3 years and showed stable disease, an increase in glutamin + glutamate and reduction in N-Acetyl-Aspartate and myo-inositol were detected during KD. 1H-MRS was able to detect ketone-bodies in patients with brain tumors who adhered to KD. Yet it remains unclear whether accumulation of ketone bodies is due to increased brain uptake or decreased utilization of ketone bodies within the brain.

  4. Quantification of serial changes in cerebral blood volume and metabolism in patients with recurrent glioblastoma undergoing antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.at [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical University Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1097 Vienna (Austria); Pichler, Petra [First Department of Internal Medicine, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Karl, Marianne [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Brandner, Sebastian [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lerch, Claudia [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria); Renner, Bertold [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Heinz, Gertraud [Institute of Medical Radiology, University Clinic of St. Pölten, Propst Führer-Straße 4, A-3100 St. Pölten (Austria)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Antiangiogenic therapy can lead to a decreased in CBV in normal brain tissue. • Responding and pseudoresponding lesions to AAT showed a similar CBV decrease. • Cho and NAA allowed for a distinction of responding and pseudoresponding lesions. • Cr ratios are not suited for evaluation of antiangiogenic therapy response. • Responders to AAT may have an increased risk for remote progression of the GBM. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of quantitative advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for assessment of antiangiogenic therapy (AAT) response in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: Eighteen patients with recurrent GBM received bevacizumab and 18 patients served as control group. Baseline MRI and two follow-up examinations were acquired every 3–5 months using dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI and {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopic imaging ({sup 1}H-MRSI). Maps of absolute cerebral blood volume (aCBV) were coregistered with choline (Cho) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) concentrations and compared to usually used relative parameters as well as controls. Results: Perfusion significantly decreased in responding and pseudoresponding GBMs but also in normal appearing brain after AAT onset. Cho and NAA concentrations were superior to Cr-ratios in lesion differentiation and showed a clear gap between responding and pseudoresponding lesions. Responders to AAT exceptionally frequently (6 out of 8 patients) showed remote GBM progression. Conclusions: Quantification of CBV reveals changes in normal brain perfusion due to AAT, which were not described so far. DSC perfusion MRI seems not to be suitable for differentiation between response and pseudoresponse to AAT. However, absolute quantification of brain metabolites may allow for distinction due to a clear gap at 6–9 months after therapy onset.

  5. Optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography using a 320-row MDCT volume scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaka, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kondo, Masatoshi; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Shimomiya, Yamato; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Funama, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    A 320-row multidetector CT (MDCT) is expected for a good artery-vein separation in terms of temporal resolution. However, a shortened scan duration may lead to insufficient vascular enhancement. We assessed the optimal scan timing for the artery-vein separation at whole-brain CT angiography (CTA) when bolus tracking was used at 320-row MDCT. We analyzed 60 patients, who underwent whole-brain four-dimensional CTA. Difference in CT attenuation between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the superior sagittal sinus (Datt) was calculated in each phase. Using a visual evaluation score for the depiction of arteries and veins, we calculated the difference between the mean score for the intracranial arteries and the mean score for the veins (Dscore). We assessed the time at which the maximum Datt and Dscore were simultaneously observed. The maximum Datt was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s and 18.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the contrast media arrival time at the ICA (Taa). The maximum Dscore was observed at 6.0 s and 8.0 s in the arterial-dominant phase and at 16.0 s in the venous-dominant phase after the Taa. There were no statistically significant differences in Datt (p = 0.375) or Dscore (p = 0.139) between these scan timings. The optimal scan timing for artery-vein separation at whole-brain CTA was 6.0 s or 8.0 s for the arteries and 16.0 s for the veins after the Taa. Advances in knowledge: Optimal scan timing allowed us to visualize intracranial arteries or veins with minimal superimposition.

  6. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yun Mi [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Nine patients with multiple ({>=}4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10- 12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application.

  7. Systematic survey of the design, statistical analysis, and reporting of studies published in the 2008 volume of the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, Hanna M; Vesterinen, Hanna V; Egan, Kieren; Deister, Amelie; Schlattmann, Peter; Macleod, Malcolm R; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2011-04-01

    Translating experimental findings into clinically effective therapies is one of the major bottlenecks of modern medicine. As this has been particularly true for cerebrovascular research, attention has turned to the quality and validity of experimental cerebrovascular studies. We set out to assess the study design, statistical analyses, and reporting of cerebrovascular research. We assessed all original articles published in the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism during the year 2008 against a checklist designed to capture the key attributes relating to study design, statistical analyses, and reporting. A total of 156 original publications were included (animal, in vitro, human). Few studies reported a primary research hypothesis, statement of purpose, or measures to safeguard internal validity (such as randomization, blinding, exclusion or inclusion criteria). Many studies lacked sufficient information regarding methods and results to form a reasonable judgment about their validity. In nearly 20% of studies, statistical tests were either not appropriate or information to allow assessment of appropriateness was lacking. This study identifies a number of factors that should be addressed if the quality of research in basic and translational biomedicine is to be improved. We support the widespread implementation of the ARRIVE (Animal Research Reporting In Vivo Experiments) statement for the reporting of experimental studies in biomedicine, for improving training in proper study design and analysis, and that reviewers and editors adopt a more constructively critical approach in the assessment of manuscripts for publication.

  8. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia. La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC.

  9. TU-AB-303-03: CBCT-Based On-Site Simulation, Planning, and Delivery (OSPD) for Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, A; Choe, K; Jiang, S; Timmerman, R; Choy, H; Pompos, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a CBCT-based on-site simulation, planning, and delivery (OSPD) for whole brain radiotherapy, in which all steps from imaging, planning to treatment delivery are performed at the treatment unit in one appointment time slot. This work serves as the proof of concept for future OSPD single fraction radiation therapy. Methods: An integrated on-site imaging, planning and delivery workflow was developed and tested for whole brain radiotherapy. An automated two-opposed-oblique-beam plan is created by utilizing the treatment planning system scripting and simple field-in-field IMRT. The IMRT plan is designed with maximum 8 control points to cover the target volume consisting of the brain to C1/C2 of the spinal cord, with dose homogeneity criteria from −5% to +7% of the prescription dose. Due to inaccuracy of reconstructed Hounsfield unit numbers in CBCT images, the dose distribution is calculated with non-heterogeneity correction introducing only clinically insignificant dose discrepancy. A coherent and synchronized workflow was designed for a team of attending physician, physicist, therapists, and dosimetrist to work closely with the ability to quickly modify, approve, and implement the treatment. Results: Thirty-one patients have been treated with this OSPD treatment, without compromising the plan quality compared to our regular clinically used parallel apposed 2D plans. The average time for these procedures are 48.02 ±11.55 minutes from the time patient entered the treatment room until s/he exited, and 35.09 ±10.35 minutes from starting CBCT until last beam delivered. This time duration is comparable to the net time when individual tasks are summed up during our regular CT- based whole brain planning and delivery. Conclusions: The OSPD whole brain treatment has been tested to be clinically feasible. The next step is to further improve the efficiency and to streamline the workflow. Other disease sites will be also tested with

  10. Analysis of structure-function network decoupling in the brain systems of spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongha; Pae, Chongwon; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Eun Sook; Cho, Sung-Rae; Um, Min-Hee; Lee, Seung-Koo; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Manifestation of the functionalities from the structural brain network is becoming increasingly important to understand a brain disease. With the aim of investigating the differential structure-function couplings according to network systems, we investigated the structural and functional brain networks of patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy with periventricular leukomalacia compared to healthy controls. The structural and functional networks of the whole brain and motor system, constructed using deterministic and probabilistic tractography of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images and Pearson and partial correlation analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance images, showed differential embedding of functional networks in the structural networks in patients. In the whole-brain network of patients, significantly reduced global network efficiency compared to healthy controls were found in the structural networks but not in the functional networks, resulting in reduced structural-functional coupling. On the contrary, the motor network of patients had a significantly lower functional network efficiency over the intact structural network and a lower structure-function coupling than the control group. This reduced coupling but reverse directionality in the whole-brain and motor networks of patients was prominent particularly between the probabilistic structural and partial correlation-based functional networks. Intact (or less deficient) functional network over impaired structural networks of the whole brain and highly impaired functional network topology over the intact structural motor network might subserve relatively preserved cognitions and impaired motor functions in cerebral palsy. This study suggests that the structure-function relationship, evaluated specifically using sparse functional connectivity, may reveal important clues to functional reorganization in cerebral palsy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5292-5306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  11. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate supports cerebral energy metabolism in pigs after ischemic brain injury caused by experimental particle embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakinen, Timo; Heikkinen, Janne; Dahlbacka, Sebastian; Alaoja, Hanna; Laurila, Päivi; Kiviluoma, Kai; Salomäki, Timo; Romsi, Pekka; Tuominen, Hannu; Biancari, Fausto; Lepola, Pasi; Nuutinen, Matti; Juvonen, Tatu

    2006-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FDP) is a high-energy intermediate that enhances glycolysis, preserves cellular adenosine triphosphate stores, and prevents the increase of intracellular calcium in ischemic tissue. Since it has been shown to provide metabolic support to the brain during ischemia, we planned this study to evaluate whether FDP is neuroprotective in the setting of combining hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and irreversible embolic brain ischemic injury. Twenty pigs were randomly assigned to receive 2 intravenous infusions of either FDP (500 mg/kg) or saline. The first infusion was given just before a 25-minute period of HCA and the second infusion immediately after HCA. Immediately before HCA, the descending aorta was clamped and 200 mg of albumin-coated polystyrene microspheres (250-750 mm in diameter) were injected into the isolated aortic arch in both study groups. There were no significant differences between the study groups in terms of neurological outcome. Brain lactate/pyruvate ratio was significantly lower (P = .015) and brain pyruvate levels (P = .013) were significantly higher in the FDP group compared with controls. Brain lactate levels were significantly higher 8 hours after HCA (P = .049). The administration of FDP before and immediately after HCA combined with embolic brain ischemic injury was associated with significantly lower brain lactate/pyruvate ratio and significantly higher levels of brain pyruvate, as well as lower lactate levels 8 hours after HCA. FDP seems to protect the brain by supporting energy metabolism. The neurological outcome was not improved, most likely resulting from the irreversible nature of the microsphere occlusion.

  12. Effects of Dopamine Infusion on Cerebral Blood Flow, Brain Cell Membrane Function and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Escherichia coli Meningitis in the Newborn Piglet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Won Soon; Chang, Yun Sil; Shim, Jae Won; Kim, Mi Jung; Ko, Sun Young; Kim, Sung Shin; Hwang, Jong Hee; Choi, Chang Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2003-01-01

    .... The decreased cerebral cortical cell membrane Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and increased lipid peroxidation products, indicative of meningitis-induced brain damage, were significantly attenuated by dopamine infusion...

  13. Moderate hyperventilation during intravenous anesthesia increases net cerebral lactate efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Grüne (Frank); S. Kazmaier (Stephan); B. Sonntag (Barbara); R.J. Stolker (Robert); A. Weyland (Andreas)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND:: Hyperventilation is known to decrease cerebral blood flow (CBF) and to impair cerebral metabolism, but the threshold in patients undergoing intravenous anesthesia is unknown. The authors hypothesized that reduced CBF associated with moderate hyperventilation might impair

  14. Report of whole-brain radiation therapy in a patient with an implanted deep brain stimulator: important neurosurgical considerations and radiotherapy practice principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Berriochoa, Camille A; Murphy, Erin S; Machado, Andre G; Chao, Samuel T; Suh, John H; Stephans, Kevin L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with implanted neuromodulation devices present potential challenges for radiation therapy treatment planning and delivery. Although guidelines exist regarding the irradiation of cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, fewer data and less clinical experience exist regarding the effects of radiation therapy on less frequently used devices, such as deep brain stimulators. A 79-year-old woman with a history of coarse tremors effectively managed with deep brain stimulation presented with multiple intracranial metastases from a newly diagnosed lung cancer and was referred for whole-brain radiation therapy. She was treated with a German helmet technique to a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 6 MV photons via opposed lateral fields with the neurostimulator turned off prior to delivery of each fraction. The patient tolerated the treatment well with no acute complications and no apparent change in the functionality of her neurostimulator device or effect on her underlying neuromuscular disorder. This represents the first reported case of the safe delivery of whole-brain radiation therapy in a patient with an implanted neurostimulator device. In cases such as this, neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists should have discussions with patients about the risks of brain injury, device malfunction or failure of the device, and plans for rigorous testing of the device before and after radiation therapy.

  15. A combined solenoid-surface RF coil for high-resolution whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Yuan, Chun; Hayes, Cecil E

    2010-09-01

    Rat brain models effectively simulate a multitude of human neurological disorders. Improvements in coil design have facilitated the wider utilization of rat brain models by enabling the utilization of clinical MR scanners for image acquisition. In this study, a novel coil design, subsequently referred to as the rat brain coil, is described that exploits and combines the strengths of both solenoids and surface coils into a simple, multichannel, receive-only coil dedicated to whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 T clinical MR scanner. Compared with a multiturn solenoid mouse body coil, a 3-cm surface coil, a modified Helmholtz coil, and a phased-array surface coil, the rat brain coil improved signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 72, 61, 78, and 242%, respectively. Effects of the rat brain coil on amplitudes of static field and radiofrequency field uniformity were similar to each of the other coils. In vivo, whole-brain images of an adult male rat were acquired with a T(2)-weighted spin-echo sequence using an isotropic acquisition resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 x 0.25 mm(3) in 60.6 min. Multiplanar images of the in vivo rat brain with identification of anatomic structures are presented. Improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by the rat brain coil may broaden experiments that utilize clinical MR scanners for in vivo image acquisition. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Single or multiple frequency generators in on-going brain activity: A mechanistic whole-brain model of empirical MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deco, Gustavo; Cabral, Joana; Woolrich, Mark W; Stevner, Angus B A; van Hartevelt, Tim J; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2017-05-15

    During rest, envelopes of band-limited on-going MEG signals co-vary across the brain in consistent patterns, which have been related to resting-state networks measured with fMRI. To investigate the genesis of such envelope correlations, we consider a whole-brain network model assuming two distinct fundamental scenarios: one where each brain area generates oscillations in a single frequency, and a novel one where each brain area can generate oscillations in multiple frequency bands. The models share, as a common generator of damped oscillations, the normal form of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation operating at the critical border between the steady state and the oscillatory regime. The envelopes of the simulated signals are compared with empirical MEG data using new methods to analyse the envelope dynamics in terms of their phase coherence and stability across the spectrum of carrier frequencies. Considering the whole-brain model with a single frequency generator in each brain area, we obtain the best fit with the empirical MEG data when the fundamental frequency is tuned at 12Hz. However, when multiple frequency generators are placed at each local brain area, we obtain an improved fit of the spatio-temporal structure of on-going MEG data across all frequency bands. Our results indicate that the brain is likely to operate on multiple frequency channels during rest, introducing a novel dimension for future models of large-scale brain activity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Variable slice thickness (VAST) EPI for the reduction of susceptibility artifacts in whole-brain GE-EPI at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunheim, Sascha; Johst, Sören; Pfaffenrot, Viktor; Maderwald, Stefan; Quick, Harald H; Poser, Benedikt A

    2017-07-10

    A new technique for 2D gradient-recalled echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) termed 'variable slice thickness' (VAST) is proposed, which reduces signal losses caused by through-slice susceptibility artifacts, while keeping the volume repetition time (TR) manageable. The slice thickness is varied across the brain, with thinner slices being used in the inferior brain regions where signal voids are most severe. Various axial slice thickness schemes with identical whole-brain coverage were compared to regular EPI, which may either suffer from unfeasibly long TR if appropriately thin slices are used throughout, or signal loss if no counter-measures are taken. Evaluation is based on time-course signal-to-noise (tSNR) maps from resting state data and a statistical group-level region of interest (ROI) analysis on breath-hold fMRI measurements. The inferior brain region signal voids with static B0 inhomogeneities could be markedly reduced with VAST GE-EPI in contrast to regular GE-EPI. ROI-averaged event-related signal changes showed 48% increase in VAST compared to GE-EPI with regular "thick" slices. tSNR measurements proved the comparable signal robustness of VAST in comparison to regular GE-EPI with thin slices. A novel acquisition strategy for functional 2D GE-EPI at ultrahigh magnetic field is presented to reduce susceptibility-induced signal voids and keep TR sufficiently short for whole-brain coverage.

  18. Field in field technique in two-dimensional planning for whole brain irradiation; Tecnica field in field em planejamentos bidimensionais para irradiacao de cerebro total

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A.L.S.; Campos, T.P.R., E-mail: radioterapia.andre@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2016-11-01

    Radiotherapy is the most used clinical method used for brain metastases treatment, the most frequent secondary tumors provided by breast, lung and melanomas as primary origin. The protocols often use high daily doses and, depending on the irradiation technique there is high probability of complications in health tissues. In order to minimize adverse effects, it is important the dosimetric analysis of three-dimensional radiotherapy planning through tomographic images or, concerning to the 2D simulations, by the application of techniques that optimize dose distribution by increasing the homogeneity. The study aimed to compare the 2D and 3D conformal planning for total brain irradiation in a individual equivalent situation and evaluate the progress of these planning applying the field in field technique. The methodology consisted of simulating a two-dimensional planning, reproduce it on a set of tomographic images and compare it with the conformal plan for two fields and four fields (field in field). The results showed no significant difference between 2D and 3D planning for whole brain irradiation, and the field in field technique significantly improved the dose distribution in brain volume compared with two fields for the proposal situation. As conclusion, the two-dimensional plane for the four fields described was viable for whole brain irradiation in the treatment of brain metastases at the proposal situation. (author)

  19. Alterations in local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (LCMRGlc) in childhood epilepsies as determined with FDG and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, M.E.; Chugani, H.T.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The authors investigated LCMRGlc in Lennox-Gastant Syndrome (LGS) (n=15), infantile spasm (IS) (n=14) and Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS) (n=5). In children with LGS, 3 distinct metabolic patterns are seen interically: 1) unilateral focal hypometabolism in frontal or temporal lobes, 2) unilateral diffuse hypometabolism, and 3) bilateral diffuse hypometabolism. Therapeutic implications of this classification are: surgical resection in focal (i.e., as for partial epilepsy), corpus callosotomy in diffuse unilateral, and elimination of surgery for those with bilateral diffuse hypometabolism. Babies with idiopathic IS showed symmetrical hypometabolism of lenticular nuclei and midbrain/brain stem compared to cortex and is characterized by slightly better prognosis. In contrast, babies with symtomatic IS had additional CMRGlc disturbances such as bilateral assymetric and multi focal hypometabolism in infant with neurofibromatosis; right parieto-occipital hypometabolims in infant with tuberous sclerosis; intense hypermetabolism of hypothalamus (34.5 vs 3.18 ..mu..moles/-min/100g in other regions) in another where x-ray CT showed only obstructive hydrocephalus. Findings support classical notion of subcortical involvement in this disorder. In SWS, PET showed marked hypometabolism in affected hemisphere in older children, while a 9 month old showed increased LCMRGlc unilaterally (40-50 vs 28-44 ..mu.. moles/min/100g contralateral) with cross cerebellar hypermetabolism (48-50 vs 27-31 ..mu.. moles/min/100g) with no behavioral or EEG evidence of seizure during study. PET studies of LCMRGlc appear sensitive and useful in classifying heterogeneous syndromes into subtypes regarding differential therapy and prognosis, and provide more comprehensive identification of sites of disturbance for investigating mechanisms of these disorders.

  20. Cerebral oxygen extraction, oxygen consumption, and regional cerebral blood flow during the aura phase of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, Jes; Lassen, N A

    1994-01-01

    The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism.......The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism....

  1. In vivo measurements of cerebral metabolic abnormalities by proton spectroscopy after a transient ischemic attack revealing an internal carotid stenosis > 70%; Anomalies metaboliques cerebrales mesurees in vivo par la spectroscopie du proton dans les accidents ischemiques transitoires revelant une stenose de la carotide interne superieure a 70%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroud, M.; Becker, F.; Lemesle, M.; Walker, P.; Guy, F.; Martin, D.; Baudouin, N.; Brunotte, F.; Dumas, R. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 21 -Dijon (France)

    1996-06-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to look for cerebral metabolic abnormalities within the first 3 days after a transient ischemic attack revealing an internal carotid stenosis > 70 %. Methods: Five patients with a transient ischemic attack lasting between 30 and 180 minutes, affecting sensory and motor brachio-facial territory, with or without aphasia. Were studied. A CT-scan, an EEG, a cervical Doppler ultrasound, a standard arteriography, a magnetic resonance imaging and a proton spectroscopy were performed within the cerebral area affected by the transient ischemic attack. We measured 2 markers: N-acetyl-aspartate, the marker of the neuronal mass, and lactate, the marker of anaerobe metabolism. In each case, a contralateral internal stenosis was diagnosed by cervical Doppler ultrasound and standard arteriography. No cerebral infarction was observed. Results: With the affected cerebral area defined according to clinical and EEG features, proton spectroscopy showed a significant rise of lactate, without any change in N-acetyl-aspartate levels. Conclusions: Within the first 3 days after a transient ischemic attack, there is a significant risk of lactate inside the affected cerebral area. This change may reflect a localized and transient hypoperfusion, but long enough to induce a rise of lactate but not sufficient to produce a cerebral infarct. This area is probably at risk to induce cerebral infarct. This data lead us to study the metabolic change induced by the asymptomatic internal carotid stenosis. (authors). 18 refs.

  2. In vivo quantitative whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging analysis of APP/PS1 transgenic mice using voxel-based and atlas-based methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yuan-Yuan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Wuhan (China); The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Mu-Wei; Oishi, Kenichi [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Shun; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Ling-Yun; Zhu, Wen-Zhen [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Wuhan (China); Lei, Hao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Wuhan (China)

    2013-08-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been applied to characterize the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a mouse model, although little is known about whether these features are structure specific. Voxel-based analysis (VBA) and atlas-based analysis (ABA) are good complementary tools for whole-brain DTI analysis. The purpose of this study was to identify the spatial localization of disease-related pathology in an AD mouse model. VBA and ABA quantification were used for the whole-brain DTI analysis of nine APP/PS1 mice and wild-type (WT) controls. Multiple scalar measurements, including fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity (DA), and radial diffusivity (DR), were investigated to capture the various types of pathology. The accuracy of the image transformation applied for VBA and ABA was evaluated by comparing manual and atlas-based structure delineation using kappa statistics. Following the MR examination, the brains of the animals were analyzed for microscopy. Extensive anatomical alterations were identified in APP/PS1 mice, in both the gray matter areas (neocortex, hippocampus, caudate putamen, thalamus, hypothalamus, claustrum, amygdala, and piriform cortex) and the white matter areas (corpus callosum/external capsule, cingulum, septum, internal capsule, fimbria, and optic tract), evidenced by an increase in FA or DA, or both, compared to WT mice (p < 0.05, corrected). The average kappa value between manual and atlas-based structure delineation was approximately 0.8, and there was no significant difference between APP/PS1 and WT mice (p > 0.05). The histopathological changes in the gray matter areas were confirmed by microscopy studies. DTI did, however, demonstrate significant changes in white matter areas, where the difference was not apparent by qualitative observation of a single-slice histological specimen. This study demonstrated the structure-specific nature of pathological changes in APP/PS1 mouse, and also showed the

  3. A link between vascular damage and cognitive deficits after whole-brain radiation therapy for cancer: A clue to other types of dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Maki K

    Whole brain radiation therapy for the treatment of tumors can sometimes cause cognitive impairment. Memory deficits were noted in up to 50% of treated patients over a short period of several months. In addition, an increased rate of dementia in young patients has been noted over the longer term, i.e. years. A deficit in neurogenesis after irradiation has been postulated to be the main cause of cognitive decline in patients, but recent data on irradiation therapy for limited parts of the brain appear to indicate other possibilities. Irradiation can directly damage various types of cells other than neuronal stem cells. However, this paper will focus on injury to brain vasculature leading to cognitive decline since vessels represent a better therapeutic target for drug development than other cells in the brain because of the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Whole-brain radiotherapy or autologous stem-cell transplantation as consolidation strategies after high-dose methotrexate-based chemoimmunotherapy in patients with primary CNS lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreri, Andrés J M; Cwynarski, Kate; Pulczynski, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    that methotrexate, cytarabine, thiotepa, and rituximab (called the MATRix regimen) is the induction combination associated with significantly better outcome compared with the other induction combinations tested. Here, we report the results of the second randomisation that addresses the efficacy of myeloablative...... chemotherapy supported by autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT), as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), as consolidation after high-dose-methotrexate-based chemoimmunotherapy. METHODS: HIV-negative patients (aged 18-70 years) with newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma and an Eastern...... iatrogenic side-effects, were eligible for the second randomisation between WBRT (photons of 4-10 MeV; five fractions per week; fraction size 180 cGy; started within 4 weeks from the last induction course; group D) and carmustine-thiotepa conditioned ASCT (carmustine 400 mg/m(2) on day -6, and thiotepa 5 mg...

  5. Cerebral hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before, during, or soon after birth such as cerebral palsy Stroke Very low blood pressure Brain cells are very sensitive to a lack of ... of the eye to light Exams and Tests Cerebral hypoxia can usually be diagnosed based on the person's medical history and a physical exam. Tests are done to ...