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Sample records for welded advanced high

  1. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  2. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Carpenter, Joseph A.; Warren, C. D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2008-12-28

    Experiments are continuing to evaluate the feasibility of friction stir spot welding advanced high-strength steels including, DP780, martensitic hot-stamp boron steel, and TRIP steels. Spot weld lap-shear strengths can exceed those required by industry standards such as AWS D8.1.

  3. Laser welding of advanced high strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Essam Ahmed Ali

    2011-01-01

    This research work focuses on characterization of CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) of dual phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel sheets based on experimental, numerical simulation and statistical modeling approaches. The experimental work aimed to investigate the welding induced-microstructures, hardness, tensile properties and formability limit of laser welding butt joints of DP/DP, TRIP/TRIP and DP/TRIP steel sheets under different welding speeds. The effects of shieldin...

  4. Resistance spot welding and weldbonding of advanced high strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G.; Gaul, H.; Rethmeier, M. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany). Div. V.5 ' ' Safety of Joined Components' ' ; Thommes, H.; Hahn, O. [Paderborn Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Maschinenbau

    2010-11-15

    The resistance spot welding procedure is one of the most important joining techniques in lightweight car body shell mass production. Especially for newly developed high strength multiphase steels, also called advanced high strength steels (AHSS), and ultra high strength steels (UHSS), this joining technique has more advantages than other thermal and mechanical joining procedures for thin steel sheets. Additionally, the technique of adhesive bonding and its combination with the technique of resistance spot welding called weldbonding becomes more and more important. One of the targets of the contribution is to show the influence of joined advanced high strength steels on the process reliability for both the resistance spot welding process and the weldbonding process. Based on welding current ranges and on results of electrode wear tests, statements concerning the resistance spot weldability of some special AHSS will be given. The mechanical behaviour of spot welded and weldbonded joints for different AHSS will be studied. Furthermore, some statements regarding the fracture behaviour, the hardness and the fatigue behaviour of both spot welded and weldbonded joints for different AHSS will be given. Finally, some results on the mechanical properties of spot welded and weldbounded joints under corrosive attacks with be discussed. (orig.)

  5. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  6. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  7. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  8. Investigation of the Failure of Advanced High Strength Steels Heterogeneous Spot Welds

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut Huin; Sylvain Dancette; Damien Fabrègue; Thomas Dupuy

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, environmental regulation encourages carmakers to reduce the global vehicle weight. Steelmakers develop grades with high performance (Advanced High Strength Steels, AHSS) and fine steel sheet assemblies are used in car body structures, with an optimized thickness in each part. However, unusual fracture modes are sometimes observed during the mechanical tests of heterogeneous AHSS welds, made of dissimilar steel grades and sheet thicknesses. Weld fractures can occur with a strength lo...

  9. Formability Analysis of Diode-Laser-Welded Tailored Blanks of Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, S. K.; Baltazar Hernandez, V. H.; Kuntz, M. L.; Zhou, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Currently, advances due to tailored blanking can be enhanced by the development of new grades of advanced high-strength steels (HSSs), for the further weight reduction and structural improvement of automotive components. In the present work, diode laser welds of three different grades of advanced high-strength dual-phase (DP) steel sheets (with tensile strengths of 980, 800, and 450 MPa) to high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) material were fabricated by applying the proper welding parameters. Formability in terms of Hecker’s limiting dome height (LDH), the strain distribution on the hemispherical dome surface, the weld line movement during deformation, and the load-bearing capacity during the stretch forming of these different laser-welded blanks were compared. Finite element (FE) analysis of the LDH tests of both the parent metals and laser-welded blanks was done using the commercially available software package LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA); the results compared well with the experimental data. It was also found that the LDH was not affected by the soft zone or weld zone properties; it decreased, however, with an increase in a nondimensional parameter, the “strength ratio” (SR). The weld line movement during stretch forming is an indication of nonuniform deformation resulting in a decrease in the LDH. In all the dissimilar weldments, fracture took place on the HSLA side, but the fracture location shifted to near the weld line (at the pole) in tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) of a higher strength ratio.

  10. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  11. Creep Strength of Dissimilar Welded Joints Using High B-9Cr Steel for Advanced USC Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Abe, Fujio

    2014-10-01

    The commercialization of a 973 K (700 °C) class pulverized coal power system, advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pressure power generation, is the target of an ongoing research project initiated in Japan in 2008. In the A-USC boiler, Ni or Ni-Fe base alloys are used for high-temperature parts at 923 K to 973 K (650 °C to 700 °C), and advanced high-Cr ferritic steels are planned to be used at temperatures lower than 923 K (650 °C). In the dissimilar welds between Ni base alloys and high-Cr ferritic steels, Type IV failure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is a concern. Thus, the high B-9Cr steel developed at the National Institute for Materials Science, which has improved creep strength in weldments, is a candidate material for the Japanese A-USC boiler. In the present study, creep tests were conducted on the dissimilar welded joints between Ni base alloys and high B-9Cr steels. Microstructures and creep damage in the dissimilar welded joints were investigated. In the HAZ of the high B-9Cr steels, fine-grained microstructures were not formed and the grain size of the base metal was retained. Consequently, the creep rupture life of the dissimilar welded joints using high B-9Cr steel was 5 to 10 times longer than that of the conventional 9Cr steel welded joints at 923 K (650 °C).

  12. Investigation of the Failure of Advanced High Strength Steels Heterogeneous Spot Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut Huin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, environmental regulation encourages carmakers to reduce the global vehicle weight. Steelmakers develop grades with high performance (Advanced High Strength Steels, AHSS and fine steel sheet assemblies are used in car body structures, with an optimized thickness in each part. However, unusual fracture modes are sometimes observed during the mechanical tests of heterogeneous AHSS welds, made of dissimilar steel grades and sheet thicknesses. Weld fractures can occur with a strength lower than expected. This study aims at understanding these fracture mechanisms and focuses on two common steel grades joined by Resistance Spot Welding (RSW: DP600 (a dual phase steel and Usibor®1500 (a martensitic steel. The parameters affecting the failure modes and load bearing capacity are investigated during two common types of tests: the Cross Tension and Tensile Shear tests. The positive effects of heterogeneous welding with respect to the corresponding homogeneous configurations are discussed, as well as the consequences of a so-called Dome failure occurring at the weld nugget boundary.

  13. Materials and welding engineering in advanced coal utilization plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhmacher, D.; Schulze-Frielinghaus, W.; Puetz, J.; Eichhorn, F.; Gaever, E. van

    1983-08-01

    The authors present the findings of studies on welding methods for high-temperature alloys used in advanced coal gasification plants. They discuss weld preparation, automatic TIG welding, MIG welding (also with pulsed arc) and plasma arc welding. The mechanical properties of welded joints before and after age hardening are investigated, and the results of fatigue and corrosion tests are presented. The welding methods are compared with a view to their suitability for high-temperature materials.

  14. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, M., E-mail: matteo.rossini@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Spena, P. Russo, E-mail: pasquale.russospena@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Cortese, L., E-mail: luca.cortese@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Matteis, P., E-mail: paolo.matteis@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Firrao, D., E-mail: donato.firrao@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-25

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades.

  15. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-04-28

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  16. Three-Sheet Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    The automotive industry has introduced the three-layer weld configuration, which represents new challenges compared to normal two-sheet lap welds. The process is further complicated by introducing high-strength steels in the joint. The present article investigates the weldability of thin, low....... The weld mechanisms are analyzed numerically and compared with metallographic analyses showing how the primary bonding mechanism between the thin, low-carbon steel sheet and the thicker sheet of high-strength steel is solid-state bonding, whereas the two high-strength steels are joined by melting, forming...... a weld nugget at their mutual interface. Despite the absence of the typical fusion nugget through the interface between the low-carbon steel and high-strength steel, the weld strengths obtained are acceptable. The failure mechanism in destructive testing is ductile fracture with plug failure....

  17. Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Resistance Welded Advanced High Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Richardt; Harthøj, Anders; Friis, Kasper Leth

    2008-01-01

    In this work a low carbon steel and two high strength steels (DP600 and TRIP700) have been resistance lap welded and the hardness profiles were measured by micro hardness indentation of cross sections of the joint. The resulting microstructure of the weld zone of the DP-DP and TRIP-TRIP joints were...

  18. Dissimilar Arc Welding of Advanced High-Strength Car-Body Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo Spena, P.; D'Aiuto, F.; Matteis, P.; Scavino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A widespread usage of new advanced TWIP steel grades for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with other automotive steel grades. Therefore, the microstructural features and the mechanical response of dissimilar butt weld seams of TWIP and 22MnB5 steel sheets after metal-active-gas arc welding are examined. The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the welded joints was carried out by optical metallography, microhardness and tensile testing, and fractographic examination. The heat-affected zone on the TWIP side was fully austenitic and the only detectable effect was grain coarsening, while on the 22MnB5 side it exhibited newly formed martensite and tempered martensite. The welded tensile specimens exhibited a much larger deformation on the TWIP steel side than on the 22MnB5. The fracture generally occurred at the interface between the fusion zone and the heat-affected zones, with the fractures surfaces being predominantly ductile. The ultimate tensile strength of the butt joints was about 25% lower than that of the TWIP steel.

  19. Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Resistance Welded Advanced High Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Richardt; Harthøj, Anders; Friis, Kasper Leth

    2008-01-01

    simulated numerically and together with the material carbon equivalent, austenization temperatures and the thermal history the simulations were used to estimate the resulting post weld hardness using the commercial FE code SORPAS. The hardness of the welds of dissimilar materials was estimated......In this work a low carbon steel and two high strength steels (DP600 and TRIP700) have been resistance lap welded and the hardness profiles were measured by micro hardness indentation of cross sections of the joint. The resulting microstructure of the weld zone of the DP-DP and TRIP-TRIP joints were...... found to consist of a martensitic structure with a significant increase in hardness. Joints of dissimilar materials mixed completely in the melted region forming a new alloy with a hardness profile lying in between the hardness measured in joints of the similar materials. Furthermore the joints were...

  20. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, M.; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge® software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within 4%, and the position of the joint interface to within 10%, of the experimental results.

  1. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11–14 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge* software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within percent, and the position of the joint interface to within 10 percent, of the experimental results.

  2. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  3. Residual formability of preformed and subsequently welded advanced high strength steels (Reform): Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Standfuß, Jens; Jahn, Axel; Weber, P; Neges, J.; Wischmann, S.; Höfemann, M.; Sierlinger, R.; Cretteur, L.; Veldt, T. van der; Veit, R.; Trattnig, G.; Pickett, A.; D Aiuto, F.

    2014-01-01

    The research project Reform was situated within the scope of research and technological development of steel and its utilisation. The central point of investigation was the determination of the load capability of preformed and subsequently welded parts made of high-strength steels. In order to cover a wide spectrum of automotive steel applications and with respect to the current development of modern high-strength steels, - two dual phase steels (HCT780X, HCT980X), - one trip steel (HCT690T),...

  4. Resistance spot welding of a complicated joint in new advanced high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nick den Uijl; Joop Pauwelussen

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to investigate resistance spot welding of a complicated welding configuration of three sheets of dissimilar steel sheet materials with shunt welds, using simulations. The configuration used resembles a case study of actual welds in automotive applications. One of the

  5. Resistance spot welding of a complicated joint in new advanced high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijl, Nick den; Pauwelussen, Joop

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to investigate resistance spot welding of a complicated welding configuration of three sheets of dissimilar steel sheet materials with shunt welds, using simulations. The configuration used resembles a case study of actual welds in automotive applications. One of the stee

  6. Development of Appropriate Spot Welding Practice for Advanced High Strength Steels (TRP 0114)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Girvin; Warren Peterson; Jerry Gould

    2004-09-17

    This program evaluated the effects of common manufacturing variables on spike-tempering effectiveness. The investigation used design-of-experiment (DOE) techniques, and examined both dual-phase and martensitic grades of high-strength steels (HSS). The specific grades chosen for this project were: Dual-phase (DP) 600, galvannealed (GA), 1.55 mm (DP) 600; Dual-phase (DP) 980 (uncoated), 1.55 mm (DP) 980; and Martensitic (M) 1300, 1.55 mm (M) 1300. Common manufacturing conditions of interest included tempering practice (quench and temper time), button size, simulated part fitup (sheet angular misalignment and fitup), and electrode wear (increased electrode face diameter). All of these conditions were evaluated against mechanical performance (static and dynamic tensile shear). Weld hardness data was also used to examine correlations between mechanical performance and the degree of tempering. Mechanical performance data was used to develop empirical models. The models were used to examine the robustness of weld strength and toughness to the selected processing conditions. This was done using standard EWI techniques. Graphical representations of robustness were then coupled with metallographic data to relate mechanical properties to the effectiveness of spike tempering. Mechanical properties for all three materials were relatively robust to variation in tempering. Major deviations in mechanical properties were caused by degradation of the weld itself. This was supported by a lack of correlation between hardness data and mechanical results. Small button sizes and large electrode face diameters (worn electrodes) produced large reductions in both static and dynamic strength levels when compared to standard production setups. Dynamic strength was further degraded by edge-located welds.

  7. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  8. Forming Limits of Weld Metal in Aluminum Alloys and Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Smith, Mark T.; Grant, Glenn J.; Davies, Richard W.

    2010-10-25

    This work characterizes the mechanical properties of DP600 laser welded TWBs (1 mm-1.5 mm) near and in the weld, as well as their limits of formability. The approach uses simple uniaxial experiments to measure the variability in the forming limits of the weld region, and uses a theoretical forming limit diagram calculation to establish a probabilistic distribution of weld region imperfection using an M-K method approach

  9. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds (2006-01-0531)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t1/2 can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  10. Resistance Welding of Advanced Materials and Micro Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard

    presented problems. Simulation of two- and three sheet spot welding of advanced high strength steels DP600 and TRIP700 did generally agree well with experimental observations. Microstructure characterisation revealed that martensite was the main constituent in the final weld. By using empirical formulae......, thermal, electrical and metallurgical effects all signifcantly in uencing the process. Modelling is further complicated when down-scaling the process for welding micro components or when welding new advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry. The current project deals with three main themes...... resistance is addressed both theoretically and experimentally. Secondly the consequences of downscaling the process is investigated experimentally and discussed in relation to simulation of the process. Finally resistance welding of advanced high strength steels is addressed aimed at improving the simulation...

  11. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  12. Improvement of in-line process in high frequency welded steel pipe mill using advance tube tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babakri, Khalid Ali [Saudi Steel Pipe Company, Dammam, (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-07-01

    The Saudi Steel Pipe Company has designed and implemented a new automated tube tracking system. This paper reported, based on practical experience, the improvement of the in-line process control in high frequency induction (HFI) welded steel pipe mill using this new advance in automated the tube tracking system (TTS). The TTS provides helps in quality control inspection stations (in-process inspection, flattening test, offline ultrasonic, final inspection). For example, the QC inspector at the in-process station is able to choose any tube from the running coil and carry out visual and dimensional inspections. The results will be automatically updated in the TTS. This new system is also integrated with the continuous electronic process control (CEPC) system where the welding and annealing parameters are recorded and linked to each produced coil. It is found that the implementation of the advanced TTS has improved in-line process control on the shop floor. The results showed an increase in productivity and a reduction of operation cost.

  13. Twin-spot laser welding of advanced high-strength multiphase microstructure steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajcar, Adam; Morawiec, Mateusz; Różański, Maciej; Stano, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The study addresses the results concerning the laser welding of TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steel using a beam focused at two spots (also referred to as twin-spot laser welding). The analysis involved the effect of variable welding thermal cycles on the properties and microstructure of welded joints. The tests were performed using a linear energy of 0.048 and 0.060 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 50%:50%, 60%:40% and 70%:30%. The tests also involved welding performed using a linear energy of 0.150 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 70%:30%. In addition, the research included observations of the microstructure of the fusion zone, heat affected zone and the transition zone using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The fusion zone was composed of blocky-lath martensite whereas the HAZ (heat-affected zone) was characterised by the lath microstructure containing martensite, bainite and retained austenite. The distribution of twin-spot laser beam power significantly affected the microstructure and hardness profiles of welded joints. The highest hardness (480-505 HV), regardless of welding variants used, was observed in the HAZ.

  14. Microstructure characteristics and temperature-dependent high cycle fatigue behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qingjun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lu, Fenggui, E-mail: Lfg119@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Cui, Haichao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ding, Yuming; Liu, Xia [Shanghai Turbine Plant of Shanghai Electric Power Generation Equipment Co. Ltd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Gao, Yulai, E-mail: ylgao@shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2014-10-06

    Advanced 9% Cr and CrMoV steels chosen as candidate materials are first welded by narrow-gap submerged arc welding (NG-SAW) to fabricate the heavy section rotor. The present work focuses on studying the high-cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint at different temperatures. Conditional fatigue strength of this dissimilarly welded joint was obtained by HCF tests at room temperature (RT), 400 °C and 470 °C. It was observed that the failure occurred at the side of CrMoV base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and heat affected zone (HAZ) of CrMoV side over 5×10{sup 7} cycles for the specimens tested at RT, 400 °C and 470 °C. The detailed microstructures of BMs, WMs and HAZs as well as fracture appearance were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Precipitation and aggregation of carbides along the grain boundaries were clearly detected with the increase of temperature, which brought a negative effect on the fatigue properties. It is interesting to note that the inclusion size leading to crack initiation became smaller for the HCF test at higher temperature. Therefore, reduction in the inclusion size in a welded joint helps to improve the HCF performance at high temperature.

  15. Hardening characteristics of CO2 laser welds in advanced high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Kyo; Park, Bong-Gyu; Kang, Chung-Yun

    2012-06-01

    When the CO2 laser welder with 6 kW output was used to weld 4 TRIP steels, 2 DP steels and a precipitation-hardened steel, which have the tensile strength in the range of 600-1000 MPa, the effect of welding speed on hardening characteristics was investigated. In the weld of TRIP steels and DP steels, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the HAZ near the bond line, and the hardness was decreased from the HAZ to the base metal. Only in the PH600 steel, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the hardness was decreased from bond line to the base metal. The maximum hardness value was not changed due to the variation of the welding speed within a given range of the welding speed. When the correlation with maximum hardness value using 6 known carbon equivalents was examined, those of CEL (=C+Si/50+Mn/25+P/2+Cr/25) and PL (=C+Mn/22+14B) were 0.96 and 0.95 respectively, and CEL was better because it could reflect the contribution of Si and Cr added to AHSS. The maximum hardness value could be calculated by the equation "Hmax=701CEL+281". The phase transformation analysis indicated that only martensitic transformation was expected in the given range of the welding conditions. Therefore, the maximum hardness of the weld was the same as that of water cooled steel and not changed with the variation of the welding speed

  16. Effect of Cr and Si Contents on Expulsion Phenomenon in Electric-Resistance Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Jong-Pan; Kang, Chung-Yun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    An expulsion phenomenon occurred during resistance spot welding of advanced high-strength steel sheets, and the effects of the Cr and Si contents on the expulsion limit current (C{sub E}xp) were investigated. The correlation between C{sub E}xp and the steel properties (e.g., resistivity, melting point, coefficient of thermal expansion, high-temperature yield-strength and viscosity), were evaluated, as were the qualities of the alloying elements. The C{sub E}xp decreased with increasing Si contents. This resulted in a narrow range of acceptable welding current, as well as poor suitability for spot welding. On the other hand, the effects of Cr-contents on the C{sub E}xp, and on the acceptable range of welding current were minimal (with content of 3 wt%). Thus, the suitability for spot welding was not affected by the Cr-Contents (at the experimental concentration). As Si-Contents increased, resistivity also increased and the melting point decreased. This resulted in easy melting of the base metal at a low welding current (low heat input) and in the rapid increase of the pressure due to the increased coefficient of expansion. However, the high-temperature yield-strength of the corona bond, which blocked the expulsion of the molten melt, also decreased. Consequently, the C{sub E}xp of steel containing additional Si was lower than that containing Cr.

  17. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  18. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  19. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  20. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  1. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  2. High frequency welded (ERW) casing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duisberg, J. (Hoesch Roehrenwerke A.G., Hamm (Germany, F.R.))

    1980-09-01

    Due to the up-to-date standard in welding and testing techniques, the significance of ERW-casing is growing rapidly. The basic items of ERW-pipe are explained in detail. The forming mechanism, the high frequency welding by induction and contact welding processes is explained in detail as well as destructive and non-destructive testing methods. Finishing the ends as threading, thread control (gauging), power tight connection, pressure test and final quality control are rounding up the picture of the production of ERW-casing. Last but not least the test results from the joint strength- and collapse tests which are of outstanding interest for casings, are compared with API requirements in order to demonstrate compliance with API requirements.

  3. Friction Stir.Welding is an advance metal joining process: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umasankar Das,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The friction stir welding is recently developed solid state welding process which overcome the problem associated with fusion welding technology. The properties achieved by friction stir welding is better than that achieve by fusion welding technique It has been invented as a solid-state joining technique and initially applied to aluminum alloys. FSW is used to replace rivets joints in the aeronautical industry. Recently the aircraft and military industries widely have been using aluminum alloys particularly because of their fine strength to weight ratio. However in compare with steels they represent welding difficulties and also lower ductility. In last years it has been observed that Friction Stir Welding (FSW method represents better microstructure and mechanical properties than conventional methods in welding aluminum alloys. It has been widely investigated for mostly low melting materials, such as Al, Mg and Cu alloys. Aluminum is the most usable material in engineering application and a lot of improvement is needed in the area of its welding. The latest works on friction stir welding of aluminum have been directed towards improving the quality of weld, reducing defects and applying the process of FSW to aluminum for specific applications. This joining technique is energy efficient, environment friendly, and versatile. In particular, it can be used to join high-strength aerospace aluminum alloys and other metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. FSW is considered to be the most significant development in metal joining in a last decade. The FSW of Aluminums and its alloys has been commercialized; and recent interest is focused on joining dissimilar materials. However, in order to commercialize the process, research studies are required to characterize and establish proper process parameters for FSW. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of this welding processes in the field of welding. Future aspects of

  4. Experimental determination of the critical welding speed in high speed MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhikun; Wu Chuansong

    2008-01-01

    In high speed MAG welding process, some weld formation defects may be encountered. To get good weld quality, the critical welding speed beyond which humping or undercutting weld bead can occur must be known for different conditions. In this research, high speed MAG welding tests were carried out to check out the effects of different factors on the critical welding speed. Through observing the weld bead profiles and the macrographs of the transverse sections of MAG welds, the occurrence tendency of humping weld was analyzed, and the values of critical welding speed were determined under different levels of welding current or voltage, and the effect of shielding gas compositions on the critical welding speed was also investigated.

  5. Fundamentals and advances in the development of remote welding fabrication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, J. E.; Masubuchi, K.; Von Alt, C.

    1986-01-01

    Operational and man-machine issues for welding underwater, in outer space, and at other remote sites are investigated, and recent process developments are described. Probable remote welding missions are classified, and the essential characteristics of fundamental remote welding tasks are analyzed. Various possible operational modes for remote welding fabrication are identified, and appropriate roles for humans and machines are suggested. Human operator performance in remote welding fabrication tasks is discussed, and recent advances in the development of remote welding systems are described, including packaged welding systems, stud welding systems, remotely operated welding systems, and vision-aided remote robotic welding and autonomous welding systems.

  6. Advanced welding technology of automobile body%先进的车身焊接技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王广勇

    2013-01-01

    With the application of new material of galvanized steel and high strength steel and aluminum alloy in the body manufacturing, automobile body welding technology based on the power frequency of resistance welding and MAG welding doesn't meet the development trend "lightweight, safety, energy saving" of the body manufacturing.Advanced welding techniques such as MF resistance welding and laser penetration welding and laser filler wire welding and laser tailor-welded blanks and CMT welding technology and friction stir welding technology has been applied in automobile body manufacturing.This paper describes the working principle and technical characteristics of the above several advanced welding technology, and their application in automobile body manufacturing and economic benefits .There is some reference function to the body design and welding process.%随着镀锌钢板、高强度钢、铝合金等新材料在车身制造中的应用,以工频电阻焊为主,辅以MAG焊的车身焊接技术,逐步难以满足车身制造“轻量、安全、节能”的发展趋势.先进的焊接技术,例如中频电阻焊、激光钎焊、激光熔焊、激光拼焊板技术、CMT焊接技术、摩擦搅拌点焊技术等在车身制造中逐步得到应用.简述了几种先进焊接技术的工作原理和技术特点,及其在车身制造中的应用特点和经济效益.对车身设计和焊装工艺方案规划有一定的借鉴作用.

  7. Wear Resistance Analysis of A359/SiC/20p Advanced Composite Joints Welded by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cuevas Mata

    Full Text Available Abstract Advancement in automotive part development demands new cost-effective materials with higher mechanical properties and improved wear resistance as compared to existing materials. For instance, Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMC shows improved mechanical properties as wear and abrasion resistance, high strength, chemical and dimensional stability. Automotive industry has focused in AMC for a variety of applications in automotive parts in order to improve the fuel economy, minimize vehicle emissions, improve design options, and increase the performance. Wear resistance is one of the most important factors in useful life of the automotive components, overall in those components submitted to mechanical systems like automotive brakes and suspensions. Friction Stir Welding (FSW rises as the most capable process to joining AMC, principally for the capacity to weld without compromising their ceramic reinforcement. The aim of this study is focused on the analysis of wear characteristics of the friction-stir welded joint of aluminum matrix reinforced with 20 percent in weight silicon carbide composite (A359/SiC/20p. The experimental procedure consisted in cut samples into small plates and perform three welds on these with a FSW machine using a tool with 20 mm shoulder diameter and 8 mm pin diameter. The wear features of the three welded joints and parent metal were analyzed at constant load applying 5 N and a rotational speed of 100 rpm employing a Pin-on - Disk wear testing apparatus, using a sapphire steel ball with 6 mm diameter. The experimental results indicate that the three welded joints had low friction coefficient compared with the parent metal. The results determine that the FSW process parameters affect the wear resistance of the welded joints owing to different microstructural modifications during welding that causes a low wear resistance on the welded zone.

  8. Next generation high productivity submerged arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    LANGENOJA, MARKUS; Öhrvall Karlsson, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The task of designing concepts for the next generation of submerged arc welding heads was given by ESAB. ESAB is a global company manufacturing welding equipment for a wide span of industries and uses. In October 2011, ESAB introduced a new technology called Integrated Cold Electrode™, abbreviated and trademarked as ICE™. ICE™ is a technique which utilizes three electrodes in a highly productive and stable process. The current state of the ICE™ technique focuses on welding thick plates with c...

  9. Overview of advanced process control in welding within ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, R.E.

    1977-02-11

    The special kinds of demands placed on ERDA weapons and reactors require them to have very reliable welds. Process control is critical in achieving this reliability. ERDA has a number of advanced process control projects underway with much of the emphasis being on electron beam welding. These include projects on voltage measurement, beam-current control, beam focusing, beam spot tracking, spike suppression, and computer control. A general discussion of process control in welding is followed by specific examples of some of the advanced joining process control projects in ERDA.

  10. Investigation of high-frequency pipe welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Nikolai A.; Lakhno, Nikolay I.; Gushchin, A. G.; Putryk, N. D.; Kovalenko, Vladimir I.; Galkina, V. A.; Veselovsky, Vladimir B.; Furmanov, Valeri B.; Kovika, Nikolai D.; Novikov, Leonid V.; Shcherbina, V. N.

    1993-01-01

    For investigation of a pipe welding process at high-frequency heating aimed at increasing of pipe quality and decreasing of spoilage, the use of high-speed recording and TV-technique is considered to be effective. The authors have created a visual inspection system for pipe welding process studies at a tube mill of the Novomoskovsk Pipe Plant.

  11. Thick SS316 materials TIG welding development activities towards advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Ramesh; Gangradey, R.

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fusion reactors like ITER and up coming Indian DEMO devices are having challenges in terms of their materials design and fabrication procedures. The operation of these devices is having various loads like structural, thermo-mechanical and neutron irradiation effects on major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, magnets and blanket modules. The concept of double wall vacuum vessel (VV) is proposed in view of protecting of major reactor subsystems like super conducting magnets, diagnostic systems and other critical components from high energy 14 MeV neutrons generated from fusion plasma produced by D-T reactions. The double walled vacuum vessel is used in combination with pressurized water circulation and some special grade borated steel blocks to shield these high energy neutrons effectively. The fabrication of sub components in VV are mainly used with high thickness SS materials in range of 20 mm- 60 mm of various grades based on the required protocols. The structural components of double wall vacuum vessel uses various parts like shields, ribs, shells and diagnostic vacuum ports. These components are to be developed with various welding techniques like TIG welding, Narrow gap TIG welding, Laser welding, Hybrid TIG laser welding, Electron beam welding based on requirement. In the present paper the samples of 20 mm and 40 mm thick SS 316 materials are developed with TIG welding process and their mechanical properties characterization with Tensile, Bend tests and Impact tests are carried out. In addition Vickers hardness tests and microstructural properties of Base metal, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone are done. TIG welding application with high thick SS materials in connection with vacuum vessel requirements and involved criticalities towards welding process are highlighted.

  12. Cladding of Advanced Al Alloys Employing Friction Stir Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der A.A.; Bor, T.C.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.; Akkerman, R.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an advanced solid state cladding process, based on Friction Stir Welding, is presented. The Friction Surface Cladding (FSC) technology enables the deposition of a solid-state coating using filler material on a substrate with good metallurgical bonding. A relatively soft AA1050 filler m

  13. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  14. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  15. Process Optimization of Dual-Laser Beam Welding of Advanced Al-Li Alloys Through Hot Cracking Susceptibility Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingtao; Robson, Joseph D.; Riekehr, Stefan; Kashaev, Nikolai; Wang, Li; Lowe, Tristan; Karanika, Alexandra

    2016-07-01

    Laser welding of advanced Al-Li alloys has been developed to meet the increasing demand for light-weight and high-strength aerospace structures. However, welding of high-strength Al-Li alloys can be problematic due to the tendency for hot cracking. Finding suitable welding parameters and filler material for this combination currently requires extensive and costly trial and error experimentation. The present work describes a novel coupled model to predict hot crack susceptibility (HCS) in Al-Li welds. Such a model can be used to shortcut the weld development process. The coupled model combines finite element process simulation with a two-level HCS model. The finite element process model predicts thermal field data for the subsequent HCS hot cracking prediction. The model can be used to predict the influences of filler wire composition and welding parameters on HCS. The modeling results have been validated by comparing predictions with results from fully instrumented laser welds performed under a range of process parameters and analyzed using high-resolution X-ray tomography to identify weld defects. It is shown that the model is capable of accurately predicting the thermal field around the weld and the trend of HCS as a function of process parameters.

  16. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding To Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current joining technologies for automotive aluminum alloys are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum welded components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability utilizing a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  17. HIGH FREQUENCY INDUCTION WELDING OF HIGH SILICON STEEL TUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Miranda Alé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-Si steel is a low cost alternative for the fabrication of tubular structures resistant to atmospheric corrosion. However, the literature has often pointed out that steels presenting a higher Si content and/or a lower Mn/Si ratio have higher susceptibility to defects at the weld bond line during HFIW (High Frequency Induction Welding process, which has been widely used for manufacturing small diameter tubes. In this study the effect of the HFIW conditions on the quality of steel tubes with high-Si content and low Mn/Si ratio is investigated. The quality of welded tubes was determined by flare test and the defects in the bond line were identified by SEM. It has been found that higher welding speeds, V-convergence angles and power input should be applied in welding of high-Si steel, when compared to similar strength C-Mn steel.

  18. Friction Stir Welding Technology: Adapting NASA's Retractable Pin Tool

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    In late 1991, The Welding Institute (TWI), a British research and technology organization, invented and patented a welding process named Friction Stir Welding (FSW). Friction Stir Welding is a highly significant advancement in aluminum welding technology that can produce stronger, lighter, and more efficient welds than any previous process.

  19. Hybrid Friction Stir Welding of High-carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Don-Hyun Choi; Seung-Boo Jung; Chang-Yong Lee; Byung-Wook Ahn; Jung-Hyun Choi; Yun-Mo Yeon; Keun Song; Seung-Gab Hong; Won-Bae Lee; Ki-Bong Kang

    2011-01-01

    A high-carbon steel joint, SK5 (0.84 wt% C), was successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW), both without and with a gas torch, in order to control the cooling rate during welding. After welding, the weld zone comprised gray and black regions, corresponding to microstructural variation: a martensite structure and a duplex structure of ferrite and cementite, respectively. The volume fraction of the martensite structure and the Vickers hardness in the welds were decreased with the using of the gas torch, which was related with the lower cooling rate.

  20. Design of advanced ultrasonic transducers for welding devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrini, L

    2001-11-01

    A new high frequency ultrasonic transducer has been conceived, designed, prototyped, and tested. In the design phase, an advanced approach was used and established. The method is based on an initial design estimate obtained with finite element method (FEM) simulations. The simulated ultrasonic transducers and resonators are then built and characterized experimentally through laser interferometry and electrical resonance spectra. The comparison of simulation results with experimental data allows the parameters of FEM models to be adjusted and optimized. The achieved FEM simulations exhibit a remarkably high predictive potential and allow full control of the vibration behavior of the transducer. The new transducer is mounted on a wire bonder with a flange whose special geometry was calculated by means of FEM simulations. This flange allows the transducer to be attached on the wire bonder, not only in longitudinal nodes, but also in radial nodes of the ultrasonic field excited in the horn. This leads to a total decoupling of the transducer to the wire bonder, which has not been achieved so far. The new approach to mount ultrasonic transducers on a welding device is of major importance, not only for wire bonding, but also for all high power ultrasound applications and has been patented.

  1. Elucidation of phenomena in high-power fiber laser welding and development of prevention procedures of welding defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke

    2009-02-01

    Fiber lasers have been receiving considerable attention because of their advantages of high power, high beam quality and high efficiency, and are expected as one of the desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In our researches, therefore, the effects of laser powers and their densities on the weld penetration and the formation of sound welds were investigated in welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel, A5052 aluminum alloy or high strength steel plates with four laser beams of about 0.12 to 1 mm in focused spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were observed with high-speed video cameras and X-ray transmission real-time imaging system. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, but on the other hand at low welding speeds deeper-penetration welds could be produced at higher power. Laser-induced plume behavior and its effect on weld penetration, and the mechanisms of spattering, underfilling, porosity and humping were elucidated, sound welds without welding defects could be produced under the improved welding conditions. In addition, importance of the development of focusing optics and the removal of a plume during remote welding will be emphasized in terms of the stable production of constant deep-penetration welds and the reduction in welding defects in high power laser welding.

  2. TIG-dressing of High Strength Steel Butt Welded Connections. Part 1: Weld Toe Geometry and Local Hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld t

  3. TIG-dressing of high strength steel butt welded connections - Part 1: weld toe geometry and local hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld t

  4. Advanced Control Methods for Optimization of Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. S.

    Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) is a proces used for joining pieces of metal. Probably, the GMAW process is the most successful and widely used welding method in the industry today. A key issue in welding is the quality of the welds produced. The quality of a weld is influenced by several factors...

  5. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  6. Laser welding of stainless steel weld filler metals at high cooling rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Several stainless steels were laser welded under conditions resulting in high cooling rates of the welds. Significant changes in the microstructures, compared to those produced by conventional welding techniques, were found. For alloys 304, 308, 309, 316 and 347, a general decrease in ferrite content with increasing cooling rate was found. For three alloys (304, 308, 347), a fully austenitic structure was obtained at the highest cooling rates. For alloys 312 and 446, the high cooling rates retarded the formation of austenite, resulting in higher ferrite contents and fully ferritic structures at the highest cooling rates. Only for alloy 310 was the microstructure after laser welding comparable to that found after conventional welding. The results are discussed in terms of their impact on the Schaeffler diagram and its applicability to laser welding. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Residual stress analysis of aluminium welds with high energy synchrotron radiation at the HARWI II beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Torben; Martins, Rene V.; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In civil aircraft production advanced welding techniques, like laser beam welding or friction stir welding, are used to reduce weight and production costs. By the welding process residual stresses are introduced in the weld zone and the surrounding area. These stresses may depend on diverse factors and can have disadvantageous influence on the service performance of the weld. For strain scanning GKSS research centre built up the high energy materials science beamline HARWI II at HASYLAB. The use of high energetic photons from about 80 keV-120 keV enables diffraction experiments in transmission geometry, which provides the information about the macroscopic stresses. A large sample-detector-distance ensures a high angular resolution for the peak position determination. The heavy load diffractometer allows making use of massive sample environments. For example laser beam welded t- and butt-joints were investigated with high spatial resolution. The large grain size of the specimen makes the measurements with high spatial resolution more difficult due to the poor grain statistics. The influences of the gauge volume size and grain statistics on the strain measurements were systematically investigated. For the t-joint configuration two dimensional stress maps were calculated from the data. For the near future an in-situ FSW experiment is planed to investigate the metallophysical processes during the welding.

  8. Advanced High Power DC-DC Converter using A Novel Type Voltage Source Full-Bridge Soft-Switching PWM Inverter with High Frequency Transformer Link for Arc Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Keiki; Doi, Toshimitsu; Manabe, Haruhiko; Ahmed, Tarek; Hiraki, Eiji; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a new circuit topology of full-bridge soft-switching PWM inverter linked DC-DC power converter composed of conventional full-bridge high frequency PWM inverter with high frequency transformer and an active quasi-resonant snubber consisting of an additional power switching device in series with DC busline and a lossless capacitor in parallel with DC busline. Under this proposed high frequency soft-switching PWM inverter linked DC-DC converter, four power switches in the full-bridge arms and DC busline series switch can achieve ZVS at turn-off commutation. By developing the advanced soft-switching PWM high frequency inverter type DC-DC converter, although the conduction power loss of DC busline series power switch increases a little, the total turn-off switching loss of full-bridge high frequency inverter power modules can be sufficiently lowered more and more in the higher frequency range of 60kHz. As a result, when the switching frequency of high frequency inverter power stage using IGBT power modules is designed so as to be more than about 10kHz, the more the switching frequency of inverter increases, the more this high frequency soft-switching DC-DC converter has remarkable advantage as for the power conversion efficiency as compared with the conventional hard-switching PWM inverter DC-DC converter. Its practical effectiveness of high power density and high performance is actually proved for TIG arc welding equipment in industry.

  9. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  10. Optimal welding technology of high strength steel S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Arsic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented the detailed procedure for defining the optimal technology for welding the structures made of the high strength steel S690QL. That steel belongs into a group of steels with exceptional mechanical properties. The most prominent properties are the high tensile strength and impact toughness, at room and at elevated temperatures, as well. However, this steel has a negative characteristic - proneness to appearance of cold cracks.  That impedes welding and makes as an imperative to study different aspects of this steel's properties as well as those of eventual filler metal. Selection and defining of the optimal welding technology of this high strength steel is done for the purpose of preserving the favorable mechanical properties once the welded joint is realized; properties of the welded metal and the melting zone, as well as in the heat affected zone, which is the most critical zone of the welded joint.

  11. A Review: Welding Of Dissimilar Metal Alloys by Laser Beam Welding & Friction Stir Welding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Deepika Harwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar metals has attracted attention of the researchers worldwide, owing to its many advantages and challenges. There is no denial in the fact that dissimilar welded joints offer more flexibility in the design and production of the commercial and industrial components. Many welding techniques have been analyzed to join dissimilar metal combinations. The objective of this paper is to review two such techniques – Laser welding and Friction stir welding. Laser beam welding, a high power density and low energy-input process, employs a laser beam to produce welds of dissimilar materials. Friction stir welding, a solid-state joining process, is also successfully used in dissimilar welding applications like aerospace and ship building industries. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of these two welding processes in the field of dissimilar welding. Future aspects of the study are also discussed.

  12. TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF DEPOSIT WELDING AND GAS LASER CUTTING TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY OF THE BIMETALLIC TOOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burlachenko Oleg Vasil’evich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deposit welding is the application of a layer of metal on the surface of a product using fusion welding. In this paper, we consider the method of improving the technology of gas laser cutting, which makes it possible to achieve a high productivity of manufacturing a bimetallic tool. The present paper is concerned with the advantages of gas laser cutting which allows to consider this particular process of separating materials as highly-productive, low-waste, and advanced method of removing allowances of weld-deposit high-speed steel on the working surfaces of bimetallic tool. Urgency of the use of deposit welding and gas laser cutting to improve the efficiency of production of bimetallic tool is shown. The comparative analysis of gas-laser cutting and other cutting methods is given according to the geometrical parameters of cutting and surface quality. Analysis of the results of experimental studies has confirmed the high technological attractiveness and economic efficiency of manufacturing composite structures of punches and matrices when applying deposit welding of cutting parts with high-speed steels. The cost of dimensional processing of the welded cutting part is reduced by 4 to 6 times, while the manufacturing time is reduced by 6 to 12 times.

  13. Recent development of high efficiency arc welding systems in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    USHIO Masao; SUGITANI Yuji; TANAKA Manabu

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes recent trends to carry forward the automation in welding process in Japanese industries.The present situation on the introduction of computer integrated manufacturing is surveyed and its concept and relation among the constituent subsystems are shown.Also recent developments of arc welding processes and related tools are reviewed.They are as follows.1) Schematic image of the structure of computer integrated manufacturing system (CIM).2) Short descriptions for the trend of introducing CIM system.An example of multi-robot welding system in shipyard,virtual factory,network monitoring of welding quality,clarification of welder's skill.3) Development of high efficiency welding processes.Copper-less wire electrode,tandem large fillet welding,tandem pulse GMA welding,digital wire feeder with new push-pull system,overhead horizontal tandem GMA welding for ship bottom shell,one-sided fillet groove GMA welding for construction machinery,ultra-NGW hot wire GTA process,Al-alloy sheet welding with laser assisted AC pulsed MIG process.

  14. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Recep Çakır; Sare Çelik

    2015-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min) with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm) and three different weld speeds ...

  15. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu 608002 (India)], E-mail: visvabalu@yahoo.com; Ravisankar, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu 608002 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbag (P.O.), Hyderabad 560058 (India)

    2007-06-25

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility.

  16. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-10-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  17. Nanosecond pulsed laser welding of high carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascari, Alessandro; Fortunato, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    The present paper deals with the possibility to exploit low-cost, near infra-red, nanosecond pulsed laser sources in welding of high carbon content thin sheets. The exploitation of these very common sources allows to achieve sound weld beads with a good depth-to-width ratio and very small heat affected zones when the proper process parameters are involved. In particular the role of pulse frequency, pulse duration, peak power and welding speed on the characteristics of the weld beads is studied and the advantage of the application of short-pulse laser sources over traditional long-pulse or continuous wave one is assessed.

  18. Advanced Laser Transmission Welding Strategies for Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippo, V.; Jaeschke, P.; Brueggmann, M.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    Laser transmission welding can be used to join endless fibre reinforced thermoplastics. The welding temperature is affected by the heat conduction along carbon fibresand depends on the local orientation of the fibres in the weld seam and the laser welding technique itself. In these investigations the heat development during the welding with quasi-static temperature fields, which is a combination of two laser welding techniques, is evaluated and compared to welding with a homogenized intensity distribution. In order to optimize the temperature distribution over the weld seam width for both linear and curved weld seams, different scanning structures have beenadapted. The experiments were conducted with a diode laser emitting at a wavelength of 940 nm and the process was monitored by aninfrared camera. The used thermoplastics consist of laminates based on unidirectional carbon fibre reinforced polyphenylenesulfide. With the developed scanning structures, a near-homogeneous temperature distribution was generated over the width of the weld seam for curved weld seams, which is not possible by welding with a homogenized laser radiation intensity distribution.

  19. Effect of Active Gas on Weld Shape and Microstructure of Advanced A-TIG-Welded Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Nakhaei; Alireza Khodabandeh; Hamidreza Najafi

    2016-01-01

    Advanced A-TIG method was conducted to increase the weld penetration and compared with the conventional TIG welding process.A two-pipeline setup was designed to apply Ar + CO2 mixed gas as the outer layer,while pure argon was applied as the inner layer to prevent any consumption of the tungsten electrode.The results indicate that the presence of active gas in the molten pool led to the change in the temperature coefficient of surface tension so that the Marangoni convection turns inward and forms a deep weld zone.The increase in gas flow rate causes a decrease in the weld efficiency which is attributed to the increase in oxygen content in the weld pool and the formation of a thicker oxide layer on the weld surface.Moreover,the stir and the temperature fluctuation,led by double shielding gas,create more homogeneous nucleation sites in the molten pool so that a fine grain microstructure was obtained.

  20. Comparison of Post Weld Treatment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints in Medium Cycle Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2010-01-01

    the stress range can exceed the yield-strength of ordinary structural steel, especially when considering positive stress ratios (R > 0). Fatigue experiments and qualitative evaluation of the different post-weld treatments leads to the selection of TIG dressing. The process of implementing TIG dressing......This paper presents a comparison of three post-weld treatments for fatigue life improvement of welded joints. The objective is to determine the most suitable post-weld treatment for implementation in mass production of certain crane components manufactured from very high-strength steel....... The processes investigated are: burr grinding, TIG dressing and ultrasonic impact treatment. The focus of this investigation is on the so-called medium cycle area, i.e. 10 000-500 000 cycles and very high stress ranges. In this area of fatigue design, the use of very high strength steel becomes necessary, since...

  1. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk A. Fraser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges, being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS. A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  2. Optimization of Friction Stir Welding Tool Advance Speed via Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Friction Stir Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kirk A; St-Georges, Lyne; Kiss, Laszlo I

    2014-04-30

    Recognition of the friction stir welding process is growing in the aeronautical and aero-space industries. To make the process more available to the structural fabrication industry (buildings and bridges), being able to model the process to determine the highest speed of advance possible that will not cause unwanted welding defects is desirable. A numerical solution to the transient two-dimensional heat diffusion equation for the friction stir welding process is presented. A non-linear heat generation term based on an arbitrary piecewise linear model of friction as a function of temperature is used. The solution is used to solve for the temperature distribution in the Al 6061-T6 work pieces. The finite difference solution of the non-linear problem is used to perform a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS). A polynomial response surface (maximum welding temperature as a function of advancing and rotational speed) is constructed from the MCS results. The response surface is used to determine the optimum tool speed of advance and rotational speed. The exterior penalty method is used to find the highest speed of advance and the associated rotational speed of the tool for the FSW process considered. We show that good agreement with experimental optimization work is possible with this simplified model. Using our approach an optimal weld pitch of 0.52 mm/rev is obtained for 3.18 mm thick AA6061-T6 plate. Our method provides an estimate of the optimal welding parameters in less than 30 min of calculation time.

  3. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  4. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    distance equal to the thickness of the material being welded. The TSW process can be significantly improved by reducing the draw forces. This can be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the weld workpieces and the containment plates. High-power ultrasonic (HPU) vibrations of the containment plates achieve friction reduction in the TSW process. Furthermore, integration of the HPU energy into the TSW stir rod can increase tool life of the stir rod, and can reduce shear forces to which the stir rod is subjected during the welding process. TSW has been used to successfully join 0.500-in (˜13-mm) thick commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium 6AL- 4V, and titanium 6AL-4V ELI in weld joint lengths up to 9 ft (˜2.75-m) long. In addition, the TSW process was used to fabricate a sub-scale hexagonally shaped gun turret component for the U.S. Navy. The turret is comprised of six 0.5000-in (˜13-mm) thick angled welds. Each angled weld joint was prepared by machining the mating surfaces to 120deg. The angled weld joint was then fixtured using an upper and lower containment plate of the same geometry of the angled weld joint. The weld joint was then stirred by the stir rod as it and the upper and lower containment plates traverse through the angled joint prep.

  5. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji [Joining and Welding Research Institute (JWRI), Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2007-10-07

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 {mu}m in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 {mu}m spot diameter and 0.6 m min{sup -1} welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min{sup -1} with fibre laser beams of 360 {mu}m or 560 {mu}m in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min{sup -1} welding speed and 360 {mu}m spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively.

  6. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-10-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 µm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 µm spot diameter and 0.6 m min-1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min-1 with fibre laser beams of 360 µm or 560 µm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min-1 welding speed and 360 µm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively.

  7. Microstructure development of welding joints in high Cr ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubushiro, Keiji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morishima, Keiko [IHI Corporation (Japan). Research Lab.

    2010-07-01

    Creep failure in high Cr ferritic steels welding joints are Type IV failure. Type IV-failure was ruptured in fine grained region of heat affected zone, microstructure and phase transformation process at welding in fine grained region were very important to clarify. Microstructure difference of heat affected zone was investigated in Gr.91, Gr.92, Gr.122 welding joint. The fraction of 60 degree block boundary, packet boundary, random boundary (including prior gamma boundary) length was compared in three ferritic steels by EBSP(Electron Backscatter Diffraction Pattern) analysis. HAZ was almost fully martensite phase in Gr.122 weld joint. On the other hand, HAZ in Gr.91 welding joint were some equiaxial grain and martensite structure. (orig.)

  8. New development in welding thin-shell aluminum alloy structures with high strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文立; 范成磊; 方洪渊; 田锡唐

    2004-01-01

    From the viewpoint of welding mechanics, two new welding methods-welding with trailing peening and welding with trailing impactive rolling were introduced. For aluminum alloy thin-shell structures with high strength, welding will lead to hot cracking, poor joint and distortion. In order to solve them, trailing impactive device was used behind welding torch to impact the different positions of welded joints, thus realizing the welding with free-hot cracking, low distortion and joint strengthening. By use of impactive rolling wheels instead of peening heads, the outlook of welded specimen can be improved and stress concentration at weld toes can be reduced. Equipment of this technology is simple and portable. It can used to weld sheets, longitudinal and ring-like beams of tube-like structures, as well as the thin-shell structures with closed welds such as flanges and hatches. So the technology has the wide application foreground in the fields of aviation and aerospace.

  9. A new method for welding aluminum alloy LY12CZ sheet with high strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    From the viewpoint of welding mechanics, a new welding technology-trailing peening was applied firstly to weld aluminum alloy LY12CZ sheet with high susceptibility to hot cracking. Trailing peening can exert a transverse extrusion strain on the metal in brittle temperature region (BTR) which can compensate for the tensioning strain during the cooling procedure post welding. So, welding hot cracking of LY12CZ sheet can be controlled effectively on the special jig for hot cracking experiment, and the phenomenon of hot cracking can't be found in specimens with large dimensions finally. At the same time, welding with trailing peening can decrease welding distortion caused by longitudinal and transverse shrinkage of weld obviously. Due to strengthening the poor position-weld toe during the process of welding, the residual stress distribution of welded joint is more reasonable. Contrast with conventional welding, mechanical properties such as tensile strength, prolongation ratio and cold-bending angle of welded joint with trailing peening can be improved obviously, and rupture position of welded joint transits from weld toe at conventional welding to weld metal at trailing peening. So, welding with trailing peening can be regarded as a dynamic welding method with low stress, little distortion and hot cracking-free really. As far as theoretical analysis is concerned, the technology of trailing peening can be used to weld the materials with high susceptibility to hot cracking such as LY12CZ and LD10, and solve the welding distortion of thin plate-shell welded structures which contain closed welds such as flange. In addition, the technology of trailing peening has many advantages: simple device, high efficiency, low cost and flexible application which make the welding method have widely applied foreground in the field of aeronautics and aerospace.

  10. Effect of welding current and speed on occurrence of humping bead in high-speed GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ji; Wu Chuansong

    2009-01-01

    The developed mathematical model of humping formation mechanism in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is used to analyze the effects of welding current and welding speed on the occurrence of humping bead. It considers both the momentum and heat content of backward flowing molten jet inside weld pool. Three-dimensional geometry of weld pool, the spacing between two adjacent humps and hump height along humping weld bead are calculated under different levels of welding current and welding speed. It shows that wire feeding rate, power intensity and the moment of backward flowing molten jet are the major factors on humping bead formation.

  11. Development of Education Program for Okinawa Model Creative and Capable Engineers in Advanced Welding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yukio; Matsue, Junji; Makishi, Takashi; Higa, Yoshikazu; Matsuda, Shoich

    Okinawa National College of Technology proposed “Educational Program for Practically Skilled Engineers in Advanced Welding Technology in Okinawa Style” to the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry and was adopted as a 2-year project starting from 2005. This project designed to fit for the regional characteristics of Okinawa, aims to develop the core human resources program that will help reinforce and innovate the welding engineering in the manufacturing industries. In 2005, the education program and the original textbook were developed, and in 2006, a proof class was held to confirm the suitability and the effectiveness of the program and the textbook in order to improve the attendees' basics and the application ability of welding. The results were quite positive. Also, by collaborating with the Japan Welding Society, points scored in this course were authorized as the education points of IIW international welding engineer qualification.

  12. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ying, E-mail: yingzou@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the K–S orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the K–S relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: • Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. • Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. • K-S relationship of Widmanstätten austenite/ferrite wasn’t varied by oxide. • Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  13. ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

    2008-06-30

    The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/π, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack

  14. Reliable Welding of HSLA Steels by Square Wave Pulsing Using an Advanced Sensing (EDAP) Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-30

    situation is the result of welding on A710 steel . (A similar effect on welding on HY80 ?) The following is offered by Woods and Milner (Ref. 12): "The...AD-R69 762 RELIABLE MELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE MAVE PULSING 1/2 USING AN ADV NCED.. (U) APPLIED FUSION TECHNOLOGIES INC FORT COLLINS CO C...6 p . 0 Report 0001 AZ AD-A 168 762 I "RELIABLE WELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE WAVE PULSING USING AN ADVANCED SENSING (EDAP) TECHNIQUE- Preliminary

  15. Advances of orbital gas tungsten arc welding for Brazilian space applications – experimental setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Orlowski de Garcia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes details of the several steps of the technology involved for the orbital Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process of pure commercially titanium tubes. These pieces will be used to connect the several components of the propulsion system of the China-Brazilian Satellite CBERS, and is part of the Brazilian aerospace industry development. The implantation involved the steps of environment control; cut and facing of the base metal; cleaning procedures; piece alignment; choice of the type, geometry and installation of the tungsten electrode; system for the pressure of the purge gas; manual tack welding; choice of the welding parameters; and, finally, the qualification of welding procedures. Three distinct welding programs were studied, using pulsed current with increasing speed, continuous current and pulsed current with decreasing amperage levels. The results showed that the high quality criteria required to the aerospace segment is such that usual welding operations must be carefully designed and executed. The three welding developed programs generated welds free of defects and with adequate morphology, allowing to select the condition that better fits the Brazilian aerospace segment, and to be implanted in the welding of the CBERS Satellite Propulsion System.

  16. Gas and RRR distribution in high purity Niobium EB welded in Ultra-High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anakhov, S.; Singer, X.; Singer, W.; Wen, H.

    2006-05-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding in UHV (ultra-high vacuum, 10-5÷10-8 mbar) is applied in the standard fabrication of high gradient niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities of TESLA design. The quality of EB welding is critical for cavity performance. Experimental data of gas content (H2, O2, N2) and RRR (residual resistivity ratio) measurements in niobium (Nb) welding seams are presented. EB welding in UHV conditions allow to preserve low gas content (1÷3 wt. ppm hydrogen and 5÷7 ppm oxygen and nitrogen), essential for high values of RRR — 350÷400 units. Gas content redistribution in the electron beam welded and heat affected region take place in the welding process. Correlation between gas solubility parameters, RRR and thermal conductivity are presented. Mechanisms of gas solubility in EB welding process are discussed.

  17. Parametric optimisation and microstructural analysis on high power Yb-fibre laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J.; Chen, L.; Davies, C. M.; Dear, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this work thin sheets of Ti-6Al-4V were full penetration welded using a 5 kW fibre laser in order to evaluate the effectiveness of high power fibre laser as a welding processing tool for welding Ti-6Al-4V with the requirements of the aircraft industry and to determine the effect of welding parameters including laser power, welding speed and beam focal position on the weld microstructure, bead profile and weld quality. It involved establishing an understanding of the influence of welding parameters on microstructural change, welding defects, and the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM) of fibre laser welded joints. The optimum range of welding parameters which produced welds without cracking and porosity were identified. The influence of the welding parameters on the weld joint heterogeneity was characterised by conducting detailed microstructural analysis.

  18. Finite element analysis of residual stress in the welded zone of a high strength steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li Yajiang; Wang Juan; Chen Maoai; Shen Xiaoqin

    2004-04-01

    The distribution of the residual stress in the weld joint of HQ130 grade high strength steel was investigated by means of finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS software. Welding was carried out using gas shielded arc welding with a heat input of 16 kJ/cm. The FEM analysis on the weld joint reveals that there is a stress gradient around the fusion zone of weld joint. The instantaneous residual stress on the weld surface goes up to 800 ∼ 1000 MPa and it is 500 ∼ 600 MPa, below the weld. The stress gradient near the fusion zone is higher than any other location in the surrounding area. This is attributed as one of the significant reasons for the development of cold cracks at the fusion zone in the high strength steel. In order to avoid such welding cracks, the thermal stress in the weld joint has to be minimized by controlling the weld heat input.

  19. Simulation of welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Song WU; Michael RETHMEIER; Christopher SCHWENK

    2011-01-01

    @@ Welding has become the most important materials processing technology in manufacturing, and has critical effects on the quality, reliability and life of products as well as production cost, efficiency and response speed to market.As various kinds of high performance metallic materials are widely used in engineering, there are more demands in manufacturing industry for advanced welding technology.

  20. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2003-09-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented results concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the used laser systems the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  1. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  2. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry.

  3. Correlation of microstructure and fracture toughness of advanced 9Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Qian [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lu, Fenggui, E-mail: Lfg119@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Xia [Shanghai Turbine Plant of Shanghai Electric Power Generation Equipment Co. Ltd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Yang, Renjie [Shanghai Turbine Works Company, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cui, Haichao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Gao, Yulai, E-mail: ylgao@shu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steels, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-06-25

    In this paper, the fracture toughness and the related microstructure characteristics of dissimilarly welded joint manufactured by advanced 9Cr and CrMoV steels were systematically investigated. The dissimilarly welded joint was fabricated by narrow gap submerged arc welding (NG-SAW) applying multi-layer and multi-pass technique. Fracture toughness, as one of the most important property to assess the reliability of welded joint, was studied for different regions including CrMoV base metal (CrMoV-BM), heat affected zone (HAZ) of CrMoV side (CrMoV-HAZ), weld metal (WM), heat affected zone of 9Cr side (9Cr-HAZ) and 9Cr base metal (9Cr-BM). It was found that the fracture toughness of CrMoV-BM, CrMoV-HAZ and WM was better than that of 9Cr-HAZ and 9Cr-BM. In order to illustrate these results, the microstructure of the whole welded joint was observed by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) detailedly. It was found that the fine high-temperature tempered martensite and bainite in WM, CrMoV-BM and CrMoV-HAZ contribute to the higher fracture toughness, while lower fracture toughness for 9Cr-BM and HAZ was caused by coarse tempered lath-martensite. Furthermore, the fracture morphology showed that ductile fracture occurred in WM and CrMoV side, while brittle fracture appeared in BM and HAZ of 9Cr side.

  4. Magnetic fabric and welding processes in high-grade tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioli, L.; Ort, M.; Lanza, R.; Rosi, M.

    2003-04-01

    The welding fabric of tuffs is generally quantified through two main parameters: porosity and fiamme aspect ratio. However, these parameters are not useful for high-grade ignimbrites that display features indicating extensive rheomorphic flow, partial to complete obliteration of primary vitroclastic textures, and syn-depositional welding rather than load-related compaction. In this case, a 3D-microstructural characterization of the rock fabric is a fundamental proxy for the assessment of the dynamics and duration of welding processes. We have investigated the relations between magnetic fabric and welding textures in a rhyolitic, high-grade ignimbrite from the Sulcis volcanic District (SW Sardinia, Italy). The ignimbrite is characterized by dense welding throughout its preserved thickness and by regular lateral and vertical variations of welding, devitrification and vesiculation facies. Field and structural data indicate that syn-depositional welding and non-particulate (NP) flow were extensive and continuous during the emplacement of the ignimbrite. Paleomagnetic measurements of AMS, NRM, and AIRM of samples from the tuff indicate that the magnetic fabric is strain-sensitive and it is not significantly affected by post-depositional, static processes such as devitrification and vapor-phase alteration; in particular, magnetic susceptibility of the rock and the welding texture correlate well in terms of shape and orientation of the anisotropy ellipsoid. The direction of the K1 axis is indicative of the flow direction in the site of measurement. The anisotropy degree (P) increases with increasing welding and foliation (F) and lineation (L) are directly related to the strain facies. Onset of welding increased the degree of anisotropy and foliation; a non particulate, laminar flow stage further deformed the fabric stretching it along the flow direction and thus increasing L. The intensity of L is strictly related to the duration and the effect of simple shear (laminar

  5. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  6. Microstructure-property relationship in microalloyed high-strength steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-04-01

    High-strength steels are favoured materials in the industry for production of safe and sustainable structures. The main technology used for joining the components of such steel is fusion welding. Steel alloy design concepts combined with advanced processing technologies have been extensively investigated during the development of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) steels. However, very few studies have addressed the issue of how various alloy designs, even with limited microalloy addition, can influence the properties of high-strength steel welds. In high-strength steel welding practices, the challenges regarding microstructure evolution and the resulting mechanical properties variation, are of great interest. The main focus is the debate regarding the role of microalloy elements on phase transformation and weld performance. Limited Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) softening and limited austenite grain coarsening are significant design essentials, but the primary goal is to ensure excellent toughness and tensile properties in the steel weld. To achieve this purpose, microalloy elements such as Ti, Nb, or V were intentionally added to modern high-strength steels. The focus of this work was to understand the mechanical properties of HSLA steels resulting from differences in alloy design after joining by modern welding processes. To begin, three microalloyed S690QL steels (Nb, Ti, and Ti+V addition) were investigated. Optical microscopy confirmed that similar mixtures of tempered bainite and martensite predominated the parent microstructure in the three steels, different types of coarse microalloy precipitates were also visible. These precipitates were analysed by using a thermodynamic-based software and then identified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results of mechanical testing revealed that all three steels performed above the standard toughness and tensile strength values, but with varied yielding phenomena. During the welding operation, each of the three steels

  7. Gas and RRR Distribution in High Purity Niobium EB Welded in Ultra-High Vacuum.

    OpenAIRE

    Anakhov, S.; Singer, X.; W. Singer; Wen, H.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding in UHV (ultra-high vacuum, 10(-5) divided by 10(-8) mbar) is applied in the standard fabrication of high gradient niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities of TESLA design. The quality of EB welding is critical for cavity performance. Experimental data of gas content (H-2, O-2, N-2) and RRR (residual resistivity ratio) measurements in niobium (Nb) welding seams are presented. EB welding in UHV conditions allow to preserve low gas content (1 divided by 3...

  8. Advanced product design principles applied for developing a reconfigurable multi-station welding workbench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merticaru Vasile

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research results presented in the paper are part of a larger approach concerning the improvement of product design process sustainability by enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of Product Design activities. As case study, an applied educational project is exemplified as result sample, particularly referring to applying such advanced design principles in developing a reconfigurable multi-station welding workbench, intended to solve the problem of the lack of space which usually most of the welding workshops have to confront with.

  9. Advanced Techniques for In-Situ Monitoring of Phase Transformations During Welding Using Synchrotron-Based X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2005-06-05

    Understanding the evolution of microstructure in welds is an important goal of welding research because of the strong correlation between weld microstructure and weld properties. To achieve this goal it is important to develop a quantitative measure of phase transformations encountered during welding in order to ultimately develop methods for predicting weld microstructures from the characteristics of the welding process. To aid in this effort, synchrotron radiation methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. Using intense, highly collimated synchrotron radiation, the atomic structure of the weld heat affected and fusion zones can be probed in real time. Two synchrotron-based techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, have been developed for these investigations. These techniques have now been used to investigate welding induced phase transformations in titanium alloys, low alloy steels, and stainless steel alloys. This paper will provide a brief overview of these methods and will discuss microstructural evolution during the welding of low carbon (AISI 1005) and medium carbon (AISI 1045) steels where the different levels of carbon influence the evolution of microstructures during welding.

  10. An improved method to spot-weld difficult junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenz, Elizabeth E.; Amare, Andinet; Arumainayagam, Christopher R.

    2001-12-01

    Recent advances in spot-welding technology such as high frequency direct current inverter welders provide an improved and reproducible method to spot-weld difficult junctions. The importance of removing the oxide layers on metal surfaces, accurately delivering the weld pulse profile, and controlling the force applied to the materials during the welding process are discussed in the context of resistance spot-welding a molybdenum crystal to a tantalum loop and attaching a tungsten-rhenium thermocouple to the crystal.

  11. Predicting of bead undercut defects in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jing XU; Chuan-song WU; De-gang ZOU

    2008-01-01

    In the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, when the welding speed reaches a certain threshold, there will be an onset of weld bead undercut defects which limit the further increase of the welding speed. Establishing a mathematical model for high-speed GMAW to predict the tendency of bead undercuts is of great significance to pre-vent such defects. Under the action of various forces, the transferred metal from filler wire to the weld pool, and the geometry and dimension of the pool itself decide if the bead undercut occurs or not. The previous model simpli-fied the pool shape too much. In this paper, based on the actual weld pool geometry and dimension calculated from a numerical model, a hydrostatic model for liquid metal surface is used to study the onset of bead undercut defects in the high-speed welding process and the effects of dif-ferent welding parameters on the bead undercut tendency.

  12. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  13. Cold Cracking Of Underwater Wet Welded S355G10+N High Strength Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fydrych D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Water as the welding environment determines some essential problems influencing steel weldability. Underwater welding of high strength steel joints causes increase susceptibility to cold cracking, which is an effect of much faster heat transfer from the weld area and presence of diffusible hydrogen causing increased metal fragility. The paper evaluates the susceptibility to cold cracking of the high strength S355G10+N steel used, among others, for ocean engineering and hydrotechnical structures, which require underwater welding. It has been found from the CTS test results that the investigated steel is susceptible to cold cracking in the wet welding process.

  14. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior of high strength AA7075 aluminium alloy friction stir welds – Effect of post weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-12-01

    It was observed that the hardness and strength of weld were observed to be comparatively high in peak aged (T6 condition but the welds showed poor corrosion resistance. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved and the mechanical properties were maintained by RRA treatment. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved in RRA condition with the minimum loss of weld strength.

  15. An experimental study of high-hydrogen welding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fydrych, D.; Labonowski, J.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents investigation results of determination of the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal obtained by means of two most often used methods-the glycerin method and the mercury method. Relation has been defined between results of those methods in the area characteristic of low-hydrogen as well as high-hydrogen welding processes. Relations available in the literature do not include the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal greater than 35 ml/100 g. Extending the scope of analysis of the diffusible hydrogen quantity to an 80 ml/100 g level considerably simplifies carrying out the steel weldability assessment with the use of high-hydrogen processes and with welding in water environment. (Author)

  16. Characteristics of coated copper wire specimens using high frequency ultrasonic complex vibration welding equipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, J; Ihara, S; Harada, Y; Kasahara, K; Sakamaki, N

    2004-04-01

    Welding characteristic of thin coated copper wires were studied using 40, 60, 100 kHz ultrasonic complex vibration welding equipments with elliptical to circular vibration locus. The complex vibration systems consisted of a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter and a driving longitudinal vibration system. Polyurethane coated copper wires of 0.036 mm outer diameter and copper plates of 0.3 mm thickness and the other dimension wires were used as welding specimens. The copper wire part is completely welded on the copper substrate and the insulated coating material is driven from welded area to outsides of the wire specimens by high frequency complex vibration.

  17. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  18. A New Perspective on Fatigue Performance of Advanced High- Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Chiang, Dr. John [Ford Motor Company; Kuo, Dr. Min [MIttal Steel; Jiang, Cindy [AET Integration, Inc; Sang, Yan [AET Integration, Inc

    2008-01-01

    Weld fatigue performance is a critical aspect for application of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) in automotive body structures. A comparative study has been conducted to evaluate the fatigue life of AHSS welds. The material studied included seven AHSS of various strength levels - DP 600, DP 780, DP 980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron and fully hardened boron steels. Two conventional steels, HSLA 590 and DR 210, were also included for baseline comparison. Lap fillet welds were made on 2-mm nominal thick sheets by the gas metal arc welding process (GMAW). Fatigue test was conducted under a number of stress levels to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. It was found that, unlike in the static and impact loading conditions, the fatigue performance of AHSS is not influenced by the HAZ softening in AHSS. There are appreciable differences in the fatigue lives among different AHSS. Changes in weld parameters can influence the fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of these of higher strength AHSS. A model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. The validity of the model is benchmarked with the experimental results. This model is capable to capture the effects of weld geometry and weld microstructure and strength on the fatigue performance experimentally observed. The theoretical basis and application of the newly developed fatigue modeling methodology will be discussed.

  19. Investigations into the microstructure-toughness relation in high frequency induction welded pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, O. E.; Thibaux, P.; Liebeherr, M. [ArcelorMittal Global RnD Ghent, Zelzate, (Belgium); Yan, P.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H. [Material Science and Mettalurgy, University of Cambridge, (United Kingdom); Quidord, D. [ArcelorMittal Commercial FCE, Fos-sur-Mer, (France)

    2010-07-01

    High frequency induction is frequently used in the production of longitudinally welded pipes for gas transmission but there is some concern about the lower toughness of the weld metal. The HFI welds require in-line post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) to ensure better weld properties. This study investigated the effect of the high frequency induction (HFI) welding process and in-line post-weld heat treatment on weld properties. Tests were performed on HFI welded X65 pipes with a diameter of 24''. Mechanical properties of the pipes were evaluated using Charpy impact (V-notch) and tensile tests before and after PWHT. The EBSD technique was used to study the microtexture and grain structure of the welds. The results showed that the toughness of the bond line after PWHT was sufficiently high, but it is still lower than that of the base material. The coarse crystallographic grain size at the junction of the welds was found to be one of the main reasons for the low toughness.

  20. Initiation and growth of microcracks in high strength steel butt welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward

    1993-05-01

    Early tests such as the explosion bulge test created a preference for overmatched welds (welds which are stronger than the base metal) which eventually became codified for many structural applications. While an overmatched system offers advantages such as the shedding of strain to the base plate, it requires the use of expensive fabrication procedures to avoid cracking. Undermatched welding of some high strength steels may offer reductions in welding costs with little sacrifice in weld performance or low cycle fatigue integrity. An experimental study was carried out to observe microcrack initiation and growth of overmatched and undermatched butt welded high strength steel samples using globally elastic low cycle fatigue testing. First, 1 inch thick HY-80 and HY-100 base plates were multipass, spray gas metal arc welded (GMAW) with overmatching and undermatching filler metal using a semiautomatic welding machine. Second, 1/4 inch thick MIL-A-46100 high hardness armor plates (HHA) were manually, two pass spray GMAW welded with two grades of undermatching consumables. Weld reinforcements were removed from all HY specimens and six HHA specimens. All specimens had a crack initiator slit machined in the test section. The specimens were fatigue tested by transverse tensile loading with a 12 to 13 Hz tension-tension profile. The loading range was from 10% to 85% of the tensile strength of the HY steel base plate and HHA weld metal respectively. Crack initiation and propagation was observed in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope.

  1. A high-precision control system for robotic welding positioner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yu; Fan Ding; Chen Jianhong

    2005-01-01

    Aiming at the robotic welding positioner with characteristic of parameter change, load change, nonlinearity, and an intelligent control system was researched and developed. This control system used a two-mode controller that based on Fuzzy and PID control method. The results of simulation show that the dynamic and steady performances of the intelligent controller are better than that of single PID or Fuzzy controller. This paper has made a detail theoretical analysis of the constitution design and real-time controlled software and brought up the design and fulfillment method of multi-task real-time control software of high precisely and numerically controlled welding positioner , which has a good result in practice.

  2. Effect of weld schedule variation on the weldability and durability of AHSS spot weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, Eric Raymond

    Tensile strength testing and high cycle fatigue testing of advanced high strength steel spot welded shear lap joints were performed for the various weld conditions. The materials used in this study were DP 980, DP 780 and TRIP 780. The microstructure and microhardness of the shear lap joints were examined in an effort to identify the effect of microstructural changes on the strength and fatigue durability of the spot weld specimens. The occurrence of interfacial failure was recorded for the differing weld processes. Several weld schedules were examined and used to produce shear lap spot weld joints, specifically varying the squeeze force and the average current. The weld force used to produce a spot weld does not have a significant effect on the fracture mode of the specimen given the average current is constant. The average current used to produce a spot weld has a significant effect on the fracture mode of the spot weld for several squeeze forces. Interfacial failure of spot welded TRIP 780 can be mitigated using a certain range of currents when welding. This appears to come as a tradeoff for sacrificing the strength of the joint. Higher values of weld strength were obtainable; however, welds that failed with higher strengths also experienced interfacial failure. A fracture mechanics approach to estimating the high cycle fatigue life of the shear lap specimen is also proposed and represents a conservative estimate of the shear lap specimen durability.

  3. Welding Characteristics of Ultrasonic Wire Bonding Using High-Frequency Vibration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Mori, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Koichi

    1994-05-01

    Welding characteristics of ultrasonic wire bonding using 60 kHz, 90 kHz and 120 kHz complex vibration as well as 190 kHz linear vibration welding systems are studied. The locus shapes of the complex vibration welding tip are controlled from linear to elliptical or circular. Aluminum wire specimens of 0.1 mm diameter are welded successfully using complex and high-frequency welding equipment. The required vibration amplitudes of these complex vibration systems are about one-half to one-third and required weld time is shorter than those of a conventional system of linear vibration. The required vibration velocity of a high-frequency system is lower than that of a low-frequency system. The deformations of the welded specimens under adequate welding conditions are almost the same, even if the welding tip vibration locus is altered from linear to elliptical or circular, or the vibration frequency used is changed from 60 kHz to 190 kHz in the case where the same wire specimens are used. Using these methods, the weld strength of wire bonding becomes independent of the difference in the directions of the welding tip vibration and wire length.

  4. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual strain/stress distribution in the vicinity of high strength welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamák I.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses resulting from non homogeneous heat distribution during welding process belong to most significant factor influencing behavior of welded structures. These stresses are responsible for defect occurrence during welding and they are also responsible for crack initiation and propagation at the either static or dynamic load. The significant effect of weld metal chemical composition as well as the effect of fatigue load and local plastic deformation on residual stress distribution and fatigue life have been recognized for high strength steels welds. The changes in residual stress distribution have then positive effect on cold cracking behavior and also on fatigue properties of the welds [1-3]. Several experimental methods, both destructive and non-destructive, such as hole drilling method, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and others, have been used to examine residual stress distribution in all three significant orientations in the vicinity of the welds. The present contribution summarizes the results of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress distribution in the vicinity of single-pass high-strength-steel welds having different chemical composition as well as the influence of fatigue load and local plastic deformation. It has been observed that the chemical composition of the weld metal has a significant influence on the stress distribution around the weld. Similarly, by aplying both cyclic load or pre-stress load on the specimens, stress relaxation was observed even in the region of approximately 40 mm far from the weld toe.

  5. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  6. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çavdar, Uǧur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined.Soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia de polvos de metal compactados. Se ha realizado un estudio de la aplicación de polvos de metal (PM de base hierro compactados por soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia (UHFIW. Estos polvos de metal compactados se utilizan para producir engranajes. Este estudio investiga los métodos de uni.n de los materiales de PM con UHFIW en su aplicación en la industria. La máxima tensión y la máxima deformación de los polvos de metal compactados soldados fueron determinadas por flexión en tres puntos y prueba de resistencia. Se determinó la microdureza y la microestructura de los polvos compactados por soldadura por inducción.

  7. The Effect of Tool Position for Aluminum and Copper at High Rotational Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Çakır

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid state welding process used for welding similar and dissimilar materials. This welding technique allows welding of Aluminum alloys which present difficulties in fusion joining and allows different material couples to be welded continuously. In this study, 1050 aluminum alloy and commercially pure copper to increase heat input were produced at high rotation rate (2440 rev/min with four different pin position (0-1-1.5-2 mm and three different weld speeds (20-30-50 mm/min by friction stir welding. The influence of welding parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints was investigated. Tensile and bending tests and microhardness measurements were used to determine of mechanical properties. Nugget zone microstructures were investigated by optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM and were analyzed in energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Depending on the XRD analysis results intermetallic phase was observed to form in the interfacial region. In the tensile test results, 83.55% weld performance was obtained in the friction stir welding merge of Al-Cu.

  8. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure.

  9. High Rotation Speed Friction Stir Welding for 2014 Aluminum Alloy Thin Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujin; Zhou, Yang; Xue, Junrong; Ni, Ruiyang; Guo, Yue; Dong, Jianghui

    2017-03-01

    In this study, 2014 aluminum alloy sheets with 1 mm thickness are welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) robot under the condition of high rotation speed. When the high rotation speed of 10,000-16,500 rpm is applied, the lower axial pressure (less than 200 N) is obtained, which reduces stiffness requirements for equipment. Welding deformation is inevitable because high rotation speed can easily result in rapid heating rate and uneven heat input. The welding distortion caused by two cooling methods is measured, respectively, by laser range finder. The experimental results show that the welding distortion is smaller under the condition of water cooling. When the rotation speed is up to 15,000 rpm and welding speed 50-170 mm/min, the whole welding process is controllable. Under the higher rotation speed condition, the welding defects disappear gradually and more stable mechanical properties can be obtained up to 75% of base metal (ω = 16,000 rpm, ν = 110 mm/min). The results of different welding parameters demonstrate that the high rotation speed can increase material mixing and reduce the axial force (z force), and it can benefit lightweight sheet welding by using FSW robot.

  10. High Rotation Speed Friction Stir Welding for 2014 Aluminum Alloy Thin Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujin; Zhou, Yang; Xue, Junrong; Ni, Ruiyang; Guo, Yue; Dong, Jianghui

    2017-02-01

    In this study, 2014 aluminum alloy sheets with 1 mm thickness are welded successfully by friction stir welding (FSW) robot under the condition of high rotation speed. When the high rotation speed of 10,000-16,500 rpm is applied, the lower axial pressure (less than 200 N) is obtained, which reduces stiffness requirements for equipment. Welding deformation is inevitable because high rotation speed can easily result in rapid heating rate and uneven heat input. The welding distortion caused by two cooling methods is measured, respectively, by laser range finder. The experimental results show that the welding distortion is smaller under the condition of water cooling. When the rotation speed is up to 15,000 rpm and welding speed 50-170 mm/min, the whole welding process is controllable. Under the higher rotation speed condition, the welding defects disappear gradually and more stable mechanical properties can be obtained up to 75% of base metal (ω = 16,000 rpm, ν = 110 mm/min). The results of different welding parameters demonstrate that the high rotation speed can increase material mixing and reduce the axial force (z force), and it can benefit lightweight sheet welding by using FSW robot.

  11. Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks for High Volume Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Carlson, Blair; Carsley, John; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Eisenmenger, Mark

    2014-02-04

    A Design of Experiment based approach is used to systematically investigate relationships between 8 different welding factors (4 related to tool geometry, 4 related to weld process control) and resulting weld properties including strength, elongation and formability in 1.2mm-2mm thick friction stir welding of AA5182-O for TWB application. The factors that result in most significant effects are elucidated. The interactions between several key factors like plunge depth, tool tilt, pin feature and pin length on the overall weld quality is discussed. Appropriate levels of factors that lead to excellent weld properties are also identified.

  12. Development of Finite Element Forulations for High-Fidelity Polycrystals and Damage Avoidance in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    simulate friction stir welding processes with a focus on computing conditions that lead to the formation and...focused on advancing the technology of friction stir welding (FSW) in shipbuilding. We developed finite element based simulation methods that can help... simulation capability we com- puted the sensitivity of defect formation to a number of variables associated with friction stir welding , including pin

  13. Microstructure and high temperature properties of the dissimilar weld between ferritic stainless steel and carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Kil; Hong, Seung Gab; Kang, Ki Bong; Kang, Chung Yun

    2009-10-01

    Dissimilar joints between STS441, a ferritic stainless steel, and SS400, a carbon steel, were welded by GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) using STS430LNb as a welding wire. The fracture behavior of the dissimilar weld was analyzed by a microstructural observation and thermo-mechanical tests. Martensite was formed at the region between SS400 and the weld metal because the Cr and Nb content in this region decreased due to the dilution of SS400 carbon steel during welding. According to results from a high temperature tensile test with a specimen aged at 900 °C, it was found that the tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature was equal to that of STS441 base metal and the formation of martensite had little influence on tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature. However, in the case of thermal fatigue resistance, the dissimilar weld had an inferior thermal fatigue life to STS441 because of the presence of martensite and the softened region around the interface between the dissimilar weld metal and SS400.

  14. Analysis Microstructure of Weld Metal for HQ130+QJ63 High Strength Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The microstructure in the weld metals for HQ130+QJ63 high strength steels, which are welded by Ar-CO2 gas shielded metal arc welding, was analyzed by means of microscope and scan electron microscope (SEM). The relative content of different microstructure was evaluated with XQF-2000 micro-image analyzer. The effect of acicular ferrite content on the impact toughness was also studied. The test results indicated that the main microstructure in the weld metals of HQ130+QJ63 high strength steels is acicular ferrite and a few pro-eutectic ferrite on the boundary of original austenite grain. Near the fusion zone there are columnar grains whose direction coefficient (X) is 3.22, but the microstructure in the center of the weld metal is isometric grain, whose direction coefficient X=1. In order to avoid welding crack and improve welding technology the weld heat input should be strictly controlled in 10-16 kJ/cm. Thus, the main microstructure in the weld metals is fine acicular ferrite and the content of pro-eutectic ferrite is limited. The impact toughness in the weld metals of HQ130+QJ63 steels can be ensured and can meet the requirements for application in engineering and machinery.

  15. Non vacuum electron beam welding of zinc coated high-strength steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, F.W.; Beniyash, A.; Lau, K.; Versemann, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Materials Science

    2005-07-01

    Due to the requirement of conservation of nature and natural resources, today more and more high-strength steels are applied for modern concepts of lightweight construction in auto body manufacturing. For a better corrosion protection mainly hot-dip galvanized sheets or electrolytically coated sheets are used. Non Vacuum Electron Beam Welding (NVEBW) offers several technological and economical advantages for joining zinc coated sheets, which are presented in this paper. The results are based on extensive welding investigations that were performed with the 175 kV-NVEBW machine at Institute of Materials Science, University of Hanover. Different zinc coated steels (microalloyed steel, dualphase steel, residualaustenite steel, complexphase steel, martensitic steel) with sheet thicknesses between 0.8-2.0 mm were welded. A main focus of the work is to investigate the influence of the zinc coating on the welding behaviour at different seam geometries (butt joint, edge-raised seam, lap joint, fillet weld, tailored blank). Up to welding speeds of 10 m/min welds with good properties were obtained. In some cases (lap joints, edge raised seams) it is necessary to weld with a weld gap for zinc evaporation. But it turned out that NVEBW has a wide tolerance concerning the gap width. Furthermore, the presentation shows the results of extensive mechanical tests to NVEBW-welded high-strength steels, especially to hardness tests, tensile tests and forming investigations. (orig.)

  16. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  17. Characteristics in Paintability of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ha Sun [POSLAB, POSCO, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    It is expected that advanced high strength steels (AHSS) would be widely used for vehicles with better performance in automotive industries. One of distinctive features of AHSS is the high value of carbon equivalent (Ceq), which results in the different properties in formability, weldability and paintability from those of common grade of steel sheets. There is an exponential relation between Ceq and electric resistance, which seems also to have correlation with the thickness of electric deposition (ED) coat. higher value of Ceq of AHSS lower the thickness of ED coat of AHSS. Some elements of AHSS such as silicon, if it is concentrated on the surface, affect negatively the formation of phosphates. In this case, silicon itself doesn't affect the phosphate, but its oxide does. This phenomenon is shown dramatically in the welding area. Arc welding or laser welding melts the base material. In the process of cooling of AHSS melt, the oxides of Si and Mn are easily concentrated on the surface of boundary between welded and non welded area because Si and Mn cold be oxidized easier than Fe. More oxide on surface results in poor phosphating and ED coating. This is more distinctive in AHSS than in mild steel. General results on paintability of AHSS would be reported, being compared to those of mild steel

  18. Variable polarity arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  19. Fatigue Performance of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) GMAW Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Sang, Yan [AET Integration, Inc; Jiang, Cindy [AET Integration, Inc; Chiang, Dr. John [Ford Motor Company; Kuo, Dr. Min [MIttal Steel

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue performance of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joints of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are compared and analyzed. The steel studied included a number of different grades of AHSS and baseline mild steels: DP600, DP780, DP980, M130, M220, solution annealed boron steel, fully hardened boron steels, HSLA690 and DR210 (a mild steel). Fatigue testing was conducted under a number of nominal stress ranges to obtain the S/N curves of the weld joints. A two-phase analytical model is developed to predict the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. It was found that there are appreciable differences in the fatigue S/N curves among different AHSS joints made using the same welding practices, suggesting that the local microstructure in the weld toe and root region plays non-negligible role in the fatigue performance of AHSS welds. Changes in weld parameters can influence the joint characteristics which in turn influence fatigue life of the weld joints, particularly of those of higher strength AHSS. The analytical model is capable of reasonably predicting the fatigue performance of welds made with various steel grades in this study.

  20. Change of Hot Cracking Susceptibility in Welding of High Strength Aluminum Alloy AA 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, M.; Hofmann, K.; Mann, V.; Hugger, F.; Roth, S.; Schmidt, M.

    High strength aluminum alloys are known as hard to weld alloys due to their high hot crack susceptibility. However, they have high potential for applications in light weight constructions of automotive industry and therefore it is needed to increase weldability. One major issue is the high hot cracking susceptibility. Vaporization during laser beam welding leads to a change of concentration of the volatile elements magnesium and zinc. Hence, solidification range of the weld and therefore hot cracking susceptibility changes. Additionally, different welding velocities lead to changed solidification conditions with certain influence on hot cracking. This paper discusses the influence of energy per unit length during laser beam welding of AA 7075 on the change of element concentration in the weld seam and the resulting influence on hot cracking susceptibility. Therefore EDS-measurements of weld seams generated with different velocities are performed to determine the change of element concentration. These quantitative data is used to numerically calculate the solidification range in order to evaluate its influence on the hot cracking susceptibility. Besides that, relative hot crack length and mechanical properties are measured. The results increase knowledge about welding of high strength aluminum alloy AA 7075 and hence support further developing of the welding process.

  1. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of steel weld joints after long time exposures at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandová, D.; Kasl, J.; Rek, A.

    2010-02-01

    The structural changes of three trial weld joints of creep resistant modified 9Cr-1Mo steels and low alloyed chromium steel after post-weld heat treatment and long-term creep tests were investigated. Smooth cross-weld specimens ruptured in different zones of the weld joints as a result of different structural changes taking place during creep exposures. The microstructure of the weld joint is heterogeneous and consequently microstructural development can be different in the weld metal, the heat affected zone, and the base material. Precipitation reactions, nucleation and growth of some particles and dissolution of others, affect the strengthening of the matrix, recovery at high temperatures, and the resulting creep resistance. Therefore, a detailed study of secondary phase's development in individual zones of weld joints can elucidate mechanism of cracks propagation in specific regions and the causes of creep failure. Type I and II fractures in the weld metal and Type IV fractures in the fine prior austenite grain heat affected zones occurred after creep tests at temperatures ranging from 525 to 625 °C and under stresses from 40 to 240 MPa. An extended metallographic study of the weld joints was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were prepared from individual weld joint regions and quantitative evaluation of dislocation substructure and particles of secondary phases has been performed.

  2. Study of Dynamic Features of Surface Plasma in High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王腾; 高向东; Katayatna SEIJI; 金小莉

    2012-01-01

    High-speed photography was used to obtain the dynamic changes in the surface plasma during a high-power disk laser welding process. A color space clustering algorithm to extract the edge information of the surface plasma region was developed in order to improve the accuracy of image processing. With a comparative analysis of the plasma features, i.e., area and height, and the characteristics of the welded seam, the relationship between the surface plasma and the stability of the laser welding process was characterized, which provides a basic understanding for the real-time monitoring of laser welding.

  3. High-cycle Fatigue Properties of Alloy718 Base Metal and Electron Beam Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Nagashima, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Hideshi; Ogata, Toshio; Nagao, Naoki

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Alloy 718 plate and its electron beam (EB) welded joint were investigated at 293 K and 77 K under uniaxial loading. At 293 K, the high-cycle fatigue strength of the EB welded joint with the post heat treatment exhibited somewhat lower values than that of the base metal. The fatigue strengths of both samples basically increased at 77 K. However, in longer life region, the EB welded joint fractured from a blow hole formed in the welded zone, resulting in almost the same fatigue strength at 107 cycles as that at 293 K.

  4. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  5. Cladding of High Mn Steel on Low C Steel by Explosive Welding

    OpenAIRE

    ACARER, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    High Mn steel containing about 16% Mn was cladded to a low C steel by explosive welding. The experimental results showed that the bonding interface has a wavy morphology; the welding interface has the characteristics of both sharp transition and local melted zones between 2 metals. Hardness increased near the welding interface due to excess plastic deformation in the explosion area and phase transformation from g (f.c.c.) to a (b.c.c.).

  6. Process of friction-stir welding high-strength aluminum alloy and mechanical properties of joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王大勇; 冯吉才; 郭德伦; 孙成彬; 栾国红; 郭和平

    2004-01-01

    The process of friction-stir welding 2A12CZ alloy has been studied. And strength and elongation tests have been performed, which demonstrated that the opportunity existed to manipulate friction-stir welding parameters in order to improve a range of material properties. The results showed that the joint strength and elongation arrived at their parameters changing, joint tensile strength and elongation had similar development. Hardness measurement indicated that the weld was softened. However, there was considerable difference in softening degree for different joint zone. The weld top had lower hardness and wider softening zone than other zone of the weld. And softening zone at advancing side was wider than that at retreating side.

  7. Effect of pulsed current welding on fatigue behaviour of high strength aluminium alloy joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India)], E-mail: visvabalu@yahoo.com; Ravisankar, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbag (P.O), Hyderabad 560 058 (India)

    2008-07-01

    High strength aluminium alloys (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys) have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 6 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing single pass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt%)) grade aluminium alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Fatigue properties of the welded joints have been evaluated by conducting fatigue test using rotary bending fatigue testing machine. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit.

  8. Strength analysis of laser welded lap joint for ultra high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young Cheol; Kim, Cheol Hee; Cho, Young Tae; Jung, Yoon Gyo

    2013-12-01

    Several industries including the automotive industry have recently applied the process of welding high strength steel. High strength steel is steel that is harder than normal high strength steel, making it much stronger and stiffer. HSS can be formed in pieces that can be up to 10 to 15 percent thinner than normal steel without sacrificing strength, which enables weight reduction and improved fuel economy. Furthermore, HSS can be formed into complex shapes that can be welded into structural areas. This study is based on previous experiments and is aimed at establishing the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel. Research on the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel is conducted by using Solid Works, a program that analyzes the stress of a virtual model. In conclusion, we found that the stress distribution is changed depending on the shape of welded lap joint. In addition, the Influence of the stress distribution on welded high strength steel can be used to standard for high energy welding of high strength steel, and we can also predict the region in welded high strength steel that may cracked.

  9. Characterization of magnetically impelled arc butt welded T11 tubes for high pressure applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivasankari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically impelled arc butt (MIAB welding is a pressure welding process used for joining of pipes and tubes with an external magnetic field affecting arc rotation along the tube circumference. In this work, MIAB welding of low alloy steel (T11 tubes were carried out to study the microstructural changes occurring in thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ. To qualify the process for the welding applications where pressure could be up to 300 bar, the MIAB welds are studied with variations of arc current and arc rotation time. It is found that TMAZ shows higher hardness than that in base metal and displays higher weld tensile strength and ductility due to bainitic transformation. The effect of arc current on the weld interface is also detailed and is found to be defect free at higher values of arc currents. The results reveal that MIAB welded samples exhibits good structural property correlation for high pressure applications with an added benefit of enhanced productivity at lower cost. The study will enable the use of MIAB welding for high pressure applications in power and defence sectors.

  10. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  11. The high frequency characteristics of laser reflection and visible light during solid state disk laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiangdong; You, Deyong; Katayama, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Optical properties are related to weld quality during laser welding. Visible light radiation generated from optical-induced plasma and laser reflection is considered a key element reflecting weld quality. An in-depth analysis of the high-frequency component of optical signals is conducted. A combination of a photoelectric sensor and an optical filter helped to obtain visible light reflection and laser reflection in the welding process. Two groups of optical signals were sampled at a high sampling rate (250 kHz) using an oscilloscope. Frequencies in the ranges 1-10 kHz and 10-125 kHz were investigated respectively. Experimental results showed that there was an obvious correlation between the high-frequency signal and the laser power, while the high-frequency signal was not sensitive to changes in welding speed. In particular, when the defocus position was changed, only a high frequency of the visible light signal was observed, while the high frequency of the laser reflection signal remained unchanged. The basic correlation between optical features and welding status during the laser welding process is specified, which helps to provide a new research focus for investigating the stability of welding status.

  12. Technology of Laser Welding-recent Advances of Research and Application in Aerospace%激光焊接技术研究进展及其在航天领域的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵耀邦; 徐爱杰; 姜勇; 成群林; 李中权

    2013-01-01

      综述了大功率光纤激光焊、激光-电弧复合焊、双光束激光焊、激光熔钎焊等高效、高适应激光焊接技术特点及其研究进展,介绍了激光焊接技术在导弹发射箱、导弹弹体结构、火箭发动机等航天领域的工程化应用。全面地梳理和总结了激光焊接技术研究进展及其在航天领域的应用。%  High efficient and adaptable laser welding methods, such as high power laser welding, laser-arc hybrid welding, dual beam laser welding, laser welding-brazing were summarized. The application of laser welding technology in aerospace manufacturing such as missile launcher, missile structure and rocket motor etc. were introduced. Recent advances of laser welding and its application in aerospace were comprehensively reviewed.

  13. Prediction of solidification and phase transformation in weld metals for welding of high performance stainless steels; Kotaishoku kotainetsu stainless koyo yosetsu kinzoku no gyoko hentai no yosoku gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, T.; Inoue, H.; Morimoto, H.; Okita, S. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    Prediction technology is introduced on the solidification and transformation of weld metals used for high performance stainless steel. A model has been developed which uses Thermo Calc, a multiple balanced calculation program, as a means to analyze the solidification of multi-component alloys including the polyphase solidification such as eutectic and peritectic. Verification has been in progress concerning the adequacy of this model and the adaptability as a practical steel. The following are the prediction technologies for solidification and transformation which have been derived from experiments and applied to welding techniques: the effects of nitrogen on the solidification mode and residual {gamma}quantity of a welding metal that is required for controlling the welding/solidification of high nitrogen content {gamma}system stainless steel; the structural control of weld metal for high corrosion resistance high Mo stainless steel, in which high Ni and high Mo contents are indispensable for attaining the optimum structure; the structural control of weld metal for two-phase stainless steel containing Mo and N, in which it is essential to secure a high nitrogen content and a {delta}/{gamma}phase balance in a weld metal; and the precipitation prediction of intermetallic compound in a high alloy weld metal for a high alloy stainless steel, for which an explanation is there by Cieslak et al. based on the phase stability theory. 22 refs., 16 figs.

  14. Plasma ARC Welding of High-Performance-Ship Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    the work piece dur- ing welding. During the course of development by industry of the plasma arc process as a welding tool, v&rious orifice...point for the intended keyhole weld although, of course , minor modification to the travel speed may have to be made. The curves may be used to estimate...8217 : ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. TABLE 2 - TENSILE TEST RESULTS SpOC imun Ytlld Strounth T’n mil• StrIe lngth I|loniinttirol Lwait IL’ ,i ifr pin

  15. Fine micro-welding of thin metal sheet by high speed laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Gillner, Arnold; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gedicke, Jens; Uno, Yoshiyuki

    2007-05-01

    Recently, since the size of component becomes smaller, then the welding of thin metal sheet has been required. Besides, the flexibility of process is important according to the accessibility especially for small components. Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology had developed the SHADOW ® welding technology, in which the high speed joining with small distortion is possible using pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The possibility of high speed and high quality welding had been reported by using single-mode fiber laser. The combination of micro beam and high speed laser scanning has the advantages for thin metal sheet welding. Therefore, the characteristics of micro-welding for thin metal sheet were investigated by high speed laser scanning, in which the welding was carried out by high speed scanner system with single-mode fiber laser and pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The proper welding region was narrow by the laser beam with a large focus diameter of 160 μm without pulse control, while a small focus diameter of 22 μm can control the welding state widely. A small focus diameter can perform the excellent welding seam from the extreme beginning without pulse control. The penetration depth can be controlled by the energy density with a small focus diameter of 22 μm at the energy densities less than 1 J/mm2. Besides, the unique periodic structure appeared at the high velocity of beam scanning with a small focus diameter. Moreover, the overlap welding of 25 μm thickness sheet can be performed regardless of small gap distance between two sheets by the laser beam with a small focus diameter of 22 μm.

  16. Microstructure characterization in the weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wang Juan; Li Yajiang

    2003-04-01

    Microstructural characterization of the weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels, welded under 80% Ar + 20% CO2 gas shielded metal arc welding and different weld heat inputs, was carried out by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The relative contents of acicular ferrite (AF) and pro-eutectic ferrites (PF) in the weld metals were evaluated by means of XQF-2000 micro-image analyser. The experimental results indicate that there is acicular ferrite in the grain and some pro-eutectic ferrite on the boundary of original austenite grains when the weld heat input is small ( = 9.6 kJ/cm), but the main microstructure is ferrite side plate (FSP) when the heat input is larger ( = 22.3 kJ/cm). So the weld heat input should be strictly controlled in the range 10 ∼ 20 kJ/cm and then the content of pro-eutectic ferrite is limited to $\\lt$ 25%. Thus weld metals of HQ130 + QJ63 high strength steels with high toughness and excellent resistance to cracking can be ensured.

  17. Quality Monitoring for Laser Welding Based on High-Speed Photography and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the prediction ability of welding quality during high-power disk laser welding, a new approach was proposed and applied in the classification of the dynamic features of metal vapor plume. Six features were extracted through the color image processing method. Three features, including the area of plume, number of spatters, and horizontal coordinate of plume centroid, were selected based on the classification accuracy rates and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. A support vector machine model was adopted to classify the welding quality status into two categories, good or poor. The results demonstrated that the support vector machine model established according to the selected features had satisfactory prediction and generalization ability. The classification accuracy rate was higher than 90%, and the model could be applied in the prediction of welding quality during high-power disk laser welding.

  18. An experimental study of high-hydrogen welding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fydrych, Dariusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigation results of determination of the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal obtained by means of two most often used methods-the glycerin method and the mercury method. Relation has been defined between results of those methods in the area characteristic of low-hydrogen as well as high-hydrogen welding processes. Relations available in the literature do not include the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal greater than 35 ml/100 g. Extending the scope of analysis of the diffusible hydrogen quantity to an 80 ml/100 g level considerably simplifies carrying out the steel weldability assessment with the use of high-hydrogen processes and with welding in water environment.Este trabajo presenta los resultados de una investigación sobre la determinación del contenido de hidrógeno difusible en el material aportado mediante dos métodos: el de la glicerina (el más utilizado y el del mercurio. El contenido de dicho hidrógeno se ha definido a partir de los resultados de esos métodos en una zona con bajo contenido en hidrógeno, así como procesos de soldadura con alto contenido en hidrógeno. No hay datos disponibles en la literatura para contenidos de hidrógeno difusible en metal depositado mayores de 35 ml/100 g. Ampliando el análisis de la cantidad de dicho hidrógeno hasta los 80 ml/100 g, se simplifica considerablemente la realización de ensayos de soldabilidad del acero en procesos de alto contenido en hidrógeno así como en la soldadura en medio acuoso.

  19. The pipes for gas and oil pipelines mains one-sided high-speed welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Вікторович Щетинін

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic theory of the undercuts formation under the arc magnetic field action according to which as welding speed increases cooling intensifies and arc diameter reduces, induction and magnetic pressure increase, pinch-effect amplifies, has been proved. The arc concentrates, heat input and the pool side edges electrical resistance reduce with the result that current through the side walls and a downward electromagnetic force, under the action of which the liquid metal flows from the pool edges, increase and the undercuts form. In high-speed welding a composite electrode as compared with the wire electrode the heat input into the side edges and their electrical resistance increase; current and induction at the pool side edges and the electromagnetic force decrease that providing the seams qualitative formation and confirming the electromagnetic theory of the undercuts. With welding speed increasing the weld pool molten metal crystallization rate increases in proportion to it, microstructure gets reduced and welding stresses decrease, that providing the welds joints toughness rise. By increasing welding speed due to deflection rearward the arc pressure decreases, the molten metal movement rate into the back part of the pool grows, that resulting in the molten metal hydrodynamic pressure reduction. Due to simultaneous reduction of the arc pressure, of the downward electromagnetic force and of the molten metal hydrodynamic pressure, the crystallization rate increase and the pool molten state time reduction the backing bead formation on the melt backing improves greatly at the high-speed welding. The energy-saving process of one-sided high-speed welding of the pipes for gas and oil pipelines on the melt backing with the use of glass flux by means of a composite electrode, which provides quality and the welded joints toughness increase, has been developed

  20. Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

    2014-05-01

    High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

  1. Root causes for failures in flattening test in high frequency induction welded steel pipe mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babakri, Khalid Ali [Saudi Steel Pipe Company, Dammam, (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-07-01

    The flattening test is used to test weld integrity in high frequency induction welded (HFIW) steel pipe mills. The flattening test failures happen mostly with the formation of oxides in the weld area during HFIZ process. This study investigated the root causes for failure in flattening test due to improper process control in the HFIW steel pipe mill. Several flattening tests have been carried out on API 5L X60 steel pipes with various chemical compositions and various procedures (height of the ductility test). A microstructure analysis was also established (EDAX analysis). Based on the experimental data, it is found that the mills can improve flattening test performance by applying various policies. It is proposed that the acceptance criteria in the international specifications related to the test of weld ductility be modified. The reasonable height for measuring weld ductility is usually at two thirds of the specified outside diameter of the pipe.

  2. Simulation of three-dimensional stress field in welding process of high-frequency welded pipe%高频焊管在焊接过程中三维应力场的模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何世权; 刘飞; 徐德怀; 钟辉

    2011-01-01

    In the production process of high-frequency welded pipe, the elimination of the high-frequency welding residual stresses caused by high-frequency welding is an important working operation. A knowledge of the residual stress of the welded pipe in advance of welding is significant for the residual stress elimination. Making use of APDL language embedded in ANSYS, a finite element model of high-frequency welded pipe was established. Then the linear thermal source model was used to conduct the computation.Meantime, the thermal boundary conditions and the physical structure of the constraints of this finite element model were also taken into account, so that the three-dimensional stress field and displacement field could be obtained for the high-frequency pipe welding process. From the analysis of result of the finite element simulation, the stress field and displacement field of the welded pipe could be theoretically obtained in advance of the stress relief process.%在高频焊管生产过程中,消除因高频焊接造成的焊管残余应力是一项重要的工序,预先得出焊管残余应力场对于消除焊管残余应力具有指导意义.利用ANSYS参数化语言APDL,建立高频焊管的有限元模型,采用高频焊接线热源模型进行计算,同时考虑高频焊管有限元模型的热边界条件及物理结构约束,从而获得高频焊管在焊接过程中三维应力场及位移场.通过对有限元模拟结果的分析,可以从理论上得出焊管在进行消除残余应力工序前的应力和位移分布.

  3. Effect of welding processes on mechanical and microstructural characteristics of high strength low alloy naval grade steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ragu Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Naval grade high strength low alloy (HSLA steels can be easily welded by all types of fusion welding processes. However, fusion welding of these steels leads to the problems such as cold cracking, residual stress, distortion and fatigue damage. These problems can be eliminated by solid state welding process such as friction stir welding (FSW. In this investigation, a comparative evaluation of mechanical (tensile, impact, hardness properties and microstructural features of shielded metal arc (SMA, gas metal arc (GMA and friction stir welded (FSW naval grade HSLA steel joints was carried out. It was found that the use of FSW process eliminated the problems related to fusion welding processes and also resulted in the superior mechanical properties compared to GMA and SMA welded joints.

  4. Residual Stresses in Inertia-Friction-Welded Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, R. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Steuwer, A.; Iqbal, N.; Preuss, M.; Bray, S. E.; Rawson, M.

    2009-09-01

    The welding of dissimilar alloys is seen increasingly as a way forward to improve efficiencies in modern aeroengines, because it allows one to tailor varying material property demands across a component. Dissimilar inertia friction welding (IFW) of two high-strength steels, Aermet 100 and S/CMV, has been identified as a possible joint for rotating gas turbine components and the resulting welds are investigated in this article. In order to understand the impact of the welding process and predict the life expectancy of such structures, a detailed understanding of the residual stress fields present in the welded component is needed. By combining energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction (EDSXRD) and neutron diffraction, it has been possible to map the variations in lattice spacing of the ferritic phase on both sides of two tubular Aermet 100-S/CMV inertia friction welds (as-welded and postweld heat-treated condition) with a wall thickness of 37 mm. Laboratory-based XRD measurements were required to take into account the variation in the strain-free d-spacing across the weld region. It was found that, in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) slightly away from the weld line, residual stress fields showed tensile stresses increasing most dramatically in the hoop direction toward the weld line. Closer to the weld line, in the plastically affected zone, a sharp drop in the residual stresses was observed on both sides, although more dramatically in the S/CMV. In addition to residual stress mapping, synchrotron XRD measurements were carried out to map microstructural changes in thin slices cut from the welds. By studying the diffraction peak asymmetry of the 200- α diffraction peak, it was possible to demonstrate that a martensitic phase transformation in the S/CMV is responsible for the significant stress reduction close to the weld line. The postweld heat treatment (PWHT) chosen to avoid any overaging of the Aermet 100 and to temper the S/CMV martensite resulted in little

  5. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  6. Development of precision numerical controlled high vacuum electron beam welding machine

    CERN Document Server

    Li Shao Lin

    2002-01-01

    The structure, main technical parameters and characteristics of the precision numerical controlled high vacuum electron beam welding machine are introduced. The design principle, some features and solutions to some key technique problems of this new type machine are described

  7. Equipment for Solid State Stir Welding of High Temperature Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stir welding generates high-quality joints in fabricated structure and is the baseline joining process for most NASA aluminum alloy structures such as cryogenic...

  8. Study of issues in difficult-to-weld thick materials by hybrid laser arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar Atabaki, Mehdi

    There is a high interest for the high strength-to-weight ratio with good ductility for the welds of advanced alloys. The concern about the welding of thick materials (Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and 5xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys) has stimulated the development of manufacturing processes to overcome the associated issues. The need to weld the dissimilar materials (AHSS and aluminum alloys) is also required for some specific applications in different industries. Hence, the requirement in the development of a state-of-the-art welding procedure can be helpful to fulfill the constraints. Among the welding methods hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) has shown to be an effective method to join thick and difficult-to-weld materials. This process benefits from both advantages of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and laser welding processes. The interaction of the arc and laser can help to have enough penetration of weld in thick plates. However, as the welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys and steels is very difficult because of the formation of brittle intermetallics the present work proposed a procedure to effectively join the alloys. The reports showed that the explosively welded aluminum alloys to steels have the highest toughness, and that could be used as an "insert" (TRICLAD) for welding the thick plates of AHSS to aluminum alloys. Therefore, the HLAW of the TRICLAD-Flange side (Aluminum alloy (AA 5456)) to the Web side (Aluminum alloys (AA 6061 and AA 5456)) and the TRICLAD-Flange side (ASTM A516) to the Web side (AHSS) was studied in the present work. However, there are many issues related to HLAW of the dissimilar steels as well as dissimilar aluminum alloys that have to be resolved in order to obtain sound welds. To address the challenges, the most recent welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels were studied and the microstructural development, mechanical properties, and on-line monitoring of the welding processes were discussed as well

  9. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD) method was used to determine t...

  10. Investigations on bending condition for welded carbon steel pipe by high frequency induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Toshimi; Matsumoto, Teruo; Tamai, Yasumasa

    1987-08-01

    The induction heating bent pipes of carbon steel welded pipes are used for the piping in nuclear power plants, in place of elbows. This application is useful to suppress the radiation exposure at in-service inspection. The quality of the bent pipes are controlled on the technical standards of welding for electrical equipments. However, the influence of the bending condition has not been yet sufficiently understood on the mechanical properties of the bent pipes. The purpose of this investigation is to establish the appropriate bending condition for the carbon steel weld pipe which corresponds to the carbon steel pipe STPT 42 in JIS G 3456, in relation to the transformation of the structures of the base metal and the weld metal during bending. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The maximum heating temperature should be set in the range from 900 deg C to 1000 deg C, in order to assure the high Charpy impact properties. (2) The maximum heating temperature which is lower than 900 deg C causes the imperfect transformation of the base metal and the weld metal, then is likely to spoil the Charpy impact properties. (3) Higher heating rate causes the increase of A/sub c1/ point, remarkably for the base metal which has higher carbon content than weld metal. (4) Higher cooling rate causes hardening of the base metal and weld metal, however, the transformation temperature does not change remarkably, except for the Ar/sub 1/ point of base metal.

  11. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  12. Laser Beam Welding with High-Frequency Beam Oscillation: Welding of Dissimilar Materials with Brilliant Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraetzsch, Mathias; Standfuss, Jens; Klotzbach, Annett; Kaspar, Joerg; Brenner, Berndt; Beyer, Eckhard

    Brilliant laser beam sources in connection with a high frequent beam oscillation make it now possible to join metallic material combinations, which have been conventionally non-laser weldable up to now. It concerns especially such combinations like Al- Cu, where brittle intermetallic phases occur. Extreme small weld seam with high aspect ratio leads to very short meld pool life time. These allow an extensive reduction of the heat input. On the other side the melting behavior at metallic mixed joint, seam geometry, meld pool turbulence and solidification behavior can be influenced by a high frequent time-, position- and powercontrolled laser beam oscillation.

  13. PREFACE: MCWASP XIII: International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Due to fast-paced development in computer technologies during the last three decades, computer-based process modeling has become an important tool for the improvement of existing process technologies and the development of new, innovative technologies. With the help of numerical process simulations, complex and costly experimental trials can now be reduced to a minimum. For metallurgical processes in particular, computer simulations are of outstanding importance, as the flow and solidification of molten alloys or the formation of microstructure and defects can hardly be observed experimentally. Corresponding computer simulations allow us inside views into the key process phenomena and so offer great potential for optimization. In 1980 the conference series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up, and has now been continued by holding the 13th international conference on 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes', MCWASP XIII, in Schladming, Austria, from June 17-22 2012. Around 200 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 20 countries around the globe attended 78 oral and 50 poster presentations on different aspects of solidification-related modeling topics. Besides process-related sessions such as (i) Ingot and Shape Casting, (ii) Continuous Casting and Direct Chill Casting, (iii) Directional Solidification and Zone Melting, (iv) Welding, and (v) Centrifugal Casting, a larger focus was put on (vi) Experimental Investigation and In-Situ Observations. In recent years, this topic has been significantly strengthened as advanced synchrotron technologies allow fantastic in-situ observations of phenomena happening inside small metallic samples. These observations will definitely serve as a benchmark for the modeling community. Further macroscopic aspects of advanced solidification science were tackled in the sessions (vii) Electromagnetic Coupling, (viii) Thermomechanics, (ix

  14. GMA-laser Hybrid Welding of High-strength Fine-grain Structural Steel with an Inductive Preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Seffer, Oliver; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    The industrial useof GMA-laser hybrid welding has increased in the last 10 years, due to the brilliant quality of the laser beam radiation, and higher laser output powers. GMA-laser hybrid welding processes operate in a common molten pool. The combination of the laser beam and the arc results in improved welding speed, penetration depth, heat affected zone and gap bridgeability. Single-layer, GMA-laser hybrid welding processes have been developed for high-strength fine-grain structural steels with a grade of S690QL and a thickness of 15 mm and 20 mm. In addition, the welding process is assisted by an integrated, inductive preheating process to improve the mechanical properties of the welding seam. By using the determined parameters regarding the energy per unit length, and the preheating temperature, welding seams with high quality can be achieved.

  15. ON INTELLIGENTIZED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MODERN WELDING MANUFACTURING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shanben; Qiu Tao; Lin Tao; Wu Yixiong

    2003-01-01

    A short survey on researching and developing status of intelligent technologies in modem welding manufacturing is given. According to the developing trend of advanced manufacturing technology, a concept on intelligentized welding manufacturing engineering (IWME), is presented for systematization of researching and developing domains on welding automation, intelligentized welding,robotic and flexible welding and advanced welding manufacturing technologies. And key technologies of welding intelligent manufacturing and its developing trend in the future are investigated.

  16. Study on fracture characteristic of welded high-density polyethylene pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐芳娟; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 荆洪阳; 杨新岐

    2002-01-01

    Crack opening displacement(COD) was applied to characterize the fracture initiation of the tough high density polyethylene. Normal single side notched three-point bend specimens and silica rubber replica techniques were used to study the characteristic COD of high-density polyethylene pipe and its butt-fusion joints including the weld fusion zone and heat affected zone at different temperature from -78℃ to 20℃ . Testing results show that the characteristic COD appears to depend on the structural features that are determined by welding process and the testing temperature. As the temperature is lowered, the characteristic COD of all zones studied decreases. Because the welding process significantly changes some structural feature of the material, characteristic COD of the weld fusion zone is the smallest one among those of the three zones. The results can be used for the engineering design and failure analysis of HDPE pipe.

  17. APFIM characterization of a high phosphorus Russian RPV weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Russell, K. F.

    1996-03-01

    A microstructural characterization of a high phosphorus (0.035 wt% P) weld from the pressure vessel of a Russian VVER nuclear reactor has been performed. The microstructure of these steels consists of intragranular and intergranular vanadium carbonitride precipitates of average composition 51.3 ± 0.9 at% V, 18.8 ± 0.7 at% C, 22.1 ± 0.7 at% N, 4.9 ± 0.4 at% Cr, 2.4 ± 0.3 at% Mo, 0.36 ± 0.05 at% Fe, 0.07 ± 0.05 at% B and 0.03 ± 0.03 at% P. The lath and grain boundaries were also coated with a thin film of molybdenum carbonitride precipitates. The phosphorus coverage at the boundaries in the unirradiated material was ˜ 13% of a monolayer in agreement with predictions from the McLean model of equilibrium segregation. After neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.15 × 10 20 n cm -2, the phosphorus coverage had increased significantly to up to ˜ 60% of a monolayer. This result indicates that neutron irradiation significantly enhanced the phosphorus segregation process. Phosphorus and copper clusters were also observed in the matrix of the neutron-irradiated material.

  18. Fatigue behaviour of welded joints treated by high frequency hammer peening: Part 1 , experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    LE QUILLIEC, Guenhael; LIEURADE, Henri Paul; BOUSSEAU, Marc; DRISSI-HABTI, Monssef; INGLEBERT, Geneviève; MACQUET, Pascal; JUBIN, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    High frequency hammer peening is a recent improvement method which is probably one of the most effective for treating welded assemblies. A number of experimental results relating to this process are presented in this article. These results lead to better understand the mechanisms of the process, to outline the influence of the operating parameters and to confirm the role played by the initial quality of the welds. In the long run, the aim of this study is to propose an industrially applicable...

  19. Fatigue Behaviour of Welded Joints Treated by High Frequency Hammer Peening: Part I , Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    LE QUILLIEC, Guenhael; Lieurade, Henri-Paul; BOUSSEAU, Marc; DRISSI-HABTI, Monssef; INGLEBERT, Geneviève; MACQUET, Pascal; JUBIN, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    International audience; High frequency hammer peening is a recent improvement method which is probably one of the most effective for treating welded assemblies. A number of experimental results relating to this process are presented in this article. These results lead to better understand the mechanisms of the process, to outline the influence of the operating parameters and to confirm the role played by the initial quality of the welds. In the long run, the aim of this study is to propose an...

  20. METAL INERT GAS WELDING OF 2519-T87 HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lianghong; TIAN Zhiling; ZHANG Xiaomu; PENG Yun

    2007-01-01

    20 mm thick plates of 2519-T87 high strength aluminum alloy have been welded. The effects of the compositions of filier wires, the heat input and the compositions of shielding gas on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the welded joint have been investigated. The results indicate that finer microstructure, better mechanical properties and higher value of hardness of HAZ can be obtained by using lower heat input. The use of Ar/He mixed shielding gas has several advantages over pure Ar shielding gas. With the increase of the proportion of He in the mixed shielding gas, the grain size of the weld metal as well as porosity susceptibility decreases. When the volume ratio of He to Ar reaches 7:3, the porosity and the grain size of weld metal reach the minimum, and the porosity can be further reduced by filling some CO2.

  1. Finite Element Modeling of the Inertia Friction Welding of Dissimilar High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. J.; Attallah, M. M.; Preuss, M.; Shipway, P. H.; Hyde, T. H.; Bray, S.

    2013-11-01

    Finite element (FE) process modeling of inertia friction welding between dissimilar high-strength steels, AerMet® 100 and SCMV, has been carried out using the DEFORM™-2D (v10.0) software. This model was validated against experimental data collected for a test weld performed between the materials; this included process data such as upset and rotational velocities as well as thermal data collected during the process using embedded thermocouples. The as-welded hoop residual stress from the FE model was also compared with experimental measurements taken on the welded component using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. The modeling work considered the solid-state phase transformations which occur in the steels, and the trends in the residual stress data were well replicated by the model.

  2. Highspeed laser welding of steel using a high-power single-mode continuous-wave fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel, J.; Loeschner, U.; Schwind, S.; Hartwig, L.; Schille, J.; Exner, H.; Huebner, P.; Eysert, A.

    2013-02-01

    Since a few years, high brilliance laser sources find their way into laser material processing. Laser micro processing by applying high brilliance laser radiation up to 3 kW of continuous wave laser power in combination with ultrafast beam deflection systems has been successfully demonstrated in 2008 for the first time. In the fields of laser welding, high brilliant laser radiation was mainly used for micro welding, but up to now the macro range is still insufficiently investigated. Hence, this study reports on detailed investigations of high speed laser welding of different steel grades, performed with a high power single mode fiber laser source. The laser beam was deflected relative to the sample by using both a fast galvanometer scanner system with f-theta focusing objective and a linear axis in combination with a welding optic, respectively. In the study, the mainly process influencing parameters such as laser power, welding speed, thickness of the metal sheets, angle of incidence and laser beam spot size were varied in a wide range. The weld seam quality was evaluated by structural analyses, static tensile tests and EDX measurements. Finally, the laser welding process has been optimized for different weld seam geometries, for example bead-on-plate welds and butt welds.

  3. High Strain Rate Testing of Welded DOP-26 Iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneibel, J. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, R. G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carmichael, C. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fox, E. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 is used to produce Clad Vent Set cups that protect the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) which provide electric power for spacecraft and rovers. In a previous study, the tensile properties of DOP-26 were measured over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and reported in ORNL/TM-2007/81. While that study established the properties of the base material, the fabrication of the heat sources requires welding, and the mechanical properties of welded DOP-26 have not been extensively characterized in the past. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the mechanical properties of DOP-26 specimens containing a transverse weld in the center of their gage sections. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 750, 900, and 1090°C and engineering strain rates of 1×10-3 and 10 s-1. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1×10-4 Torr. The welded specimens had a significantly higher yield stress, by up to a factor of ~2, than the non-welded base material. The yield stress did not depend on the strain rate except at 1090°C, where it was slightly higher for the faster strain rate. The ultimate tensile stress, on the other hand, was significantly higher for the faster strain rate at temperatures of 750°C and above. At 750°C and above, the specimens deformed at 1×10-3 s-1 showed pronounced necking resulting sometimes in perfect chisel-edge fracture. The specimens deformed at 10 s-1 exhibited this fracture behavior only at the highest test temperature, 1090°C. Fracture occurred usually in the fusion zone of the weld and was, in most cases, primarily intergranular.

  4. Comparative study on laser welding and TIG welding of semi-solid high pressure die cast A356 aluminium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available and micro-Vickers hardness (MVH) properties of the welds were investigated. It was found that the laser welding processes yielded a finer dendritic fusion zone and a much smaller heat affected zone (HAZ) compared to the TIG welds. The HAZ for both the laser...

  5. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; ERDMAN III, DONALD L [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Kelly, Steve [ArcelorMittal USA; Hou, Wenkao [ArcelorMittal USA; Yan, Benda [ArcelorMittal USA; Wang, Zhifeng [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Yu, Zhenzhen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Liu, Stephen [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  6. Design aspects of high strength steel welded structures improved by high frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Halid Can

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral study is concerned with the fatigue strength of welded steel structures which are improved by high frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) treatment. A comprehensive evaluation of 417 HFMI test data obtained from the literature and 24 HFMI fatigue data tested as a part of this work are studied. According to the statistical analyses an S-N slope of five (5) is proposed. A yield strength correction procedure which relates the material yield strength (fy) to fatigue is presented and ver...

  7. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of High Strength Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    of as-recieved MIL-A-46100 291 500X, Nital etch. 5.4 Microstructure of MIL-A-46100 after heat 292 treament procedure and machining. 50X, Nital etch...gas. (Ref F.5) 1.11 Variation in the diffusible hydrogen content as a 69 function of heat input. (Ref F.5) 1.12 Diffusible hydrogen content of GTA welds...of the square root of hydrogen partial pressure. (Ref C.7) 3.9 Variation in weld current, voltage, and heat 208 input as a function of hydrogen in

  8. Development of 30Cr06A, a high strength cast steel and its welding ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO You-jin

    2008-01-01

    High performance hydraulic supports have a high requirement in strength, toughness and welding ability of socket ma- terial. Targeting this problem, we analyzed the properties of the high strength socket material 30Cr06, used in high performance hydraulic supports both at home and abroad and developed a new kind of high strength cast steel 30Cr06A, by making use of an orthogonal experiment, which provided the design conditions for its optimal composition. The result shows that the strength and toughness of the newly developed high strength cast steel 30Cr06A is much better than that of 30Cr06. Theoretical calculations, mechanical property tests and hardness distribution tests of welded joints were carried out for a study of the welding ability of the new material, which is proved to be very good. Therefore, this 30Cr06A material has been successfully used in the socket of high performance hydraulic support.

  9. Phenomena Elucidation of High Brightness Fiber Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    A high-brigthness fiber laser can produce an ultra-high peak power density of MW/mm2 level corresponding to a focused electron beam, and is promising as one of the desirable heat sources for deep-penetration welding. The objectives of this research are to elucidate the factors affecting weld penetration and defects formation mechanisms, to obtain a fundamental knowledge of interaction between a fiber laser beam and the laser-induced plume, and to assess laser absorption with water-calorimetric method in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates with a 10 kW fiber laser beam. Concerning the weldablity and defects, the penetration depth reached 18 mm at the maximum. At 50 mm/s or lower welding speeds, porosity was generated under the conventionally-focused and tightly-focused conditions. X-ray transmission in-site observation images demonstrated that pores were formed not only at the tip of the keyhole but also near the upper part. The keyhole behavior was stabilized by using nitrogen shielding gas, which led to the porosity prevention. As for the interaction under the normal Ar shielding gas conditions, the temperature and ionization degree of the laser-induced plumes were calculated to be 6,000 K and 0.02, respectively, by the Bolzman plots and Saha's equation. It was also found that the attenuation and the refraction between the 10-kW fiber laser beam and the short weakly-ionized plume were too small to exert the reduction in weld penetration. The laser absorption of the stainless steel plate was approximately 85 % high at 10 kW laser power and 50 mm/s welding speed. Compared X-ray transmission observation images of the keyhole with the focusing feature of the fiber laser beam, most of the incident laser passed through the keyhole inlet, and the center part of the beam was delivered directly to the tip of the deep keyhole. Consequently, as far as the adquate welding procedures were utilized on the basis of eclucidation of the welding

  10. STUDY ON HIGH WELD STRENGTH OF IMPACT PROPYLENE COPOLYMER/HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE LAMINATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-hui Zhang; Rui-fen Chen; Feng Chen; Yong-gang Shangguan; Qiang Zheng; Guo-hua Hu

    2011-01-01

    The impact propylene copolymer (IPC) and isotactic polypropylene (iPP) were separately selected to prepare laminates with high density polyethylene (HDPE) by hot press. The peel forces of IPC/HDPE and iPP/HDPE laminates were examined, and it was found that the welded joint strength in IPC/HDPE laminate was dramatically higher than that of iPP/HDPE laminate. According to the special microstructure of IPC, the co-crystallization of the ethylene segments in ethylene-propylene block copolymer (EbP) component of IPC and the PE chain in HDPE was proposed to explain the highstrength welding. The DSC results indicated that there indeed existed some interaction between IPC and HDPE, and the crystallizable PE component in IPC could affect the crystallization of HDPE. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of IPC/HDPE blends demonstrated that HDPE tended to stay with the PE-rich EbP chains to form the dispersed phase, indicating the good miscibility between HDPE and EbP components of IPC. According to the above results, the effect of co-crystallization of the PE components of theIPC and HDPE on the high weld strength of IPC/HDPE laminate was confirmed.

  11. Research on overlaying welding rod of high hardness maraging steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yong-ming; CHEN Shao-wei

    2006-01-01

    The development of new maraging steel overlaying welding rod,which contains Co,Mo,W and V alloy,solved the problems of poor homogeneity of hardness and mechanical process, prolonged the service life of wear-resistant components and increased the productive efficiency of repairing,greatly benefiting the national economy.

  12. Advances in high temperature chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    1969-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in the knowledge of the high temperature behavior of materials and the complex and unfamiliar characteristics of matter at high temperature. The book discusses the dissociation energies and free energy functions of gaseous monoxides; the matrix-isolation technique applied to high temperature molecules; and the main features, the techniques for the production, detection, and diagnosis, and the applications of molecular beams in high temperatures. The text also describes the chemical research in streaming thermal plasmas, as w

  13. Welding Quality Forecast for Longitudinal Welded Pipe High Frequency Induction Welding Based on Neural Network%基于神经网络的直缝焊管高频感应焊接质量预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于恩林; 许学文; 韩毅

    2014-01-01

    Based on in-depth study on longitudinal welded pipe high frequency induction welding mechanism, it determined 3 welding process parameters affecting welding quality greatly, such as max. opening angle, current frequency and the distance from coil to welding V point. Meanwhile, it extracted two forecasts, including temperature difference along steel pipe wall thickness in weld, which characterize welding quality, and the maximum equivalent residual stress in HAZ. Then using genetic algorithm to optimize the BP neural network to establish the nonlinear mapping model between process parameters and forecast target. Test results showed that the prediction accuracy is within ±5%, the BP neural network generalization ability is good, which can be applied to the actual forecast for longitudinal welded pipe high-frequency induction welding quality.%通过对直缝焊管高频感应焊接过程机理的深入研究,确定了影响焊接质量最大的开口角度、电流频率和线圈到焊接V点距离这3个工艺参数,同时提取表征焊接质量的焊缝处沿钢管壁厚的温度差和焊接热影响区最大等效残余应力这两个预测目标,然后利用遗传算法优化的BP神经网络建立了上述工艺参数和预测目标之间的非线性映射模型。测试结果表明,预测精度在±5%以内, BP神经网络的泛化能力良好,可以应用于直缝焊管高频感应焊接质量的实际预测。

  14. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goldak, J.A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DebRoy, T.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rappaz, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  15. Track dynamic behavior at rail welds at high speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guangwen; Xiao, Xinbiao; Guo, Jun; Wen, Zefeng; Jin, Xuesong

    2010-06-01

    As a vehicle passing through a track with different weld irregularities, the dynamic performance of track components is investigated in detail by using a coupled vehicle-track model. In the model, the vehicle is modeled as a multi-body system with 35 degrees of freedom, and a Timoshenko beam is used to model the rails which are discretely supported by sleepers. In the track model, the sleepers are modeled as rigid bodies accounting for their vertical, lateral and rolling motions and assumed to move backward at a constant speed to simulate the vehicle running along the track at the same speed. In the study of the coupled vehicle and track dynamics, the Hertizian contact theory and the theory proposed by Shen-Hedrick-Elkins are, respectively, used to calculate normal and creep forces between the wheel and the rails. In the calculation of the normal forces, the coefficient of the normal contact stiffness is determined by transient contact condition of the wheel and rail surface. In the calculation of the creepages, the lateral, roll-over motions of the rail and the fact that the relative velocity between the wheel and rail in their common normal direction is equal to zero are simultaneously taken into account. The motion equations of the vehicle and track are solved by means of an explicit integration method, in which the rail weld irregularities are modeled as local track vertical deviations described by some ideal cosine functions. The effects of the train speed, the axle load, the wavelength and depth of the irregularities, and the weld center position in a sleeper span on the wheel-rail impact loading are analyzed. The numerical results obtained are greatly useful in the tolerance design of welded rail profile irregularity caused by hand-grinding after rail welding and track maintenances.

  16. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir Welding High Nitrogen Martensitic Stainless Steel 30Cr15Mo1N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen martensitic stainless steel 30Cr15Mo1N plates were successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW at a tool rotation speed of 300 rpm with a welding speed of 100 mm/min, using W-Re tool. The sound joint with no significant nitrogen loss was successfully produced. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of an FSW joint were investigated. The results suggest that the grain size of the stir zone (SZ is larger than the base metal (BM and is much larger the case in SZ-top. Some carbides and nitrides rich in chromium were found in BM while not observed in SZ. The martensitic phase in SZ could transform to austenite phase during the FSW process and the higher peak temperature, the greater degree of transformation. The hardness of SZ is significantly lower than that of the BM. An abrupt change of hardness defined as hard zone (HZ was found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ on the advancing side (AS, and the HZ is attributed to a combination result of temperature, deformation, and material flow behavior. The corrosion resistance of SZ is superior to that of BM, which can be attributed to less precipitation and lower angle boundaries (LABs. The corrosion resistance of SZ-bottom is slight higher than that of SZ-top because of the finer grained structure.

  17. Development and application of high-precision laser welding technology for manufacturing Ti alloy frames of glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. S.; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y.; Kim, J. M.; Leem, B. C.; Shin, J. S.; Lee, D. H

    1999-12-01

    The research and development efforts of the high precision laser welding technology for manufacturing titanium alloy frames of glasses. For this purpose, laser welding device with the high beam quality is designed and fabricated, which consists of a optical fiber transmission part, a welding monitoring part and a welding controller. The welding nozzle and holding fixtures for manufacturing titanium and shape memory alloy frames of glasses. Titanium and shape memory alloy frames of glasses to be developed were experimentally manufactured by utilizing the laser welding using the optical fiber of GI 400 {mu}m. As a result, the seam welding with the bead width of 0.3 mm or less and the weld penetration of 0.3-0.4mm could be accomplished. The fundamental technology was established through design of welding jigs with a variety of configurations and adequate welding conditions. Also, for the purpose to enable the companies participating in this project to commercialize the developed technology acceleratedly, a training program for the engineers belonging to such companies was conducted along with the technology transfer through joint experiments with the engineers. (author)

  18. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding titanium with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Mironov, V. D.; Prokopova, N. M.; Tret'yakov, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    This work is devoted to the research of welding plume during high power ytterbium fiber laser welding of a titanium alloy in the Ar shielding gas environment. High speed video observation of a vapor-plasma plume for visualization of processes occurring at laser welding was carried out. The coefficient of the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is calculated for a plasma welding plume by results of spectrometer researches. The conclusion deals with the impact of plasma on a high-power fiber laser radiation.

  19. Determination of optimum welding parameters in connecting high alloyed X53CrMnNiN219 and X45CrSi93 steels by friction welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Uzkut; Bekir Sadik Ünlü; Mustafa Akdağ

    2011-07-01

    In this study, different welding parameters were applied to two different steels with high alloys and mechanical and metallographical investigations are performed. Thus, the optimum welding parameters were determined for these materials and working conditions. 12.30 diameter steel bars made up of 1.4871 (X53CrMnNiN219) and 1.4718 (X45CrSi93) steel were used as experimental material. The material loss increased with increase in friction and rotating pressure. No fracture at the welding region was observed and the highest fracture energy was identified in B5 group. Based on micro hardness investigation; the hardness profile reached its minimum value at the welding region.

  20. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    This thesis focuses on numerical analysis of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints. Two types of welds are investigated here. First, a study of the localization of plastic flow and failure in aluminum sheets, welded by the relatively new Friction Stir (FS) Welding method, has been...... conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly......, a study of the damage development in Resistance SpotWelded joints, when subject to the commonly used static shear-lab or cross-tension testing techniques, has been carried out ([P3]-[P6]). The focus in thesis is on the Advanced High Strength Steels, Dual-Phase 600, which is used in for example...

  1. Optimized design on condensing tubes high-speed TIG welding technology magnetic control based on genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Chang, Yunlong; Li, Yingmin; Lu, Ming

    2013-05-01

    An orthogonal experiment was conducted by the means of multivariate nonlinear regression equation to adjust the influence of external transverse magnetic field and Ar flow rate on welding quality in the process of welding condenser pipe by high-speed argon tungsten-arc welding (TIG for short). The magnetic induction and flow rate of Ar gas were used as optimum variables, and tensile strength of weld was set to objective function on the base of genetic algorithm theory, and then an optimal design was conducted. According to the request of physical production, the optimum variables were restrained. The genetic algorithm in the MATLAB was used for computing. A comparison between optimum results and experiment parameters was made. The results showed that the optimum technologic parameters could be chosen by the means of genetic algorithm with the conditions of excessive optimum variables in the process of high-speed welding. And optimum technologic parameters of welding coincided with experiment results.

  2. Extending the process limits of laser polymer welding with high-brilliance beam sources (recent status and prospects of POLYBRIGHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowinsky, A.; Boglea, A.

    2011-03-01

    Plastics play an important role in almost every facet of our lives and constitute a wide variety of products, from everyday products such as food and beverage packaging, over furniture and building materials to high tech products in the automotive, electronics, aerospace, white goods, medical and other sectors [1]. The objective of PolyBright, the European Research project on laser polymer welding, is to provide high speed and flexible laser manufacturing technology and expand the limits of current plastic part assembly. New laser polymer joining processes for optimized thermal management in combination with adapted wavelengths will provide higher quality, high processing speed up to 1 m/s and robust manufacturing processes at lower costs. Key innovations of the PolyBright project are fibre lasers with high powers up to 500 W, high speed scanning and flexible beam manipulation systems for simultaneous welding and high-resolution welding, such as dynamic masks and multi kHz scanning heads. With this initial step, PolyBright will break new paths in processing of advanced plastic products overcoming the quality and speed limitations of conventional plastic part assembly. Completely new concepts for high speed processing, flexibility and quality need to be established in combination with high brilliance lasers and related equipment. PolyBright will thus open new markets for laser systems with a short term potential of over several 100 laser installations per year and a future much larger market share in the still growing plastic market. PolyBright will hence establish a comprehensive and sustainable development activity on new high brilliance lasers that will strengthen the laser system industry.

  3. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Uspenskiy, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study.

  4. A novel variable polarity welding power based on high-frequency pulse modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Ling; Yang Chunli; Fan Chenglei; Lin Sanbao; Wu Yun

    2006-01-01

    A new type of variable polarity welding power modulated with high-frequency pulse current is developed.Series of high-frequency pulse current is superimposed on direct-current-electrode-negative (DCEN), which can improve the crystallization process in the weld bead as a result of the electromagnetic force generated by pulse current.Digital signal processor (DSP) is used to realize the closed-loop control of the first inverter, variable polarity output of the second inverter and high-frequency pulse current superposition.

  5. High-power Laser Welding of Thick Steel-aluminum Dissimilar Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a worldwide reduction of CO2-emissions is indispensable to avoid global warming. Besides the automotive sector, lightweight construction is also of high interest for the maritime industry in order to minimize CO2-emissions. Using aluminum, the weight of ships can be reduced, ensuring lower fuel consumption. Therefore, hybrid joints of steel and aluminum are of great interest to the maritime industry. In order to provide an efficient lap joining process, high-power laser welding of thick steel plates (S355, t = 5 mm) and aluminum plates (EN AW-6082, t = 8 mm) is investigated. As the weld seam quality greatly depends on the amount of intermetallic phases within the joint, optimized process parameters and control are crucial. Using high-power laser welding, a tensile strength of 10 kN was achieved. Based on metallographic analysis, hardness tests, and tensile tests the potential of this joining method is presented.

  6. High Temperature Plasticity of Bimetallic Magnesium and Aluminum Friction Stir Welded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Michael; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Cabibbo, Marcello; Quercetti, Giovanni; Ciccarelli, Daniele; Spigarelli, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    The high temperature deformation of a bimetallic AZ31/AA6061 Friction Stir Welded joint was investigated in the present study by constant load creep experiments carried out at 473 K (200 °C). The microstructural analysis revealed the strongly inhomogeneous nature of the weld, which was characterized by an extremely fine grain size in the magnesium-rich zones and by the extensive presence of intermetallic phases. In the high stress regime, the creep strain was concentrated in the refined and particle-rich microstructure of the weld zone, while the AA6061 base metal remained undeformed. In the low stress regime, deformation became more homogeneously distributed between the AZ31 base metal and the weld zone. The creep behavior of the weld was found to obey the constitutive equation describing the minimum creep rate dependence on applied stress for the base AZ31, slightly modified to take into account the finer microstructure and the role of secondary phase particles, i.e., the retardation of grain growth and the obstruction of grain boundary sliding.

  7. Development of Deep Penetration Welding Technology with High Brightness Laser under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Yohei, Abe; Mizutani, Masami; Kawahito, Yousuke

    The authors have developed a new chamber for laser welding under the low vacuum conditions achieved by using rotary pumps. High-power disk laser bead-on-plate welding was performed on Type 304 stainless steel or A5052 aluminium alloy plate at the powers of 10, 16 and 26 kW at various welding speeds under low vacuum. The sound welds of more than 50 and 70 mm in penetration depth could be produced in Type 304 at the pressure of 0.1 kPa, the speed of 0.3 m/min and the power of 16 kW and 26 kW, respectively. Similar penetration was achieved in A 5052 aluminum alloy. Welding phenomena under low vacuum were also understood by observing the behavior of a keyhole inlet, a molten pool, melt flows and a plume ejected from a keyhole through high speed video cameras. Low interaction between a laser beam and a plume under low vacuum was confirmed by using probe laser beam method.

  8. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  9. Primary research on image of plasma in CO II laser welding with high-speed photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinhe; Ma, Licai; Xie, Yaozheng; Zhang, Yong

    2006-02-01

    In this paper the image by high-speed photography of plasma in CO II laser welding is studied including the area of these images, the change rate of these images, the isogray line of the image and the maximal variation of the image gray. The used laser is RS850 made in German and the high-speed photography is NAC-10 made in Japan. The weld material is low carbon steel. The welding parameters include laser power 4KW, welding speed 1.2m/min, shielding gas Helium, Helium flow rate 11L/min. The parameters for high-speed photography are as exposure time 1/5000 of second, shoot frequency 1000 frame/s. According to the analyses the main conclusion as follows: In the experiment, the values of gray of these images cover from 40 to 255. The area of the plasma is oscillation and the average frequency of the oscillation is about 300Hz. The laser welding plasma can be divided to three parts: periphery, smoothness and core from the external to inner. The isogray line of the periphery is very irregular because of shocking of the shielding gas and the metal spatter. In the core region, the thermal motion of the electrons is violent, so there is lots of little division with complex shape. The gap of isogrey line in the periphery region and core region are larger than it in the smoothing region. The isogrey lines of the image in the melting pool link with the isogray line of the image of the laser welding plasma, so it can be used to checking the temperature field each other. There exits an isothermal kernel in the core region.

  10. Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jian [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

  11. The resistance of high frequency inductive welded pipe to grooving corrosion in salt water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, C.; Triess, E.; Herbsleb, G.

    1986-09-01

    When exposed to neutral, salt-containing waters, electric resistant welded pipe in carbon and low alloy steels with increased sulfur contents may suffer preferential corrosion attack in the weld area. Because of its appearance, this type of corrosion is called grooving corrosion. The susceptibility to grooving corrosion may be determined and quantitatively described by means of an accelerated potentiostatic exposure test. The importance of type, concentration, and temperature of the electrolytic solution; potential; test duration; and the sulfur content of the steel in the accelerated corrosion test and the susceptibility of steels to grooving corrosion are described. Line pipe in high frequency inductive (HFI) welded carbon and low alloy steels are resistant to grooving corrosion particularly because of their low sulfur content.

  12. Influence of backward flowing molten jet on humping bead formation during high-speed GMA welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ji; WU Chuansong

    2009-01-01

    Considering the inflttence of backward flowing molten jet observed by experiments, a new pool surface deformation formula and droplets heat content model are used to investigate the humping formation mechanism during high-speed gas metal arc (GMA) welding. Three-dimensional geometry of the humping bead is numerically simulated only if some extra force and heat acted at the rear part of weld pool are taken into account in the model. It has proved that both the momentum and heat content of backward flowing molten jet must be appropriately treated to quantitatively analyze the physical mechanism of the humping phenomenon.

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TEMPERATURE FIELD ON FLASH BUTT WELDING FOR HIGH MANGANESE STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.D. Yu; W.D. Song; F.C. Zhang

    2005-01-01

    An axial symmetry finite element model coupled with electricity-thermal effect was developed to study the temperature field distribution in process of the flash butt welding (FBW) of frog highmanganese steel. The influence of temperature dependent material properties and the contact resistance were taken into account in FEMsimulation. Meanwhile, the lost materials due to splutter was resolved by using birth and death element. The result of analyzing data shows that the model in the FBW flashing is reasonable and feasible, and can exactly simulate the temperature field distribution. The modeling provides reference for analysis of welding technologies on the temperature field of high-manganese steel in FBW.

  14. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  15. Mechanical behavior study of laser welded joints for DP steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are gaining considerable market shares in the automotive industry. The development and application of Dual Phase (DP) steel is just a consistent step towards high-strength steel grades with improved mechanical behavior. Tailor welded blanks with DP steel are promoted in the application of Body-In-White (BIW) structure by the automotive industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that are laser welded together before stamping. Applied cases of tailor welded blanks of high strength steels on the automotive structural parts are investigated in this paper. The mechanical behavior of laser welded joints for DP steel is studied. Microstructure of laser welded joints for DP steel was observed by SEM. Martensite in the weld seam explains the higher strength of welded joints than the base metal. Results show that the strain safety tolerance of laser welded seam for high strength steel can meet the requirement of automobile parts for stamping if the location of laser welded seam is designed reasonably.

  16. Control of Hydrogen Embrittlement in High Strength Steel Using Special Designed Welding Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen can diffuses into steel at high temperatures ( liquid state), in amount that exceeds the solid – solubility at low temperature. – At low...the weld – Add austenite stabilizing alloy element (e.g. Ni, Cu) to promote retained austenite formation (to trap hydrogen and slowdown diffusion

  17. Fatigue strength of welded connections made of very high strength cast and rolled steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Although Very High Strength Steels (VHSS) with nominal strengths up to 1100 MPa have been available on the market for many years, the use of these steels in the civil engineering industry is still uncommon. The main objective of the research is the determination of the fatigue strength of welded con

  18. Pulse current gas metal arc welding characteristics, control and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Prakriti Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is a first-of-its-kind compilation on high deposition pulse current GMAW process. The nine chapters of this monograph may serve as a comprehensive knowledge tool to use advanced welding engineering in prospective applications. The contents of this book will prove useful to the shop floor welding engineer in handling this otherwise critical welding process with confidence. It will also serve to inspire researchers to think critically on more versatile applications of the unique nature of pulse current in GMAW process to develop cutting edge welding technology.

  19. Microstructure characterization in the weld joint of a high nickel austenitic alloy and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan [Shandong Univ., Jinan (CN). Key Lab. for Liquid - Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education)

    2012-06-15

    High nickel austenitic alloy, 6 mm thick, and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.6 mm were joined by pulsed current tungsten inert gas arc welding without filler metal in this work. Metallographic examination, microhardness measurement and electron microprobe analysis were used to reveal microstructural characteristics in the joint. The results indicated that the weld metal consisted of {gamma}-austenite, {delta}-ferrite and carbides without the appearance of martensite. There were dendrite crystals at the edge of the weld metal near the high nickel austenitic alloy and isometric crystals in the center of the weld metal. The microhardness of the weld metal was the highest due to the existence of carbides and its finer structure. Graphite flakes were still embedded in the austenite matrix of the heat-affected zone without the formation of martensite. (orig.)

  20. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Shcheglov, P. Yu.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Gumenyuk, A. V.; Rethmeier, M.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted spectroscopic studies of the welding plasma formed in the process of welding with an ytterbium fiber laser delivering output power of up to 20 kW. The influence of shielding gases (Ar, He) on different parts of the welding plume is investigated. The absorption coefficient of the laser radiation by the welding-plume plasma is estimated. Scattering of 532-nm probe radiation from particles of the condensed metal vapor within the caustic of a high-power fiber laser beam is measured. Based on the obtained results, conclusions are made on the influence of the plasma formation and metal vapor condensation on the radiation of the high-power fiber laser and the stability of the welding process.

  1. TIG-dressing of High Strength Butt Welded Connection. Part 2: Physical Testing and Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  2. TIG-dressing of high strength butt welded connection - Part 2: physical testing and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  3. TIG-dressing of high strength butt welded connection - Part 2: physical testing and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging fro

  4. TIG-dressing of High Strength Butt Welded Connection. Part 2: Physical Testing and Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging fro

  5. Mechanical characteristics and microstructure of weld joint of high-temperature martensitic steel containing 9% Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhova, Ya. E.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and mechanical characteristics of a weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel (0.097 C, 0.17.Si, 0.54 Mn, 8.75 Cr, 0.21 Ni, 0.51 Mo, 0.07 Nb, 0.23 V, 0.004 N, 0.003 B, 1.6 W, 0.15 Cu, and Fe for balance, wt %) have been studied; the joint was produced by hand welding in an argon atmosphere using 03Kh20N45M7G6B welding wire (0.3 C, 20 Cr, 45 Ni, 7 Mo, 6 Mn, and 1 Nb, wt %). The weld joint is divided into the zone of the base metal, a thermal effect zone, which consists of zones that contain fine and coarse original austenitic grains, and the zone of seam metal. It has been shown that the weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel possesses high strength characteristics at the room temperature under static loading and a satisfactorily impact toughness, which has the minimum value of 30 J/cm2 in the zone of the seam metal and does not depend on the temperature. With a decrease in the temperature from the room temperature to 253 K, a ductile-brittle transition occurs in the thermal effect zone. Creep tests carried out at the temperature of 923 K have shown that the long-term strength of the weld seam is lower than that of the base material in the entire stress range being tested. At stresses of 140 MPa or higher, the acceleration of creep in the weld seam is observed, while at low stresses of about 120 MPa, the rates of creep in the weld seam and in the base metal remain similar until the transition to the stage of accelerated fracture occurs. The difference in the values of the long-term strength is due to premature fracture, which occurs in the thermal effect zone with the finegrained structure.

  6. Variation of chemical composition of high strength low alloy steels with different groove sizes in multi-pass conventional and pulsed current gas metal arc weld depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Devakumaran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 25 mm thick micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate is welded by multi-pass GMAW and P-GMAW processes using conventional V-groove and suitably designed narrow gap with 20 mm (NG-20 and 13 mm (NG-13 groove openings. The variation of weld metal chemistry in the multi pass GMA and P-GMA weld depositions are studied by spark emission spectroscopy. It is observed that the narrow groove GMA weld joint shows significant variation of weld metal chemistry compared to the conventional V-groove GMA weld joint since the dilution of base metal extends from the deposit adjacent to groove wall to weld center through dissolution by fusion and solid state diffusion. Further, it is noticed that a high rate of metal deposition along with high velocity of droplet transfer in P-GMAW process enhances the dilution of weld deposit and accordingly varies the chemical composition in multi-pass P-GMA weld deposit. Lower angle of attack to the groove wall surface along with low heat input in NG-13 weld groove minimizes the effect of dissolution by fusion and solid state diffusion from the deposit adjacent to groove wall to weld center. This results in more uniform properties of NG-13 P-GMA weld in comparison to those of NG-20 and CG welds.

  7. Evaluation of microstructure and creep damage in high-Cr ferritic steel welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaaki TABUCHI; Hiromichi HONGO

    2011-01-01

    11Cr-0.4Mo-2W-CuVNb steel (ASME Gr.122) is used for boiler components in ultrasupercritical (USC) thermal power plants. The creep strength of high-Cr steel welds decreases due to the formation of Type Ⅳ creep damage in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) during long-term use at high temperatures. In the present study, the processes and mechanisms of Type Ⅳ creep damage were elucidated by investigating the long-term creep strength, microstructure and damage behavior of Gr.122 steel welds.Creep tests using thick welded joints were interrupted at several time steps, and the initiation, evolution and distribution of creep damage were measured. It was found that the formation and growth of creep damage was suppressed during the steadystate stage; creep voids formed at 0.5 of life, and coalesced to form a crack after 0.9of life. Type Ⅳ creep damage was mostly observed in the area about 30% below the surface of the plate. Differences in creep damage behavior between Gr.122 and Gr.91 steel welds were examined. Experimental creep damage distribution was compared with computed versions using the finite element method and damage mechanics.

  8. Recent advances in Ti and Nb explosion welding with stainless steel for 2K operating (ILC Program)- To the proceedings of LCWS11

    CERN Document Server

    Sabirov, B; Sissakian, A; Shirkov, G; Taran, Yu; Trubnikov, G; Dhanarai, N; Foley, M; Harms, E; Mitchell, D; Nagaitsev, S; Soyars, W; Rybakov, V; Samarokov, Yu; Zhigalov, V; Basti, A; Bedeschi, F

    2012-01-01

    The world first samples 0f Ti+SS and Nb+SS joints were manufactured by an explosion welding technology demonstrating a high mechanic properties and leak absence at 4.6 x 10^{-9} atm-cc/sec. Residual stresses in bimetallic joints resulting from explosion welding measured by neutron diffraction method are quite high (~1000 MPa). Thermal tempering of explosion welded Ti+SS and Nb+SS specimens leads to complete relaxation of internal stresses in Ti,Nb and Stainless steel and makes the transition elements quite serviceable.

  9. Analysis of porosity characteristics in weld metal of high strength aluminum alloy and the effect of mixed shielding gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaomu Zhang; Zhiyong Zhang; Yun Peng; Zhiling Tian; Changhong He; Hongjun Xiao; Chengyong Ma [Central Iron and Steel Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China)

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum alloy has being widely used in modern automobile and aeronautic industry. However, the welding of aluminum alloy, especially high strength aluminum alloy is difficult. Porosities are usually brought in the weld metal. In this paper, MIG welding using mixed gas shielding is carried out. The characteristic shapes of porosity in weld metal are described, the mechanism of porosity formation is analyzed, and the factors that influence the tendency of porosity formation are studied. Experiment results indicate that by the use of mixed shielding gas of 38%He+62%Ar, the number of porosity is reduced, the width of HAZ and softened zone is decreased, and the mechanical properties of welded joint is increased. (orig.)

  10. Advanced examination techniques applied to the qualification of critical welds for the ITER correction coils

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Libeyre, Paul; Marcinek, Dawid Jaroslaw; Piguiet, Aline; Cécillon, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The ITER correction coils (CCs) consist of three sets of six coils located in between the toroidal (TF) and poloidal field (PF) magnets. The CCs rely on a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC), whose supercritical cooling at 4.5 K is provided by helium inlets and outlets. The assembly of the nozzles to the stainless steel conductor conduit includes fillet welds requiring full penetration through the thickness of the nozzle. Static and cyclic stresses have to be sustained by the inlet welds during operation. The entire volume of helium inlet and outlet welds, that are submitted to the most stringent quality levels of imperfections according to standards in force, is virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional or computed radiography or by Ultrasonic Testing. On the other hand, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of several dozens of helium inlet qualification samples. The extensive use of CT techniques allowed a significant progress in the ...

  11. Technique for the residual life assessment of high temperature components based on creep-rupture testing on welded miniature specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzillo, A.; Guardamagna, C.; Moscotti, L.; Ranzani, L. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    Following the present trend in the development of advanced methodologies for residual life assessment of high temperature components operating in power plants, particularly in non destructive methods, a testing technique has been set up at ENEL-CRAM based on creep-rupture testa in an argon on welded miniature specimens. Five experimental systems for creep-rupture tests in an argon atmosphere have been set up which include high accuracy systems, vacuum chambers and exrwnsometer devices. With the aim of establishing and validating the suitability of the experimental methodology, creep-rupture and interrupted creep testing programmes have been performed on miniature specimens (2 mm diameter and 10 mm gauge lenght). On the basis of experience gathered by various European research laboratories, a miniature specimen construction procedure has been developed using a laser welding technique for joining threaded heads to sample material. Low alloy ferritic steels, such as virgin 2.25CrlMo, 0.5Cr 0.5Mo 0.25V, and IN 738 superalloy miniature specimens have been investigated and the results, compared with those from standard specimens, show a regular trend in deformation vs time. Additional efforts to provide guidelines for material sampling from each plant component will be required in order to reduce uncertainties in residual life prediction.

  12. High-power fiber laser welding and its application to metallic glass Zr{sub 55}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 5}Cu{sub 30}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahito, Yousuke [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University (JWRI), 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: kawahito@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Terajima, Takeshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University (JWRI), 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kimura, Hisamich [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan); Kuroda, Toshio; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Katayama, Seiji [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University (JWRI), 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Fiber laser has been receiving attention due to its advantages of high-power and high-beam quality to produce narrow and deep penetration welds at high-welding speeds. Therefore, fiber laser welding is expected to apply to the joining of metallic glass which has unique properties such as high-mechanical strength or small solidification shrinkage, because extremely rapid quenching for the laser weldment or heat-affected zone (HAZ) is possible to remain amorphous. In this research, fiber laser welding was first performed with the objective of obtaining a fundamental knowledge of weld property produced in bead-on-plate welding for common marital such as Type 304 stainless steel with 6 kW fiber laser beams of several peak power densities. Deeply penetrated weld beads with narrow widths were produced with small spots of tightly focused laser beams and full-penetration welds in 8 mm thick plate could be obtained at the high-welding speed of 4.5 m/min. Subsequently, the tightly focused 2.5 kW fiber laser beam was applied to 72 m/min ultra-high-speed welding for metallic glass Zr{sub 55}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 5}Cu{sub 30} in order to keep amorphous metals. Consequently, the weldment and HAZ remained desirably amorphous at ultra-high-welding speed with a tightly focused fiber laser beam.

  13. High Frequency Induction Welding of Al Tube%铝管的高频感应焊接

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗刚

    2011-01-01

    介绍了金属管高频焊接工艺及金属铝管高频感应焊接时焊接V形区各参数对焊接质量的影响.比较了采用真空管焊机和固态高频焊机进行感应焊时焊接区域各组件之间的相互关系,指出了两种焊机各自所使用的调整方法,以便提高焊接效率、获得良好的焊缝质量,同时给出了适用的V形角范围及焊接挤压辊的选用原则.最后,对铝管的高频感应焊接提出了10条建议.%This article introduced high frequency welding process of metal pipe and the effect on welding quality of each parameter in vee area during high frequency induction welding. It compared welded area component relationships by using vacuum tube welder and solid state welder to conduct induction welding, and pointed out adjustment methods adopted separately by two kinds of welder to increase welding efficiency and obtain perfect weld, at the same time,it gave applicable vee angle scope and selection principle of welding extrude roll. Finally,it put forward 10 pieces of suggestion for high frequency induction welding of Al tube.

  14. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ying, E-mail: csudengying@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng, Bing [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Xu, Guofu, E-mail: csuxgf66@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying [Northeast Light Alloy Co. Ltd., Hei Longjiang, Harbin 150060 (China)

    2015-07-15

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process.

  15. Welded Kimberlite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, B. I.; Kopylova, M. G.; Russell, J. K.; Scott Smith, B. H.

    2009-05-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits generally involves the sintering of hot glassy vesicular particles and requires the presence of a load and/or high temperatures. Welding can occur on various scales as observed in large welded pyroclastic flows, in small-volume agglutinated spatter rims, or as in coalesced clastogenic lava flows. In all these examples welding occurs mainly by reduction or elimination of porosity within the vesicular clasts and/or inter-clast pore space. The end result of welding in pyroclastic deposits is to produce dense, massive, coherent deposits. Here, we present a possible new end-member of the welding process: welding of non- vesicular pyroclasts in intra-crater kimberlite deposits. Kimberlite melt is a low-viscosity liquid carrying abundant crystals. Because of this, kimberlite eruptions generally produce non-vesicular pyroclasts. During welding, these pyroclast cannot deform by volume reduction to form typical fiamme. As a result, welding and compaction in kimberlites proceeds via the reduction of inter-clast pore space alone. The lack of porous pyroclasts limits the maximum amount of volumetric strain within pyroclastic kimberlite deposits to about 30%. This value is substantially lower than the limiting values for welding of more common felsic pyroclastic flows. The lower limit for volumetric strain in welded kimberlite deposits severely restricts the development of a fabric. In addition, pyroclastic kimberlite deposits commonly feature equant-shaped pyroclasts, and equant-shaped crystals. This, in turn, limits the visibility of the results of compaction and pore space reduction, as there are few deformable markers and elongate rigid markers that are able to record the strain during compaction. These features, together with the low viscosity of kimberlite magma and the stratigraphic position of these kimberlite deposits within the upper reaches of the volcanic conduit, call for careful interpretation of coherent-looking rocks in these

  16. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  17. Residual stress measurement with high energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winholtz, R. A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Green, R.E.L.; Varma, R.; Hammond, D.

    2000-03-02

    Preliminary measurements with high energy x-rays from the SRI CAT 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon show great promise for the measurement of stress and strain using diffraction. Comparisons are made with neutron measurements. Measurements of strains in a 2 mm thick 304 stainless steel weld show that excellent strain and spatial resolutions are possible. With 200 {micro}m slits, strain resolutions of 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} were achieved.

  18. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  19. Experimental and numerical thermo-mechanical analysis of friction stir welding of high-strength alluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljić Darko M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical analysis of the change of temperature and force in the vertical direction during the friction stir welding of high-strength aluminium alloy 2024 T3. This procedure confirmed the correctness of the numerical model, which is subsequently used for analysis of the temperature field in the welding zone, where it is different to determine the temperature experimentally. 3D finite element model is developed using the software package Abaqus; arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is applied. Johnson-Cook material law and Coulomb’s Law of friction are used for modelling the material behaviour. Temperature fields are symmetrical with respect to the welding line. The temperature values below the tool shoulder, i.e. in the welding zone, which are reached during the plunge stage, are approximately constant during the entire welding process and lie within the interval 430-502°C. The temperature of the material in the vicinity of the tool is about 500°C, while the values on the top surface of the welding plates (outside the welding zone, but close to the tool shoulder are about 400°C. The temperature difference between the top and bottom surface of the plates is small, 10-15°C. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34018 and ON 174004

  20. Reactive Fusion Welding for Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composite Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    INTRODUCTION Zirconium diboride (ZrB2) is ceramic material belonging to the group of materials known as ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTCs), where UHTCs...expended during the diffusion of C from the graphite spacer. This occurs as the enthalpy of fusion (Hf) and mixing (Hmix) are expected to be positive...ZrB2 Ceramics ( Contributed Oral Presentation) Authors: Derek King, Greg E. Hilmas, and William G. Fahrenholtz Plasma arc welding was used to join

  1. Optimization of the welding process of high alloyed steels and improvement of corrosion behaviour of welded joints; Optimierung des Schweissprozesses hochlegierter Staehle und Verbesserung der Korrosionsbestaendigkeit der Schweissverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, K.; Goellner, J. [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, IWW, PF 4120, D-39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Ryspaev, T.; Reiter, R.; Wesling, V. [Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Agricolastrasse 2, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The optimization of welding processes is necessary to obtain a good durability of the welded joints connected with a minimization of the corrosion performance. Welding processes represent a considerable influence of the material. The formation of precipitations, strong structure changes, increasing of the residual stress and not at all undefined surface layers are possible. All these changes have a great influence on the corrosion behaviour. Particularly tempering tarnish changes the passive layer which is decisive for the corrosion resistance. But also surface treatment methods can influence the corrosion behaviour. Therefore both the welding process and an ''after-care'' coordinated with the respective welding process had to be optimized. The optimization of the welding process was carried out by variation of the energy per unit length and the use of different protective gases. For a selection of a surface treatment method it has to be taken into account that an obvious remove of the tempering tarnish doesn't lead to an improvement in the corrosion behaviour. Traces of the working tool which can have a negative effect on the corrosion behaviour often remain on the surface. The influence of these different parameters on the corrosion property could be proved by electrochemical and surface analytical examinations. The investigations were carried out at specimens of two typical representatives of high alloyed austenitic steels and at welded joints, which had different surface treatments. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Die Optimierung von Schweissprozessen ist erforderlich, um eine gute Haltbarkeit der Schweissverbindungen und eine Minimierung der Korrosionsneigung zu erzielen. Schweissprozesse stellen eine erhebliche Beeinflussung fuer den Werkstoff dar. Es kann dabei zu Ausscheidungen bzw. zu starken Gefuegeveraenderungen, zur Erhoehung der Eigenspannungen und nicht zuletzt zu Schichtbildungen kommen. All

  2. Repair of high temperature stages of HP and IP turbine rotors by welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, A.; Roberts, B.W. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Novak, F. [Welding Services, Inc., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The highly-stressed blade attachment region of the high temperature sections of high and intermediate pressure turbines eventually reaches end-of-life due to creep and creep-fatigue damage. Once this state is reached, options to continue operation of the unit include: (a) rotor replacement, (b) removal of a section of the rotor and replacement by welding on a forged piece, (c) removal of the damaged material and replacement by welding of a forged ring, or (d) removal of the damaged material and complete restoration by weld metal buildup. TVA has a large number of units, mostly designed for 1,050 F steam inlet temperatures, which have reached end-of-life and require restoration. because of the large expense associated with any of the options previously stated, it was concluded that development of an internal capability for option d offered the lowest cost solution. The generic rotor materials of interest include CrMoV, NiMoV, and NiCrMoV.

  3. 高效的垂直自动化焊接技术%Advanced vertical welding technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIMMORUOTTU

    2004-01-01

    In manufacturing of hull constructions like double bottom egg-boxes, walls, bulkheads, vertical welding is both time and man power consuming process. In close cooperation with shipyards, PEMAMEK OY, the Finnish welding automation specialist has designed and constructed an automaton to mechanise this difficult welding process.

  4. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  5. Analysis of droplet transfer of pulsed MIG welding based on electrical signal and high-speed photography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Ping; XUE Jiaxiang; HUANG Wenchao; ZHANG Rui

    2009-01-01

    In order to study how welding parameters affect welding quality and droplet transfer, a synchronous acquisition and analysis system is established to acquire and analyze electrical signal and instantaneous images of droplet transfer simultaneously, which is based on a self-developed soft-switching inverter. On the one hand, welding current and voltage signals are acquired and analyzed by a self-developed dynamic wavelet analyzer. On the other hand, images are filtered and optimized after they are captured by high-speed camera. The results show that instantaneous waveforms and statistical data of electrical signal contribute to make an overall assessment of welding quality, and that optimized high-speed images allow a visual and clear observation of droplet transfer process. The analysis of both waveforms and images leads to a further research on droplet transfer mechanism and provides a basis for precise control of droplet transfer.

  6. Influence of Oxides on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yangchuan; Luo, Zhen; Huang, Zunyue; Zeng, Yida

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation was conducted into the effect of oxides on penetrations, microstructures and mechanical properties of BS700MC super steel weld bead. Boron oxide changed the penetration of weld bead by changing the Marangoni convection in the weld pool and contracting the welding arc. Chromium oxide only changed the Marangoni convection in the weld pool to increase the penetration of super steel. Thus, the super steel weld bead has higher penetration coated with flux boron oxide than that coated with chromium oxide. In other words, the activating flux TIG (A-TIG) welding with flux boron oxide has less welding heat input than the A-TIG welding with flux chromium oxide. As a result, on the one hand, there existed more fine and homogeneous acicular ferrites in the microstructure of welding heat-affected zone when the super steel was welded by A-TIG with flux boron oxide. Thus, the weld beads have higher value of low-temperature impact toughness. On the other hand, the softening degree of welding heat-affected zone, welded by A-TIG with flux boron oxide, will be decreased for the minimum value of welding heat input.

  7. Cracking behavior in a dissimilar weld between high silicon nodular cast iron and ferritic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Lee, Sangchul; Han, Kyutae; Hong, Seunggab; Lee, Changhee

    2010-06-01

    In this work, the microstructural evolution and cracking behavior of a dissimilar weld between high silicon nodular cast iron and ferritic stainless steel was investigated. An austenitic filler metal (Y309) was employed to produce the dissimilar weld. Microstructural analysis revealed that cracking formed at the unmixed zone (UMZ) and propagated into the partially melted zone (PMZ) in the bond line between the cast iron and the Y309, with hard layers formed around the bond line. The cracking behavior was strongly related to the difference in the melting points of cast iron and the Y309 filler metal, the local liquation of the laves phase, and the constitutional liquation between the graphite and austenite phases in the PMZ.

  8. Application of schlieren interferometry to temperature measurements during laser welding of high-density polyethylene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, João M P; Abreu, Manuel A; Rodrigues, F Carvalho

    2003-11-01

    Schlieren interferometry is found to be an alternative tool for temperature measurement during thermoplastic laser welding with regard to methods based on thermocouples or optical pyrometers. In fact, these techniques are not easily applied when materials to be processed have reduced thickness, negligible heat conduction, and low emissivity, as is the case of welding high-density polyethylene films with 10.6-microm CO2 laser radiation, even if the method reaches its applicability limit after approximately 1 s of the interaction process. The schlieren method provides the means and the results to probe the thermal variations of the laser-thermoplastic interaction on both the surface and the interface between the sample material and the air.

  9. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  10. Elucidation of laser welding phenomena and factors affecting weld penetration and welding defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami

    The behavior and effect of a plasma plume on the weld penetration are greatly different between CO2 laser welding and YAG, disk or fiber laser welding. The effects of the power and the power density on the weld penetration are elucidated. Spattering leading to the formation of underfilled weld beads is controlled by inclining the laser beam. Porosity is formed from bubbles generated from the tip of the keyhole at low welding speed or from the middle part of the keyhole at high laser power density. Cracking easily occurs in pulsed spot welding of aluminum alloys.

  11. VPPA weld model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-07-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  12. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72...

  13. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Woon Suk [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  14. Utilization of the equipment and program cine- and telerecording complex for the high-frequency steel pipe welding investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Nikolai A.; Veselovsky, Vladimir B.; Furmanov, Valeri B.; Kovalenko, Vladimir I.; Lakhno, Nikolay I.; Kovika, Nikolai D.; Novikov, Leonid V.; Scherbina, Vadim N.; Zlydennaya, Lyubov M.

    1995-08-01

    With the aim of technological process automatization and control for high-frequency welding of different diameter pipes, the machine-program complex (APC) was designed. APC gives the opportunity to create the cine- and telerecording of process in production conditions at the mill '159-529' of the Novomoskovsky Tube Rolling Mill, Ukraine). With the help of APC in real functioning mill conditions, the character of flashing zone length changing and the angle of convergence depending on pipe welding speed was investigated. Also the zone of jumpers is defined. The comparison of theoretical and experimental data gave an opportunity to define a welding rate which is optimal for the most qualitative values of welded joints in the range of pipe products of mill '159-529'.

  15. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  16. Twin-wire Submerged Arc Welding Process of a High-strength Low-alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiuzhi; XU Qinghua; YIN Niandong; XIAO Xinhua

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of thermal cycle curves of a high-strength low-alloy steel (HSLA)subjected twin-wire submerged arc welding (SAW) was introduced. The thermal simulation test was performed by using the obtained curves. The impact toughness at -50 ℃ temperature of the simulated samples was also tested. OM, SEM and TEM of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of some simulation specimens were investigated. The results showed that the HSLA endured the twin-wire welding thermal cycle, generally, the low-temperature toughness values of each part of HAZ was lower than that of the parent materials, and the microstructure of coarse-grained zone(CGHAZ) mainly made up of granular bainite is the reason of the toughness serious deterioration. Coarse grain, grain boundary carbide extract and M-A island with large size and irregular polygon, along the grain boundary distribution, are the reasons for the toughness deterioration of CGHAZ. The research also showed that selected parameters of twin-wire SAW can meet the requirements to weld the test steel.

  17. High-accuracy defect sizing for nozzle attachment welds using asymmetric TOFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloodworth, T. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    Inspection procedures for the detection, characterisation and high-accuracy sizing of defects in nozzle attachment welds in a Swedish BWR have been developed. These welds are set-on nozzle-to-pipe attachment welds between the main recirculation pipe and related piping systems. The nozzles and the main recirculation pipe are made of ferritic steel with austenitic stainless steel cladding on the inner surface. The overall wall thickness of the nozzle is 30 mm. The inspection uses an automated pulse-echo technique for the detection and length sizing of defects. Software for the display of complex geometry ultrasonic data is used to assist in data analysis. An unorthodox automated ultrasonic TOFD technique is used to measure the through-wall height of defects. This technique deploys probes on both the nozzle and main pipe surfaces. The TOFD data for this complex geometry are analysed using the CGTOFD software, to locate the origin of defect edge signals. The Qualification detection criterion for this inspection is the detection of defects 6 mm x 18 mm (height x length) or greater. The required length measurement accuracy is {+-}14 mm and the required through-wall height measurement accuracy is {+-}2.3 mm. This last requirement is very demanding. The inspection procedures for detection and sizing passed Procedure Qualification when measured against the above criteria on an `open` test specimen. Data collection and analysis personnel have subsequently passed Personnel Qualification using `blind` specimens. (Author)

  18. Factors Affecting the Inclusion Potency for Acicular Ferrite Nucleation in High-Strength Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Factors affecting the inclusion potency for acicular ferrite nucleation in high-strength weld metals were investigated and the contribution of each factor was qualitatively evaluated. Two kinds of weld metals with different hardenabilities were prepared, in both, MnTi2O4-rich spinel formed as the predominant inclusion phase. To evaluate the factors determining the inclusion potency, the inclusion characteristics of size, phase distribution in the multiphase inclusion, orientation relationship with ferrite, and Mn distribution near the inclusion were analyzed. Three factors affecting the ferrite nucleation potency of inclusions were evaluated: the Baker-Nutting (B-N) orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion; the formation of an Mn-depleted zone (MDZ) near the inclusion; and the strain energy around the inclusion. Among these, the first two factors were found to be the most important. In addition, it was concluded that the increased chemical driving force brought about by the formation of an MDZ contributed more to the formation of acicular ferrite in higher-strength weld metals, because the B-N orientation relationship between ferrite and the inclusion was less likely to form as the transformation temperature decreased.

  19. TIG-dressing of High Strength Butt Welded Connection. Part 2: Physical Testing and Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging from S460 to S1100 in the TIG-dressed condition. The test results are compared with modelled fatigue strength according to the notch stress theory and similar specimens in the as-welded condition. The...

  20. Laser beam welding quality monitoring system based in high-speed (10 kHz) uncooled MWIR imaging sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Rodrigo; Vergara, German; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Fernández, Carlos; Villamayor, Víctor; Gómez, Luis; González-Camino, Maria; Baldasano, Arturo; Castro, G.; Arias, R.; Lapido, Y.; Rodríguez, J.; Romero, Pablo

    2015-05-01

    The combination of flexibility, productivity, precision and zero-defect manufacturing in future laser-based equipment are a major challenge that faces this enabling technology. New sensors for online monitoring and real-time control of laserbased processes are necessary for improving products quality and increasing manufacture yields. New approaches to fully automate processes towards zero-defect manufacturing demand smarter heads where lasers, optics, actuators, sensors and electronics will be integrated in a unique compact and affordable device. Many defects arising in laser-based manufacturing processes come from instabilities in the dynamics of the laser process. Temperature and heat dynamics are key parameters to be monitored. Low cost infrared imagers with high-speed of response will constitute the next generation of sensors to be implemented in future monitoring and control systems for laser-based processes, capable to provide simultaneous information about heat dynamics and spatial distribution. This work describes the result of using an innovative low-cost high-speed infrared imager based on the first quantum infrared imager monolithically integrated with Si-CMOS ROIC of the market. The sensor is able to provide low resolution images at frame rates up to 10 KHz in uncooled operation at the same cost as traditional infrared spot detectors. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new sensor technology, a low-cost camera was assembled on a standard production laser welding head, allowing to register melting pool images at frame rates of 10 kHz. In addition, a specific software was developed for defect detection and classification. Multiple laser welding processes were recorded with the aim to study the performance of the system and its application to the real-time monitoring of laser welding processes. During the experiments, different types of defects were produced and monitored. The classifier was fed with the experimental images obtained. Self

  1. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  2. Microstructural Development during Welding of TRIP steels

    OpenAIRE

    Amirthalingam, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are promising solutions for the production of lighter automobiles which reduce fuel consumption and increase passenger safety by improving crash-worthiness. Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel (TRIP) are part of the advanced high strength steels which offers a high strength and toughness combination with excellent uniform elongation. However, the higher alloying content of these steel limits their weldability and the thermal cycle of a welding proc...

  3. Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-03-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

  4. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum...alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL- STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding (FSW) process using a tungsten-rhenium...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A preliminary report on the strength and metallography of a bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL

  5. Cold Cracking of Flux Cored Arc Welded Armour Grade High Strength Steel Weldments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Magudeeswaran; V.Balasubramanian; G.Madhusudhan Reddy

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables on the factors that influence cold cracking of armour grade quenched and tempered (Q&T) steel welds. Flux cored arc welding (FCAW) process were used making welds using austenitic stainless steel (ASS) and low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF) consumables. The diffusible hydrogen levels in the weld metal of the ASS and LHF consumables were determined by mercury method. Residual stresses were evaluated using X-ray stress analyzer and implant test was carried out to study the cold cracking of the welds. Results indicate that ASS welds offer a greater resistance to cold cracking of armour grade Q&T steel welds.

  6. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  7. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  8. 埋弧焊管高速焊接工艺设计及生产应用%Design and Application of High Speed Welding Procedure for Submerged Arc Welded(SAW) Pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹红平; 唐子金; 彭新星; 杨雄英

    2014-01-01

    Aim at the need of SAW pipe production, under the premise of ensuring the weld quality and production efficiency, the mathematical model of function relation among welding wire deposition, welding penetration, welding current, arc voltage and welding speed was set. The welding parameter of SAW pipe was designed under different welding speed, and was applied in production. Through comparison of weld performance and production efficiency of SAWH pipe with the same specification under different welding speed, the result showed that the design method and the determined parameters of high-speed welding process are reasonable. The pipe quality is stable after increasing speed, and the output can be increased by 20%.%针对埋弧焊管生产需要,在兼顾焊缝质量要求和生产效率的前提下,研究构建了焊丝熔敷量、焊接熔透量与焊接电流、电弧电压和焊接速度的函数关系数学模型,对埋弧焊管在不同焊接速度下的焊接工艺参数进行设计,并在实际生产中进行应用。通过同规格螺旋埋弧焊管在不同焊接速度下的焊缝性能及生产效率对比,表明研究的高速焊接工艺设计方法和所确定的参数是合理的,提速后焊管质量稳定,并可增产20%。

  9. on the High-Temperature Performance of Ni-Based Welding Material NiCrFe-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Wenlin; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2014-10-01

    The effects of M 23C6 ( M = Cr, Fe) on the high-temperature performance of the NiCrFe-7 welding rods and weld metals were studied by high-temperature tensile tests and microstructure analysis. M 23C6 at the grain boundaries (GBs) has a cube-on-cube coherence with one grain in the NiCrFe-7 weld metals, and the adjacent M 23C6 has the coherence relationship with the same grain. The grain with a coherent M 23C6 has a Cr-depletion region. The number and size of M 23C6 particles can be adjusted by heat treatment and alloying. There are two temperatures [ T E1: 923 K to 1083 K (650 °C to 810 °C) and T E2: 1143 K to 1203 K (870 °C to 930 °C)] at which the GBs and grains of the NiCrFe-7 welding rod have equal strength during the high-temperature tensile test. When the temperatures are between T E1 and T E2, the strength of the GBs is lower than that of the grains, and the tensile fractures are intergranular. When the temperatures are below T E1 or over T E2, the strength of the GBs is higher than that of the grains, and the tensile fractures are dimples. M 23C6 precipitates at the GBs, which deteriorates the ductility of the welding rods at temperature between T E1 and T E2. M 23C6 aggravates ductility-dip-cracking (DDC) in the weld metals. The addition of Nb and Ti can form MX ( M = Ti, Nb, X = C, N), fix C in grain, decrease the initial precipitation temperature of M 23C6, and mitigate the precipitation of M 23C6, which is helpful for minimizing DDC in the weld.

  10. Validating a Model for Welding Induced Residual Stress Using High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, J. C.; Budrow, C. J.; Pagan, D. C.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Park, J.-S.; Okasinski, J.; Beaudoin, A. J.; Miller, M. P.

    2017-03-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) provides a pathway to advance performance in structures through the use of physically-based models to better understand how manufacturing processes influence product performance. As one particular challenge, consider that residual stresses induced in fabrication are pervasive and directly impact the life of structures. For ICME to be an effective strategy, it is essential that predictive capability be developed in conjunction with critical experiments. In the present work, simulation results from a multi-physics model for gas metal arc welding are evaluated through x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. A test component was designed with intent to develop significant gradients in residual stress, be representative of real-world engineering application, yet remain tractable for finely spaced strain measurements with positioning equipment available at synchrotron facilities. The experimental validation lends confidence to model predictions, facilitating the explicit consideration of residual stress distribution in prediction of fatigue life.

  11. Validating a Model for Welding Induced Residual Stress Using High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, J. C.; Budrow, C. J.; Pagan, D. C.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Park, J.-S.; Okasinski, J.; Beaudoin, A. J.; Miller, M. P.

    2017-05-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) provides a pathway to advance performance in structures through the use of physically-based models to better understand how manufacturing processes influence product performance. As one particular challenge, consider that residual stresses induced in fabrication are pervasive and directly impact the life of structures. For ICME to be an effective strategy, it is essential that predictive capability be developed in conjunction with critical experiments. In the present work, simulation results from a multi-physics model for gas metal arc welding are evaluated through x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. A test component was designed with intent to develop significant gradients in residual stress, be representative of real-world engineering application, yet remain tractable for finely spaced strain measurements with positioning equipment available at synchrotron facilities. The experimental validation lends confidence to model predictions, facilitating the explicit consideration of residual stress distribution in prediction of fatigue life.

  12. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  13. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded ferritic stainless steels in high temperature aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzuka, Toshio; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo (Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan). Central Research and Development Lab.); Kanda, Masao

    1982-07-01

    In considering the application of ferritic stainless steels to heat exchanger tubing materials for moisture separator-reheaters in LWRs, the effects of environmental conditions (temperature, chloride, dissolved oxygen, pH), thermal history, and steel composition (content of C, N, Cr and Ti) on the Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature aqueous environments, were studied. The IGSCC was proved to depend on steel composition and thermal history rather than environment. From these results, a steel was designed to prevent IGSCC of the welding HAZ for 18Cr and 13Cr steels.

  14. Wear and Grip Loss Evaluation of High Chromium Welding Deposits Applied on Sugar Cane Rolls1

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Millan, Sebastian; Rugbeño S.A.S; Aguilar Castro, Yesid; Escuela de Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia; Casanova García, Gonzalo Fernando; Escuela de Ingeniería Mecánica,Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia

    2015-01-01

    Wear on sugar cane rolls is an expensive maintenance problem for the sugar cane industry. Wear produces loss of sucrose extraction and loss of grip of the roll on the bagasse. This paper presents the evaluation of wear and loss of grip of hypoeutectic and hypereutectic high chromium welding deposits applied on ASTM A-36 steel and gray cast iron. A modified ASTM G-65 standard test was used. Wear was produced by the abrasive action of wet bagasse with three levels of mineral extraneous matter. ...

  15. Research on Microstructure and Weld Penetration of LY12 Duralumin Alloy Welded Joint under TIG Welding and A-TIG Welding%LY12硬铝合金TIG与A-TIG焊接接头组织和熔深的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕; 魏晓红; 胡宗智

    2011-01-01

    针对Al-Cu-Mg系共晶型高强度LY12硬铝合金,进行了TIG与A-TIG焊接接头组织特征和熔深变化规律的研究.结果表明,在相同焊接规范下,TIG与A-TIG焊接接头焊缝区金相组织均为树枝状晶,热影响区金相组织均为等轴晶,差别在于A-TIG焊接接头组织晶粒较粗大.高倍显微镜下的金相组织显示,A-TIG焊缝区和热影响区中强化相数量比TIG焊多,且比TIG焊粗大.另外由于活性剂的加入,电弧产生收缩,热量集中,使得A-TIG焊熔深比TIG焊大.%This paper have researched the microstructure characteristics and weld penetration change law of welded joint of Al-Cu-Mg system eutectic type high strength LY12 duralumin alloy under TIG welding and A-TIG welding. Results showed that the weld zone microstructure of TIG welding and A-TIG welding was dendritic crystal and the heat-affected zone microstructure of TIG welding and A-TIG welding was equiaxed crystal under the same welding specification. The difference was that the microstructure of A-TIG welded joint was coarser. The microstructure under advanced microscope showed that the weld zone and heat-affected zone of A-TIG had more strengthening phase than TIG and the strengthening phase of A-TIG was coarser than that of TIG. The weld penetration of A-TIG was deeper than TIG which had been caused by the addition of surfactant which leaded to arc constriction and heat concentration.

  16. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  17. Embrittlement of molybdenum-rhenium welds under low and high temperature neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnikov, A. V.; Morito, F.; Danylenko, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of low- and high-temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile strength, microhardness, and fracture mode has been studied for a series of Mo-Re welds with various Re concentrations. Radiation-induced hardening and concurrent ductility reduction are the key after-effects of neutron exposure. Low-temperature irradiation usually leads to a very hard embrittlement. The hardening effect is rather limited and unstable because of the lack of ductility. Irradiated specimens fail by brittle intergranular or transgranular fracture. The damaging effect of neutrons is less pronounced after high-temperature irradiation. The hardening of the matrix is rather high, but irradiated specimens still keep residual plasticity. High-temperature irradiation intensifies homogeneous nucleation of Re-rich phases, and this effect equalises the difference in mechanical properties between the different weld zones. A characteristic ductility loss exposure temperature was found to separate the temperature fields of absolutely brittle and relatively ductile behaviour. It usually varies between 850 K and 1000 K depending on the alloy composition and irradiation conditions.

  18. Automatic control system of high precision welding of workpieces in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, I. N.; Zvezdin, V. V.; Israfilov, I. H.; Portnov, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, based on the conducted patent research, the system of laser welding control with different geometry of weld and shapes of parts is developed. The method of monitoring the position of the spot of laser radiation in relation to the curved weld is worked out; it is based on the tracking the edges of the welded parts by low-power laser radiation reflected from the surface of the parts. It allows to make the positioning of the focus of laser radiation in relation to the juncture of the welded parts automatically.

  19. Improving Hygienic Characteristics of Coated Electrodes for Welding High-Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Ivanov, K. V.; Sadikov, I. D.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies showing that the use of an inverter power supply instead of a diode rectifier provides:: fine-droplet electrode metal transfer which reduces generation time by 46% and transfer time by 28%; transfer of alloying elements from welding materials into the weld metal which reduces its loss from the welding line by 6% and the heat affected area by 3%; reducing the emission rate of welding fumes and their components by 23%; reducing specific emission of welding fumes and their components by 23%.

  20. Determinants of High Schools' Advanced Course Offerings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatarola, Patrice; Conger, Dylan; Long, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the factors that determine a high school's probability of offering Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses. The likelihood that a school offers advanced courses, and the number of sections that it offers, is largely driven by having a critical mass of students who enter high school with…

  1. Welding control parameters simulation of high-frequency electric resistance welded pipe based on ANSYS%基于ANSYS的高频直缝焊管主要控制参数模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何世权; 刘飞; 樊丁; 徐德怀; 田禾

    2011-01-01

    基于高频直缝焊管的焊接温度是影响高频直缝焊管焊缝质量的首要因素,为提高高频直缝焊管的质量,重点研究了在高频感应加热中,高频焊接的主要控制参数焊接速度、焊接电流和焊管厚度对高频直缝焊管焊缝温度场的影响.依据高频焊接过程中的热源方程,利用ANSYS有限元热分析模块,建立适当的线热源模型,编写APDL程序.通过对3个主要控制参数的调节,得到在不同参数条件下的高频焊管焊缝温度场的分布云图,发现沿着高频焊管运动方向焊缝处温度是均匀递减的.在其中一组参数一定的状态下,对金洲集团Φ219 mm高频焊接机组的焊缝温度场进行测温,结果发现模拟温度场与实际温度场基本一致.%Welding temperature is the key factor for the quality of straight-line welded seam of high-frequency electric resistance welded pipe. To improve weld quality of high-frequency electric resistance weld ( HFW) pipe,the effects of the main control parameters of welding speed,welding current and pipe thickness on weld quality were discussed for the high-frequency induction heating process. According to the heat equation of high-frequency induction heating process, the proper model of line heat source was established to obtain APDL program based on the thermal analysis module of ANSYS finite element. By adjusting three main control parameters, the welding temperature contour plot was achieved for various parameters. The temperature at welded seam is decreased uniformly at HFW motion direction. With a set of parameters for Φ219 mm high-frequency welding machine of Jinzhou Company, the temperature of temperature field on welding seam was mearured. The results show that the simulation temperature field is consistent with actual temperature field .

  2. Welding technology for rails. Rail no setsugo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M.; Karimine, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Uchino, K.; Sugino, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Technical Research Inst. of Yawata Works); Ueyama, K. (JR Railway Technical Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The rail joining technology is indispensable for making long welded rails. Flush butt welding, gas welding, enclosed arc welding, and thermit welding are used properly as the welding methods. A method for improving the joint reliability by controlling the residual stress distribution of welded joint is investigated to prepare high carbon component weld metal similar to the rail. Problems with each of the welding methods and the newly developed technology to solve the problems are outlined. Composition of the coating is improved also, and a high C system welding rod is developed which has satisfactory weldability. High performance and high efficient new enclosed arc welding technology not available by now is developed which utilizes high carbon welding metal as a new EA welding work technology, and put to practical use. As a result of this study, useful guides are obtained for the establishment of satisfactory thermit welding technology. 17 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Mechanism of Action of Rare Earths in High Effective Fe Powder Welding Rods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Yongquan; Li Jianguo; Yao Qinghu; Liu Yan; Huang Lihong

    2007-01-01

    The optimum coating composition of alkali Fe powder welding rods was designed by orthogonal experiment with mix rates. A new kind of effective RE-Fe powder welding rod was prepared which could be used at the condition of direct and indirect current. The arc characteristics and stabilities of effective Fe powder welding rods containing RE were analyzed by HANNOVER analyzer. The efficiency of Fe powder welding rods was tested by weighting method. It wag found that the stability of Fe powder welding rods Wag improved when it was added with rare earths. The results of impact experiment at low temperatures and SEM analysis on impact break showed that the grain was refined, the welding joint was cleaned, and the mechanical properties of joint was enhanced with proper RE content. It was provided with good processing property for this effective RE-Fe powder welding rod, and its efficiency could arrive at 180%.

  4. Assessment of weld quality of aerospace grade metals by using ultrasonic matrix phased array technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-03-01

    Advantages of two dimensional electronic ultrasonic beam focusing, steering and scanning with the matrix phased array (MPA) technology has been used to visualize the conditions of resistance spot welds in auto vehicle grade advanced high strength steel carbon steels nondestructively. Two of the commonly used joining techniques, resistance spot welding and resistance seam welding, for thin aerospace grade plates made of aluminum, titanium, and stainless steels have also been inspected with the same MPA NDE system. In this study, a detailed discussions of the current MPA based ultrasonic real time imaging methodology has been made followed by some of the NDT results obtained with various welded test coupons.

  5. Design of TRIP Steel With High Welding and Galvanizing Performance in Light of Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new type of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with not only high strength and high ductility but also superior welding and galvanizing properties was designed and developed recently. Low carbon and low silicon content were preliminarily selected with the aim of meeting the requirements of superior quality in both welding and galvanizing. Phosphorus was chosen as one of the alloying elements, because it could reduce carbon acttvity in cementite and increase the stability of austenite. In addition, the possibility of phosphorus segregating at grain boundary was also discussed by thermodynamics as well as kinetics. Phase diagram was estimated at high temperature and the composition of the steel was then selected in the hyperperitectic range to avoid problems, whichmight occur in sheet steel continuous casting. Phase diagram in the inter-critical temperature was estimated for the steel to obtain the starting temperature of fast cooling. For understanding the minimum rate of fast cooling, pearlite growth kinetics was calculated with self-developed diffusion coefficients of elements in grain boundary. Overaging temperature was determined through the calculation of T0 temperature by both equilibrium and para-equilibrium assumptions,which was different from the current determination, which is only based on an equilibrium estimation.

  6. MINERVA, qualification of dissimilar welds for HTR-application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, B.; Gnirss, G.; Neureuther, H.; Schneider, K.

    1989-03-01

    The component test ''MINERVA'' is part of an overall concept to qualify dissimilar welds in pipings of advanced gas-cooled high temperature reactors. ''MINERVA'' is designed for a testing time of 20000 h. The experiment started in January 1987. The paper describes the concept, the manufacuring parameters including the basis of selection of materials and welding procedures. The experiment MINERVA and the operating conditions are described.

  7. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  8. Analysis of solidification cracks in welds of Al-Mg-Si A6351 type alloy welded by high frequency pulsed TIG process. 1st report. Evaluation of solidification crack susceptibility by means of Houldcroft test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, M.; Machida, S. [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Taniguchi, C.; Brandi, S. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1994-08-05

    The main objective of this work is to study the susceptibility to solidification crack by means of Houldcroft test on Al-Mg-Si alloy A6351 welded by TIG process using a D.C. straight polarity and pulsed current with high frequency with varied parameters. The parameters are welding speed, current, arc pulse, frequency, and heat input per unit weld length. The effect of grain structures on the susceptibility of solidification crack is evaluated as well as the welding pool geometry in which these structures has developed. The `quasi-stationary` state is studied for the specimen geometry used, and the process efficiencies are estimated using welding pool width method. The trend of increase of crack length with the welding speed observed in no pulsed arc conditions is significantly changed with the introduction of the pulsed arc. Therefore, the pulsed frequency and the welding speed seem to be competing parameters in effect on the development of solidification crack. This work shows that the generalized tendency of solidification crack susceptibility with regard to the obtained grain structures as presented in previous works is not a general trend. 40 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Friction stir welding of copper alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shuhua; Liu Meng; Wang Deqing; Xu Zhenyue

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates,brass plates and copper/brass plates were friction stir welded with various parameters. Experimental results show that the microstructure of the weld is characterized by its much finer grains as contrasted with the coarse grains of parent materials and the heat-affected zones are very narrow. The microhardness of the copper weld is a little higher than that of parent plate. The microhardness of brass weld is about 25% higher than that of parent material. The tensile strength of copper joints increases with increasing welding speed in the test range. The range of parameters to obtain good welds for copper is much wider than that for brass. When different materials were welded, the position of copper plate before welding affected the quality of FSW joints. If the copper plate was put on the advancing side of weld, the good quality of weld could be got under proper parameters.

  10. Possibilities in optical monitoring of laser welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horník, Petr; Mrňa, Libor; Pavelka, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Laser welding is a modern, widely used but still not really common method of welding. With increasing demands on the quality of the welds, it is usual to apply automated machine welding and with on-line monitoring of the welding process. The resulting quality of the weld is largely affected by the behavior of keyhole. However, its direct observation during the welding process is practically impossible and it is necessary to use indirect methods. At ISI we have developed optical methods of monitoring the process. Most advanced is an analysis of radiation of laser-induced plasma plume forming in the keyhole where changes in the frequency of the plasma bursts are monitored and evaluated using Fourier and autocorrelation analysis. Another solution, robust and suitable for industry, is based on the observation of the keyhole inlet opening through a coaxial camera mounted in the welding head and the subsequent image processing by computer vision methods. A high-speed camera is used to understand the dynamics of the plasma plume. Through optical spectroscopy of the plume, we can study the excitation of elements in a material. It is also beneficial to monitor the gas flow of shielding gas using schlieren method.

  11. The Kinetics of Phase Transformation in Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Palmer, T

    2002-02-06

    The fundamentals of welding-induced phase transformations in metals and alloys are being investigated using a combination of advanced synchrotron based experimental methods and modem computational science tools. In-situ experimental methods have been developed using a spatially resolved x-ray probe to enable direct observations of phase transformations under the real non- isothermal conditions experienced during welding. These experimental techniques represent a major step forward in the understanding of phase transformations that occur during welding, and are now being used to aid in the development of models to predict microstructural evolution under the severe temperature gradients, high peak temperatures and rapid thermal fluctuations characteristic of welds. Titanium alloys, stainless steels and plain carbon steels are currently under investigation, and the phase transformation data being obtained here cannot be predicted or measured using conventional metallurgical approaches. Two principal synchrotron-based techniques have been developed and refined for in-situ investigations of phase transformation dynamics in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of welds: Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD). Both techniques provide real-time observations of phases that exist during welding, and both have been developed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux wiggler beam line. The SRXRD technique enables direct observations of the phases existing in the HAZ of quasi-stationary moving arc welds, and is used to map the HAZ phases by sequentially jogging the weld with respect to the x-ray beam while taking x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns at each new location. These spatially resolved XRD patterns are collected in linear traverses perpendicular to the direction of weld travel. The XRD data contained in multiple traverses is later compiled to produce an areal map of the phases

  12. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  13. FE Simulation Models for Hot Stamping an Automobile Component with Tailor-Welded High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bingtao; Wang, Qiaoling; Wei, Zhaohui; Meng, Xianju; Yuan, Zhengjun

    2016-05-01

    Ultra-high-strength in sheet metal parts can be achieved with hot stamping process. To improve the crash performance and save vehicle weight, it is necessary to produce components with tailored properties. The use of tailor-welded high-strength steel is a relatively new hot stamping process for saving weight and obtaining desired local stiffness and crash performance. The simulation of hot stamping boron steel, especially tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) stamping, is more complex and challenging. Information about thermal/mechanical properties of tools and sheet materials, heat transfer, and friction between the deforming material and the tools is required in detail. In this study, the boron-manganese steel B1500HS and high-strength low-alloy steel B340LA are tailor welded and hot stamped. In order to precisely simulate the hot stamping process, modeling and simulation of hot stamping tailor-welded high-strength steels, including phase transformation modeling, thermal modeling, and thermal-mechanical modeling, is investigated. Meanwhile, the welding zone of tailor-welded blanks should be sufficiently accurate to describe thermal, mechanical, and metallurgical parameters. FE simulation model using TWBs with the thickness combination of 1.6 mm boron steel and 1.2 mm low-alloy steel is established. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the hot stamped automotive component (mini b-pillar), hardness and microstructure at each region are investigated. The comparisons between simulated results and experimental observations show the reliability of thermo-mechanical and metallurgical modeling strategies of TWBs hot stamping process.

  14. Fatigue in Welded High-Strength Steel Plate Elements under Stochastic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Petersen, R.I.; Martinez, L. Lopez

    1999-01-01

    The present project is a part of an investigation on fatigue in offshore structures in high-strength steel. The fatigue life of plate elements with welded attachments is studied. The material used has a yield stress of ~ 810-840 MPa, and high weldability and toughness properties. Fatigue test...... series with constant amplitude loading and with various types of stochastic loading have been carried through on test specimens in high-strength steel, and - for a comparison - on test specimens in conventional offshore structural steel with a yield stress of ~ 400-410 MPa.A comparison between constant...... amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue test results shows shorter fatigue lives in variable amplitude loading than should be expected from the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula. Furthermore, in general longer fatigue lives were obtained for the test specimens in high-strength steel than those...

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mainã Portella; Mantovani, Gerson Luiz; Vasant Kumar, R.; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of metal active gas-welded joints of a high-strength steel with tensile yield strength of 900 MPa was investigated. The welded joints were obtained using two different heat inputs. The corrosion behavior has been studied in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Optical microscopy images, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray revealed different microstructural features in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal (WM). Before and after the corrosion process, the sample was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy to measure the depth difference between HAZ and WM. The results showed that the heat input did not play an important role on corrosion behavior of HSLA steel. The anodic and cathodic areas of the welded joints could be associated with depth differences. The HAZ was found to be the anodic area, while the WM was cathodic with respect to the HAZ. The corrosion behavior was related to the amount and orientation nature of carbides in the HAZ. The microstructure of the HAZ consisted of martensite and bainite, whereas acicular ferrite was observed in the weld metal.

  16. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  17. The effects of solid state high frequency welding machine sensor manufacturing and installment for weld%固态高频感应器的制作与安装对焊接的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏学灵

    2014-01-01

    the representative of equipment manufacture level is agree to depend on the maximum working frequency the equipment can adapt to ,and it also have closely relation to control technology、the main circuit component selection and the technological level and so on. for the welded pipe technology,the small diameter thin wall steel tube need higher welding frequency,otherwise due to the welding frequency is too low, on the one hand it result in hot melt welding seam area is too wide, the required welding power increase, and affect the welding efficiency and the beautiful sex of steel after welding; On the other hand, due to the welding transformer (tubular) efficiency are greatly influenced by the frequency, reduced the frequency of welding, welding transformer coupling efficiency is reduced, thus affect the whole efficiency of solid state high frequency welding machine. it will have a very big influence on the efficiency of the welding due to the production technology of the sensors、 installation location and the method.%固态高频焊管设备能够适应的最高工作频率代表设备制造水平,这与控制技术、主电路器件选择、工艺水平等密切相关。从焊管工艺来说,小口径、薄壁钢管需要较高的焊接频率,否则由于焊接频率过低,一方面造成焊缝热熔区过宽,所需的焊接功率增加,影响焊接效率和钢管焊接后的美观性;另一方面由于焊接变压器(空芯)效率受频率影响较大,焊接频率降低,焊接变压器耦合效率降低,从而影响整机效率。固态高频焊机的感应器的制作工艺与安装位置、方法对焊接效率的影响非常大。

  18. Isothermal Calorimetric Observations of the Effect of Welding on Compatibility of Stainless Steels with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) is receiving renewed interest as a monopropellant and as the oxidizer for bipropellant systems. HTP is hydrogen peroxide having concentrations ranging from 70 to 98%. In these applications the energy and oxygen released during decomposition of HTP is used for propulsion. In propulsion systems components must be fabricated and connected using available joining processes. Welding is a common joining method for metallic components. The goal of this study was to compare the HTP compatibility of welded vs. unwelded stainless steel.

  19. Development of a Robust and Cost-Effective Friction Stir Welding Process for Use in Advanced Military Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    245influences the FSW joint profile as well as the weld material 246microstructure and properties. Initially, one-piece steel tools 247were used with both the pin...885Fracture Locations of Friction-Stir Welded Joints of 6061-T6 Alumin - 886ium Alloy, J. Mater. Sci. Lett., 2003, 22, p 1061–1063 8878. W.B. Lee, C.Y. Lee...Stir Welding of Stainless Steel , 915 Mater. Sci. Eng. A, 2005, 398, p 146–163 916 18. M. Grujicic, G. Arakere, C.-F.Yen, and B.A. Cheeseman, Computa- 917

  20. 高频焊钢管焊缝冲击试验问题探讨%Discussion on Weld Impact Test of High Frequency Welded Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁才萌; 张永

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the HFW pipe product quality, ensure the measurement results accuracy of the welded pipe impact test is very important. In the process of the actual detection, due to the high frequency weld is a thin line with width less than 0.3 mm after heat treatment, so make sure the exact impact test result has certain difficulty. Some problems affecting impact test result were discussed, including the preparation of impact test sample, weld corrosion, small size test sample, testing machine and so on. And give the relevant solutions, thus the accuracy of impact test result can be ensured.%为提升高频焊钢管产品质量,保证焊管冲击试验测量结果的准确性非常重要.在实际检测过程中,因高频焊缝经热处理后是一条宽度不到0.3 mm的细线,因此要保证得到准确的冲击试验结果存在一定困难.通过对高频焊钢管焊缝冲击试验中试样的准备、 焊缝腐蚀、 小尺寸试样以及试验机等多方面影响冲击试验结果问题探讨,找到了相应的解决方案,从而保证了冲击试验结果准确性.

  1. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  2. Influence of the parameters of a high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure, properties, and plastic flow of metal in the zone of a joint of materials welded by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2017-05-01

    The results of an investigation of the influence of the parameters of high-frequency acoustic wave on the structure and properties of the zone of joint of homogeneous metals bonded by explosive welding under the action of ultrasound have been presented. The influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibrations on the structure and properties of the explosively welded joints compared with the samples welded without the application of ultrasound has been established. The action of high-frequency acoustic waves on the metal leads to a reduction in the dynamic yield stress, which changes the properties of the surface layers of the metal and the conditions of the formation of the joint of the colliding plates upon the explosive welding. It has been shown that the changes in the length and amplitude of waves that arise in the weld joint upon the explosive welding with the simultaneous action of ultrasonic vibrations are connected with a decrease in the magnitude of the deforming pulse and time of action of the compressive stresses that exceed the dynamic yield stress beyond the point of contact.

  3. High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools discusses the fundamentals and advances in high performance grinding processes, and provides a complete overview of newly-developing areas in the field. Topics covered are grinding tool formulation and structure, grinding wheel design and conditioning and applications using high performance grinding wheels. Also included are heat treatment strategies for grinding tools, using grinding tools for high speed applications, laser-based and diamond dressing techniques, high-efficiency deep grinding, VIPER grinding, and new grinding wheels.

  4. High-Temperature Deformation Constitutive Law for Dissimilar Weld Residual Stress Modeling: Effect of Thermal Load on Strain Hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Crooker, Paul [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Weld residual stress is one of the primary driving forces for primary water stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal welds (DMWs). To mitigate tensile residual stress in DMWs, it is critical to understand residual stress distribution by modeling techniques. Recent studies have shown that weld residual stress prediction using today s DMW residual stress models strongly depends on the strain-hardening constitutive model chosen. The commonly used strain-hardening models (isotropic, kinematic, and mixed) are all time-independent and inadequate to account for the time-dependent (viscous) plastic deformation at the elevated temperatures experienced during welding. For materials with profound strain-hardening, such as stainless steels and nickel-based alloys that are widely used in nuclear reactor and piping systems, the equivalent plastic strain the determinate factor of the flow stress can be highly dependent on the recovery and recrystallization processes. These processes are in turn a strong function of temperature, time, and deformation rate. Recently, the authors proposed a new temperature- and time-dependent strain-hardening constitutive model: the dynamic strain-hardening constitutive model. The application of such a model has resulted in improved weld residual stress prediction compared to the residual stress measurement results from the contour and deep-hole drilling methods. In this study, the dynamic strain-hardening behavior of Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 82 used in pressure vessel nozzle DMWs is experimentally determined. The kinetics of the recovery and recrystallization of flow stress are derived from experiments, resulting in a semi-empirical equation as a function of pre-strain, time, and temperature that can be used for weld residual stress modeling. The method used in this work also provides an approach to study the kinetics of recovery and recrystallization of other materials with significant strain-hardening.

  5. Advances in high voltage engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Haddad, A

    2005-01-01

    This book addresses the very latest research and development issues in high voltage technology and is intended as a reference source for researchers and students in the field, specifically covering developments throughout the past decade. This unique blend of expert authors and comprehensive subject coverage means that this book is ideally suited as a reference source for engineers and academics in the field for years to come.

  6. High Frequency Welding(HFW) Procedure Selection for API Large Diameter Units%API大管径机组高频焊接工艺的选择

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琪

    2013-01-01

    During HFW pipe production with diameter greater than 406 mm (16 in),in order to correctly assess and select appropriate welding procedure,in this article,it discussed the difference of contact welding and induction welding from weld quality,energy consumption and other aspects,and emphasized the influence on high frequency contact welding and high frequency induction welding of large diameter units.The results showed that relative to high frequency induction welding,high frequency contact welding is with some advantages,such as weld quality is good,energy saving effect is obvious,it doesn't need the expensive loop,induction coil or a large number of complicated impedor device.The design and maintenance for inside slash mandrel are simple,the breakdown time of replacing the coil and impedor device is shorter and the finished product yield rate is high.In addition,when adopting "reel-to-reel" welding procedure,for contact welding,the output is high and less waste,it can obtain obvious shorter welding angle of V-shaped length and shorter welding area,and easy to control plate edge quality and weld quality.%在生产直径大于406 mm(16 in)高频焊管时,为了能正确评估并选择适合的焊接工艺,从焊缝质量、能耗等方面讨论了接触焊和感应焊的差异,并重点讨论了大管径机组对高频感应焊和高频接触焊的影响.综合分析对比得出,高频接触焊相对感应焊具有焊缝质量好、节能效果明显、不需要昂贵的活套和感应线圈以及复杂的阻抗器装置等优势,感应芯棒设计及维护简单方便,成材率高,并且当采用“卷对卷工艺”时,相对于感应焊,接触焊产量高、废品少,能够获得明显较短的焊接V形区长度和较短的焊接区,易于控制板边质量和焊缝质量.

  7. Effect of 16Cr Austenite Stainless Steel High Frequency Welding Parameters on Weld Microstructure and Properties%16Cr奥氏体不锈钢高频焊接参数对焊缝组织性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕宗岳; 严培林; 余晗; 汪海涛

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of 16Cr stainless steel high frequency welding parameter on weld microstructure and properties, under the different high frequency welding(HFW) parameters,the change of weld microstructure and properties of 16Cr stainless steel were studied by optical microscope(OM), scanning electron microscope(SEM) tensile test and bending test. The results showed that the weld formability of 16Cr austenitic stainless steel becomes better with the increase of welding speed. The content of δ-ferrite in weld show a trend of decrease after an initial increase with the increasing of welding heat input,accompanied by brittle σ-phase precipitation. The weld of 3.4 mm thickness 16Cr austenitic stainless steel has good formability,when welding speed about 10 m/min,welding heat input 2.9 kJ/cm, and with appropriate pressing force and the opening angle. The welded joints have good matching hardness and the weld tensile strength is close to the base material tensile strength. The microstructure of weld is mainly composed of austenite and δ-ferrite. But the welded joints have poor toughness, because of the oxide inclusions in weld.%为了分析16Cr不锈钢高频焊接参数对焊缝组织性能的影响,通过光学显微镜(OM)、扫描电镜(SEM)和拉伸、弯曲试验,分析了不同高频焊接参数下1Cr17Mn6Ni5N 不锈钢(以下简称16Cr不锈钢)焊缝组织与性能的变化情况。结果表明:16Cr奥氏体不锈钢高频焊随着焊接速度的增加,焊缝成形性能变好;焊缝中δ铁素体的含量随焊接热输入的增加先增后减,同时伴随σ脆性相析出;对于壁厚3.4 mm的16Cr奥氏体不锈钢,当焊接速度为10 m/min、焊接热输入为2.9 kJ/cm、并配以适当的挤压力和开口角时,焊缝成形及焊接接头硬度匹配良好,且焊缝抗拉强度接近母材抗拉强度,焊缝显微组织以奥氏体+δ铁素体为主,但由于焊缝存在大量

  8. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding.

  9. Advances in high temperature chemistry 1

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 1 describes the complexities and special and changing characteristics of high temperature chemistry. After providing a brief definition of high temperature chemistry, this nine-chapter book goes on describing the experiments and calculations of diatomic transition metal molecules, as well as the advances in applied wave mechanics that may contribute to an understanding of the bonding, structure, and spectra of the molecules of high temperature interest. The next chapter provides a summary of gaseous ternary compounds of the alkali metals used in

  10. Friction welding of a nickel free high nitrogen steel: influence of forge force on microstructure, mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrityunjoy Hazra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, nickel free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel specimens were joined by continuous drive friction welding process by varying the amount of forge (upsetting force and keeping other friction welding parameters such as friction force, burn-off, upset time and speed of rotation as constant at appropriate levels. The joint characterization studies include microstructural examination and evaluation of mechanical (micro-hardness, impact toughness and tensile and pitting corrosion behaviour. The integrity of the joint, as determined by the optical microscopy was very high and no crack and area of incomplete bonding were observed. Welds exhibited poor Charpy impact toughness than the parent material. Toughness for friction weld specimens decreased with increase in forge force. The tensile properties of all the welds were almost the same (irrespective of the value of the applied forge force and inferior to those of the parent material. The joints failed in the weld region for all the weld specimens. Weldments exhibited lower pitting corrosion resistance than the parent material and the corrosion resistance of the weld specimens was found to decrease with increase in forge force.

  11. Laser beam welding of high strength aluminium-lithium alloys; Laserstrahlschweissen von hochfesten Aluminium-Lithium Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enz, Josephin

    2012-07-01

    The present development in aircraft industry determined by the demand for a higher cost-effectiveness. Laser beam welding is one of the most promising joining technologies for the application in the aircraft industry through the considerable reduction of the production costs. Furthermore the weight of an aircraft structure can be reduced by the use of light and high strength aluminium alloys. This paper deals with the development of a process for the laser beam welding of a skin-stringer-joint where the Al-Li-alloy AA2196 is used as stringer material and the Al-Li-alloy AA2198 is used as skin and stringer material. By the use of design of experiments the optimal welding process parameters for different material combinations were determined which will be used for the welding of a 5-stringer panel. Therefore the weld seams of the joints were tested for irregularities and microstructural characteristics. In addition several mechanical tests were performed, which define the quality of the welded joint. Furthermore the influence of the oxide layer and the welding preparation on the welding performance was investigated. (orig.) [German] Die derzeitigen Entwicklungen im Flugzeugbau werden durch die allgemeine Forderung nach einer Steigerung der Wirtschaftlichkeit bestimmt. Das Laserstrahlschweissen ist dabei eines der vielversprechendsten Fuegeverfahren fuer die Anwendung im Flugzeugbau durch das die Herstellungskosten deutlich reduziert werden koennen. Zudem kann durch die Verwendung von leichten und hochfesten Aluminium-Legierungen das Gewicht einer Flugzeugstruktur zusaetzlich reduziert werden. Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit der Entwicklung eines Prozesses zum Laserstrahlschweissen einer Skin-Stringer-Verbindung aus den Aluminium-Lithium-Legierungen AA2196 (als Stringer-Werkstoff) und AA2198 (als Skin- und Stringer-Werkstoff). Unter Verwendung der statistischen Versuchsplanung wurden die optimalen Einstellungen der Schweissprozessparameter fuer die

  12. Fatigue lifetime of steel weldments with high resistance, rough welding, repaired by welding and hammered; Duree de vie en fatigue d'assemblages soudes en acier de construction a haute resistance, bruts de soudage, repares par soudage et marteles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braid, J.E.M. [Materials Technology Laboratory, Ottawa (Canada); Bell, R. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Carlton University, Ottawa (Canada); Militaru, D.V. [Centre for Surface Transportation Technology, Ottawa (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    It has been shown in literature that the propagation velocity of fatigue cracks and that the ratio da/dN are relatively independent of the elasticity limit. In order to better use high resistance steels solicited in fatigue, it is necessary to improve the fatigue resistance of weldments: better design and/or post-welding treatments. The improvements obtained by grinding, TIG-refusion, shot-blasting and hammering are indicated. The most part of this study concerns the fatigue resistance of longitudinal welds on rough T assembling, repaired by welding and hammered or not. The steel test pieces are of 350 MPa (specification CSA G 4021350WT) and of 550 MPa (specification HY80). The two steels have the same behavior in fatigue at the rough-welding state. The used repair method restore the initial fatigue characteristics of the rough-welding state. Compared with the rough-welding state, the hammering improves the fatigue resistance of steel weldments (550 MPa) of 175%. (O.M.)

  13. Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

    2006-01-15

    Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry

  14. Three-dimensional welding and cutting using high-power CO2 or YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Tiechuan; Chen, Jiming; Xiao, Rongshi; Bao, Yong

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, the theory of 3D laser welding and cutting was established firstly. Then the expert system for 3D laser processing and software of 3D laser processing CAD/CAM were developed, respectively. Under the guidance of these software, with high power CO2 laser, the 3D covers of a car have been cut and edge smoothed, which decrease the number of models and shorten the period of production. With adoption of this technology, the covers of extended Hong Qi cars and furthermore Da Hong Qi cars have been processed successfully, which will bring out the innovation of production design and the revolution of processing technology in manufacture industry.

  15. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  16. [FORMATION OF BILIODIGESTIVE AND INTERINTESTINAL ANASTOMOSES IN ENVIRONMENT OF BILIARY PERITONITIS, USING A HIGH FREQUENCY ELECTRIC WELDING IN EXPERIMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nychytaylo, M Yu; Furmanov, Yu O; Gutsulyak, A I; Savytska, I M; Lopatkina, K G; Zagriychuk, M S; Goman, A V

    2016-01-01

    In experiment on 20 rabbits a diffuse biliary peritonitis was simulated, using intraabdominal injection of a laboratory culture of E. coli suspension and a medicinal bile. In 24 h on background of peritonitis on excluded loop of a small bowel in accordance to method of Roux, using a high frequency electric welding with the help of apparatus Patonmed EKB3-300 a one-layered everting cholecystoenteroanastomosis and enteroenteroanastomosis was formated. In a 6 mo postoperatively a connection line was not revealed from outside or from inside, the signs of stenosis were absent. In environment of a diffuse biliary peritonitis a welding technologies have permitted to form a hermetic and competent biliodigestive and interintestinal anastomoses, the processes of a welding suture regeneration postoperatively have a typical course. Using a high frequency-electric welding it is possible to perform a one-staged reconstructive interventions in environment of a pronounced inflammation of tissues due to subsequent precise conjunction of mucosal sheets of connected organs, preventing the anastomotic stricture formation.

  17. Determination through the distortions analysis of the best welding sequence in longitudinal welds VATS electron beam welding FE simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, J., E-mail: julio@natec-ingenieros.co [Numerical Technologies, S.L., Marques de San Esteban No. 52, 33206 Gijon (Spain); Rodriguez, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Viesques, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Bayon, A. [Vacuum Vessel Group, Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Bouyer, F. [DCNS, Indret 44620 LA MONTAGNE (France); Pistono, J. [Department of Thermal Machines and Motors, University of Oviedo, Campus de Viesques, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Jones, L. [Vacuum Vessel Group, Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents a detailed finite element simulation of the longitudinal rib welds of Vessel Advanced Technology Segment (VATS) by e-beam welding. Nine different simulation sequences were carried out to explain the different mechanisms that drive the distortions process during welding and to lead to an optimum sequence which minimizes the final distortions. The simulations were used to guide the manufacture of the final sequence of the VATS. Distortion measurements taken after welding compared very well with the simulated results.

  18. High power laser welding of thick steel plates in a horizontal butt joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Yazdian, N.; Ma, J.; Kovacevic, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this investigation, two laser-based welding techniques, autogenous laser welding (ALW) and laser welding assisted with a cold wire (LWACW), were applied to join thick plates of a structural steel (A36) in a horizontal narrow gap butt joint configuration. The main practical parameters including welding method and laser power were varied to get the sound weld with a requirement to achieve a full penetration with the reinforcement at the back side of weld in just one pass. The weld-bead shape, cross-section and mechanical properties were evaluated by profilometer, micro-hardness test and optical microscope. In order to investigate the stability of laser-induced plasma plume, the emitted optical spectra was detected and analyzed by the spectroscopy analysis. It was found that at the laser power of 7 kW a fully penetrated weld with a convex back side of weld could be obtained by the LWACW. The microstructural examinations showed that for the ALW the acicular ferrite and for the LWACW the pearlite were formed in the heat affected zone (HAZ). The prediction of microstructure based on continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram and cooling curves obtained by thermocouple measurement were in good agreement with each other. According to the plasma ionization values obtained from the spectroscopy analysis the plume for both processes was recognized as dominated weakly ionized plasma including the main vaporized elemental composition. At the optimum welding condition (LWACW at the laser power of 7 kW) the fluctuation of the electron temperature was reduced. The spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that at the higher laser power more of the elemental compositions such as Mn and Fe were evaporated.

  19. Welding of glasses in optical and partial-optical contact via focal position adjustment of femtosecond-laser pulses at moderately high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hua; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-07-01

    We used 1030-nm femtosecond-laser pulses focused above/at/below the interface of two fused-silica glass substrates in optical and partial-optical contact to successfully weld them at a moderately high repetition rate of 600 kHz. Variation in the laser focal position for these two gap-distance regimes (optical and partial-optical contact) yields different bonding strengths (BSs) and machining mechanisms. The maximum bonding strength (58.2 MPa) can be achieved for a gap distance ≤λ /4 for optical-contact welding when laser focused below the interface, and the corresponding height of the welding seam was 23 μm. In addition, our results demonstrated that the "filamentation welding technique" is critical to the femtosecond-laser direct welding of glasses. Furthermore, line welding is significantly easier to realize when the femtosecond laser focuses at the interface in partial-optical-contact welding applications due to the combined effects of filamentation welding and ablation.

  20. Weldability of thin sheet metals by small-scale resistance spot welding using high-frequency inverter and capacitor-discharge power supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Dong, S. J.; Ely, K. J.

    2001-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted of the weldability of 0.2-mm-thick sheet aluminum, brass, and copper in small-scale resistance spot welding using a high-frequency inverter and a capacitor-discharge power supply. The results have been compared to those of previous investigations using a line-frequency alternating current power supply. The effects of electrode materials and process parameters on joint strength, nugget diameter, weld-metal expulsion and electrode-sheet sticking were studied. This work has also provided practical guidelines for selection of power supplies, process parameters (welding current/pulse energy, welding time/pulse width, electrode forces, etc.) and electrode materials for small-scale resistance spot welding of thin sheet aluminum, brass and copper.

  1. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  2. Fabrication of a microresonator-fiber assembly maintaining a high-quality factor by CO2 laser welding

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zhiwei; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhengming; Yao, Jinping; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate fabrication of a microtoroid resonator of a high-quality (high-Q) factor using femtosecond laser three-dimensional (3D) micromachining. A fiber taper is reliably assembled to the microtoroid using CO2 laser welding. Specifically, we achieve a high Q-factor of 2.12*10^6 in the microresonator-fiber assembly by optimizing the contact position between the fiber taper and the microtoroid.

  3. Study on Control Methods of Welding Porosity in Laser-arc Hybrid Welding for High Nitrogen Steels%高氮钢激光-电弧复合焊接气孔控制方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王力锋; 刘凤德; 刘薇娜; 田淼磊

    2016-01-01

    In order to master the control methods of welding porosity on laser-arc hybrid welding for high nitrogen steel, the effect of weld porosity on arc energy and laser energy and the vibration frequency are studied. Causes of welding porosity are analyzed in terms of porosity rate, and its effect is investigated on stability of welding processes through waveforms of current and voltage and droplet transfer. There is certain relevance between fluid flow in the melt pool and formation of welding porosity, and the influence on welding porosity is analyzed in terms of fluid flow in the melt pool. The keyhole is generated when laser power reaches up to a certain extent and condition of keyhole will affect porosity rate. Influence of porosity rate on condition of keyhole is analyzed according to keyhole's stress situation. The results shows that porosity rate of welding seam increased first and then decreased with the increasing of arc energy or laser energy, and porosity rate of welding seam is reduced to the lowest for just 0.49% while arc energy is 4 800 J (I=200 A,U=24 V) and the porosity rate of welding seam is only 0.14% when laser power is 2.8 kW, but porosity rate of welding seam is reduced greatly after work pieces are vibrated during hybrid welding. Porosity rate of welding seam decreased first and then increased with the increasing of vibration frequency. The number of welding porosity is inhibited efficiently by suitable arc energy or laser power, and inhibitory effect of welding porosity is best while vibration frequency amount to 35 Hz.%为了掌握高氮钢复合焊接气孔控制的有效方法,研究电弧能量、激光能量和振动频率对焊缝气孔的影响。从气孔率方面分析焊缝气孔的产生原因,并从电流和电压波形及熔滴过渡方面分析其对焊接过程稳定性的影响。熔池流动与焊缝气孔具有一定的关联性,并从熔池流动状态方面分析其对气孔的影响。激光匙孔的形成需要一

  4. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...

  5. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...... in the weld causing expulsion of the melt pool. Trailing beams were applied to melt additional material and ensure a melt pool. The method showed good results for increasing tolerances to impurities and reduction of scrapped parts from blowouts during laser welding....

  6. The effects of fillet formation on the strength of braze pressure welded joint with high frequency induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzumura, A.; Inagaki, Y.; Ikeshoji, T.T.; Yamazaki, T. [Graduate School of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Braze Pressure Welding (BPW) with high frequency induction heating had been invented as the new joining method for bonding general steel pipes for on-site piping without danger of fire and the dispersion in joint properties due to welder's skill. In the BPW, brazing filler is interlaid between the mating surfaces to be joined. The filler melts by heating up to joining temperature, then the welding pressure discharges it from the joining interface. At the same time, the base metals are pressure-welded to each other, and that the discharged liquid filler forms fillets around the joining area. The fillets have the effects both on relaxing the stress concentration at the joint and on increasing the joining area, which contributes to the strengthening of joint. And the pressure is comparatively low, so the deformation of joint is little. In this paper, in order to investigate the effects of fillet on strengthening the joint, the stress state around the joint area and the degree of the effect of stress concentration relaxation were analyzed by finite element analysis. So it was revealed that the fillets reduced the stress concentration and separated the maximum stress site from the edge of the joining interface. Experimentally, the fillet formation was confirmed around the BPW joining area and that BPW joint had the superior tensile strength to brazed or pressure-welded joints by tensile test of joints. (orig.)

  7. Effects of annealing time on the recovery of Charpy V-notch properties of irradiated high-copper weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1994-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. An important issue to be resolved is the effect on the toughness properties of reirradiating a vessel that has been annealed. This paper describes the annealing response of irradiated high-copper submerged-arc weld HSSI 73W. For this study, the weld has been annealed at 454 C (850 F) for lengths of time varying between 1 and 14 days. The Charpy V-notch 41-J (30-ft-lb) transition temperature (TT{sub 41J}) almost fully recovered for the longest period studied, but recovered to a lesser degree for the shorter periods. No significant recovery of the TT{sub 41J} was observed for a 7-day anneal at 343 C (650 F). At 454 C for the durations studied, the values of the upper-shelf impact energy of irradiated and annealed weld metal exceeded the values in the unirradiated condition. Similar behavior was observed after aging the unirradiated weld metal at 460 and 490 C for 1 week.

  8. Weld penetration and defect control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, B.A.

    1992-05-15

    Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

  9. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent.

  10. Process Optimization for Friction-Stir-Welded Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Kumar, K.; Mishra, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    Advanced high-strength M190 steel sheets were joined by friction-stir welding under different tool rotational and traversing speeds. The optical microstructure of the joints exhibited complete martensite and partial martensite at the weld nugget depending on the cooling rate during welding. The first heat-affected zone outside of the weld nugget revealed ferrite-pearlite phase aggregate, and the second heat-affected zone showed a tempered martensitic structure. The interplay of process variables in terms of peak temperature and cooling rate was studied to observe their effect on joint efficiency under shear testing. The peak hardness at weld nugget was close to the parent alloy at an intermediate cooling rate of 294 to 313 K/s. The lowest hardness was observed at the first heat-affected zone for all welded joints. Joint efficiency was dependent on relative quantity of ferrite-pearlite at first heat-affected zone. In that respect, the intermediate temperature to the tune of ~1193 K to 1273 K (~920 °C to 1000 °C) at the weld nugget was found to be beneficial for obtaining an adequate quantity of pearlite at the first heat-affected zone to provide joint efficiency of more than 50 pct of that of parent alloy.

  11. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  12. The reliability of the repair weld joints of aged high temperature components in fossil power boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Hiroyuki [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ohtani, Ryuichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, Kazuya [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Tomomitsu; Nishimura, Nobuhiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Komei [Japan Steel Works Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    It is of fundamental engineering importance to be able to give reliable assessments of the effective service life of the critical components used within fossil power plants, particularly for those operating for prolonged periods. It is common practice for such assessments to have been estimated using destructive tests, typically the stress rupture test, this having been recognized as one of the most reliable evaluation methods available. Its only drawback is that it often does not permit the component to be in use following the sampling of the test specimen without repairing. The current piece of work focuses on the reliability of the repair welds of components for specimens taken from fossil power plants, having been in service for prolonged periods. Several such repairs to welds have been made to an old power boiler, in particular to a superheater header which is fabricated from 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. Under close examination the repairs to the girth weldment showed susceptibilities of weld cracking, similar to that observed in as-manufactured material. Within the repaired region of the welded joint the microstructure, tensile properties and toughness seemed to be unaffected. The hardness attained its minimum value within the heat affected zone, HAZ of the repair weld, overlapping that of original girth weld HAZ. Furthermore, the stress rupture strength achieved its minimum value at the same position taking on the same value as the strength associated with the aged girth welded joint. (orig.)

  13. Method for laser spot welding monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassero, Giorgio

    1994-09-01

    As more powerful solid state laser sources appear on the market, new applications become technically possible and important from the economical point of view. For every process a preliminary optimization phase is necessary. The main parameters, used for a welding application by a high power Nd-YAG laser, are: pulse energy, pulse width, repetition rate and process duration or speed. In this paper an experimental methodology, for the development of an electrooptical laser spot welding monitoring system, is presented. The electromagnetic emission from the molten pool was observed and measured with appropriate sensors. The statistical method `Parameter Design' was used to obtain an accurate analysis of the process parameter that influence process results. A laser station with a solid state laser coupled to an optical fiber (1 mm in diameter) was utilized for the welding tests. The main material used for the experimental plan was zinc coated steel sheet 0.8 mm thick. This material and the related spot welding technique are extensively used in the automotive industry, therefore, the introduction of laser technology in production line will improve the quality of the final product. A correlation, between sensor signals and `through or not through' welds, was assessed. The investigation has furthermore shown the necessity, for the modern laser production systems, to use multisensor heads for process monitoring or control with more advanced signal elaboration procedures.

  14. Weld pool image sensor for pulsed MIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Pengfei; Sun Zhenguo; Huang Cao; Chen Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Visual image sensor is developed to detect the weld pool images in pulsed MIG welding. An exposure controller, which is composed of the modules of the voltage transforming, the exposure parameters presetting, the complex programmable logic device (CPLD) based logic controlling, exposure signal processing, the arc state detecting, the mechanical iris driving and so on, is designed at first. Then, a visual image sensor consists of an ordinary CCD camera, optical system and exposure controller is established. The exposure synchronic control logic is described with very-high-speed integrated circuit hardware description language (VHDL) and programmed with CPLD, to detect weld pool images at the stage of base current in pulsed MIG welding. Finally, both bead on plate welding and V groove filled welding are carried out, clear and consistent weld pool images are acquired.

  15. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  16. Cognitive high speed defect detection and classification in MWIR images of laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapido, Yago L.; Rodriguez-Araújo, Jorge; García-Díaz, Antón; Castro, Gemma; Vidal, Félix; Romero, Pablo; Vergara, Germán.

    2015-07-01

    We present a novel approach for real-time defect detection and classification in laser welding processes based on the use of uncooled PbSe image sensors working in the MWIR range. The spatial evolution of the melt pool was recorded and analyzed during several welding procedures. A machine learning approach was developed to classify welding defects. Principal components analysis (PCA) is used for dimensionality reduction of the melt pool data. This enhances classification results and enables on-line classification rates close to 1 kHz with non-optimized code prototyped in Python. These results point to the feasibility of real-time defect detection.

  17. Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HY100 and HY130 High Strength Steels During Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    High Yields) Steels for pressure hulls and special applications like flight decks where aluminum is impractical to use. HY80 is the most famous and...most widely used of the HYQ & T steels developed. Interest waned in widely using the steels with strengths above HY80 because of cracking problems...Reduction of Residual Stress and Distortion in HYI00 and HYI30 High Strength Steels During Welding CY) by _RICHARD ALLEN BASS B.S. Electrical

  18. Rotating arc horizontal narrow gap welding of high strength quenched and tempered steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Ning; Yang Chunli; Han Yanfei; Jia Chuanbao; Du Yongpeng; Zhang Linlin

    2010-01-01

    Rotating arc horizontal narrow gap welding of quenched & tempered ( Q&T) steel was innovatively performed for solving the bottleneck that the molten pool sagged due to the gravity. The shapely multilayer single pass horizontal joint could be obtained by using the rotating arc welding process. The cold crack was not observed in the joint without controlling the heat input and selecting the consumables intentionally. Mkrostructure of the joint could be divided into three zones:base metal zone ( BMZ) , heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld zone ( WZ). Because of the characteristic of the rotating arc horizontal welding process, the defects in the joints were slag inclusion formed at the inUrlayer of lower side wall. The tensile strength and hardness of HAZ and WZ were larger than those of BMZ. The impact toughness in WZ, HAZ and BM at 0℃ is equal to 115, 212 and 236 J, respectively.

  19. Effects of welding wire composition and welding process on the weld metal toughness of submerged arc welded pipeline steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-liang Ren; Fu-ren Xiao; Peng Tian; Xu Wang; Bo Liao

    2009-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements in welding wires and submerged arc welding process on the microstructures and low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals have been investigated.The results indicate that the optimal contents of alloying elements in welding wires can improve the low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals because the proentectoid ferrite and bainite formations can be suppressed,and the fraction of acicular ferrite increases.However,the contents of alloying elements need to vary along with the welding heat input.With the increase in welding heat input,the contents of alloying elements in welding wires need to be increased accordingly.The microstructures mainly consisting of acicular ferrite can be obtained in weld metals after four-wire submerged arc welding using the wires with a low carbon content and appropriate contents of Mn,Mo,Ti-B,Cu,Ni,and RE,resulting in the high low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals.

  20. High-frequency power supply for making electro-resistance-welded tubes. Denhokanyo koshuha dengen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, M. (Meidensha Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-27

    This paper introduces the current status of the Meidensha Corporation mainly on parts of a large-capacity electron-tube type high-frequency power supply for making electro-resistance-weld tubes (RFG). The company produces RFGs with oscillation output ranging from 65 to 1300 kW. The company uses oscillation tubes made by Nippon Electric Company for an oscillation output of 400 kW or lower, and those made by Siemens for above 400 kW. A water-cooled cylindrical capacitor, which has a unit capacity about five times as much of a disk type porcelain capacitor, enables constructing a compact tank circuit. The output from the oscillator driving power supply is adjusted by a thyristor AC control on the primary side of a positive transformer. The positive transformer (TF) adopts water cooling type for 100 kW or lower, and oil-filled self-cooling type for above 100 kW. The DC high-voltage power supply uses the power of the primary side of the positive TF which is controlled by a thyrisctor AC controller, and subjected to a three-face full-wave rectification using high-voltage silicon diodes. The oscillation tube, which operates on thermal electrons is heated to a prescribed temperature, of which value is controlled by the cathode heating power supply voltage. The voltage adjustment uses a constant voltage transformers system. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Research on energy distribution of AD CMT advanced welding with aluminum alloy sheet%铝合金薄板交流CMT焊接过程能量分配研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞英; 穆森; 王军

    2013-01-01

    以1060铝合金为对象,采用交流CMT焊接技术进行平板堆焊,研究了交流CMT焊接过程中用于母材熔化能量和焊丝熔化能量的精确控制.结果表明,通过变换EN、EP的数值及比例可以对交流CMT焊接过程中的能量分配进行控制进而控制焊缝成形.当EN/EP=1∶1时,焊接过程中输入的总能量不变,由于删值的变化使对母材连续热输入的方式发生改变,会使熔深余高变化,随着删个数的增加、熔深逐渐减小、余高逐渐增加.当EN+EP=14时,变化EN的个数.当EN=0时相当于直流反接,此时焊丝的熔化系数最小,熔深最大,余高最小;随着EN的增加,焊缝熔深减小,对焊丝的热输入逐渐增加,余高增加.%With AD CMT Advanced welding technology for plate welding on 1060 aluminum alloy targeted,the influences of polarity transform is studied on weld figuration during AD CMT Advanced welding.The results indicate that transforming EN,EP values and proportion to control the energy during the welding process thereby will control the weld figuration.When the EN/EP of 1∶1,the total energy input in the welding process is constant,while change on continuous heat input to the base mental,the penetration and width of the weld joint will be changed.Change the number of EN when EN+EP are 14.When EN is 0,that is equivalent to conventional CMT,wire melting coefficient is minimum,penetration is maximum and width weld joint is minimum.With the increasing of EN weld penetration decreases,the heat input to wire increases gradually and weld width increases.

  2. [INVITED] Laser welding of glasses at high repetition rates - Fundamentals and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sören; Zimmermann, Felix; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We report on the welding of various glasses with ultrashort laser pulses. Femtosecond laser pulses at repetition rates in the MHz range are focused at the interface between two substrates, resulting in multiphoton absorption and heat accumulation from successive pulses. This leads to local melting and subsequent resolidification which can be used to weld the glasses. The fundamental interaction process was studied using an in-situ micro Raman setup to measure the laser induced temperature distribution and its temporal decay. The induced network changes were analyzed by Raman spectrocopy identifying an increase of three and four membered silicon rings within the laser irradiated area. In order to determine the stability of the laser welded samples a three point bending test was used. Thereby, we identified that the maximal achievable breaking strength is limited by laser induced stress surrounding the modified material. To minimize the amount of stress bursts of laser pulses or an post processing annealing step can be applied. Besides fused silica, we welded borosilicate glasses and glasses with a low thermal expansion coefficient. Even the welding of different glass combinations is possible demonstrating the versatility of ultrashort pulse induced laser welding.

  3. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  4. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling......Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  5. High Reliability Technology of the Weld Zone of High-Frequency Electric Resistance Welding Linepipes%HFW管线钢管焊缝的高可靠性技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宏; 王志太; 刘振伟

    2015-01-01

    为了解决HFW管线钢管焊缝可靠性问题, 通过使用高速摄像机实现了HFW焊接过程的动态可视化, 并构建了一个HFW数值分析模型, 从而优化HFW焊接条件并实现焊缝区域的均匀加热. 试验结果表明, 焊接条件优化后开发出的HFW钢管焊缝金属的夏比韧脆转变温度达到-90 ℃,且具有较高的低温吸收能量值. 此外, 开发的点融合串列束超声波检验方法实现了焊缝区氧化物的实时连续检测, 其灵敏度为常规方法的10倍以上.%To address the significant need for weld seam reliability,the HFW phenomena were visualized dynamically using a high-speed video camera,and an HFW numerical analysis model was constructed to develop optimization technology of HFW conditions and the homogeneous heating technology of the weld zone. The Charpy fracture transition temperature of the weld metal of the developed steel pipe was -90℃ showing the high absorbed energy value at cryogenic temperature. Furthermore, real-time continuous detection technology of the oxide of the weld zone was developed by a point converging tandem beam ultrasonic inspection method. This technology achieved high sensitivity 10 times or more than that of the conventional method.

  6. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew J. (R.J. Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA); Faraone, Kevin M. (BWX Technologies, Inc., Lynchburg, VA); Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  7. The effect of variable loading onintegrity of a welded joint of high alloy-steel X20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Burzić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In present paper, experimental investigations have included the effect of exploitation conditions (exploitation time and temperature on properties of high-cycle fatigue and parameters of fatigue-crack growth of a welded joint of steel X20 CrMoV 12-1 (X20. The effect of exploitation conditions was analysed by testing new pipe and the pipe having been exploited for 116 000 hours. The results obtained by testing and their analysis provide a practical contribution to assessment of quality of a welded joint of steel X20, the aim of which is revitalisation and extension of exploitation life of vital components of thermal power plants manufactured from high-alloy steel for operation at elevated temperatures.

  8. Failure mode transition in AHSS resistance spot welds. Part I. Controlling factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouranvari, M., E-mail: mpouranvari@yahoo.com [Young Researchers Club, Dezful Branch, Islamic Azad University, Dezful (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Marashi, S.P.H. [Mining and Metallurgical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Interfacial to pullout failure mode transition for AHSS RSWs is studied. {yields} An analytical mode is proposed to predict failure mode of AHSS RSWs. {yields} Hardness characteristics of RSWs plays key role in the failure mode transition. - Abstract: Failure mode of resistance spot welds is a qualitative indicator of weld performance. Two major types of spot weld failure are pull-out and interfacial fracture. Interfacial failure, which typically results in reduced energy absorption capability, is considered unsatisfactory and industry standards are often designed to avoid this occurrence. Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) spot welds exhibit high tendency to fail in interfacial failure mode. Sizing of spot welds based on the conventional recommendation of 4t{sup 0.5} (t is sheet thickness) does not guarantee the pullout failure mode in many cases of AHSS spot welds. Therefore, a new weld quality criterion should be found for AHSS resistance spot welds to guarantee pull-out failure. The aim of this paper is to investigate and analyze the transition between interfacial and pull-out failure modes in AHSS resistance spot welds during the tensile-shear test by the use of analytical approach. In this work, in the light of failure mechanism, a simple analytical model is presented for estimating the critical fusion zone size to prevent interfacial fracture. According to this model, the hardness ratio of fusion zone to pull-out failure location and the volume fraction of voids in fusion zone are the key metallurgical factors governing type of failure mode of AHSS spot welds during the tensile-shear test. Low hardness ratio and high susceptibility to form shrinkage voids in the case of AHSS spot welds appear to be the two primary causes for their high tendency to fail in interfacial mode.

  9. Welding of solid wood

    OpenAIRE

    Ivica Župčić; Goran Mihulja; Andrija Bogner; Ivica Grbac; Ivica @up~i}, Goran Mihulja, Andrija Bogner, Ivica Grbac,; Božidar Hrovat

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the up-to-date knowledge and results of the application of wood welding techniques at the Faculty of Forestry University of Zagreb. Wood welding technologies have been developed as a new way of bonding timber by using high temperature generatedby friction and pressure. Timber is assembled without any adhesives. During the process the surface layer of timber (lignin), which is in direct contact with its counterpart, melts due to high pressure and temperature, which is usual...

  10. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  11. Fusion Welding Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    RD-AlSO 253 FUSION WELDING RESEARCH(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH L/I CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING T W EAGAR ET AL. 30 RPR 85...NUMBER 12. GOV’ ACCESSION NO. 3. RECICIE-S CATALOG NUMBER 4. T TL V nd Subtitle) S. P OFRPR PERIOD COVERED 5t h A~nnual Technical Report Fusion Welding ...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc, development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal

  12. New trends for the NDT of aeronautic welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ithurralde, G.; Simonet, D.; Choffy, J.-P.; Bernard, L.

    2001-04-01

    Recent advances in laser beam welding, electron beam welding and friction stir welding enable to join aeronautic and space alloys (mainly aluminum based) and think about new welded design for structural parts at a lower cost. This paper deals with both the non destructive testing approach implemented for welding process optimization, and the NDT multi-sensors tools selected because of their ability for on-line defect tracking automation.

  13. The study of measuring technology on the dynamic mechanical properties of welded joint with high strain rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, to meet the needs of studying work of dynamic mechanical properties of welded joint, the dynamic mechanical properties of welded joint were measured by means of SHPB(Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar).The dynamic mechanical property's curves of every part of welded joint were obtained. For studying the dynamic behavior of mechanical heterogeneity of welded joint, important data were offered. The method of test creates a new way of studying dynamic mechanical properties of welded joint.

  14. FORMATION MECHANISM FOR THE NANOSCALE AMORPHOUS INTERFACE IN PULSE-WELDED AL/FE BIMETALLIC SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jingjing; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Zijiao; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin

    2016-05-20

    Pulse or impact welding traditionally has been referred to as “solid-state” welding. By integrating advanced interface characterizations and diffusion calculations, we report that the nanoscale amorphous interface in the pulse-welded Al/Fe bimetallic system is formed by rapid heating and melting of a thin Al layer at the interface, diffusion of iron atoms in the liquid aluminum, and subsequent rapid quenching with diffused iron atoms in solution. This finding challenges the commonly held belief regarding the solid-state nature of the impact-based welding process for dissimilar metals. Elongated ultra-fine grains with high dislocation density and ultra-fine equiaxed grains also are observed in the weld interface vicinity on the steel and aluminum sides, respectively, which further confirms that melting and the resulted recrystallization occurred on the aluminum side of the interface.

  15. Manufacturing of 25 mm heavy-wall linepipe using the high frequency induction (HFI) welding technique, a challenge for a pipe manufacturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazedakis, Athanasios S.; Voudouris, Nikolaos G. [Corinth Pipeworks Thisvi Plant, Viotia, (Greece); Musslewhite, Mike [CPW America, Houston, TX, (United States)

    2010-07-01

    High frequency inductive welding is widely used in the pipeline industry to process longitudinally welded pipes from hot-rolled strip. Increased demand has caused CPW-Thisvi to expand HFI process limits from 20.6 mm to 25 mm for high grade applications. This paper reports on the development of this process and presents the technical specifications. The technology used to make possible the use of HFI up to X60 are described in detail. The theoretical analysis was performed using a finite element model. It was used to determine the new forming and welding parameters required to optimize production. The CPW also designed specifically heavy wall weld seam ultrasonic inspection for HFI pipes. Results showed properties which were homogenous and satisfied API 5L requirements. This study also showed the interesting potential of micro-alloyed steels.

  16. Effect of weld heat input on toughness and structure of HAZ of a new super-high strength steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wang Juan; Li Yajiang; Liu Peng

    2003-04-01

    Fracture morphology and fine structure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of HQ130 super-high strength steel are studied by means of SEM, TEM and electron diffraction technique. Test results indicated that the structure of HAZ of HQ130 steel was mainly lath martensite (ML), in which there were a lot of dislocations in the sub-structure inside ML lath, the dislocation density was about (0.3 ∼ 0.9) × 1012/cm2. No obvious twin was observed in the HAZ under the condition of normal weld heat input. By controlling weld heat input ($E \\leq$ 20 kJ/cm), the impact toughness in the HAZ can be assured.

  17. EMAT weld inspection and weld machine diagnostic system for continuous coil processing lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Wayne M.; MacLauchlan, Daniel T.; Geier, Dan P.; Lang, Dennis D.

    1996-11-01

    Weld breaks of steel coil during cold rolling and continuous pickling operations are a significant source of lost productivity and product yield. Babcock and Wilcox Innerspec Technologies has developed a weld process control system which monitors the key variables of the welding process and determines the quality of the welds generated by flash butt welding equipment. This system is known as the Temate 2000 Automated Flash Butt Weld Inspection and Weld Machine Diagnostic System. The Temate 2000 system utilizes electro- magnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) technology as the basis for performing on-line, real-time, nondestructive weld quality evaluation. This technique accurately detects voids, laps, misalignment and over/under trim conditions in the weld. Results of the EMAT weld inspection are immediately presented to the weld machine operator for disposition. Welding process variables such as voltage, current, platen movements and upset pressures are monitored and collected with the high speed data acquisition system. This data is processed and presented in real-time display to indicate useful welding process information such as platen crabbing, upset force, peak upset current, and many others. Alarming for each variable is provided and allows detailed maintenance reports and summary information to be generated. All weld quality and process parameter data are stored, traceable to each unique weld, and available for post process evaluation. Installation of the Temate 2000 system in a major flat rolled steel mill has contributed to near elimination of weld breakage and increased productivity at this facility.

  18. 高铬镍合金钢焊接设备的选择%Selection of Welding Equipment for Alloy with High Cr-Ni Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周永安; 王万民; 史静

    2001-01-01

    结合武汉石化制氢装置改造工程中高铬镍合金钢的焊接施工,分析高铬镍耐热合金的焊接特点、工艺要求,以及对相匹配焊材的选用、对焊接设备的使用要求。通过焊机的性能比较,选择了具有高频自动引弧功能的YC-300WP4VTA型焊机,确保了该工程中高铬镍合金钢的焊接质量。%Based on welding construction of alloy with high Cr-Ni content inthe reconstructive project of Wu Han petrochemical hydrogen production unit, the article analyzes welding characteristic of heat- resistance alloy with high Cr-Ni content, technology requirement, the selection of matching welding material and operation instruction of welding equipment. By comparing performance, YC- 300WP4VTA welding machine is selected in the reconstructive project, which has high frequency and function of automatically striking the arc, and it ensures the welding quality of alloy with high Cr-Ni content in the project.

  19. The Development of High Frequency Welded Pipe with Large Radius-thickness Ratio%大径厚比高频焊管的开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李烨; 陈浮; 冷洪刚; 张毅; 孙广东

    2015-01-01

    根据大径厚比圆管的特点 ,选用高效、低成本的高频焊接生产方式 ,采用线性排辊成型工艺 ,并通过对大径厚比高频焊管的铣边、成型、焊接、定径等工艺的研究 ,成功地开发出径厚比≥100的高频焊接圆管 Φ508 × 5 ,该焊管成功地应用于太阳能光伏发电装置.%Based on the characteristics of high frequency welded pipes with large radius-thickness ratio , a highly efficient welding production mode with low cost was applied in this project .Adopting linear cage roll forming process ,and through research of milling ,molding ,welding ,sizing process of making the large diameter-thick ratio of high frequency welded pipe ,the researchers successfully developed the high frequency welded pipe 508 x 5 with a diameter thickness ratio of 100 or more 5 ,the welded tube was suc-cessfully applied to solar energy photovoltaic devices.

  20. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  1. The Influence of Weld Metal Alloying Additions to Extend the Heat Input Range for the Submerged Arc Welding of High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-16

    in the weld metal is planned to be two fold. First, the for- mation of niobium carbide precipitates is expected to reduce the amount of free carbon...and niobium carbide ) in the matrix and more uniform mechanical proper- ties are anticipated. Second, The combination of two kinds of precipitates...produced by a consumables manufacturer) will be used to generate welds for mechanical and impact toughness data. Additionally, the e-copper and niobium

  2. Highly efficient welding power supply. Final report, May 1, 1978-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thommes, J M

    1980-09-01

    The results and findings of an energy efficient welding power development project are presented. The power source developed is to be used for electric arc welding processes in which 3.5 trillion Btu of energy (1978 example year) can be saved annually. The power source development incorporates the use of switch mode power supply techniques in order to convert industrial supply mains (230/460 VAC 3 phi 60 Hz) to appropriate welding voltages and currents (up to 32 volts/up to 300 amps). A series capacitor switch mode power circuit was the circuit technique chosen in order to optimize energy efficiency, costs, reliability, size/weight, and welding performance. Test results demonstrated an effective efficiency (taking into account idle power consumption) of 80 to 91% for the energy efficient power source while the conventional types of power sources tested ranged from 41 to 74% efficiency. Line power factor was also improved for the energy efficient power source. Field tests indicated additional refinements of weld process performance and power source audible noise emission reduction could be beneficial.

  3. A study on consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Wang Yuxin; Feng Jicai

    2009-01-01

    A consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding method has been studied. This method is different from the traditional TIG welding because it introduces an MIG welding torch into the traditional TIG welding system. An indirect arc is generated between the consumable electrode of the MIG welding torch and the tungsten electrode of the TIG welding torch, but not generated between the tungsten electrode of the welding torch and the base metal. Welding current flows from the consumable electrode to the tungsten electrode in the free-burning indirect arc. The consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding not only rapidly melts the welding wire but also effectively restrains the excessive fusion of the base metal. The welding experiment and the theoretical analysis confirm that this method can obtain a high deposition rate and a low dilution ratio during the welding process.

  4. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  5. Optimum Design and Development of High Strength and Toughness Welding Wire for Pipeline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuixin; Xue, Haitao; Yin, Fuxing; Peng, Huifen; Zhi, Lei; Wang, Sixu

    Pipeline steel with higher strength(>800MPa) has been gradually used in recent years, so how to achieve good match of base metal and weld deposit is very important for its practical application. Based on the alloy system of 0.02-0.04%C, 2.0%Mn and 0.5%Si, four different kinds of welding wires were designed and produced. The effects of alloy elements on phase transformation and mechanical properties were analyzed. Experimental results show that the designed steels with the addition of 2-4% Ni+Cr+Mo and 800MPa) and good elongation (>15%). The microstructure of deposits metal is mainly composed of granular bainite and M-A constituents with the mean size of 0.2-07μm are dispersed on ferritic matrix. The deposited metals have good match of strength (>800MPa) and impact toughness (>130J) which well meet the requirement of pipeline welding.

  6. High temperature creep properties and microstructural examinations of P92 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalck, Charlotte; Giroux, Pierre-Francois [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); MINES ParisTech, UMR CNRS, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux; Fournier, Benjamin; Barcelo, Francoise; Dalle, France; Ivan, Tournie [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laurent, Forest [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/LTA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Francoise [MINES ParisTech, UMR CNRS, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux

    2010-07-01

    The present study deals with the creep properties of welded joints made of P92 steels. The purpose is to determine the weakest zone at 550 C under various load levels (160-240 MPa) and to investigate the evolution of the microstructure during creep. The study of the fracture surfaces and the microstructural examination of welded joints prior to and after creep tests allow to investigate damage development. Ductile fracture occurs in the heat affected zone, more precisely, in the intercritical area, together with pronounced necking. Observation of the necking area shows many cavities and cracks. (orig.)

  7. Welding of silver nanowire networks via flash white light and UV-C irradiation for highly conductive and reliable transparent electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-08-01

    In this work, silver nanowire inks with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) binders were coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and welded via flash white light and ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiation to produce highly conductive transparent electrodes. The coated silver nanowire films were firmly welded and embedded into PET substrate successfully at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash white light welding system and UV-C irradiation. The effects of light irradiation conditions (light energy, irradiation time, pulse duration, and pulse number) on the silver nanowire networks were studied and optimized. Bending fatigue tests were also conducted to characterize the reliability of the welded transparent conductive silver nanowire films. The surfaces of the welded silver nanowire films were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the transmittance of the structures was measured using a spectrophotometer. From the results, a highly conductive and transparent silver nanowire film with excellent reliability could be achieved at room temperature under ambient conditions via the combined flash white light and UV-C irradiation welding process.

  8. Thermo-mechanical Modeling for Residual Stresses of Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    ABDUL ARIF; ABHISHEK; K. N. Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an advanced joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. FSW produces a weld that is strong than the base material because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material. FSW produces no fumes and can join aluminum alloys, magnesium, steels, copper and titanium. In this study, a thermo-mechanical model with improved potential is developed to study the formation of residual stress field in dissimilar ...

  9. Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagesen, Larry K. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Madison, Jonathan D.

    2012-05-01

    A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

  10. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  11. Material Flow and Oxide Particle Distributions in Friction-Stir Welded F/M-ODS Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Jin, Hyun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion in ODS(Oxide dispersion strengthened) steel. However, these advantages will disappear while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. There is only limited literature available on the joining of ODS steels. Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered to be the best welding technique for welding ODS steels as the technique helps in retaining the homogeneous nano-oxide particles distributions in matrix. FSW is a solid.state, hot.shear joining process in which a rotating tool with a shoulder and terminating in a threaded pin, moves along the butting surfaces of two rigidly clamped plates placed on a backing plate. Heat generated by friction at the shoulder and to a lesser extent at the pin surface, softens the material being welded. Severe plastic deformation and flow of this plasticised metal occurs as the tool is translated along the welding direction. Material is transported from the front of the tool to the trailing edge where it is forged into a joint. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels. This study found that, during FSW, the forward movement of the tool pin results in loose contact between the tool pin and the receding material on the advancing side.

  12. X65级高频焊接钢管爆裂原因分析%Cause Analysis on Bursting of X65 High Frequency Welded Steel Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张良; 罗金恒; 冯耀荣; 张华; 张广利

    2011-01-01

    Bursting reasons for the φ457 mm× 7.1 mm X65 grade high frequency welded (HFW) pipeline was analyzed by means of chemical compositions analysis, mechanical properties test, metallographic examination and scanning electron microscope analysis.The results show that existing cold welding defects in the welding line and disqualification of impact ductility of the welding line were main reasons for the bursting.The effective bearing area reduced because of the cold welding defects and the original cracks initiated and expanded in the welding line.At the same time the ability of resistance the crack spreading was worsened because of low impact ductility of the welding line.So the X65 grade pipeline burst at the welding line under the force of hydraulic pressure test.%通过化学成分分析、力学性能测试、金相检验以及扫描电镜分析等方法对某规格为φ457 mm×7.1 mm的X65级高频焊(HFW)钢管水压试验时发生爆裂的原因进行了分析.结果表明:钢管爆裂失效是由于其直焊缝上存在冷焊缺陷以及焊缝冲击韧度不合格所致;焊缝中存在冷焊缺陷使其有效承载面积减小,原始裂纹在冷焊缺陷处萌生并扩展,加之焊缝冲击韧度低,抗裂纹扩展能力差,在水压试验压力作用下最终导致该钢管于焊缝处失稳爆裂.

  13. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  14. Advances in Very High Frequency Power Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Milovan

    . Excellent performance and small size of magnetic components and capacitors at very high frequencies, along with constant advances in performance of power semiconductor devices, suggests a sizable shift in consumer power supplies market into this area in the near future. To operate dc-dc converter power...... to be applied, especially at low power levels where gating loss becomes a significant percentage of the total loss budget. Various resonant gate drive methods have been proposed to address this design challenge, with varying size, cost, and complexity. This dissertation presents a self-oscillating resonant gate...

  15. 薄壁高频电阻焊管焊缝的爬波检测%Creeping Wave Testing for Weld of Thin-walled High-frequency Electric Resistance Welded Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘正红; 方晓东; 余国民; 余洋; 苏继权

    2014-01-01

    电阻焊管焊缝中易出现的缺陷有未熔合(冷焊)、裂纹、夹杂等,该类缺陷主要为沿焊缝延伸的面积型缺陷,采用超声检测。根据薄壁高频电阻焊管焊缝的缺陷特征,选用了超声爬波检测。阐述了超声爬波检测的原理、特点和工艺方法,设计了爬波检测专用探头和对比试块。实际检测结果表明,爬波检测是一种新型高效的检测方法,证明了爬波检测技术在薄壁电阻焊管焊缝检测中的可行性。%Some defects easily appear in weld of HFW pipe, such as incomplete fusion (cold welding), crack, inclusion etc. The above defects are mainly area type defects along weld extension. These defects can be detected by creeping wave testing according to defects characteristics of thin-walled high-frequency electric resistance welded pipe. In this article, it expatiated the detection principle, features and process method of the creeping wave testing method, designed the creeping wave testing special probe and the reference blocks. The practical detection results showed that the creeping wave testing is a new type of high efficient detection method, and the creeping wave detection technology feasibility in thin-walled high-frequency electric resistance welded pipe was proved.

  16. Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Baliga, B Jayant

    2012-01-01

    Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts describes devices utilized in power transmission and distribution equipment, and for very high power motor control in electric trains and steel-mills. Since these devices must be capable of supporting more than 5000-volts in the blocking mode, this books covers operation of devices rated at 5,000-V, 10,000-V and 20,000-V. Advanced concepts (the MCT, the BRT, and the EST) that enable MOS-gated control of power thyristor structures are described and analyzed in detail. In addition, detailed analyses of the silicon IGBT, as well as the silicon carbide MOSFET and IGBT, are provided for comparison purposes. Throughout the book, analytical models are generated to give a better understanding of the physics of operation for all the structures. This book provides readers with: The first comprehensive treatment of high voltage (over 5000-volts) power devices suitable for the power distribution, traction, and motor-control markets;  Analytical formulations for all the device ...

  17. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed...... as a hybrid CO2-laser and GTAW welding process in 2 mm pure copper sheets. The purpose was to identify maximum welding speeds for the three independent welding processes, i.e. GTAW alone, laser alone and combined processes. After welding, representative welds were quality assesed according to inernational...... norms. The paper describes the results obtained, showing significant productivity improvements and good weld qualities applying laser hybrid welding....

  18. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed...... as a hybrid CO2-laser and GTAW welding process in 2 mm pure copper sheets. The purpose was to identify maximum welding speeds for the three independent welding processes, i.e. GTAW alone, laser alone and combined processes. After welding, representative welds were quality assesed according to inernational...... norms. The paper describes the results obtained, showing significant productivity improvements and good weld qualities applying laser hybrid welding....

  19. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion a

  20. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion

  1. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  2. 高频焊接钢管焊缝的超声波自动检测工艺%Automated Ultrasonic Inspection Technology for Weld Seam of High Frequency Welding Pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志刚

    2011-01-01

    在高频焊接钢管焊缝自动超声波检测的实际工作中,精确的焊缝跟踪较难实现,易影响检测的可靠性.通过对超声波检测技术进行分析,利用6 dB声束全壁厚覆盖区进行检测,提出了一套超声波检测新工艺.实践证明:该工艺可以在焊缝跟踪不精确的情况下实现可靠的超声波检测,为高频焊接钢管焊缝自动超声波检测提供了一套有效的检测方法.%During the automated ultrasonic inspection of weld seam of high frequency welding(HFW) pipes,it is very difficult to track the weld seam accurately, which will affect the reliability of inspection easily. Through the analysis of ultrasonic inspection techniques, and inspecting with 6 dB sound beam full wall thickness overlap area, a new set of ultrasonic inspection technology was put forward. Practice showed that, in the event of inexact seam track, the technology can assure the reliable inspection result, and provided a effective method for the automated ultrasonic inspection of weld seams of HFW pipes.

  3. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  4. 热丝TIG焊方法最新研究进展%Research on Development of Hot-wire TIG Welding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵福海; 华学明; 叶欣; 吴毅雄

    2011-01-01

    综述了各类热丝TIG焊方法的特点及其技术与工艺难点,并着重阐述了近些年来研究较多的脉冲加热热丝TIG焊、窄间隙热丝TIG焊、超高速热丝TIG焊的研究进展.%The characteristics of hot-wire welding process and the principles and technical difficulties of many kinds of hot-wire welding process were briefly introduced. The research progress of several advanced hot- wire welding processes in recent years, including pulse-heated hot-wire TIG welding process, narrow gap hot-wire TIG welding process and ultra-high-speed hot-wire welding process was introduced.

  5. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Ebrahimzadeh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  6. A study of processes for welding pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, J. (ed.)

    1991-07-01

    A review was made of exisiting and potential processes for welding pipelines: fusion welding (arc, electron beam, laser, thermit) and forge welding (friction, flash, magnetically impelled arc butt, upset butt, explosive, shielded active gas, gas pressure). Consideration of J-lay operations gave indications that were reflections of the status of the processes in terms of normal land and offshore S-lay operation: forge welding processes, although having promise require considerable development; fusion welding processes offer several possibilities (mechanized GMA welding likely to be used in 1991-2); laser welding requires development in all pipeline areas: a production machine for electron beam welding will involve high costs. Nondestructive testing techniques are also reviewed. Demand for faster quality assessment is being addressed by speeding radiographic film processing and through the development of real time radiography and automatic ultrasonic testing. Conclusions on most likely future process developments are: SMAW with cellulosic electrodes is best for tie-ins, short pip runs; SMAW continues to be important for small-diameter lines, although mechanized GMA could be used, along with mechanical joining, MIAB, radial fraction, and flash butt; mechanized GMA welding is likely to predominate for large diameter lines and probably will be used for the first J-lay line (other techniques could be used too); and welding of piping for station facilities involves both shop welding of sub-assemblies and on-site welding of pipe and sub-assemblies to each other (site welding uses both SMAW and GMAW). Figs, tabs.

  7. Influence of welding parameters and post-weld aging on tensile properties and fracture location of AA2139-T351 friction-stir-welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Prisco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties and fracture location of AA2139-T351 friction stir welded joints are studied in the as-welded and post-weld aged condition. The experimental results show that when the joints are free of welding defects, they fail on the advancing side of the HAZ exhibiting a large amount of plastic deformation. When the revolutionary pitch exceeds a threshold value, some micro-defects are formed in the weld nugget due to insufficient heat input. In this case, the joints fail near the weld center, and the fracture occurs in a mixed mode, both ductile and brittle. However, being less ductile, post-weld aged joints are less defect-tolerant and, then, they fracture closer to the weld center, showing a reduced elongation at fracture and an UTS within the order of magnitude of the as-welded joints.

  8. A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding materials for AFCI/GNEP Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indrajit Charit; Megan Frary; Darryl Butt; K.L. Murty; Larry Zirker; James Cole; Mitchell Meyer; Rajiv S. Mishra; Mark Woltz

    2011-03-31

    This research project involved working on the pressure resistance welding of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys which will have a large role to play in advanced nuclear reactors. The project also demonstrated the research collaboration between four universities and one nation laboratory (Idaho National Laboratory) with participation from an industry for developing for ODS alloys. These alloys contain a high number density of very fine oxide particles that can impart high temperature strength and radiation damage resistance suitable for in-core applications in advanced reactors. The conventional fusion welding techniques tend to produce porosity-laden microstructure in the weld region and lead to the agglomeration and non-uniform distribution of the neededoxide particles. That is why two solid state welding methods - pressure resistance welding (PRW) and friction stir welding (FSW) - were chosen to be evaluated in this project. The proposal is expected to support the development of Advanced Burner Reactors (ABR) under the GNEP program (now incorporated in Fuel Cycle R&D program). The outcomes of the concluded research include training of graduate and undergraduate students and get them interested in nuclear related research.

  9. Numerical optimisation of friction stir welding: review of future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, the combination of increasingly more advanced numerical simulation software with high computational power has resulted in models for friction stir welding (FSW), which have improved the understanding of the determining physical phenomena behind the process substantially....... This has made optimisation of certain process parameters possible and has in turn led to better performing friction stir welded products, thus contributing to a general increase in the popularity of the process and its applications. However, most of these optimisation studies do not go well beyond manual...

  10. Advances in high power semiconductor diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Li

    2008-03-01

    High power semiconductor lasers have broad applications in the fields of military and industry. Recent advances in high power semiconductor lasers are reviewed mainly in two aspects: improvements of diode lasers performance and optimization of packaging architectures of diode laser bars. Factors which determine the performance of diode lasers, such as power conversion efficiency, temperature of operation, reliability, wavelength stabilization etc., result from a combination of new semiconductor materials, new diode structures, careful material processing of bars. The latest progress of today's high-power diode lasers at home and abroad is briefly discussed and typical data are presented. The packaging process is of decisive importance for the applicability of high-power diode laser bars, not only technically but also economically. The packaging techniques include the material choosing and the structure optimizing of heat-sinks, the bonding between the array and the heat-sink, the cooling and the fiber coupling, etc. The status of packaging techniques is stressed. There are basically three different diode package architectural options according to the integration grade. Since the package design is dominated by the cooling aspect, different effective cooling techniques are promoted by different package architectures and specific demands. The benefit and utility of each package are strongly dependent upon the fundamental optoelectronic properties of the individual diode laser bars. Factors which influence these properties are outlined and comparisons of packaging approaches for these materials are made. Modularity of package for special application requirements is an important developing tendency for high power diode lasers.

  11. Local equivalent welding element to predict the welding deformations of plate-type structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Considering the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of welding joint, the residual strain be-haviors of material under constraint and temperature circulation, as well as the activating mechanism of welding process, this paper addresses a new type welding element for numerical simulation of welding deformation, which is called the LEWE (the local equivalent welding element). This element can describe the basic char-acteristics of welded seam: the local position points of inherent strain, the equiva-lent size, the bending radius (or bending angle) from inherent strain, etc. It could be used to predict the welding deformation of plate-type structure. The comparisons between the computed deflection of welded plate and its experiment measurement are present. The results showed that the LEWE possesses a potential to simulate the deformation of welding process high-efficiently and precisely.

  12. Influence of weld structure on cross-weld creep behavior in P23 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.J.; Degnan, C.C. [E.ON Engineering (United Kingdom); Brett, S.J. [RWE npower (United Kingdom); Buchanan, L.W. [Doosan Babcock (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    A thick section pipe weld in low alloy steel P23 has been characterised by cross-weld creep rupture testing at a range of stresses, together with all-weld-metal and parent material testing, under the auspices of the UK High Temperature Power Plant Forum. The results generally show that the weld metal can be weak when tested in the transverse (cross-weld) orientation, and can fail with limited overall ductility by cracking in the zone of refined weld metal beneath the fusion boundary of the superposed weld bead. However, one specimen showed a much superior performance, which could be understood in terms of its locally more creep resistant weld macrostructure. The implications for P23 performance and weld manufacture are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Development of Weld Overlay Technology for Dissimilar Welds in Pressurizer Nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. S.; Byeon, J. G.; Lee, J. B. [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    As a result of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) in alloy 600, leaks in dissimilar metal welds of pressurizer nozzles were discovered recently in several US plants. The involved companies developed advanced repair techniques to prevent or repair PWSCC applying weld overlay procedures to dissimilar metal welds such as those between pipes and nozzles. Within 2 or 3 years, more than half of the nuclear power plants in Korea will have been in operation for more than 20 years. From this background, a weld overlay procedure has been developed in Korea for the dissimilar metal welds of pressurizer nozzles.

  14. Study on 3D finite element simulation of high frequency welded pipe welding residual stress%高频直缝焊管焊接残余应力的三维有限元模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于恩林; 韩毅; 谷绪地; 张洪亮

    2012-01-01

    基于高频直缝焊管焊接热源的计算结果,综合考虑材料的物理属性随温度的高度非线性变化,以及高频加热的焊缝热影响区特有的温度分布规律,利用ANSYS有限元软件建立了高频直缝焊管焊接残余应力的三维有限元模型.获得了高频焊管温度场和残余应力场的分布规律,并对结果进行了分析.通过后处理模块,给出了焊缝部位残余应力的分布趋势,并分析了高频感应焊接残余应力的主要形成原因.发现焊缝附近的轴向残余应力较大,其中有些数值接近材料的屈服强度,而周向残余应力仅为材料屈服应力的1/3左右,径向残余应力数值较小,工程上可以忽略.%Based on the high-frequency longitudinal welding heat calculations, ANSYS finite element software is used to establish the three-dimensional finite element model of welding residual stress. Physical properties of materials with highly non-linear changes in temperature and high-frequency heating of the weld heat affected zone-specific temperature distribution are considered. High-frequency welded pipe temperature field and residual stress field distribution are obtained, and the results are analyzed. Trends of the main causes of the high frequency induction welding residual stress are analyzed through the post-processing module. The axial residual stress of near the weld seam are larger, and some of the values are close to the material yield strength. Residual stress in the circumferential direction is one-third of the material yield stress, and radial residual stress value is smaller that in projects can be ignored.

  15. Strength Evaluation of Heat Affected Zone in Electron Beam Welded ARAA for HCCR TBM in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J. S.; Kim, S. K.; Jin, H. G.; Lee, E. H.; Lee, D. W. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) has been developed for ITER, and Korean reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel, called advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA), has also been developed for a structural material of the HCCR TBM. One case of limited optimized electron beam (EB) welding conditions was selected based on previous work, and the weldability of an EB weld was evaluated for TBM fabrication. The micro-hardness was measured from the base to the weld region, and the microstructures were also observed. A small punch (SP) test considering the HAZ was carried out at room and high (550 .deg. C) temperatures. The empirical mechanical properties of HAZ in the EB weld were evaluated, and the fracture behavior was investigated after the SP test. The SP results show that the estimated yield and tensile strength of the HAZ were higher than the base metal at both temperatures. Korean RAFM steel, ARAA, was developed as a TBM structural material. Using one of the program alloys in ARAA (F206), one case of a limited optimized EB welding condition was selected based on previous works, and the weldability of an EB weld using the SP test was evaluated for TBM fabrication at room and high (550 .deg. C) temperatures. From a micro-Vickers hardness evaluation, the HAZ gave the highest values compared with the other regions. The irregular grain boundaries in the HAZ were observed, but its width was narrower than the TIG weld from the previous results. The optimized welding methods such as the TIG, EB, and laser weld, and the welding procedure considering the PWHT are being established, and the weldability evaluation is also progressing according to the development of the ARAA for the fusion material application in Korea.

  16. Shedding Light on Laser Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, B.J.; Aalderink, Benno; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.; Meijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Nd:YAG laser welding is often used in industry to obtain high quality joints. This however does not mean that monitoring or control of this process is common practice. A few commercial products are available but none of these systems can be used for monitoring the laser welding process of aluminium.

  17. The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2017-08-01

    Athena (the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) is a next generation X-ray observatory currently under study by ESA for launch in 2028. Athena is designed to address the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme, which addresses two key questions: 1) How did ordinary matter evolve into the large scale structures we see today? 2) How do black holes grow and shape the Universe. To address these topics Athena employs an innovative X-ray telescope based on Silicon Pore Optics technology to deliver extremely light weight and high throughput, while retaining excellent angular resolution. The mirror can be adjusted to focus onto one of two focal place instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) which provides spatially-resolved, high resolution spectroscopy, and the Wide Field Imager (WFI) which provides spectral imaging over a large field of view, as well as high time resolution and count rate tolerance. Athena is currently in Phase A and the study status will be reviewed, along with the scientific motivations behind the mission.

  18. 高频感应焊接的特点及其在异种金属焊接中的应用%Characteristic and application in dissimilar metals welding of high-frequency induction welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李连杰; 戴乐

    2011-01-01

    回顾了高频感应的定义和发展,介绍了高频感应加热焊接的基本原理和其加热速度快,焊接热影响区小,能量集中,冷却时间短以及环保、节能等特点.针对异种金属焊接存在的难点,综述了常用的焊接方法及其优缺点.高频感应焊的快速加热和表面集肤效应的特点,使其能够实现异种金属钎焊和表面熔覆焊的冶金结合,接头性能优良.指出感应圈的形状及其与工件之间的相互位置对加热的质量和效率起至关重要的作用.研究表明,通过在钢表面预镀一层锌作为钎料并改善铝在钢上的润湿性,控制温度低于钢的熔点而高于铝的熔点,采用高频感应焊可实现钢-铝良好的直接熔焊结合.%The definition and development of high-frequency induction welding are reviewed and the fundamental principle and characteristic are introduced.The characteristic is that heating speed is fast,heat affected zone is small,energy is centralized,cooling time is short and so on.To the difficulties of dissimilar metals welding,advantages and disadvantages of general welding ways are studied. High calefaction speed and surfacing effect of high-frequency induction can realize metallurgy welding of brazing and surface fusion welding of dissimilar metals and the capabilities of the joint are excellent. The shape of inductor and the distance between workpiece and inductor are important to quality and efficiency.The experimental results indicate that high-frequency induction welding can melt aluminum to steel directly by the way of galvanization on steel and control the temperature between the melting point of steel and that of aluminum.

  19. Hydrogen-Induced Cold Cracking in High-Frequency Induction Welded Steel Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kumkum

    2016-04-01

    Detailed investigation was carried out on 0.4C steel tubes used for the telescopic front fork of two-wheelers to establish the root cause for the occurrence of transverse cracks at the weld heat-affected zone of the tubes. Fractographic and microstructural observations provide evidences of delayed hydrogen-induced cracking. The beneficial microstructure for avoiding the transverse cracks was found to be the bainitic-martensitic, while martensitic structure was noted to be deleterious.

  20. Effect of activating fluxes on weld mechanical properties in TIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Activating TIG (A-TIG) welding has received many attentions worldwide since the end of 1990s. Compared with conventional TIG welding A-TIG welding can greatly improve the welding productivity and reduce the welding cost without altering the equipments under the same welding procedures and is considered as a innovative variant of conventional TIG welding. The materials applied by A-TIG welding have ranged from original titanium alloy to stainless steel, carbon steel, high temperature alloy steel and so forth. The effects of activating fluxes with single component on weld mechanical properties such as tensile strength, hardness and elastics during A-TIG welding of stainless steel are discussed in this paper. The experimental results show that different fluxes have different effects on the weld mechanical properties. Among these fluxes the flux SiO2 is the best in the performance of tensile strength and ductility, while flux Cr2O3 is the best in the performance of weld hardness compared with conventional TIG welding. These experiments provide the foundation for selecting the most suitable fluxes for stainless steel in practical welding production.

  1. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  2. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam welding of AA5083-H321

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Subbaiah; M Geetha; B Shanmugarajan; S R Koteswara Rao

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the size of the fusion zone and heat affected zone compared to tungsten inert gas welding process. High speed LB welding and fast heating and cooling of LB welding process hinders grain growth compared to TIG welding process. The effect of vapourization of volatile alloying elements is also considered. It seems that magnesium evaporation is relatively less in LB welding compared to TIG welding. Tensile testing of the welded joints revealed that LB welding results in superior mechanical properties. It is concluded that LB welding process is more suitable to join AA5083-H321.

  3. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Carla [Applied Sciences, Inc., Cedarville, OH (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASI’s Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASI’s patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  4. High Temperature Corrosion studies on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Alloy C-276 in Molten Salt Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, M.; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.; Puneeth, T.; Sivakumar, N.; Murugan, B. Arul; Sathishkumar, M.; Sivalingam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Alloy C-276 is widely used in the power plant environment due to high strength and corrosion in highly aggressive environment. The investigation on high- temperature corrosion resistance of the alloy C-276 PCGTA weldment is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. Investigation has been carried out on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding by autogenous and different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERNiCrMo-4) under molten state of K2SO4-60% NaCl environment at 675oC under cyclic condition. Thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. Weight gained in the molten salt reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. PCGTA ERNiCrMo-3 shows the higher parabolic constant compared to others. The scale formed on the weldment samples upon hot corrosion was characterized by using X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDAX analysis to understand the degradation mechanisms. From the results of the experiment the major phases are identified as Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and NiCr2O4. The result showed that weld fabricated by ERNiCrMo-3 found to be more prone to degradation than base metal and ERNiCrMo-4 filler wire due to higher segregation of alloying element of Mo and W in the weldment

  5. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán, J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the carbody has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties.

    La industria del automóvil se enfrenta a una creciente demanda de vehículos de pasajeros más eficientes. Con el fin de disminuir el consumo de energía y la contaminación ambiental, el peso del vehículo tiene que ser reducido, al mismo tiempo que se garantizan altos niveles de seguridad. Ante esta situación, la elección de material se convierte en una decisión crucial en el diseño del vehículo. Como respuesta a las necesidades del sector automovilístico, nuevos aceros avanzados y de alta resistencia, han sido desarrollados por la industria siderúrgica. Dichos tipos de acero ofrecen un excelente equilibrio de precio, peso y propiedades mecánicas.

  6. Advances in High Energy Materials (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. R. Nair

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Research and development efforts for realizing higher performance levels of high energy materials (HEMs are continued unabated all over the globe. Of late, it is becoming increasingly necessary to ensure that such materials are also eco-friendly. This has provided thrust to research in the area of force multiplying HEMs and compounds free from pollution causing components. Enhancement of the performance necessitates introduction of strained structure or increase in oxygen balance to achieve near stoichiometry. The search for environment friendly molecules is focused on chlorine free propellant compositions and lead free primary explosives. Energetic polymers offer added advantage of partitioning of energy and thus not necessitating the concentration of only solid components (HEMs and metal fuels in the formulations, to achieve higher performance, thereby leading to improvement in energetics without adversely affecting the processability and mechanical properties. During recent times, research in the area of insensitive explosives has received impetus particularly with the signature of STANAG. This paper gives a review of the all-round advances in the areas of HEMs encompassing oxidizers, high-energy dense materials, insensitive high-energy materials, polymers and plasticizers. Selected formulations based on these materials are also included.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(2, pp.137-151, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.327

  7. Advances in industrial high-power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, Holger

    2005-03-01

    Four major types of laser sources are used for material processing. Excluding Excimer lasers, this paper focuses on advances in High Power CO2 lasers, Solid State Lasers and Diode Lasers. Because of their unrivaled cost to brightness relationship the fast axial flow CO2 laser remains unrivaled for flat-sheet laser cutting. Adding approximately a kW of output power ever four years, this laser type has been propelling the entire sheet metal fabrication industry for the last two decades. Very robust, diffusion cooled annular discharge CO2 lasers with 2kW output power have enabled robot mounted lasers for 3D applications. Solid State Lasers are chosen mainly because of the option of fiber delivery. Industrial applications still rely on lamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers with guaranteed output powers of 4.5 kW at the workpiece. The introduction of the diode pumped Thin Disc Laser 4.5 kW laser enables new applications such as the Programmable Focus Optics. Pumping the Thin Disc Laser requires highly reliable High Power Diode Lasers. The necessary reliability can only be achieved in a modern, automated semiconductor manufacturing facility. For Diode Lasers, electro-optical efficiencies above 65% are as important as the passivation of the facets to avoid Burn-In power degradation.

  8. A Stereo Vision Visualization Method in Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuangxin; Richardson, Ian M.; Kleijn, Chris; Kenjeres, Sasa; Saldi, Zaki

    2008-09-01

    The oscillation of weld pool surface, vaporization and spatters make the measurement in welding difficult; two dimensional results can not reflect enough information in welding. However, there are few direct three dimensional methods to understand the fluid flow during welding. In this paper, we described a three dimensional reconstruction method to measure velocity in welding based on a single high speed camera. A stereo adapter was added in front of the high speed camera lens to obtain two images in the same frame from different view points at the same time; according to the machine vision theory, three dimensional parameters could be reconstructed based on these two images

  9. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  10. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  11. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of 9%Cr/CrMoV Dissimilar Steels Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Lu, Fenggui; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xiaojin; Huo, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Advanced 9%Cr steel with good heat resistance and CrMoV with good toughness were chosen as candidate materials to fabricate combined rotor for steam turbine operating at over 620 °C. But the great difference in base metals properties presents a challenge in achieving sound defect-free joint with optimal properties in dissimilar welded rotor. In this paper, appropriate selection of filler metal, welding parameters, and post-weld heat treatment was combined to successfully weld 1100-mm-diameter 9%Cr/CrMoV dissimilar experimental rotor through ultra-narrow gap submerge arc welding. Some properties such as hardness, low-cycle fatigue (LCF), and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) combined with microstructural characterization qualify the integrity of the weld. Microstructural analysis indicated the presence of high-temperature tempered martensite as the phase responsible for the improved properties obtained in the weld. The Coffin-Manson parameters were obtained by fitting the data in LCF test, while the conditional fatigue strength was derived from the HCF test based on S-N curve. Analysis of hardness profile showed that the lowest value occurred at heat-affected zone adjacent to base metal which represents the appropriate location of fracture for the samples after LCF and HCF tests.

  12. Influence of residual stress on the HIC resistance of high frequency induction welded pipes with regard to process-specific influencing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krageloh, Joachim; Brauer, Holger; Bosch, Christoph [Salzgitter Mannesmann Line Pipe GmbH, (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The industry needs to meet growing demand for pipes with high resistance to sour service conditions. Salzgitter Mannesmann Line Pipe is developing new product ranges of high frequency induction (HFI) welded pipes. This study investigated the influence of residual stress on the resistance of HFI welded pipes to HIC with focus on process-specific influencing factors. Four materials with different strengths were tested. Three of them were not manufactured for sour service and so were sure to show significant HIC damage during the tests. The specimens were studied using the cross-sectioning method for longitudinal and circumferential residual stress. A four-point-bend test in line with ADTM G 39 was also done to determine the HIC resistance of the pipe specimens. The results provide a characteristic HIC value and crack area ratio, CAR. This study showed that residual stress induced by HFI welding of pipes has no negative impact on resistance to HIC.

  13. Ensuring and improving corrosion resistance in high-alloy welds. Final report; Sicherung und Steigerung der Korrosionsbestaendigkeit hochlegierter Schweissverbindungen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-22

    The welding process of the two high-alloy austenitic steels X5CrNiMo17 12 2 (1.4404) and X1NiCrMoCuN25 20 5 (1.4539) and the subsequent maintenance of the welds were to be optimized. This comprised detailed investigations into the interdependence between welding technologies and surface treatment. Systematic investigations showed that even with optimized processes, welding involves considerable stress to the materials, leading to structural changes, higher intrinsic stress and tarnish layers. Investigations of surface finishing processes showed that the finishing process and tools have significant effect on corrosion. (orig.) [German] Das Forschungsvorhaben hatte zum Ziel, neben der Optimierung des Schweissprozesses der beiden hochlegierten austenitischen Staehle X5CrNiMo17 12 2 (1.4404) und X1NiCrMoCuN25 20 5 (1.4539), eine auf den Schweissprozess abgestimmte ''Nachsorge'' zu optimieren. Das heisst, dass die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der jeweiligen Schweisstechnologie und der Oberflaechennachbehandlung in ihrer Vielschichtigkeit grundlegend untersucht werden sollen. Es konnte anhand von systematischen schweisstechnischen und werkstofftechnischen Untersuchungen gezeigt werden, dass auch nach einer umfassenden Optimierung des Schweissprozesses das Schweissen fuer den Werkstoff eine erhebliche Beeinflussung darstellt. Es kommt zu Gefuegeveraenderungen, zur Erhoehung der Eigenspannungen und zur Ausbildung von Anlaufschichten. Diese durch das Schweissen bedingten Effekte ueben allesamt einen grossen Einfluss auf das Korrosionsverhalten aus. Weder durch die Optimierung der Schweissparameter (z. B. Streckenenergie) noch durch die Wahl der Art des zu verwendenen Schutz- bzw. Wurzelschutzgases kann die Ausbildung der Anlaufschichten und eine daraus resultierende Veraenderung der Korrosionsbestaendigkeit verhindert werden. Das Korrosionsverhalten laesst sich jedoch positiv z.B. durch die Art des Schutzgases bei Einhaltung der optimierten Schweissparameter

  14. Laboratory work for preparation of scraping tests of high-frequency welded pipes using electrodynamic, ultrasonic transducers. Laboruntersuchungen zur Schabungspruefung hochfrequenzgeschweisster Rohre mittels elektrodynamischer US-Wandler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, R.; Maurer, A. (Nuklear-Chemie und -Metallurgie GmbH (NUKEM), Alzenau (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution examinations for which coupling agents cannot be used are done with dry-coupled, electrodynamic ultrasonic transducers. A specific electrodynamic transducer supported by an air cushion has been used for measuring the wall thickness curve directly behind a high-frequency weld seam. The paper presents wall thickness profiles in unwelded zones and in scraped zones. (DG).

  15. Design of Human-Machine Interface System of High Frequency Inverter Spot Welding%高频逆变点焊人机交互系统的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱祁; 朱燕丛

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at high frequency inverter spot welding, a human-machine interface system, SCM ADuC812 as the main chip is designed to realize the setting, modification and storage for welding parameters. The panel is set based on the inverter spot welding current and welding technology. The each stage of current wave is controlled by LED and key easily. Then welding current is controlled by the setting. It proves that the human-machine interface system is stable, easy-input and strong anti-interference ability.%针对高频逆变点焊电源,设计了以单片机ADuC812为核心的人机交互系统.该系统能实现焊接工艺参数的设置、修改、保存.根据逆变点焊电流波形及焊接工艺设置了面板外观,能够非常明确简单地设置焊接电流各阶段波形,控制焊接输出.实用证明,该系统运行稳定可靠,输入方便,抗干扰能力强.

  16. Weld pool vision sensing and image processing for GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Jianfeng; LI Liangyu; FAN Fanglei; WU Baolin

    2009-01-01

    It is difficult to acquire satisfied weld pool image by CCD sensor during gas metal arc welding(GMAW), for arc disturbs violently, welding current is great and working frequeacy is high. By using CMOS vision sensor to GMA W process, the vivid weld pool image is collected at any time, furthermore, whose gray compression ratio is controllable by sensor hardware circuit developed. Acquired weld pool image is firstly pre-processed by using Wiener filter and Ostu threshold segmentation algorithm. Subsequently separation between weld pool intage and cathode mist region is conducted by means of mathematical morphological algorithm, and the edge of weld pool image is extracted by using Prewitt algorithm.

  17. Application of Welding box girder flange by Using RAPID Welding Technology%RAPID焊接工艺技术在箱型梁翼缘板焊接的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程国志; 于连康

    2016-01-01

    RA PID焊接技术是目前比较先进的一项焊接工艺技术,它是利用数字控制的电弧曲线参数,进一步压缩电弧,使得电弧热量更集中、更具备熔透能力的一种高速焊接技术。由于其高速、高熔深的焊接工艺特性,被用于单面焊接双面成型的钢结构焊接上,可显著提高焊接生产效率。在铝电解多功能机组生产制造的专业厂,其天车主梁的焊接工艺技术一直是采取MAG焊接工艺技术,焊接质量及效率低。应用RAPID焊接工艺技术对箱型梁翼缘板焊接,与M AG焊接工艺技术在焊接质量、效率、经济性等方面进行对比、分析总结,可知,RAPID焊接工艺技术应用在天车主梁翼缘板的焊接中,综合经济效益较MAG焊接工艺有着显著的提高。%RAPID welding technology is an advanced high speed welding technology , the arc curve parame‐ters of w hich is controlled by digital technology , further compressed arc made the arc heat more concen‐trated , and had more penetration ability . Because of its welding technology properties of high speed and high penetration ,it is used for steel structure which is single -sided welding but double -sided molding , significantly improved the efficiency of welding production .In most aluminum electrolysis multifunctional unit manufacturing plants , the crane girder welding technology has been adopt MAG welding technology , welding quality and efficiency is low . After comparing , analyzing and summarizing the welding technology between RAPID and MAG about welding box beam wing flange , found that the RAPID welding technolo‐gy is better than MAG in welding quality , efficiency , economy and so on . RAPID welding technology used in crane girder flange plate welding , the comprehensive economic benefits is significantly improved than that of MAG welding technology .

  18. Virtual Reality Simulator Developed Welding Technology Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Faizal Amin Nur; Baser, Jamil Abd; Masran, Saiful Hadi; Razali, Nizamuddin; Rahim, Bekri

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the suitability of VR welding simulator application towards CBT in developing welding skills upon new trainees at the Centre of Instructor and Advanced Skills Training (CIAST) Shah Alam Selangor and National Youth Skills Institute (IKBN) Pagoh Johor. The significance of the study was to create a…

  19. Techniques for laser welding polymeric devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, I A

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in laser techniques mean that lasers are now being considered as an alternative to vibration, ultrasonic, dielectric, hot plate or hot bar welding, and adhesive bonding of plastics. The techniques required to put laser welding methods into practice are described for medical devices, tubular systems, films and synthetic fabrics.

  20. Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing: Weld Optimization for Aluminum 6061, Development of Scarf Joints for Aluminum Sheet Metal, and Joining of High Strength Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, Paul J.

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a low temperature, solid-state manufacturing process that enables the creation of layered, solid metal structures with designed anisotropies and embedded materials. As a low temperature process, UAM enables the creation of active composites containing smart materials, components with embedded sensors, thermal management devices, and many others. The focus of this work is on the improvement and characterization of UAM aluminum structures, advancing the capabilities of ultrasonic joining into sheet geometries, and examination of dissimilar material joints using the technology. Optimized process parameters for Al 6061 were identified via a design of experiments study indicating a weld amplitude of 32.8 synum and a weld speed of 200 in/min as optimal. Weld force and temperature were not significant within the levels studied. A methodology of creating large scale builds is proposed, including a prescribed random stacking sequence and overlap of 0.0035 in. (0.0889 mm) for foils to minimize voids and maximize mechanical strength. Utilization of heat treatments is shown to significantly increase mechanical properties of UAM builds, within 90% of bulk material. The applied loads during the UAM process were investigated to determine the stress fields and plastic deformation induced during the process. Modeling of the contact mechanics via Hertzian contact equations shows that significant stress is applied via sonotrode contact in the process. Contact modeling using finite element analysis (FEA), including plasticity, indicates that 5000 N normal loads result in plastic deformation in bulk aluminum foil, while at 3000 N no plastic deformation occurs. FEA studies on the applied loads during the process, specifically a 3000 N normal force and 2000 N shear force, show that high stresses and plastic deformation occur at the edges of a welded foil, and base of the UAM build. Microstructural investigations of heat treated foils confirms

  1. Effect of pulse duty cycle on Inconel 718 laser welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, M. H.; McCay, T. D.; Dahotre, N. B.; Sharp, C. M.; Sedghinasab, A.; Gopinathan, S.

    1989-01-01

    Crack sensitive Inconel 718 was laser pulse welded using a 3.0 kW CO2 laser. Weld shape, structure, and porosity were recorded as a function of the pulse duty cycle. Within the matrix studied, the welds were found to be optimized at a high (17 ms on, 7 ms off) duty cycle. These welds were superior in appearance and lack of porosity to both low duty cycle and CW welds.

  2. Advanced Functionalities for Highly Reliable Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Yi

    This thesis covers two research topics concerning optical solutions for networks e.g. avionic systems. One is to identify the applications for silicon photonic devices for cost-effective solutions in short-range optical networks. The other one is to realise advanced functionalities in order to in......) using two exclusive OR (XOR) gates realised by four-wave mixing (FWM) in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is experimentally demonstrated and very low (~ 1 dB) total operation penalty is achieved....... to increase the availability of highly reliable optical networks. A cost-effective transmitter based on a directly modulated laser (DML) using a silicon micro-ring resonator (MRR) to enhance its modulation speed is proposed, analysed and experimentally demonstrated. A modulation speed enhancement from 10 Gbit...... interconnects and network-on-chips. A novel concept of all-optical protection switching scheme is proposed, where fault detection and protection trigger are all implemented in the optical domain. This scheme can provide ultra-fast establishment of the protection path resulting in a minimum loss of data...

  3. 寒冷季节高强钢油品设备的焊接施工%Welding on High Strength Steel Equipment in Winter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑国平

    2012-01-01

    分析了高强钢SA-516的化学成分和力学性能,从焊前准备、焊接过程控制、焊后保温及无损检测等方面对在寒冷季节高强钢设备的焊接施工进行了介绍,制造的设备质量良好,达到了相关要求.%The analysis was made for SA-516 high strength steel on its chemical composition and mechanical property. The presentation was made for weld preparation, control in welding process, post-weld temperature holding time, and NDT during winter period. The equipment in such process meets the requirement and quality

  4. Weld penetration and defect control. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, B.A.

    1992-05-15

    Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

  5. Integrating advanced facades into high performance buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2001-05-01

    Glass is a remarkable material but its functionality is significantly enhanced when it is processed or altered to provide added intrinsic capabilities. The overall performance of glass elements in a building can be further enhanced when they are designed to be part of a complete facade system. Finally the facade system delivers the greatest performance to the building owner and occupants when it becomes an essential element of a fully integrated building design. This presentation examines the growing interest in incorporating advanced glazing elements into more comprehensive facade and building systems in a manner that increases comfort, productivity and amenity for occupants, reduces operating costs for building owners, and contributes to improving the health of the planet by reducing overall energy use and negative environmental impacts. We explore the role of glazing systems in dynamic and responsive facades that provide the following functionality: Enhanced sun protection and cooling load control while improving thermal comfort and providing most of the light needed with daylighting; Enhanced air quality and reduced cooling loads using natural ventilation schemes employing the facade as an active air control element; Reduced operating costs by minimizing lighting, cooling and heating energy use by optimizing the daylighting-thermal tradeoffs; Net positive contributions to the energy balance of the building using integrated photovoltaic systems; Improved indoor environments leading to enhanced occupant health, comfort and performance. In addressing these issues facade system solutions must, of course, respect the constraints of latitude, location, solar orientation, acoustics, earthquake and fire safety, etc. Since climate and occupant needs are dynamic variables, in a high performance building the facade solution have the capacity to respond and adapt to these variable exterior conditions and to changing occupant needs. This responsive performance capability

  6. Leak-Tight Welding Experience from the Industrial Assembly of the LHC Cryostats at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bourcey, N; Chiggiato, P; Limon, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Musso, G; Poncet, A; Parma, V

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of the approximately 1700 LHC main ring cryostats at CERN involved extensive welding of cryogenic lines and vacuum vessels. More than 6 km of welding requiring leak tightness to a rate better than 1.10-9 mbar.l.s-1 on stainless steel and aluminium piping and envelopes was made, essentially by manual welding but also making use of orbital welding machines. In order to fulfil the safety regulations related to pressure vessels and to comply with the leak-tightness requirements of the vacuum systems of the machine, welds were executed according to high qualification standards and following a severe quality assurance plan. Leak detection by He mass spectrometry was extensively used. Neon leak detection was used successfully to locate leaks in the presence of helium backgrounds. This paper presents the quality assurance strategy adopted for welds and leak detection. It presents the statistics of non-conformities on welds and leaks detected throughout the entire production and the advances in the use...

  7. FEM Analysis and Measurement of Residual Stress by Neutron Diffraction on the Dissimilar Overlay Weld Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Lee, Ho Jin; Woo, Wan Chuck; Seong, Baek Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Byeon, Jin Gwi; Park, Kwang Soo; Jung, In Chul [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Much research has been done to estimate the residual stress on a dissimilar metal weld. There are many methods to estimate the weld residual stress and FEM (Finite Element Method) is generally used due to the advantage of the parametric study. And the X-ray method and a Hole Drilling technique for an experimental method are also usually used. The aim of this paper is to develop the appropriate FEM model to estimate the residual stresses of the dissimilar overlay weld pipe. For this, firstly, the specimen of the dissimilar overlay weld pipe was manufactured. The SA 508 Gr3 nozzle, the SA 182 safe end and SA376 pipe were welded by the Alloy 182. And the overlay weld by the Alloy 52M was performed. The residual stress of this specimen was measured by using the Neutron Diffraction device in the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) research reactor, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Secondly, FEM Model on the dissimilar overlay weld pipe was made and analyzed by the ABAQUS Code (ABAQUS, 2004). Thermal analysis and stress analysis were performed, and the residual stress was calculated. Thirdly, the results of the FEM analysis were compared with those of the experimental methods

  8. Plastic flow pattern and its effect in friction stir welding of A2024 and A1060

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xi-jing; ZHANG Zhong-ke; LI Jing; DA Chao-bing

    2006-01-01

    During the friction stir welding (FSW), the property of the welding joint is highly affected by the plastic and viscous flow behavior of the softened material. The flow pattern of the welded material was examined through observing the microstructural distribution of friction stir welded joints between dissimilar 2024 and 1060 aluminum alloy. The experimental results show that the flow patterns of material at different locations in the weld are different and can be divided into four layers along the thickness direction: surface flow layer influenced by the shoulder of the tool, in which the material tends to flow as integrity; horizontal flow layer influenced by the surface flow layer, in which the material of surface flow layer enters and flows forwards under the advancing force of the tool; vertical flow layer (plastic flow area induced by stirring of the pin), in which the flow pattern is complex and onion rings can often be observed; unstirred bottom layer because of the length of the pin being shorter than the thickness of the plates. The effect of plastic flow on welding quality was further investigated. The study suggests that welding quantity is significantly influenced by the flow pattern and defects always appear in horizontally lamellar flow region because of the complex flow pattern.

  9. Experimental study of cyclic creep and high-cycle fatigue of welded joints of St3 steel by the DIC technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibitkin, Vladimir V., E-mail: vvk@ispms.tsc.ru; Solodushkin, Andrey I., E-mail: s.ai@sibmail.com; Pleshanov, Vasily S., E-mail: vsp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    In the paper the mechanisms of plastic deformation and fracture of welded joints of steel St3 were investigated at high-cycle fatigue and cyclic creep by the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The evolution of strain rate is studied for the following regions: base metal, HAZ, and fusion zone. This strain rate evolution can be considered as a mechanical response of material. Three stages of deformation evolution are shown: deformation hardening (I), fatigue crack initiation (II), and the last stage is related to main crack (III). Two criteria are offered to evaluate the current mechanical state of welded joints.

  10. PVRC/MPC Round Robin Tests for the Low Toughness High-Copper 72W Weld Using Master Curve Methodology of PCVN Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong-Sang; Hong, Jun Hwa; Yang, Won Jon

    2000-06-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from the Korean contribution the PVRC/MPC cooperative program on {sup R}ound Robin Tests for Low Toughness High-Copper 72W Weld Using Master Curve Methodology of PCVN Specimens. The mandatory part of this program is to perform fracture toughness (K{sub jc}) tests on the low toughness 72W weld at three different temperatures using pre-cracked Charpy specimens. The purpose of the tests is to verify the specimen size requirements in the ASTM E 1921, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T{sub o}, for ferritic steels in the transition range'.

  11. Boosting Active Contours for Weld Pool Visual Tracking in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Søren Ingvor;

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the shape of the non-rigid molten metal during welding, so-called weld pool visual sensing, is one of the central tasks for automating arc welding processes. It is challenging due to the strong interference of the high-intensity arc light and spatters as well as the lack of robust...... to weld pool tracking and the presented results verified its feasibility....

  12. The Effect of Weld Penetration on Blast Performance of Welded Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    demonstrate the difference in performance of full-penetration (nominally 100%) welds and partial-penetration (nominally 70%) welds under blast loading...The welded coupons consisted of armour steel plate, Bisalloy BisPlate High Hardness Armour steel, welded to Bisalloy BisPlate80 steel with an...If an armoured vehicle is subjected to explosive blast loading, such as, detonation of a mine or an Improvised Explosive Device (IED), the blast

  13. Comparison of fatigue property between friction stir and TIG welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xunhong Wang; Kuaishe Wang; Yang Shen; Kai Hu

    2008-01-01

    The alloy 5052 was welded by friction stir welding (FSW) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. The effect of welding processes (FSW and TIG) on the fatigue properties of 5052 aluminum-welded joints was analyzed based on fatigue testing, and the S-N curve of the joints were established. The results show that the fatigue properties of FSW welded joints are better than those of TIG welded joints. The fatigue strength is determined as 65 Mpa under 106 cycling of fatigue life. The microstructure of joints is fine grains and narrow HAZ zone in FSW welds, which inhibit the growth of cracks and produce high fatigue life compared with that of TIG welds. Fracture morphologies also show that the fatigue fracture results from weld defects.

  14. Influence of Specific Features of Twin Arc Welding on Properties of Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholokhov, M. A.; Melnikov, A. U.; Fiveyskiy, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The present article covers the influence of standard and narrow gap twin arc welding on properties of weld joints from high-strength steels. While analyzing microsections we established that distribution of micro structure and phase terms, as well the distribution of micro-hardness, were more homogeneous under narrow gap twin arc welding.

  15. Boosting Active Contours for Weld Pool Visual Tracking in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the shape of the non-rigid molten metal during welding, so-called weld pool visual sensing, is one of the central tasks for automating arc welding processes. It is challenging due to the strong interference of the high-intensity arc light and spatters as well as the lack of robust...

  16. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  17. Numerical simulation of TIG welding with filler of steel pieces of high thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmigani, B.; Toselli, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The problem of numerical simulation of welding process with filler, in particular TIG (tungsten inert gas) with cold filler, has been approached with ABAQUS/S code. Reference has been made to some experimental models studied and prepared ad hoc in order to better know the physical phenomena involved in TIG welding technique and to validate the computation methodologies and results obtained. The results obtained, compared with the experimental ones, will be presented, analyzed and discussed. [Italian] Con il codice di analisi termo-strutturale non lineare agli EF, ABAQUS/S, viene affrontato per la prima volta il problema della simulazione numerica di un processo di saldatura con materiale d'apporto, in particolare il processo di saldatura TIG (tungsten inert gas). In questo lavoro sono presentati, analizzati e discussi e confrontati con le misure corrispondenti sperimentali i primi risultati ottenuto. Sono state descritte e discusse anche le difficolta' incontrate, le approssimazioni fatte e la ricerca di procedure di calcolo piu' semplificate.

  18. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K{sub Ia} curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Gas tungsten arc welding of ZrB2–SiC based ultra high temperature ceramic composites

    OpenAIRE

    R.V. Krishnarao; G. Madhusudhan Reddy

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty in fabricating the large size or complex shape limits the application of ZrB2–SiC composites. Joining them by fusion welding without or with preheating, controlled cooling under protective gas shield leads to thermal shock failure or porosity at the weld interface. In the present work, a filler material of (ZrB2–SiC–B4C–YAG) composite with oxidation resistance and thermal shock resistance was produced in the form of welding wire. Using the filler, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW...

  20. A Study on Process Characteristics and Performance of Hot Wire Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Process for High Temperature Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanaban MR,Anantha; Neelakandan, Baskar; Kandasamy,Devakumaran

    2016-01-01

    Hot wire gas tungsten arc welding (HW-GTAW) process is the one where the filler wire is pre-heated close to its melting point before it is fed in to the arc. The effect of HW-GTAW parameters such as welding current, hot wire current and the wire feed rate during welding of super ASS 304H stainless steel tubes were evaluated in terms of heat input, voltage-current (V-I) characteristics and weld bead characteristics such as bead weight and geometry. The results obtained indicate that for a cons...

  1. Penetration control by weld pool resonance during gas tungsten arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents penetration control by weld pool resonance which occurs when the natural frequency of weld pool is equal to the frequency of sine wave current while the weld pool is excited into oscillation by superimposing sine wave current with definite frequency or regular fiequency on DC current, and experiments carried out on detecting resonance signals during both stationary and travelling arc welding with variant frequency pulse current, and concludes with ex perimental results that penetration control can be realized by weld pool resonance when welding speed is lower than 80mm/min, and this control method is applicable to welding thin (0.5 ~ 3.0 mm) plates of carbon steel, low alloy steel, high strength steel and superhigh strength steel, and suitable for alternating polarity welding of stainless steel, titanium alloy steel and aluminum alloy.

  2. Development of high strength pipes grade API 5L X70 PSL2 offshore by the HFIW Process (High Frequency Induction Welding)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, Wilson R.; Melo, Luis C.R.; Gomes, Igor O.; Boni, Luiz P.; Sanctis, Marco A.M. di [Apolo Tubulars, Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    High strength pipes can be manufactured with excellency in dimensional tolerances, rapidity and efficiency through HFIW process (High Frequency Induction Welding). API 5L 6 5/8 x 0,374 in pipes were made of thin, hot rolled and coiled plates with dimensional 9,300 x 1.040,0 x 140.000 mm. Mechanical tests, chemical and microstructural analysis were performed. For the microstructural analysis, ferrite and perlitic structure were detected. All the results obtained are according to API 5L, 44{sup th} edition, 2008 for the grade API 5L X70 PSL2 Offshore. (author)

  3. Monitoring of solidification crack propagation mechanism in pulsed laser welding of 6082 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Witzendorff, P.; Kaierle, S.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed laser sources with pulse durations in the millisecond regime can be used for spot welding and seam welding of aluminum. Seam welds are generally produced with several overlapping spot welds. Hot cracking has its origin in the solidification process of individual spot welds which determines the cracking morphology along the seam welding. This study used a monitoring unit to capture the crack geometry within individual spot welds during seam welding to investigate the conditions for initiation, propagation and healing (re-melting) of solidification cracking within overlapping pulsed laser welds. The results suggest that small crack radii and high crack angles with respect to welding direction are favorable conditions for crack healing which leads to crack-free seam welds. Optimized pulse shapes were used to produce butt welds of 0.5 mm thick 6082 aluminum alloys. Tensile tests were performed to investigate the mechanical strength in the as-welded condition.

  4. Moiré method analysis for tensile strain field of 2024 aluminum alloy welded joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文立; 魏艳红; 刘雪松; 方洪渊; 赵敏; 田锡唐

    2003-01-01

    Using experimental mechanics method of moiré analysis, strain field distributions of 2024 aluminum alloy welded joints under different conditions were investigated. The results show that moiré stripes of welded joint without trailing peening just before fracture are not only few and scattered but also uneven, and the stress mainly concentrates on the poor position-welded toes during the tensioning process with the relatively poor mechanical properties of welded joints; When the method of welding with trailing peening is adopted, moiré stripes of welded joint just before fracture are relatively thick and even due to the strengthening welded toes during the welding process, and fracture position transfers from the welded toes to weld, at the same time the mechanical properties of welded joints are improved greatly than conventional welding which can show that the technology of trailing peening is effective to strengthen welded joints of aluminum alloy with high strength.

  5. Acquisition and processing of coaxial image of molten pool and keyhole in Nd:YAG laser welding with high power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦国梁; 齐秀滨; 杨永波; 王旭友; 林尚扬

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup of acquiring the coaxial visual image of the molten pool and keyhole in high power Nd:YAG laser welding is introduced in this paper. It is one of the most difficult problems in acquiring coaxial image that the coaxial imaging signal of molten pool and keyhole must be separated from the laser beam with high power. This problem was resolved by designing a dichroitic spectroscope. The characteristics of imaging signal were analyzed and the coaxial image of molten pool and keyhole was acquired. A smoothing filter and a homomorphic filter were designed to remove the low frequency noise and to enhance the image according to the characteristics of imaging signal. At last, edges of molten pool and keyhole were detected and extracted based on image segmentation with threshold.

  6. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  7. Laser-Assisted Stir Welding of 25-mm-Thick HSLA-65 Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Keith M.

    2002-12-01

    Laser-assisted stir welding is a hybrid process that combines energy from a laser with functional heating and mechanical energy to join materials in the solid state. The technology is an adaptation of friction stir welding which is particularly suited for joining thick plates. Aluminum plates up to 75 mm thick have been successfully joined using friction stir welding. Since joining occurs in the solid state, stir technology offers the capability for fabricating full penetration joints in thick plates with better mechanical properties and less weld distortion than is possible by fusion processes. Currently friction stir welding is being used in several industries to improve productivity, reduce weight, and increase the strength of welded structures. Examples include: (a) the aircraft/aerospace industry where stir technology is currently being used to fabricate the space shuttle's external tank as well as components of the Delta family of rockets; (b) the shipping industry where container manufacturers are using stir technology to produce lighter containers with more payload capacity; and (c) the oil industry where offshore platform manufactures are using automated stir welding plants to fabricate large panels and structures up to 16 meters long with widths as required. In all these cases, stir technology has been restricted to aluminum alloys; however, stainless and HSLA 65 steels have been recently stir welded with friction as the primary heat source. One of the difficulties in adapting stir welding to steel is tool wear aggravated by the high tool rubbing velocities needed to provide frictional heat input into the material. Early work showed that the tool shoulder reached temperatures above 1000 C and the weld seam behind the tool stayed within this temperature range for up to 25 mm behind the tool. Cross sections of stir welded samples showed that the heat-affected zone is relatively wide and follows the profile of the tool shoulder. Besides minimizing the tool

  8. TIG welding power supply with improved efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Володимирович Гулаков

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the influence of the DC component of the welding current during TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas welding is discussed. Known methods of DC current cancellation are reviewed, such as capacitor bank or diode/thyristor network insertion in the secondary circuit of the welding transformer. A new method of controlling the magnitude and shape of the TIG welding current is proposed. The idea is to insert a controlled voltage source in the secondary circuit of the welding transformer. This controlled voltage source is realized using a full-bridge voltage source inverter (VSI. VSI control system design issues are discussed. VSI is controlled by a three-level hysteretic current controller, while current reference is generated using lookup table driven by PLL (Phase Locked Loop locked to the mains frequency. Simulation results are shown. The proposed topology of TIG power supply allows to provide magnitude and shape control of the welding current, with the limitation that its DC component must be zero. Thus, some capabilities of professional AC-TIG welders are obtained using substantially lower cost components: VSI built using high-current low voltage MOSFETs with control system based on 32-bit ARM microcontroller. The use of proposed TIG welding power supply will eliminate the DC component of the welding current, improve welding transformer’s power factor and improve welding technology by increasing the welding arc stability

  9. Evolution of a Laser Hybrid Welding Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alexander F. H.; Frostevarg, Jan; Ilar, Torbjörn; Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur

    Laser arc hybrid welding combines the advantages but also the complex physical mechanisms of gas metal arc welding and laser keyhole welding. From manifold mainly experimental but also theoretical research results a map with versatile functions was initiated for the first time. The purpose is to survey the overall context and to facilitate navigation to the various phenomena that are shown through case studies accompanied by theoretical explanations and guidelines for optimization. Though not complete, the map enables systematic and graphical navigation to relevant publications. Based on a fundamental structure of the map, which was decided early, it is inherently extendable in the future by adding existing and new knowledge, also from other research groups, enabling evolution. The fundament of the map structure comprises gouge thickness, joint type and metal grade, in coherence with product and weld designers' starting points. The next hierarchy level of the map offers options in the joint type as well as in hybrid welding techniques. The latter contains techniques like double-sided welding, pulse shaping management of the arc or laser, CMT arcs, tandem arcs, or remelting of undercuts. In addition to laser-arc hybrid welding, other hybrid laser techniques like multilayer hot-wire laser welding of narrow gaps or hybrid laser friction stir welding can be taken into account. At the other end of the hierarchy, the map offers via a database-like archive electronic navigation to research results like weld macrographs, high speed imaging or numerical simulation results of the welding process.

  10. Welding Curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  11. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  12. Study of Gravity Effects on Titanium Laser Welding in the Vertical Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Baohua; Yuan, Zhang; Pu, Haitao; Li, Haigang; Cheng, Hao; Du, Dong; Shan, Jiguo

    2017-09-08

    To obtain satisfactory welds in positional laser beam welding, it is necessary to know how process parameters will influence the quality of welds in different welding positions. In this study, the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V sheets were laser welded in two vertical welding positions (vertical up and vertical down), and the appearance, porosity, strength, and ductility of the laser joints were evaluated. Results show that undercuts of the vertical up welds were greater than that of vertical down welds, while the porosity contents were much higher in vertical down welds than that in vertical up welds. When welding with a higher heat input, the vertical up welding position resulted in poor weld profiles (undercuts and burn-through holes), whereas the vertical down welding position led to excessive porosity contents in welds. Both severe undercut and excessive porosity were detrimental to the tensile properties of the welds. Weld appearance was improved and porosity contents were reduced by using a lower heat input, achieving better weld quality. Therefore, it is suggested that process parameter settings with relatively high laser powers and welding speeds, which can result in lower heat inputs, are used when laser welding the Ti6Al4V titanium alloys vertically.

  13. Gas tungsten arc welding of ZrB2–SiC based ultra high temperature ceramic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Krishnarao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty in fabricating the large size or complex shape limits the application of ZrB2–SiC composites. Joining them by fusion welding without or with preheating, controlled cooling under protective gas shield leads to thermal shock failure or porosity at the weld interface. In the present work, a filler material of (ZrB2–SiC–B4C–YAG composite with oxidation resistance and thermal shock resistance was produced in the form of welding wire. Using the filler, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW was performed without employing preheating, post controlled cooling and extraneous protective gas shield to join hot pressed ZrB2–SiC (ZS, and pressureless sintered ZrB2–SiC–B4C–YAG (ZSBY composites to themselves. The fusion welding resulted in cracking and non-uniform joining without any filler material. The weld interfaces of the composites were very clean and coherent. The Vickers micro-hardness across the weld interface was found to increase due to the increase in the volume % of both SiC and B4C in the filler material. The shear strength of the weld was about 50% of the flextural strength of the parent composite.

  14. Numerical simulation of TIG welding with filler of steel pieces of high thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmignani, B.; Toselli, G. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The problem of the numerical simulation of welding process with filler, in particular TIG (tungsten inert gas) with cold filler, has been approached with ABAQUS/S code. Reference has been made to some experimental models studied and prepared ad hoc in order to better know the physical phenomena involved in the TIG welding technique and to validate the computation methodologies and results obtained. This numerical simulation has been required in order to assist the fabrication development and QA for TF (toroidal field) coil case, an important component of ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) machine. [Italian] Con il codice di analisi termo-strutturale non lineare agli EF, ABAQUS/S, viene affrontato per la prima volta il problema della simulazione numerica di un processo di saldatura con materiale d'apporto, in particolare il processo di saldatura TIG (tungsten inert gas) a filo freddo. Si e' fatto riferimento ad alcuni modelli sperimentali studiati e preparati ad hoc per conoscere meglio e valutare le metodologie di calcolo adottate ed i corrispondenti risultati ottenuti. Questo tipo di simulazione e' stato richiesto per fornire alcune conoscenze preliminari, che potessero essere di aiuto e guida nelle scelte di saldatura da eseguire per la fabbricazione e la quality assurance delle casse che dovranno contenere le bobine per la creazione del campo magnetico toroidale nella macchina ITER (international thermonuclear experiemental reactor) per la fusione nucleare. In questo lavoro, sono presentati, analizzati, discussi e confrontati con le corrispondenti misure sperimentali i primi risultati ottenuti. Sono descritte e discusse anche le difficolta' incontrate, le approssimazioni fatte e la ricerca di procedure di calcolo piu' semplificate.

  15. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  16. Effect of Welding Processes and Consumables on Tensile and Impact Properties of High Strength Quenched and Tempered Steel Joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G Magudeeswaran; V Balasubramanian; G Madhusudhan Reddy; T S Balasubramanian

    2008-01-01

    Quenched and tempered steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking in the heat affected gone after welding.The use of austenitic stainless steel consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase.In this investigation,an attempt was made to determine a suitable consumable to replace expensive austenitic consumables.Two different consumables,namely,austenitic stainless steel and lOW hydrogen ferritic steel,were used to fabricate the joints by shielded metal arc welding(SMAW)and flux cored arc welding(FCAW)processes.The joints fabricated by using low hydrogen ferritic steel consumables showed superior transverse tensile properties,whereas joints fabricated by using austenitic stainless steel consumables exhibited better impact toughness,irrespective of the welding process used.The SMAW joints exhibited superior mechanical and impact properties,irrespective of the consumables used,than their FCAW counterparts.

  17. Welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems using fundamental- and higher-resonance frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hongoh, Misugi; Yoshikuni, Masafumi; Hashii, Hidekazu; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2004-04-01

    The welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems that are driven at only the fundamental-resonance frequency vibration were compared, and also those of the welding systems that were driven at the fundamental and several higher resonance frequencies simultaneously were studied. At high frequency, welding characteristics can be improved due to the larger vibration loss of plastic materials. For welding of rather thin or small specimens, as the fundamental frequency of these welding systems is higher and the numbers of driven higher frequencies are driven simultaneously, larger welded area and weld strength were obtained.

  18. Progress in High Brightness Solid-state Laser Welding%高亮度固体激光焊接研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖荣诗; 邹江林; 吴世凯

    2015-01-01

    高亮度固体激光,特别是光纤激光以其光束质量高、加工柔性好、运行成本低等综合优势,吸引了国内外研究人员的广泛关注. 结合作者的研究工作,概括了高亮度固体激光焊接模式转变过程、羽辉特性、飞溅特性、深熔小孔壁形貌及孔内能量耦合等焊接物理过程方面的最新研究进展. 阐述了大厚板材超窄间隙激光焊、异种金属熔钎焊、激光电弧复合焊等焊接方法的最新研究.%High brightness solid-state lasers, especially the fiber laser, have received extensive attention all over the world owing to their favorable comprehensive advantages, such as high beam quality, high processing flexibility, and low operating cost. In this paper, some aspects on high brightness solid laser welding physical processes, such as the transition of welding mode, laser-induced plume, spatters, the micro-morphology of the keyhole wall and the energy coupling in the keyhole are reviewed. Additionally, some new welding methods, including ultra-narrow gap laser welding of heavy section, laser penetration brazing of dissimilar alloys, and laser-arc hybrid welding, are also reviewed.

  19. High-frequency welded finned tubes - finning of 9% chromium steel X10CrMoVNb91 (P91/T91)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coussement, C.J. [Belgian Welding Inst., Gent (Belgium); Bruehl, F.H. [Mannesmann Carnoy N.V., Gent (Belgium); Donckt, E. van der [Mannesmann Carnoy N.V., Gent (Belgium)

    1995-07-01

    During the past two years, a research programme was set up to investigate the feasibility of producing, in an economical way, finned tubes in modified 9% chromium steel, by using the high frequency resistance welding (finning) process and to evaluate their properties and product reliability for the intended high temeprature application area, at temepratures above 530 C. The basic aim was to produce T91/P91 finned tubes and to demonstrate their applicability in the `as-welded` condition. Therefore, the influence of omitting any post weld heat treatment on the short and longer term behaviour was evaluated. The programm was performed by Mannesmann-Carnoy and realised in collaboration with the Research Centre of the Belgian Welding Institute, with support of the Minister of Economic Affairs of the Flemish Region. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den letzten zwei Jahren wurde ein Untersuchungsprogramm durchgefuehrt, in dem die Moeglichkeit einer wirtschaftlichen Herstellung von Rippenrohren aus 9%igem modifizierten Chromstahl untersucht wurde durch Anwendung des Hochfrequenz-Widerstandsschweissprozesses. Die Eigenschaften und die Zuverlaessigkeit des Produktes fuer die Anwendung im Hochtemperaturbereich (ueber 530 C) wird beurteilt. Es kamen T91/P91-Rippenrohre zum Einsatz, um ihre Verwendbarkeit im nicht waermebehandelten Zustand zu zeigen. Insbesondere wurde ueberprueft, welchen Einfluss der nicht waermebehandelten Zustand nach dem Schweissen auf das Kurz- und Langzeitverhalten der Rippenrohre hat. Das Programm wurde von Mannesmann Carnoy in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Untersuchungszentrum des belgischen Schweissinstitutes, und mit Unterstuetzung durch das Wirtschaftsministerium der flaemischen Regierung durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  20. Rheology of welding: Field constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K.; Quane, S.

    2003-04-01

    Pyroclastic deposits emplaced at high temperature and having sufficient thickness become welded via sintering, compaction and flattening of hot glassy particles. The welding process is attended by pronounced changes in the physical properties of the deposit and welding intensity can be tracked by measuring the density, porosity, fabric or strength of samples. Ultimately, the intensity of welding reflects the aggregate effects of load and residence time at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (Tg). This results in welding intensity varying with stratigraphic depth; vertical sections through welded ignimbrite deposits commonly show maximum (e.g., density) or minimum (porosity) values in physical properties in the lower half (30--40% above the base) of the unit. Here we explore the extent to which these data, serving as proxies for strain, can be used constrain the rheological properties of the pyroclastic deposit during the welding process. Our data include measurements of density, porosity, fabric and rock strength as a function of stratigraphic position for 4 sections through the Bandelier tuff, New Mexico. These profiles record changes in physical properties and, thus, map the cumulative strain associated with welding as a function of depth (load). We have used simple conductive heat transfer models to estimate cooling curves for each sample. Essentially, these curves provide the residence time within the "welding window" for each sample. The curves are dependent on sample position, thickness of ignimbrite, emplacement temperature and the glass transition temperature of the material. The unknowns in the problem are a number of physical constants in a generalized power-law relationship between strain-rate (ɛ') and stress (σ) for steady-state creep at constant load: ɛ' = A σ^n e[-Q/R T]. Specifically, we adopt an inverse-model approach whereby the observations on the natural material are used to constrain the pre-exponential constant (A), stress

  1. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  2. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  3. Effect of welding speed on the material flow patterns in friction stir welding of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; Wu Huiqiang; Huang Jihua; LIN Sanbao; WU Lin

    2007-01-01

    The clear zigzag-line pattern on transverse cross sections can be used to explain the formation mechanism of the weld nugget when friction stir welded AZ31 magnesium alloy without any other insert material is used as mark. It provides a simple and useful method to research the joining mechanism of friction stir welding. The rotation speed is kept at 1000 r/min and the welding speed changes from 120 mm/min to 600 mm/min. The macrostructure on the transverse cross section was divided into several parts by faying surface. The results show that the shape and formation procedure of the weld nugget change with the welding speed. There are two main material flows in the weld nugget: one is from the advancing side and the other is from the retreating side. A simple model on the weld nugget formation of FSW is presented in this article.

  4. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  5. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  6. Mechanical properties and microstructural investigations of TIG welded 40 mm and 60 mm thick SS 316L samples for fusion reactor vacuum vessel applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar, E-mail: brkumar75@gmail.com; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P.M.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Austenitic stainless steels (316L) of 40 mm and 60 mm thickness plates were joined by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG) process which are probable materials for advanced fusion reactor vacuum vessel requirements. • Mechanical properties and detailed microstructure studies have been carried out for welded samples. • Fractography analysis of impact test specimens indicated ductile fracture mode in BM, HAZ and WZ samples. • Presence of delta ferrite phase was observed in the welded zone and ferrite number data was measured for the base and weld metal and was found high in welds. - Abstract: The development of advanced fusion reactors like DEMO will have various challenges in materials and fabrication. The vacuum vessel is important part of the fusion reactor. The double walled design for vacuum vessel with thicker stainless steel material (40–60 mm) has been proposed in the advanced fusion reactors like ITER. Different welding techniques will have to be used for such vacuum vessel development. The required mechanical, structural and other properties of stainless steels have to be maintained in these joining processes of components of various shapes and sizes in the form of plates, ribs, shells, etc. The present paper reports characterization of welding joints of SS316L plates with higher thicknesses like 40 mm and 60 mm, prepared using multi-pass Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process. The weld quality has been evaluated with non-destructive tests by X-ray radiography and ultrasonic methods. The mechanical properties like tensile, bend tests, Vickers hardness and impact fracture tests have been carried out for the weld samples. Tensile property test results indicate sound weld joints with efficiencies over 100%. Hardening was observed in the weld zone in non-uniform manner. Macro and microstructure studies have been carried out for Base Metal (BM), Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and Weld Zone (WZ). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis carried

  7. A study on twin-tungsten TIG welding method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leng Xuesong; Zhang Guangjun; Gao Hongming; Wu Lin

    2006-01-01

    A new twin-tungsten TIG (T-TIG) welding method was studied. This method differs from the conventional TIG method, it places two electrodes insulated from each other in the same welding torch, and a coupling arc is generated from the two electrodes. The coupling arc pressure was measured and preliminary welding experiment was made. The results show that the coupling arc can keep arc pressure at a low level compared with conventional TIG arc, and welding can be achieved under higher current and high travel speed with sound appearance of weld. Therefore, this new method can applied widely in high efficiency welding.

  8. Optimisation of laser welding parameters for welding of P92 material using Taguchi based grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugarajan B.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF steels are used in advanced power plant systems for high temperature applications. P92 (Cr–W–Mo–V steel, classified under CSEF steels, is a candidate material for piping, tubing, etc., in ultra-super critical and advanced ultra-super critical boiler applications. In the present work, laser welding process has been optimised for P92 material by using Taguchi based grey relational analysis (GRA. Bead on plate (BOP trials were carried out using a 3.5 kW diffusion cooled slab CO2 laser by varying laser power, welding speed and focal position. The optimum parameters have been derived by considering the responses such as depth of penetration, weld width and heat affected zone (HAZ width. Analysis of variance (ANOVA has been used to analyse the effect of different parameters on the responses. Based on ANOVA, laser power of 3 kW, welding speed of 1 m/min and focal plane at −4 mm have evolved as optimised set of parameters. The responses of the optimised parameters obtained using the GRA have been verified experimentally and found to closely correlate with the predicted value.

  9. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow.

  10. Microstructure modeling in weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Since microstructure development in the weld metal region is controlled by various physical processes, there is a need for integrated predictive models based on fundamental principles to describe and predict the effect of these physical processes. These integrated models should be based on various tools available for modeling microstructure development in a wide variety of alloy systems and welding processes. In this paper, the principles, methodology, and future directions of modeling thermochemical reactions in liquid, solidification, and solid state transformations are discussed with some examples for low-alloy steel, stainless steel, and Ni-base superalloy. Thermochemical deoxidation reactions in liquid low-alloy steel lead to oxide inclusion formation. This inclusion formation has been modeled by combining principles of ladle metallurgy and overall transformation kinetics. The model`s comparison with the experimental data and the ongoing work on coupling this inclusion model with the numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow are discussed. Also, recent advances in theoretical and physical modeling of the solidification process are reviewed with regard to predicting the solidification modes, grain structure development, segregation effects, and nonequilibrium solidification in welds. The effects of solid state phase transformations on microstructure development and various methods of modeling these transformations are reviewed. Successful models, based on diffusion-controlled growth and plate growth theories, on microstructure development in low-alloy steel and stainless steel weld metals are outlined. This paper also addresses the importance of advanced analytical techniques to understand the solid state transformation mechanisms in welds.

  11. Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI Series 5. Volume 1, Main report and Appendices A, B, C, and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Menke, B.H. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program obtained a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two high-copper (0.23 and 0.31 wt %) submerged-arc welds to determine the shift and shape of the K{sub Ic} curve as a consequence of irradiation. Compact specimens with thicknesses to 101.6 mm (4 in) in the irradiated condition and 203.2 mm (8 in) in the unirradiated condition were tested, in addition to Charpy impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens. Irradiations were conducted at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C and an average fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>l MeV). The Charpy 41-J temperature shifts are about the same as the corresponding drop-weight NDT temperature shifts. The irradiated welds exhibited substantial numbers of cleavage pop-ins. Mean curve fits using two-parameter (with fixed intercept) nonlinear and linearized exponential regression analysis revealed that the fracture toughness 100 MPa{lg_bullet}{radical}m shifts exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Analyses of curve shape changes indicated decreases in the slopes of the fracture toughness curves, especially for the higher copper weld. Weibull analyses were performed to investigate development of lower bound curves to the data, including the use of a variable K{sub min} parameter which affects the curve shape.

  12. On-line welding quality inspection system for steel pipe based on machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, high frequency welding has been widely used in production because of its advantages of simplicity, reliability and high quality. In the production process, how to effectively control the weld penetration welding, ensure full penetration, weld uniform, so as to ensure the welding quality is to solve the problem of the present stage, it is an important research field in the field of welding technology. In this paper, based on the study of some methods of welding inspection, a set of on-line welding quality inspection system based on machine vision is designed.

  13. Research on the properties of laser welded joints of aluminum killed cold rolled steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎启; 曹能; 俞宁峰

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum killed cold rolled steel used for automobiles was welded shows that high quality of welding can be realized at welding speed of laser welded joints for aluminum killed cold rolled steel increased compared to those of the base metal while the formability decreased. Forming limit diagram of joint material indicated that the laser weld seam should avoid the maximum deformation area of automobile parts during the designing period for the position of weld seam.

  14. Development of Automatic Extraction Weld for Industrial Radiographic Negative Inspection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓光; 林家骏; 李浴; 卢印举

    2003-01-01

    In industrial X-ray inspection, in order to identify weld defects automatically, raise the identification ratio, and avoid processing of complex background, it is an important step for sequent processing to extract weld from the image. According to the characteristics of weld radiograph image, median filter is adopted to reduce the noise with high frequency, then relative gray-scale of image is chosen as fuzzy characteristic, and image gray-scale fuzzy matrix is constructed and suitable membership function is selected to describe edge characteristic. A fuzzy algorithm is adopted for enhancing radiograph image processing. Based on the intensity distribution characteristic in weld, methodology of weld extraction is then designed. This paper describes the methodology of all the weld extraction, including reducing noise, fuzzy enhancement and weld extraction process. To prove its effectiveness, this methodology was tested with 64 weld negative images available for this study. The experimental results show that this methodology is very effective for extracting linear weld.

  15. Assisting Gas Optimization in CO2 Laser Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1996-01-01

    High quality laser welding is achieved under the condition of optimizing all process parameters. Assisting gas plays an important role for sound welds. In the conventional welding process assisting gas is used as a shielding gas to prevent that the weld seam oxidates. In the laser welding process...... assisting gas is also needed to control the laser induced plasma.Assisting gas is one of the most important parameters in the laser welding process. It is responsible for obtaining a quality weld which is characterized by deep penetration, no interior imperfections, i.e. porosity, no crack, homogeneous seam...... are applied with three different flow rates for each of the gases. A number of systematic laboratory experiments is carried out by employing various experimental designs, 33 and 32 Factorial Design. In the experiments a CO2 laser is used to weld thin sheets of mild steel. The welding specimens are evaluated...

  16. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  17. Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

    2006-05-25

    The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

  18. Laser vision sensing based on adaptive welding for aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhixiang; SONG Yonglun; ZHANG Jun; ZHANG Wanchun; JIANG Li; XIA Xuxin

    2007-01-01

    A laser vision sensing based on the adaptive tungsten inert gas(TIG)welding system for large-scale aluminum alloy components was established to fit various weld groove conditions.A new type of laser vision sensor was used to precisely measure the weld groove.The joint geometry data,such as the bevel angle,the gap,the area,and the mismatch,etc.,aided in assembling large-scale aerospace components before welding.They were also applied for automatic seam tracking,such as automatic torch transverse alignment and torch height adjustment in welding.An adaptive welding process was realized by automatically adjusting the wire feeding speed and the welding current according to the groove conditions.The process results in a good weld formation and high welding quality,which meet the requirements of related standards.

  19. MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF WELDING DISTORTIONS IN THIN PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Kheidari Monfared

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding is a crucial manufacturing process and widely used for manufacturing various products including ships, automobiles, trains and bridges. Welding distortions often occur in welded structures of thin plates due to relatively low stiffness and result in their warpage during assembly process and high manufacturing cost. Therefore, prediction and reduction of welding distortions are important in order to improve quality of welded structures. Welding distortion during the assembly process is caused not only by local shrinkage due to rapid heating and cooling. 3-D thermo-elastic-plastic finite element method (FEM has been used to simulate single-bead-on-plate welding with 1 mm thickness. Experiments have been carried out to prove the simulated results. Comparison of the experimental results and FEM simulation results has confirmed that the proposed method efficiently  predicts level of  welding distortions while making single-bead-on-plate welding with 1 mm thickness.

  20. Guiding the welding robot to the initial welding position with visual method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhenyou; Lin Tao; Chen Shanben

    2008-01-01

    Using step pattern match technology with variational resolution can recognize the position and orientation of the weld seam in the image. According to using the image segmentation method based on pattern match, not only advanced the speed and anti-jamming capability, but also captured the edge information of the weld seam and the edge of the workpiece, and the image coordinate of the initial welding position can be obtained. The matrix for hand-eye relationship of the robot can be calculated by adopting the rapid calculation method. According to the depth calculating principle with the special point matching using binocular stereovision, the initial welding position can be confirmed by calculating the middle point of the perpendicular line of two radials in the space, and the function to guide the welding robot to the initial welding position can be realized.

  1. Effect of width of repair welding on stress distribution of dissimilar metal butt weld of nuclear piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Won Shik; Lee, Hwee Seung; Huh, Nam Su [Seoul National Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In the present work, the welding residual stress due to repair welding and the stress redistribution behavior due to primary pressure are investigated via 2-dimensional non-linear finite element analyses. In particular, the effect of repair welding width on stress distribution is emphasized. Although, large tensile residual stresses are produced at the PWSCC sensitive region due to repair welding, these stresses are highly reduced due to stress redistribution caused by primary load. Based on the present finite element results, it has been revealed that the effect of width of repair welding on stress distribution is not significant. In the past few years, many numerical and experimental works have been made to assess a structural integrity of cracked components subjected to primary water stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal weld (DMW) using Alloys 82/182 in nuclear industries worldwide. These works include a prediction of weld residual stresses in dissimilar metal weld by either numerical or experimental works since an accurate estimation of residual stress distribution in dissimilar metal weld is the most important element for integrity assessment of components subjected to primary water stress corrosion cracking. During an actual welding process, in general, a repair welding is often performed when a defect indication is detected during post-welding inspection. It has been revealed that such a repair welding could lead to higher tensile residual stress in dissimilar metal weld, which is detrimental to the crack growth due to primary water stress corrosion cracking. Thus, the prediction of residual stress considering a repair welding is needed, and then many efforts were made on this issue. In the present work, the effect of width of repair welding on stress distribution of dissimilar metal butt weld of nuclear piping is evaluated based on the detailed 2-dimensional non-linear finite element analyses. For this purpose, the welding residual stress due to

  2. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  3. Microstructural Characterization and Hardness Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded Composite AA6061-4.5Cu-5SiC (Wt.%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Shettigar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in advanced materials research have led to the emergence of new materials having features like low density, high strength to weight ratio, excellent mechanical properties, heat and corrosion resistance. In friction stir welding (FSW, a non-consumable rotating welding tool is used to generate the frictional heat and plastic deformation of the material in the welding zone, which is in the solid state. The advantages of FSW as compared to the fusion welding are high joint strength, less defect weld, uniform distribution of grain structure in the weld zone and low power consumption. AA6061with 4.5 % weight of copper and 5 % weight of SiC composite material has been prepared to conduct experiment and carry out characterization, evaluation of the mechanical properties. Micro-structural characterization of the weld zone is carried out by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Evaluation of hardness was also carried out across the weld zone. A successful method for FSW of AA6061-4.5(wt.% Cu-5(wt.% SiC has been developed.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(4, pp.429-434, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4869

  4. Microstructural Characterization and Hardness Evaluation of Friction Stir Welded Composite AA6061-4.5Cu-5SiC (Wt.%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Shettigar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in advanced materials research have led to the emergence of new materials having features like low density, high strength to weight ratio, excellent mechanical properties, heat and corrosion resistance. In friction stir welding (FSW, a non-consumable rotating welding tool is used to generate the frictional heat and plastic deformation of the material in the welding zone, which is in the solid state. The advantages of FSW as compared to the fusion welding are high joint strength, less defect weld, uniform distribution of grain structure in the weld zone and low power consumption. AA6061with 4.5 % weight of copper and 5 % weight of SiC composite material has been prepared to conduct experiment and carry out characterization, evaluation of the mechanical properties. Micro-structural characterization of the weld zone is carried out by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Evaluation of hardness was also carried out across the weld zone. A successful method for FSW of AA6061-4.5(wt.% Cu-5(wt.% SiC has been developed.

  5. Study of the flux effect nature for VVER-1000 RPV welds with high nickel content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Lavrukhina, Z. V.; Maltsev, D. A.; Fedotova, S. V.; Frolov, A. S.; Zhuchkov, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    This work extends the research of the basic regularities of segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The paper considers the influence of irradiation with different fast neutron fluxes on the structure, yield strength and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (TK) changes as well as on changes of the share of brittle intergranular fracture and development of segregation processes in the VVER-1000 RPV weld metal (WM). The obtained experimental results allow to separate the contribution of the hardening and non-hardening mechanisms to mechanical properties degradation of material irradiated at the operating temperature. It is shown that the difference in TK shift in WM irradiated to the same fluence with different fast neutron fluxes is mainly due to the difference in the GB accumulation kinetics of impurities and only to a small extent due to the material hardening. Phosphorus bulk diffusion coefficients were evaluated for the temperature exposure, accelerated irradiation and irradiation within surveillance specimens (SS) using a kinetic model of phosphorus GB accumulation in low-alloyed low-carbon steels under the influence of operational factors. The correlation between the GB segregation level of phosphorus and nickel, and the TK shift - in WM SS was obtained experimentally and indicates the non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels throughout its extended lifetime.

  6. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries.

  7. S-N lognormal distribution of ultra-high strength steel welding spot%超高强钢焊点的 S-N 对数正态分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓光; 宇慧平; 李晓阳; 陈树君; 刘跃华

    2016-01-01

    In order to research the fatigue properties of ultra-high strength steel welding spot,the 22MnB5 spot-welding structure was taken as the research object.An intermediate frequency servo spot-welding device was used to weld the specimens with a thickness of 2 mm.With the high-frequency fatigue testing machine,laser repair welding device and optical microscope,the S-N curves of specimens under different welding process parameters were studied.The results show that the welding time and current parameters have obvious influence on the fatigue life of welding spot in the high stress area,while have small influence on the fatigue life of welding spot in the low stress area.In addition,the reasonable process parameters can effectively improve the fatigue life of welding spot.After the repair welding for the tiny circumferential vulnerable zone of welding spot with the laser process,the structural strength of welding spot can be effectively enhanced.%为了研究超高强钢焊点的疲劳性能,以22MnB5点焊结构为研究对象,采用中频伺服点焊设备对2 mm 厚试件进行了焊接。利用高频疲劳试验机、激光补焊设备和光学显微镜,研究了不同焊接工艺参数下试件的 S-N 曲线。结果表明,焊接时间与电流参数会对高应力等级焊点的疲劳寿命产生明显影响,而其对低应力区焊点的疲劳寿命影响较小。合理的工艺参数可以有效提高焊点的疲劳寿命。利用激光工艺对焊点的微小圆周薄弱区进行补焊后,可以有效增强焊点的结构强度。

  8. Thermo-mechanical Modeling for Residual Stresses of Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDUL ARIF

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is an advanced joining process that has been used for high production since 1996. FSW produces a weld that is strong than the base material because melting does not occur and joining takes place below the melting temperature of the material. FSW produces no fumes and can join aluminum alloys, magnesium, steels, copper and titanium. In this study, a thermo-mechanical model with improved potential is developed to study the formation of residual stress field in dissimilar materials. The model predictions were confirmed with experimental data obtained by Jamshidi et al. on dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061 to AA5086. A commercial finite element software ANSYS® is used for simulation of friction stir welding. Longitudinal and transverse residual stresses are obtained when AA5086-O on the advancing side and AA6061- T6 on the retreating side after 15sec.

  9. “Effect of Tool Geometries on Thermal and Mechanical Behaviour of Friction Stir Welding Welds of Aluminum Alloy”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuber Singh Patel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding is an advanced solid state joining technique, widely being used in various applications for joining aluminum alloys in aerospace, marine, automotive and many other applications of profitable importance. The welding parameters and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. It is an attempt to being made to analyze the effect of tool geometries, the effect of tool rotation and welding speeds on the mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints made for sample of profitable grade aluminum alloy and ANSYS is used to compare and prove the attempts made for various analyses

  10. Towards Real Time Diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Mcjunkin; Dennis C. Kunerth; Corrie Nichol; Evgueni Todorov; Steve Levesque; Feng Yu; Robert Danna Couch

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  11. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  12. Towards real time diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McJunkin, T. R.; Kunerth, D. C.; Nichol, C. I. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3570 (United States); Todorov, E.; Levesque, S. [Edison Welding Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  13. Patterns of residual stresses due to welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botros, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    Residual stresses caused by welding result from the nonuniform rate of cooling and the restrained thermal contraction or non-uniform plastic deformation. From the zone of extremely high temperature at the weld, heat flows into both the adjoining cool body and the surrounding atmosphere. The weld metal solidifies under very rapid cooling. The plasticity of the hot metal allows adjustment initially, but as the structure cools the rigidity of the surrounding cold metal inhibits further contraction. The zone is compressed and the weld is put under tensile stresses of high magnitude. The danger of cracking in these structural elements is great. Change in specific volume is caused by the change in temperature.

  14. Welding in space and the construction of space vehicles by welding; Proceedings of the Conference, New Carrollton, MD, Sept. 24-26, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present conference discusses such topics in spacecraft welding as the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility's evidence on material properties degradation, EVA/telerobotic construction techniques, welding of the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer flight demonstration tanks and hardware, electron-beam welding of aerospace vehicles, variable-polarity plasma arc keyhole welding of Al, aircraft experiments of low-gravity fusion welding, flash-butt welding of Al alloys, and a computer-aided handbook for space welding fabrication. Also discussed are the welded nozzle extension for Ariane launch vehicles, the existence of on-orbit cold-welding, structural materials performance in long-term space service, high-strength lightweight alloys, steels, and heat-resistant alloys for aerospace welded structures, the NASA-Goddard satellite repair program, and the uses of explosion welding and cutting in aerospace engineering.

  15. Explosive welding of undersea pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalker, A.W.

    1978-02-01

    The phenomenon of explosive welding has been known informally for many years. A number of investigations reported the occurerence of solid phase bonds as an incidental effect when using high explosives in association with adjacent metal surfaces and probably the earliest formal record was the observation by Carl in 1944 of a bond between two copper discs in contact with a detonator. In 1957 Philipchuk reported what is now recognized as an explosive weld between aluminium channel sections and a steel die when carrying out explosive forming trials. Since then a great deal of development work has resulted in explosive welding becoming a well established manufacturing technique, particularly in the fields of cladding and the joining of tube/tubeplates. In more recent years the process has been extended to the welding of large diameter line pipe materials.

  16. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  17. Combination of laser keyhole and conduction welding: Dissimilar laser welding of niobium and Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamany, M. J.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Poursalehi, R.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2016-04-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of pure niobium plate to titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V sheet in butt joint is studied regarding the laser/metal interaction modes. To obtain the optimized process parameters in dissimilar welding of Ti-6Al-4V/Nb, the melting ratio of laser beam energy for each weld counterpart is evaluated experimentally. Different laser welding modes of keyhole and conduction are predicted regarding the absorbed energy from the similar laser pulses on each weld counterpart. Laser keyhole and conduction welding were observed simultaneously through direct visualization of laser interaction with dissimilar metals using High Speed Imaging (HSI) system.

  18. New technology for the design of advanced ultrasonic transducers for high-power applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrini, Lorenzo

    2003-06-01

    A new high-frequency ultrasonic transducer for wire bonding has been conceived, designed, prototyped and tested. In the design phase an advanced approach was used and established. The method is based on the two basic principles of modularity and iteration. The transducer is decomposed to its elementary components. For each component an initial design is obtained with finite elements method (FEM) simulations. The simulated ultrasonic modules are then built and characterized experimentally through laser-interferometry measurements and electrical resonance spectra. The comparison of simulation results with experimental data allows the parameters of FEM models to be iteratively adjusted and optimized. The achieved FEM simulations exhibit a remarkably high-predictive potential and allow full control on the vibration behavior of the ultrasonic modules and of the whole transducer. The new transducer is fixed on the wire bonder with a flange whose special geometry was calculated by means of FEM simulations. This flange allows the converter to be attached on the wire bonder not only in longitudinal nodes but also in radial nodes of the ultrasonic field excited in the horn. This leads to a nearly complete decoupling of the transducer to the wire bonder, which has not been previously obtained. The new approach to mount ultrasonic transducers on a welding-device is of major importance not only for wire bonding but also for all high-power ultrasound applications and has been patented.

  19. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  20. Microstructural and microtextural analysis of InterPulse GTCAW welds in Cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, Rowan K., E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Merson, Eleanor [National Metals Technology Centre, Swinden House, Moorgate Road, Rotherham S60 3AR (United Kingdom); Birmingham, Keith; Harvey, David [VBC Group, Castle Business Park, Pavilion Way, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 5GW (United Kingdom); Brydson, Rik, E-mail: mtlrmdb@leeds.ac.uk [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Evaluation of a new low heat input welding technique for titanium alloys. {yields} Demonstration of the potential to tailor weld microstructures and microtextures. {yields} New insight into the mechanisms of microtextural evolution in titanium alloys. {yields} {alpha} Variants sharing a common 112-bar 0 pole are found to cluster into groups. {yields} Direct analysis of the impact of microtexture on mechanical properties. - Abstract: The InterPulse technique is an advanced gas tungsten constricted arc welding (GTCAW) method for controlled heat input welding of titanium alloys. Microstructural and microtextural analysis has been used to show that the technique has the potential to produce high integrity welds in Cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V while welding outside of a vacuum chamber and without a trailing gas shield. The arc waveform control provided by the technique is shown to have the potential to tailor weld macrostructures, microstructures and microtextures. At the cooling rates associated with the technique, {alpha}-variants sharing a common (112-bar 0) pole are found to cluster together into groups within prior {beta} grains, leading to large areas where all variants are separated by a misorientation of 60 deg. Characterisation of these microtextures may provide new insight into microtexture-properties relations and the mechanisms of microtextural evolution.