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Sample records for welded ct specimens

  1. The effect of the weld mismatch on the yield load of C(T) and SE(B) fracture specimens; El efecto de la heterogeneidad de las propiedades mecanicas de una union soldada sobre la crga de plastificacion de probetas de fractura tipo C(t) y SE(B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, J. R.; Leiva, R.; Labbe, F.

    2008-07-01

    The yield load values of two-dimensional C(T) and SE(B) specimens with various degrees of mismatch, were numerically evaluated. the yield load values were normalized using the Common Format in order to analyze the effect of the weld, using gas reference material C(T) and SE(B) specimens made only of base metal (BM). In under matched specimens (the weld metal elastic limit is lower than that of BM) the normalized yield load decreases compared to the elastic limit of BM. In overmatched specimens (the weld metal elastic limit is larger than that of BM), the yield load increases. This variation of the yield load depends on the degree of mismatch, and on the relation between weld size and crack length. The numerical results were compared with experimental values obtained with mismatched weld C(T) specimens using an ASTM A 588 steel as base metal. (Author) 17 refs.

  2. Strip specimen tests for pipeline materials and girth welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, William C. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Strip specimen testing of pipeline materials has been widely applied as a method of getting data relevant to the performance of pipelines under axial direction loading. Comparisons of strip specimen against smaller standard tests (round tensile bar, fracture toughness specimens, polished round bars) and against full-scale or large-scale testing will be explored. Data from early-generation pipe welds from the 1920's to the 1940's to the most recent materials for offshore reeled pipe will be used for examples. Strip samples can provide full thickness information to take account of varying material properties or imperfection distribution through the thickness. Strip samples can also accommodate measurement of effects of the original surface finish or weld surface shape. Strip samples have more design flexibility than standard tests, but must be designed to limit stress concentrations and effects of local bending. (author)

  3. Development of Simplified Ultrasonic CT System for Imaging of Weld Metal and It's Comparison with TOFD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Cho; Fukuhara, Hiroaki; Yamawaki, Hisashi

    In this paper, as a new measurement method to estimate the structure change of weld metal, the simplified ultrasonic CT system, which uses the information of three directions, that is, 90°, +45° and -45° about inspection plane is developed. Use of simplified ultrasonic CT system has two merits: Firstly, the measurement time is very short comparing with general CT. Secondly, it can detect sensitively very infinitesimal defect in vertical or slant direction about inspection plane because the obtained image is not C scan image but CT image calculated from three directions. From these merits, this method can be considered as a very effective method for the evaluation of material condition. In order to compare the performance of simplified ultrasonic CT, the CT image obtained from several specimens with several simple defects was compared with the D scan image obtained by TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction) method. We can see simple defects more clearly by new proposed method. Experimental results on several kinds of specimen, having welded joint by electron beam welding, welded joint by electron beam welding and fatigue crack showed that the obtained C scan or CT image has better resolution than the D scan image by TOFD method and shows similar image to actual shape.

  4. Numerical Analysis of Crack Progress in Different Areas of a Friction Stir Welded Bead for an 5251 H14 Aluminum Alloy Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kambouz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The assemblies welded by Friction Stir Welding have a major advantage which is the absence of a metal filler. This process contributes to the welding of materials that are known to be difficult to weld using the conventional techniques often employed in the field of transport, for example in the automobile body by applying a spot welding. The numerical modeling of this type of process is complex, not only in terms of the variety of physical phenomena which must be considered, but also because of the experimental procedure that must be followed in order to verify and validate numerical predictions. In this work, a finite element model is proposed in order to simulate the crack propagation under monotonic loading in different areas of the weld seam of a strain hardening CT-50 aluminum alloy 5251H14 specimen.

  5. Experimental investigation of the thickness effect for large as-welded SAW S355 steel specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Ólafur Magnús; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Berggreen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The presented work aims to investigate and establish a pre-cise, thorough and detailed database from series of experi-mental testing of submerged arc welded (SAW) specimens of various thicknesses typically applied in ships and offshore structures and foundations. Welded structures of all sizes...... and shapes exhibit fatigue failure primarily in the welded region, rather than in the base material, due to imperfections and flaws relating to the welding procedure. The welded region has therefore received much attention from universities, re-search institutions along with industry as it is of significant...

  6. Non-destructive evaluation of weld discontinuity in steel tubes by gamma ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, A. E.; Dantas, C. C.; Nery, M. S.; Barbosa, J. M.; Rolim, T. L.; Lima, E. A. O.; Melo, S. B.; Dos Santos, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Weld discontinuity in steel tubes was investigated and dimensioned in a data analysis sequence. The correlation matrix, cosine distance and hierarchical cluster were applied as multivariate data processing in this analysis. Welded rings of 9236 mm3 were scanned in gamma ray CT in test tubes and compared with steel base and references. The discontinuity volume detected in the welded rings was assessed based on the pixel volume in data sampling. By modeling gamma ray trajectories and rotation angles in CT scanning, a discontinuity of 0.3 mm was determined and a limit detection of 23 mm3 was obtained.

  7. Influence of the Initial Fiber Orientation on the Weld Strength in Welding of Glass Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fiebig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The welding factors are significantly lower in welding of fiber reinforced thermoplastics than in welding of unreinforced thermoplastics due to the fiber orientation in the weld. This paper presents results from investigations on the influence of the initial fiber orientation on the weld strength in hot plate and vibration welding for glass fiber reinforced polypropylene and polyamide 6. Injection molded specimens are compared to specimens with main initial fiber orientation being longitudinal and transverse to the joining direction. The results of CT analysis of the fiber orientation in the weld show the opportunity to achieve a higher weld strength by using specimens with fibers being initially oriented longitudinally to the joining direction. The influence of the initial fiber orientation in the parts to be welded on the weld strength in hot plate welding is more distinct than in vibration welding.

  8. Evaluation on ductile tearing properties of girth weld pipelines using SE(T) and SE(B) specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathias, Leonardo Luiz Siqueira; Ruggieri, Claudio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Naval e Oceanica

    2012-07-01

    Predictive methodologies aimed at quantifying the impact of defects in oil and gas pipelines play a key role in safety assessment procedures of in-service facilities. Current methodologies for structural integrity assessments advocate the use of geometry dependent resistance curves so that crack-tip constraint in the test specimen closely matches the crack tip constraint for the structural component. Testing standards now under development to measure fracture resistance of pipeline steels (J and CTOD) most often employ single edge notched specimens under tension (SENT) to match a postulated defect in the structural component. This paper presents an investigation of the ductile tearing properties for a girth weld of an API 5L X80 pipeline steel using experimentally measured crack growth resistance curves (J-R curves). Testing of the girth weld pipeline steels employed side-grooved, clamped SE(T) specimen with center-crack weld and side-grooved, three-point bending SE(B) (or SENB) specimens to determine the J-R curves. The methods were compared in terms of geometry, relative crack size and crack-tip constraint, and the results were applied to a case study, to evaluate the degree of conservativeness in defect acceptance criteria. The tests involving SE(B) specimens are usually considered conservative, however, the comparison between this two methods may point an accurate alternative for girth weld assessments, since adequate geometry is adopted to describe accurately the structure's behavior. (author)

  9. 3D modelling of plug failure in resistance spot welded shear-lab specimens (DP600-steel)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2008-01-01

    Ductile plug failure of resistance spot welded shear-lab specimens is studied by full 3D finite element analysis, using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that accounts for nucleation and growth of microvoids to coalescence (The Gurson model). Tensile properties and damage parameters a...

  10. An inset CT specimen for evaluating fracture in small samples of material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, M; Nazari, A; Kruzic, J J; Quinn, G D; Arola, D

    2014-02-01

    In evaluations on the fracture behavior of hard tissues and many biomaterials, the volume of material available to study is not always sufficient to apply a standard method of practice. In the present study an inset Compact Tension (inset CT) specimen is described, which uses a small cube of material (approximately 2×2×2mm(3)) that is molded within a secondary material to form the compact tension geometry. A generalized equation describing the Mode I stress intensity was developed for the specimen using the solutions from a finite element model that was defined over permissible crack lengths, variations in specimen geometry, and a range in elastic properties of the inset and mold materials. A validation of the generalized equation was performed using estimates for the fracture toughness of a commercial dental composite via the "inset CT" specimen and the standard geometry defined by ASTM E399 (2006). Results showed that the average fracture toughness obtained from the new specimen (1.23±0.02MPam(0.5)) was within 2% of that from the standard. Applications of the inset CT specimen are presented for experimental evaluations on the crack growth resistance of dental enamel and root dentin, including their fracture resistance curves. Potential errors in adopting this specimen are then discussed, including the effects of debonding between the inset and molding material on the estimated stress intensity distribution. Results of the investigation show that the inset CT specimen offers a viable approach for studying the fracture behavior of small volumes of structural materials. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  12. Characterising electron beam welded dissimilar metal joints to study residual stress relaxation from specimen extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Abburi Venkata, Kiranmayi; Truman, Christopher E; Smith, David J.; Bhaduri, Arun K

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require dissimilar metal weld joints to connect the primary steam generator made from ferritic steel to the intermediate heat exchanger made from austenitic steel. Such joints are complex because of the mismatch in the thermal and the mechanical properties of the materials used in the joint. Electron Beam (EB) welding is emerging as a promising technique to manufacture dissimilar joints providing a great many advantages over conventional welding techniques, in terms of lo...

  13. Using mastectomy specimens to develop breast models for breast tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Das, Mini; Didier, Clay; Mah'D, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    Dedicated x-ray computed tomography (CT) of the breast using a cone-beam flat-panel detector system is a modality under investigation by a number of research teams. As previously reported, we have fabricated a prototype, bench-top flat-panel CT breast imaging (CTBI) system and developed computer simulation software to model such a system. We are developing a methodology to use high resolution, low noise CT reconstructions of fresh mastectomy specimens for generating an ensemble of 3D digital breast phantoms that realistically model 3D compressed and uncompressed breast anatomy. These breast models can be used to simulate realistic projection data for both breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT systems thereby providing a powerful evaluation and optimization mechanism.

  14. Technique for the residual life assessment of high temperature components based on creep-rupture testing on welded miniature specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzillo, A.; Guardamagna, C.; Moscotti, L.; Ranzani, L. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    Following the present trend in the development of advanced methodologies for residual life assessment of high temperature components operating in power plants, particularly in non destructive methods, a testing technique has been set up at ENEL-CRAM based on creep-rupture testa in an argon on welded miniature specimens. Five experimental systems for creep-rupture tests in an argon atmosphere have been set up which include high accuracy systems, vacuum chambers and exrwnsometer devices. With the aim of establishing and validating the suitability of the experimental methodology, creep-rupture and interrupted creep testing programmes have been performed on miniature specimens (2 mm diameter and 10 mm gauge lenght). On the basis of experience gathered by various European research laboratories, a miniature specimen construction procedure has been developed using a laser welding technique for joining threaded heads to sample material. Low alloy ferritic steels, such as virgin 2.25CrlMo, 0.5Cr 0.5Mo 0.25V, and IN 738 superalloy miniature specimens have been investigated and the results, compared with those from standard specimens, show a regular trend in deformation vs time. Additional efforts to provide guidelines for material sampling from each plant component will be required in order to reduce uncertainties in residual life prediction.

  15. CT imaging of wet specimens from a pathology museum: How to build a "virtual museum" for radiopathological correlation teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhem, R K; Woo, J K H; Pakkiri, P; Stewart, E; Romagnoli, C; Garcia, B

    2006-01-01

    X-rays and CT have been used to examine specimens such as human remains, mummies and formalin-fixed specimens. However, CT has not been used to study formalin-fixed wet specimens within their containers. The purpose of our study is firstly to demonstrate the role of CT as a non-destructive imaging method for the study of wet pathological specimens and secondly to use the CT data as a method for teaching pathological and radiological correlation. CT scanning of 31 musculoskeletal specimens from a pathology museum was carried out. Images were reconstructed using both soft-tissue and bone algorithms. Further processing of the data produced coronal and sagittal reformats of each specimen. The container and storage solution were manually removed using Volume Viewer Voxtool software to produce a 3D reconstruction of each specimen. Photographs of each specimen (container and close-up) were displayed alongside selected coronal, sagittal, 3D reconstructions and cine sequences in a specially designed computer program. CT is a non-destructive imaging modality for building didactic materials from wet specimens in a Pathology Museum, for teaching radiological and pathological correlation.

  16. Estimation of adipose compartment volumes in CT images of a mastectomy specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Abdullah-Al-Zubaer; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2016-03-01

    Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been utilized for preclinical quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Efficacy of the simulation-based validation depends on the realism of phantom images. Anatomical measurements of the breast tissue, such as the size and distribution of adipose compartments or the thickness of Cooper's ligaments, are essential for the realistic simulation of breast anatomy. Such measurements are, however, not readily available in the literature. In this study, we assessed the statistics of adipose compartments as visualized in CT images of a total mastectomy specimen. The specimen was preserved in formalin, and imaged using a standard body CT protocol and high X-ray dose. A human operator manually segmented adipose compartments in reconstructed CT images using ITK-SNAP software, and calculated the volume of each compartment. In addition, the time needed for the manual segmentation and the operator's confidence were recorded. The average volume, standard deviation, and the probability distribution of compartment volumes were estimated from 205 segmented adipose compartments. We also estimated the potential correlation between the segmentation time, operator's confidence, and compartment volume. The statistical tests indicated that the estimated compartment volumes do not follow the normal distribution. The compartment volumes are found to be correlated with the segmentation time; no significant correlation between the volume and the operator confidence. The performed study is limited by the mastectomy specimen position. The analysis of compartment volumes will better inform development of more realistic breast anatomy simulation.

  17. An Inset CT Specimen for Evaluating Fracture in Small Samples of Material

    OpenAIRE

    Yahyazadehfar, M.; Nazari, A.; Kruzic, J. J.; Quinn, G. D.; Arola, D.

    2013-01-01

    In evaluations on the fracture behavior of hard tissues and many biomaterials, the volume of material available to study is not always sufficient to apply a standard method of practice. In the present study an inset Compact Tension (inset CT) specimen is described, which uses a small cube of material (approximately 2×2×2 mm3) that is molded within a secondary material to form the compact tension geometry. A generalized equation describing the Mode I stress intensity was developed for the spec...

  18. Fatigue damage observed non-destructively in fibre composite coupon test specimens by X-ray CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method for monitoring the 3D fatigue damage progression on a micro-structural level in a glass fibre/polymer coupon test specimen by means of laboratory X-ray Computed Tomography (CT). A modified mount and holder made for the standard test samples to fit into the X-ray CT...... scanner along with a tension clamp solution is presented. Initially, the same location of the test specimen is inspected by ex-situ X-ray CT during the fatigue loading history, which shows the damage progression on a micro-structural level. The openings of individual uni-directional (UD) fibre fractures...

  19. Analysis of Deformation and Failure Behaviors of TIG Welded Dissimilar Metal Joints Using Miniature Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji-Hwan; Jahanzeb, Nabeel; Kim, Min-Seong; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Shi-Hoon [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The deformation and failure behaviors of dissimilar metal joints between SS400 steel and STS316L steel were investigated. The dissimilar metal joints were fabricated using the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with STS309 steel as a filler metal. The microstructures of the dissimilar metal joints were investigated using an optical microscope and EBSD technique. The mechanical properties of the base metal (BM), heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM) were measured using a micro-hardness and micro-tension tester combined with the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The HAZ of the STS316L steel exhibited the highest micro-hardness value, and yield/tensile strengths, while the BM of the SS440 steel exhibited the lowest micro-hardness value and yield /tensile strengths. The grain size refinement in the HAZ of SS400 steel induced an enhancement of micro-hardness value and yield/tensile strengths compared to the BM of the SS400 steel. The WM, which consists of primary δ-ferrite and a matrix of austenite phase, exhibited relatively a high micro-hardness value, yield /tensile strengths and elongation compared to the BM and HAZ of the SS400 steel.

  20. Imaging skeletal anatomy of injured cervical spine specimens: comparison of single-slice vs multi-slice helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obenauer, S.; Alamo, L.; Herold, T.; Funke, M.; Kopka, L.; Grabbe, E. [Department of Radiology, Georg August-University Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Our objective was to compare a single-slice CT (SS-CT) scanner with a multi-slice CT (MS-CT) scanner in the depiction of osseous anatomic structures and fractures of the upper cervical spine. Two cervical spine specimens with artificial trauma were scanned with a SS-CT scanner (HighSpeed, CT/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various collimations (1, 3, 5 mm) and pitch factors (1, 1.5, 2, 3) and a four-slice helical CT scanner (LightSpeed, QX/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various table speeds ranging from 3.75 to 15 mm/rotation for a pitch of 0.75 and from 7.5 to 30 mm/rotation for a pitch of 1.5. Images were reconstructed with an interval of 1 mm. Sagittal and coronal multiplanar reconstructions of the primary and reconstructed data set were performed. For MS-CT a tube current resulting in equivalent image noise as with SS-CT was used. All images were judged by two observers using a 4-point scale. The best image quality for SS-CT was achieved with the smallest slice thickness (1 mm) and a pitch smaller than 2 resulting in a table speed of up to 2 mm per gantry rotation (4 points). A reduction of the slice thickness rather than of the table speed proved to be beneficial at MS-CT. Therefore, the optimal scan protocol in MS-CT included a slice thickness of 1.25 mm with a table speed of 7.5 mm/360 using a pitch of 1.5 (4 points), resulting in a faster scan time than when a pitch of 0.75 (4 points) was used. This study indicates that MS-CT could provide equivalent image quality at approximately four times the volume coverage speed of SS-CT. (orig.)

  1. Acoustoelastic evaluation of an OCTG pipe welded casing type API 5CT N80Q; Avaliacao acustoelastica de tubo OCTG do tipo casing API 5CT N80Q com solda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Manoel A.C.; Bittencourt, Marcelo S.Q. [nstituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Payao Filho, Joao C. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an acoustoelastic evaluation of an OCTG API 5CT N80Q casing pipe welded by the ERW/HFIW process, which is used in oil and gas exploration and exploitation. The ultrasonic technique of acoustic birefringence was employed to evaluate the acoustoelastic behavior of the T-380 CSN steel plate used to manufacture the pipe under study, and the acoustoelastic behavior of the pipe itself before subjected to the heat treatment of quench tempering and after subjected to hot straightening. It was observed a reduction in the level of anisotropy after these two manufacturing steps, what shows the efficacy of the heat treatment of quench tempering and hot straightening. After the hot straightening step, a test specimen was extracted from the pipe containing at its center the circumferential area of inspection under evaluation, which was subjected to a milling cutting operation along the weld. The opening of specimen after cutting indicated that the residual circumferential stress in the pipe was tensile. A comparison between the acoustoelastic states of the pipe after the hot straightening and the cutting operations indicated a 63% reduction in the level of anisotropy after the latter operation. (author)

  2. Detection of the anatomic structure and pathology in animal lung specimens: comparison of micro CT and multi-detector row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kun Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Chang Hyun; Son, Kyu Ri; Goo, Jin Mo; Im, Jung Gi [Seoul National University Hospital and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Joon Beom [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    We wanted to compare the capability of micro CT and the clinically available thin-slice multi-detector row CT (MDCT) for demonstrating fine anatomic structures and pathological lesions in formalin-fixed lung specimens. The porcine lung with shark liver oil-induced lipoid pneumonia and the canine lung with pulmonary paragonimiasis were fixed by ventilating them with formalin vapor, and they were then sliced into one-centimeter thick sections. Micro CT (section thickness, 18 micrometer) and MDCT (section thickness, 0.75 mm) images were acquired in four of the lung slices of the lipoid pneumonia specimen and in five of the lung slices of the paragonimiasis specimen. On 62 pairs of micro CT and MDCT images, 169 pairs of rectangular ROIs were manually drawn in the corresponding locations. Two chest radiologists recorded the detectability of three kinds of anatomic structures (lobular core structure, interlobular septum and small bronchiolar lumen) and two kinds of pathological lesions (ground-glass opacity and consolidation) with using a five-point scale. The statistical comparison was performed by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Interobserver agreement was evaluated with kappa statistics. For all observers, all the kinds of anatomic structures and pathological lesions were detected better on the micro CT images than on the MDCT images ({rho} < 0.01). Agreement was fair between two observers ({kappa} = 0.38, {rho} < 0.001). The fine anatomic structures and pathological lesions of the lung were more accurately demonstrated on micro CT than on thin-slice MDCT in the inflated and fixed lung specimens.

  3. Status Report on Irradiation Capsules Containing Welded FeCrAl Specimens for Radiation Tolerance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-26

    This status report provides the background and current status of a series of irradiation capsules, or “rabbits”, that were designed and built to test the contributions of microstructure, composition, damage dose, and irradiation temperature on the radiation tolerance of candidate FeCrAl alloys being developed to have enhanced weldability and radiation tolerance. These rabbits will also test the validity of using an ultra-miniature tensile specimen to assess the mechanical properties of irradiated FeCrAl base metal and weldments. All rabbits are to be irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to damage doses up to ≥15 dpa at temperatures between 200-550°C.

  4. Mechanical Behavior of Lithium-Ion Batteries and Fatigue Behavior of Ultrasonic Weld-Bonded Lap-Shear Specimens of Dissimilar Magnesium and Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Jen

    The mechanical behaviors of LiFePO4 battery cell and module specimens under in-plane constrained compression were investigated for simulations of battery cells, modules and packs under crush conditions. The experimental stress-strain curves were correlated to the deformation patterns of battery cell and module specimens. Analytical solutions were developed to estimate the buckling stresses and to provide a theoretical basis for future design of representative volume element cell and module specimens. A physical kinematics model for formation of kinks and shear bands in battery cells was developed to explain the deformation mechanism for layered battery cells under in-plane constrained compression. A small-scale module constrained punch indentation test was also conducted to benchmark the computational results. The computational results indicate that macro homogenized material models can be used to simulate battery modules under crush conditions. Fatigue behavior and failure modes of ultrasonic spot welds in lap-shear specimens of magnesium and steel sheets with and without adhesive were investigated. For ultrasonic spot welded lap-shear specimens, the failure mode changes from the partial nugget pullout mode under low-cycle loading conditions to the kinked crack failure mode under high-cycle loading conditions. For adhesive-bonded and weld-bonded lap-shear specimens, the test results show the near interface cohesive failure mode and the kinked crack failure mode under low-cycle and high-cycle loading conditions, respectively. Next, the analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for main cracks in lap-shear specimens of three dissimilar sheets under plane strain conditions were developed and the solutions agreed well with the computational results. The analytical effective stress intensity factor solutions for kinked cracks were compared with the computational results at small kink lengths. The results indicate that the computational results approach to

  5. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  6. FDG-PET provides the best correlation with the tumor specimen compared to MRI and CT in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsen, Jeroen; van den Bogaard, Jørgen; Janssen, Marco H M; Bakers, Frans C H; Engelsman, Stephanie; Öllers, Michel; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Nap, Marius; Beets, Geerard L; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido

    2011-02-01

    To compare CT-, MR- and PET-CT based tumor length measurements in rectal cancer with pathology. Twenty-six rectal cancer patients underwent both MR and PET-CT imaging followed by short-course radiotherapy (RT 5×5 Gy) and surgery within 3 days after RT. Tumor length was measured manually and independently by 2 observers on CT, MR and PET. PET-based tumor length measurements were also generated automatically using the signal-to-background-ratio (SBR) method. All measurements were correlated with the tumor length on the pathological specimen. CT-based measurements did not show a valuable correlation with pathology. MR-based measurements correlated only weakly, but still significantly (Pearson correlation=0.55 resp. 0.57; p<0.001). Manual PET measurements reached a good correlation with pathology, but less strong (Pearson correlation 0.72 and 0.76 for the two different observers) than automatic PET-CT based measurements, which provided the best correlation with pathology (Pearson correlation of 0.91 (p<0.001)). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated in general an overestimation of the tumor diameter using manual measurements, while the agreement of automatic contours and pathology was within acceptable ranges. A direct comparison of the different modalities revealed a significant better precision for PET-based auto-contours as compared to all other measurements. Automatically generated PET-CT based contours show the best correlation with the surgical specimen and thus provide a useful and powerful tool to accurately determine the largest tumor dimension in rectal cancer. This could be used as a quick and reliable tool for target delineation in radiotherapy. However, a 3D volume analysis is needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatigue damage observed non-destructively in fibre composite coupon test specimens by X-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, K. M.; Mikkelsen, L. P.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a method for monitoring the 3D fatigue damage progression on a micro-structural level in a glass fibre/polymer coupon test specimen by means of laboratory X-ray Computed Tomography (CT). A modified mount and holder made for the standard test samples to fit into the X-ray CT scanner along with a tension clamp solution is presented. Initially, the same location of the test specimen is inspected by ex-situ X-ray CT during the fatigue loading history, which shows the damage progression on a micro-structural level. The openings of individual uni-directional (UD) fibre fractures are seen to generally increase with the number of cycles, and new regions of UD fibre fractures also appear. There are some UD fibre fractures that are difficult to detect since their opening is small. Therefore, the effect of tension on the crack visibility is examined afterwards using a tension clamp solution. With applied tension some additional cracks become visible and the openings of fibre fractures increases, which shows the importance of applied tension during the scan.

  8. Quantification of fatigue cracking in CT specimens with passive and active piezoelectric sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianguo; Ziehl, Paul; Zarate, Boris; Caicedo, Juan; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Metrovich, Brian; Matta, Fabio

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel bridges is of interest to bridge owners and agencies. Monitoring of fatigue cracks has been attempted with acoustic emission using either resonant or broadband sensors. One drawback of passive sensing is that the data is limited to that caused by growing cracks. In this work, passive emission was complemented with active sensing (piezoelectric wafer active sensors) for enhanced detection capabilities. Passive and active sensing methods were described for fatigue crack monitoring on specialized compact tension specimens. The characteristics of acoustic emission were obtained to understand the correlation of acoustic emission behavior and crack growth. Crack and noise induced signals were interpreted through Swansong II Filter and waveform-based approaches, which are appropriate for data interpretation of field tests. Upon detection of crack extension, active sensing was activated to measure the crack size. Model updating techniques were employed to minimize the difference between the numerical results and experimental data. The long term objective of this research is to develop an in-service prognostic system to monitor structural health and to assess the remaining fatigue life.

  9. CT Images Are Noninferior to Anatomic Specimens in Teaching Cardiac Anatomy-A Randomized Quantitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolossváry, Márton; Székely, Andrea D; Gerber, Gábor; Merkely, Béla; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2017-03-01

    The new generation's learning habits demand reforms in the methods by which we teach anatomy. Medical imaging techniques such as CT may offer a solution to help the understanding of complex anatomic structures. Our objective was to assess the noninferiority of using radiologic images in teaching anatomy as opposed to prosections or lecture slides. Seventy-three first-year medical students were assigned to three experimental groups taught using different approaches: lecture slides (LG), prosections (PG), or radiology images (RG). All three groups received a 2-hour presentation on cardiac anatomy. Three days after the lectures, the participants were subjected to a gross anatomic "pin test" followed by a written theoretical examination to evaluate their knowledge of cardiac anatomy. We found a significant difference between the three groups regarding their gross anatomic examination scores (LG: 8.1 ± 4.1, PG: 10.6 ± 3.3, RG: 8.5 ± 3.4, P = .03; Tukey's honest significant difference: P(LG-PG) = .04, P(PG-RG) = .08, P(LG-RG) = .94), whereas no significant difference was apparent regarding their written theoretical examination scores (LG: 16.6 ± 4.2, PG: 18.6 ± 3.5, RG: 18.3 ± 3.0, P = .13). Concerning gross anatomic knowledge, groups taught using prosections or radiologic images showed no significant difference. Demonstrative materials do not seem to significantly affect the theoretical knowledge of the students. The use of medical imaging techniques could represent a valuable contribution toward teaching anatomy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Reactor Coolant System (Carbon Steel-to-CASS) Dissimilar Metal Weld Mockup Specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, S. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cinson, A. D. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, M. T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    In the summer of 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff traveled to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, to conduct phased-array ultrasonic testing on a large bore, reactor coolant pump nozzle-to-safe-end mockup. This mockup was fabricated by FlawTech, Inc. and the configuration originated from the Port St. Lucie nuclear power plant. These plants are Combustion Engineering-designed reactors. This mockup consists of a carbon steel elbow with stainless steel cladding joined to a cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) safe-end with a dissimilar metal weld and is owned by Florida Power & Light. The objective of this study, and the data acquisition exercise held at the EPRI NDE Center, were focused on evaluating the capabilities of advanced, low-frequency phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) examination techniques for detection and characterization of implanted circumferential flaws and machined reflectors in a thick-section CASS dissimilar metal weld component. This work was limited to PA-UT assessments using 500 kHz and 800 kHz probes on circumferential flaws only, and evaluated detection and characterization of these flaws and machined reflectors from the CASS safe-end side only. All data were obtained using spatially encoded, manual scanning techniques. The effects of such factors as line-scan versus raster-scan examination approaches were evaluated, and PA-UT detection and characterization performance as a function of inspection frequency/wavelength, were also assessed. A comparative assessment of the data is provided, using length-sizing root-mean-square-error and position/localization results (flaw start/stop information) as the key criteria for flaw characterization performance. In addition, flaw signal-to-noise ratio was identified as the key criterion for detection performance.

  11. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  12. Mechanical Characteristics of 9% Ni Steel Welded Joint for Lng Storage Tank at Cryogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Shim, Kyu-Taek; Kim, Young-Kyun

    To confirm the safety performance of LNG storage tank, the change in fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness within X-grooved weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of newly developed 9% Ni steel, which was SMAW welded, was investigated. These materials were produced by QT (quenching, tempering) heat treatment. The weld metal specimens were prepared by taking the same weld procedure applied in actual inner shell of LNG storage tank. All tests were performed in the temperature ranging from R.T. and -162°C. The fatigue crack growth behavior was carried out using CT specimen. Investigation has been carried out to study the influence of temperature and weld effect on fatigue crack growth behavior. Also, Fracture surfaces after tests were observe by scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  13. Comparative study of residual stress by table of coordinates and X-ray diffraction in a welded joint; Estudo comparativo das tensoes residuais por mesa de coordenadas e DR-X numa junta soldada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira Filho, A.V.; Rolim, T.L.; Yadava, Y.P.; Ferreira, R.A.S., E-mail: anibal_siqueira@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Cardoso, F.I.B. [Universidade de Pernambuco (POLI/UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Guimaraes, P.B. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Residual stresses in a welded joint of naval steel ASTM AH-32 was measured either by the displacements of referenced points with a coordinated table (CT) or by x-ray diffraction (X-DR) after welding. For all tests, the welding was performed by a certified welder in the SMAW process, using an AWS E 7018 G3 electrode. Before welding, small holes evenly spaced were made in the specimens to be mapped on a coordinated table (CT). After labeling, the specimens were submitted to the welding process and new measurements by (CT) to evaluate the displacements produced by the tensions generated. In parallel, residual stress were measured by DR-X for validation of this new measurement methodology. (author)

  14. El efecto de la heterogeneidad de las propiedades mecánicas de una unión soldada sobre la carga de plastificación de probetas de fractura tipo C(T) Y SE(B)

    OpenAIRE

    Donoso, J. R.; Leiva, R.; Labbé, F.

    2008-01-01

    The yield load values of two-dimensional C(T) and SE(B) specimens with various degrees of mismatch, were numerically evaluated. The yield load values were normalized using the Common Format in order to analyze the effect of the weld, using as reference material C(T) and SE(B) specimens made only of base metal (BM). In undermatched specimens (the weld metal elastic limit is lower than that of BM) the normalized yield load decreases compared to the elastic limit of BM. In overmatched specimens ...

  15. Combined Testing for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Trichomonas by Use of the BD Max CT/GC/TV Assay with Genitourinary Specimen Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Pol, Barbara; Williams, James A; Fuller, DeAnna; Taylor, Stephanie N; Hook, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    The BD Max CT/GC/TV (MAX) assay is a true multiplex assay for simultaneous detection of chlamydia (CT), gonorrhea (GC), and trichomonas (TV). We evaluated assay performance for women using endocervical and vaginal swabs as well as urine specimens. A total of 1,143 women were tested for CT, GC, and TV and, subsequently, another 847 (1,990 total women) for CT and GC only, with positivity rates for CT, GC, and TV of 7.1%, 2.3%, and 13.5%, respectively. In men, the performance for CT and GC was determined using only urine specimens. TV performance was not assessed in male urine samples. Among men, 181/830 (21.8%) and 108/840 (12.9%) chlamydia and gonorrhea infections, respectively, were identified. Comparator assays included BD ProbeTec Chlamydia trachomatis Qx (CTQ)/Neisseria gonorrhoeae Qx (GCQ), Hologic Aptima Combo 2 (AC2) and Aptima TV (ATV), trichomonas microscopy, and culture. MAX CT sensitivity was 99.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 96.1% to 99.9%), 95.7% (90.8% to 98.0%), 91.5% (85.8% to 95.1%), and 96.1% (92.2% to 98.1%) for vaginal swabs, endocervical swabs, female urine samples, and male urine samples, respectively. MAX GC sensitivity was 95.5% (84.9% to 98.7%), 95.5% (84.9% to 98.7%), 95.7% (85.5% to 99.8%), and 99.1% (94.9% to 99.8%) in the same order. MAX TV sensitivity was 96.1% (91.7% to 98.2%) for vaginal swabs, 93.4% (88.3% to 96.4%) for endocervical swabs, and 92.9% (87.8% to 96.0%) for female urine samples. Specificity for all organisms across all sample types was ≥98.6%. Performance estimates for the MAX assays were consistent with estimates calculated for the comparator assays (all P values were >0.1). The availability of a CT/GC/TV multiplexed assay on a benchtop instrument with a broad menu has the potential to facilitate local sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing at smaller laboratories and may encourage expanded screening for these highly prevalent infections. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT-Guided Biopsy and Cryoablation with Autoradiography of Biopsy Specimen for Treatment of Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service (United States); Grewal, Ravinder K. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Healey, John H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopedic Surgical Oncology Service, Department of Surgery (United States); Antonescu, Cristina R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology (United States); Fanchon, Louise [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Physics (United States); Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Kirov, Assen [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Physics (United States); Farooki, Azeez [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused by small benign tumors of mesenchymal origin also known as phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors mixed connective tissue variant. Excellent prognosis is expected with eradication of the culprit tumor. These small tumors are notoriously difficult to localize with conventional imaging studies; this often leads to an extensive work up and prolonged morbidity. We report a patient with clinical diagnosis of TIO whose culprit tumor was localized with Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT and MRI. Biopsy and cryoablation were performed under Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT guidance. Autoradiography of the biopsy specimen was performed and showed in situ correlation between Ga-68 DOTATOC uptake and histopathology with millimeter resolution.

  17. [Observations on three dimensional images for cracks of doweled teeth--comparison of images from specimen sections and dental tomograms from small three dimensional X-ray CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Soichiro; Sasaki, Norichika; Hagihara, Takahiro; Fujiseki, Youhei; Takayama, Junichi; Fujisaki, Noboru; Kurasawa, Ikufumi; Amari, Mitsuharu; Ohshima, Kazunari

    2005-02-01

    Intraoral views of teeth with dowel and post hole taken by small three-dimensional X-ray CT (3DX) were compared with three-dimensional images from specimen sections of the same extracted teeth. This comparison shows the usefulness of 3DX for examination of cracked teeth in the oral cavity. After taking dental tomographic images using 3DX for fractured teeth in the oral cavity, the fractured teeth were extracted and three-dimensional images for them and their cracks were obtained from a set of photographed sections. Then both sets of three-dimensional images for the fractured teeth were compared in terms of the form and region of the cracks. The tooth cracks were observed at the root face region in the intraoral view. Also, in the extracted teeth, fracture lines were recognized from the three-dimensional images. Moreover, a discontinuous image was obtained in teeth from the dental tomographic image using 3DX. This discontinuous image in teeth was observed in the same region and direction as the cracks of the three dimensional image from specimen sections of the extracted teeth. The discontinuous images of teeth in the dental tomographic images from 3DX were observed in the same region and direction as the cracks of teeth in the three-dimensional images from specimen sections of the extracted teeth. It was confirmed that dental tomographic images from 3DX are useful for finding cracks in living teeth. However, dental tomographic images from small three-dimensional X-ray CT are not perfectly reliable because the discontinuous image is not found in some teeth where the cracks are recognized by images from specimen sections after extraction.

  18. Non-destructive three-dimensional evaluation of pores at different welded joints and their effects on joints strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Rie; Takayama, Yasuko; Tsuchida, Fujio; Nakajima, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the porosity in different laser welded cast alloys non-destructively using X-ray micro-focus computerized tomography (micro-CT) and to evaluate the effect of porosity on the tensile strength of the welded joints. The welding procedure was conducted in rectangular cast metals, CoCr, Ti and platinum added gold alloy (AuPt). The metal plates were butted CoCr to CoCr (CoCr/CoCr) or Ti to Ti (Ti/Ti) for welding of similar metals and Ti to AuPt (Ti/AuPt) for welding of dissimilar metals. Specimens were welded under several laser-welding conditions; with groove (normal), without groove (no groove), spatter, crack, or no overlapped welding (no overlap) (n=5). Porosity in the welded area was evaluated using a micro-CT. Tensile strength of the welded specimens was measured at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Multiple comparisons of the group means were performed using ANOVA and Fisher's multiple comparisons test (α=.05). The relationship between the porosity and the tensile strength was investigated with a regression analysis. Three-dimensional images of Ti/AuPt could not be obtained due to metal artifacts and the tensile specimens of Ti/AuPt were debonded prior to the tensile test. All other welded specimens had porosity in the welded area and the porosities ranged from 0.01% to 0.17%. The fractures of most of the CoCr/CoCr and Ti/Ti specimens occurred in the parent metals. Joint strength had no relationship with the porosity in the welded area (R(2)=0.148 for CoCr/CoCr, R(2)=0.088 for Ti/Ti, respectively). The small amount of porosity caused by the laser-welding procedures did not affect the joint strength. The joint strength of Ti/AuPt was too weak to be used clinically. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Static and dynamic fracture toughness of 25mm thick single edge notch bend (SENB) specimen of C-Mn pressure vessel submerged arc weld metal and flaw assessment under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Wiesner, C. S.

    2003-09-01

    Although there are well established procedures for assessing the significance of defects in welded structures in a number of countries, such as BS7910 and R6 procedures in the UK, the Japanese WES 2807 procedure, the API and MPC procedures in the USA and the recently completed SINT AP procedure resulting from European collaboration, there are no clear guidelines for assessment of the effects of dynamic loading. In principle, the standard procedure can be applied for any rate of loading but there is little or no experience of how to allow for the effects of dynamic loading on load magnitude and material properties. Submerge arc weldments of 100mm thick have been manufactured. The effect of loading rate was investigated by testing 25mm thick SENB specimens. The fracture toughness of the weld metal exhibited marked loading rate sensitivity; shift in fracture toughness transition temperature for high loading rate tests of up to 115^{circ}C for 25mm specimens. Finite element (FE) analyses have been carried out to obtain plastic collapse load solutions for SENB fracture mechanics test piece. A simple equation for estimate of dynamic plastic yielding load has been suggested. Flaw assessment under dynamic loading has been demonstrated using the results of dynamic fracture toughness and plastic yiending load. The general methods of assessment of the significance of defects in BS7910 is shown to be applicable to assessments under dynamic loading up to impact.

  20. SU-F-J-07: Evaluating the Adequacy of Biopsy Specimens for Genetic Signature Assessment by Measuring the Metabolic Activity in Specimens Obtained Under 18F-FDG PET/CT Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanchon, L; Russell, J; Dogan, S; Carlin, S; Pinker-Domenig, K; Yorke, E; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Fujisawa, S; Manova-Todorova, K; Zanzonico, P; Deasy, J O; Humm, J L; Solomon, S; Kirov, A S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Genetic profiling of biopsied tissue is the basis for personalized cancer therapy. However biopsied materials may not contain sufficient amounts of DNA needed for analysis. We propose a method to determine the adequacy of specimens for performing genetic profiling by quantifying metabolic activity. Methods: We measured the response of two radiation detectors to the activity contained in the minimum amount of tumor cells needed for genetic profiling in biopsy specimens obtained under 2-deoxy-2-({sup 18}F)fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET/CT guidance. The expected tumor cell concentration in biopsy specimens was evaluated from the amount of DNA needed (∼100 µg) and the number of pathology sections typically used for the analysis. The average {sup 18}F-FDG uptake per cell was measured by incubating KPC-4662 pancreatic tumor cells and HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma tumor cells in {sup 18}F-FDG containing solution (activity concentrations between 0.0122 and 1.51 MBq/mL and glucose concentrations of 3.1 and 1 g/L) for 1 to 1.75 hours and then measuring the activity of a known number of cells. Measurements of surrogate specimens obtained using 18G needle biopsies of gels containing these cells in expected concentrations (∼10{sup 4} µL{sup −1}) were performed using an autoradiography CCD based device (up to 20 min exposure) and a scintillation well counter (∼1 min measurements) about 3 and 5 hours after the end of incubation respectively. Results: At start of autoradiography there were between 0.16 and 1.5 {sup 18}F-FDG molecules/cell and between 1.14 and 5.43×10{sup 7} {sup 18}F-FDG molecules/mL. For the scintillation well counter, sample to minimum-detectable-count rate ratios were greater than 7 and the counting error was less than 25% for ≤80 s measurement times. Images of the samples were identifiable on the autoradiograph for ∼10 min and longer exposure times. Conclusion: Scintillation well counter measurements and CCD based

  1. Accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of acute pulmonary embolism - development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens. Development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens; Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie mittels Spiral-CT und 3D-Rekonstruktion. Entwicklung eines Tiermodells und technischer Probekoerper im Ex-vivo-Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ries, B.G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Kauczor, H.U.; Thelen, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Konerding, M.A. [Anatomisches Inst., Mainz Univ (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for simulation the CT morphologic situation of acute pulmonary embolism, to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of artificial emboli and to investigate the influence of the orientation of emboli depending on z-axis orientation. Materials and Methods: Standardized artificial emboli made of wax and of defined size and shape were positioned into the pulmonary arteries of porcine lungs. Castings of the embolized pulmonary arterial trees were made by injection of a special opaque resin. After performance of spiral CT the data sets of the emboli and the pulmonary arteries were post-processed. The 3D segmentations were compared with the anatomic preparation to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT/3D reconstruction-technique. Technical specimens simulating CT-morphology of acute embolized vessels underwent spiral CT in six different positions with respect to the z-axis. The CT data were reconstructed using a standardized and a contrastadapted method with interactive correction. The 3D emboli were analysed under qualitative aspects, and measurements of their extent were done. Results: In nearly 91%, there was complete agreement between CT and the corresponding findings at the anatomical preparation. Measurements of the 3D reconstructed technical specimens showed discrepancies of shape and size in dependence of the size of the original preparation, orientation and reconstruction technique. Overestimation up to 4 mm and underestimation to 2,2 mm were observed. Measurements of preparations with heights from 14 to 26 mm showed variances of {+-}1,5 mm ({proportional_to}6-11%). Conclusion: The presented models are suitable to simulate CT morphology of acute pulmonary embolism under ex-vivo conditions. Accuracy in the detection of artificial emboli using spiral CT/3D reconstruction is affected by localization, size and orientation of the emboli and the reconstruction technique. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Entwicklung

  2. Microscopic dual-energy CT (microDECT): a flexible tool for multichannel ex vivo 3D imaging of biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, S; Beisser, C J; Ruthensteiner, B; Metscher, B D

    2017-07-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) uses two different x-ray energy spectra in order to differentiate between tissues, materials or elements in a single sample or patient. DECT is becoming increasingly popular in clinical imaging and preclinical in vivo imaging of small animal models, but there have been only very few reports on ex vivo DECT of biological samples at microscopic resolutions. The present study has three main aims. First, we explore the potential of microscopic DECT (microDECT) for delivering isotropic multichannel 3D images of fixed biological samples with standard commercial laboratory-based microCT setups at spatial resolutions reaching below 10 μm. Second, we aim for retaining the maximum image resolution and quality during the material decomposition. Third, we want to test the suitability for microDECT imaging of different contrast agents currently used for ex vivo staining of biological samples. To address these aims, we used microCT scans of four different samples stained with x-ray dense contrast agents. MicroDECT scans were acquired with five different commercial microCT scanners from four companies. We present a detailed description of the microDECT workflow, including sample preparation, image acquisition, image processing and postreconstruction material decomposition, which may serve as practical guide for applying microDECT. The MATLAB script (The Mathworks Inc., Natick, MA, USA) used for material decomposition (including a graphical user interface) is provided as a supplement to this paper (https://github.com/microDECT/DECTDec). In general, the presented microDECT workflow yielded satisfactory results for all tested specimens. Original scan resolutions have been mostly retained in the separate material fractions after basis material decomposition. In addition to decomposition of mineralized tissues (inherent sample contrast) and stained soft tissues, we present a case of double labelling of different soft tissues with subsequent

  3. Correlation of the same fields imaged in the TEM, confocal, LM, and microCT by image registration: from specimen preparation to displaying a final composite image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Douglas R; Tufa, Sara F; Wong, Melissa H; Smith, Nicholas R; Sakai, Lynn Y; Horton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Correlated imaging is the process of imaging a specimen with two complementary modalities and then registering and overlaying the fields obtained in each modality to create a composite view. One of the images is made somewhat transparent, allowing detail in the underlying image to be visible and assisting in the registration of the two images. As an example, an image localizing a specific tissue component by fluorescence may be overlaid atop a TEM image of the same field. The resulting composite image would demonstrate specific ultrastructural features in the high-resolution TEM field, which are colorized in the overlay. Other examples include composites from MicroCT or soft X-ray images overlaid atop light microscopy or TEM images. Automated image registration may be facilitated by a variety of sophisticated computer programs utilized by high-throughput laboratories. This chapter is meant for the more occasional user wishing to align images manually. ImageJ is a public domain, image processing program developed at the National Institutes of Health and is available to anyone as a free download. ImageJ performs marvelously well for the purpose of image registration; therefore, step-by-step instructions are included here. Specimen handling, including fixation and choice of embedding media, is not straightforward for correlative imaging. A step-by-step description of the protocols which work in our laboratory is included for simultaneous localization in LM, EM and micro-CT, as well as maintaining GFP emission in tissue embedded for TEM. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  5. Feasibility of in situ, high-resolution correlation of tracer uptake with histopathology by quantitative autoradiography of biopsy specimens obtained under 18F-FDG PET/CT guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchon, Louise M; Dogan, Snjezana; Moreira, Andre L; Carlin, Sean A; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Yorke, Ellen; Apte, Aditya P; Burger, Irene A; Durack, Jeremy C; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Maybody, Majid; Schöder, Heiko; Siegelbaum, Robert H; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Deasy, Joseph O; Solomon, Stephen B; Humm, John L; Kirov, Assen S

    2015-04-01

    Core biopsies obtained using PET/CT guidance contain bound radiotracer and therefore provide information about tracer uptake in situ. Our goal was to develop a method for quantitative autoradiography of biopsy specimens (QABS), to use this method to correlate (18)F-FDG tracer uptake in situ with histopathology findings, and to briefly discuss its potential application. Twenty-seven patients referred for a PET/CT-guided biopsy of (18)F-FDG-avid primary or metastatic lesions in different locations consented to participate in this institutional review board-approved study, which complied with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Autoradiography of biopsy specimens obtained using 5 types of needles was performed immediately after extraction. The response of autoradiography imaging plates was calibrated using dummy specimens with known activity obtained using 2 core-biopsy needle sizes. The calibration curves were used to quantify the activity along biopsy specimens obtained with these 2 needles and to calculate the standardized uptake value, SUVARG. Autoradiography images were correlated with histopathologic findings and fused with PET/CT images demonstrating the position of the biopsy needle within the lesion. Logistic regression analysis was performed to search for an SUVARG threshold distinguishing benign from malignant tissue in liver biopsy specimens. Pearson correlation between SUVARG of the whole biopsy specimen and average SUVPET over the voxels intersected by the needle in the fused PET/CT image was calculated. Activity concentrations were obtained using autoradiography for 20 specimens extracted with 18- and 20-gauge needles. The probability of finding malignancy in a specimen is greater than 50% (95% confidence) if SUVARG is greater than 7.3. For core specimens with preserved shape and orientation and in the absence of motion, one can achieve autoradiography, CT, and PET image registration with spatial accuracy better than 2 mm. The

  6. Evaluation of the Effect of Fracture Resistance Curve Change Owing to the Presence or Absence of Side Groove in C(T) Specimen on Finite Element Failure Model Parameter Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hune-Tae; Ryu, Ho-Wan; Kim, Yun-Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Sung [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Myung-Rak; Kim, Jin-Weon [Chosun Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, the effect of J-R curve changes on the determination of parameters in a failure model owing to the presence or absence of a side groove in a C(T) specimen is investigated. A stress-modified fracture strain model is implemented for FE damage simulations. C(T) specimens were taken from SA508 grade 1a low-alloy steel piping material, and some of them were processed with a side groove. Fracture toughness tests were performed at room temperature and at 316 .deg. C. The parameters of the failure model were determined by damage simulations using the J-R curves obtained from the tests. Finally, the results show that the determination of failure model parameters is not affected by variations in J-R curves owing to the presence or absence of a side groove.

  7. TIG-dressing of high strength butt welded connection - Part 2: physical testing and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  8. TIG-dressing of High Strength Butt Welded Connection. Part 2 : Physical Testing and Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  9. Fatigue Behavior of Inconel 718 TIG Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos D.; Argyriou, Nikolaos; Stergiou, Vasillis; Kourkoulis, Stavros K.

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical behavior of reference and TIG-welded Inconel 718 specimens was examined in the present work. Tensile, constant amplitude fatigue, and fracture toughness tests were performed in ambient temperature for both, reference and welded specimens. Microstructure revealed the presence of coarse and fine-grained heat-affected zones. It has been shown that without any post-weld heat treatment, welded specimens maintained their tensile strength properties while their ductility decreased by more than 40%. It was found that the welded specimens had lower fatigue life and this decrease was a function of the applied fatigue maximum stress. A 30% fatigue life decrease was noticed in the high cycle fatigue regime for the welded specimens while this decrease exceeded 50% in the low cycle fatigue regime. Cyclic stress-strain curves showed that Inconel 718 experiences a short period of hardening followed by softening for all fatigue lives. Cyclic fatigue response of welded specimens' exhibited cyclically stable behavior. Finally, a marginal decrease was noticed in the Mode I fracture toughness of the welded specimens.

  10. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  11. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  12. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  13. WOOD WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Theodoro Muller; Rafael Rodolfo de Melo; Diego Martins Stangerlin

    2010-01-01

    The term "wood welding" designates what can be defined as "welding of wood surfaces". This new process, that it provides the joint of wood pieces without the use of adhesives or any other additional material, provokes growing interest in the academic environment, although it is still in laboratorial state. Linear friction welding induced bymechanical vibration yields welded joints of flat wood surfaces. The phenomenon of the welding occurs in less time than 10 seconds, with the temperature in...

  14. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel; Modelisation de l'endommagement a haute temperature dans le metal d'apport des joints soudes d'acier inoxydable austenitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouche, G

    2000-07-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  15. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  16. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  17. Chondrocalcinosis of femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints in cadaveric specimens: a high-resolution CT imaging study of the calcification distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Touraine

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze calcium deposits by computed tomography (CT in femoro-tibial compartments and proximal tibio-fibular joints; to assess the relationship with CT-assessed osteoarthritis (OA. METHODS: 68 (34 pairs cadaveric knees (mean age of 84 were scanned at high resolution CT. Menisci and hyaline cartilage calcifications in the femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints were analyzed. OA was CT-assessed by the Kellgren and Lawrence score. Gross appearance of OA was evaluated on 29 left knees after dissection and India ink staining of tibial plateaus. RESULTS: In femoro-tibial joints, meniscal calcifications (MC and hyaline cartilage calcifications (HCC were detected in 23(34% and 14(21% knees respectively. Calcifications mainly involved the three meniscal segments and were mainly observed in all thirds of the femoro-tibial compartments. In proximal tibio-fibular joints, HCC were detected in 19(28% knees. The association HCC-MC in femoro-tibial joints and between calcifications in femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints was strong (p<0.0001. Femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular CT-assessed OA were respectively found in 23(34% and 19(28% knees. HCC were significantly associated with femoro-tibial OA (p = 0.04 while MC were not (p = 0.34. OA macroscopic evaluation showed a mean surface of cartilage lesions of 35% (range 0.13-0.55. No significant difference was demonstrated regarding the CT-detection of MC, HCC or CT-assessed OA. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to report a strong association of chondrocalcinosis between femoro-tibial and tibio-fibular joints in addition to a strong association between MC and HCC in femoro-tibial compartments. No significant relationship between chondrocalcinosis and OA was demonstrated.

  18. Chondrocalcinosis of femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints in cadaveric specimens: a high-resolution CT imaging study of the calcification distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Sébastien; Ea, Hang Korng; Bousson, Valérie; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Laouisset, Liess; Chappard, Christine; Lioté, Frédéric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2013-01-01

    To analyze calcium deposits by computed tomography (CT) in femoro-tibial compartments and proximal tibio-fibular joints; to assess the relationship with CT-assessed osteoarthritis (OA). 68 (34 pairs) cadaveric knees (mean age of 84) were scanned at high resolution CT. Menisci and hyaline cartilage calcifications in the femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints were analyzed. OA was CT-assessed by the Kellgren and Lawrence score. Gross appearance of OA was evaluated on 29 left knees after dissection and India ink staining of tibial plateaus. In femoro-tibial joints, meniscal calcifications (MC) and hyaline cartilage calcifications (HCC) were detected in 23(34%) and 14(21%) knees respectively. Calcifications mainly involved the three meniscal segments and were mainly observed in all thirds of the femoro-tibial compartments. In proximal tibio-fibular joints, HCC were detected in 19(28%) knees. The association HCC-MC in femoro-tibial joints and between calcifications in femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular joints was strong (p<0.0001). Femoro-tibial and proximal tibio-fibular CT-assessed OA were respectively found in 23(34%) and 19(28%) knees. HCC were significantly associated with femoro-tibial OA (p = 0.04) while MC were not (p = 0.34). OA macroscopic evaluation showed a mean surface of cartilage lesions of 35% (range 0.13-0.55). No significant difference was demonstrated regarding the CT-detection of MC, HCC or CT-assessed OA. This is the first study to report a strong association of chondrocalcinosis between femoro-tibial and tibio-fibular joints in addition to a strong association between MC and HCC in femoro-tibial compartments. No significant relationship between chondrocalcinosis and OA was demonstrated.

  19. Intraindividual Comparison of (18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT, Multiparametric MRI, and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Patients with Primary Prostate Cancer: A Retrospective, Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesch, Claudia; Vinsensia, Maria; Radtke, Jan P; Schlemmer, Heinz P; Heller, Martina; Ellert, Elena; Holland-Letz, Tim; Duensing, Stefan; Grabe, Nils; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Wieczorek, Kathrin; Schäfer, Martin; Neels, Oliver C; Cardinale, Jens; Kratochwil, Clemens; Hohenfellner, Markus; Kopka, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hadaschik, Boris A; Giesel, Frederik L

    2017-11-01

    (68)Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-11 PET/CT represents an advanced method for the staging of primary prostate cancer (PCa) and diagnosis of recurrent or metastatic PCa. However, because of the narrow availability of (68)Ga the development of alternative tracers is of high interest. The objective of this study was to examine the value of the new PET tracer (18)F-PSMA-1007 for the staging of local disease by comparing it with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and radical prostatectomy (RP) histopathology. Methods: In 2016, (18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT was performed in 10 men with biopsy-confirmed high-risk PCa. Nine patients underwent mpMRI in the process of primary diagnosis. Consecutively, RP was performed in all 10 men. Agreement analysis was performed retrospectively. PSMA staining was added for representative sections in RP specimen slices. Localization and agreement analysis of (18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT, mpMRI, and RP specimens was performed by dividing the prostate into 38 sections as described in the prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) (version 2). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracy were calculated for total and near-total agreement. Results:(18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT had an NPV of 68% and an accuracy of 75%, and mpMRI had an NPV of 88% and an accuracy of 73% for total agreement. Near-total agreement analysis resulted in an NPV of 91% and an accuracy of 93% for (18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT and 91% and 87% for mpMRI, respectively. Retrospective combination of mpMRI and PET/CT had an accuracy of 81% for total and 93% for near-total agreement. Conclusion: Comparison with RP histopathology demonstrates that (18)F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT is promising for accurate local staging of PCa. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. The Assessment and Validation of Mini-Compact Tension Test Specimen Geometry and Progress in Establishing Technique for Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nanstad, Randy K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of small specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Assessment and validation of mini-CT specimen geometry has been performed on previously well characterized HSST Plate 13B, an A533B class 1 steel. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature measured by these Mini-CT specimens is within the range of To values that were derived from various large fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, the scatter of the fracture toughness values measured by Mini-CT specimens perfectly follows the Weibull distribution function providing additional proof for validation of this geometry for the Master Curve evaluation of rector pressure vessel steels. Moreover, the International collaborative program has been developed to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated weld metal. The program is underway and involves ORNL, CRIEPI, and EPRI.

  1. Mechanical properties and microstructure of F-82H welded joints using CO{sub 2} laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanouchi, N.; Shiba, K.

    1996-10-01

    The laser welding of F-82H was successfully conducted. The heat affected zone of the welding, was about 21 mm width. It was quite adequate to make small specimens, such as SS-3 type sheet tensile specimen.

  2. Effect of CT Specimen Thickness on the Mechanical Characteristics at the Crack Tip of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Ni-based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinghao, Cui; He, Xue; Lingyan, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    It’s important to obtain accurate stress corrosion crack(SCC) growth rate for quantitative life prediction of components in nuclear power plants. However, the engineering practice shows that the crack tip constraint effect has a great influence on the mechanical properties and crack growth rate of SCC at crack tip. To study the influence of the specimen thickness on the crack tip mechanical properties of SCC, the stress, strain and C integral at creep crack tip are analyzed under different specimens thickness. Results show that the cracked specimen is less likely to crack due to effect of crack tip constraint. When the thickness ratio B/W is larger than 0.1, the crack tip constraint is almost ineffective. Value of C integral is the largest when B/W is 0.25. Then specimen thickness has little effect on the value of C integral. The effect of specimen thickness on the value of C integral is less significant at higher thickness ratio.

  3. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  4. The impact of welding wire on the mechanical properties of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Mazur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the mechanical properties of Hardox 450 steel welded joints. These welded joints were made in accordance with welding procedure specifications (WPS, which was prepared and  applied in the Wielton company. Fillers were provided by welding wires with two different diameters. The welding wire was G4Sil with diameter of 1.0 mm and 1.2 mm. The aim of this study was to examine whether the thickness of the welding wire has a direct effect on the properties of welded joints. Test specimens were made in similar parameters of the welding process. Then they were subjected to macroscopic research, tensile strength, impact strength and hardness

  5. Yield load solutions of heterogeneous welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, D., E-mail: dkozak@sfsb.h [Mechanical Engineering Faculty in Slavonski Brod, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Trg Ivane Brlic-Mazuranic 2, Hr-35000 Slavonski Brod (Croatia); Gubeljak, N. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Konjatic, P.; Sertic, J. [Mechanical Engineering Faculty in Slavonski Brod, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Trg Ivane Brlic-Mazuranic 2, Hr-35000 Slavonski Brod (Croatia)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this paper is to establish yield load solutions when the materials inhomogeneity within the weld is present, which is usually the case in repair welding. The effect of yield strength mismatch of welded joints performed with different geometry on the yield load value has been investigated in the context of single edge notched fracture toughness specimen subjected to bending SE(B) using the finite element method. The crack was located in the center of the weld and the two most important geometrical parameters were identified as: crack length ratio a/W as well as slenderness of the welded joint, which were systematically varied. One practical and four additional combinations of filler materials, with the same portion of overmatched part and undermatched part of the weld, were analyzed, and plane strain FE solutions for the case when the crack is located in the overmatched half of the heterogeneous weld were obtained.

  6. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in an STI population: performances of the Presto CT-NG assay, the Lightmix Kit 480 HT CT/NG and the COBAS Amplicor with urine specimens and urethral/cervicovaginal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurs, T A; Verweij, S P; Weel, J F L; Ouburg, S; Morré, S A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the performances of the Presto CT-NG assay, the Lightmix Kit 480 HT CT/NG and the COBAS Amplicor for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae detection. Design A cross-sectional study design. Setting Izore, Centre for Diagnosing Infectious Diseases in Friesland, the Netherlands, tested samples sent from regional sexually transmitted infection (STI) outpatient clinics and regional hospitals from the province Friesland, the Netherlands. Participants Samples were collected from 292 men and 835 women. These samples included 560 urine samples and 567 urethral/cervicovaginal samples. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure is C trachomatis infection. No secondary outcome measures are available. Results The sensitivity, specificity, positive predicative value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for C trachomatis detection in urine samples using the Presto CT-NG assay were 100%, 99.8%, 98.1% and 100%, respectively; for the Lightmix Kit 480 HT CT/NG: 94.2%, 99.8%, 96.1% and 99.4%, respectively; for the COBAS Amplicor: 92.3%, 99.6%, 96% and 99.2%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for C trachomatis detection in urethral/cervicovaginal swabs using the Presto CT-NG assay and the COBAS Amplicor were 100%, 99.8%, 97.7% and 100%, respectively; for the Lightmix Kit 480 HT CT/NG: 100%, 99.6%, 97.7% and 100%, respectively. Calculations for N gonorrhoeae could not be made due to a low prevalence. Conclusions All three assays had a high sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for C trachomatis, with best performance for the Presto CT-NG assay. PMID:24381252

  7. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  8. Virtual Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  9. Survey of welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The current KYTC SPECIAL PROVISION NO. 4 WELDING STEEL BRIDGES prohibits the use of welding processes other than shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Nationally, bridge welding is codified under ANSI/AASHTO/AWS D1....

  10. Investigate The Effect Of Welding Parameters On Mechanical Properties During The Welding Of Al-6061 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is being used in recent times to weld similar as well as dissimilar metals for getting defect free weld. Many combinations like low carbon to stainless steel austenitic to ferrite stainless steel aluminium to copper and titanium to aluminium or steel have been tried out by various solid state welding processes with quite good results. In the present work the 3 level full factorial design has been employed to investigate the effect of welding parameters on tensile strength toughness and heat generation during the welding of Al-6061 alloy. Mathematical relationships between friction welding parameters and mechanical properties like heat generation tensile strength and toughness have also been developed. An attempt has also been made to examine the fracture surfaces of test specimens using SEM. It has been found that welding speed is the most significant parameter thats affect the heat generation tensile strength and toughness. it has been found that tensile strength and toughness during welding increases with increased in welding speed while tensile strength and toughness initially increased as the welding time increases after that it decreased with increase in welding time. The difference in weight of alloying elements can be clearly seen by analyzing spectrum of elements.

  11. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  12. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  13. Mechanical Properties of Thermally Aged Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds and Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Seo, Myeong-Gyu; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Conventional test methods for tensile and J-R properties of such weld require large size specimens. Meanwhile, small punch (SP) test has advantages of using small size samples at specific location. In this study, the mechanical property changes caused by the thermal aging were evaluated for the stainless steel welds and CASSs using tensile, J-R, and SP test. Based on the results, correlations were developed to estimate the fracture toughness using the load-displacement curve of SP tests. Finally, the fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) and SP test specimens are compared and discussed in view of the effect of thermal aging on microstructure. Stainless steel welds of ER316L and ER347 as well as CASS (CF8M) were thermally aged at 400 .deg. C for 5,000 h. So far, tensile properties and fracture toughness of un-aged materials were carried out at room temperature and 320 .deg. C as a reference data. In order to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties, aged specimens are being tested and the changes in these properties will be discussed. In addition, correlations will be developed to estimate the fracture toughness in between J-R curve and SP curve.

  14. Specimen Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David B.; Carter, C. Barry

    Specimen preparation is a very broad subject; there are books devoted to this topic alone. The intention here is to summarize the techniques, suggest routes that you might follow, and above all to emphasize that there are many ways to produce a TEM specimen; the one you choose will depend on the information you need, time constraints, availability of equipment, your skill, and the material. So we’ll concentrate on the ‘principles of cooking,’ but won’t try to list all the possible ‘recipes.’ One important point to bear in mind is that your technique must not affect what you see or measure, or if it does, then you must know how. Specimen preparation artifacts may be interesting but they are not usually what you want to study. Incidentally, we’ll make ‘specimens’ from the ‘sample’ we’re investigating so we’ll look at ‘TEM specimens,’ but sometimes we, and everyone else, will interchange the two words.

  15. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  16. Detection of carotid artery stenosis using histological specimens: a comparison of CT angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, digital subtraction angiography and Doppler ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netuka, David; Belšán, Tomáš; Broulíková, Karolina; Mandys, Václav; Charvát, František; Malík, Josef; Coufalová, Lucie; Bradáč, Ondřej; Ostrý, Svatopluk; Beneš, Vladimír

    2016-08-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is accepted as a primary modality to treat carotid stenosis. The accuracy of measuring carotid stenosis is important for indication of the CEA procedure. Different diagnostic tools have been developed and used in the past 2 decades for the diagnosis of carotid stenosis. Only a few studies, however, have focused on the comparison of different diagnostic tools to histological findings of carotid plaque. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis were investigated primarily by computed tomography angiography (CTA). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA), Doppler ultrasonography (DUS) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were performed as well. Atherosclerotic plaque specimens were transversally cut into smaller segments and histologically processed. The slides were scanned and specimens showing maximal stenosis were determined; the minimal diameter and the diameter of the whole plaque were measured. High quality histological specimen and histological measurement was considered to be the prerequisite for inclusion into the analysis. The preoperative findings were compared with histological measurement. CTA and histological measurements were obtained from 152 patients. DSA measurements were available in 138 of these cases, MRA in 107 and DUS in 88. A comparison between preoperative and histological findings was performed. In addition, correlation coefficients were computed and tested. A significant correlation was found for each of the diagnostic procedures. The strongest correlation coefficient and the best allocation of stenosis into clinical significant groups (<50 %, 50-69 %, ≥70 %) was observed for CTA. Mean differences in the whole cohort between preoperative and histological measurements were as follows: CTA underestimated histological measurement by 2.4 % (based on European Carotid Surgery Trial [ECST] methodology) and 11.9 % (based on North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial [NASCET] methodology

  17. Models for selecting GMA Welding Parameters for Improving Mechanical Properties of Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, P.; Ramachandran, Pragash; Jebaraj, S.

    2016-02-01

    During the process of Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) welding, the weld joints mechanical properties are influenced by the welding parameters such as welding current and arc voltage. These parameters directly will influence the quality of the weld in terms of mechanical properties. Even small variation in any of the cited parameters may have an important effect on depth of penetration and on joint strength. In this study, S45C Constructional Steel is taken as the base metal to be tested using the parameters wire feed rate, voltage and type of shielding gas. Physical properties considered in the present study are tensile strength and hardness. The testing of weld specimen is carried out as per ASTM Standards. Mathematical models to predict the tensile strength and depth of penetration of weld joint have been developed by regression analysis using the experimental results.

  18. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  19. The fatigue life of a cobalt-chromium alloy after laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaa, Nabil Jalal Ahmad; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fatigue life of laser welded joints in a commercially available cast cobalt-chromium alloy. Twenty rod shaped specimens (40 mm x 1.5 mm) were cast and sand blasted. Ten specimens were used as controls and the remaining ten were sectioned and repaired using a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welder. All specimens were subjected to fatigue testing (30N - 2Hz) in a controlled environment. A statistically significant difference in median fatigue life was found between as-cast and laser welded specimens (p cracks, pores and constriction of the outer surface in the welded specimens despite 70% penetration of the weld.

  20. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of the intercept method for evaluating stable crack extension in a steel C(T) specimen; Analisis experimental y numerico del metodo del intercepto para evaluar la extension estable de grieta en una probeta C(T) de acero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, J. R.; Leiva, R.; Labbe, F.

    2009-07-01

    A new method for evaluating the crack size in a fracture mechanics test which only has force-displacement data P-{nu}, is introduced. this method consists in generating P-{nu} data of an A 508 C(T) specimen, and a two-dimensional finite element model, it is shown that the method contributes to generate relevant data concerning the evolution of the crack size in a test. The results obtained with the method make it possible to construct a J-R curve which is practically identical to that constructed with the original experimental data. (Author) 11 refs.

  2. Predictions for fatigue crack growth life of cracked pipes and pipe welds using RMS SIF approach and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Punit, E-mail: punit@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Department of Atomic Energy, Maharashtra, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, P.K.; Bhasin, Vivek; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Department of Atomic Energy, Maharashtra, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pukazhendhi, D.M.; Gandhi, P.; Raghava, G. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, Chennai 600 113 (India)

    2011-10-15

    The objective of the present study is to understand the fatigue crack growth behavior in austenitic stainless steel pipes and pipe welds by carrying out analysis/predictions and experiments. The Paris law has been used for the prediction of fatigue crack growth life. To carry out the analysis, Paris constants have been determined for pipe (base) and pipe weld materials by using Compact Tension (CT) specimens machined from the actual pipe/pipe weld. Analyses have been carried out to predict the fatigue crack growth life of the austenitic stainless steel pipes/pipes welds having part through cracks on the outer surface. In the analyses, Stress Intensity Factors (K) have been evaluated through two different schemes. The first scheme considers the 'K' evaluations at two points of the crack front i.e. maximum crack depth and crack tip at the outer surface. The second scheme accounts for the area averaged root mean square stress intensity factor (K{sub RMS}) at deepest and surface points. Crack growth and the crack shape with loading cycles have been evaluated. In order to validate the analytical procedure/results, experiments have been carried out on full scale pipe and pipe welds with part through circumferential crack. Fatigue crack growth life evaluated using both schemes have been compared with experimental results. Use of stress intensity factor (K{sub RMS}) evaluated using second scheme gives better fatigue crack growth life prediction compared to that of first scheme. Fatigue crack growth in pipe weld (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) can be predicted well using Paris constants of base material but prediction is non-conservative for pipe weld (Shielded Metal Arc Welding). Further, predictions using fatigue crack growth rate curve of ASME produces conservative results for pipe and GTAW pipe welds and comparable results for SMAW pipe welds. - Highlights: > Predicting fatigue crack growth of Austenitic Stainless Steel pipes and pipe welds. > Use of RMS-SIF and

  3. Residual stress reduction and fatigue strength improvement by controlling welding pass sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Hattori, Toshio; Nakakado, Kimiaki

    2000-01-01

    The effects of residual stress on fatigue strength at a weld toe in a multi-pass fillet weld joint were evaluated. The residual stresses in the weld joints were varied by controlling the sequence of welding passes. The residual stress at the weld toe was 80 MPa in the specimen whose last welding pass was on the main plate side, but it was 170 MPa in the specimen whose last pass was on the attachment side. The fatigue strength was nearly the same at high stress amplitude for both specimens, but the fatigue strength of the specimen whose last weld pass on the main plate was higher than that of the other specimen at low stress amplitude. This difference is due to the magnitude of the initial residual stress and the relaxation of the residual stress under fatigue cycling. The effects of the residual stress were shown in a modified Goodman diagram, in which residual stress is treated as a mean stress.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  5. Thermal analysis of laser welding for ITER correction coil case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, C., E-mail: fangchao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta (Finland); Song, Y.T.; Wu, W.Y.; Wei, J.; Xin, J.J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 200031 (China); Wu, H.P.; Salminen, A. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, 53850 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Morphology of simulated heat source is found to be close to the welded joint sample. • The FEA temperature distribution shows good agreement with experimental measurements. • Laser welding process used on ITER correction coil case will not harm the winding pack. - Abstract: This paper presents the simulation results of 3D finite element analysis (FEA) of laser welding processes for the ITER correction coil case welding; predicts the temperature distribution and compares it with the experimental result to evaluate the impact to the properties of winding pack during the welding process. A specimen of coil case was modeled and simulated by using specialized welding simulation software SYSWELD, Modeling used austenitic stainless steel 316LN as the specimen material and a 3D Conical Gaussian was used as a heat source model. A plate sample was welded before the FE modeling in order to obtain the laser welding parameters and the Gaussian parameters of molten pool. To verify the simulation results, a coil case sample was welded using laser welding with welding parameters that matched the model, and the corresponding temperature values were measured using thermocouples. Compared with the FEA results, it was found that the FEA temperature distribution shows good agreement with the experimental measurements and the laser welding process will not harm the winding pack.

  6. Monitoring the quality of welding based on welding current and ste analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, Afidatusshimah; Daniyal, Hamdan; Izzani Mohamed, Amir; Ishak, Mahadzir; Hadi, Amran Abdul

    2017-10-01

    Qualities of welding play an important part in industry especially in manufacturing field. Post-welding non-destructive test is one of the importance process to ensure the quality of welding but it is time consuming and costly. To reduce the chance of defects, online monitoring had been utilized by continuously sense some of welding parameters and predict welding quality. One of the parameters is welding current, which is rich of information but lack of study focus on extract them at signal analysis level. This paper presents the analysis of welding current using Short Time Energy (STE) signal processing to quantify the pattern of the current. GMAW set with carbon steel specimens are used in this experimental study with high-bandwidth and high sampling rate oscilloscope capturing the welding current. The results indicate welding current as signatures have high correlation with the welding process. Continue with STE analysis, the value below 5000 is declare as good welding, meanwhile the STE value more than 6000 is contained defect.

  7. Nondestructive Testing of Residual Stress on the Welded Part of Butt-welded A36 Plates Using Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongsuk Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most manufacturing processes, including welding, create residual stresses. Residual stresses can reduce material strength and cause fractures. For estimating the reliability and aging of a welded structure, residual stresses should be evaluated as precisely as possible. Optical techniques such as holographic interferometry, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI, Moire interferometry, and shearography are noncontact means of measuring residual stresses. Among optical techniques, ESPI is typically used as a nondestructive measurement technique of in-plane displacement, such as stress and strain, and out-of-plane displacement, such as vibration and bending. In this study, ESPI was used to measure the residual stress on the welded part of butt-welded American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM A36 specimens with CO2 welding. Four types of specimens, base metal specimen (BSP, tensile specimen including welded part (TSP, compression specimen including welded part (CSP, and annealed tensile specimen including welded part (ATSP, were tested. BSP was used to obtain the elastic modulus of a base metal. TSP and CSP were used to compare residual stresses under tensile and compressive loading conditions. ATSP was used to confirm the effect of heat treatment. Residual stresses on the welded parts of specimens were obtained from the phase map images obtained by ESPI. The results confirmed that residual stresses of welded parts can be measured by ESPI.

  8. Improved design bases of welded joints in seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Ólafur Magnús

    were tested in a corrosion environment with cathodic protection. The specimens were subjected to high fatigue loading at the samestress ratio as the tests performed in-air. A direct comparison to the specimens testedunder in-air conditions was performed in order to evaluate the effects of the corrosion...... different environments, i.e. under in-air conditions and in a corrosion environment. Welded structures of all sizes and shapes exhibit fatigue failure primarily in the welded region, rather than in the base material, due to imperfections and flaws relating to the welding procedure. The welded region has...

  9. A study on the fatigue strength characteristics of ship structural steel with gusset welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jo Park

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess fatigue property by the static overload and average load in the fillet welded joints which is on the ship structural steel having gusset welds. To this end, a small specimen was made, to which the same welding condition for the actual ship structure was applied, to perform fatigue tests. In this study, a method to simply assess changes in welding residual stress according to different static overload was suggested. By measuring actual strain at the weld toe, the weld stress concentration factor and property which is determined by recrystallization in the process of welding were estimated to investigate the relation between overload and fatigue strength.

  10. A study on the fatigue strength characteristics of ship structural steel with gusset welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jo; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to assess fatigue property by the static overload and average load in the fillet welded joints which is on the ship structural steel having gusset welds. To this end, a small specimen was made, to which the same welding condition for the actual ship structure was applied, to perform fatigue tests. In this study, a method to simply assess changes in welding residual stress according to different static overload was suggested. By measuring actual strain at the weld toe, the weld stress concentration factor and property which is determined by recrystallization in the process of welding were estimated to investigate the relation between overload and fatigue strength.

  11. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  12. Geometry and Material Constraint Effects on Creep Crack Growth Behavior in Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wang, G. Z.; Xuan, F. Z.; Tu, S. T.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the geometry and material constraint effects on creep crack growth (CCG) and behavior in welded joints were investigated. The CCG paths and rates of two kinds of specimen geometry (C(T) and M(T)) with initial cracks located at soft HAZ (heat-affected zone with lower creep strength) and different material mismatches were simulated. The effect of constraint on creep crack initiation (CCI) time was discussed. The results show that there exists interaction between geometry and material constraints in terms of their effects on CCG rate and CCI time of welded joints. Under the condition of low geometry constraint, the effect of material constraint on CCG rate and CCI time becomes more obvious. Higher material constraint can promote CCG due to the formation of higher stress triaxiality around crack tip. Higher geometry constraint can increase CCG rate and reduce CCI time of welded joints. Both geometry and material constraints should be considered in creep life assessment and design for high-temperature welded components.

  13. Examination of weld defects by computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jovanović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defects in metal arc gas (MAG welds made in S235JR low carbon steel of 6 mm thickness were examined. A sample containing lack of fusion (LOF and pores was examined by computed tomography – CT. The computed tomography examination was performed in order to define LOF size and position as well as dimensions and distribution of accompanying pores in the weld metal.

  14. Evaluation of anodic behavior of commercially pure titanium in tungsten inert gas and laser welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Raimundo, Larica B; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio de Arruda; Kuri, Sebastião E; Rovere, Carlos Alberto D; Pagnano, Valeria Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the resistance to corrosion in welds made with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) in comparison with laser welds. A total of 15 circular specimens (10-mm diameter, 2-mm thick) were fabricated and divided into two groups: control group-cp Ti specimens (n = 5); experimental group-cp Ti specimens welded with TIG (n = 5) and with laser (n = 5). They were polished mechanically, washed with isopropyl alcohol, and dried with a drier. In the anodic potentiodynamic polarization assay, measurements were taken using a potentiostat/galvanostat in addition to CorrWare software for data acquisition and CorrView for data visualization and treatment. Three curves were made for each working electrode. Corrosion potential values were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. Statistical analysis showed that corrosion potentials and passive current densities of specimens welded with TIG are similar to those of the control group, and had lower values than laser welding. TIG welding provided higher resistance to corrosion than laser welding. Control specimens welded with TIG were more resistant to local corrosion initiation and propagation than those with laser welding, indicating a higher rate of formation and growth of passive film thickness on the surfaces of these alloys than on specimens welded with laser, making it more difficult for corrosion to occur. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Friction Stir Welding of Magnesium Die Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skar, Jan Ivar; Gjestland, Haavard; Oosterkamp, Ljiljana Djapic; Albright, Darryl L.

    Friction stir welding (FSW), being a solid-state process, is an attractive method for joining magnesium die castings. In this study, FSW of AZ91D and AM50A plates was performed both on the individual alloys and to join them together. The welds were sound and free from defects, except for small surface cracks in AM50A; a fine microstructure characterized the weld zones. The tensile properties of specimens transverse to the weld zone were measured, as were the corrosion properties. The tensile properties were somewhat lower than the base metal, with the largest percentage decrease found in the elongation of AM50A, perhaps due to the surface cracking. The corrosion resistance of the weld zone was relatively poor, most likely due to iron contamination from wearing of the tool. Further optimization of the FSW tool design and process parameters must take place to improve the reliability of FSW for magnesium die castings.

  16. Creep of service-aged welds

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The creep behaviour of welds in service-aged pipes are studied. The aims of the research have been achieved using analytical, numerical and experimental approaches to the relevant subjects. Several features of the work are presented: (i) a systematic parametric study of the creep of two-material test specimens including a stress singularity analysis, (ii) an impression creep testing method using a rectangular indenter, which can be applied to study the creep properties in welds, and (iii) met...

  17. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Similar- and Dissimilar-Alloy Friction Stir Welded Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Sinke, Jos

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process with relatively low welding temperatures. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of friction stir welded blanks are degraded after welding. Indeed, both strength and ductility of the welds are decreased after welding. Often, the resulting friction stir welded blanks need to be formed to their final structural shape. Therefore, the formability of friction stir welded blanks is of primary importance in the manufacturing of structural parts. This paper studies how the mechanical properties and particularly formability of friction stir welded blanks can be improved by applying a post weld heat treatment. Two aluminum alloys from 2000 and 7000 series, namely 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study. The sheet thickness of both materials is 2,0 mm. The selected alloys are welded in three configurations: 2024-T3 and 2024-T3, 7075-T6 and 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 and 7075-T6. The resulting welds are naturally aged for a few months. Three sets of standard dog bone shape tensile test specimens are then machined from the welds. The first set of the specimens is tested without any heat treatment. The second set of the specimens is solution heat treated and quenched before testing. The third set of the specimens is solution heat treated, quenched, and naturally aged for a week before testing. The mechanical properties of the three different sets of specimens are compared with each other. It is shown that careful selection of post weld heat-treatment can greatly improve the formability of friction stir welded blanks.

  18. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  19. Environmental cracking behavior of submerged arc-welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Sharkawy, S. W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-04-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel welds produced by submerged are welding were assessed for their microstructure and properties. Slow strain rate tests conducted on these specimens revealed that both the parent material and the weld metals are susceptible to cracking under conditions of hydrogen (H) charging.

  20. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  1. Recent advances on Charpy specimen reconstitution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Lobo, Raquel M.; Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J., E-mail: aandrade@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Charpy specimen reconstitution is widely used around the world as a tool to enhance or supplement surveillance programs of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The reconstitution technique consists in the incorporation of a small piece from a previously tested specimen into a compound specimen, allowing to increase the number of tests. This is especially important if the available materials is restricted and fracture mechanics parameter have to be determined. The reconstitution technique must fulfill some demands, among them tests results like the original standard specimens and the loaded material of the insert must not be influenced by the welding and machining procedure. It is known that reconstitution of Charpy specimens may affect the impact energy in a consequence of the constraint of plastic deformation by the hardened weldment and HAZ. This paper reviews some recent advances of the reconstitution technique and its applications. (author)

  2. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Fatigue and Fracture Mechanisms of Weld-Repaired Bisplate80 With or Without a Buffer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguo; Ren, Cuiping; Lei, Beibei; Hu, Xiaozhi; Lu, Pengmin

    2017-04-01

    In this work, weld-repaired Bisplate80 joints without or with a buffer layer (BL) were subjected to a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 930 °C for 1 h followed by air cooling. The mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of the PWHT specimens were compared to those from corresponding as-welded specimens to study the influence of the PWHT and to compare them with as-received Bisplate80 specimens to inspect the welding quality of the joints. Fatigue crack growth curves and micro-hardness profiles across the welded joints for the as-weld or PWHT conditions were measured together with relevant scanning electron microscope observations along the crack growth path. Special attention was paid to the areas at and around the welded interfaces. The results showed that the incorporation of a BL with an appropriate thickness significantly improved the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joint for the PWHT condition, as the da/dN over the entire area of the welded joint was much lower than for both the as-welded and as-received Bisplate80 specimens, showing that the incorporated BL greatly improved the fracture mechanisms of the fatigue specimens.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of welds and Ta in liquid lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzel, A., E-mail: Annette.heinzel@kit.edu; Müller, G.; Weisenburger, A.

    2016-02-15

    Four specimens, P91 welded by friction stir welding with and without post heat treatment, P91 electromagnetic pulse welded (EMP) and 14Cr ODS (explosive welding) were exposed at 550 °C for up to 2131 h to Pb containing 10{sup −6} wt% oxygen. After the exposure none of the samples showed dissolution attack, all were protected by an oxide layer at the surface. Nearly no effect on the oxidation due to welding was found in both friction stir welded specimens. Severe deformation and partial melting during explosive welding result in a slower oxide layer growth within the welding zone. The EMP sample was tested as delivered without post-heat treatment. No Pb penetrated into the tiny gap between the welded parts. After the test, the gap is filled up with oxides. Additionally, Ta, discussed as a pump impeller material, was exposed to Pb and PbBi at different temperatures (400–900 °C) and oxygen concentrations in liquid metal (saturated, 10{sup −6} wt%, 10{sup −8} wt% and reduced (<<10{sup −8} wt%). Only the Ta specimens exposed to Pb with highly reduced oxygen content showed nearly no attack. All the others exhibited oxide scale formation that becomes severe above 400 °C test temperature.

  4. Onorbit electron beam welding experiment definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The proposed experiment design calls for six panels to be welded, each having unique characteristics selected to yield specific results and information. The experiment is completely automated and the concept necessitated the design of a new, miniaturized, self-contained electron beam (EB) welding system, for which purpose a separate IR and D was funded by the contractor, Martin Marietta Corporation. Since future tasks beyond the proposed experiment might call for astronauts to perform hand-held EB gun repairs or for the gun to be interfaced with a dexterous robot such as the planned flight telerobotic servicer (FTS), the EB gun is designed to be dismountable from the automated system. In the experiment design, two separate, identical sets of weld panels will be welded, one on earth in a vacuum chamber and the other onorbit in the aft cargo bay of an orbiter. Since the main objective of the experiment is to demonstrate that high quality welds can be achieved under onorbit conditions, the welds produced will be subjected to a wide range of discriminating non-destructive Q.C. procedures and destructive physical tests. However, advantage will be taken of the availability of a fairly large quantity of welded material in the two series of welded specimens to widen the circle of investigative talent by providing material to academic and scientific institutions for examination.

  5. Bond strength of gold alloys laser welded to cobalt-chromium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneously-welded groups showed inferior fracture load compared to corresponding control groups, except for Co-Cr. In the specimens welded heterogeneously to Co-Cr, Type IV was the greatest, followed by low-gold and Type II. There was no statistical difference (Palloys tested, the Type IV gold alloy was the most suitable alloy for laser-welding to Co-Cr.

  6. Structure and Phase Composition of 09G2S Steel Modified by Different Types of Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksandr N.; Popova, Natal’ya A.; Nikonenko, Elena L.; Ozhiganov, Evgenii A.; Ababkov, Nikolai V.; Koneva, Nina A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of the structure and phase composition of the type 09G2S weld steel modified by four types of welding, namely: electrode welding and electropercussive welding both with and without the introduction of artificial flaws. Artificial flows are aluminum pieces. TEM investigations are carried out within the heat-affected zone, i.e. between the deposited and base metal, at 0.5 mm distance to the former. Welding electrode of the type E50A is used for welding 09G2S steel specimens. It is shown how the type of welding affects the steel morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters. After each type of welding, the dislocation structure is polarized. This, however, does not cause internal stresses which can destroy the specimen.

  7. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  8. Optimization of weld bead geometry of MS plate (Grade: IS 2062) in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present reporting, multiobjective optimization dilemmas have been answered in metal inert gas (MIG) welding process using MS plate (Grade: IS 2062) specimen. The considered specimen was checked to harmonize the optimum setting between input factors, for example, welding current, open circuit voltage, and ...

  9. The Investigation of Mechanical Properties of the Flash Welded Different Steel Bars

    OpenAIRE

    AKKUŞ, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, three type steel bars were selected as experimentalspecimens. The steel types are S235JR (St37), S355JR (St52),AISI 304 stainless steel. Experimental parameters are material type and weldcurrent. The specimens which have Ø24 x 200 mm dimensions flash welded botheach other and different steel bars as using three weld currents. After thewelding operations, the welded specimens were cooled at open - air conditionsand their diameters were dropped by using a lathe machine so that th...

  10. Microstructure and fatigue resistance of high strength dual phase steel welded with gas metal arc welding and plasma arc welding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiale, Godwin Kwame; Oh, Yong-Jun; Choi, Won-Doo; Lee, Kwang-Bok; Jung, Jae-Gyu; Nam, Soo Woo

    2013-09-01

    This study presents the microstructure and high cycle fatigue performance of lap shear joints of dual phase steel (DP590) welded using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and plasma arc welding (PAW) processes. High cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single and double lap joints under a load ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 20 Hz. In order to establish a basis for comparison, both weldments were fabricated to have the same weld depth in the plate thickness. The PAW specimens exhibited a higher fatigue life, a gentle S-N slope, and a higher fatigue limit than the GMAW specimens. The improvement in the fatigue life of the PAW specimens was primarily attributed to the geometry effect that exhibited lower and wider beads resulting in a lower stress concentration at the weld toe where cracks initiate and propagate. Furthermore, the microstructural constituents in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the PAW specimens contributed to the improvement. The higher volume fraction of acicular ferrite in the HAZ beneath the weld toe enhanced the PAW specimen's resistance to fatigue crack growth. The double lap joints displayed a higher fatigue life than the single lap joints without changing the S-N slope.

  11. Application of Taguchi approach to optimize friction stir welding parameters of polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bejaoui S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical results of butt friction stir welding of high density polyethylene. The FSW designed tool insulates the welded samples and preserves the heat gained from friction thus avoiding the appearance of blisters and splits after welding. The experimental tests, conducted according to combinations of process factors such as rotation speed, welding speed, pin diameter and hold time at beginning welding, were carried out according the Taguchi orthogonal table L27 in randomized way. Temperatures in the joint during the welding operation and flow stresses from the tensile tests of welded samples were measured and variances were analyzed. Identified models were used to simulate, by finite elements, the tensile tests performed on specimens having a weld cordon in their active area. The results show coherence between the numerical predictions and experimental observations in different cases of weld cordon mechanical behaviour.

  12. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  13. Effect of joint design and welding type on the flexural strength and weld penetration of Ti-6Al-4V alloy bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Resende Novais, Veridiana; Rodrigues Machado, Asbel; Soares, Carlos José; Araújo Raposo, Luís Henrique

    2015-05-01

    Framework longevity is a key factor for the success of complete-arch prostheses and commonly depends on the welding methods. However, no consensus has been reached on the joint design and welding type for improving framework resistance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different joint designs and welding methods with tungsten inert gas (TIG) or laser to join titanium alloy bars (Ti-6Al-4V). Seventy titanium alloy bar specimens were prepared (3.18 mm in diameter × 40.0 mm in length) and divided into 7 groups (n=10): the C-control group consisting of intact specimens without joints and the remaining 6 groups consisting of specimens sectioned perpendicular to the long-axis and rejoined using an I-, X30-, or X45-shaped joint design with TIG welding (TI, TX30, and TX45) or laser welding (LI, LX30, and LX45). The specimens were tested with 3-point bending. The fracture surfaces were first evaluated with stereomicroscopy to measure the weld penetration area and then analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test, 1-way ANOVA and the Dunnett test, and the Pearson correlation test (α=.05). Specimens from the X30 and X45 groups showed higher flexural strength (Pwelded area (Pwelding type. TIG welded groups showed significantly higher flexural strength than the laser groups (PTIG welding also resulted in higher welded areas than laser welding for the I-shaped specimens. No significant differences were found for the weld penetration area in the X45 group, either for laser or TIG welding. SEM analysis showed more pores at the fracture surfaces of the laser specimens. Fracture surfaces indicative of regions of increased ductility were detected for the TIG specimens. TIG welding resulted in higher flexural strength for the joined titanium specimens than laser welding. For both welding methods, X30- and X45-shaped joint designs resulted in higher flexural strength and

  14. Comparison of Tensile Damage Evolution in Ti6A14V Joints Between Laser Beam Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2014-12-01

    The present paper studied the evolution of tensile damage in joints welded using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (TIG) under a uniaxial tensile load. The damage evolution in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints was studied by using digital image correlation (DIC) technology and monitoring changes in Young's modulus during tensile testing. To study the mechanism of void nucleation and growth in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints, test specimens with various amounts of plastic deformation were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared with TIG-welded joints, LBW-welded joints have a finer microstructure and higher microhardness in the fusion zone. The SEM analysis and DIC test results indicated that the critical strain of void nucleation was greater in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints, while the growth rate of voids was lower in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints. Thus, the damage ratio in the LBW joints was lower than that in the TIG-welded joints during tensile testing. This can be due to the coarser martensitic α' and the application of TC-1 welding rods in the TIG-welded joint.

  15. Flow Accelerated Corrosion of Carbon Steel in the Feedwater System of PWR Plants - Behaviour of Welds and Weld Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, C.; Pavageau, E. M.; Faucher, A.; Inada, F.; Yoneda, K.; Miller, C.; Bretelle, J.-L.

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is a phenomenon that has been studied for many years. However, to date, the specific behavior of welds and weld assemblies of carbon steel towards this phenomenon has been scarcely examined. An experimental program of FAC of welds and weld assemblies is being conducted by EDF and CRIEPI. This paper describes the results obtained on the behavior of weld metal independently of its behavior in a weld assembly as well as the sensitivity to FAC of various weld assembly configurations. Tests are performed, at EDF, in the CIROCO loop which permits to follow the FAC rate by gammametry measurements, and at CRIEPI, in the PRINTEMPS loop where FAC is measured by laser displacement sensor. Welds are performed by two different methods: Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). The influence of several parameters on FAC of welds is examined: welding method, chromium content and temperature. For weld assemblies, only the impact of chromium content is studied. All the tests are conducted in ammonia medium at pH 9.0 and oxygen concentration lower then 1 ppb. Chemical parameters, as the pH, the conductivity and oxygen concentration, are measured in situ during the test and surface characterizations are performed after the test. The results show that, with more than 0.15% chromium, no FAC is detected on the weld metal, which is similar to the base metal behaviour. For the same and lower chromium content, the two types of metal have the same FAC rate. Concerning the temperature effect, for both metals FAC rate decreases with temperature increase above 150°C. Below 150 °C, their behaviour seems to be different. For weld assemblies, the study of different configurations shows that the chromium content is the main parameter affecting the behaviour of the specimens. Additional tests and modeling studies will be conducted in order to complete the results.

  16. Tensile strength of various nylon PA6 specimen modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Karel; Zahalka, Martin

    2017-05-01

    This article explores the influence of production technique on the strength of nylon parts. Identical specimens were manufactured by various techniques. The material of specimens was nylon PA6. 3D printing and injection molding were used, with various orientations of printed layers, and various orientations of specimens in the working space of the 3D printer. The variants are described in detail. A special mold was used for the injection molding process in order to make specimens with and without a weld line. The effect of this weld line was evaluated. All specimens were tested using the standard tensile test configuration. The strength was compared. It was found that the same plastic material has very different mechanical properties depending on the production process.

  17. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  18. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  19. The influence of the weld toe grinding and wig remelting weld toe rehabilitation techniques, on variable stresses, in case of cross fillet welds, reinforced with additional welding rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babis Claudiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable stresses where the load value varies between a maximum and a minimum value, or varies the position in time, cause after accumulating a large number of load cycles in those structures, the emergence of drug fatigue. Fatigue is characterized by failure on values of the applied stress from the load cycles, below the material flow, values which in case of static stress would not have caused problems. Knowing that the variable stressed structures are sensitive to stress concentrators, the paper aims to highlight the influence of two techniques to reduce stress concentrator weld toe grinding and WIG remelting weld toe, on the behavior of variable tensile test of cross corner welded specimens, reinforced with additional welding rows.

  20. El efecto de la heterogeneidad de las propiedades mecánicas de una unión soldada sobre la carga de plastificación de probetas de fractura tipo C(T Y SE(B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donoso, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The yield load values of two-dimensional C(T and SE(B specimens with various degrees of mismatch, were numerically evaluated. The yield load values were normalized using the Common Format in order to analyze the effect of the weld, using as reference material C(T and SE(B specimens made only of base metal (BM. In undermatched specimens (the weld metal elastic limit is lower than that of BM the normalized yield load decreases compared to the elastic limit of BM. In overmatched specimens (the weld metal elastic limit is larger than that of BM, the yield load increases. This variation of the yield load depends on the degree of mismatch, and on the relation between weld size and crack length. The numerical results were compared with experimental values obtained with mismatched weld C(T specimens using an ASTM A 588 steel as base metal.

    Se determinaron, numéricamente, los valores de la carga de plastificación de probetas de geometría compacta C(T y de flexión SE(B, bidimensionales, con cordón de soldadura de diferentes grados de desajuste entre los límites elásticos del material de soldadura y del metal base. Los valores de la carga de plastificación de las probetas bimetálicas se normalizaron mediante el Formato Común, con el objeto de analizar el efecto del cordón, tomando como referencia probetas de metal base (MB. En probetas sub-ajustadas (límite elástico del cordón menor que el de MB la carga de plastificación normalizada disminuye, comparada con el límite elástico de MB. En probetas sobre-ajustadas (límite elástico del cordón mayor que el de MB se produce un aumento de la carga de plastificación normalizada. Esta variación depende del grado de desajuste, y de la relación entre tamaño de cordón y longitud de grieta. Los resultados numéricos se compararon con valores experimentales obtenidos con probetas C(T de uniones soldadas desajustadas del acero ASTM A 588.

  1. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  2. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  3. Development of Alternative Technology to PWHT in Site Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. D.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, K. B.; Sung, K. W

    2007-04-15

    ASME Section IX added requirements for qualification when using temper bead welding in the 2004 edition. The temper bead welding techniques which can satisfy the requirements of the Code are needed to use them in the site repair welding. The optimized welding parameters can be obtained when controlling the process to supercritically-reheat and to subcritically-reheat the coarse grain region sequently. The microstructures of SCFGCG obtained from the Gleegle simulated specimens and those of post weld heat treated coarse grain region are compared. The obtained both microstructures showed almost similar patterns. mid bead deposition technique Suggested in this study has a technical concept that the mid beads are deposited between the deposited initial beads repeatedly in a bead layer, which gives a lot of reheating effects on brittle microstructure in HAZ. This newly suggested technique is considered to have more effective tempering effect than the conventional temper bead technique which has concept to deposit one type of beads in a bead layer. The suggested modeling in this study can simulate well the SMAW process. Hence this modeling was used in analyzing the more complicated welding process of multi-layer welding. The modeling was used to analyze the tempering effect on the microstructures of HAZ by considering the patterns of overlapping of the reheating regions under the consequently deposited beads. When considering the crack path in the ever-matched weld metal condition, the interface may have a resistance against the crack propagation. A182 filler and A625 filler were used to make the weld specimens which have different weld metal conditions. The crack directed toward the under-matched weld metal may propagate across the fusion line easier than that of the even-matched weld metal condition.

  4. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  5. Hydrogen permeation characteristics of welded 316 stainless steel using nickel welding filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, T.; Ikeshoji, T.T.; Suzumura, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Naito, T. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Low carbon stainless steel of 316L has been utilized for an ultra high vacuum chamber assembled by welding, and it contains 12-15% nickel. We investigate the work of nickel element with hydrogen atoms as the hydrogen catalysis near heat affected zone. Hydrogen permeation tests for welded specimens using nickel filler were performed to prevent from hydrogen embrittlement cracking in the heat affected zone. In this study, the hydrogen permeation technique using an orifice and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is utilized to measure the hydrogen gas flux in the stainless steel. A stationary hydrogen flux from the stainless steel surface was measured by using a system with an orifice. The hydrogen pressure difference which applied to the specimen was enabled us to maintain constant by constant gas flow rate from the orifice in low pressure vessel. The value of hydrogen permeability, K, at 620K for welded specimen using the nickel filler is 3.62 times 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}s{sup -1}Pa{sup 1/2}. It is 1.9 times grater than that of normal non-welded 316 stainless steel substrate. The value at 520 K for the welded specimen is 7.31 times 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}s{sup -1}Pa{sup 1/2}. It is as same as that of the non-welded substrate. It is considered that the role of nickel at high temperature near 620K is to release hydrogen atom, and the role of nickel at temperature below 520K is to trap hydrogen atoms, and that the weld metal become hydrogen diffusion path. (orig.)

  6. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  7. MICROSTRUCTURE AND FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF DISSIMILAR SPOT WELDED JOINTS OF AISI 304 AND AISI 1008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon steel and stainless steel composites are being more frequently used for applications requiring a corrosion resistant and attractive exterior surface and a high strength structural substrate. Spot welding is a potentially useful and efficient jointing process for the production of components consisting of these two materials. The spot welding characteristics of weld joints between these two materials are discussed in this paper. The experiment was conducted on dissimilar weld joints using carbon steel and 304L (2B austenitic stainless steel by varying the welding currents and electrode pressing forces. Throughout the welding process; the electrical signals from the strain sensor, current transducer and terminal voltage clippers are measured in order to understand each and every millisecond of the welding process. In doing so, the dynamic resistances, heat distributions and forging forces are computed for various currents and force levels within the good welds’ regions. The other process controlling parameters, particularly the electrode tip and weld time, remained constant throughout the experiment. The weld growth was noted for the welding current increment, but in the electrode force increment it causes an adverse reaction to weld growth. Moreover, the effect of heat imbalance was clearly noted during the welding process due to the different electrical and chemical properties. The welded specimens finally underwent tensile, hardness and metallurgical testing to characterise the weld growth.

  8. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  9. Residual Stress and Fatigue Strength of Hybrid Laser-MIG-Welded A7N01P-T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuying; Chen, Hui; Qiu, Peixian; Zhu, Zongtao

    2017-02-01

    A7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy is widely used in some important welded components of high-speed trains. The hybrid laser-metal inert gas (MIG) welding process was studied to solve problems associated with the MIG welding process, such as low welding efficiency, high residual stress and deformation, and serious loss of strength. A high-speed camera, a voltage and current collection system, and NI DAQ were used to acquire arc profiles, welding voltage, and welding current simultaneously. Thermal cycle tests were carried out. Residual stresses induced by the welding process and fatigue strength of the joint were investigated. Large-size fatigue specimens were used in fatigue tests. The results show that the energy of the hybrid welding process is focused, and the power density of hybrid welding process is intense. The heat input per unit of the hybrid welding process is only half of that of the MIG welding process. Compared with the MIG welded joint, the overall residual stress level of the hybrid-welded joint is lower. The peak longitudinal stress of the hybrid-welded joint is reduced by 20 pct. The fatigue strength of hybrid joints is 14 pct higher than that of MIG-welded joints. Narrow weld and HAZ, weak softening behavior, and low residual stress level are the causes of the improvement of fatigue strength.

  10. Comparative study of TIG and SMAW root welding passes on ductile iron cast weldability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cárcel-Carrasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the weldability of ductile iron when: (I a root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG process using an Inconel 625 source rod and filler welds are subsequently applied using coated electrodes with 97,6%Ni; and (II welds on ductile iron exclusively made using the manual shielded metal arc welding technique (SMAW. Both types of welds are performed on ductile iron specimen test plates that are subjected to preheat and post-weld annealing treatments. Samples with TIG root-welding pass shown higher hardness but slightly lower ductility and strength. Both types of welding achieved better ductile and strength properties than ones found in literature.

  11. Bond Strength of Gold Alloys Laser Welded to Cobalt-Chromium Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Wallace, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the joint properties between cast gold alloys and Co-Cr alloy laser-welded by Nd:YAG laser. Cast plates were fabricated from three types of gold alloys (Type IV, Type II and low-gold) and a Co-Cr alloy. Each gold alloy was laser-welded to Co-Cr using a dental laser-welding machine. Homogeneously-welded and non-welded control specimens were also prepared. Tensile testing was conducted and data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The homogeneo...

  12. Numerical aspects for efficient welding computational mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aburuga Tarek Kh.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the residual stresses and strains is one of the most important parameter in the structure integrity assessment. A finite element model is constructed in order to simulate the multi passes mismatched submerged arc welding SAW which used in the welded tensile test specimen. Sequentially coupled thermal mechanical analysis is done by using ABAQUS software for calculating the residual stresses and distortion due to welding. In this work, three main issues were studied in order to reduce the time consuming during welding simulation which is the major problem in the computational welding mechanics (CWM. The first issue is dimensionality of the problem. Both two- and three-dimensional models are constructed for the same analysis type, shell element for two dimension simulation shows good performance comparing with brick element. The conventional method to calculate residual stress is by using implicit scheme that because of the welding and cooling time is relatively high. In this work, the author shows that it could use the explicit scheme with the mass scaling technique, and time consuming during the analysis will be reduced very efficiently. By using this new technique, it will be possible to simulate relatively large three dimensional structures.

  13. Evaluation of welding performance of 20 kHz and 40 kHz ultrasonic metal welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W. H.; Kang, E. J.; Park, D. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, ultrasonic horns are designed by using vibration equations, vibration modal analysis and harmonic response analysis in order to compare welding performance when ultrasonic welding is performed at resonance frequencies of 20 kHz and 40 kHz. For the weldability evaluation of the manufactured horn for 20 kHz and 40 kHz, welding strength between Ni specimens with a thickness of 0.1 mm using tensile test are compared and analyzed. The lengths of horns with resonance frequencies of 20kHz and 40kHz were calculated as 130mm and 68mm respectively. As a result of vibration modal analysis, the optimum longitudinal vibration modes of 19,584Hz and 39,794Hz are obtained in 10th mode, and the frequency response of the two horns are 19,600 Hz and 39,800 Hz respectively. As the welding conditions are changed to welding pressure 2 bar, 3 bar and 4 bar, vibration amplitude of horn 60%, 80% and 100%, tensile strengths of welded specimens are observed. The welding strength was smaller at 40 kHz than at 20 kHz even at the same amplitude. This is because diffusion action of Ni in the weld interface is facilitated at 20 kHz than at 40 kHz.

  14. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  15. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F. [NDE Center, Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp. (Japan); Brziak, P. [Welding Research Inst. - Industrial Inst. of Slovak Republic (Slovakia); Lomozik, M. [Inst. of Welding (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  16. Reprocessing weld and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, M.L.; Lewis, H.E.

    1993-08-03

    A process is described for improving the fatigue resistance of a small primary structural weld at a joint between structural members of a weldment, the weld having been made with the welding energy input of E[sub 1], the process comprising: applying a reprocessing weld on at least a portion of either one or both toes of the primary structural weld, thereby covering said toe portion, the reprocessing weld containing a filler metal and having a cross-sectional area which is less than the corresponding cross-sectional area of the primary structural weld, the reprocessing weld extending onto the face of the primary structural weld at one side of the toe portion covered and onto the structural member at the other side of the toe portion covered, and the total welding energy input, E[sub 2], used in said reprocessing the primary structural weld being less than the welding energy input E[sub 1] of the primary structural weld.

  17. The synthesis of organic charge transfer hetero-microtubules by crack welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Chung, J; Hyon, J; Kwon, T; Seo, C; Nam, J; Kang, Y

    2014-09-14

    The strain-induced cracks in organic microtubules composed of an organic charge transfer (CT) complex of 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) and naphthalene were selectively welded via the formation of secondary CT complexes; this process, in turn, led to the formation of organic hetero-microtubules consisting of multiple segments of two organic CT complexes.

  18. Correlation Between Acoustic Emission and Induced Hydrogen of Shield Metal Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsawat, P.; Jirarungsatian, C.; Phung-On, I.

    This chapter presents a study on detecting acoustic emission (AE) of hydrogen diffusion after shield metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Technique to detect hydrogen which diffused from steel, gas, or other elements is performed. A correlation between occurred AE and induced hydrogen in weldment after welding is determined. In the experiment, a broadband AE sensor and welded specimens were mounted on a wave guide plate which has 250 mm of separate distance for monitoring and recording AE activity of hydrogen diffusion. The specimens are prepared according to the welding standard (JIS Z 3113). The specimen sizes were 25 mm width, 130 mm length, and 12 mm thickness. Four types of electrodes were used for welding to vary hydrogen amount. The welding current was lower than the manufacturer's specification of 15 amperes. The specimens were quenched in 5 s after welding process. The results showed that the AE technique can be used to detect hydrogen diffusion after weld. The emitted AE signals were analyzed to determine the relation with the amount of hydrogen. The method for measurement of hydrogen referred to the welding standard (JIS Z 3113). The correlation plot between AE and diffused hydrogen amount can be shown as 0.8 of R 2 linearity. The benefit of this study will be applied to monitor the weldment before cold crack occurs.

  19. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  20. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... International Clinical Practice Guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis . 2010;50(5): ...

  1. Advanced examination techniques applied to the qualification of critical welds for the ITER correction coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgobba, Stefano, E-mail: Stefano.Sgobba@cern.ch [CERN, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Langeslag, Stefanie Agnes Elisabeth [CERN, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Libeyre, Paul [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Marcinek, Dawid Jaroslaw [Tadeusz Kościuszko Cracow University of Technology, 31-155 Kraków (Poland); Piguiet, Aline [CERN, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Cécillon, Alexandre [RX Solutions, ZAC Altaïs, Chavanod (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of critical qualification welds for the ITER correction coils. • These welds featuring a complex geometry are virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) techniques. • The applied advanced examinations allowed an exhaustive identification of weld imperfections and a thorough understanding of their nature, position and size. • A substantial progress in weld quality could be achieved during the weld qualification phases. - Abstract: The ITER correction coils (CCs) consist of three sets of six coils located in between the toroidal (TF) and poloidal field (PF) magnets. The CCs rely on a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC), whose supercritical cooling at 4.5 K is provided by helium inlets and outlets. The assembly of the nozzles to the stainless steel conductor conduit includes fillet welds requiring full penetration through the thickness of the nozzle. Static and cyclic stresses have to be sustained by the inlet welds during operation. The entire volume of helium inlet and outlet welds, that are submitted to the most stringent quality levels of imperfections according to standards in force, is virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional or computed radiography or by Ultrasonic Testing. On the other hand, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of several dozens of helium inlet qualification samples. The extensive use of CT techniques allowed a significant progress in the weld quality of the CC inlets. CT is also a promising technique for inspection of qualification welds of helium inlets of the TF magnets, by far more complex to examine due to their larger dimensions.

  2. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  3. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  4. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  5. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  6. Fracture mechanics characterisation of the WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel beltline welding seam of Greifswald unit 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Schuhknecht, Jan [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    WWER-440 second generation (V-213) reactor pressure vessels (RPV) were produced by IZHORA in Russia and by SKODA in the former Czechoslovakia. The surveillance Charpy-V and fracture mechanics SE(B) specimens of both producers have different orientations. The main difference is the crack extension direction which is through the RPV thickness and circumferential for ISHORA and SKODA RPV, respectively. In particular for the investigation of weld metal from multilayer submerged welding seams the crack extension direction is of importance. Depending on the crack extension direction in the specimen there are different welding beads or a uniform structure along the crack front. The specimen orientation becomes more important when the fracture toughness of the weld metal is directly determined on surveillance specimens according to the Master Curve (MC) approach as standardised in the ASTM Standard Test Method E1921. This approach was applied on weld metal of the RPV beltline welding seam of Greifswald Unit 8 RPV. Charpy size SE(B) specimens from 13 locations equally spaced over the thickness of the welding seam were tested. The specimens are in TL and TS orientation. The fracture toughness values measured on the SE(B) specimens with both orientations follow the course of the MC. Nearly all values lie within the fracture toughness curves for 5% and 95% fracture probability. There is a strong variation of the reference temperature T{sub 0} though the thickness of the welding seam, which can be explained with structural differences. The scatter is more pronounced for the TS SE(B) specimens. It can be shown that specimens with TS and TL orientation in the welding seam have a differentiating and integrating behaviour, respectively. The statistical assumptions behind the MC approach are valid for both specimen orientations even if the structure is not uniform along the crack front. By comparison crack extension, JR, curves measured on SE(B) specimens with TL and TS orientation

  7. Physics of arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1982-05-01

    A discussion of the factors controlling the size and shape of the weld fusion zone is presented along with a description of current theories of heat and fluid flow phenomena in the plasma and the molten metal weld pool. Although experimental results confirm that surface tension, plasma jets, and weld pool convection all strongly influence the fusion zone shape; no comprehensive model is available from which to predict welding behavior. It is proposed that the lack of such an understanding is a major impediment to development of automated welding processes. In addition, sensors for weld torch positioning are reviewed in terms of the mechnical and electromagnetic energy spectra which have been used. New developments in this area are also needed in order to advance the technology of automated welding.

  8. Effect of Welding Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Fe-40Al Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Torun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding of cast Fe-40Al alloy was carried out at 1000 rmp for various friction times, friction pressures, and forging pressures. The microstructures of the interface of welded samples were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Micrographs demonstrated that excellent welding formed continuously along the interface, except for samples welded for 3 s. Chemical compositions of the interface of the friction welded samples and of the fractured surface of all the specimens were determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. After the welding process, shear tests were applied to the welded samples to determine the shear strength of joints. Test results indicated that the maximum shear strength was 469.5 MPa.

  9. Molecular detection and confirmation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urogenital and extragenital specimens using the Abbott CT/NG RealTime assay and an in-house assay targeting the porA pseudogene.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, A

    2011-04-01

    Culture for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) is being replaced by molecular assays, but difficulties are observed with false positive and negatives results, especially for extragenital samples. This study evaluates the Abbott CT\\/NG Real-Time assay and a real-time porA pseudogene assay. Samples (n = 600) from a mixed prevalence Irish population include 164 male urines with corresponding urethral swabs, 58 endocervical swabs, 173 male pharyngeal swabs, 205 male rectal swabs, 36 NG clinical isolates and 26 commensal Neisseria species isolates. There was a 100% concordance between the Abbott CT\\/NG Real-Time and the porA assay. The positivity rate was 1.2%, 1.7%, 8.1% and 5.8% for FVU\\/urethral swabs, endocervical, pharyngeal and rectal swabs, respectively. These results were compared to culture and discrepancies were found with nine pharyngeal and three rectal swabs. Seven of the 12 discrepant positive samples were sequenced and were confirmed "true positives". The sensitivity and specificity of the molecular assays was 100%. The sensitivity of the culture-based testing was 100% for urogenital samples but 36% and 75% for pharyngeal and rectal swabs, respectively. The combined Abbott CT\\/NG and porA assays provide a valuable alternative to culture and also generate a significant increase in the diagnosis of pharyngeal and rectal NG infection.

  10. Mechanical Behaviour Investigation Of Aluminium Alloy Tailor Welded Blank Developed By Using Friction Stir Welding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Anggono, Agus; Sugito, Bibit; Hariyanto, Agus; Subroto; Sarjito

    2017-10-01

    The objective on the research was to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructure of tailor welded blank (TWB) made from AA6061-T6 and AA1100 using friction stir welding (FSW) process. Due to the dissimilar mechanical properties of the two aluminium alloys, microhardness test was conducted to measure the hardness distribution across the weld nugget. The mixing of two distinct materials was influenced by tool rotation speed. Therefore, microstructure analysis was carried out to investigate the grain size and shape. The grain size of AA6061-T6 has increased in the heat affected zone (HAZ) while for AA1100 has decreased. In the weld nugget, it has found a hook defects in the dissimilar aluminium joining. By using monotonic tensile load, the different weld line direction was observed with the expansion in tool rotation. The joints failure were consistently on the area of AA1100 series. Furthermore, two specimens were investigated, one through the dissimilar aluminium and the other through similiar material. Inspection of the weld nugget hardness was shown that nonhomogen material intermixing during the stiring process as confirmed by microhardness measurement.

  11. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  12. Weld overlay cladding with iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The author has established a range of compositions for these alloys within which hot cracking resistance is very good, and within which cold cracking can be avoided in many instances by careful control of welding conditions, particularly preheat and postweld heat treatment. For example, crack-free butt welds have been produced for the first time in 12-mm thick wrought Fe{sub 3}Al plate. Cold cracking, however, still remains an issue in many cases. The author has developed a commercial source for composite weld filler metals spanning a wide range of achievable aluminum levels, and are pursuing the application of these filler metals in a variety of industrial environments. Welding techniques have been developed for both the gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc processes, and preliminary work has been done to utilize the wire arc process for coating of boiler tubes. Clad specimens have been prepared for environmental testing in-house, and a number of components have been modified and placed in service in operating kraft recovery boilers. In collaboration with a commercial producer of spiral weld overlay tubing, the author is attempting to utilize the new filler metals for this novel application.

  13. Modification of creep and low cycle fatigue behaviour induced by welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carofalo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the mechanical properties of Waspaloy superalloy have been evaluated in case of welded repaired material and compared to base material. Test program considered flat specimens on base and TIG welded material subjected to static, low-cycle fatigue and creep test at different temperatures. Results of uniaxial tensile tests showed that the presence of welded material in the gage length specimen does not have a relevant influence on yield strength and UTS. However, elongation at failure of TIG material was reduced with respect to the base material. Moreover, low-cycle fatigue properties have been determined carrying out tests at different temperature (room temperature RT and 538°C in both base and TIG welded material. Welded material showed an increase of the data scatter and lower fatigue strength, which was anyway not excessive in comparison with base material. During test, all the hysteresis cycles were recorded in order to evaluate the trend of elastic modulus and hysteresis area against the number of cycles. A clear correlation between hysteresis and fatigue life was found. Finally, creep test carried out on a limited number of specimens allowed establishing some changes about the creep rate and time to failure of base and welded material. TIG welded specimen showed a lower time to reach a fixed strain or failure when a low stress level is applied. In all cases, creep behaviour of welded material is characterized by the absence of the tertiary creep.

  14. CT identification of coeliac ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Pozzo, G.; Bozza, A.; Fargnoli, R.; Brizzi, E.

    1985-02-01

    The authors achieved the ''in vivo'' identification of the coeliac ganglia (C.G), using computerised tomography (CT). This result was confirmed by autopsies and by CT scans of an anatomical specimen in which the coeliac ganglia had been previously marked. CT allows and exact location of the coeliac ganglia and can be very useful for a precise alcoholic neurolysis of the coeliac plexus.

  15. Statistical analyses of fracture toughness results for two irradiated high-copper welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Haggag, F.M.; Bowman, K.O.; Downing, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Fifth Irradiation Series were to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the transition temperature shift and the shape of the K{sub Ic} curve described in Sect. 6 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31% were commercially fabricated in 215-mm-thick plates. Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact, tensile, drop-weight, and compact specimens up to 203.2 mm thick (1T, 2T, 4T, 6T, and 8T C(T)) were tested to provide a large data base for unirradiated material. Similar specimens with compacts up to 4T were irradiated at about 288{degrees}C to a mean fluence of about 1.5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV) in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Both linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods were used to analyze all cleavage fracture results and local cleavage instabilities (pop-ins). Evaluation of the results showed that the cleavage fracture toughness values determined at initial pop-ins fall within the same scatter band as the values from failed specimens; thus, they were included in the data base for analysis (all data are designated K{sub Jc}).

  16. Creep rupture properties of P122 and P92 steel HAZs simulated by heat treatments and by a weld simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.K. [IGCAR, Kalpakkam (India); Matsui, M. [Mitsubushi Heavy Industries, Nagasaki (Japan); Watanabe, T.; Hongo, H.; Kubo, K.; Tabuchi, M. [National Inst. for Materials Science, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    In the present study, creep rupture properties of the heat affected zones (HAZs) of P122 and P92 steels, simulated by a heat treatments and by a weld simulator, are studied and compared with those of the actual weld joint. Specimen blanks cut out from steel plates were heated to different peak temperatures that corresponds to intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ), fine grained HAZ (FGHAZ) and coarse grained HAZ (CGHAZ) both by heat treatment and by employing a weld simulator. These were then subjected to post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and creep specimens prepared from these blanks were tested at 923 K for various stress levels. Microstructure was uniform for the specimens with HAZ simulated by heat treatment while for those produced by weld simulator, the uniform microstructures corresponding to the peak temperature of simulation was confined to only {proportional_to}10 mm at the center of the specimens. (orig.)

  17. Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

    2005-10-31

    Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2.

  18. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  19. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  20. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  1. Experimental modeling of weld thermal cycle of the heat affected zone (HAZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kulhánek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contribution deals with experimental modeling of quick thermal cycles of metal specimens. In the introduction of contribution will be presented measured graphs of thermal cycle of heat affected zone (HAZ of weld. Next will be presented experimental simulation of measured thermal cycle on the standard specimens, useable for material testing. This approach makes possible to create material structures of heat affected zone of weld, big enough for standard material testing.

  2. Modern Methods of Rail Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay A.; Kozyreva, Olga A.; Usoltsev, Aleksander A.; Kryukov, Roman E.; Shevchenko, Roman A.

    2017-10-01

    Existing methods of rail welding, which are enable to get continuous welded rail track, are observed in this article. Analysis of existing welding methods allows considering an issue of continuous rail track in detail. Metallurgical and welding technologies of rail welding and also process technologies reducing aftereffects of temperature exposure are important factors determining the quality and reliability of the continuous rail track. Analysis of the existing methods of rail welding enable to find the research line for solving this problem.

  3. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  4. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  5. Mechanical and toughness properties of robotic-FSW repair welds in 6061-T6 aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinckmann, S.; Strombeck, A. v.; Schilling, C.; Santos, J.F. dos; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung; Lohwasser, D. [DaimlerChrysler Aerospace Airbus GmbH, Bremen (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Panel or structures welded in fixed installations might require local repair of eventual process induced defects. Ideally such repair operations should take place outside the production line to avoid interruption of the manufacturing flow. Robotic FSW systems offer the required flexibility to perform such repairs. The main objective of this work was to conduct a preliminary investigation on the microstructural, mechanical and toughness properties of robotic friction stir repair welds. To achieve this objective defective welds have been purposely produced and subsequently repaired. Specimens for microstructural analysis, mechanical and fracture toughness testing have been obtained from repaired and defect-free welds as well as from the base plate for comparison purposes. The mechanical properties have been established using standard tests, i.e. hardness, bending and tensile. Toughness properties of the joints have been determined using small (compact tension - CT) and large (M(T)) scale specimens. Fatigue pre-cracks were positioned in the nugget and HAZ. Crack resistance curves (R-Curves) were determined using the potential drop technique. The obtained results indicated that the additional thermal cycle and deformation process imposed by the repair weld did not adversely affect the mechanical and toughness properties of the nugget area. Both defect-free and repair welds showed higher toughness than the base material. Pre-cracks positioned in the nugget region were deviated into the lower strength TMAZ after initiation and ductile crack growth within the nugget area due to strength undermatch. Later propagation remained within the TMAZ. (orig.) [German] Das Schweissen von Elementen oder Strukturen kann eine lokale Reparatur erfordern, wenn durch den Fuegeprozess ausgeloeste Fehler auftreten. Vorteilhafterweise sollten die Reparaturen ausserhalb der Fertigungslinie erfolgen, um den Produktionsablauf nicht zu stoeren. Robotergestuetzte FSW-Systeme bieten die benoetigte

  6. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  7. Experimental Evaluation and Characterization of Electron Beam Welding of 2219 AL-Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sobih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to reduce the weight of components, thus allowing a profit in terms of energy saving, automotive industry as well as aircraft industry extensively uses aluminum alloys. The most widely used joining technology in aircraft industry is riveting, while welding seems to be used in the car industry in the case of aluminum alloys. However, welding technology is characterized by many defects, such as gas porosity; oxide inclusions; solidification cracking (hot tearing; and reduced strength in both the weld and the heat affected zones which could limit its development. Many techniques are used for aluminum alloys welding, among them is electron beam welding (EBW, which has unique advantages over other traditional fusion welding methods due to high-energy density, deep penetration, large depth-to-width ratio, and small heat affected zone. The welding parameters that yield to optimal weld joint have been previously obtained. These optimal parameters were validated by welding a specimen using these parameters. To evaluate this optimal weld joint, complete, microstructural observations and characterization have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. This evaluation leads to description and quantification of the solidification process within this weld joint.

  8. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual strain/stress distribution in the vicinity of high strength welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamák I.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses resulting from non homogeneous heat distribution during welding process belong to most significant factor influencing behavior of welded structures. These stresses are responsible for defect occurrence during welding and they are also responsible for crack initiation and propagation at the either static or dynamic load. The significant effect of weld metal chemical composition as well as the effect of fatigue load and local plastic deformation on residual stress distribution and fatigue life have been recognized for high strength steels welds. The changes in residual stress distribution have then positive effect on cold cracking behavior and also on fatigue properties of the welds [1-3]. Several experimental methods, both destructive and non-destructive, such as hole drilling method, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and others, have been used to examine residual stress distribution in all three significant orientations in the vicinity of the welds. The present contribution summarizes the results of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress distribution in the vicinity of single-pass high-strength-steel welds having different chemical composition as well as the influence of fatigue load and local plastic deformation. It has been observed that the chemical composition of the weld metal has a significant influence on the stress distribution around the weld. Similarly, by aplying both cyclic load or pre-stress load on the specimens, stress relaxation was observed even in the region of approximately 40 mm far from the weld toe.

  9. Study of MA Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2017-09-01

    Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (MA) fraction in these reheated zones. The MA exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of MA was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the MA, along with debonding of MA from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.

  10. Fatigue Properties of Welded Butt Joint and Base Metal of MB8 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-xia YU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue properties of welded butt joint and base metal of MB8 magnesium alloy were investigated. The comparative fatigue tests were carried out using EHF-EM200K2-070-1A fatigue testing machine for both welded butt joint and base metal specimens with the same size and shape. The fatigue fractures were observed and analyzed by a scanning electron microscope of 6360 LA type. The experimental results show that the fatigue performance of the welded butt joint of MB8 magnesium alloy is sharply decreased. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of base metal and welded butt joint is about 69.41 and 32.76 MPa, respectively. The conditional fatigue limit (1×107 of the welded butt joint is 47.2 % of that of base metal. The main reasons are that the welding can lead to stress concentration in the weld toe area, tensile welding residual stress in the welded joint, as well as grain coarsening in the welding seam. The cleavage steps or quasi-cleavage patterns present on the fatigue fracture surface, indicating the fracture type of the welded butt joint belongs to a brittle fracture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9132

  11. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  12. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  13. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  14. Joining characteristics of orthodontic wires with laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kawashima, Isao; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding 0.016 x 0.022 in. beta-Ti, Ni-Ti, and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires was investigated by measuring joint tensile strength, measuring laser penetration depth, determining metallurgical phases using micro X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD), and examining microstructures with an scanning electron microscope (SEM). Welding was performed from 150 to 230 V. Mean tensile strength for Ni-Ti groups was significantly lower (p Ni was significantly lower than for control specimens joined by silver soldering, it was sufficient for clinical use. The beta-Ti orthodontic wire showed deeper penetration depth from laser welding than the Ni-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni orthodontic wires. Micro-XRD patterns of laser-welded beta-Ti and Ni-Ti obtained 2 mm from the boundary were similar to as-received specimens, indicating that original microstructures were maintained. When output voltages of 190 V and higher were used, most peaks from joint areas disappeared or were much weaker, perhaps because of a directional solidification effect, evidenced by SEM observation of fine striations in welded beta-Ti. Laser welding beta-Ti and Co-Cr-Ni wires may be acceptable clinically, since joints had sufficient strength and metallurgical phases in the original wires were not greatly altered.

  15. The structure and phase composition of welded joint after deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksander; Popova, Natalya; Ozhiganov, Eugeniy; Nikonenko, Elena; Ababkov, Nikolay; Kalashnikov, Mark; Koneva, Nina; Kozlov, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of the structure and phase composition of welded joint and focuses on their investigation after plastic deformation. The contribution of internal stresses to the formation of phase composition and fine structure of welded joint is shown herein. Electrode welding is used to obtain welded joint in St3 steel. Specimens are subjected to a quasi-static tensile deformation ranging from 0 to 5% under 370 MPa loading. TEM investigations on thin foil specimens allow studying the structure and phase composition within the heat-affected zone at 1 mm distance from base material and 0.5 mm from welding material. The degree of plastic deformation is shown for both base and welding materials and includes their morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters. Long-range stresses are divided into plastic and elastic. Plastic deformation has no qualitative effect on the material structure, however, it modifies its quantitative parameters. With the increase of deformation degree, the perlite component becomes more imperfect and transforms, first, to a fractured perlite and then to ferrite, thereby decreasing the volume ratio of perlite. Polarization of the dislocation structure is observed. The amplitude of internal stress fields grows. Unlike the shear stresses, long-range stresses manifest their intensive growth. The elastic component makes the major contribution to the long-range stresses resulting in the formation of microcracks.

  16. The Effect of Vibration during Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behavior, Mechanical Properties, and Machining Characteristics of Stir Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Fouladi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Different methods have been applied to refine various characteristics of the zone (or nugget obtained by friction stir welding (FSW. In the current research, joining components are vibrated normal to the weld line during FSW to refine the zone microstructure. This process is described as friction stir vibration welding (FSVW. The effect of FSVW on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and machining characteristics of the zone are investigated. Al5052 alloy specimens are welded using FSW and FSVW processes and their different characteristics are compared and discussed. The results show that the strength and ductility of the welded parts increase when the vibration is applied. The outcomes also show that corrosion resistance of the nugget for FSV-welded specimens is lower than FS welded samples, and machining force of the former specimens is higher than the latter ones. These are related to smaller grain size in the zone of FSV-welded specimens compared to FS welded parts. Smaller grain size leads to a greater volume fraction of grain boundaries and, correspondingly, higher strength and hardness, as well as lower corrosion resistance.

  17. Influence of induction hardening parameters on the GS30Mn5 weld properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marušić

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines parameters of post-weld heat treatment on the test specimens made of cast steel GS30Mn5. The welding is performed with shielded metal arc welding (SMAW process. The aim is to obtain the surface without illicit cracks, with hardness ranging from 320 up to 400 HB. After induction heating, the specimens are cooled alternately with air and water. Decreased speed of quenching results in avoiding the occurrence of illicit splashes, while the hardness is maintained within the prescribed limits.

  18. Low Cycle Fatigue behavior of SMAW welded Alloy28 superaustenitic stainless steel at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kchaou, Y., E-mail: yacinekchaou@yahoo.fr [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia); Pelosin, V.; Hénaff, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, UPR 3346 CNRS ISAE-ENSMA Université de Poitiers, Téléport 2, 1, avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, F – 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Haddar, N.; Elleuch, K. [Laboratoire de Génie des Matériaux et Environnement (LGME), ENIS, BPW 1173, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-01-10

    This paper focused on the study of Low Cycle Fatigue of welded joints of superaustenitic (Alloy28) stainless steels. Chemical composition and microstructure investigation of Base Metal (BM) and Weld Metal (WM) were identified. The results showed that both of composition is fully austenitic with a dendritic microstructure in the WM. Low cycle fatigue tests at different strain levels were performed on Base Metal (BM) and Welded Joint (WJ) specimens with a strain ratio R{sub ε}=−1. The results indicated that the fatigue life of welded joints is lower than the base metal. This is mainly due to the low ductility of the Welded Metal (WM) and the presence of welding defects. Simultaneously, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observations of fractured specimens show that WJ have brittle behavior compared to BM with the presence of several welding defects especially in the crack initiation site. An estimation of the crack growth rate during LCF tests of BM and WJ was performed using distance between striations. The results showed that the crack initiation stage is shorter in the case of WJ compared to BM because of the presence of welding defects in WJ specimens.

  19. Application of welding simulation to block joints in shipbuilding and assessment of welding-induced residual stresses and distortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fricke Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During ship design, welding-induced distortions are roughly estimated as a function of the size of the component as well as the welding process and residual stresses are assumed to be locally in the range of the yield stress. Existing welding simulation methods are very complex and time-consuming and therefore not applicable to large structures like ships. Simplified methods for the estimation of welding effects were and still are subject of several research projects, but mostly concerning smaller structures. The main goal of this paper is the application of a multi-layer welding simulation to the block joint of a ship structure. When welding block joints, high constraints occur due to the ship structure which are assumed to result in accordingly high residual stresses. Constraints measured during construction were realized in a test plant for small-scale welding specimens in order to investigate their and other effects on the residual stresses. Associated welding simulations were successfully performed with fine-mesh finite element models. Further analyses showed that a courser mesh was also able to reproduce the welding-induced reaction forces and hence the residual stresses after some calibration. Based on the coarse modeling it was possible to perform the welding simulation at a block joint in order to investigate the influence of the resulting residual stresses on the behavior of the real structure, showing quite interesting stress distributions. Finally it is discussed whether smaller and idealized models of definite areas of the block joint can be used to achieve the same results offering possibilities to consider residual stresses in the design process.

  20. Application of welding simulation to block joints in shipbuilding and assessment of welding-induced residual stresses and distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Wolfgang; Zacke, Sonja

    2014-06-01

    During ship design, welding-induced distortions are roughly estimated as a function of the size of the component as well as the welding process and residual stresses are assumed to be locally in the range of the yield stress. Existing welding simulation methods are very complex and time-consuming and therefore not applicable to large structures like ships. Simplified methods for the estimation of welding effects were and still are subject of several research projects, but mostly concerning smaller structures. The main goal of this paper is the application of a multi-layer welding simulation to the block joint of a ship structure. When welding block joints, high constraints occur due to the ship structure which are assumed to result in accordingly high residual stresses. Constraints measured during construction were realized in a test plant for small-scale welding specimens in order to investigate their and other effects on the residual stresses. Associated welding simulations were successfully performed with fine-mesh finite element models. Further analyses showed that a courser mesh was also able to reproduce the welding-induced reaction forces and hence the residual stresses after some calibration. Based on the coarse modeling it was possible to perform the welding simulation at a block joint in order to investigate the influence of the resulting residual stresses on the behavior of the real structure, showing quite interesting stress distributions. Finally it is discussed whether smaller and idealized models of definite areas of the block joint can be used to achieve the same results offering possibilities to consider residual stresses in the design process.

  1. Investigation of Using Waste Welded Tuff Material as Mineral Filler in Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem KARAHANCER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the welded tuff waste- known as koyke in Isparta region - was used in the hot mix asphalt (HMA as mineral filler for reduction of the moisture susceptibility of HMA. Optimum binder content was assessed with Marshall Design Method. First of all, welded tuff was substituted as filler with limestone filler in proportion of 50% and 100%. After that Marshall Stability test was performed on specimens. The results showed that the 50% substitution was more effective than the 100% substitution. Therefore, welded tuff was substituted with limestone filler in proportion of 25%, 50%, 65% and 75%. Next, Indirect Tensile Strength test was practiced on the fabricated specimens and the results were assessed. According to the Indirect Tensile Strength results, welded tuff with 65% was given higher strength than the limestone filler. As a result, it has come up that welded tuff can be used as mineral filler in the hot mix asphalt.

  2. Fracture Behaviour of Nickel-Titanium Laser Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletta, C.; Falvo, A.; Furgiuele, F.; Barbieri, G.; Brandizzi, M.

    2009-08-01

    In this study, the effects of Nd:YAG laser welding on the fracture behavior of Ni-rich nickel-titanium sheets are analyzed by experimental investigations. The welding was carried out in open air conditions by using a special shielding/clamping system to avoid the chemical contamination of the molten zone and the formation of hot cracks. Mechanical tests of standard dog bone-shaped and single edge crack specimens were carried out to measure the stress-strain response and the fracture resistance of both the base and the welded materials. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy observations of the fracture surfaces were carried out in order to better understand the failure mechanisms. Finally, systematic comparative studies between base and laser-welded materials were carried out.

  3. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeom Kee Paik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of high-strength aluminum alloys is increasing in shipbuilding industry, particularly for the design and construction of war ships, littoral surface craft and combat ships, and fast passenger ships. While various welding methods are used today to fabricate aluminum ship structures, namely gas metallic arc welding (GMAW, laser welding and friction stir welding (FSW, FSW technology has been recognized to have many advantages for the construction of aluminum structures, as it is a low-cost welding process. In the present study, mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys are examined experimentally. Tensile testing is undertaken on dog-bone type test specimen for aluminum alloys 5083 and 5383. The test specimen includes friction stir welded material between identical alloys and also dissimilar alloys, as well as unwelded (base alloys. Mechanical properties of fusion welded aluminum alloys are also tested and compared with those of friction stir welded alloys. The insights developed from the present study are documented together with details of the test database. Part of the present study was obtained from the Ship Structure Committee project SR-1454 (Paik, 2009, jointly funded by its member agencies.

  4. Microstructural developments and mechanical properties of friction stir welding of AZ91D magnesium alloy plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushan Kumar Kadigithala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is an efficient technique which can be used particularly for magnesium and aluminum alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this work AZ91D Mg alloy plates 3mm thick were friction stir welded at different process variables such as rotational speed and welding speed. The range of rotational speeds varied from 1025 to 1525 rpm, and the welding speed varied from 25 to 75 mm/min. Good quality welds were obtained under 1025 rpm of rotational speed with the welding speeds range from 25 to 75 mm/min. The microstructure of the AZ91D alloy consists of primary α-phase, eutectic α-phase and eutectic β (Mg17Al12 phase in the received condition (gravity die cast. The original dendrite grain structure completely disappeared and was transformed to fine equiaxed grains in stir zone (SZ. It was observed that there was a slight increase in hardness in SZ, because of fine recrystallized grain structure. The transverse tensile test results of weld specimens indicated constant strength irrespective of traveling speed. Fractrographic analysis of the friction stir welded specimens showed the brittle failure.

  5. Thermal-mechanical modeling and experimental validation of weld solidification cracking in 6061-T6 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.

    1997-12-31

    Finite element simulation using an internal state variable constitutive model coupled with a void growth and damage model are used to study weld solidification cracking of 6061-T6 aluminum. Calculated results are compared with data from an experimental program determining the locations of failure as a function of weld process parameters and specimen geometry. Two types of weld solidification cracking specimen were studied. One specimen, in which cracking did not occur, was used to evaluate finite element simulations of the thermal response and calculations of average strain across the weld. The other specimen type was used to determine the location of crack initiation as a function of weld process parameters. This information was used to evaluate the finite element simulations of weld solidification cracking. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was used in both thermal and mechanical finite element analyses. A strain rate and temperature history dependent constitutive model is coupled with a ductile void growth damage model in the mechanical analyses. Stresses near the weld pool are examined to explain results obtained in the finite element analyses and correlated with experimental observations. Good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment for locations of crack initiation and extent of cracking. Some effects of uncertainties in material parameters are discussed.

  6. Microstructural observations of HFIR-irratiated austenitic stainless steels including welds from JP9-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, T.; Shiba, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels, including specimens taken from various electron beam (EB) welds, have been irradiated in HFIR Phase II capsules, JP9-16. Fifteen specimens irradiated at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C up to 17 dpa are so far examined by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In 300{degrees}C irradiation, cavities were smaller than 2nm and different specimens showed little difference in cavity microstructure. At 400{degrees}C, cavity size was larger, but still very small (<8 nm). At 500{degrees}C, cavity size reached 30 nm in weld metal specimens of JPCA, while cold worked JPCA contained a small (<5 nm) cavities. Inhomogeneous microstructural evolution was clearly observed in weld-metal specimens irradiated at 500{degrees}C.

  7. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  8. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  9. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  10. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  11. Microstructural changes in welded joints of 316 SS by dual-ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Baba, K.; Katoh, Y.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-09-01

    As a part of the activity to establish joining methods to fabricate in-vessel components and to evaluate their performance under fusion environment, microstructural evolution was studied by means of the dual-ion irradiation method. The base material used in this study was solution annealed 316 stainless steel. Welded joints were made by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method and electron beam (EB) welding method. For the prospective improvement of swelling in welded joints, modified TIG or EB welding procedures utilizing titanium or nickel foil insertions were investigated. TEM disk specimens from various positions of welded joints were irradiated to 25 dpa at 673, 773 and 873 K. He/dpa ratio in Ni/He dual-ion irradiation was 15 appm He/dpa. The present results indicate some concern about the microstructures which result in the fusion zone and heat affected zones.

  12. Laser-welded V-Cr-Ti alloys: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Smith, D.L.; Xu, Z.; Leong, K.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A systematic study has been in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to examine the use of YaG or CO{sub 2} lasers to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the laser-welded materials. In addition, several postwelding heat treatments are being applied to the welded samples to evaluate their benefits, if any, to the structure and properties of the weldments. Hardness measurements are made across the welded regions of different samples to evaluate differences in the characteristics of various weldments. Several weldments were used to fabricate specimens for four-point bend tests. Several additional weldments were made with a YaG laser; here, the emphasis was on determining the optimal weld parameters to achieve deep penetration in the welds. A preliminary assessment was then made of the weldments on the basis of microstructure, hardness profiles, and defects.

  13. High Strain Rate Testing of Welded DOP-26 Iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneibel, J. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, R. G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carmichael, C. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fox, E. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 is used to produce Clad Vent Set cups that protect the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) which provide electric power for spacecraft and rovers. In a previous study, the tensile properties of DOP-26 were measured over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and reported in ORNL/TM-2007/81. While that study established the properties of the base material, the fabrication of the heat sources requires welding, and the mechanical properties of welded DOP-26 have not been extensively characterized in the past. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the mechanical properties of DOP-26 specimens containing a transverse weld in the center of their gage sections. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 750, 900, and 1090°C and engineering strain rates of 1×10-3 and 10 s-1. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1×10-4 Torr. The welded specimens had a significantly higher yield stress, by up to a factor of ~2, than the non-welded base material. The yield stress did not depend on the strain rate except at 1090°C, where it was slightly higher for the faster strain rate. The ultimate tensile stress, on the other hand, was significantly higher for the faster strain rate at temperatures of 750°C and above. At 750°C and above, the specimens deformed at 1×10-3 s-1 showed pronounced necking resulting sometimes in perfect chisel-edge fracture. The specimens deformed at 10 s-1 exhibited this fracture behavior only at the highest test temperature, 1090°C. Fracture occurred usually in the fusion zone of the weld and was, in most cases, primarily intergranular.

  14. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  15. Study on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by Tig-Mig Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundimu, Emmanuel O.; Akinlabi, Esther T.; Erinosho, Mutiu F.

    Stainless steel is a family of Fe-based alloys having excellent resistance to corrosion and as such has been used imperatively for kitchen utensils, transportation, building constructions and much more. This paper presents the work conducted on the material characterizations of a tungsten inert gas (TIG)-metal inert gas (MIG) hybrid welded joint of type 304 austenitic stainless steel. The welding processes were conducted in three phases. The phases of welding employed are MIG welding using a current of 170A, TIG welding using a current of 190A, and a hybrid TIG-MIG welding with currents of 190/170A, respectively. The MIG, TIG, and hybrid TIG-MIG weldments were characterized with incomplete penetration, full penetration and excess penetration of weld. Intergranular austenite was created toward transition and heat affected zones. The thickness of the delta ferrite (δ-Fe) formed in the microstructures of the TIG weld is more than the thickness emerged in the microstructures of MIG and hybrid TIG-MIG welds. A TIG-MIG hybrid weld of specimen welded at the currents of 190/170A has the highest ultimate tensile strength value and percentage elongation of 397.72MPa and 35.7%. The TIG-MIG hybrid welding can be recommended for high-tech industrial applications such as nuclear, aircraft, food processing, and automobile industry.

  16. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  17. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  18. Controlled Environment Specimen Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2014-01-01

    an environmental transmission electron microscope to an in situ X-ray diffractometer through a dedicated transmission electron microscope specimen transfer holder, capable of sealing the specimen in a gaseous environment at elevated temperatures. Two catalyst material systems have been investigated; Cu/ZnO/Al2O3...... transferred in a reactive environment to the environmental transmission electron microscope where further analysis on the local scale were conducted. The Co/Al2O3 catalyst was reduced in the environmental microscope and successfully kept reduced outside the microscope in a reactive environment. The in situ......Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking...

  19. Flexural strength of pure Ti, Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys submitted to Nd:YAG laser or TIG welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rick; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2006-01-01

    Welding of metals and alloys is important to Dentistry for fabrication of dental prostheses. Several methods of soldering metals and alloys are currently used. The purpose of this study was to assess, using the flexural strength testing, the efficacy of two processes Nd:YAG laser and TIG (tungsten inert gas) for welding of pure Ti, Co-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys. Sixty cylindrical specimens were prepared (20 of each material), bisected and welded using different techniques. Four groups were formed (n=15). I: Nd:YAG laser welding; II- Nd:YAG laser welding using a filling material; III- TIG welding and IV (control): no welding (intact specimens). The specimens were tested in flexural strength and the results were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. There was significant differences (pwelded materials, the Co-Cr alloy being the most resistant to deflection. Comparing the welding processes, significant differences (pTIG and laser welding and also between laser alone and laser plus filling material. In conclusion, TIG welding yielded higher flexural strength means than Nd:YAG laser welding for the tested Ti, Co-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys.

  20. Estimation of Fatigue Life of Laser Welded AISI304 Stainless Steel T-Joint Based on Experiments and Recommendations in Design Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Damkilde, Lars; Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    of specimens are used, two of these are non-welded and the third is welded with a transverse welding (T-Joint). The 13 laser welded specimens are cut out with a milling cutter. The non-welded specimens are divided in 13 specimens cut out with a milling cutter and 10 specimens cut out by a plasma cutter......In this paper the fatigue behavior of laser welded T-joints of stainless steel AISI304 is investigated experimentally. In the fatigue experiments 36 specimens with a sheet thickness of 1 mm are exposed to one-dimensional cyclic loading. Three different types of specimens are adopted. Three groups....... The non-welded specimens are used to study the influence of heat and surface effects on the fatigue life. The fatigue life from the experiments is compared to fatigue life calculated from the guidelines in the standards DNV-RP-C203 and EUROCODE 3 EN-1993-1-9. Insignificant differences in fatigue life...

  1. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  2. Detection and assessment of flaws in friction stir welded metallic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohammad Ali; Mustapha, Samir; Tarraf, Jaafar; Ayoub, Georges; Hamade, Ramsey

    2017-04-01

    Investigated is the ability of ultrasonic guided waves to detect flaws and assess the quality of friction stir welds (FSW). AZ31B magnesium plates were friction stir welded. While process parameters of spindle speed and tool feed were fixed, shoulder penetration depth was varied resulting in welds of varying quality. Ultrasonic waves were excited at different frequencies using piezoelectric wafers and the fundamental symmetric (S0) mode was selected to detect the flaws resulting from the welding process. The front of the first transmitted wave signal was used to capture the S0 mode. A damage index (DI) measure was defined based on the amplitude attenuation after wave interaction with the welded zone. Computed Tomography (CT) scanning was employed as a nondestructive testing (NDT) technique to assess the actual weld quality. Derived DI values were plotted against CT-derived flaw volume resulting in a perfectly linear fit. The proposed approach showed high sensitivity of the S0 mode to internal flaws within the weld. As such, this methodology bears great potential as a future predictive method for the evaluation of FSW weld quality.

  3. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  4. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  5. Solar array welding developement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  6. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  7. Preliminary assessment of the fracture behavior of weld material in full-thickness clad beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Iskander, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes a testing program that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients due to welding and cladding applications, as well as material inhomogeneities in welded regions due to reheating in multiple weld passes. A summary of the testing program includes a description of the specimen geometry, material properties, the testing procedure, and the experimental results form three specimens. The yield strength of the weld material was determined to be 36% higher than the yield strength of the base material. An irradiation-induced increase in yield strength of the weld material could result in a yield stress that exceeds the upper limit where code curves are valid. The high yield strength for prototypic weld material may have implications for RPV structural integrity assessments. Analyses of the test data are discussed, including comparisons of measured displacements with finite-element analysis results, applications of toughness estimation techniques, and interpretations of constraint conditions implied by stress-based constraint methodologies. Metallurgical conditions in the region of the cladding heat-affected zone are proposed as a possible explanation for the lower-bound fracture toughness measured with one of the shallow-crack clad beam specimens. Fracture toughness data from the three clad beam specimens are compared with other shallow- and deep-crack uniaxial beam and cruciform data generated previously from A 533 Grade B plate material.

  8. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... exceed 1/8 inch per minute during yield strength determination. (k) Elongation. Physical test specimens... bend test. A root bend test specimen must be cut from the cylinder or a welded test plate, used for the... specified for American Standard taper pipe threads. (iii) Straight threads having at least 6 engaged threads...

  9. Genomics and museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Allan Wilson and colleagues isolated DNA sequences from museum specimens of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys panamintinus) and compared these sequences with those from freshly collected animals (Thomas et al. 1990). The museum specimens had been collected up to 78 years earlier, so the two samples provided a direct temporal comparison of patterns of genetic variation. This was not the first time DNA sequences had been isolated from preserved material, but it was the first time it had been carried out with a population sample. Population geneticists often try to make inferences about the influence of historical processes such as selection, drift, mutation and migration on patterns of genetic variation in the present. The work of Wilson and colleagues was important in part because it suggested a way in which population geneticists could actually study genetic change in natural populations through time, much the same way that experimentalists can do with artificial populations in the laboratory. Indeed, the work of Thomas et al. (1990) spawned dozens of studies in which museum specimens were used to compare historical and present-day genetic diversity (reviewed in Wandeler et al. 2007). All of these studies, however, were limited by the same fundamental problem: old DNA is degraded into short fragments. As a consequence, these studies mostly involved PCR amplification of short templates, usually short stretches of mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites. In this issue, Bi et al. (2013) report a breakthrough that should open the door to studies of genomic variation in museum specimens. They used target enrichment (exon capture) and next-generation (Illumina) sequencing to compare patterns of genetic variation in historic and present-day population samples of alpine chipmunks (Tamias alpinus) (Fig. 1). The historic samples came from specimens collected in 1915, so the temporal span of this comparison is nearly 100 years. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Gap-bridging During Quasi-simultaneous Laser Transmission Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmailzl, Anton; Hierl, Stefan; Schmidt, Michael

    Tightness is often the main requirement for quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welds. However, remaining gaps cannot be detected by the used set-path monitoring. By using a pyrometer in combination with a 3D-scanner, weld seam interruptions can be localized precisely while welding, due to temperature deviations along the weld contour. To analyze the temperature signal in correlation to the progress of gap-bridging, T-joint samples with predefined gaps are welded. The set-path is measured synchronously. Additionally, the temperature distribution and the influence of the thermal expansion of the polymers are studied by a thermo-mechanical FEM-process simulation. On top of that, the melt blow-out of the welded samples is analyzed using μCT-measurements. The experiments have shown that closing of a gap can be identified reliably by the temperature signal and that the squeezed melt flow into the gap and the thermal expansion in the gap zone accelerates gap-bridging. Furthermore the inserted heat can be adapted in the fault zone, in order to avoid thermal damage.

  11. Experiments and simulation for 6061-T6 aluminum alloy resistance spot welded lap joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Radu Stefanel

    This comprehensive study is the first to quantify the fatigue performance, failure loads, and microstructure of resistance spot welding (RSW) in 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) alloy according to welding parameters and process sensitivity. The extensive experimental, theoretical and simulated analyses will provide a framework to optimize the welding of lightweight structures for more fuel-efficient automotive and military applications. The research was executed in four primary components. The first section involved using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning, tensile testing, laser beam profilometry (LBP) measurements, and optical microscopy(OM) images to experimentally investigate failure loads and deformation of the Al-alloy resistance spot welded joints. Three welding conditions, as well as nugget and microstructure characteristics, were quantified according to predefined process parameters. Quasi-static tensile tests were used to characterize the failure loads in specimens based upon these same process parameters. Profilometer results showed that increasing the applied welding current deepened the weld imprints. The EBSD scans revealed the strong dependency between the grain sizes and orientation function on the process parameters. For the second section, the fatigue behavior of the RSW'ed joints was experimentally investigated. The process optimization included consideration of the forces, currents, and times for both the main weld and post-heating. Load control cyclic tests were conducted on single weld lap-shear joint coupons to characterize the fatigue behavior in spot welded specimens. Results demonstrate that welding parameters do indeed significantly affect the microstructure and fatigue performance for these welds. The third section comprised residual strains of resistance spot welded joints measured in three different directions, denoted as in-plane longitudinal, in-plane transversal, and normal, and captured on the fusion zone, heat affected zone

  12. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  13. Prediction of the welding distortion of large steel structure with mechanical restraint using equivalent load methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-ung Park

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The design dimension may not be satisfactory at the final stage due to the welding during the assembly stage, leading to cutting or adding the components in large structure constructions. The productivity is depend on accuracy of the welding quality especially at assembly stage. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to decide the component dimension during each assembly stage considering the above situations during the designing stage by exactly predicting welding deformation before the welding is done. Further, if the system that predicts whether welding deformation is equipped, it is possible to take measures to reduce deformation through FE analysis, helping in saving time for correcting work by arresting the parts which are prone to having welding deformation. For the FE analysis to predict the deformation of a large steel structure, calculation time, modeling, constraints in each assembly stage and critical welding length have to be considered. In case of fillet welding deformation, around 300 mm is sufficient as a critical welding length of the specimen as proposed by the existing researches. However, the critical length in case of butt welding is around 1000 mm, which is far longer than that suggested in the existing researches. For the external constraint, which occurs as the geometry of structure is changed according to the assembly stage, constraint factor is drawn from the elastic FE analysis and test results, and the magnitude of equivalent force according to constraint is decided. The comparison study for the elastic FE analysis result and measurement for the large steel structure based on the above results reveals that the analysis results are in the range of 80–118% against measurement values, both matching each other well. Further, the deformation of fillet welding in the main plate among the total block occupies 66–89%, making welding deformation in the main plate far larger than the welding deformation in the longitudinal

  14. Creep-fatigue propagation of semi-elliptical crack at 650 deg. C in 316L(N) stainless steel plates with or without welded joints; Propagation de fissures semi-elliptiques en fatigue-fluage a 650 deg. C dans des plaques d'acier 316L(N) avec ou sans joints soudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtit, F

    2000-07-01

    This study realised in LISN Laboratory of CEA Saclay, deals with the creep fatigue propagation of semi elliptical crack at the temperature of 650 deg C in 316L(N) stainless steel plates with or without welded joints. A vast majority of the studies on creep fatigue propagation models are based on specimen (CT) especially designed for crack propagation study. The PLAQFLU program performed in LISN laboratory deals with the application and adaptation of these models to complex crack shape, which are more representative of the cracks observed in industrial components. In this scope, we use propagation tests realised at the temperature of 650 deg C with wide plates containing semi elliptical defects. For some of them, the initial defect is machined in the middle of a welded joint, which constitute a privileged site for the crack initiation. The approach used in this study is based on global parameters of fracture mechanics. At first, tests on CT specimen are used in order to determine the propagation laws correlating the crack growth rate to the global parameters K or C{sup *}. These laws are then supposed to be intrinsic to our materials and are used to analysed the semi elliptical crack propagation. The analysis of the comportment of the crack during the hold time demonstrates the possibility to establish a correlation between the crack propagation both in the deepest and the surface point and the local value of C{sup *}. These correlations are coherent in the different points of the crack front for the different applied hold times, and they present a reasonably good agreement with the creep propagation law identified on CT specimen. The simulation of test performed on based metal specimen with a model of summation of both creep and pure fatigue crack growth gives acceptable results when the calculus of the simplified expression of C{sup *}{sub s} considers a continuous evolution of creep deformations rate during the all test. (author)

  15. Failure Behaviors Depending on the Notch Location of the Impact Test Specimens on the HAZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yun Chan; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Young Suk [Chungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jae Keun; Park, Ji Hong [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Numerical studies were performed to examine the effects of notch location of impact specimens on the failure behavior of HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) when Charpy V-notch impact test were made at a low temperature (1 .deg. C). Carbon steel plate (SA-516 Gr. 70) with thickness of 25mm for pressure vessel was welded by SMAW (Shielded Metal-Arc Welding) and specimens were fabricated from the welded plate. Charpy tests were then performed with specimens having different notch positions of specimens varying from the fusion line through HAZ to base metal. A series of finite element analysis which simulates the Charpy test and crack propagation initiating at the tip of V-notch was carried out as well. The finite element analysis takes into account the irregular fusion line and non-homogenous material properties due to the notch location of the specimen in HAZ. Results reveals that the energies absorbed during impact test depend significantly on the notch location and direction of specimen. Finite element analysis also demonstrates that the notch location of specimens, to a great extent, influences the reliability and consistency of the test.

  16. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s). 2.59 Section 2.59 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s). (a...

  17. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  18. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  19. Microstructure Stability During Creep of Friction Stir Welded AA2024-T3 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Michael; Rashkovsky, Tal; Cabibbo, Marcello; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The poor weldability of the AA2024 aluminum alloy limits its use in industrial applications. Because friction stir welding (FSW) is a non-fusion welding process, it seems to be a promising solution for welding this alloy. In the current study, FSW was applied to butt weld AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy plates. Creep tests were conducted at 250 and at 315 °C on both the parent material and the friction stir welded specimens. The microstructures of the welded and non-welded AA2024-T3 specimens before and after the creep tests were studied and compared. A comprehensive transmission electron microscopy study together with a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy study and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis was conducted to investigate the microstructure stability. The parent material seems to contain two kinds of Cu-rich precipitates—coarse precipitates of a few microns each and uniformly dispersed fine nanosized precipitates. Unlike the parent material, the crept specimens were found to contain the two kinds of precipitates mentioned above together with platelet-like precipitates. In addition, extensive decoration of the grain boundaries with precipitates was clearly observed in the crept specimens. Controlled aging experiments for up to 280 h at the relevant temperatures were conducted on both the parent material and the welded specimens in order to isolate the contribution of exposure to high temperatures to the microstructure changes. TEM study showed the development of dislocation networks into a cellular dislocation structure in the case of the parent metal. Changes in the dislocation structure as a function of the creep strain and the FSW process were recorded. A detailed creep data analysis was conducted, taking into account the instability of the microstructure.

  20. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  1. Modeling the damage of welded steel, using the GTN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Ahmar Kadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work is the modeling of the damage in the weld metal according to the finite element method and the concepts of fracture mechanics based on local approaches using the code ABAQUS calculates. The use of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model axisymmetric specimens AE type to three different zones (Base metal, molten metal and heat affected Zone with four levels of triaxiality (AE2, AE4, AE10 and AE80, we have used to model the behavior of damage to welded steel, which is described as being due to the growth and coalescence of cavities with high rates of triaxiality

  2. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...... with the simulation prediction, showing the validity of the algorithm....

  3. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding and instrumental technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carin, M.; Rogeon, P.; Carron, D.; Le Masson, P.; Couedel, D. [Universite de Bretagne Sud, Centre de Recherche, Lab. d' Etudes Thermiques Energetique et Environnement, 56 - Lorient (France)

    2004-07-01

    In the present work, thermal cycles measured with thermocouples embedded in specimens are employed to validate a numerical thermo-metallurgical model of an Electron Beam welding process. The implemented instrumentation techniques aim at reducing the perturbations induced by the sensors in place. The numerical model is based on the definition of a heat source term linked to the keyhole geometry predicted by a model of pressure balance using the FEMLAB code. The heat source term is used by the thermo-metallurgical simulation carried out with the finite element code SYSWELD. Kinetics parameters are extracted from dilatometric experiments achieved in welding austenitization conditions at constant cooling rates. (authors)

  4. Microstructure and properties of weld joint during 10 kW laser welding with surface-active element sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shichun; Deng, Zhaohui; Deng, Hui; Xu, Wei

    2017-12-01

    The present work has been focused on the effects of surface-active element sulfur on welding properties during 10 kW high power laser welding of 304 stainless steel thick plate. Molten pool behavior, morphology feature of sulfide inclusions, metallographic structures, XRD patterns, microhardness, potentiodynamic polarization curves and pitted surface have been investigated and discussed. The results indicated that the added sulfur powder improved the weld depth by increasing molten metal fluidity, elongating molten pool and promoting heat transmission. The observed sulfide inclusions had small particle size of 0.65 μm in average and were distributed sparsely in weld joint. The WWS (weld joint with sulfur powder) had higher δ-ferrite content and finer grain size than the WWOS (weld joint without sulfur powder) and BM (base metal) due to the effects of sulfide inclusions on crystallizing process. The preferred orientations of γ-austenite along the (200) and (220) directions were promoted both in WWS and WWOS. Fine grain size and high δ-ferrite content led to high microhardness. The WWS had the highest microhardness among all the specimens. The WWOS and BM had a similar corrosion resistance. By comprehensive comparison, the WWS had a relative lower corrosion resistance than others, since sulfide inclusions in WWS not only had some benefits but also had some bad effects on corrosion property.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanapal, A.; S. RAJENDRA BOOPATHY; Balasubramanian, V.; Chidambaram, K.; A. R. Thoheer Zaman

    2013-01-01

    Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosi...

  6. Effects of stop-start features on residual stresses in a multipass austenitic stainless steel weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turski, M., E-mail: Mark.Turski@magnesium-elektron.com [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Francis, J.A. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)] [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hurrell, P.R. [Rolls-Royce Plc., Raynesway, Derby DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Bate, S.K. [Serco Technical Services, Birchwood Park, Warrington, Cheshire WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Hiller, S. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    In this article we describe experiments that characterise and quantify the localised perturbations in residual stress associated with both ramped and abrupt stop-start features in a multipass weld. Residual stress distributions in AISI Grade 304L/308L stainless steel groove-welded specimens, containing weld interruptions that were introduced in a controlled manner, have been characterised using both neutron diffraction and the incremental deep hole drilling method. The extent to which the localised stresses associated with the interruptions were annealed by overlayed passes was also assessed. The results suggest that, regardless of the type of interruption, there can be significant localised increases in residual stress if the stop-start feature is left exposed. If further weld passes are deposited, then the localised increases in stress are likely to persist if the interruption was abrupt, whereas for a ramped interruption they may be dissipated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study the residual stress-field surrounding weld interruptions was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localised stresses were found to increase at weld interruptions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both ramped and abrupt weld interruptions were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses persisted for abrupt interruptions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses dissipated for ramped interruptions.

  7. Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V: Microstructure, Mechanical and Fracture Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D. G.; Edwards, P.; Cantrell, A. M.; Gangwar, K.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been refined to create butt welds from two sheets of Ti-6Al-4V alloy to have an ultra-fine grain size. Weld specimen testing was completed for three different FSW process conditions: As welded, stress relieved, stress relieved and machined, and for the un-welded base material. The investigation includes macrostructure, microstructure, microhardness, tensile property testing, notched bar impact testing, and fracture toughness evaluations. All experiments were conducted in accordance with industry standard testing specifications. The microstructure in the weld nugget was found to consist of refined and distorted grains of alpha in a matrix of transformed beta containing acicular alpha. The enhanced fracture toughness of the welds is a result of increased hardness, which is attributed to an increase in alpha phase, increase in transformed beta in acicular alpha, and grain refinement during the weld process. The noted general trend in mechanical properties from as welded, to stress relieved, to stress relieved and machined conditions exhibited a decrease in ultimate tensile strength, and yield strength with a small increase in ductility and a significant increase in fracture toughness.

  8. Microstructure change in the interface of co2 laser welded zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutarek, N.; Azzougui, B.; Saidi, D.; Neggache, M.

    2009-11-01

    Welding is a joining procedure that offers some benefits over mechanical fasteners such as weight reduction and absence of notches induced by machining operations. CO2 laser beam welding with a continuous wave is a high energy density and low heat input process. The result of this is a small heat-affected zone (HAZ), which cools very rapidly with very little distortion, and a high depth-to-width ratio for the Welding is a necessary process during fabricating fuel rods and fuel assemblies with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and electron beam welding is one of the commonly- used method. In this work, the joining of zirconium alloys was attempted by laser beam welding. A 2 kW CO2 laser is used and the joints are obtained from similar materials, which are plates of Zircaloy-4 (2 mm thick). A series of zirconium alloys were welded and investigated in a tow-fold approach: (1) process optimisation: the laser processing parameters are optimized to obtain welds with minimum defects, and (2) material characterisation: weld microstructures were evaluated. The microstructure and the phases present in the resolidified zone of the laser -welded specimens were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and also by the realization of micro hardness diagrams. A particular attention was made to study the correlation between surface structure and mechanical behaviour.

  9. Evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jae Sung, E-mail: jsyoon2@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk-Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyu In [Gentec Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • For confirming the evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM, the followings are performed. • E-beam welding in ARAA plate. • Evaluation for the penetration depth and beam width according to the E-beam welding current. • Performed micro-hardness and Charpy impact test after PWHT. • Determine the optimized PWHT condition. - Abstract: Korea has designed a helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM), including a TBM shield, called a TBM set, that will be tested in ITER. Korean RAFM steel was developed as a structural material for the HCCR TBM, and advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA) was selected as the primary candidate from various program alloys. Fabrication technologies for the HCCR TBM were developed using ARAA to provide the method and procedure for fabricating the TBM for testing in ITER based on RCC-MRx, which was selected as the design and fabrication code and standard for the HCCR TBM. To establish and optimize welding procedures for electron beam welding of an ARAA material, variations in welding current and speed were investigated. A series of performance tests was performed before and after post-weld heat treatment to evaluate the welded specimen under the determined welding conditions.

  10. Weld formation control at electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Koleva, Elena; Mladenov, Georgy; A. Shcherbakov

    2014-01-01

    Electron beam welding is used extensively to produce essential machine parts. The control of the basic beam parameters beam power or beam current at constant accelerating voltage, welding speed, current of focusing lens and distance between electron gun and welded sample surface is not enough to obtain at most of the regimes sound welds. Control of the focus position using analysis of the high frequency component of the current, collected by plasma, at periodic interactions on the beam (the o...

  11. The effect of electron beam welding on the creep rupture properties of a Nb-Zr-C alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.; Titran, R. H.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    Creep rupture tests of electron beam welded PWC-11 sheet were conducted at 1350 K. Full penetration, single pass welds were oriented transverse to the testing direction in 1 mm thick sheet. With this orientation, stress was imposed equally on the base metal, weld metal, and heat-affected zone. Tests were conducted in both the postweld annealed and aged conditions. Unwelded specimens with similar heat treatments were tested for comparative purposes. It was found that the weld region is stronger than the base metal for both the annealed and aged conditions and that the PWC-11 material is stronger in the annealed condition than in the aged condition.

  12. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  13. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  14. Effect of a shear modified Gurson model on damage development in a FSW tensile specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2009-01-01

    For a friction stir welded aluminum plate the resistance to ductile failure is studied by analyzing tensile test specimens cut out across the weldline. As the stress triaxiality is rather low in these tests, the Gurson material model is not expected to give a very accurate description of the void....... It is found that the modification does provide additional damage development in the friction stir weld, which may help to fit experimental data. But the suggested modification depends strongly on the overall stress state, and may have a too strong effect in some cases where the stress triaxiality is rather......, such that the damage parameter does not really represent the void volume fraction. Various amounts of the additional damage evolution are compared with predictions of the original Gurson model. The analyses are carried out for different yield stress profiles transverse to the weld and for different specimen widths...

  15. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  16. An Analysis of the Weldability of Ductile Cast Iron Using Inconel 625 for the Root Weld and Electrodes Coated in 97.6% Nickel for the Filler Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the weldability of ductile cast iron when the root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG welding process employing an Inconel 625 source rod, and when the filler welds are applied with electrodes coated with 97.6% Ni. The welds were performed on ductile cast iron specimen test plates sized 300 mm × 90 mm × 10 mm with edges tapered at angles of 60°. The plates were subjected to two heat treatments. This article analyzes the influence on weldability of the various types of electrodes and the effect of preheat treatments. Finally, a microstructure analysis is made of the material next to the weld in the metal-weld interface and in the weld itself. The microstructure produced is correlated with the strength of the welds. We treat an alloy with 97.6% Ni, which prevents the formation of carbides. With a heat treatment at 900 °C and 97.6% Ni, there is a dissolution of all carbides, forming nodules in ferritic matrix graphite.

  17. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  18. Experimental characterization of fatigue strength in butt welded joint considering the geometry and the effect of cooling rate of the weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzola, Nelson; Hernández, Edgar

    2017-05-01

    In this work the experimental characterization of fatigue strength in butt welded joints considering the geometry and the post-weld cooling cycle was performed. ASTM A-36 structural steel was used as the base metal for the shielded metal arc welding process, with welding electrode E6013. Two experimental factors were established: weld bead geometry and the post-weld cooling rate. Two levels for each factor, the welding reinforcement (1 and 3 mm), and the rate of cooling, slow (quiet air) and fast (immersion in water) are evaluated respectively. For the uniaxial fatigue tests, 8 samples were selected for each treatment for a total of 32 specimens. The mechanical and fractomechanical properties of fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal in relation to the analysis of failure mechanisms were analysed. The fatigue crack growth rates were estimated based on the counting of microstrations. Furthermore, experimental tests, such as uniaxial tension, microindentation hardness, Charpy impact and metallographic analysis, were made to know the influence of the experimental factors in the fatigue strength. On this research, about the 78.13% of the samples obtained a resistance higher than the recommended one by class FAT 100. The results showed that the geometry of the joint is the factor of greatest influence on fatigue strength for butt welded joints; the greater the weld reinforcement the lower the fatigue strength of the joint. Although it is also important to consider other geometric factors of less impact as it is the weld toe radius and the welding chord width.

  19. USE OF ROUND BAR SPECIMEN IN FRACTURE TOUGHNESS TEST OF METALLIC MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    NEELAKANTHA V LONDE,; DR. T.JAYARAJU; DR. P.R.SADANANDA RAO

    2010-01-01

    The fracture toughness of high strength metallic materials is determined by standard test methods like ASTM E 399, ASTM E-1820 using standard specimen geometries such as Compact tension (CT) or Single edge notched bend (SENB) specimens. This paper explains a simple test methodology based on fracture mechanics approach usingcircumferentially cracked round bar (CCRB) specimen. Specimen preparation and fatigue precracking is quite simple, consuming less material and machining time. This CCRB, be...

  20. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  1. Test to Determine Margin-to-Failure for Hy-100 Steel with Undermatched Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-01

    This test program was undertaken to determine the flaw tolerance and to quantify the strength margin-to-failure of high yield strength steel fillet welded specimens. The tests demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure for HY-100 specimens fabricated with matched welding systems. In the use of high yield (HY) steel materials in designs required to accommodate rapidly applied dynamic loads, the concern was raised where the possibility of decreased flaw tolerance and premature failure by unstable ductile tearing could limit their use. Tests were developed and conducted to demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure in HY-100 fillet and partial penetration welded structures. In addition, inelastic analytical predictions were performed to assess the accuracy of such predictive tools compared to actual test data. Results showed that adequate margin-to-failure exists when using matched welding systems.

  2. Evaluation of self-welding susceptibility of an austenitic stainless steel (alloy D9) in sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Albert, S. K.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Meikandamurthy, C.; Amarendra, G.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2008-02-01

    Self-welding susceptibility of a 15Cr-15Ni-2Mo titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel (alloy D9), in both annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions, have been evaluated in flowing sodium at 823 K for 2160 and 4320 h under contact stress of 9.4 MPa. Tests were performed on flat-on-flat geometry of hollow cylindrical specimens under compression. One pair of 20% cold-worked alloy D9 vs. 20% cold-worked alloy D9 specimens tested for 4320 h was self-welded for which the breakaway shear force was measured. Scanning electron micrographs of the self-welded region showed that portions of the original interface no longer existed. The paper discusses the experimental set-up installed in the sodium loop test facility and the results of self-welding susceptibility studies on this material.

  3. Welding and Brazing Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Hot isostatic pressing and conventional furnace brazing effective under right conditions. Study performed showed feasibility of welding SiC using several welding and brazing techniques. Use of SiC improves engine efficiency by allowing increase in operating temperature. SiC successfully hot-pressure-welded at 3,550 degrees F (1,950 degrees C) in argon. Refinements of solid-state welding and brazing procedures used sufficient for some specific industrial applications.

  4. Influence of the phase morphology on the weldability of PLA/PBAT-blends by using butt-welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, L.; Bonten, C.

    2014-05-01

    The material development in the field of bioplastics is steadily increasing. It is important to examine the processability but the Investigation of further process steps is also very important. In this paper the weldability of bioplastics is discussed. Compounds of Polylactide (PLA) and Polybutyleneadipate-terephthalate (PBAT) are produced by a twin screw extruder with different mixing ratios. Tensile specimens are produced by injection moulding and the tensile tests are carried out. In order to verify the weldability, some tensile specimens are cut in halfes and butt welded. Afterwards a tensile test is performed with the welded samples and the results are compared with the values of the unwelded samples. For understanding the results, the morphology of the welds were examined and correlated. It has been found that blends with a mixing ratio of 50:50 have the lowest welding factor, because of the immiscibility of PLA and PBAT. Weld images show segregated areas that reduce the force transmission.

  5. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  6. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  7. Welding sequence effects on residual stress distribution in offshore wind monopile structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mehmanparast

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses are often inevitably introduced into the material during the fabrication processes, such as welding, and are known to have significant effects on the subsequent fatigue crack growth behavior of welded structures. In this paper, the importance of welding sequence on residual stress distribution in engineering components has been reviewed. In addition, the findings available in the literature have been used to provide an accurate interpretation of the fatigue crack growth data on specimens extracted from the welded plates employed in offshore wind monopile structures. The results have been discussed in terms of the role of welding sequence in damage inspection and structural integrity assessment of offshore renewable energy structures.

  8. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirapeix, Jesus; Cobo, Adolfo; Fuentes, Jose; Davila, Marta; Etayo, Juan Maria; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques. PMID:22346696

  9. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirapeix, Jesus; Cobo, Adolfo; Fuentes, Jose; Davila, Marta; Etayo, Juan Maria; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques.

  10. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose-Miguel Lopez-Higuera

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques.

  11. Laser Welding of Coated Press-hardened Steel 22MnB5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, Jukka; Minkkinen, Ari; Järn, Sanna

    The press-hardening process is widely used for steels that are used in the automotive industry. Using ultra-high-strength steels enables car manufacturers to build lighter, stronger, and safer vehicles at a reduced cost and generating lower CO2 emissions. In the study, laser welding properties of the coated hot stamped steel 22BMn5 were studied. A constant 900 °C temperature was used to heat the steel plates, and two different furnace times were used in the press-hardening, being 300 and 740 seconds. Some of the plates were shot blasted to see the influence of the partly removed oxide layer on the laser welding and quality. The welding set-up, welding, and testing of the weld specimens complied with the automotive testing code SEP 1220.

  12. High cycle fatigue of weld repaired cast Ti-6AI-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. B.; Hodi, F. S.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of weld repair on fatigue life of titanium-6Al-4V castings, a series of specimens was exposed to variations in heat treatment, weld procedure, HIP cycle, cooling rate, and surface finish. The results indicate that weld repair is not detrimental to HCF properties as fatigue cracks were located primarily in the base metal. Fine surface finish and large colony size are the primary variables improving the fatigue life. The fusion zone resisted fatigue crack initiation due to a basketweave morphology and thin grain boundary alpha. Multipass welds were shown not to affect fatigue life when compared with single pass welds. A secondary HIP treatment was not detrimental to fatigue properties, but was found to be unnecessary.

  13. Effects of the Heterogeneity in the Electron Beam Welded Joint on Mechanical Properties of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of microstructure heterogeneity on the tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of electron beam welded (EBW) Ti6Al4V sheets. To achieve this goal, the tensile and low cycle fatigue property in the EBW joints and base metal (BM) specimens is compared. During the tensile testing, digital image correlation technology was used to measure the plastic strain field evolution within the specimens. The experimental results showed that the tensile ductility and low cycle fatigue strength of EBW joints are lower than that of BM specimens, mainly because of the effect of microstructure heterogeneity of the welded joint. Moreover, the EBW joints exhibit the cyclic hardening behavior during low fatigue process, while BM specimens exhibit the cyclic softening behavior. Compared with the BM specimens with uniform microstructure, the heterogeneity of microstructure in the EBW joint is found to decrease the mechanical properties of welded joint.

  14. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  15. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  16. Laser welding of titanium in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, G; Andersson, M; Bergman, M

    1988-08-01

    Unalloyed titanium of the quality used for osseointegrated implants by the method of Brånemark is also sometimes used for the metallic part of the prosthetic superstructure placed on the fixtures and for crowns and bridges of conventional type. Forty bars of titanium, 8 of ASTM B 348 grade-1 quality and 32 of ASTM B 348 grade-2 quality, were laser-welded, using dissimilar laser joint variables. Tensile strength, 0.2% proof stress, and percentage elongation of the welded bars were measured and compared with the corresponding values for the titanium bars as delivered and with those of brazed type-3 gold alloy bars of similar dimensions. The type of fracture was evaluated from fractographs. The results showed that the use of certain defined laser joint variables during welding produced values for the mechanical properties studied which were more favorable than those obtained from the brazed gold bars. The fracture of the titanium specimens was ductile, with dimples occurring at the fracture surfaces.

  17. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  18. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  19. THE EXAMINATION OF WELD LINE PROPERTIES IN INJECTION MOLDED PP AND PP COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Demirer, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effect of weld lines occurred in injection moulded components on mechanical behaviours of PP and PP with 30% glass fiber (GF) materials has been investigated. Two types of specimens were produced; with and without weld line by using single gate and double gate moulds. The range of process temperatures was varied depending on the type of material. The mold was designed to achieve homogenous cooling with the help of Moldflow software. The bending and tensile tests were carrie...

  20. The influence of the heat treatment on delta ferrite transformation in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shielded metal arc (SMAW welded specimens using austenitic consumable materials with different amount of delta-ferrite are annealed in range 650-750 °C through 2-10 hours. Factorial plan 33 with influenced factors regression analyze of measured delta-ferrite values is used. The transformation i.e. decomposition of delta ferrite during annealing was analyzed regarding on weld cracking resistance using metallographic examination and WRC-1992 diagram.

  1. Investigation of Using Waste Welded Tuff Material as Mineral Filler in Asphalt Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    KARAHANCER, Sebnem; ERISKIN, Ekinhan; CAPALI, Buket; SALTAN, Mehmet; TERZI, Serdal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the welded tuff waste- known as koyke in Isparta region - was used in the hot mix asphalt (HMA) as mineral filler for reduction of the moisture susceptibility of HMA. Optimum binder content was assessed with Marshall Design Method. First of all, welded tuff was substituted as filler with limestone filler in proportion of 50% and 100%. After that Marshall Stability test was performed on specimens. The results showed that the 50% substitution was more effective than the 100% subs...

  2. Designing aluminium friction stir welded joints against multiaxial fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Susmel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating multiaxial fatigue strength of aluminium friction stir (FS welded joints. Having developed a bespoke joining technology, circumferentially FS welded tubular specimens of Al 6082-T6 were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out using the experimental results have demonstrated that the MWCM applied in terms of nominal stresses, notch stresses, and also the Point Method is accurate in predicting the fatigue lifetime of the tested FS welded joints, with its use resulting in life estimates that fall within the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  3. Multiaxial fatigue of aluminium friction stir welded joints: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Hattingh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to check the accuracy of the Modified Wöhler Curve Method (MWCM in estimating the fatigue strength of friction stir (FS welded tubular joints of Al 6082-T6 subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase multiaxial fatigue loading. The welded samples being investigated were manufactured by equipping an MTS I-STIR process development system with a retracting tool that was specifically designed and optimised for this purpose. These specimens were tested under proportional and non-proportional tension and torsion, the effect of non-zero mean stresses being also investigated. The validation exercise carried out by using the generated experimental results allowed us to prove that the MWCM (applied in terms of nominal stresses is highly accurate in predicting the fatigue strength of the tested FS welded joints, its usage resulting in estimates falling with the uniaxial and torsional calibration scatter bands.

  4. Microstructural, compositional and residual stress evaluation of CO{sub 2} laser welded superaustenitic AISI 904L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, A. [DIMEG, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 9 I-35131 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: a.zambon@unipd.it; Ferro, P. [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Str.lla S. Nicola, 3 I-36100 Vicenza (Italy); Bonollo, F. [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Str.lla S. Nicola, 3 I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2006-05-25

    CO{sub 2} laser welding was performed on AISI 904L superaustenitic stainless steel sheets, with optimised processing parameters determined by means of melt run trial evaluations. X-ray diffraction phase identification and light microscopy confirmed that the weld structure is fully austenitic and dendritic. A hardness increase in the weld bead with respect to the parent metal occurred and was related to both the microstructural refinement induced by a rapid cooling of the fusion zone and the presence of nanometric scale precipitates observed by TEM in the weld bead. Residual stresses were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, exhibiting tensile stresses, close to the yield strength, in the longitudinal direction in the weld bead, while the stresses were compressive in the transverse direction and in the base material. Tensile tests showed that welded specimens retained strength and ductility values comparable to those of the base material.

  5. Weld bead profile of laser welding dissimilar joints stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghusoon R.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.; Abdulhadi, Hassan A.

    2017-10-01

    During the process of laser welding, the material consecutively melts and solidifies by a laser beam with a peak high power. Several parameters such as the laser energy, pulse frequency, pulse duration, welding power and welding speed govern the mode of the welding process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of peak power, incident angle, and welding speed on the weld bead geometry. The first investigation in this context was conducted using 2205-316L stainless steel plates through the varying of the welding speed from 1.3 mm/s to 2.1 mm/s. The second investigation was conducted by varying the peak power from 1100 W to 1500 W. From the results of the experiments, the welding speed and laser power had a significant effect on the geometry of the weld bead, and the variation in the diameter of the bead pulse-size. Due to the decrease in the heat input, welding speed affected penetration depth more than bead width, and a narrow width of heat affected zone was achieved ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Conclusively, weld bead geometry dimensions increase as a function of peak power; at over 1350 W peak power, the dimensions lie within 30 μm.

  6. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  7. Predicting failure response of spot welded joints using recent extensions to the Gurson model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-01-01

    to their approximate description of the nucleation, growth and coalescence of microvoids. Using the void shape factor of the GLD-model, a simple approach for approximating void nucleation by either particle fracture or particle-matrix decohesion is applied and a study of the subsequent void shape evolution...... is presented. The models are applied to predict failure of specimens containing a fully intact weld nugget as well as a partly removed weld nugget to address the problems of shrinkage voids or larger weld defects. All analysis are carried out by full 3D finite element modelling....

  8. INVESTIGATION OF SINGLE-PASS/DOUBLE-PASS TECHNIQUES ON FRICTION STIR WELDING OF ALUMINIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A.A. Sathari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the effects of single-pass/ double-pass techniques on friction stir welding of aluminium. Two pieces of AA1100 with a thickness of 6.0 mm were friction stir welded using a CNC milling machine at rotational speeds of 1400 rpm, 1600 rpm and 1800 rpm respectively for single-pass and double-pass. Microstructure observations of the welded area were studied using an optical microscope. The specimens were tested by using a tensile test and Vickers hardness test to evaluate their mechanical properties. The results indicated that, at low rotational speed, defects such as ‘surface lack of fill’ and tunnels in the welded area contributed to a decrease in mechanical properties. Welded specimens using double-pass techniques show increasing values of tensile strength and hardness. From this investigation it is found that the best parameters of FSW welded aluminium AA1100 plate were those using double-pass techniques that produce mechanically sound joints with a hardness of 56.38 HV and 108 MPa strength at 1800 rpm compared to the single-pass technique. Friction stir welding, single-pass/ double-pass techniques, AA1100, microstructure, mechanical properties.

  9. The reliability of the repair weld joints of aged high temperature components in fossil power boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Hiroyuki [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ohtani, Ryuichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, Kazuya [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Tomomitsu; Nishimura, Nobuhiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Komei [Japan Steel Works Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    It is of fundamental engineering importance to be able to give reliable assessments of the effective service life of the critical components used within fossil power plants, particularly for those operating for prolonged periods. It is common practice for such assessments to have been estimated using destructive tests, typically the stress rupture test, this having been recognized as one of the most reliable evaluation methods available. Its only drawback is that it often does not permit the component to be in use following the sampling of the test specimen without repairing. The current piece of work focuses on the reliability of the repair welds of components for specimens taken from fossil power plants, having been in service for prolonged periods. Several such repairs to welds have been made to an old power boiler, in particular to a superheater header which is fabricated from 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. Under close examination the repairs to the girth weldment showed susceptibilities of weld cracking, similar to that observed in as-manufactured material. Within the repaired region of the welded joint the microstructure, tensile properties and toughness seemed to be unaffected. The hardness attained its minimum value within the heat affected zone, HAZ of the repair weld, overlapping that of original girth weld HAZ. Furthermore, the stress rupture strength achieved its minimum value at the same position taking on the same value as the strength associated with the aged girth welded joint. (orig.)

  10. Brittle crack arrestability of thick steel plate welds in large structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Gyu Baek; Park, Joon Sik

    2011-10-01

    Recently, there has been such a critical issue in shipbuilding industry that much larger and stronger ships are required to develop oil and gas in the Arctic region. Attention has been paid to obtaining high strength, good toughness at low temperature, and good weldability. An experimental study was performed to evaluate the brittle crack arrest toughness value (Kca) and brittle crack arrest method of welded joints using EH40 grade steel with a thickness of 80 mm. The test specimens were made by both flux cored arc welding (FCAW) and combined welding (EGW+FCAW) processes. Temperature gradient ESSO test was performed to measure the Kca of the base metal. Also, a constant temperature (-10 °C) ESSO test was performed to establish a brittle crack arrest method using high toughness welding consumable with real structural specimens. The research aims in this study were to investigate the effect of joint design and welding consumable for the crack arrestability of thick steel plates using EH40 grade shipbuilding steel of straight block joint weld line with two kinds of welding processes.

  11. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  12. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  13. Pulsed welding plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz'kov, A.; Pustovykh, O.; Verevkin, A.; Terekhin, V.; Shachek, A.; Tyasto, A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in order to form the current pulse of a near rectangular shape, which provides conversion of the welding arc into a dynamic mode, it is rational to connect a forming element made on the basis of an artificial forming line in series to the welding DC circuit. The paper presents a diagram of a pulsed device for welding with a non-consumable electrode in argon which was developed using the forming element. The conversion of the arc into the dynamic mode is illustrated by the current and voltage oscillograms of the arc gap and the dynamic characteristic of the arc within the interval of one pulse generation time in the arc gap. The background current travels in the interpulse interval.

  14. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  15. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity. Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  16. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  17. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of friction stir linear welded aluminum to magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, H.M. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Ghaffari, B. [Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121 (United States); Yuan, W., E-mail: wei.yuan@hitachi-automotive.us [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States); Jordon, J.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Badarinarayan, H. [Research & Development Division, Hitachi America Ltd., Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The microstructure and lap-shear behaviors of friction stir linear welded wrought Al alloy AA6022-T4 to cast Mg alloy AM60B joints were examined. A process window was developed to initially identify the potential process conditions. Multitudes of welds were produced by varying the tool rotation rate and tool traverse speed. Welds produced at 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) tool rotation rate and either 50 mm/min or 75 mm/min tool traverse speed displayed the highest quasi-static failure load of ~3.3 kN per 30 mm wide lap-shear specimens. Analysis of cross sections of untested coupons indicated that the welds made at these optimum welding parameters had negligible microvoids and displayed a favorable weld geometry for the cold lap and hook features at the faying surface, compared to welds produced using other process parameters. Cross sections of the tested coupons indicated that the dominant crack initiated on the advancing side and progressed through the weld nugget, which consists of intermetallic compounds (IMC). This study demonstrates the feasibility of welding wrought Al and cast Mg alloy via friction stir linear welding with promising lap-shear strength results.

  18. Investigation of residual stresses in welded joints of heat-resistant magnesium alloy ML10 after electrodynamic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Lobanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In repair of aircraft structures of magnesium alloy ML10, the argon arc non-consumable electrode welding is used. In this case, the residual welding stresses occur in repair welds, being one of the causes for reducing the service characteristics of the restored products. Residual stresses arise as a result of welding. Post-weld heat treatment is used to reduce the residual stresses. The heat treatment, which occurs after welding, increases the cost of repair. This leads to the search for alternative methods to control the stressed state of welded joints, one of which is electrodynamic treatment, which reduces the level of residual stresses in repair welds, and as a consequence, the cost of the welding repair in restoring aircraft structures. It was found from the results of experiments carried out, that the electrodynamic treatment allows reduces the initial level of stresses in welded joints, reaching 120 MPa, to 30 MPa, and at definite geometric characteristics of the specimens forming the field of compressive stresses, the values of which are equal to –50 MPa. It is shown that the optimum distance between the zones of treatment, being 5 mm, provides the guaranteed covering the zones of electrodynamic effect and, as a consequence, the maximum efficiency of the electric dynamic treatment.

  19. The Structure and Properties of Microcrystalline and Submicrocrystalline Titanium Alloy VT1-0 in the Area of the Electron Beam Welding Seam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Gnyusov, S. F.; Potekaev, A. I.; Klopotov, A. A.; Abzaev, Yu. A.; Kurgan, K. A.; Marzol, M. R.; Galsanov, S. V.; Tsellermayer, V. Ya.; Marchenko, E. S.

    2017-10-01

    An investigation of the welding seam structure of micro- and submicrocrystalline specimens of VT1-0 alloy is reported. Special features are revealed in the formation of the heat-affected zone in the alloy as a result of electron-beam action due to its structural state. Particular attention is given to the role of α→β-transformations characterizing titanium alloys subjected to thermal impacts. It is found that the structural features of all welding-joint zones, considering the phase transformations, determine the character of hardness value distribution and the respective strength properties of the weld joints. A comparison is given between the structure formation in microcrystalline alloys and in welding seams formed by laser-beam welding. The welding of submicrocrystalline titanium is also compared to another high-energy impact - resistance welding.

  20. Surface cracking in resistance seam welding of coated steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonyi, Y.; Kimchi, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this experimental work, the focus was on the understanding the electrode-wheel/coated steel surface phenomena by building operational lobes and by correlating the weld quality with static-and dynamic-contact-resistance variation during welding. Conventional AC, DC, and electrode-wire resistance-seam weldability of printed zinc-coated and hot-dipped tin-coated steel was performed in this work, as compared with traditional lead-tin (terne) coating used as reference material. Variables included steel substrate type, welding equipment type, electrode-wheel cleaning practice, and electrode-wire geometry. Optic and electron microscopy were used for the evaluation of specimens extracted from longitudinal cross-sections of representative welds. The size and morphology of surface cracks was characterized and correlated with variations in the above-mentioned parameters. It was found that the tin-coated (unpainted) steel sheet had a superior all-together performance to the zinc-coated steel and terne-coated steel, both in terms of wider weldability lobes and lesser surface cracking. The extent of surface cracking was greatly reduced by using the electrode-wire seam welding process using a longitudinally grooved wire profile, which also widened the corresponding weldability lobes. It was also found that the extent of cracking depended on the electrode knurl geometry, substrate type, and the presence of conductive paint applied on top of the metallic coating. An attempt was made to characterize the specific mechanisms governing the LME phenomenon for the lead-, zinc and tin-based coating systems and to assess the potential for crack propagation in the welds. The dynamic contact resistance was found to be a good measure of the welding process stability and an indicator of defect formation. It was found that the ratio between the static and dynamic contact resistances of the tin-coated sheet was considerably lower than similar ratios for bare and zinc-coated sheet.

  1. Tensile strength and corrosion resistance of brazed and laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Rok; Legat, Andraz; Funduk, Nenad

    2006-10-01

    The longevity of prosthodontic restorations is often limited due to the mechanical or corrosive failure occurring at the sites where segments of a metal framework are joined together. The purpose of this study was to determine which joining method offers the best properties to cobalt-chromium alloy frameworks. Brazed and 2 types of laser-welded joints were compared for their mechanical and corrosion characteristics. Sixty-eight cylindrical cobalt-chromium dental alloy specimens, 35 mm long and 2 mm in diameter, were cast. Sixteen specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in an artificial saliva solution and divided into 4 groups (n=4). In the intact group, the specimens were left as cast. The specimens of the remaining 3 groups were sectioned at the center, perpendicular to the long-axis, and were subsequently rejoined by brazing (brazing group) or laser welding using an X- or I-shaped joint design (X laser and I laser groups, respectively). Another 16 specimens were selected for electrochemical measurements in a more acidic artificial saliva solution. These specimens were also divided into 4 groups (n=4) as described above. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization were used to assess corrosion potentials, breakdown potentials, corrosion current densities, total impedances at lowest frequency, and polarization charge-transfer resistances. The remaining 36 specimens were used for tensile testing. They were divided into 3 groups in which specimen pairs (n=6) were joined by brazing or laser welding to form 70-mm-long cylindrical rods. The tensile strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. Differences between groups were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance (alpha=.05). The fracture surfaces and corrosion defects were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The average tensile strength of brazed joints was 792 MPa and was significantly greater (Pcobalt-chromium alloy joints, but strength is

  2. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  3. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  4. Acoustic-Emission Weld-Penetration Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, J.; Collins, J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld penetration monitored by detection of high-frequency acoustic emissions produced by advancing weld pool as it melts and solidifies in workpiece. Acoustic emission from TIG butt weld measured with 300-kHz resonant transducer. Rise in emission level coincides with cessation of weld penetration due to sudden reduction in welding current. Such monitoring applied to control of automated and robotic welders.

  5. Synergy of corrosion activity and defects in weld bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented work evaluates synergism of atmosphere corrosive action and material defects. These defects appear not only during particular technological process of connecting of structural material but also during cooling and up to hundreds hours afterwards. The multiplication of degradation impact of defects in joint welds and heat-affected zone caused by activity of atmosphere acidic medium is simulated in condensation chambers. The verification is realized by use of mechanical uniaxial tension loading and following fractographic and metalgraphic analysis.The metal plasticity is sufficient factor to eliminate thermal stress in tough metal (11 373. This is reflected in more homogenous weld root area (with no cracks. The corrosion influence of environment is in case of such specimens limited to very slight decrease of weld maximum load. The ultimate strength value decreases approximately for 20MPa only in contrast to dramatic strength decrease in case of 11 503 material. Before metalographic examination was observed surprisingly great value of load capacity of spot welds. These welds were not ruptured nor in a single case even during maximum length of corrosion exploitation. The consequent material analysis discovered high qualitative material and strength properties of this kind of joint.

  6. Weld procedure development with OSLW - optimization software for laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Eisler, G.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, R.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Weld procedure development can require extensive experimentation, in-depth process knowledge, and is further complicated by the fact that there are often multiple sets of parameters that will meet the weld requirements. Choosing among these multiple weld procedures can be hastened with computer models that find parameters to meet selected weld dimensional requirements while simultaneously optimizing important figures of merit. Software is described that performs this task for CO{sub 2} laser beam welding. The models are based on dimensionless parameter correlations that are derived from solutions to the moving heat source equations. The use of both handbook and empirically verified thermophysical property values allows OSLW to be extended to many different materials. Graphics displays show the resulting solution on contour plots that can be used to further probe the model. The important figures of merit for laser beam welding are energy transfer efficiency and melting efficiency. The application enables the user to input desired weld shape dimensions, select the material to be welded, and to constrain the search problem to meet the application requirements. Successful testing of the software at a laser welding fabricator has validated this tool for weld procedure development.

  7. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of AISI 304 to AISI 420 stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, José Roberto; de Rossi, Wagner; David Martins das Neves, Maurício; Alves de Almeida, Ivan; Dias Vieira Junior, Nilson

    2007-09-01

    The technique to weld AISI 304 stainless steel to AISI 420 stainless steel with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser has been investigated. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of the laser beam position, with respect to the joint, on weld characteristics. Specimens were welded with the laser beam incident on the joint and moved 0.1 and 0.2 mm on either side of the joint. The joints were examined in an optical microscope for cracks, pores and to determine the weld geometry. The microstructure of the weld and the heat affected zones were observed in a scanning electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer, coupled to the scanning electron microscope, was used to determine variations in (weight %) the main chemical elements across the fillet weld. Vickers microhardness testing and tensile testing were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the weld. The results of the various tests and examinations enabled definition of the best position for the incident laser beam with respect to the joint, for welding together the two stainless steels.

  8. Laser welding study for further development in essential power plant part repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isarawit Chaopanich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work was to study the effects of laser welding when compared with shield metal arc welding (SMAW process on the heat input, welded deposit rate, residual stress, distortion, microstructure and micro hardness. The martensitic stainless steel grade 431 specimens were overlay welded with the stainless steel filler metals. From the results, the heat input of 0.26 kJ/mm in laser welding calculated was significantly lower than that of 1.66 kJ/mm in SMAW, and contributed to low level residual stress, minimal distortion, very small penetration depth and heat affected zone (HAZ of less than 100 µm. The micro hardness results indicated that the maximum value from laser welding in the HAZ was 370.2 HV lower than the value from SMAW of 525.5 HV. The welded deposit rate for laser welding was with 26.5 mm3 /min remarkably lower than the rate for SMAW of 1,800 mm3 /min.

  9. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  10. Friction welding of a nickel free high nitrogen steel: influence of forge force on microstructure, mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrityunjoy Hazra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, nickel free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel specimens were joined by continuous drive friction welding process by varying the amount of forge (upsetting force and keeping other friction welding parameters such as friction force, burn-off, upset time and speed of rotation as constant at appropriate levels. The joint characterization studies include microstructural examination and evaluation of mechanical (micro-hardness, impact toughness and tensile and pitting corrosion behaviour. The integrity of the joint, as determined by the optical microscopy was very high and no crack and area of incomplete bonding were observed. Welds exhibited poor Charpy impact toughness than the parent material. Toughness for friction weld specimens decreased with increase in forge force. The tensile properties of all the welds were almost the same (irrespective of the value of the applied forge force and inferior to those of the parent material. The joints failed in the weld region for all the weld specimens. Weldments exhibited lower pitting corrosion resistance than the parent material and the corrosion resistance of the weld specimens was found to decrease with increase in forge force.

  11. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  12. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  13. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  14. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Fiber-Laser-Welded and Diode-Laser-Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, S. M.; Chen, D. L.; Bhole, S. D.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D. C.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-07-01

    The microstructures, tensile properties, strain hardening, and fatigue strength of fiber-laser-welded (FLW) and diode-laser-welded (DLW) AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloys were studied. Columnar dendrites near the fusion zone (FZ) boundary and equiaxed dendrites at the center of FZ, with divorced eutectic β-Mg17Al12 particles, were observed. The FLW joints had smaller dendrite cell sizes with a narrower FZ than the DLW joints. The heat-affected zone consisted of recrystallized grains. Although the DLW joints fractured at the center of FZ and exhibited lower yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and fatigue strength, the FLW joints failed at the fusion boundary and displayed only moderate reduction in the YS, UTS, and fatigue strength with a joint efficiency of ~91 pct. After welding, the strain rate sensitivity basically vanished, and the DLW joints exhibited higher strain-hardening capacity. Stage III hardening occurred after yielding in both base metal (BM) and welded samples. Dimple-like ductile fracture characteristics appeared in the BM, whereas some cleavage-like flat facets together with dimples and river marking were observed in the welded samples. Fatigue crack initiated from the specimen surface or near-surface defects, and crack propagation was characterized by the formation of fatigue striations along with secondary cracks.

  15. Fatigue Analysis of Load-Carrying Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Tychsen, Jesper; Andersen, Jens Ulfkjær

    2006-01-01

    is a doubler plate connection, which is often applied in connection with modifications of offshore structures. As a part of the present work, fatigue tests have been performed with test specimens fabricated by the current industry standard for welded offshore steel structures. The fatigue tests show....... Using the test results, it is shown that the new definition of fatigue stress can be used for a wide range of DOB with a low standard deviation of the resulting SN curve....

  16. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    among others are shielded metal arc welding, submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, gas ... welding (SMAW) technique is preferable to the other techniques ..... studies''International Journal of Innovative Research.

  17. Standard Guide for Reconstitution of Irradiated Charpy-Sized Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for the reconstitution of ferritic pressure boundary steels used in nuclear power plant applications, Type A Charpy (Test Methods E 23) specimens and specimens suitable for testing in three point bending in accordance with Test Methods E 1921 or E 1820. Materials from irradiation programs (principally broken specimens) are reconstituted by welding end tabs of similar material onto remachined specimen sections that were unaffected by the initial test. Guidelines are given for the selection of suitable specimen halves and end tab materials, for dimensional control, and for avoidance of overheating the notch area. A comprehensive overview of the reconstitution methodologies can be found in Ref (1). 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard...

  18. Structural health monitoring of multi-spot welded joints using a lead zirconate titanate based active sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ping; Kong, Qingzhao; Xu, Kai; Jiang, Tianyong; Huo, Lin-sheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    Failures of spot welded joints directly reduce the load capacity of adjacent structures. Due to their complexity and invisibility, real-time health monitoring of spot welded joints is still a challenge. In this paper, a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) based active sensing approach was proposed to monitor the structural health of multi-spot welded joints in real time. In the active sensing approach, one PZT transducer was used as an actuator to generate a guided stress wave, while another one, as a sensor, detected the wave response. Failure of a spot welded joint reduces the stress wave paths and attenuates the wave propagation energy from the actuator to the sensor. A total of four specimens made of dual phase steel with spot welds, including two specimens with 20 mm intervals of spot welded joints and two with 25 mm intervals, were designed and fabricated for this research. Under tensile tests, the spot welded joints successively failed, resulting in the PZT sensor reporting decreased received energy. The energy attenuations due to the failures of joints were clearly observed by the PZT sensor signal in both the time domain and frequency domain. In addition, a wavelet packet-based spot-weld failure indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the failure condition corresponding to the number of failed joints.

  19. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  20. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  1. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  2. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  3. Effect of plasma welding parameters on the flexural strength of Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra e Silva, João Paulo; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Novais, Veridiana Resende; de Araujo, Cleudmar Amaral; Cavalcante, Luisa de Andrade Lima; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different plasma arc welding parameters on the flexural strength of titanium alloy beams (Ti-6Al-4V). Forty Ti-6Al-4V and 10 NiCr alloy beam specimens (40 mm long and 3.18 mm diameter) were prepared and divided into 5 groups (n=10). The titanium alloy beams for the control group were not sectioned or subjected to welding. Groups PL10, PL12, and PL14 contained titanium beams sectioned and welded at current 3 A for 10, 12 or 14 ms, respectively. Group NCB consisted of NiCr alloy beams welded using conventional torch brazing. After, the beams were subjected to a three-point bending test and the values obtained were analyzed to assess the flexural strength (MPa). Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test at 0.05 confidence level. Significant difference was verified among the evaluated groups (pplasma welded groups (p>0.05). The NCB group showed the lowest flexural strength, although it was statistically similar to the PL 14 group (p>0.05). The weld depth penetration was not significantly different among the plasma welded groups (p=0.05). Three representative specimens were randomly selected to be evaluated under scanning electron microcopy. The composition of the welded regions was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This study provides an initial set of parameters supporting the use of plasma welding during fabrication of titanium alloy dental frameworks.

  4. An Investigation on the Influence of Root Defects on the Fatigue Life of the Welded Structure of a Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders V.; Olesen, John Forbes; Agerskov, Henning

    2004-01-01

    -models of the welded joints, are described and the results presented. In addition, large-scale test specimens with controlled lack-of-fusion weld root geometry were manufactured and fatigue tested to develop S-N curves and determine threshold stress intensity factor range values. These were established for opening...... mode loading both under the influence of residual stresses from production and in stress relieved specimens....

  5. Computer Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In friction stir welding, a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld such as aluminum alloys. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and thus tracks the aluminum deformation flow paths in a unique 3-dimensional manner. CT scanning is a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  6. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  7. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions. c2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  9. Susceptibility of Welded and Non-Welded Titanium Alloys to Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Estill, J C; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-10-14

    The engineering barriers for the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain include a double walled container and a detached drip shield. The material selected to construct the drip shield will be Titanium Grade 7 (Ti Gr 7 or R52400). Ti Gr 7 is highly resistant to corrosion and consequently it is widely used to handle aggressive industrial environments. The model for the degradation of the engineering barriers includes three modes of corrosion, namely general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the susceptibility of three titanium alloys to EAC in several environmental conditions with varying solution composition, pH and temperature. The susceptibility to EAC was evaluated using constant deformation (deflection) U-bend specimens in both the non-welded and welded conditions. Results show that after more than five years exposure in the vapor and liquid phases of alkaline (pH {approx} 10) and acidic (pH {approx} 3) multi-ionic environments at 60 C and 90 C, most of the specimens were free from EAC. The only specimens that suffered EAC were welded Ti Gr 12 (R53400) exposed to liquid simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C.

  10. Upgrading weld quality of a friction stir welded aluminum alloys AMG6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, I. K.; Vasil’ev, E. V.; Matuzko, E. N.; Krivonos, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    In the course of introduction of FSW technology into the industry there is a keen interest in this process; there are issues such as how does joining take place, what is the structure of the joint, and where there are dangerous zones. The objective of this research is to obtain information about the structure of the joint, what are the temperatures that arise during the joining, what strength is apply to the tool when joining the material, what tensile strength of joint, and where fracture tended to occur. Specimens were produced at different modes of welding at a tool rotation speed of 315 to 625 rpm and tool travel speed of 40 to 125 mm/min. During the experiment, the strength applied to the tool was measured, which reached 800016000 N (Fz) and 400-1400 N (Fx) and the temperature on the surface of the tool, which is in the range 250-400°C. Before the welding process the tool was heated to a temperature in the range of 100-250 degrees, but the tensile strength is not had a tangible impact. The tensile strength is about 80 % of that of the aluminum alloy base metal tensile strength, and fracture tended is occur not at the line of joint but follow the shape of the tool. In the transverse cross section of a FSW material there is a microstructural regions such as weld nugget, thermomechanically affected zone and heat-affected zone with parent material.

  11. Janka hardness using nonstandard specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Marshall Begel; William Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Janka hardness determined on 1.5- by 3.5-in. specimens (2×4s) was found to be equivalent to that determined using the 2- by 2-in. specimen specified in ASTM D 143. Data are presented on the relationship between Janka hardness and the strength of clear wood. Analysis of historical data determined using standard specimens indicated no difference between side hardness...

  12. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  13. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  14. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    effect of the post-welding conditions when subjecting a friction stir weld to loading transverse to the weld line. The numerical model of the friction stir welded joint, employs a step-wise modeling approach to combine an in-situ weld simulation with a post-welding failure analysis. Using the commercial......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence...... the weld performance. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the main conflicts that arise when taking both the post-welding material conditions and stressestrain state into account in a subsequent structural analysis. The discussion is here based on a preliminary numerical study of the possible...

  15. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Alloy 82/182 Weld Joint Between SA508 Gr.3 Nozzle and F316L Safe-End

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Weon [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents the distributions of the tensile and fracture properties of an alloy 82/182 dissimilar weld joint between an SA508 Gr.3 nozzle and F316L SS safe-end at ambient temperature. Tensile and J-R tests were conducted using specimens extracted from base metals, heat-affected zones (HAZs), buttering regions, and various regions of the weld metal. The results show that the root region of the weld has higher strength than the upper region. The yield and tensile strengths vary considerably within the root region of the weld. The buttering region had the lowest strengths. The strengths gradually increased as the F316L stainless steel weld boundary was approached. The variation of the strengths within the upper region of the weld is insignificant. The fracture toughness of the alloy 82/182 weld metal is less than those of both the base metals and both HAZs. Within the alloy 82/182 weld, the center of weld has a slightly lower fracture toughness than the weld boundary and buttering region, and the root region has greater toughness than the upper region of the weld.

  16. Distribution of mechanical properties in Alloy 82/182 dissimilar weld joint between SA508 Gr.3 nozzle and F316L safe-end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Weon [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents the distribution of tensile properties and fracture toughness in Alloy 82/182 dissimilar weld joint between SA508 Gr.3 nozzle and F316L SS safe-end at ambient temperature. Tensile and J-R tests were conducted using the specimens extracted form both base metals, Heat Affected Zones (HAZs), buttering, and various regions of weld metal. It showed that root region of weld exhibits higher strengths than upper region. The yield and tensile strengths considerably varied within root region of weld, the lowest strengths appeared at buttering region and gradually increased with approaching boundary with F316L stainless steel, whereas the variation of strengths within the weld was insignificant at upper region of weld. It was also indicated that fracture toughness of Alloy 82/182 weld metal was lower than that of both base metals and both HAZs. Within the Alloy 82/182 weld, the center of weld showed slightly lower fracture toughness than weld boundary and buttering, and the root region showed higher toughness than upper region of weld.

  17. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  18. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  19. Portable electron beam weld chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. R.; Dimino, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Development and characteristics of portable vacuum chamber for skate type electron beam welding are discussed. Construction and operational details of equipment are presented. Illustrations of equipment are provided.

  20. A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Mannan, S. L.

    1995-05-01

    A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joints was carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 × 10-3 s-1 with strain amplitudes in the range ±0.20 to ±1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. From TEM, the cyclic softening in weld metal was ascribed to the annihilation of dislocations during LCF. Type 316LN base metal exhibits better fatigue resistance than weld metal at 773 K, whereas the reverse holds true at 873 K. The weld joint shows the lowest life at both temperatures. The better fatigue resistance of weld metal is related to the brittle transformed delta ferrite structure and the high density of dislocations at the interface, which inhibits the growth rate of cracks by deflecting the crack path. The lower fatigue endurance of the weld joint was ascribed to the shortening of the crack initiation phase caused by surface intergranular crack initiation and to the poor

  1. Defects detection on the welded reinforcing steel with self-shielded wires by vibration tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crâştiu Ion

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the development and validation of a vibroacustic technique to welding defects detection, especially for welded reinforcing structures. In welded structures subjected to dynamic cyclic loads may appear and propagate fatigue cracks due to local structural damage. These cracks may initiate due to the technological parameters used in welding process, or due to environmental operating conditions. By the means of Finite Element Method (FEM, the natural frequencies and shape modes of more welded steel specimens are determined. The analysis is carried out in undamaged condition as well as damaged one, after artificially induced damages. The experimental measurement of the vibroacustic response is carried out by using a condenser microphone, which is suitable for high-fidelity acoustic measurements in the frequency range of 20 – 20.000 Hz. The vibration responses of the welded specimens, in free-free conditions, are carried out using algorithms based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, and Prony's series. The results are compared to modal parameters estimated using FE Analysis.

  2. Pengaruh Proses Quenching Pada Sambungan Las Shielded Metal Arc Welding (Smaw) Terhadap Kekerasan Impak Struktur Mikro Dan Kekerasan Baja St37

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, Jumain

    2015-01-01

    Toughness of a material is influenced by the physical and mechanical properties of these materials. However, the joining by using the welding process cause a change in the properties. Has been conducted research by using welding shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) in the process of joining St37 steel to determine the physical and mechanical properties with variation of electrode diameter (2.6 mm, 3,2mm and 4,0 mm) and different cooling processes. After the welding treatment, the specimen is sub...

  3. Structure and mechanical properties of Cresco-Ti laser-welded joints and stress analyses using finite element models of fixed distal extension and fixed partial prosthetic designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Hakan; Kurtoglu, Cem; Gurbuz, Riza; Tutuncu, Naki

    2005-03-01

    The Cresco-Ti System uses a laser-welded process that provides an efficient technique to achieve passive fit frameworks. However, mechanical behavior of the laser-welded joint under biomechanical stress factors has not been demonstrated. This study describes the effect of Cresco-Ti laser-welding conditions on the material properties of the welded specimen and analyzes stresses on the weld joint through 3-dimensional finite element models (3-D FEM) of implant-supported fixed dentures with cantilever extensions and fixed partial denture designs. Twenty Grade III (ASTM B348) commercially pure titanium specimens were machine-milled to the dimensions described in the EN10002-1 tensile test standard and divided into test (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups. The test specimens were sectioned and laser-welded. All specimens were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and percent elongation (PE). The Knoop micro-indentation test was performed to determine the hardness of all specimens. On welded specimens, the hardness test was performed at the welded surface. Data were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test and Student's t test (alpha=.05). Fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy to characterize the mode of fracture and identify defects due to welding. Three-dimensional FEMs were created that simulated a fixed denture with cantilever extensions supported by 5 implants (M1) and a fixed partial denture supported by 2 implants (M2), 1 of which was angled 30 degrees mesio-axially. An oblique load of 400 N with 15 degrees lingual-axial inclinations was applied to both models at various locations. Test specimens fractured between the weld and the parent material. No porosities were observed on the fractured surfaces. Mean values for YS, UTS, PE, and Knoop hardness were 428 +/- 88 MPa, 574 +/- 113 MPa, 11.2 +/- 0.4%, 270 +/- 17 KHN, respectively, for the control group and 642 +/- 2 MPa, 772 +/- 72

  4. Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-05-31

    In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

  5. Histopathologic Analysis of Pancreaticoduodenectomy Specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Dhakhwa

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Pancreaticoduodenectomy specimen requires thorough histopathological evaluation. Pathologists should also be aware of possibility of a benign diagnosis in PD specimens which have been resected presuming malignancy based on clinical judgement and radiological data. Keywords: histopathologic evaluation, pancreaticoduodenectomy, periampullary carcinoma. | PubMed

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  7. Prediction of residual stresses in electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lianyong; Ge, Keke; Jing, Hongyang; Zhao, Lei; Lv, Xiaoqing [Tianjin Univ. (China); Han, Yongdian [Tianjin Univ. (China). Key Lab. of Advanced Joining Technology

    2017-05-01

    A thermo-metallurgical procedure based on the SYSWELD code was developed to predict welding temperature field, microstructure and residual stress in butt-welded Ti-6Al-4V plate taking into account phase transformation. The formation of martensite was confirmed by the CCT diagram and microstructure in the weld joint, which significantly affects the magnitude of residual stress. The hole drilling procedure was utilized to measure the values of residual stress at the top surface of the specimen, which are in well agreement with the numerical results. Both simulated and test results show that the magnitude and distribution of residual stress on the surface of the plate present a large gradient feature from the weld joint to the base metal. Moreover, the distribution law of residual stresses in the plate thickness was further analyzed for better understanding of its generation and evolution.

  8. The effect of laser shock peening on hardness and microstructure in a welded marine steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress is generally considered as the main criterion in laser shock peening for enhancement of fatigue life. However, changes in material hardness, microstructure and surface roughness can also affect component performance. These three aspects are investigated in this paper for welded marine steel samples subjected to laser peening. After laser peening an increase in hardness was seen across the weld and parent metal, with the local hardness dependent upon the initial hardness of the region before peening. The increase was relatively higher for the weld metal which had lower initial hardness. The local surface displacement profiles reflected the number of laser peening layers applied, and the peening also affected the distortion of the specimen after welding.

  9. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  10. Nondestructive Online Detection of Welding Defects in Track Crane Boom Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive detection of structural component of track crane is a difficult and costly problem. In the present study, acoustic emission (AE was used to detect two kinds of typical welding defects, that is, welding porosity and incomplete penetration, in the truck crane boom. Firstly, a subsidiary test specimen with special preset welding defect was designed and added on the boom surface with the aid of steel plates to get the synchronous deformation of the main boom. Then, the AE feature information of the welding defect could be got without influencing normal operation of equipment. As a result, the rudimentary location analysis can be attained using the linear location method and the two kinds of welding defects can be distinguished clearly using AE characteristic parameters such as amplitude and centroid frequency. Also, through the comparison of two loading processes, we concluded that the signal produced during the first loading process was mainly caused by plastic deformation damage and during the second loading process the stress release and structure friction between sections in welding area are the main acoustic emission sources. Thus, the AE is an available tool for nondestructive online detection of latent welding defects of structural component of track crane.

  11. Creep-fatigue damage characteristics for a welded cylindrical structure of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeo Yeon; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hoon; Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    In the design and assessment of a high temperature structure, it is important to ensure the structural integrity for the welded joint subjected to a creep-fatigue load because a statistical investigation shows that 29 events out of 46 leaks in liquid metal reactors were caused at the welded joints. As for the structural integrity due to thermal ratchet load at the welded joint, KAERI has performed the test and analysis work for a cylindrical structure with welded joints. As a continuation of the study on welded joints at a high temperature structure, a creep-fatigue structural test and analysis work is now on-going and this paper present the interim findings for the structural test and analysis work. Recently the structural and analysis work for the Y-piece made of a 316L stainless steel structure has been carried out. The objectives of the present structural creep-fatigue test with the welded cylindrical specimen are to compare the creep-fatigue damage mechanisms for the 304 and 316L stainless steels, to compare the different behavior of the welding methods in a high temperature austenitic structures and to quantify the conservatism of the design guidelines for a high temperature structure.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-07-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  13. Mechanical behaviour of Nd:YAG laser welded superelastic NiTi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, L. Alberty [UNIDEMI, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Industrial, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Fernandes, F.M. Braz [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciencias dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Miranda, R.M., E-mail: rmiranda@fct.unl.pt [UNIDEMI, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Industrial, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Silva, R.J.C. [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciencias dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Quintino, L. [IDMEC, Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1200 Lisboa (Portugal); Cuesta, A.; Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Edificio ' La Arboleda' , Ctra. Valencia, km 7,300, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-25

    Highlights: {yields} The main innovations claimed are: understand rolling direction effect on mechanical cycling of laser welded NiTi. {yields} Functionality confirmed by stabilization of hysteretic response up to 8% strain. {yields} Welds tensile cycled exhibited superior functional mechanical behaviour. {yields} For applied stresses of 50 MPa below UTS the joints showed superelastic behaviour. - Abstract: Joining techniques for shape memory alloys (SMA) has become of great interest, as their functional properties, namely shape memory effect (SME) and superelasticity (SE), present unique solutions for state-of-the-art applications, although limited results concerning mechanical properties are reported. This paper reports experimental work performed with Nd:YAG continuous wave laser welding of superelastic cold-rolled plates of NiTi 1 mm thick. The mechanical behaviour was evaluated by means of tensile tests performed both to failure and to cycling. The superelastic behaviour of the welded joints was observed for applied stresses close to about 50 MPa below the ultimate tensile strength of the welds. The functionality was confirmed by analyzing the stabilization of the mechanical hysteretic response to strain levels up to 8%. For tensile cycling involving strain levels larger than 6%, welded specimens were found to exhibit superior functional mechanical behaviour presenting larger recoverable strain levels. The fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the effect of the rolling direction on mechanical properties was evaluated and discussed, reinforcing the importance of joint design when laser welding these alloys.

  14. Fatigue Life Improvement for Cruciform Welded Joint by Mechanical Surface Treatment using Hammer Peening and UNSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung-Ho; Han, Jeong-Woo; Nam, Yong-Yun; Cho, In-Ho

    For the improvement of fatigue strength of welded structures, mechanical post treatments have been applied in various industrial fields and have in most cases been founded to give substantial increases in their fatigue lives. These methods, generally, consist of the modification of weld toe geometry and the introduction of compressive residual stresses. In mechanical surface treatments, e.g. PHP (pneumatic hammer peening) and UNSM (ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification), the weld profile is modified due to remove or reduce minute crack-like flaws, and compressive residual stresses are also induced. In this study, a pneumatic hammer peening procedure and a UNSM device were introduced, and a quantitative measure of fatigue strength improvement was performed. The fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles of hammer-peened and UNSM treated on a non-load carrying cruciform welded joint shows 220 and 260MPa, respectively, which are more than two times higher than that of as-welded specimen. Especially, the surface layer in the vicinity weld toe treated by the UNSM provides nano-crystal structure created by an ultrasonic cold forging and introduces very high welding residual stress in compression.

  15. Influence of the Strength Mismatch of a Narrow Gap Welded Joint of SA508 on the Plastic η Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, J. M.; Huh, Y.; Seok, C. S.

    2012-11-01

    In this article, the influence of the strength mismatch of a narrow gap welded joint of SA508 on the η factor was evaluated. The η factor is the principal parameter that determines the plastic portion of the J-integral. The specimens for tensile and hardness tests were collected from piping with narrow gap welding and the stress-strain curve and hardness were obtained from those. From these results, the Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) constant was obtained. Also, the finite element analysis was performed with variations in the strength mismatch and the weld width. The η factor equation considering the strength mismatch and the weld width of a narrow gap welded joint was suggested.

  16. Assessment of The Cracking Properties of Stainless Steel Alloys and their Usability for Laser Welding in Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    2001-01-01

    Methods to assess stainless steel alloys’ cracking properties and usability for laser welding has been studied. Also tests to assess alloys’ susceptibility to hot cracking has been conducted. Among these is the so-called Weeter test which assesses the alloy by executing a number of spot welds...... to provoke cracking in the alloy. In this work the Weeter test has been modified and changed in order to develop a faster and easier test also applicable to small specimens. The new test, called a Groove test differs from the Weeter test by its procedure in which linear seam welds are conducted instead...... of spot welds. The Groove test has the advantage of an easier microscopy and analysis in the welds. Results from crack tests was partly confirmed by predictions made on the basis of the alloy’s constituents and solidification growth rate....

  17. Modeling Stress-Strain State in Butt-Welded Joints after TIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Atroshenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper mathematical model was developed for definition of thermal-welding cycle influence on welding deformations distribution in flat samples of austenitic steels after TIG welding and developed recommendations to reduce the welding deformation on o the machinery for welding with a copper backing.

  18. Numerical study of the Notch Location of the Impact Test Specimens on the HAZ of SA516 Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yun Chan; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Young Seog [Chungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jae Keun; Park, Ji Hong [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were performed to examine the effects of notch position on the failure behavior and energy absorption when the Charpy V-notch impact test is made at 1 .deg. C. For this purpose, carbon steel plate (SA-516 Gr. 70) with thickness of 25mm usually used for pressure vessel was welded by SMAW (Shielded Metal-Arc Welding) method and specimens were fabricated from the welded plate. The Charpy impact tests were then performed with specimens having different notch positions varying within HAZ. A series of three-dimensional FE analysis which simulates the Charpy test and crack propagation are carried out as well to examine the reproducibility of test results. The FE analysis takes into account the heterogeneous mechanical properties with complex microstructures in HAZ. Results reveal that the absorbed energies during impact test depend significantly on the notch position.

  19. Microstructure and anisotropic mechanical behavior of friction stir welded AA2024 alloy sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhihan [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Wenya, E-mail: liwy@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Li, Jinglong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China); Chao, Y.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Vairis, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, TEI of Crete, Heraklion, Crete 71004 (Greece)

    2015-09-15

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of friction stir welded (FSW) AA2024-T3 alloy joints were investigated based on the uniaxial tensile tests. The joint microstructure was examined by using electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in the FSW joints. With the increase of loading angle from 0° to 90° the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the specimens consistently decrease, or at first decrease and then increase, depending on the FSW process parameters. The specimen cut from the weld direction, i.e. a loading angle of 0°, exhibits the highest strength and elongation. - Highlights: • Microstructure and anisotropy of friction stir welded joints were studied. • The evident anisotropic failure and yielding are present in joints. • The lowest yield stress and UTS are at 45° and 60° loadings, respectively. • Rotation speed heavily impact on the anisotropy of joints.

  20. Reproducibility of pop-ins in laboratory testing of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Berejnoi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The pop-in phenomenon, quite common in fracture mechanics tests of welded joints, corresponds to a brittle crack initiation grown from a local brittle zone (LBZ that is arrested in reaching the higher toughness material that surrounds this LBZ. A methodology to obtain a high percentage of pop-in occurrence in laboratory testing is necessary to study the pop-in significance. Such a method is introduced in this work and includes the consumable combination and welding procedures for the SMAW welding process to generate artificial LBZ. In order to find out the influence of the loading state upon the pop-in phenomenon, laboratory CTOD tests were performed using two specimen configurations: some single edge-notched specimens were loaded on a three-point bending (SE(B fixture while others were tested in tensile load (SE(T. A higher frequency of pop-in occurrence was observed in the SE(B geometry.

  1. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    OpenAIRE

    B. Vargas-Arista; J. Teran-Guillen; Solis, J.; García-Cerecero,G.; Martínez-Madrid,M.

    2013-01-01

    The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughne...

  2. Welding--Trade or Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, C. E.; Smith, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a collaborative program between schools with the purpose of training and providing advanced education in welding. Modern manufacturing is turning to automation to increase productivity, but it can be a great challenge to program robots and other computer-controlled welding and joining systems. Computer programming and…

  3. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  4. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. Th...

  5. Finite element modelling and updating of friction stir welding (FSW joint for vibration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahari Siti Norazila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding of aluminium alloys widely used in automotive and aerospace application due to its advanced and lightweight properties. The behaviour of FSW joints plays a significant role in the dynamic characteristic of the structure due to its complexities and uncertainties therefore the representation of an accurate finite element model of these joints become a research issue. In this paper, various finite elements (FE modelling technique for prediction of dynamic properties of sheet metal jointed by friction stir welding will be presented. Firstly, nine set of flat plate with different series of aluminium alloy; AA7075 and AA6061 joined by FSW are used. Nine set of specimen was fabricated using various types of welding parameters. In order to find the most optimum set of FSW plate, the finite element model using equivalence technique was developed and the model validated using experimental modal analysis (EMA on nine set of specimen and finite element analysis (FEA. Three types of modelling were engaged in this study; rigid body element Type 2 (RBE2, bar element (CBAR and spot weld element connector (CWELD. CBAR element was chosen to represent weld model for FSW joints due to its accurate prediction of mode shapes and contains an updating parameter for weld modelling compare to other weld modelling. Model updating was performed to improve correlation between EMA and FEA and before proceeds to updating, sensitivity analysis was done to select the most sensitive updating parameter. After perform model updating, total error of the natural frequencies for CBAR model is improved significantly. Therefore, CBAR element was selected as the most reliable element in FE to represent FSW weld joint.

  6. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  7. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  8. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  9. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  10. Magnetic Deflection Of Welding Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron-beam welds inside small metal parts produced with aid of magnetic deflector. Beam redirected so it strikes workpiece at effective angle. Weld joint positioned to where heavy microfissure concentration removed when subsequent machining required, increasing likelihood of removing any weld defects located in face side of electron-beam weld.

  11. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  12. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  13. Repair of Structural Steel Surface Groove by Using Diffusion Welding of Pure Iron Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimy Y.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal pieces wear out due to variable loading, because cracks formed on their surface of them. In order to increase useful life of metal pieces with the help of different methods of welding, surface cracks are repaired. In this research, performance of the diffusion welding of pure iron powder through magnetic induction evaluated for repairing structural steel surface cracks. First, four specimens prepared including one control specimen and other three specimens grooved specimens in length of 6.25mm and in depth of 1mm and groove width in the sizes of 0.5, 0.75 and 1mm. Then by a coil, the induced current created in the piece surface. After crossing the current, the powder melted and the groove repaired due to diffusion welding. To prevent oxidation, the atmosphere inside the coil filled with argon gas. The results show that after repairing surface groove, tensile strength of the repaired specimens reached to the tensile strength of control specimen with the margin of 7.5%.

  14. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen; Guerrero-Mata, Martha Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature fail...

  15. Research on stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Bai, Q.; Dong, S.; Yang, Z. L.; Gao, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of CCSE40 welded by underwater wet welding with austenitic welding rod in seawater was studied. Microstructure, mechanical property and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the underwater wet welding joint were analyzed by metallographic observation, tensile and bending tests, slow strain rate test (SSRT) and SEM. The results indicated that the weld zone (WZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ) were all sensitive to the stress corrosion, and the WZ was more sensitive than the HAZ.

  16. Measured residual stress distributions for low and high heat input single weld beads deposited on to SA508 steel

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, J. A.; Turski, M.; Withers, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    In steel Weld.s, the development of residual stress is often complicated by the solid state phase transformations that occur upon cooling. Here the authors present bulk residual stress distributions, as measured by neutron diffraction, for the configuration of a single pass gas tungsten arc Weld. bead deposited on to a 20 mm thick SA508 steel substrate. Two specimens were manufactured, one with a low heat input (1-2 kJ mm-1) and another with a high heat input (2-4 kJ mm-1). The resulting micr...

  17. Local strain energy density for the fatigue assessment of hot dip galvanized welded joints: some recent outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Peron

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since in literature only data about the effect of the hot-dip galvanizing coating on fatigue behavior of unnotched specimens are available, whereas very few for notched components and none for welded joints, the aim of this paper is to partially fill this lack of knowledge comparing fatigue strength of uncoated and hot-dip galvanized fillet welded cruciform joints made of structural steel S355 welded joints, subjected to a load cycle R = 0. 34. The results are shown in terms of stress range ?s and of the averaged strain energy density range DW in a control volume of radius R0 = 0.28 mm

  18. Research on the Effects of Technical Parameters on the Molding of the Weld by A-TIG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Kai; Pan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of welding parameters on the molding of weld by A-TIG welding of a 4mm thickness mild steel plate is studied in the present paper. The results obtained show that: as welding current increases A-TIG welding penetration gets deeper than TIG welding; size and shape of HAZ has remarkable change; A-TIG welding has the narrower weld pool width than TIG welding.

  19. Towards a Map of Solidification Cracking Risk in Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, María-Asunción Valiente; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Hurtig, Kjell; Karlsson, Leif; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    In this work, two series of specimens with Hammar and Svensson's Cr- and Ni-equivalents (Creq+Nieq) = 35 and 45 wt% were used to cover a wide range of austenitic grades. These were laser welded with different energy inputs achieving cooling rates in the range of 103 °C/s to 104 °C/s. As high cooling rates and rapid solidification conditions could favour fully austenitic solidification and therefore raise susceptibility to solidification cracking, the solidification modes of the laser welded specimens were compared to the ones experienced by the same alloys under arc welding conditions. It was found that high cooling rates experienced in laser welding promoted fully austenitic solidification for a wider range of compositions, for example specimens with (Creq+Nieq) = 35% under arc welding cooling conditions at 10 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.30, whilst the same specimens laser cooled at 103 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.50 and those cooled at 104 °C/s showed it up to Creq/Nieq = 1.68. Therefore, high cooling rates extended the solidification cracking risk to a wider range of Creq/Nieq values. This work also compares the cooling rates experimentally determined by thermocouples to the computed cooling rates calculated by a highly-advanced computational model. The distance between the thermocouple's wires and the thermal resistance of thermocouples together with the small size of the weld pools proved to be practical limitations in the experimental determination of cooling rates. However, an excellent agreement was found between computed and experimental solidus isotherms at high energy input settings. For low energy input settings cooling rate was in the order of magnitude of 104 °C/s, whilst for high energy input settings cooling rate was found to be in the order of magnitude of 103 °C/s.

  20. Effects of Heat Treatment on Interface Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Explosively Welded Ck60/St37 Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Majid; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Hashemi, Seyyed Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    This study explores the effects of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of explosively welded Ck60 steel/St37 steel. The objective is to find an economical way for manufacturing bimetallic plates that can be used in the rolling stand of hot rolling mill units. The explosive ratio and stand-off distance are set at 1.7 and 1.5 t ( t = flyer thickness), respectively. Since explosive welding is accompanied by such undesirable metallurgical effects as remarkable hardening, severe plastic deformation, and even formation of local melted zones near the interface, heat treatment is required to overcome or alleviate these adverse effects. For this purpose, the composites are subjected to heat treatment in a temperature range of 600-700 °C at a rate of 90 °C/h for 1 h. Results demonstrate well-bonded composite plates with a wavy interface. In the as-welded case, vortex zones are formed along the interface; however, they are transformed into fine grains upon heat treatment. Microhardness is also observed to be maximum near the interface in the welded case before it decreases with increasing temperature. Shear strength is the highest in the as-welded specimen, which later decreases as a result of heat treatment. Moreover, the energy absorbed by the heat-treated specimens is observed to increase with increasing temperature so that the lowest value of absorbed energy belongs to the as-welded specimen. Finally, fractography is carried out using the scanning electron microscope to examine the specimens subjected to shear and impact tests. As a result of heat treatment, fracture surfaces exhibit dimpled ruptures and fail in the mixed mode, while failure in the as-welded specimens predominantly occurs in the brittle mode.

  1. First CT using Medipix3 and the MARS-CT-3 spectral scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, M F; Butler, P H; Doesburg, R M N; Ballabriga, R; Butler, A. P. H.; Opie, A M T; Mohr, J L; Ronaldson, J P; Nik, S J

    2011-01-01

    The MARS research group has created a new version of their scanner for taking improved spectral CT datasets. This version of the scanner (MARS-CT-3) has taken the first Medipix3 CT images of a phantom. MARS-CT-3 incorporates a new gantry, new x-ray sources and the new MARS readout board, as well as the ability to connect gas lines to the specimen. The new gantry has improved mechanical rigidity and can perform scans faster. Magnification can be controlled by moving the detector and the x-ray ...

  2. The Effect of Shielding N{sub 2} gas on The Pitting Corrosion of Seal-welded Super Austenitic Stainless Steel by Autogenous Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun Young [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Many research efforts on the effect of nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of stainless steels have been reported, but little research has been conducted on the effect of nitrogen for the weldment of stainless steels by the seal-weld method. Therefore, this work focused on the determining the corrosion resistance of tube/tube sheet mock-up specimen for sea water condensers, and elucidating the effect of shielding nitrogen gas on its resistance. The pitting corrosion of autogenously welded specimen propagated preferentially along the dendritic structure. Regardless of the percent of shielding nitrogen gas, the analyzed nitrogen contents were very much lower than that of the bulk specimen. This can be arisen because the nitrogen in shielding gas may partly dissolve into the weldment, but simultaneously during the welding process, nitrogen in the alloy may escape into the atmosphere. However, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the dendrite arm, regardless of the shielding gas percent; and the PREN of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the base metal; the PREN of the dendrite arm was lower than that of the base metal because of the formation of (Cr, Mo) rich phases by welding.

  3. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  4. Automatic welding systems for large ship hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregi, B.; Granados, S.; Hascoet, JY.; Hamilton, K.; Alonso, M.; Ares, E.

    2012-04-01

    Welding processes represents about 40% of the total production time in shipbuilding. Although most of the indoor welding work is automated, outdoor operations still require the involvement of numerous operators. To automate hull welding operations is a priority in large shipyards. The objective of the present work is to develop a comprehensive welding system capable of working with several welding layers in an automated way. There are several difficulties for the seam tracking automation of the welding process. The proposed solution is the development of a welding machine capable of moving autonomously along the welding seam, controlling both the position of the torch and the welding parameters to adjust the thickness of the weld bead to the actual gap between the hull plates.

  5. 2003 Dead Bald Eagle Specimen

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The specimen report states the Bald Eagle was found along the side of the I-95 by a motorist who contacted Santee National Wildlife Refuge. The Bald Eagle was taken...

  6. The application of neutron diffraction to a study of phases in type 316 stainless steel weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, G. F.; Windsor, C. G.

    1983-10-01

    Neutron diffraction techniques have been utilised to study the phases in type 316 austenitic stainless steel weld metal, both in the as-welded condition and after stress-relieving and ageing heat-treatments. The amounts of the principal crystallographic phases present in bulk specimens have been measured. Two compositions of weld metal were selected to provide a "low" (6%) and "high" (16%) initial ferrite level and the subsequent volume fractions of transformation products were measured after heat-treatment. Some retained ferrite was observed in all the heat-treated specimens, ranging from 4% for specimens of both initial ferrite levels treated at 625°C for 1000 h, to around 1% for the specimens treated at 850°C for 6 h. The high initial ferrite specimen produced 0.9% of sigma phase after the 850°C treatment and 0.2% sigma after the 625°C treatment. The low initial ferrite specimen produced 1.5% M 23C 6 carbide after both heat-treatments. The results compare well with previous findings on similar samples of weld metal using optical and electron microscopy.

  7. Comparison of CT and PET/CT for biopsy guidance in oncological patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerci, Juliano J.; Bogoni, Mateos; Cunha Pereira, Carlos; Cerci, Rodrigo J.; Krauzer, Cassiano; Vicente Vitola, Joao [Quanta - Diagnostico e Terapia, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Tabacchi, Elena; Fanti, Stefano [University Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine Department, Bologna (Italy); Delbeke, Dominique [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Giacometti Sakamoto, Danielle [Byori - Laboratorio de Patologia, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2017-08-15

    lesions. This prospective analysis of a large number of patients demonstrated the feasibility and advantages of using PET/CT as the imaging method of choice for biopsy guidance, especially where FDG-avid foci do not show corresponding lesions on the CT scan. There were no significant differences in the ability to obtain a diagnostic specimen or in the complication rates between PET/CT and CT guidance. (orig.)

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    He Peng; Daolun Chen; Xianquan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique-ultrasonic spot welding (USW...

  9. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  10. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  11. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  12. Reheat cracking susceptibility of P23 (7CrWVMoNb9-6) steel welds made using matching and mis-matching filler metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevasmaa, Pekka; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti; Rantala, Juhani; Holmstroem, Stefan [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Reheat cracking sensitivity of 7CrWVMoNb9-6 (P23) thick-section multipass welds has been investigated by Gleeble simulation, mechanical testing, fractography and metallography. The results demonstrate that the experimental weld metal made using a high-Nb-W-Ti-B type filler metal was sensitive to reheat cracking, with a reduction of area no more than 2-3% in the BWI reheat cracking (RC) test. Welds made using a high-W -low-Ti type filler metal with Nb content similar to the parent steel, as well as welds make using a Ni-Nb-Ti-free-(W-free) type filler metal with the chemical composition closer to P24 grade material, were more ductile and crack-resistant, though with reduced cross-weld creep strength. Fractography of RC test specimens showed evidence of pronounced localisation of damage at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the thermally reheated, experimental P23 weld metal. The reheat cracking susceptibility of the less ductile weld metal was apparently related both to the chemical composition (higher B, Nb and Ti content) and sub-structural features of the coarse-grained reheated weld metal microstructure. Appropriate single- and multi-cycle thermal Gleeble simulations to produce representative HAY and reheated weld metal microstructures (as function of peak temperature), in conjunction with the BWI RC test were successfully applied to characterise the reheat cracking sensitivity of the candidate weld metals and parent steel HAZ. (orig.)

  13. Control of Welding Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Structures, Office of Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for R&E (ET), Department of Defense, Washington, D.C. CHARLES ZANIS, Assistant Director for Platform... CHARLES NULL, Head, Metals Branch, Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. ROBERT A. WEBER, Welding Engineering and Metallurgy, U.S. Army Corps of...Needs. Pp. 487-90. in Papers Presented at the August 3-8, 1Q80, AIME Syi,.posium. Essers, W . ., and R. Walter. Heat transfer and penet ration

  14. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP).

  15. The effect of friction welding self-regulation process on weld structure and hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Ptak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The self-regulation phenomenon that occurs during friction welding process was characterised, and the effect of the self-regulation of theenergy-related parameters on structure and hardness distribution in SW7Mo steel – 55 steel welded joint was determined experimentally.The structure and hardness of the weld zone were examined, the energy required for the stable run of a friction welding process wascalculated, and a relationship between the welding energy and weld hardness was derived.

  16. T*{sub {epsilon}} integral analysis of fracture specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, Y.; Ma, L.; Kobayashi, A.S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    T*{sub {epsilon}} integral values associated with stable crack growth in thin 2024-T3 aluminum compact (CT) specimens and A606 HSLA steel single edge notched (SEN) specimens were determined directly from the crack tip displacement field obtained by moire interferometry. Stable crack growth in the SEN specimen was also simulated by an elastic-plastic finite element (FE) model which was driven by the experimentally determined boundary conditions. T*{sub {epsilon}} obtained experimentally and by FE were in reasonable agreements with each other. Unlike the vanishing J integrals with crack extension, T*{sub {epsilon}} reached steady state values with stable crack growth. Thus, for a given integration contour, {Gamma}{sub {epsilon}}, near the crack tip, T*{sub {epsilon}} can be used as a stable crack growth as well as a ductile fracture criteria.

  17. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  18. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  19. Changes in Precipitate Distributions and the Microstructural Evolution of P24/P91 Dissimilar Metal Welds During PWHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Karl E.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Chi, Kuangnan; Barnard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The effect of post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) on the evolution of precipitate phases in dissimilar metal welds made between 9 pct Cr P91 alloy and 2.25 pct Cr T/P24-type weld metal has been investigated. Sections of multi-pass fusion welds were analyzed in their as welded condition and after PWHTs of 2 and 8 hour duration at 1003 K (730 °C). Thin foil specimens and carbon extraction replicas have been examined in transmission electron microscopes in order to identify precipitate phases and substantiate their distributions in close proximity to the fusion line. The findings of these studies confirm that a carbon-depleted region develops in the lower alloyed weld material, adjacent to the weld interface, during thermal processing. A corresponding carbon enriched region is formed, simultaneously, in the coarse grain heat affected zone of the P91 parent alloy. It has been demonstrated that carbon depletion from the weld alloy results in the dissolution of M7C3 and M23C6 chromium carbides. However, micro-alloying additions of vanadium and niobium which are made to both the P24 and P91 alloys facilitate the precipitation of stable, nano-scale, MX carbonitride particles. This work demonstrates that these particles, which are of key importance to the strength of ferritic creep resistant alloys, are retained in carbon-depleted regions. The microstructural stability which is conferred by their retention means that the pernicious effects of recrystallization are largely avoided.

  20. Rotary Bending Fatigue Characteristics According to Optimal Friction Welding of SF45 to SM45C Steel Bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Yu Sik; Park, Young Whan [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A study on dissimilar friction-welded joints was performed for cam shaft applications using solid bar samples, 20mm in diameter, of forging steel(SF45) and carbon steel(SM45C). The main parameters of friction welding such as tensile tests, Vickers hardness surveys of the bond of area, the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the observation of microstructure were investigated to ensure a good quality of friction welding through visual observations. The specimens were tested as-welded and post weld heat treatment(PWHT). This paper deals with optimizing the welding conditions and analyzing various rotary bending fatigue test(RBFT) properties about heat-treated base metal(BM), as-welded and PWHT. Consequently, two materials for friction welding are strongly mixed with a well-combined structure of micro-particles without any molten material, particle growth, or any defect. Moreover, the fatigue limit of BM(SF45) and PWHT for the RBFT were observed as 180MPa and 250MPa, respectively. It was confirmed that the PWHT causes approximately 40% improvement in the fatigue limit when compared to the BM(SF45).

  1. Study of gas tungsten arc welding procedures for tantalum alloy T-111 (Ta-8 W-2Hf) plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Kesterson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Methods of eliminating or reducing underbread cracking in multipass GTA welds in thick T-111 plate were studied. Single V butt welds prepared using experimental filler metal compositions and standard weld procedures resulted in only moderate success in reducing underbread cracking. Subsequent procedural changes incorporating manual welding, slower weld speeds, and three or fewer fill passes resulted in crack-free single V welds only when the filler metal was free of hafnium. The double V joint design with successive fill passes on opposite sides of the joint produced excellent welds. The quality of each weld was determined metallographically since the cracking, when present, was very slight and undetectable using standard NDT techniques. Tensile and bend tests were performed on selected weldments. The inherent filler metal strength and the joint geometry determined the strength of the weldment. Hardness and electron beam microprobe traverses were made on selected specimens with the result that significant filler metal-base metal dilution as well as hafnium segregation was detected. A tentative explanation of T-111 plate underbread cracking is presented based on the intrinsic effects of hafnium in the weldment.

  2. Advanced Process Possibilities in Friction Crush Welding of Aluminum, Steel, and Copper by Using an Additional Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besler, Florian A.; Grant, Richard J.; Schindele, Paul; Stegmüller, Michael J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Joining sheet metal can be problematic using traditional friction welding techniques. Friction crush welding (FCW) offers a high speed process which requires a simple edge preparation and can be applied to out-of-plane geometries. In this work, an implementation of FCW was employed using an additional wire to weld sheets of EN AW5754 H22, DC01, and Cu-DHP. The joint is formed by bringing together two sheet metal parts, introducing a wire into the weld zone and employing a rotating disk which is subject to an external force. The requirements of the welding preparation and the fundamental process variables are shown. Thermal measurements were taken which give evidence about the maximum temperature in the welding center and the temperature in the periphery of the sheet metals being joined. The high welding speed along with a relatively low heat input results in a minimal distortion of the sheet metal and marginal metallurgical changes in the parent material. In the steel specimens, this FCW implementation produces a fine grain microstructure, enhancing mechanical properties in the region of the weld. Aluminum and copper produced mean bond strengths of 77 and 69 pct to that of the parent material, respectively, whilst the steel demonstrated a strength of 98 pct. Using a wire offers the opportunity to use a higher-alloyed additional material and to precisely adjust the additional material volume appropriate for a given material alignment and thickness.

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  4. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special ... the Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a ... the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis ... Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  7. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  8. Creep properties and simulation of weld repaired low alloy heat resistant CrMo and Mo steels at 540 deg C. Sub project 1 - Ex-serviced parent metal and virgin weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld; Weilin Zang

    2006-10-15

    Many existing power generating and process plants, where low alloy heat resistant CrMo(V) steels are extensively used for critical components, have exceeded their design lifetime of usually 100,000 hours. Assessment of residual lifetime and extension of economic life by weld repair have become increasingly important and attractive. This project aims at i) performing weld repair and determining the degree of mismatching, ii) evaluating the creep properties of weld repairs, iii) analysing creep behaviour of weld repair and providing necessary data for further reliable simulations of weld repair creep behaviour in long term service, and iv), simulating and assessing lifetime and creep damage evolution of weld repair. Weld repair using 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 consumables has been carried out in a service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 pipe. Creep specimens have been extracted from the service-exposed 10 CrMo 9 10 parent metal (PM), from the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10 weld metal (WM), from the virgin 13 CrMo 4 4 WM as well as from the virgin 15 Mo 3 WM. Iso-thermal uniaxial creep tests have been performed at 540 deg C in air. Pre- and post-metallography are carried out on the selected samples. FEM simulations using obtained creep data are executed. Pre-test metallography shows normal and acceptable weld repairs at given welding conditions. Creep tests demonstrate that the virgin 10 CrMo 9 10, 13 CrMo 4 4 and 15 Mo 3 WMs have apparently longer creep lifetime than the service-exposed CrMo 9 10 PM at higher stresses than 110 MPa. Among the weld metals, the longest creep lifetime is found in 10 CrMo 9 10. Higher creep strength and lower creep strain rate in the weld metals indicate an overmatch weld. At 95 MPa, however, lifetime of 13 CrMo 4 4 WM is surprisingly short (factors which may shorten lifetime are discussed and one more test will start to verify creep strength at low stress) and tests are still running for other two weld metals. More results regarding low stress

  9. Review of laser hybrid welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus

    2004-01-01

    In this artucle an overview og the hybrid welding process is given. After a short historic overview, a review of the fundamental phenomenon taking place when a laser (CO2 or Nd:YAG) interacts in the same molten pool as a more conventional source of energy, e.g. tungsten in-active gas, plasma......, or metal inactive gas/metal active gas.This is followed by reports of how the many process parameters governing the hybrid welding process can be set and how the choice of secondary energy source, shielding gas, etc. can affect the overall welding process....

  10. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  11. Convection in arc weld pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreper, G.M.; Eagar, T.W.; Szekely, J.

    1982-11-01

    A mathematical model was developed to account for convection and temperature distributions in stationary arc weld pools driven by buoyancy, electromagnetic and surface tension forces. It is shown that the electromagnetic and surface tension forces dominate the flow behavior. In some cases, these forces produce double circulation loops, which are indirectly confirmed by experimental measurements of segregation in the weld pool. It is also shown that the surface tension driven flows are very effective in dissipating the incident energy flux on the pool surface which, in turn, reduces the vaporization from the weld pool.

  12. Plasticity Theory of Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with simple methods for calculation of fillet welds based on the theory of plasticity. In developing the solutions the lower-bound theorem is used. The welding material and parts of the base material are subdivided into triangular regions with homogeneous stress fields; thereby...... a safe and statically admissible stress distribution is established. The plasticity solutions are compared with tests carried out at the Engineering Academy of Denmark, Lyngby, in the early nineties, and old fillet weld tests. The new failure conditions are in very good agreement with the yield load...

  13. Specification and qualification of welding procedures for metallic materials : welding procedure test : part 1 : arc and gas welding of steels and arc welding of nickel and nickel alloys : technical corrigendum 1

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    Specification and qualification of welding procedures for metallic materials : welding procedure test : part 1 : arc and gas welding of steels and arc welding of nickel and nickel alloys : technical corrigendum 1

  14. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  15. Standard practice for preparation and use of direct tension stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using ASTM standard tension test specimens for investigating susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking. Axially loaded specimens may be stressed quantitatively with equipment for application of either a constant load, constant strain, or with a continuously increasing strain. 1.2 Tension test specimens are adaptable for testing a wide variety of product forms as well as parts joined by welding, riveting, or various other methods. 1.3 The exposure of specimens in a corrosive environment is treated only briefly because other standards are being prepared to deal with this aspect. Meanwhile, the investigator is referred to Practices G35, G36, G37, and G44, and to ASTM Special Technical Publication 425 (1).

  16. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  17. Influences of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of AA5456 (AlMg5) at Different Lap Joint Thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishevar, M. R.; Mohandesi, J. Aghazadeh; Omidvar, H.; Safarkhanian, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is suitable for joining series 5000 alloys because no fusion welding problems arise for the alloys in this process. The present study examined the effects of double-pass welding and tool rotational and travel speeds for the second-pass welding on the mechanical and microstructural properties of friction stir lap welding of AA5456 (AlMg5)-H321 (5 mm thickness) and AA5456 (AlMg5)-O (2.5 mm thickness). The first pass of all specimens was performed at a rotational speed of 650 rpm and a travel speed of 50 mm/min. The second pass was performed at rotational speeds of 250, 450, and 650 rpm and travel speeds of 25, 50, and 75 mm/min. The results showed that the second pass changed the grain sizes in the center of the nugget zone compared with the first pass. It was observed that the size of the hooking defect of the double-pass-welded specimens was higher than that for the single-pass-welded specimen. The size of the hooking defect was found to be a function of the rotational and travel speeds. The optimal joint tensile shear properties were achieved at a rotational speed of 250 rpm and travel a speed of 75 mm/min.

  18. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  19. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  20. MFDC - technological improvement in resistance welding controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somani, A.K.; Naga Bhaskar, V.; Chandramouli, J.; Rameshwara Rao, A. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2008-07-01

    Among the various Resistance Welding operations carried out in the production line of a fuel bundle end plug welding is the most critical operation. Welding controllers play a very vital role in obtaining consistent weld quality by regulating and controlling the weld current. Conventional mains synchronized welding controllers are at best capable of controlling the weld current at a maximum speed of the mains frequency. In view of the very short welding durations involved in the various stages of a fuel bundle fabrication, a need was felt for superior welding controllers. Medium Frequency Welding Controllers offer a solution to these limitations in addition to offering other advantages. Medium Frequency power sources offer precise welding current control as they regulate and correct the welding current faster, typically twenty times faster when operated at 1000Hz. An MFDC was employed on one of the welding machines and its performance was studied. This paper discusses about the various advantages of MFDCs with other controllers employed at NFC to end plug welding operation. (author)

  1. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  2. Metallurgical characteristics and failure mode transition for dissimilar resistance spot welds between ultra-fine grained and coarse-grained low carbon steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, F.; Kazeminezhad, M., E-mail: mkazemi@sharif.edu; Kokabi, A.H.

    2015-06-18

    We studied the microstructure and mechanical characteristics of spot welded specimens, fabricated from low carbon steel sheets with different microstructures. Both ultra-fine grained (UFG) steel sheet and coarse grained (CG) steel sheet were used. The refined microstructure of the UFG steel has been produced by severe plastic deformation (SPD) using the constrained groove pressing (CGP) method. The grain size of the base metals was approximately 260 nm and 30 µm in diameter, respectively, in the UFG and CG steels. Examining the microstructure of a cross section cut through the spot weld reveals a similar grain size and phase distribution in the nugget on both the sides of the initial interface between sheets. Some recrystallization is observed in the heat affected zone on the UFG side as previously reported after the welding of symmetrical UFG–UFG spot welded specimens. The same energy deposit produces larger nuggets after the spot welding of UFG steels. Moreover, the hardness distribution across the nugget changes after welding on both sides of the initial (UFG/CG) interface. This effect is presently attributed to a change in the solidification, cooling rate and tempering after welding, likely because the higher resistance of UFG steel sheets increases the heat release by the Joule effect during spot welding. These changes in the mechanical behavior modify the transition between the interfacial failure (IF) and pull out failure (PF) mode with respect to energy deposit.

  3. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  4. Residual stress determination in an overlay dissimilar welded pipe by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Em, Vyacheslav [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Lee, Ho-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Park, Kwang Soo [Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction

    2011-01-01

    Residual stresses were determined through the thickness of a dissimilar weld overlay pipe using neutron diffraction. The specimen has a complex joining structure consisting of a ferritic steel (SA508), austenitic steel (F316L), Ni-based consumable (Alloy 182), and overlay of Ni-base superalloy (Alloy 52M). It simulates pressurized nozzle components, which have been a critical issue under the severe crack condition of nuclear power reactors. Two neutron diffractometers with different spatial resolutions have been utilized on the identical specimen for comparison. The macroscopic 'stress-free' lattice spacing (d{sub o}) was also obtained from both using a 2-mm width comb-like coupon. The results show significant changes in residual stresses from tension (300-400 MPa) to compression (-600 MPa) through the thickness of the dissimilar weld overlay pipe specimen.

  5. Influence of laser beam incidence angle on laser lap welding quality of galvanized steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lifang; Yan, Dongbing; Chen, Genyu; Wang, Zhenhui; Chen, Shuixuan

    2017-11-01

    Based on the characteristics of laser welded structural parts of auto bodies, the influence of variation in laser beam incidence angle on the lap welding performance of galvanized auto-body sheets was studied. Lap welding tests were carried out on the galvanized sheets for auto-body application at different laser beam incidence angles by using the optimal welding parameters obtained through orthogonal experiment. The effects of incidence angle variation on seam appearance, cross-sectional shape, joint mechanical properties and microstructure of weldments were analyzed. In addition, the main factors influencing the value of incidence angle were investigated. According to the results, the weld seams had a good appearance as well as a fine, and uniform microstructure when the laser beam incidence angle was smaller than the critical incidence angle, and thus they could withstand great tensile and shear loads. Moreover, all tensile-shear specimens were fractured in the base material zone. When the laser beam incidence angle was larger than the critical incidence angle, defects like shrinkage and collapse tended to emerge, thereby resulting in the deteriorated weldability of specimens. Meanwhile, factors like the type and thickness of sheet, weld width as well as inter-sheet gap all had a certain effect on the value of laser beam incidence angle. When the sheet thickness was small and the weld width was narrow, the laser beam incidence angle could be increased appropriately. At the same time, small changes in the inter-sheet gap could greatly impact the value of incidence angle. When the inter-sheet gap was small, the laser beam incidence angle should not be too large.

  6. Welding and Production Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 6000 square foot facility represents the only welding laboratory of its kind within DA. It is capable of conducting investigations associated with solid state...

  7. Thermomechanical Modelling of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a generic programme for analysis, optimization and development of resistance spot and projection welding. The programme includes an electrical model determining electric current and voltage distribution as well as heat generation, a thermal model calculating heat...

  8. Laser Welding of Ship Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brayton, W. C; Banas, C. M; Peters, G. T

    1979-01-01

    ... joint cleanliness and fitup conditions. In the current program, welds were formed between surfaces with nonperfect fitup, between plasma-cut surfaces, between surfaces deliberately mismatched to provide a varging joint gap and under out...

  9. Welding process modelling and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.; Adenwala, Jinen A.

    1993-01-01

    The research and analysis performed, and software developed, and hardware/software recommendations made during 1992 in development of the PC-based data acquisition system for support of Welding Process Modeling and Control is reported. A need was identified by the Metals Processing Branch of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, for a mobile data aquisition and analysis system, customized for welding measurement and calibration. Several hardware configurations were evaluated and a PC-based system was chosen. The Welding Measurement System (WMS) is a dedicated instrument, strictly for the use of data aquisition and analysis. Although the WMS supports many of the functions associated with the process control, it is not the intention for this system to be used for welding process control.

  10. CT FINDINGS IN HEAD SCANS AT MOI TEACHING AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-02-20

    Feb 20, 1998 ... ionic contrast media which are less toxic than ionic media are recommended in brain CT(15). CT scan guided biopsies are a safe and accurate way to obtain brain tissue specimens for pathological diagnosis in selected cases(l6). Assault and motor vehicle accidents were the major causes of head trauma.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser welded DP600 steel joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farabi, N. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Chen, D.L., E-mail: dchen@ryerson.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Li, J.; Zhou, Y. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Dong, S.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2010-02-15

    To reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, dual phase (DP) steels have been considered for automotive applications due to their higher tensile strength, better initial work hardening along with larger elongation compared to conventional grade of steels. In such applications welding and joining have to be involved, which would lead to a localized alteration of materials and create potential safety and reliability issues under cyclic loading. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate microstructural change after laser welding and its effect on the tensile and fatigue properties in DP600 steel. The welding resulted in a significant increase of hardness in the fusion zone, but also the formation of a soft zone in the outer heat-affected zone (HAZ). While the ductility decreased after welding, the yield strength increased and the ultimate tensile strength remained almost unchanged. Fatigue life at higher stress amplitudes was almost the same between the base metal and welded joints despite slightly lower fatigue limit after welding. Tensile fracture and fatigue failure at higher stress amplitudes occurred at the outer HAZ. Fatigue crack initiation was observed to occur from the specimen surface and crack propagation was characterized by the characteristic mechanism of striation formation. Dimples and deformation bands were observed in the fast propagation area.

  12. Effect of Pin Geometry on the Mechanical Strength of Friction-Stir-Welded Polypropylene Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordestani, F.; Ashenai Ghasemi, F.; Arab, N. B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, which has successfully been applied in aerospace and automotive industries for joining materials. The friction stir tool is the key element in the FSW process. In this study, the effect of four different tool pin geometries on the mechanical properties of two types of polypropylene composite plates, with 30% glass and carbon fiber, respectively, were investigated. For this purpose, four pins of different geometry, namely, a threaded-tapered pin, square pin, four-flute threaded pin, and threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer were made and used to carry out the butt welding of 5-mm-thick plates. The standard tensile and Izod impact tests were performed to evaluate the tensile strength and impact toughness of welded specimens. The results indicated that the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer produced welds with a better surface appearance and higher tensile and impact strengths. The tests also showed that, with the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer, the impact strength of the glass- and carbon-fiber composite welds were about 40 and 50%, respectively, of that of the base materials.

  13. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (pwelding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (pwelded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  14. Acoustic emisson and ultrasonic wave characteristics in TIG-welded 316 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Sang Pill; Son, In Su; Bae, Dong Su

    2014-05-01

    A TIG welded 316 stainless steel materials will have a large impact on the design and the maintenance of invessel components including pipes used in a nuclear power plant, and it is important to clear the dynamic behavior in the weld part of stainless steel. Therefore, nondestructive techniques of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic wave were applied to investigate the damage behavior of welded stainless steel. The velocity and attenuation ratio of the ultrasonic wave at each zone were measured, and a 10 MHz sensor was used. We investigated the relationship between dynamic behavior and AE parameters analysis and derived the optimum parameters to evaluate the damage degree of the specimen. By measuring the velocity and the attenuation of an ultrasonic wave propagating each zone of the welded stainless steel, the relation of the ultrasonic wave and metal structure at the base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) metal and weld metal is also discussed. The generating tendency of cumulated counts is similar to that of the load curve. The attenuation ratios from the ultrasonic test results were 0.2 dB/mm at the base zone, and 0.52 dB/mm and 0.61 dB/mm at the HAZ zone and weld zone, respectively.

  15. Dissimilar Arc Welding of Advanced High-Strength Car-Body Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo Spena, P.; D'Aiuto, F.; Matteis, P.; Scavino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A widespread usage of new advanced TWIP steel grades for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with other automotive steel grades. Therefore, the microstructural features and the mechanical response of dissimilar butt weld seams of TWIP and 22MnB5 steel sheets after metal-active-gas arc welding are examined. The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the welded joints was carried out by optical metallography, microhardness and tensile testing, and fractographic examination. The heat-affected zone on the TWIP side was fully austenitic and the only detectable effect was grain coarsening, while on the 22MnB5 side it exhibited newly formed martensite and tempered martensite. The welded tensile specimens exhibited a much larger deformation on the TWIP steel side than on the 22MnB5. The fracture generally occurred at the interface between the fusion zone and the heat-affected zones, with the fractures surfaces being predominantly ductile. The ultimate tensile strength of the butt joints was about 25% lower than that of the TWIP steel.

  16. ANALISA ELECTRODE CONSUMABLE TYPE OK AUTROD 12.10 DENGAN PENGELASAN SUBMERGED ARC WELDING (SAW PADA BLOCK KAPAL DCV 18500 DWT DI PT. JASA MARINA INDAH SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiryanto Kiryanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this of globalization is growing very rapidly advancing technology. As well as in shipyard industry is toshipbuilding process. Submerged Arch Welding (SAW is as joint methode of ship construction. Purpose ofresearch know number of electrodes wich requirement on block welding the ship DCV 18500 DWT in JasaMarina Indah Shipyard Semarang.The specimen experiment used is ST 42 low carbon steel. Variation of plates tickness is 12, 13, 14, 17, 19 and24 mm. Research step is carried out by making the specimen with variation thickness respectively. Specimendimensions length x width is 500 mm x 50 mm. The number of each specimen was made of three pieces. Thendo the measurement welding length, length and weight electrodes and slag welding.The analysis result of data welding on the specimen can be known number of electrode s and fluxs inSubmerged Arch Welding (SAW. The aplication of this research is the block DB 5(p/c/s, SS5A(p/s, SS5B(p/s, UD 5C, and TB 102 (p/c/s. Weight of consumable electrodes is 2185.31 kg (73 roll and number offlux used wight is 2967.95 kg (119 bag.

  17. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  18. Friction-Stir Welding - Heavy Inclusions in Bi-metallic welds of Al 2219/2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Ward W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy Inclusions (HI) were detected for the first time by radiographic examination in aluminum alloy 2219forging/2195plate (advancing/retreating side) Friction Sir Welds (FSW) for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Program. Radiographic HI indications appear as either small (approx.0.005"-0.025") individual particles or clusters of small particles. Initial work was performed to verify that the HI was not foreign material or caused by FSW pin tool debris. That and subsequent elemental analysis determined that the HI were large agglomerations of Al2Cu (theta phase), which is the strengthening precipitate in Al2219. A literature search on that subject determined that the agglomeration of phase has also been found in Al2219 bead on plate FSW [Ref. 1]. Since this was detected in ET space flight hardware, an investigative study of the effect of agglomerated theta phase particles in FSW Al2219f/2195p was performed. Numerous panels of various lengths were welded per ET weld procedures and radiographically inspected to determine if any HI was detected. Areas that had HI were sampled for room temperature and cyclic cryogenic (-423F) tensile testing and determined no significant adverse affect on mechanical properties when compared to test specimens without HI and historical data. Fracture surface examination using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) revealed smaller phase agglomerations undetectable by radiographic inspection dispersed throughout the Al2219f/2195p FSW. This indicates that phase agglomeration is inherent to the Al2219f/2195p FSW process and only rarely creates agglomerations large enough to be detected by radiography. HI has not been observed in FSW of plate to plate material for either Al2219 or AL2195.

  19. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  20. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  1. Quantitative Acoustic Emission Fatigue Crack Characterization in Structural Steel and Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adutwum Marfo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue crack growth characteristics of structural steel and weld connections are analyzed using quantitative acoustic emission (AE technique. This was experimentally investigated by three-point bending testing of specimens under low cycle constant amplitude loading using the wavelet packet analysis. The crack growth sequence, that is, initiation, crack propagation, and fracture, is extracted from their corresponding frequency feature bands, respectively. The results obtained proved to be superior to qualitative AE analysis and the traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics for fatigue crack characterization in structural steel and welds.

  2. Cavitation Erosion Tests Performed by Indirect Vibratory Method on Stainless Steel Welded Samples with Hardened Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian-Dumitru Nedeloni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of cavitation erosion tests performed on two types of samples. The materials of the samples are frequently used for manufacturing and repairs of the hydro turbines components submitted to cavitation. The first sample was made by welding of an austenitic stainless steel on austenito-feritic base material. The second sample was made similarly with the first but with a martensitic base material. After the welding processes, on both samples was applied a hardening treatment by surface peening. The cavitation erosion tests were performed on vibratory equipment using the indirect method with stationary specimen. The results show a good cavitation erosion resistance on both samples.

  3. Specimen Collection and Submission Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    local, approved medical treatment facility collection procedures. Superficial wounds and abscesses Sterile swab Follow local, approved medical...Tests May Include: West Nile virus (WNV), Eastern equine encephalitis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus... Wound Botulism Acceptable Specimens Required Volume/Comments Toxin Assay (T) or Culture (C) Performed Serum (priority sample type) 5 ml (less

  4. Corrosion in artificial saliva of a Ni-Cr-based dental alloy joined by TIG welding and conventional brazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Irma C; Bastos, Ivan N; Diniz, Marília G; de Miranda, Mauro S

    2015-08-01

    Fixed prosthesis and partial dental prosthesis frameworks are usually made from welded Ni-Cr-based alloys. These structures can corrode in saliva and have to be investigated to establish their safety. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the corrosion behavior of joints joined by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and conventional brazing in specimens made of commercial Ni-Cr alloy in Fusayama artificial saliva at 37°C (pH 2.5 and 5.5). Eighteen Ni-Cr base metal specimens were cast and welded by brazing or tungsten inert gas methods. The specimens were divided into 3 groups (base metal, 2 welded specimens), and the composition and microstructure were qualitatively evaluated. The results of potential corrosion and corrosion current density were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test for pairwise comparisons (α=.05). Base metal and tungsten inert gas welded material showed equivalent results in electrochemical corrosion tests, while the air-torched specimens exhibited low corrosion resistance. The performance was worst at pH 2.5. These results suggest that tungsten inert gas is a suitable welding process for use in dentistry, because the final microstructure does not reduce the corrosion resistance in artificial saliva at 37°C, even in a corrosion-testing medium that facilitates galvanic corrosion processes. Moreover, the corrosion current density of brazed Ni-Cr alloy joints was significantly higher (Pwelded joints. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (ΔT) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. ΔT increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of ΔT was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in ΔT and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  6. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  7. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  8. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  9. A study of processes for welding pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, J. (ed.)

    1991-07-01

    A review was made of exisiting and potential processes for welding pipelines: fusion welding (arc, electron beam, laser, thermit) and forge welding (friction, flash, magnetically impelled arc butt, upset butt, explosive, shielded active gas, gas pressure). Consideration of J-lay operations gave indications that were reflections of the status of the processes in terms of normal land and offshore S-lay operation: forge welding processes, although having promise require considerable development; fusion welding processes offer several possibilities (mechanized GMA welding likely to be used in 1991-2); laser welding requires development in all pipeline areas: a production machine for electron beam welding will involve high costs. Nondestructive testing techniques are also reviewed. Demand for faster quality assessment is being addressed by speeding radiographic film processing and through the development of real time radiography and automatic ultrasonic testing. Conclusions on most likely future process developments are: SMAW with cellulosic electrodes is best for tie-ins, short pip runs; SMAW continues to be important for small-diameter lines, although mechanized GMA could be used, along with mechanical joining, MIAB, radial fraction, and flash butt; mechanized GMA welding is likely to predominate for large diameter lines and probably will be used for the first J-lay line (other techniques could be used too); and welding of piping for station facilities involves both shop welding of sub-assemblies and on-site welding of pipe and sub-assemblies to each other (site welding uses both SMAW and GMAW). Figs, tabs.

  10. Creep rupture behavior of welded Grade 91 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Triratna [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Basirat, Mehdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Alsagabi, Sultan; Sittiho, Anumat [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Charit, Indrajit, E-mail: icharit@uidaho.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Potirniche, Gabriel P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    Creep rupture behavior of fusion welded Grade 91 steel was studied in the temperature range of 600 – 700 °C and at stresses of 50–200 MPa. The creep data were analyzed in terms of the Monkman-Grant relation and Larson-Miller parameter. The creep damage tolerance factor was used to identify the origin of creep damage. The creep damage was identified as the void growth in combination with microstructural degradation. The fracture surface morphology of the ruptured specimens was studied by scanning electron microscopy and deformed microstructure examined by transmission electron microscopy, to further elucidate the rupture mechanisms.

  11. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Johannes Bock

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05. In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N. Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N. Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test. In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  12. STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF THE HEAT INPUT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF C-Mn STEEL WELD METALS OBTAINED BY SUBMERGED ARC PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick de Sousa Marouço

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is part of a research program that aims to evaluate the technical feasibility of increasing productivity in the manufacturing of tubular components for offshore oil industry, which are fully welded by automatic submerged arc welding process, with high heat input, but with no impairment on the impact toughness of the weld metal. Multipass welds were produced by the submerged arc welding process, with a combination of F7A4-EM12K (wire/flux, by using a 3.2 mm-diameter wire, preheating at 80°C, with direct current, in flat position, with heat input varying from 3.5 kJ/mm to 12 kJ/mm. After welding, tensile tests and Charpy-V impact tests at –60°C, –40°C, –20°C, 0°C and 20°C were carried out, as well as metallographic examination by both optical (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, of specimens obtained entirely from the weld metal, allowing the discussion over the toughness X microstructure relationship. The weld metals have shown higher toughness levels in relation to the minimum required for use with low-alloy C-Mn steels welding with requirements of impact toughness of 27 J at 0°C for heat input up to 12 kJ/mm allowing an increase in productivity of 58% on the effective manufacturing time.

  13. Weld procedure produces quality welds for thick sections of Hastelloy-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flens, F. J.; Fletcher, C. W.; Glasier, L. F., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Welding program produces premium quality, multipass welds in heavy tube sections of Hastelloy-X. It develops semiautomatic tungsten/inert gas procedures, weld wire procurement specifications material weld properties, welder-operator training, and nondestructive testing inspection techniques and procedures.

  14. Laser welding of aluminium-magnesium alloys sheets process optimization and welds characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, C. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Fouquet, F. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Robin, M. [GEMPPM (CALFETMAT), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of the present study was to obtain good quality welds using a CO2 laser with Al-Mg alloys sheet. Defects formation mechanisms were analyzed and a welding procedure was defined, using several characterization technics, in order to realize low defects welding seams. After laser welding optimization, comparative tensile tests and microstructural analysis were carried out. (orig.)

  15. Local zone-wise elastic-plastic constitutive parameters of Laser-welded aluminium alloy 6061 using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruixiang; Wei, Yuepeng; Lei, Zhenkun; Jiang, Hao; Tao, Wang; Yan, Cheng; Li, Xiaolei

    2018-02-01

    The mechanical properties of aluminium alloys can be affected by the local high temperature in laser welding. In this paper, an inversion identification method of local zone-wise elastic-plastic constitutive parameters for laser welding of aluminium alloy 6061 was proposed based on full-field optical measurement data using digital image correlation (DIC). Three regions, i.e., the fusion zone, heat-affected zone, and base zone, of the laser-welded joint were distinguished by means of microstructure optical observation and micrometer hardness measurement. The stress data were obtained using a laser-welded specimen via a uniaxial tensile test. Meanwhile, the local strain data of the laser-welded specimen were obtained by the DIC technique. Thus, the stress-strain relationship for different local regions was established. Finally, the constitutive parameters of the Ramberg-Osgood model were identified by least-square fitting to the experimental stress-strain data. Experimental results revealed that the mechanical properties of the local zones of the welded joints clearly weakened, and these results are consistent with the results of the hardness measurement.

  16. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, E.

    2015-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters.

  17. Nitrogen And Oxygen Amount In Weld After Welding With Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-jet cooling after welding was tested only for MIG welding process with argon, helium and nitrogen as a shielded gases. A paper presents a piece of information about nitrogen and oxygen in weld after micro-jet cooling. There are put down information about gases that could be chosen both for MIG/MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was presented in terms of nitrogen and oxygen amount in WMD (weld metal deposit.

  18. TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES IN MECHANISED FEED WIG/TIG WELDING SURFACING OF WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURCA Mircea

    2016-09-01

    manual welding tests in the light of using the process for welding surfacing being known that in such applications mechanised operations are recommended whenever possible given the latter strengths i.e. increased productivity and quality deposits. The research also aims at achieving a comparative a study between wire mechanised feed based WIG manual welding and the manual rod entry based manual welding in terms of geometry deposits, deposits aesthetics, operating technique, productivity, etc . In this regard deposits were made by means of two welding procedures, and subsequently welding surfacing was made with the optimum values of the welding parameters in this case.

  19. Exemplification of Tomographic Method to Evaluate the Quality of Welded Joints Made from EN 5754-H22 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błachnio Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of welded joints depends on many factors. The relevant standards stipulate technical conditions of welds quality assessment, which provides the basis for stating whether the given joint is compatible with the requirements or whether it is defective. In practice, making welded joints that are totally devoid of defects is extremely difficult. To conduct the control of inner structure of the given joint a non-destructive method with the application of industrial CT scanner might be applied. This modern diagnosing method combines the x-ray examination with advanced computer technology. The basic advantage of computer-assisted tomography consists in examining objects in three dimensions and the possibility to carry out three-dimensional reconstructions. The aim of this article is to discuss the use of this method to evaluate the quality of welded joints made of aluminium alloys. Capabilities of computer-assisted tomography were depicted by the case of weld probes constructed with TIG (ang. Tungsten Inert Gas welding by different process variables. One has made the analysis of the quality of probes showing the smallest and the biggest internal and external welding defects.

  20. Effect of long-term thermal aging on the fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel base and weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F.F.

    1995-09-27

    Compact tension specimens taken from FFTF primary piping materials (Type 316 stainless steel (SS) and 16-8-2 SS weld metal) and from reactor vessel materials (304 SS and 308 SS weld metal) were heated in laboratory furnaces from 100,000 hours. Fracture toughness testing was performed on these specimens, which are 7.62- and 25.4-mm thick, respectively at the aging temperature (482 and 427 degrees). Results were analyzed with the multiple-specimen method. Thermal aging continues to reduce the fracture toughness of FFTF component materials. Results show that thermal aging has a strong effect on the toughness degradation of weld metals, particularly for 16-8-2 SS weld whose aged/unaged Jc ratio is only 0.31 after 100,000-hour aging. The fracture toughness of the 308 and 16-8-2 SS weld metals fluctuated during 20,000 to 50,000-hour aging but deteriorated as the aging time increased to 100,000 hours; the toughness degradation is significant. Fracture control based on a fracture mechanics approach should be considered

  1. Effects of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of inert gas welded 6063 Aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertan, Taner [MAKO Corporation (Turkey); Uguz, Agah [Uludag Univ. (Turkey). Mechnical Engineering Dept.; Ertan, Rukiye

    2012-07-01

    The influence of welding parameters, namely welding current and gas flow rate, on the mechanical properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) welded 6063 Aluminum alloy (AA 6063) has been investigated. In order to study the effect of the welding current and gas flow rate, microstructural examination, hardness measurements and room temperature tensile tests have been carried out. The experimental results show that the mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints have better mechanical properties than those of SMAW welded joints. Increasing the welding current appeared to have a beneficial effect on the mechanical properties. However, either increasing or decreasing the gas flow rate resulted in a decrease of hardness and tensile strength. It was also found that, the highest strength was obtained in GTAW welded samples at 220 A and 15 l/min gas flow rate.

  2. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  3. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    Weld strength testing of single spots in DP600 steel is presented for the three typical testing procedures, i.e. tensile-shear, cross-tension and peel testing. Spot welds are performed at two sets of welding parameters and strength testing under these conditions is presented by load......-elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...... the size and shape of the weld nugget, these properties include the new strength of the material in the weld and the heat affected zone based on the predicted hardness resulting from microstructural phase changes simulated during cooling of the weld before strength testing. Comparisons between overall...

  4. CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    With the advent of multidetector row CT scanners, evaluation of the urothelium of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution thin sections during a single breath-hold has become a reality. Multidetector CT urography (MDCTU) is a single examination that allows evaluation of potential urinary tract calculi, renal parenchymal masses, and both benign and malignant urothelial lesions. Initial results with this new technique are encouraging. Current investigations of MDCTU focus on methods to improve opacification and distension of the upper urinary tract - the collecting systems, pelvis, and ureters. The role of abdominal compression, infusion of saline and/or furosemide, and optimal time delay of excretory phase imaging is being explored. Upper tract urothelial malignancies, including small lesions less the 5 mmin diameter, can be detected with high sensitivity. Methods to reduce radiation exposure are being explored, including split-bolus contrast injection techniques that combine nephrographic and excretory phases into a single phase. It is likely that in the near future, radiological evaluation of significant unexplained hematuria or of known or prior urothelial malignancy will consist of a single examination - MDCTU. (orig.)

  5. Oxidation behavior of base metal, weld metal and HAZ regions of SMAW weldment in ASTM SA210 GrA1 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ravindra [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: ravirs_2002@rediffmail.com; Tewari, V.K.; Prakash, Satya [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2009-06-24

    Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) was used to weld together ASTM SA210 GrA1 steel. The oxidation studies were conducted on different regions of shielded metal arc weldment i.e., base metal, weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ) specimens after exposure to air at 900 deg. C under cyclic conditions. The thermo-gravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of oxidation. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX) techniques were used to analyze the oxidation products. Base metal showed more weight gain than that of weld metal and HAZ. The HAZ specimen showed the least weight gain due to the formation of densely inner oxide scale.

  6. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  7. Closed circuit television welding alignment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darner, G.S.

    1976-09-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) weld targeting systems were developed to provide accurate and repeatable positioning of the electrode of an electronic arc welder with respect to the parts being joined. A sliding mirror electrode holder was developed for use with closed circuit television equipment on existing weld fixturing. A complete motorized CCTV weld alignment system was developed to provide weld targeting for even the most critical positioning requirements.

  8. Preventing Contamination In Electron-Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Wesley D.; Gulbrandsen, Kevin A.; Oleksiak, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Simple expedient eliminates time-consuming, expensive manual hand grinding. Use of groove and backup tube greatly reduces postweld cleanup in some electron-beam welding operations. Tube-backup method developed for titanium parts, configurations of which prevents use of solid-block backup. In new welding configuration, tube inserted in groove to prevent contact between alumina beads and molten weld root. When welding complete and beads and tube removed, only minor spatter remains and is ground away easily.

  9. Development of methodology for measurements of residual stresses in welded joint based on displacement of points in a coordinated table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Veras Siqueira Filho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses in a welded joint of ASTM A131 grade AH32 steel was measured either by the X-ray diffraction or by displacements of referenced points measured on a coordinate measuring machine before and after heat treatment. For all tests, the welding was performed with Shielded Metal Arc Welding, vertical-up position, by a certified welder. After welding, some specimens were subjected to marking, made through small holes evenly spaced and mapped on a coordinate measuring machine. After labeling, the samples were subjected to heat treatment at temperatures nearby recrystallization. After heat treatment, the samples were subjected to new measurements by coordinate measuring machine to evaluate the displacements of the points produced by the recrystallization. In parallel, residual stress measurements were made by XRD for validation of this new methodology. The results obtained either by X-ray or by coordinate measuring machine showed a good correlation between the two measurement methodologies employed.

  10. The effect of stress relieving treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of different welding areas of A517 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Hassan; Raisi, Solyman; Tayebi, Morteza

    2017-12-01

    Quench and temper steels are classified as low alloy steels. In these types of steel, post-weld heat treatment is used to obtain high toughness, elevated strength and better corrosion resistance in addition to decline residual stress and hydrogen cracking for high pressure vessel applications. In this study, welding mechanical properties were characterized by hardness measurements, tensile and impact tests. Additionally, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out in order to characterize the microstructure and the fracture analysis of A517 steel before and after the post-weld heat treatment. Residual stress examinations were employed to confirm the data reliability. Results showed no changes in the weld zone microstructures. The residual stress measurements revealed the highest and the lowest residual stresses in non-treated samples and heat treated samples in 560 °C, respectively. On the other side, hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the specimens was decreased after heat treatment.

  11. A Microstructural Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded 7075 Aluminum Rolled Plate Heat Treated to the Semi-Solid State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two rolled plates of 7075 aluminum alloy were used as starting material. The plates were welded using a simultaneous double-sided friction stir welding (FSW process. One way of obtaining feedstock materials for Semi-solid processing or thixoforming is via deformation routes followed by partial melting in the semi-solid state. As both the base plate materials and the friction weld area have undergone extensive deformation specimens were subjected to a post welding heat-treatment in the semi-solid range at a temperature of 628 °C, for 3 min in order to observe the induced microstructural changes. A comparison between the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welded plates was performed before and after the heat-treatment in the Base Metal (BM, the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, the Thermomechanically Affected Zone (TMAZ and the Nugget Zone (NZ using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM and Vickers hardness tests. The results revealed that an extremely fine-grained structure, obtained in the NZ after FSW, resulted in a rise of hardness from the BM to the NZ. Furthermore, post welding heat-treatment in the semi-solid state gave rise to a consistent morphology throughout the material which was similar to microstructures obtained by the thixoforming process. Moreover, a drop of hardness was observed after heat treatment in all regions as compared to that in the welded microstructure.

  12. Performance of mesh seam welds in tailor welded blanks; Terado blank yo mash seam yosetsubu no tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchihara, M.; Takahashi, M.; Kurita, M.; Hirose, Y.; Fukui, K. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Formability, fatigue properties and corrosion behavior of mash seam welded steel sheets were investigated and the results were compared with laser weld. The stretch formability of mash seam weld and laser weld were same level. Mash seam weld however, showed slightly smaller formability in hole expansion test. The fatigue strength of mash seam welds was lower than that of laser welds in case of differential thickness joints. Corrosion was apt to initiate at weld in both mash seam and laser weld with E-coat. The corrosion resistance of welds was improved by using zinc coated steel. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Welding technology for rails. Rail no setsugo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M.; Karimine, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Uchino, K.; Sugino, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Technical Research Inst. of Yawata Works); Ueyama, K. (JR Railway Technical Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The rail joining technology is indispensable for making long welded rails. Flush butt welding, gas welding, enclosed arc welding, and thermit welding are used properly as the welding methods. A method for improving the joint reliability by controlling the residual stress distribution of welded joint is investigated to prepare high carbon component weld metal similar to the rail. Problems with each of the welding methods and the newly developed technology to solve the problems are outlined. Composition of the coating is improved also, and a high C system welding rod is developed which has satisfactory weldability. High performance and high efficient new enclosed arc welding technology not available by now is developed which utilizes high carbon welding metal as a new EA welding work technology, and put to practical use. As a result of this study, useful guides are obtained for the establishment of satisfactory thermit welding technology. 17 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions that...

  15. 49 CFR 179.100-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.100-9 Section 179.100-9... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-9 Welding. (a) All..., appendix W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  16. 49 CFR 179.220-10 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.220-10 Section 179.220-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-10 Welding. (a) All joints... of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders, and fabricators shall be approved. (b) Radioscopy...

  17. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11...-11 Welding. (a) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in... subchapter). (d) Each welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR 27708...

  18. 49 CFR 179.200-10 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.200-10 Section 179.200-10... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.200-10 Welding. (a) All joints... W (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall be...

  19. 30 CFR 77.408 - Welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding operations. 77.408 Section 77.408 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.408 Welding operations. Welding operations shall be shielded and the...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1729 - Welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding operations. 75.1729 Section 75.1729 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1729 Welding operations. Welding...

  1. Friction welding thermal and metallurgical characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    This book provides insight into the thermal analysis of friction welding incorporating welding parameters such as external, duration, breaking load, and material properties. The morphological and metallurgical changes associated with the resulting weld sites are analysed using characterization methods such as electron scanning microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Nuclear reaction analysis.

  2. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  3. 49 CFR 179.11 - Welding certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding certification. 179.11 Section 179.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Design Requirements § 179.11 Welding certification. (a) Welding procedures, welders and fabricators shall...

  4. 46 CFR 154.665 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 154.665 Section 154.665 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... Construction § 154.665 Welding procedures. Welding procedure tests for cargo tanks for a design temperature...

  5. Low Speed Control for Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Amplifier module allows rotating positioner of automatic welding machine to operate at speeds below normal range. Low speeds are precisely regulated by a servomechanism as are normal-range speeds. Addition of module to standard welding machine makes it unnecessary to purchase new equipment for low-speed welding.

  6. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3) . The quality of the test welds used to... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214...

  7. Welding multiple plies with an electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiluk, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Method for electron-beam welding of multi-ply metal sheets eliminates ply separation and minimizes porosity. Method was developed for assembling bellows made of four plies of iron/nickel alloy sheets. Method consists of making successive stitch welds with electron beam until weld seam is completely filled in and all plies have been penetrated.

  8. Viewing electron-beam welds in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenoff, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    With aid of optical filter, operator of electron-beam welding machine can view TV image of joint that is being welded and can make corrections as necessary. Operator can see when weld bead gets out of alinement, for example, and compensate for deflection of electron beam caused by changes in magnetic field.

  9. [Dental welding titanium and its clinical usage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Xiao, M; Zhao, Y

    1998-09-01

    Due to its excellent biocompatibility, desirable chemical and mechanical properties, Titanium has been used for implant denture, RPD and FPD, where welding techniques were indispensable. This paper introduces 5 useful modern ways to weld Titanium and their clinical usage. They are: laser, plasma welding, TIG, infraned brazing and Hruska electrowelding.

  10. Technology of welding aluminum alloys-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. R.; Kor, L. J.; Oleksiak, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Control of porosity in weld beads was major objective in development of aluminum welding program. Porosity, most difficult defect to control, is caused by hydrogen gas unable to escape during solidification. Hard tooling allows hotter bead than free-fall tooling so hydrogen bubbles can boil out instead of forming pores. Welding position, moisture, and cleanliness are other important factors in control of porosity.

  11. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  12. Study on visual image information detection of external angle weld based on arc welding robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaorui; Liu, Nansheng; Sheng, Wei; Hu, Xian; Ai, Xiaopu; Wei, Yiqing

    2009-11-01

    Nowadays, the chief development trend in modern welding technology is welding automation and welding intelligence. External angle weld has a certain proportion in mechanical manufacture industries. In the real-time welding process, due to hot deformation and the fixture of workpieces used frequently, torch will detach welding orbit causes deviation, which will affect welding quality. Therefore, elimination weld deviation is the key to the weld automatic tracking system. In this paper, the authors use the self-developed structured light vision sensor system which has significant advantage compared with arc sensors to capture real-time weld images. In the project of VC++6.0 real-time weld image processing, after binaryzation with threshold value seventy, 3*1 median filter, thinning, obtain weld main stripe. Then, using the extraction algorithm this paper proposed to obtain weld feature points, and compute position of weld. Experiment result verified that the extraction algorithm can locate feature points rapidly and compute the weld deviation accurately.

  13. Contamination and solid state welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-05-01

    Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

  14. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    tension of the liquid metal. For a detachment the initial kinetic energy of the weld pool with respect to the plate has to exceed the energy to form the extra surface required for the detachment of the pool. The difficulty is in transferring the energy from the point of impact through the plate and sample to the cut edge. It is likely that not all of the kinetic energy is available for detaching the pool; some may be sequestered in weld pool oscillations. The coefficient of restitution for the collision will be lower than one if irreversible deformation, for example plastic flow deformation, takes place during the collision. Thus determining the amount of energy from an impact that actually reaches the molten metal droplet is critical. Various molten metal detachment scenarios were tested experimentally in an enclosed vacuum chamber using the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool, an electron beam welder designed for space welding. The experimental testing was performed in a 4 ft. X 4 ft. vacuum chamber at Marshall Space Flight Center, evacuated to vacuum levels of at least 50 microTorr, and also some welding garment material was utilized to observe the effect of the molten metal detachments on the material. A "carillon" apparatus consisting of four pendulum hammer strikers, each weighing approximately 3.65 lbs, raised to predetermined specific heights was used to apply an impact force to the weld sample/plate during electron beam welding and cutting exercises. The strikers were released by switching on an electric motor to rotate a pin holding wires retaining the strikers at desired heights. The specimens were suspended so as to be free to respond to the blows with a sudden velocity increment. The specimens were mounted on a hinged plate for minimizing effective mass with the option to fasten it down so as to raise its effective mass closer to that anticipated for an actual space welding scenario. Measurements were made of the impact energy and the horizontal fling distances of

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF THERMAL BOUNDARY CONDITIONS AND THERMO-METALLURGICAL BEHAVIOUR OF X10CrMoVNb9-1 STEEL DURING SIMPLE TIG WELDING TESTS

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Guilhem; Billardon, René

    2006-01-01

    International audience; To validate the thermo-metallurgical models that are used during finite element simulations of multi-pass TIG welding, two simple experiments – called "disk-spot" and "disk-cycle" TIG welding tests- have been designed. A procedure has been developed to identify the thermal boundary conditions that are imposed to the specimen during these experiments. These boundary conditions include the heat source that is equivalent to the TIG torch as well as the heat flux by convec...

  16. Laser welding of selected aerospace alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadan, Gracie E.

    The study was aimed at developing an understanding of the microstructural effects of the laser welding process on the alloys, and assessing the structural integrity of the resultant welds. The effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, laser beam traverse speed, lens focal length, and the manipulation of these parameters on the welding efficiency and weld area integrity was also investigated. Other tasks within the project included a study on the possibility of using an anodic film to enhance the laser weld ability of Al 6061. Finally, attempts were made to identify phases observed in the weld area of the composite materials. Nimonics C263 and PE11 exhibited laser welds free of cracks and porosity. The difference in composition between the two alloys did not result in any significant dissimilarities in their response to the laser welding process. The welds in both alloys exhibited a fine columnar dendritic microstructure, and while carbides were observed in the interdendritic regions of the welds, electron optical analysis did not reveal any gamma' precipitates in this region. It was concluded that for the welding of thin gage materials above a threshold laser power the resultant welding efficiency shows a greater dependence on laser beam mode, and laser spot size, than on laser power, and beam traverse speed. Aluminum 6061 was not easily welded with a laser in its as received form, and the welds showed some degree of porosity. Anodizing was found to improve the welding efficiency in this material. While the presence of an anodic film on the metal surface increased the welding efficiency of the alloy, no relationship was found between the thickness of the anodic film and welding efficiency in the range of film thicknesses investigated. Weld regions were observed to be cellular dendritic in structure, with narrow heat affected zones. No precipitates or low melting point phases could be identified in the weld region. Melt zones were successfully

  17. Heavy-section fracture toughness screening specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Brown, W. F., Jr.; Donald, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    The reported study has the objective to fix the proportions and limits of application of a double-edge-notch specimen with one of the notches tipped with a fatigue crack (DENC). Details regarding the DENC specimen are discussed, taking into account specimen length, notch length, specimen width and thickness, and the loading pins. The influence of specimen width and thickness on the crack strenght and apparent plane-strain fracture toughness of the specimen has been determined for eight alloys. It is concluded that the DENC specimen shows promise for screening alloys with reference to their plane-strain fracture toughness in sections up to 1 in.

  18. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  19. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  20. Materials and welding engineering in advanced coal utilization plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhmacher, D.; Schulze-Frielinghaus, W.; Puetz, J.; Eichhorn, F.; Gaever, E. van

    1983-08-01

    The authors present the findings of studies on welding methods for high-temperature alloys used in advanced coal gasification plants. They discuss weld preparation, automatic TIG welding, MIG welding (also with pulsed arc) and plasma arc welding. The mechanical properties of welded joints before and after age hardening are investigated, and the results of fatigue and corrosion tests are presented. The welding methods are compared with a view to their suitability for high-temperature materials.

  1. Fatigue strength: effect of welding type and joint design executed in Ti-6Al-4V structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Juliana M C Nuñez; Farina, Ana P; Vaz, Luis G; Consani, Rafael L X; Nóbilo, Mauro A de Arruda; Mesquita, Marcelo F

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluated the fatigue strength of Ti-6Al-4V-machined structures submitted to laser (L)-welding and TIG (TIG)-welding procedures, varying the joint designs. Seventy dumbbell rods were machined in Ti-6Al-4V alloy with central diameters of 3.5 mm. The specimens were sectioned and welded using TIG or L and three joint designs {'I' design, varying welding distances [0.0 mm (I00) or 0.6 mm (I06)], or 'X' [X] design}. The combinations of variables created six groups, which, when added to the intact group, made a total of seven groups (n = 10). L was executed as follows: 360 V/8 ms (X) and 390 V/9 ms (I00 and I06), with focus and frequency regulated to zero. TIG was executed using 2:2 (X) and 3:2 (I00 and I06) as welding parameters. Joints were finished, polished and submitted to radiographic examination to be analysed visually for the presence of porosity. The specimens were then subjected to mechanical cyclic tests, and the number of cycles completed until failure was recorded. The fracture surface was examined using a scanning electron microscope. The Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test (α = 0.05) indicated that the number of cycles resisted for fracture was higher to X for both welding procedures. To L, I06 was as resistant as X. The Mann-Whitney U-test (α = 0.05) indicated that L joints were more resistant than TIG to I00 and I06. Spearman's correlation coefficient (α = 0.05) indicated a negative correlation between the number of cycles and presence of porosity. Thus, to weld Ti-6Al-4V structures, the best condition is X, independent of the welding method employed. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Influence of submerged electrical welding/cutting on dental amalgam in Swedish divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortendahl, T W; Holland, R I

    1986-12-01

    Professional commercial divers working with electrical cutting and welding sometimes experience a metallic taste phenomenon. An enquéte study among divers showed no influence of different equipment on the occurrence of such metallic taste, but it seems to occur less frequently in low salinity water. It has been suggested that this metallic taste phenomenon is due to increased corrosion rate of dental restorations, especially of amalgam. Experimental results recording the potential of amalgam specimens placed in the oral cavity of divers during welding, showed influence on the potential, and thus probably on the corrosion rate, during welding only when the diver came into direct contact with the water, e.g. through leakage in the suit.

  3. The manufactoring of a two–layered injection mold by welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Košnik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the technology of deposit cladding different materials, using the injection molds for thermoplastic as a case study. The aim of the study is to surface weld to the working surface of the mold a different material with corresponding physical properties. Steel (1.1141 and a copper alloy were used as the base, onto which different materials were surface-welded. Tungsten inert gas (TIG welding was employed to make molds inserts. An analysis of cross-sectioned specimens was made by optical microscopy, and chemical and hardness profiles were measured too. The thermal conductivity of base and cladded layer was also tested. Finally, a thermal fatigue test was employed to investigate the thermal fatigue properties of such surfaces.

  4. An Experimental Evaluation of Electron Beam Welded Thixoformed 7075 Aluminum Alloy Plate Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two plates of thixoformed 7075 aluminum alloy were joined using Electron Beam Welding (EBW. A post-welding-heat treatment (PWHT was performed within the semi-solid temperature range of this alloy at three temperatures, 610, 617 and 628 °C, for 3 min. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of EB welded plates, as well as the heat-treated specimens, were investigated in the Base Metal (BM, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, and Fusion Zone (FZ, using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, and Vickers hardness test. Results indicated that after EBW, the grain size substantially decreased from 67 µm in both BM and HAZ to 7 µm in the FZ, and a hardness increment was observed in the FZ as compared to the BM and HAZ. Furthermore, the PWHT led to grain coarsening throughout the material, along with a further increase in hardness in the FZ.

  5. Diffusion Bonding and Post-Weld Heat Treatment of Extruded AZ91 Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei LIN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The grain size of as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys was refined to 12.31 μm from 21.41 μm by recrystallization annealing. The vacuum diffusion welding of as-annealed AZ91 magnesium alloys was researched. The results showed that the maximum shear strength of joints reached 64.70 MPa in the situation of 10 MPa bonding pressure, 18 Pa vacuum degree, 470 °C bonding temperature and 90 min bonding time; both bonding temperature and time are the main influence factors on as-extruded AZ91 magnesium alloys diffusion welding. Then the diffusion welded specimens were annealed, and the shear strength of joints was further improved to 76.93 MPa.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9699

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a relatively short time, especially when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hard time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ... of soft tissue (particularly the brain, including the disease processes) are less visible on CT scans . CT ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the CT equipment look like? The CT scanner ... a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning ...

  12. Advanced Welding Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Accutron Tool & Instrument Co.'s welder was originally developed as a tool specifically for joining parts made of plastic or composite materials in any atmosphere to include the airless environment of space. Developers decided on induction or magnetic heating to avoid causing deformation and it also can be used with almost any type of thermoplastic material. Induction coil transfers magnetic flux through the plastic to a metal screen that is sandwiched between the sheets of plastic to be joined. When welder is energized, alternating current produces inductive heating on the screen causing the adjacent plastic surfaces to melt and flow into the mesh, creating a bond on the total surface area. Dave Brown, owner of Great Falls Canoe and Kayak Repair, Vienna, VA, uses a special repair technique based on operation of the Induction Toroid Welder to fix canoes. Whitewater canoeing poses the problem of frequent gashes that are difficult to repair. The main reason is that many canoes are made of plastics. The commercial Induction model is a self-contained, portable welding gun with a switch on the handle to regulate the temperature of the plastic melting screen. Welder has a broad range of applications in the automobile, appliance, aerospace and construction industries.

  13. Application of the simplified J-estimation scheme Aramis to mismatching welds in CCP; Application du concept d`integrale J dans l`outil Aramis aux effets de mismatch sur des eprouvettes CCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eripret, C.; Franco, C.; Gilles, P.

    1995-12-31

    The J-based criteria give reasonable predictions of the failure behaviour of ductile cracked metallic structures, even if the material characterization may be sensitive to the size of the specimens. However in cracked welds, this phenomenon due to stress triaxiality effects could be enhanced. Furthermore, the application of conventional methods of toughness measurement (ESIS or ASTM standard) have evidenced a strong influence of the portion of the weld metal in the specimen. Several authors have shown the inadequacy of the simplified J-estimation methods developed for homogeneous materials. These heterogeneity effects mainly related to the mismatch ratio (ratio of weld metal yield strength upon base metal yield strength) as well as to the geometrical parameter h/W-a (weld width upon ligament size). In order to make decisive progress in this field, the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), the PWR manufacturer FRAMATOME, and the French utility (EDF) have launched a large research program on cracked piping welds behaviour. As part of this program, a new J-estimation scheme, so called ARAMIS, has been developed to account for the influence of both materials, i.e. base metal and weld metal, on the structural resistance of cracked welds. It has been shown that, when the mismatch is high, and when the ligament size is small compared to the weld width, a classical J-based method using the softer material properties is very conservative. On the opposite the ARAMIS method provides a good estimate of J, because it predicts pretty well the shift of the cracked weld limit load, due to the presence of the weld. the influence of geometrical parameters such as crack size, weld width, or specimen length is property accounted for. (authors). 23 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab., 1 appendix.

  14. 3D volume reconstruction from serial breast specimen radiographs for mapping between histology and 3D whole specimen imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertzanidou, Thomy; Hipwell, John H; Reis, Sara; Hawkes, David J; Ehteshami Bejnordi, Babak; Dalmis, Mehmet; Vreemann, Suzan; Platel, Bram; van der Laak, Jeroen; Karssemeijer, Nico; Hermsen, Meyke; Bult, Peter; Mann, Ritse

    2017-03-01

    image of the whole sample (either MRI or CT). Qualitative and quantitative assessment has illustrated the benefit of using our proposed methodology to reconstruct a coherent specimen volume from serial slab radiographs. To our knowledge, this is the first method that has been applied to clinical breast cases, with the goal of reconstructing a whole specimen sample. The algorithm can be used as part of the pipeline of mapping histology images to ex vivo and ultimately in vivo radiological images of the breast. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Effect of weld spacing on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM electron beam welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yutao; Huang, Bo, E-mail: aufa0007@163.com; Zhang, Junyu; Zhang, Baoren; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding, and a simplified model of CLAM sheet was proposed. • The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). • The effect of the welding thermal cycle was significantly when the weld spacings were smaller than 4 mm. • When the weld spacing was small enough, the original microstructures would be fragmented with the high heat input. - Abstract: China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel has been chosen as the primary structural material in the designs of dual function lithium-lead (DFLL) blanket for fusion reactors, China helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) for ITER and China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) blanket. The cooling components of the blankets are designed with high density cooling channels (HDCCs) to remove the high nuclear thermal effectively. Hence, the welding spacing among the channels are small. In this paper, the welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding (EBW). The weld spacing was designed to be 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm. The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The PWHT is tempering at 740 °C for 120 min. The results showed that the grain size in the heat affected zone (HAZ) increased with the increasing weld spacing, and the joint with small weld spacing had a better performance after PWHT. This work would give useful guidance to improve the preparation of the cooling components of blanket.

  16. Advanced examination techniques applied to the qualification of critical welds for the ITER correction coils

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Libeyre, Paul; Marcinek, Dawid Jaroslaw; Piguiet, Aline; Cécillon, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The ITER correction coils (CCs) consist of three sets of six coils located in between the toroidal (TF) and poloidal field (PF) magnets. The CCs rely on a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC), whose supercritical cooling at 4.5 K is provided by helium inlets and outlets. The assembly of the nozzles to the stainless steel conductor conduit includes fillet welds requiring full penetration through the thickness of the nozzle. Static and cyclic stresses have to be sustained by the inlet welds during operation. The entire volume of helium inlet and outlet welds, that are submitted to the most stringent quality levels of imperfections according to standards in force, is virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional or computed radiography or by Ultrasonic Testing. On the other hand, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of several dozens of helium inlet qualification samples. The extensive use of CT techniques allowed a significant progress in the ...

  17. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  18. Optimizing specimen processing for ancient soft tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats-Muñoz, G; Malgosa, A; Isidro, A; Galtés, I

    2015-05-01

    Despite many reports concerning processing of ancient soft tissues, scant attention has been paid to optimizing procedures for processing soft tissues that have been altered by taphonomic processes. To determine the best procedures, we investigated the rehydration solution, time of exposure to the solutions, fixative solution and exposure to heat. Processes were evaluated based on the minimum section thickness, degree of tissue fragmentation, definition of tissue architecture and penetration of stains. We found that in desiccated samples, tissue architecture was optimized by using Ruffer's solution for rehydration and Schaffer's solution as fixative, because these tissues require water restoration within the tissues due to their compacted character. Heating enhanced penetration of dyes in these specimens, which improved diagnosis. Saponified tissues that had suffered extensive decomposition were more labile and required slow water uptake. The best histological sections were obtained using Sandison's solution followed by fixation with formaldehyde and avoiding heat. To obtain the best results with paleohistological specimens, the procedure must be determined by the condition of the sample and by accounting for the nature of its damage.

  19. Microstructural Characterization of Internal Welding Defects and Their Effect on the Tensile Behavior of FSW Joints of AA2198 Al-Cu-Li Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jolu, Thomas; Morgeneyer, Thilo F.; Denquin, Anne; Sennour, Mohamed; Laurent, Anne; Besson, Jacques; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Internal features and defects such as joint line remnant, kissing bond, and those induced by an initial gap between the two parent sheets were investigated in AA2198-T851 friction stir welded joints. They were compared with the parent material and to defect-free welds obtained using a seamless sheet. The cross-weld tensile strength was reduced by the defects by less than 6 pct. The fracture elongation was not significantly affected in view of experimental scatter. Fracture location, however, changed from the thermomechanically affected zone (retreating side) to the defect in the weld nugget for the welds bearing a kissing bond and for some of the gap welds. The kissing bond was shown by EBSD to be an intergranular feature; it fractured under a normal engineering stress close to 260 MPa during an in situ SEM tensile test. Synchrotron tomography after interrupted tensile testing confirmed opening of the kissing bond. For an initial gap of 23 pct of the sheet thickness, intergranular fracture of copper-enriched or oxide-bearing grain boundaries close to the nugget root was evidenced. The stress and strain state of cross-weld specimens loaded under uniaxial tension was assessed using a 3D finite element, multi-material model, determined on the basis of experimental data obtained on the same specimens using digital image correlation.

  20. Prediction of Residual Stress Distributions in Welded Sections of P92 Pipes with Small Diameter and Thick Wall based on 3D Finite Element Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei

    2015-05-01

    This study used ABAQUS finite element (FE) software to investigate the residual stress distributions of P92 welded pipes in both the as-weld and post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Sequential coupling quasi-static thermo-mechanical in conjunction with moving double ellipsoidal heat source and an element add/remove technique to simulate deposition of new weld material, are combined in the 3D FE analysis. To validate the simulation results, the residual stresses in axial direction at the surface of pipe were measured by X-ray diffraction technique and compared with the results of FE analysis. Detailed characteristic distributions of the residual stresses are discussed. Results show that the FE model can predict the residual stress distributions satisfactorily. Highest residual stresses on the outer surface are found in the last weld bead to be deposited. And the highest tensile residual stress for the full welded section take place in heat affected zone (HAZ) near the middle thickness. Larger residual sstress can be found around the welding start point along the pipe circumference. Comparison of heat treated specimen and untreated specimen illustrates that PWHT has a strong effect on the residual stress field.