WorldWideScience

Sample records for web ontology languages

  1. OWL Web Ontology Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staab, S.; Studer, R.; Antoniou, Grigoris; Van Harmelen, Frank; Staab, S; Studer, R

    2004-01-01

    The OWL Web Ontology Language is designed for use by applications that need to process the content of information instead of just presenting information to humans. OWL facilitates greater machine interpretability of Web content than that supported by XML, RDF, and RDF Schema (RDF-S) by providing

  2. OWL 2 Web Ontology Language: structural specification and functional-style syntax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motik, B.; Patel-Schneider, P.F.; Parsia, B.; Bock, C.; Fokoue, A.; Haase, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Horrocks, I.; Ruttenberg, A.; Sattler, U.; Smith, M.

    2008-01-01

    The OWL 2 Web Ontology Language, informally OWL 2, is an ontology language for the Semantic Web with formally defined meaning. OWL 2 ontologies provide classes, properties, individuals, and data values and are stored as Semantic Web documents. OWL 2 ontologies can be used along with information

  3. tOWL: a temporal Web Ontology Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, Viorel; Frasincar, Flavius; Kaymak, Uzay

    2012-02-01

    Through its interoperability and reasoning capabilities, the Semantic Web opens a realm of possibilities for developing intelligent systems on the Web. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) is the most expressive standard language for modeling ontologies, the cornerstone of the Semantic Web. However, up until now, no standard way of expressing time and time-dependent information in OWL has been provided. In this paper, we present a temporal extension of the very expressive fragment SHIN(D) of the OWL Description Logic language, resulting in the temporal OWL language. Through a layered approach, we introduce three extensions: 1) concrete domains, which allow the representation of restrictions using concrete domain binary predicates; 2) temporal representation , which introduces time points, relations between time points, intervals, and Allen's 13 interval relations into the language; and 3) timeslices/fluents, which implement a perdurantist view on individuals and allow for the representation of complex temporal aspects, such as process state transitions. We illustrate the expressiveness of the newly introduced language by using an example from the financial domain.

  4. OWLing Clinical Data Repositories With the Ontology Web Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Rubí, Raimundo; Pastor, Xavier; Lozano, Esther

    2014-08-01

    The health sciences are based upon information. Clinical information is usually stored and managed by physicians with precarious tools, such as spreadsheets. The biomedical domain is more complex than other domains that have adopted information and communication technologies as pervasive business tools. Moreover, medicine continuously changes its corpus of knowledge because of new discoveries and the rearrangements in the relationships among concepts. This scenario makes it especially difficult to offer good tools to answer the professional needs of researchers and constitutes a barrier that needs innovation to discover useful solutions. The objective was to design and implement a framework for the development of clinical data repositories, capable of facing the continuous change in the biomedicine domain and minimizing the technical knowledge required from final users. We combined knowledge management tools and methodologies with relational technology. We present an ontology-based approach that is flexible and efficient for dealing with complexity and change, integrated with a solid relational storage and a Web graphical user interface. Onto Clinical Research Forms (OntoCRF) is a framework for the definition, modeling, and instantiation of data repositories. It does not need any database design or programming. All required information to define a new project is explicitly stated in ontologies. Moreover, the user interface is built automatically on the fly as Web pages, whereas data are stored in a generic repository. This allows for immediate deployment and population of the database as well as instant online availability of any modification. OntoCRF is a complete framework to build data repositories with a solid relational storage. Driven by ontologies, OntoCRF is more flexible and efficient to deal with complexity and change than traditional systems and does not require very skilled technical people facilitating the engineering of clinical software systems.

  5. Model Problems in Technologies for Interoperability: OWL Web Ontology Language for Services (OWL-S)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Metcalf, Chris; Lewis, Grace A

    2006-01-01

    .... The OWL Web Ontology Language for Services (OWL-S) is a language to describe the properties and capabilities of Web Services in such a way that the descriptions can be interpreted by a computer system in an automated manner. This technical note presents the results of applying the model problem approach to examine the feasibility of using OWL-S to allow applications to automatically discover, compose, and invoke services in a dynamic services-oriented environment.

  6. Using Web Ontology Language to Integrate Heterogeneous Databases in the Neurosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hugo Y.K.; Marenco, Luis; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Miller, Perry L.; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2006-01-01

    Integrative neuroscience involves the integration and analysis of diverse types of neuroscience data involving many different experimental techniques. This data will increasingly be distributed across many heterogeneous databases that are web-accessible. Currently, these databases do not expose their schemas (database structures) and their contents to web applications/agents in a standardized, machine-friendly way. This limits database interoperation. To address this problem, we describe a pilot project that illustrates how neuroscience databases can be expressed using the Web Ontology Language, which is a semantically-rich ontological language, as a common data representation language to facilitate complex cross-database queries. In this pilot project, an existing tool called “D2RQ” was used to translate two neuroscience databases (NeuronDB and CoCoDat) into OWL, and the resulting OWL ontologies were then merged. An OWL-based reasoner (Racer) was then used to provide a sophisticated query language (nRQL) to perform integrated queries across the two databases based on the merged ontology. This pilot project is one step toward exploring the use of semantic web technologies in the neurosciences. PMID:17238384

  7. The use of web ontology languages and other semantic web tools in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huajun; Xie, Guotong

    2010-05-01

    To optimize drug development processes, pharmaceutical companies require principled approaches to integrate disparate data on a unified infrastructure, such as the web. The semantic web, developed on the web technology, provides a common, open framework capable of harmonizing diversified resources to enable networked and collaborative drug discovery. We survey the state of art of utilizing web ontologies and other semantic web technologies to interlink both data and people to support integrated drug discovery across domains and multiple disciplines. Particularly, the survey covers three major application categories including: i) semantic integration and open data linking; ii) semantic web service and scientific collaboration and iii) semantic data mining and integrative network analysis. The reader will gain: i) basic knowledge of the semantic web technologies; ii) an overview of the web ontology landscape for drug discovery and iii) a basic understanding of the values and benefits of utilizing the web ontologies in drug discovery. i) The semantic web enables a network effect for linking open data for integrated drug discovery; ii) The semantic web service technology can support instant ad hoc collaboration to improve pipeline productivity and iii) The semantic web encourages publishing data in a semantic way such as resource description framework attributes and thus helps move away from a reliance on pure textual content analysis toward more efficient semantic data mining.

  8. A novel way of integrating rule-based knowledge into a web ontology language framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberger, Dragan; Krstaçić, Goran; Jović, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Web ontology language (OWL), used in combination with the Protégé visual interface, is a modern standard for development and maintenance of ontologies and a powerful tool for knowledge presentation. In this work, we describe a novel possibility to use OWL also for the conceptualization of knowledge presented by a set of rules. In this approach, rules are represented as a hierarchy of actionable classes with necessary and sufficient conditions defined by the description logic formalism. The advantages are that: the set of the rules is not an unordered set anymore, the concepts defined in descriptive ontologies can be used directly in the bodies of rules, and Protégé presents an intuitive tool for editing the set of rules. Standard ontology reasoning processes are not applicable in this framework, but experiments conducted on the rule sets have demonstrated that the reasoning problems can be successfully solved.

  9. Language engineering for the Semantic Web: a digital library for endangered languages. Endangered languages, Ontology, Digital library, Multimedia, EMELD, Intelligent querying and retrieval, ImageSpace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Shiyong

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the effort undertaken at Wayne State University to preserve endangered languages using the state-of-the-art information technologies. In particular, we discuss the issues involved in such an effort, and present the architecture of a distributed digital library for endangered languages which will contain various data of endangered languages in the forms of text, image, video, audio and include advanced tools for intelligent cataloguing, indexing, searching and browsing information on languages and language analysis. We use various Semantic Web technologies such as XML, OLAC, ontologies so that our digital library becomes a useful linguistic resource on the Semantic Web.

  10. Ontology Enabled Generation of Embedded Web Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Zhang, Weishan; Soares, Goncalo Teofilo Afonso Pinheiro

    2008-01-01

    Web services are increasingly adopted as a service provision mechanism in pervasive computing environments. Implementing web services on networked, embedded devices raises a number of challenges, for example efficiency of web services, handling of variability and dependencies of hardware...... and software platforms, and of devices state and context changes. To address these challenges, we developed a Web service compiler, Limbo, in which Web Ontology Language (OWL) ontologies are used to make the Limbo compiler aware of its compilation context, such as targeted hardware and software. At the same...... time, knowledge on device details, platform dependencies, and resource/power consumption is built into the supporting ontologies, which are used to configure Limbo for generating resource efficient web service code. A state machine ontology is used to generate stub code to facilitate handling of state...

  11. Semantics Web and Ontology Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Musumbu, Kaninda

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The Semantics Web is a vision for the future of the Web in which informati on is given explicit meaning, making it easier for machines to automatically pro cess and integrate information available on the Web. An ontology defines the terms used to describe and represent an area of knowledg e. Ontologies are used by people, databases, and applications that need to share domain information (a domain is just a specific subject area or area of knowled ge, like medicine, too...

  12. Semantic Web Services with Web Ontology Language (OWL-S) - Specification of Agent-Services for DARPA Agent Markup Language (DAML)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sycara, Katia P

    2006-01-01

    CMU did research and development on semantic web services using OWL-S, the semantic web service language under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency- DARPA Agent Markup Language (DARPA-DAML) program...

  13. Reviewing the design of DAML+OIL : An ontology language for the Semantic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrocks, Ian; Patel-Schneider, Peter F.; Van Harmelen, Frank

    2002-01-01

    In the current "Syntactic Web", uninterpreted syntactic constructs are given meaning only by private off-line agreements that are inaccessible to computers. In the Semantic Web vision, this is replaced by a web where both data and its semantic definition are accessible and manipulable by computer

  14. Ontology Based Natural Language Discovery of Semantic Web Services in the Geospatial Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yuzhu

    2009-01-01

    Semantic Web Services (SWS) has been an active research topic in the recent years. It aims to achieve automatic Web service discovery, and invocation and composition of services, by adding semantics to the services, which is very significant for accelerating the achievement of Serviceoriented architectures by solving a lot of interoperability issues. Geospatial data on the Web contains more and more important information. Capturing, analyzing and managing such data can help peo...

  15. Mapping between the OBO and OWL ontology languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirmizi, Syed Hamid; Aitken, Stuart; Moreira, Dilvan A; Mungall, Chris; Sequeda, Juan; Shah, Nigam H; Miranker, Daniel P

    2011-03-07

    Ontologies are commonly used in biomedicine to organize concepts to describe domains such as anatomies, environments, experiment, taxonomies etc. NCBO BioPortal currently hosts about 180 different biomedical ontologies. These ontologies have been mainly expressed in either the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) format or the Web Ontology Language (OWL). OBO emerged from the Gene Ontology, and supports most of the biomedical ontology content. In comparison, OWL is a Semantic Web language, and is supported by the World Wide Web consortium together with integral query languages, rule languages and distributed infrastructure for information interchange. These features are highly desirable for the OBO content as well. A convenient method for leveraging these features for OBO ontologies is by transforming OBO ontologies to OWL. We have developed a methodology for translating OBO ontologies to OWL using the organization of the Semantic Web itself to guide the work. The approach reveals that the constructs of OBO can be grouped together to form a similar layer cake. Thus we were able to decompose the problem into two parts. Most OBO constructs have easy and obvious equivalence to a construct in OWL. A small subset of OBO constructs requires deeper consideration. We have defined transformations for all constructs in an effort to foster a standard common mapping between OBO and OWL. Our mapping produces OWL-DL, a Description Logics based subset of OWL with desirable computational properties for efficiency and correctness. Our Java implementation of the mapping is part of the official Gene Ontology project source. Our transformation system provides a lossless roundtrip mapping for OBO ontologies, i.e. an OBO ontology may be translated to OWL and back without loss of knowledge. In addition, it provides a roadmap for bridging the gap between the two ontology languages in order to enable the use of ontology content in a language independent manner.

  16. The Semantic Web: Differentiating between Taxonomies and Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine

    2002-01-01

    Explains the concept of a semantic Web where software agents perform jobs for end-users by using hierarchies, metadata, and structured vocabularies. Discusses taxonomies; defining ontologies and taxonomies; standardized language and conceptual relationships; different points of emphasis; and topic maps as new Web infrastructure. (LRW)

  17. Web ontology language: Owl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, G.; Van Harmelen, F.

    2004-01-01

    Summary. The expressivity of RDF and RDF Schema that was described in 12 is deliberately very limited: RDF is (roughly) limited to binary ground predicates, and RDF Schema is (again roughly) limited to a subclass hierarchy and a property hierarchy, with domain and range

  18. Development of Semantic Web - Markup Languages, Web Services, Rules, Explanation, Querying, Proof and Reasoning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuinness, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    ...-S), the Web Ontology Query Language (OWL-QL) and Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) W3C submissions. This report contains the evolution of these markup languages as well as a discussion of semantic query languages, proof and explanation...

  19. Building a biomedical ontology recommender web service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonquet, Clement; Musen, Mark A; Shah, Nigam H

    2010-06-22

    Researchers in biomedical informatics use ontologies and terminologies to annotate their data in order to facilitate data integration and translational discoveries. As the use of ontologies for annotation of biomedical datasets has risen, a common challenge is to identify ontologies that are best suited to annotating specific datasets. The number and variety of biomedical ontologies is large, and it is cumbersome for a researcher to figure out which ontology to use. We present the Biomedical Ontology Recommender web service. The system uses textual metadata or a set of keywords describing a domain of interest and suggests appropriate ontologies for annotating or representing the data. The service makes a decision based on three criteria. The first one is coverage, or the ontologies that provide most terms covering the input text. The second is connectivity, or the ontologies that are most often mapped to by other ontologies. The final criterion is size, or the number of concepts in the ontologies. The service scores the ontologies as a function of scores of the annotations created using the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) Annotator web service. We used all the ontologies from the UMLS Metathesaurus and the NCBO BioPortal. We compare and contrast our Recommender by an exhaustive functional comparison to previously published efforts. We evaluate and discuss the results of several recommendation heuristics in the context of three real world use cases. The best recommendations heuristics, rated 'very relevant' by expert evaluators, are the ones based on coverage and connectivity criteria. The Recommender service (alpha version) is available to the community and is embedded into BioPortal.

  20. Building a biomedical ontology recommender web service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonquet Clement

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers in biomedical informatics use ontologies and terminologies to annotate their data in order to facilitate data integration and translational discoveries. As the use of ontologies for annotation of biomedical datasets has risen, a common challenge is to identify ontologies that are best suited to annotating specific datasets. The number and variety of biomedical ontologies is large, and it is cumbersome for a researcher to figure out which ontology to use. Methods We present the Biomedical Ontology Recommender web service. The system uses textual metadata or a set of keywords describing a domain of interest and suggests appropriate ontologies for annotating or representing the data. The service makes a decision based on three criteria. The first one is coverage, or the ontologies that provide most terms covering the input text. The second is connectivity, or the ontologies that are most often mapped to by other ontologies. The final criterion is size, or the number of concepts in the ontologies. The service scores the ontologies as a function of scores of the annotations created using the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO Annotator web service. We used all the ontologies from the UMLS Metathesaurus and the NCBO BioPortal. Results We compare and contrast our Recommender by an exhaustive functional comparison to previously published efforts. We evaluate and discuss the results of several recommendation heuristics in the context of three real world use cases. The best recommendations heuristics, rated ‘very relevant’ by expert evaluators, are the ones based on coverage and connectivity criteria. The Recommender service (alpha version is available to the community and is embedded into BioPortal.

  1. Ontology-Based Administration of Web Directories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Marko; Gledec, Gordan; Bogunović, Nikola

    Administration of a Web directory and maintenance of its content and the associated structure is a delicate and labor intensive task performed exclusively by human domain experts. Subsequently there is an imminent risk of a directory structures becoming unbalanced, uneven and difficult to use to all except for a few users proficient with the particular Web directory and its domain. These problems emphasize the need to establish two important issues: i) generic and objective measures of Web directories structure quality, and ii) mechanism for fully automated development of a Web directory's structure. In this paper we demonstrate how to formally and fully integrate Web directories with the Semantic Web vision. We propose a set of criteria for evaluation of a Web directory's structure quality. Some criterion functions are based on heuristics while others require the application of ontologies. We also suggest an ontology-based algorithm for construction of Web directories. By using ontologies to describe the semantics of Web resources and Web directories' categories it is possible to define algorithms that can build or rearrange the structure of a Web directory. Assessment procedures can provide feedback and help steer the ontology-based construction process. The issues raised in the article can be equally applied to new and existing Web directories.

  2. ``Force,'' ontology, and language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a linguistic framework through which one can interpret systematically students’ understanding of and reasoning about force and motion. Some researchers have suggested that students have robust misconceptions or alternative frameworks grounded in everyday experience. Others have pointed out the inconsistency of students’ responses and presented a phenomenological explanation for what is observed, namely, knowledge in pieces. We wish to present a view that builds on and unifies aspects of this prior research. Our argument is that many students’ difficulties with force and motion are primarily due to a combination of linguistic and ontological difficulties. It is possible that students are primarily engaged in trying to define and categorize the meaning of the term “force” as spoken about by physicists. We found that this process of negotiation of meaning is remarkably similar to that engaged in by physicists in history. In this paper we will describe a study of the historical record that reveals an analogous process of meaning negotiation, spanning multiple centuries. Using methods from cognitive linguistics and systemic functional grammar, we will present an analysis of the force and motion literature, focusing on prior studies with interview data. We will then discuss the implications of our findings for physics instruction.

  3. OntoFox: web-based support for ontology reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Ontology development is a rapidly growing area of research, especially in the life sciences domain. To promote collaboration and interoperability between different projects, the OBO Foundry principles require that these ontologies be open and non-redundant, avoiding duplication of terms through the re-use of existing resources. As current options to do so present various difficulties, a new approach, MIREOT, allows specifying import of single terms. Initial implementations allow for controlled import of selected annotations and certain classes of related terms. Findings OntoFox http://ontofox.hegroup.org/ is a web-based system that allows users to input terms, fetch selected properties, annotations, and certain classes of related terms from the source ontologies and save the results using the RDF/XML serialization of the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Compared to an initial implementation of MIREOT, OntoFox allows additional and more easily configurable options for selecting and rewriting annotation properties, and for inclusion of all or a computed subset of terms between low and top level terms. Additional methods for including related classes include a SPARQL-based ontology term retrieval algorithm that extracts terms related to a given set of signature terms and an option to extract the hierarchy rooted at a specified ontology term. OntoFox's output can be directly imported into a developer's ontology. OntoFox currently supports term retrieval from a selection of 15 ontologies accessible via SPARQL endpoints and allows users to extend this by specifying additional endpoints. An OntoFox application in the development of the Vaccine Ontology (VO) is demonstrated. Conclusions OntoFox provides a timely publicly available service, providing different options for users to collect terms from external ontologies, making them available for reuse by import into client OWL ontologies. PMID:20569493

  4. Semantic Web Services with Web Ontology Language (OWL-S) - Specification of Agent-Services for DARPA Agent Markup Language (DAML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    needed. In addition, it will be important to conduct empirical evaluation of the applicability and benefits of OWL-S in developing and managing service...Sycara, and T. Nishimura, "Towards a Semantic Web Ecommerce ," in Proceedings of 6th Conference on Business Information Systems (BIS2003), Colorado...various Web services standardization efforts is the vision of the enormous benefit to be had by achieving reliable, ubiquitous software

  5. Product line based ontology development for semantic web service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Kunz, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Ontology is recognized as a key technology for the success of the Semantic Web. Building reusable and evolve-able ontologies in order to cope with ontology evolution and requirement changes is increasingly important. But the existing methodologies and tools fail to support effective ontology reuse...... will lead to the initial implementation of the meta-onotologies using design by reuse and with the objective of design for reuse. After that step new ontologies could be generated by reusing these meta-ontologies. We demonstrate our approach with a Semantic Web Service application to show how to build...

  6. BioPortal: enhanced functionality via new Web services from the National Center for Biomedical Ontology to access and use ontologies in software applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetzel, Patricia L; Noy, Natalya F; Shah, Nigam H; Alexander, Paul R; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) is one of the National Centers for Biomedical Computing funded under the NIH Roadmap Initiative. Contributing to the national computing infrastructure, NCBO has developed BioPortal, a web portal that provides access to a library of biomedical ontologies and terminologies (http://bioportal.bioontology.org) via the NCBO Web services. BioPortal enables community participation in the evaluation and evolution of ontology content by providing features to add mappings between terms, to add comments linked to specific ontology terms and to provide ontology reviews. The NCBO Web services (http://www.bioontology.org/wiki/index.php/NCBO_REST_services) enable this functionality and provide a uniform mechanism to access ontologies from a variety of knowledge representation formats, such as Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) format. The Web services provide multi-layered access to the ontology content, from getting all terms in an ontology to retrieving metadata about a term. Users can easily incorporate the NCBO Web services into software applications to generate semantically aware applications and to facilitate structured data collection.

  7. Automatic Learning of Ontologies for the Semantic Web: experiment lexical learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Puerto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the design of a System for Automatic Learning of Ontologies and Lexical Information (SALOX for the Dynamic Semantic Ontological Framework for the Semantic Web (DSOFSW. DSOFSW interprets query in natural language (Spanish to the web, and is composed by five parts; a linguistic ontology for the grammar of Spanish, a lexicon for the lexical information, a database of facts about the system experiences, a task ontology for the linguistic analysis process, and an interpretative ontology of the context. SALOX integrates several methods, approaches and techniques for information extraction, discovery and actualization (pragmatic (user profile, context knowledge, lexical and semantic linguistic information, etc. in order to update the knowledge used for DSOFSW. SALOX has a component to map the sources of learning with the learning methods, and another to update the linguistic ontology and the lexicon of the DSOFSW. Specifically, in this paper we present the design of the learning unit of lexical information.

  8. An ontology-driven tool for structured data acquisition using Web forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rafael S; Tu, Samson W; Nyulas, Csongor I; Tierney, Michael J; Musen, Mark A

    2017-08-01

    Structured data acquisition is a common task that is widely performed in biomedicine. However, current solutions for this task are far from providing a means to structure data in such a way that it can be automatically employed in decision making (e.g., in our example application domain of clinical functional assessment, for determining eligibility for disability benefits) based on conclusions derived from acquired data (e.g., assessment of impaired motor function). To use data in these settings, we need it structured in a way that can be exploited by automated reasoning systems, for instance, in the Web Ontology Language (OWL); the de facto ontology language for the Web. We tackle the problem of generating Web-based assessment forms from OWL ontologies, and aggregating input gathered through these forms as an ontology of "semantically-enriched" form data that can be queried using an RDF query language, such as SPARQL. We developed an ontology-based structured data acquisition system, which we present through its specific application to the clinical functional assessment domain. We found that data gathered through our system is highly amenable to automatic analysis using queries. We demonstrated how ontologies can be used to help structuring Web-based forms and to semantically enrich the data elements of the acquired structured data. The ontologies associated with the enriched data elements enable automated inferences and provide a rich vocabulary for performing queries.

  9. Constitutive rules, language, and ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hindriks, Frank

    It is a commonplace within philosophy that the ontology of institutions can be captured in terms of constitutive rules. What exactly such rules are, however, is not well understood. They are usually contrasted to regulative rules: constitutive rules (such as the rules of chess) make institutional

  10. CNTRO: A Semantic Web Ontology for Temporal Relation Inferencing in Clinical Narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; Wei, Wei-Qi; Solbrig, Harold R; Savova, Guergana; Chute, Christopher G

    2010-11-13

    Using Semantic-Web specifications to represent temporal information in clinical narratives is an important step for temporal reasoning and answering time-oriented queries. Existing temporal models are either not compatible with the powerful reasoning tools developed for the Semantic Web, or designed only for structured clinical data and therefore are not ready to be applied on natural-language-based clinical narrative reports directly. We have developed a Semantic-Web ontology which is called Clinical Narrative Temporal Relation ontology. Using this ontology, temporal information in clinical narratives can be represented as RDF (Resource Description Framework) triples. More temporal information and relations can then be inferred by Semantic-Web based reasoning tools. Experimental results show that this ontology can represent temporal information in real clinical narratives successfully.

  11. Flexible Generation of Pervasive Web Services using OSGi Declarative Services and OWL Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Zhang, Weishan; Fernandes, Joao

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing trend to deploy web services in pervasive computing environments. Implementing web services on networked, embedded devices leads to a set of challenges, including productivity of development, efficiency of web services, and handling of variability and dependencies of hardware...... and software platforms. To address these challenges, we developed a web service compiler called Limbo, in which Web Ontology Language (OWL) ontologies are used to make the Limbo compiler aware of its compilation context such as device hardware and software details, platform dependencies, and resource....../power consumption. The ontologies are used to configure Limbo for generating resource-efficient web service code. The architecture of Limbo follows the Blackboard architectural style and Limbo is implemented using the OSGi Declarative Services component model. The component model provides high flexibility...

  12. A Note on Ontology and Ordinary Language

    OpenAIRE

    Saba, Walid S.

    2007-01-01

    We argue for a compositional semantics grounded in a strongly typed ontology that reflects our commonsense view of the world and the way we talk about it. Assuming such a structure we show that the semantics of various natural language phenomena may become nearly trivial.

  13. A novel design of hidden web crawler using ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Manvi,; Bhatia, Komal Kumar; Dixit, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Deep Web is content hidden behind HTML forms. Since it represents a large portion of the structured, unstructured and dynamic data on the Web, accessing Deep-Web content has been a long challenge for the database community. This paper describes a crawler for accessing Deep-Web using Ontologies. Performance evaluation of the proposed work showed that this new approach has promising results.

  14. A Hydrological Sensor Web Ontology Based on the SSN Ontology: A Case Study for a Flood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accompanying the continuous development of sensor network technology, sensors worldwide are constantly producing observation data. However, the sensors and their data from different observation platforms are sometimes difficult to use collaboratively in response to natural disasters such as floods for the lack of semantics. In this paper, a hydrological sensor web ontology based on SSN ontology is proposed to describe the heterogeneous hydrological sensor web resources by importing the time and space ontology, instantiating the hydrological classes, and establishing reasoning rules. This work has been validated by semantic querying and knowledge acquiring experiments. The results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed ontology and its potential to grow into a more comprehensive ontology for hydrological monitoring collaboratively. In addition, this method of ontology modeling is generally applicable to other applications and domains.

  15. Ontology Alignment Architecture for Semantic Sensor Web Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Alarcos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensor networks are a concept that has become very popular in data acquisition and processing for multiple applications in different fields such as industrial, medicine, home automation, environmental detection, etc. Today, with the proliferation of small communication devices with sensors that collect environmental data, semantic Web technologies are becoming closely related with sensor networks. The linking of elements from Semantic Web technologies with sensor networks has been called Semantic Sensor Web and has among its main features the use of ontologies. One of the key challenges of using ontologies in sensor networks is to provide mechanisms to integrate and exchange knowledge from heterogeneous sources (that is, dealing with semantic heterogeneity. Ontology alignment is the process of bringing ontologies into mutual agreement by the automatic discovery of mappings between related concepts. This paper presents a system for ontology alignment in the Semantic Sensor Web which uses fuzzy logic techniques to combine similarity measures between entities of different ontologies. The proposed approach focuses on two key elements: the terminological similarity, which takes into account the linguistic and semantic information of the context of the entity’s names, and the structural similarity, based on both the internal and relational structure of the concepts. This work has been validated using sensor network ontologies and the Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative (OAEI tests. The results show that the proposed techniques outperform previous approaches in terms of precision and recall.

  16. Ontology alignment architecture for semantic sensor Web integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Susel; Marsa-Maestre, Ivan; Velasco, Juan R; Alarcos, Bernardo

    2013-09-18

    Sensor networks are a concept that has become very popular in data acquisition and processing for multiple applications in different fields such as industrial, medicine, home automation, environmental detection, etc. Today, with the proliferation of small communication devices with sensors that collect environmental data, semantic Web technologies are becoming closely related with sensor networks. The linking of elements from Semantic Web technologies with sensor networks has been called Semantic Sensor Web and has among its main features the use of ontologies. One of the key challenges of using ontologies in sensor networks is to provide mechanisms to integrate and exchange knowledge from heterogeneous sources (that is, dealing with semantic heterogeneity). Ontology alignment is the process of bringing ontologies into mutual agreement by the automatic discovery of mappings between related concepts. This paper presents a system for ontology alignment in the Semantic Sensor Web which uses fuzzy logic techniques to combine similarity measures between entities of different ontologies. The proposed approach focuses on two key elements: the terminological similarity, which takes into account the linguistic and semantic information of the context of the entity's names, and the structural similarity, based on both the internal and relational structure of the concepts. This work has been validated using sensor network ontologies and the Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative (OAEI) tests. The results show that the proposed techniques outperform previous approaches in terms of precision and recall.

  17. Web Ontologies to Categorialy Structure Reality: Representations of Human Emotional, Cognitive, and Motivational Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gil, Juan-Miguel; Gil, Rosa; García, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a Web ontology for modeling and representation of the emotional, cognitive and motivational state of online learners, interacting with university systems for distance or blended education. The ontology is understood as a way to provide the required mechanisms to model reality and associate it to emotional responses, but without committing to a particular way of organizing these emotional responses. Knowledge representation for the contributed ontology is performed by using Web Ontology Language (OWL), a semantic web language designed to represent rich and complex knowledge about things, groups of things, and relations between things. OWL is a computational logic-based language such that computer programs can exploit knowledge expressed in OWL and also facilitates sharing and reusing knowledge using the global infrastructure of the Web. The proposed ontology has been tested in the field of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) to check if it is capable of representing emotions and motivation of the students in this context of use. PMID:27199796

  18. Webulous and the Webulous Google Add-On--a web service and application for ontology building from templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, Simon; Burdett, Tony; Welter, Danielle; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Parkinson, Helen; Malone, James

    2016-01-01

    Authoring bio-ontologies is a task that has traditionally been undertaken by skilled experts trained in understanding complex languages such as the Web Ontology Language (OWL), in tools designed for such experts. As requests for new terms are made, the need for expert ontologists represents a bottleneck in the development process. Furthermore, the ability to rigorously enforce ontology design patterns in large, collaboratively developed ontologies is difficult with existing ontology authoring software. We present Webulous, an application suite for supporting ontology creation by design patterns. Webulous provides infrastructure to specify templates for populating ontology design patterns that get transformed into OWL assertions in a target ontology. Webulous provides programmatic access to the template server and a client application has been developed for Google Sheets that allows templates to be loaded, populated and resubmitted to the Webulous server for processing. The development and delivery of ontologies to the community requires software support that goes beyond the ontology editor. Building ontologies by design patterns and providing simple mechanisms for the addition of new content helps reduce the overall cost and effort required to develop an ontology. The Webulous system provides support for this process and is used as part of the development of several ontologies at the European Bioinformatics Institute.

  19. Mapping the gene ontology into the unified medical language system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Jane; McCray, Alexa T

    2004-01-01

    We have recently mapped the Gene Ontology (GO), developed by the Gene Ontology Consortium, into the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). GO has been developed for the purpose of annotating gene products in genome databases, and the UMLS has been developed as a framework for integrating large numbers of disparate terminologies, primarily for the purpose of providing better access to biomedical information sources. The mapping of GO to UMLS highlighted issues in both terminology systems. After some initial explorations and discussions between the UMLS and GO teams, the GO was integrated with the UMLS. Overall, a total of 23% of the GO terms either matched directly (3%) or linked (20%) to existing UMLS concepts. All GO terms now have a corresponding, official UMLS concept, and the entire vocabulary is available through the web-based UMLS Knowledge Source Server. The mapping of the Gene Ontology, with its focus on structures, processes and functions at the molecular level, to the existing broad coverage UMLS should contribute to linking the language and practices of clinical medicine to the language and practices of genomics.

  20. A Review of Ontologies with the Semantic Web in View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the movement of the World Wide Web from the first generation to the second, called the Semantic Web. Provides an overview of ontology, a philosophical theory about the nature of existence being applied to artificial intelligence that will have a crucial role in enabling content-based access, interoperability, and communication across the…

  1. Semantic Indexing of Web Documents Based on Domain Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Abdeslem DENNAI; Sidi Mohammed BENSLIMANE

    2015-01-01

    The first phase of reverse engineering of web-oriented applications is the extraction of concepts hidden in HTML pages including tables, lists and forms, or marked in XML documents. In this paper, we present an approach to index semantically these two sources of information (HTML page and XML document) using on the one hand, domain ontology to validate the extracted concepts and on the other hand the similarity measurement between ontology concepts with the aim of enrichment the index. This a...

  2. Ontology-Based Information Behaviour to Improve Web Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Calegari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Web Search Engines provide a huge number of answers in response to a user query, many of which are not relevant, whereas some of the most relevant ones may not be found. In the literature several approaches have been proposed in order to help a user to find the information relevant to his/her real needs on the Web. To achieve this goal the individual Information Behavior can been analyzed to ’keep’ track of the user’s interests. Keeping information is a type of Information Behavior, and in several works researchers have referred to it as the study on what people do during a search on the Web. Generally, the user’s actions (e.g., how the user moves from one Web page to another, or her/his download of a document, etc. are recorded in Web logs. This paper reports on research activities which aim to exploit the information extracted from Web logs (or query logs in personalized user ontologies, with the objective to support the user in the process of discovering Web information relevant to her/his information needs. Personalized ontologies are used to improve the quality of Web search by applying two main techniques: query reformulation and re-ranking of query evaluation results. In this paper we analyze various methodologies presented in the literature aimed at using personalized ontologies, defined on the basis of the observation of Information Behaviour to help the user in finding relevant information.

  3. Insider Threat Indicator Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Sattler, "Description logics," in Handbook on ontologies , ed: Springer, 2004, pp. 3-28. [22] T. R. Gruber, "A translation approach to portable ontology ...Education, 2012. [55] G. Antoniou and F. Van Harmelen, "Web ontology language: Owl," in Handbook on ontologies , ed: Springer, 2004, pp. 67-92. [56] R...

  4. An open annotation ontology for science on web 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Ocana, Marco; Garcia Castro, Leyla Jael; Das, Sudeshna; Clark, Tim

    2011-05-17

    There is currently a gap between the rich and expressive collection of published biomedical ontologies, and the natural language expression of biomedical papers consumed on a daily basis by scientific researchers. The purpose of this paper is to provide an open, shareable structure for dynamic integration of biomedical domain ontologies with the scientific document, in the form of an Annotation Ontology (AO), thus closing this gap and enabling application of formal biomedical ontologies directly to the literature as it emerges. Initial requirements for AO were elicited by analysis of integration needs between biomedical web communities, and of needs for representing and integrating results of biomedical text mining. Analysis of strengths and weaknesses of previous efforts in this area was also performed. A series of increasingly refined annotation tools were then developed along with a metadata model in OWL, and deployed for feedback and additional requirements the ontology to users at a major pharmaceutical company and a major academic center. Further requirements and critiques of the model were also elicited through discussions with many colleagues and incorporated into the work. This paper presents Annotation Ontology (AO), an open ontology in OWL-DL for annotating scientific documents on the web. AO supports both human and algorithmic content annotation. It enables "stand-off" or independent metadata anchored to specific positions in a web document by any one of several methods. In AO, the document may be annotated but is not required to be under update control of the annotator. AO contains a provenance model to support versioning, and a set model for specifying groups and containers of annotation. AO is freely available under open source license at http://purl.org/ao/, and extensive documentation including screencasts is available on AO's Google Code page: http://code.google.com/p/annotation-ontology/ . The Annotation Ontology meets critical requirements for

  5. Ontology translation approaches for interoperability: A case study with Protege-2000 and WebODE

    OpenAIRE

    Corcho, Oscar; Gómez-Pérez, A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe four ontology translation approaches that can be used to exchange ontologies between ontology tools and/or ontology languages. These approaches are analysed with regard to two main features: how they preserve the ontology semantics after the translation process (aka semantic or consequence preservation) and how they allow final users and ontology-based applications to understand the resulting ontology in the target format (aka pragmatic preservation). These approaches are illustra...

  6. Ontology-Based Administration of Web Directories

    OpenAIRE

    Horvat, Marko; Gledec, Gordan; Bogunović, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    Administration of a Web directory and maintenance of its content and the associated structure is a delicate and labor intensive task performed exclusively by human domain experts. Subsequently there is an imminent risk of a directory structures becoming unbalanced, uneven and difficult to use to all except for a few users proficient with the particular Web directory and its domain. These problems emphasize the need to establish two important issues: i) generic and objective measures of Web di...

  7. Language in Web Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    Having taught and carried out research in LSP and business communication for many years, I have come across, again and again, the problems arising from the inferior status of language in the business environment. Being convinced that it does not have to be so, instead of going on trying to convince...... non-linguistically trained colleagues of the importance of language via the usual arguments, I suggest that we let them experience the problems arising from the non-recognition of the importance of language via a Web communication crash course, inspired by a course taught to BA students...

  8. Comparison of Question Answering Systems Based on Ontology and Semantic Web in Different Environment

    OpenAIRE

    DURAISWAMY, K.; Kalaivani, S.

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Question Answering (QA) system is taking an important role in current search engine optimization concept. Natural language processing technique is mostly implemented in QA system for asking userâs question and several steps are also followed for conversion of questions to query form for getting an exact answer. Approach: This paper surveys different types of question answering system based on ontology and semantic web model with different query format. For comparison, the t...

  9. WebProtégé: a collaborative Web-based platform for editing biomedical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Matthew; Tudorache, Tania; Nuylas, Csongor; Vendetti, Jennifer; Noy, Natalya F; Musen, Mark A

    2014-08-15

    WebProtégé is an open-source Web application for editing OWL 2 ontologies. It contains several features to aid collaboration, including support for the discussion of issues, change notification and revision-based change tracking. WebProtégé also features a simple user interface, which is geared towards editing the kinds of class descriptions and annotations that are prevalent throughout biomedical ontologies. Moreover, it is possible to configure the user interface using views that are optimized for editing Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) class descriptions and metadata. Some of these views are shown in the Supplementary Material and can be seen in WebProtégé itself by configuring the project as an OBO project. WebProtégé is freely available for use on the Web at http://webprotege.stanford.edu. It is implemented in Java and JavaScript using the OWL API and the Google Web Toolkit. All major browsers are supported. For users who do not wish to host their ontologies on the Stanford servers, WebProtégé is available as a Web app that can be run locally using a Servlet container such as Tomcat. Binaries, source code and documentation are available under an open-source license at http://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/WebProtege. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The chemical information ontology: provenance and disambiguation for chemical data on the biological semantic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Janna; Chepelev, Leonid; Willighagen, Egon; Adams, Nico; Steinbeck, Christoph; Dumontier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Cheminformatics is the application of informatics techniques to solve chemical problems in silico. There are many areas in biology where cheminformatics plays an important role in computational research, including metabolism, proteomics, and systems biology. One critical aspect in the application of cheminformatics in these fields is the accurate exchange of data, which is increasingly accomplished through the use of ontologies. Ontologies are formal representations of objects and their properties using a logic-based ontology language. Many such ontologies are currently being developed to represent objects across all the domains of science. Ontologies enable the definition, classification, and support for querying objects in a particular domain, enabling intelligent computer applications to be built which support the work of scientists both within the domain of interest and across interrelated neighbouring domains. Modern chemical research relies on computational techniques to filter and organise data to maximise research productivity. The objects which are manipulated in these algorithms and procedures, as well as the algorithms and procedures themselves, enjoy a kind of virtual life within computers. We will call these information entities. Here, we describe our work in developing an ontology of chemical information entities, with a primary focus on data-driven research and the integration of calculated properties (descriptors) of chemical entities within a semantic web context. Our ontology distinguishes algorithmic, or procedural information from declarative, or factual information, and renders of particular importance the annotation of provenance to calculated data. The Chemical Information Ontology is being developed as an open collaborative project. More details, together with a downloadable OWL file, are available at http://code.google.com/p/semanticchemistry/ (license: CC-BY-SA).

  11. The chemical information ontology: provenance and disambiguation for chemical data on the biological semantic web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Hastings

    Full Text Available Cheminformatics is the application of informatics techniques to solve chemical problems in silico. There are many areas in biology where cheminformatics plays an important role in computational research, including metabolism, proteomics, and systems biology. One critical aspect in the application of cheminformatics in these fields is the accurate exchange of data, which is increasingly accomplished through the use of ontologies. Ontologies are formal representations of objects and their properties using a logic-based ontology language. Many such ontologies are currently being developed to represent objects across all the domains of science. Ontologies enable the definition, classification, and support for querying objects in a particular domain, enabling intelligent computer applications to be built which support the work of scientists both within the domain of interest and across interrelated neighbouring domains. Modern chemical research relies on computational techniques to filter and organise data to maximise research productivity. The objects which are manipulated in these algorithms and procedures, as well as the algorithms and procedures themselves, enjoy a kind of virtual life within computers. We will call these information entities. Here, we describe our work in developing an ontology of chemical information entities, with a primary focus on data-driven research and the integration of calculated properties (descriptors of chemical entities within a semantic web context. Our ontology distinguishes algorithmic, or procedural information from declarative, or factual information, and renders of particular importance the annotation of provenance to calculated data. The Chemical Information Ontology is being developed as an open collaborative project. More details, together with a downloadable OWL file, are available at http://code.google.com/p/semanticchemistry/ (license: CC-BY-SA.

  12. PENCARIAN BUDAYA MENGGUNAKAN ONTOLOGI DAN ATURAN BERBASIS SEMANTIC WEB UNTUK SISWA SD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendra Husni Thamrin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Internet users every year have increased rapidly. One function of the Internet is that it is used as a source of information. Keywords used in search engine will help to find information. Semantic Web technologies can be used to help make the search more effective system either globally or specifically. Certain material in this study could use material about Indonesian art and culture taught in social studies class IV Elementary School in the odd semester.  Ontology bridges the differences in perception between humans with a machine that generally break the words then looking into the query. In addition SWRL (Semantic Web Rule Language is used by Ontology which has already made.

  13. Ekstraksi Informasi Halaman Web Menggunakan Pendekatan Bootstrapping pada Ontology-Based Information Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erma Susanti

    2015-07-01

    Abstract  Information extraction is a field study of natural language processing by converting unstructured text into structured information. Several types of information on the Internet is transmitted through unstructured information via websites, led to emergence of the need a technology to analyze text and found relevant knowledge into structured information. For example of unstructured information is existing main information on the content of web pages. Various approaches  for information extraction have been developed by many researchers, either using manual or automatic method, but still need to be improved performance related accuracy and speed of extraction. This research proposed an approach of information extraction that combines bootstrapping approach with Ontology-Based Information Extraction (OBIE. Bootstrapping approach using small seed of labelled data, is used to minimize human intervention on information extraction process, while the use of guide ontology for extracting classes, properties and instances, using for provide semantic content for semantic web. Combining both approaches expected to increase speed of extraction process and accuracy of extraction results. Case study to apply information extraction system using “LonelyPlanet” datasets.   Keywords— Information extraction, ontology, bootstrapping, Ontology-Based Information Extraction, OBIE, performance

  14. Ontologies for ship's flag search on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinos, Nikolaos-Panagiotis; Triakosaris, Evangelos; Galiotou, Eleni

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues on the representation and search of maritime data on the semantic web. In particular, we are concerned with data related to the requirements put forward by ship registries and should be met in view of a ship's flag acquisition. The choice of a ship's flag is a matter of crucial importance since it is the basis of tax payment and rule and regulation enforcement for the flying of flags. In our approach, flags and corresponding requirements are represented in the form of a ontology. Data "opening" and linking with the use of the ontology in question, will facilitate a ship's flag search based on its particular characteristics and will provide useful information on ship registration requirements.

  15. XOA: Web-Enabled Cross-Ontological Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riensche, Roderick M.; Baddeley, Bob; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu

    2007-07-09

    The paper being submitted (as an "extended abstract" prior to conference acceptance) provides a technical description of our proof-of-concept prototype for the XOA method. Abstract: To address meaningful questions, scientists need to relate information across diverse classification schemes such as ontologies, terminologies and thesauri. These resources typically address a single knowledge domain at a time and are not cross-indexed. Information that is germane to the same object may therefore remain unlinked with consequent loss of knowledge discovery across disciplines and even sub-domains of the same discipline. We propose to address these problems by fostering semantic interoperability through the development of ontology alignment web services capable of enabling cross-scale knowledge discovery, and demonstrate a specific application of such an approach to the biomedical domain.

  16. Towards Web 3.0: taxonomies and ontologies for medical education -- a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaum, Wolf E; Jarczweski, Anne; Balzer, Felix; Stötzner, Philip; Ahlers, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Both for curricular development and mapping, as well as for orientation within the mounting supply of learning resources in medical education, the Semantic Web ("Web 3.0") poses a low-threshold, effective tool that enables identification of content related items across system boundaries. Replacement of the currently required manual with an automatically generated link, which is based on content and semantics, requires the use of a suitably structured vocabulary for a machine-readable description of object content. Aim of this study is to compile the existing taxonomies and ontologies used for the annotation of medical content and learning resources, to compare those using selected criteria, and to verify their suitability in the context described above. Based on a systematic literature search, existing taxonomies and ontologies for the description of medical learning resources were identified. Through web searches and/or direct contact with the respective editors, each of the structured vocabularies thus identified were examined in regards to topic, structure, language, scope, maintenance, and technology of the taxonomy/ontology. In addition, suitability for use in the Semantic Web was verified. Among 20 identified publications, 14 structured vocabularies were identified, which differed rather strongly in regards to language, scope, currency, and maintenance. None of the identified vocabularies fulfilled the necessary criteria for content description of medical curricula and learning resources in the German-speaking world. While moving towards Web 3.0, a significant problem lies in the selection and use of an appropriate German vocabulary for the machine-readable description of object content. Possible solutions include development, translation and/or combination of existing vocabularies, possibly including partial translations of English vocabularies.

  17. Computing an Ontological Semantics for a Natural Language Fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczak, Bartlomiej Antoni

    tried to establish a domain independent “ontological semantics” for relevant fragments of natural language. The purpose of this research is to develop methods and systems for taking advantage of formal ontologies for the purpose of extracting the meaning contents of texts. This functionality......The key objective of the research that has been carried out has been to establish theoretically sound connections between the following two areas: • Computational processing of texts in natural language by means of logical methods • Theories and methods for engineering of formal ontologies We have...... is desirable e.g. for future content–based search systems in contrast to today’s keyword based search systems (viz., Google) which rely chiefly on recognition of stated keywords in the targeted text. Logical methods were introduced into semantic theories for natural language already during the 60’s in what...

  18. Architecture of an Ontology-Based Domain-Specific Natural Language Question Answering System

    OpenAIRE

    Athira P. M; Sreeja M; P. C. Reghuraj

    2013-01-01

    Question answering (QA) system aims at retrieving precise information from a large collection of documents against a query. This paper describes the architecture of a Natural Language Question Answering (NLQA) system for a specific domain based on the ontological information, a step towards semantic web question answering. The proposed architecture defines four basic modules suitable for enhancing current QA capabilities with the ability of processing complex questions. The first module was t...

  19. Coping with medical polysemy in the semantic web: the role of ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanelli, Domenico M; Gangemi, Aldo; Battaglia, Massimo; Catenacci, Carola

    2004-01-01

    Polysemy is the linguistic phenomenon by which a term has more than one meaning. It is not a negligible issue in information management, since an effective and unambiguous sharing of the semantic content of data among different databases or knowledge repositories is needed. The paper illustrates a case of polysemy (concerning inflammation), and puts it within the framework provided by the DOLCE+ foundational ontology. This solution enables us to formally represent several senses of inflammation, and their interrelationships. This we take as a demonstration of how ontologies play an essential role in providing precisely the conceptual foundations that are needed in order to make the intended meaning of natural language expressions available to all the (artificial or human) agents that could be involved in the semantic web

  20. Using semantic web rules to reason on an ontology of pseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holford, Matthew E; Khurana, Ekta; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Gerstein, Mark

    2010-06-15

    Recent years have seen the development of a wide range of biomedical ontologies. Notable among these is Sequence Ontology (SO) which offers a rich hierarchy of terms and relationships that can be used to annotate genomic data. Well-designed formal ontologies allow data to be reasoned upon in a consistent and logically sound way and can lead to the discovery of new relationships. The Semantic Web Rules Language (SWRL) augments the capabilities of a reasoner by allowing the creation of conditional rules. To date, however, formal reasoning, especially the use of SWRL rules, has not been widely used in biomedicine. We have built a knowledge base of human pseudogenes, extending the existing SO framework to incorporate additional attributes. In particular, we have defined the relationships between pseudogenes and segmental duplications. We then created a series of logical rules using SWRL to answer research questions and to annotate our pseudogenes appropriately. Finally, we were left with a knowledge base which could be queried to discover information about human pseudogene evolution. The fully populated knowledge base described in this document is available for download from http://ontology.pseudogene.org. A SPARQL endpoint from which to query the dataset is also available at this location.

  1. A semantic web ontology for small molecules and their biological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jooyoung; Davis, Melissa J; Newman, Andrew F; Ragan, Mark A

    2010-05-24

    A wide range of data on sequences, structures, pathways, and networks of genes and gene products is available for hypothesis testing and discovery in biological and biomedical research. However, data describing the physical, chemical, and biological properties of small molecules have not been well-integrated with these resources. Semantically rich representations of chemical data, combined with Semantic Web technologies, have the potential to enable the integration of small molecule and biomolecular data resources, expanding the scope and power of biomedical and pharmacological research. We employed the Semantic Web technologies Resource Description Framework (RDF) and Web Ontology Language (OWL) to generate a Small Molecule Ontology (SMO) that represents concepts and provides unique identifiers for biologically relevant properties of small molecules and their interactions with biomolecules, such as proteins. We instanced SMO using data from three public data sources, i.e., DrugBank, PubChem and UniProt, and converted to RDF triples. Evaluation of SMO by use of predetermined competency questions implemented as SPARQL queries demonstrated that data from chemical and biomolecular data sources were effectively represented and that useful knowledge can be extracted. These results illustrate the potential of Semantic Web technologies in chemical, biological, and pharmacological research and in drug discovery.

  2. Dynamic sub-ontology evolution for traditional Chinese medicine web ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuxin; Wu, Zhaohui; Tian, Wenya; Jiang, Xiaohong; Cheung, William K

    2008-10-01

    As a form of important domain knowledge, large-scale ontologies play a critical role in building a large variety of knowledge-based systems. To overcome the problem of semantic heterogeneity and encode domain knowledge in reusable format, a large-scale and well-defined ontology is also required in the traditional Chinese medicine discipline. We argue that to meet the on-demand and scalability requirement ontology-based systems should go beyond the use of static ontology and be able to self-evolve and specialize for the domain knowledge they possess. In particular, we refer to the context-specific portions from large-scale ontologies like the traditional Chinese medicine ontology as sub-ontologies. Ontology-based systems are able to reuse sub-ontologies in local repository called ontology cache. In order to improve the overall performance of ontology cache, we propose to evolve sub-ontologies in ontology cache to optimize the knowledge structure of sub-ontologies. Moreover, we present the sub-ontology evolution approach based on a genetic algorithm for reusing large-scale ontologies. We evaluate the proposed evolution approach with the traditional Chinese medicine ontology and obtain promising results.

  3. OBO Explorer: an editor for Open Biomedical Ontologies in OWL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Stuart; Chen, Yin; Bard, Jonathan

    2008-02-01

    To clarify the semantics, and take advantage of tools and algorithms developed for the Semantic Web, a mapping from the Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) format to the Web Ontology Language (OWL) has been established. We present an ontology editor that allows end users to work directly with this OWL representation of OBO format ontologies. http://www.aiai.ed.ac.uk/project/cobra-ct.

  4. Language and embodied consciousness: A Peircean ontological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adopting the Peircean triadic semiotic model of the affective and “organic” relationship between the sign and the referent (in a pragmatic sense), the paper argues that the relationship between words and concepts is not as arbitrary as Saussurean and post-structuralist language theorists posit. Consciousness, Concepts and ...

  5. An approach for natural language understanding in GIS based on ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liguo; Feng, Xuezhi; She, Jiangfeng; Xie, Shunping

    2007-06-01

    A natural language interface can make a geographic information system (GIS) easy to use. It allows one to use the natural language quickly and conveniently to operate in such as digital city management system or traffic guidance system. This paper discusses the method of nature language understanding in GIS based on ontology. Natural language understanding is general apply in computer or artificial intelligence research area, yet in GIS the natural language understanding is mainly concerned about spatial information. In order to implement the natural language understanding for spatial information perfectly we use the ontology model. First we put forward a generally process of natural language understanding in GIS, defined the conception of the ontology, next set up the ontology structure, ontology-based understanding model, also indicate the mechanism of natural language understanding based on ontology. Finally are a case study and a prototype, a discussion about the research deficiency and the development forecast of my research.

  6. Commonsense Knowledge, Ontology and Ordinary Language

    OpenAIRE

    Saba, Walid S.

    2008-01-01

    Over two decades ago a "quite revolution" overwhelmingly replaced knowledgebased approaches in natural language processing (NLP) by quantitative (e.g., statistical, corpus-based, machine learning) methods. Although it is our firm belief that purely quantitative approaches cannot be the only paradigm for NLP, dissatisfaction with purely engineering approaches to the construction of large knowledge bases for NLP are somewhat justified. In this paper we hope to demonstrate that both trends are p...

  7. Semantic Cooperation and Knowledge Reuse by Using Autonomous Ontologies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yuting; Wang, Kewen; Topor, Rodney; Pan, Jeff Z.; Giunchiglia, Fausto

    2007-01-01

    Several proposals have been put forward to support distributed agent cooperation in the SemanticWeb, by allowing concepts and roles in one ontology be reused in another ontology. In general, these proposals reduce the autonomy of each ontology by defining the semantics of the ontology to depend on the semantics of the other ontologies. We propose a new framework for managing autonomy in a set of cooperating ontologies (or ontology space). In this framework, each language entity concept/role/i...

  8. An Ontological Approach to Developing Information Operations Applications for use on the Semantic Web

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Timothy L

    2008-01-01

    .... By expressing IO capabilities in a formal ontology suitable for use on the Semantic Web, conditions are set such that computational power can more efficiently be leveraged to better define required...

  9. An Ontological Approach to Developing Information Operations Applications for Use on the Semantic Web

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Timothy L

    2008-01-01

    .... By expressing IO capabilities in a formal ontology suitable for use on the Semantic Web, conditions are set such that computational power can more efficiently be leveraged to better define required...

  10. Embedding defeasible argumentation in the semantic web: an ontology-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Sergio Alejandro; Chesñevar, Carlos Iván; Simari, Guillermo Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    The SemanticWeb is a project intended to create a universal medium for information exchange by giving semantics to the content of documents on the Web by means of ontology definitions. Ontologies intended for knowledge representation in intelligent agents rely on common-sense reasoning formalizations. Defeasible argumentation has emerged as a successful approach to model common-sense reasoning. Recent research has linked argumentation with belief revision in order to model the dynamics of ...

  11. NeXO Web: the NeXO ontology database and visualization platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkowski, Janusz; Ono, Keiichiro; Kramer, Michael; Yu, Michael; Pratt, Dexter; Demchak, Barry; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    The Network-extracted Ontology (NeXO) is a gene ontology inferred directly from large-scale molecular networks. While most ontologies are constructed through manual expert curation, NeXO uses a principled computational approach which integrates evidence from hundreds of thousands of individual gene and protein interactions to construct a global hierarchy of cellular components and processes. Here, we describe the development of the NeXO Web platform (http://www.nexontology.org)-an online database and graphical user interface for visualizing, browsing and performing term enrichment analysis using NeXO and the gene ontology. The platform applies state-of-the-art web technology and visualization techniques to provide an intuitive framework for investigating biological machinery captured by both data-driven and manually curated ontologies.

  12. The Lexicon Builder Web service: Building Custom Lexicons from two hundred Biomedical Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parai, Gautam K; Jonquet, Clement; Xu, Rong; Musen, Mark A; Shah, Nigam H

    2010-11-13

    Domain specific biomedical lexicons are extensively used by researchers for natural language processing tasks. Currently these lexicons are created manually by expert curators and there is a pressing need for automated methods to compile such lexicons. The Lexicon Builder Web service addresses this need and reduces the investment of time and effort involved in lexicon maintenance. The service has three components: Inclusion - selects one or several ontologies (or its branches) and includes preferred names and synonym terms; Exclusion - filters terms based on the term's Medline frequency, syntactic type, UMLS semantic type and match with stopwords; Output - aggregates information, handles compression and output formats. Evaluation demonstrates that the service has high accuracy and runtime performance. It is currently being evaluated for several use cases to establish its utility in biomedical information processing tasks. The Lexicon Builder promotes collaboration, sharing and standardization of lexicons amongst researchers by automating the creation, maintainence and cross referencing of custom lexicons.

  13. CNTRO 2.0: A Harmonized Semantic Web Ontology for Temporal Relation Inferencing in Clinical Narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical Narrative Temporal Relation Ontology (CNTRO) has been developed for the purpose of allowing temporal information of clinical data to be semantically annotated and queried, and using inference to expose new temporal features and relations based on the semantic assertions and definitions of the temporal aspects in the ontology. While CNTRO provides a formal semantic foundation to leverage the semantic-web techniques, it is still necessary to arrive at a shared set of semantics and operational rules with commonly used ontologies for the time domain. This paper introduces CNTRO 2.0, which tries to harmonize CNTRO 1.0 and a list of existing time ontologies or top-level ontologies into a unified model-an OWL based ontology of temporal relations for clinical research.

  14. Ontology-based information visualization : Toward semantic web applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluit, Christiaan; Sabou, Marta; Van Harmelen, Frank

    2006-01-01

    This chapter has demonstrated an elegant way to visually represent ontological data. We have described how the Cluster Map visualization can use ontologies to create expressive information visualizations, with the attractive property that classes and objects that are semantically related are also

  15. WebProtégé: A Collaborative Ontology Editor and Knowledge Acquisition Tool for the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudorache, Tania; Nyulas, Csongor; Noy, Natalya F; Musen, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present WebProtégé-a lightweight ontology editor and knowledge acquisition tool for the Web. With the wide adoption of Web 2.0 platforms and the gradual adoption of ontologies and Semantic Web technologies in the real world, we need ontology-development tools that are better suited for the novel ways of interacting, constructing and consuming knowledge. Users today take Web-based content creation and online collaboration for granted. WebProtégé integrates these features as part of the ontology development process itself. We tried to lower the entry barrier to ontology development by providing a tool that is accessible from any Web browser, has extensive support for collaboration, and a highly customizable and pluggable user interface that can be adapted to any level of user expertise. The declarative user interface enabled us to create custom knowledge-acquisition forms tailored for domain experts. We built WebProtégé using the existing Protégé infrastructure, which supports collaboration on the back end side, and the Google Web Toolkit for the front end. The generic and extensible infrastructure allowed us to easily deploy WebProtégé in production settings for several projects. We present the main features of WebProtégé and its architecture and describe briefly some of its uses for real-world projects. WebProtégé is free and open source. An online demo is available at http://webprotege.stanford.edu.

  16. An Ontology for Context-Aware Pervasive Computing Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Harry; Finin, Tim; Joshi, Anupam

    2005-01-01

    .... COBRA-ONT, expressed in the Web Ontology Language OWL, is a collection of ontologies for describing places, agents, events and their associated properties in an intelligent meeting room domain...

  17. TermGenie - a web-application for pattern-based ontology class generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Heiko; Berardini, Tanya Z; Foulger, Rebecca E; Hill, David P; Lomax, Jane; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Roncaglia, Paola; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Biological ontologies are continually growing and improving from requests for new classes (terms) by biocurators. These ontology requests can frequently create bottlenecks in the biocuration process, as ontology developers struggle to keep up, while manually processing these requests and create classes. TermGenie allows biocurators to generate new classes based on formally specified design patterns or templates. The system is web-based and can be accessed by any authorized curator through a web browser. Automated rules and reasoning engines are used to ensure validity, uniqueness and relationship to pre-existing classes. In the last 4 years the Gene Ontology TermGenie generated 4715 new classes, about 51.4% of all new classes created. The immediate generation of permanent identifiers proved not to be an issue with only 70 (1.4%) obsoleted classes. TermGenie is a web-based class-generation system that complements traditional ontology development tools. All classes added through pre-defined templates are guaranteed to have OWL equivalence axioms that are used for automatic classification and in some cases inter-ontology linkage. At the same time, the system is simple and intuitive and can be used by most biocurators without extensive training.

  18. OIL Ontology Infrastructure to Enable the Semantic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fensel, Dieter; Horrocks, Ian; Harmelen, Frank Van; McGuinness, Deborah L

    2001-01-01

    Currently computers are changing from single isolated devices to entry points into a worldwide network of information exchange and business transactions. Therefore, support in the exchange of data, information, and knowledge is becoming the key issue in computer technology today. Ontologies provide

  19. Ontology Language to Support Description of Experiment Control System Semantics, Collaborative Knowledge-Base Design and Ontology Reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardan Gyurjyan, D Abbott, G Heyes, E Jastrzembski, B Moffit, C Timmer, E Wolin

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we discuss the control domain specific ontology that is built on top of the domain-neutral Resource Definition Framework (RDF). Specifically, we will discuss the relevant set of ontology concepts along with the relationships among them in order to describe experiment control components and generic event-based state machines. Control Oriented Ontology Language (COOL) is a meta-data modeling language that provides generic means for representation of physics experiment control processes and components, and their relationships, rules and axioms. It provides a semantic reference frame that is useful for automating the communication of information for configuration, deployment and operation. COOL has been successfully used to develop a complete and dynamic knowledge-base for experiment control systems, developed using the AFECS framework.

  20. Informatics in radiology: radiology gamuts ontology: differential diagnosis for the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budovec, Joseph J; Lam, Cesar A; Kahn, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    The Semantic Web is an effort to add semantics, or "meaning," to empower automated searching and processing of Web-based information. The overarching goal of the Semantic Web is to enable users to more easily find, share, and combine information. Critical to this vision are knowledge models called ontologies, which define a set of concepts and formalize the relations between them. Ontologies have been developed to manage and exploit the large and rapidly growing volume of information in biomedical domains. In diagnostic radiology, lists of differential diagnoses of imaging observations, called gamuts, provide an important source of knowledge. The Radiology Gamuts Ontology (RGO) is a formal knowledge model of differential diagnoses in radiology that includes 1674 differential diagnoses, 19,017 terms, and 52,976 links between terms. Its knowledge is used to provide an interactive, freely available online reference of radiology gamuts ( www.gamuts.net ). A Web service allows its content to be discovered and consumed by other information systems. The RGO integrates radiologic knowledge with other biomedical ontologies as part of the Semantic Web. © RSNA, 2014.

  1. Post-processing of Deep Web Information Extraction Based on Domain Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PENG, T.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many methods are utilized to extract and process query results in deep Web, which rely on the different structures of Web pages and various designing modes of databases. However, some semantic meanings and relations are ignored. So, in this paper, we present an approach for post-processing deep Web query results based on domain ontology which can utilize the semantic meanings and relations. A block identification model (BIM based on node similarity is defined to extract data blocks that are relevant to specific domain after reducing noisy nodes. Feature vector of domain books is obtained by result set extraction model (RSEM based on vector space model (VSM. RSEM, in combination with BIM, builds the domain ontology on books which can not only remove the limit of Web page structures when extracting data information, but also make use of semantic meanings of domain ontology. After extracting basic information of Web pages, a ranking algorithm is adopted to offer an ordered list of data records to users. Experimental results show that BIM and RSEM extract data blocks and build domain ontology accurately. In addition, relevant data records and basic information are extracted and ranked. The performances precision and recall show that our proposed method is feasible and efficient.

  2. OntoPop: An Ontology Population System for the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongkrau, Theerayut; Lalitrojwong, Pattarachai

    The development of ontology at the instance level requires the extraction of the terms defining the instances from various data sources. These instances then are linked to the concepts of the ontology, and relationships are created between these instances for the next step. However, before establishing links among data, ontology engineers must classify terms or instances from a web document into an ontology concept. The tool for help ontology engineer in this task is called ontology population. The present research is not suitable for ontology development applications, such as long time processing or analyzing large or noisy data sets. OntoPop system introduces a methodology to solve these problems, which comprises two parts. First, we select meaningful features from syntactic relations, which can produce more significant features than any other method. Second, we differentiate feature meaning and reduce noise based on latent semantic analysis. Experimental evaluation demonstrates that the OntoPop works well, significantly out-performing the accuracy of 49.64%, a learning accuracy of 76.93%, and executes time of 5.46 second/instance.

  3. Leveraging declarative languages in web application development

    OpenAIRE

    Vuorimaa, Petri; Laine, Markku; Litvinova, Evgenia; Shestakov, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Web Applications have become an omnipresent part of our daily lives. They are easy to use, but hard to develop. WYSIWYG editors, form builders, mashup editors, and markup authoring tools ease the development of Web Applications. However, more advanced Web Applications require servers-side programming, which is beyond the skills of end-user developers. In this paper, we discuss how declarative languages can simplify Web Application development and empower end-users as Web developers. We first ...

  4. An Ontology-supported Approach for Automatic Chaining of Web Services in Geospatial Knowledge Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, L.; Yue, P.; Yang, W.; Yu, G.

    2006-12-01

    Recent developments in geospatial semantic Web have shown promise for automatic discovery, access, and use of geospatial Web services to quickly and efficiently solve particular application problems. With the semantic Web technology, it is highly feasible to construct intelligent geospatial knowledge systems that can provide answers to many geospatial application questions. A key challenge in constructing such intelligent knowledge system is to automate the creation of a chain or process workflow that involves multiple services and highly diversified data and can generate the answer to a specific question of users. This presentation discusses an approach for automating composition of geospatial Web service chains by employing geospatial semantics described by geospatial ontologies. It shows how ontology-based geospatial semantics are used for enabling the automatic discovery, mediation, and chaining of geospatial Web services. OWL-S is used to represent the geospatial semantics of individual Web services and the type of the services it belongs to and the type of the data it can handle. The hierarchy and classification of service types are described in the service ontology. The hierarchy and classification of data types are presented in the data ontology. For answering users' geospatial questions, an Artificial Intelligent (AI) planning algorithm is used to construct the service chain by using the service and data logics expressed in the ontologies. The chain can be expressed as a graph with nodes representing services and connection weights representing degrees of semantic matching between nodes. The graph is a visual representation of logical geo-processing path for answering users' questions. The graph can be instantiated to a physical service workflow for execution to generate the answer to a user's question. A prototype system, which includes real world geospatial applications, is implemented to demonstrate the concept and approach.

  5. Modeling Ontology Views: An Abstract View Model for Semantic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajugan, R.; Chang, E.; Dillon, T.S.; Feng, L.

    The emergence of Semantic Web (SW) and the related technologies promise to make the web a meaningful experience. However, high level modeling, design and querying techniques proves to be a challenging task for organizations that are hoping to utilize the SW paradigm for their industrial

  6. Ontology-Based Information Visualization: Toward Semantic Web Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluit, Christiaan; Sabou, Marta; Harmelen, Frank van

    2006-01-01

    The Semantic Web is an extension of the current World Wide Web, based on the idea of exchanging information with explicit, formal, and machine-accessible descriptions of meaning. Providing information with such semantics will enable the construction of applications that have an increased awareness

  7. A Probabilistic Ontology Development Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Journal of Human-Computer Studies, pp. 907-928, 1995. [8] Grigoris Antoniou and Frank Van Harmelen, "Web Ontology Language: OWL," in Handbook on...Probabilistic Ontology Development Methodology Topic 3: Data, Information,and Knowledge Topic 5: Modeling and Simulation Topic 7: Autonomy...2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Probabilistic Ontology Development Methodology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  8. An Ontology for Insider Threat Indicators Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    G. Antoniou and F. Van Harmelen, "Web ontology language: Owl," in Handbook on ontologies , ed: Springer, 2004, pp. 67-92 ...An Ontology for Insider Threat Indicators Development and Applications Daniel L. Costa, Matthew L. Collins, Samuel J. Perl, Michael J. Albrethsen...cert.org Abstract—We describe our ongoing development of an insider threat indicator ontology . Our ontology is intended to serve as a standardized

  9. Case-based classification alternatives to ontologies for automated web service discovery and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Roy; Warner, Elizabeth; Petry, Fred; Gupta, Kalyan Moy; Moore, Philip; Aha, David W.; Shaw, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    Web Services are becoming the standard technology used to share data for many Navy and other DoD operations. Since Web Services technologies provide for discoverable, self-describing services that conform to common standards, this paradigm holds the promise of an automated capability to obtain and integrate data. However, automated integration of applications to access and retrieve data from heterogeneous sources in a distributed system such as the Internet poses many difficulties. Assimilation of data from Web-based sources means that differences in schema and terminology prevent simple querying and retrieval of data. Thus, machine understanding of the Web Services interface is necessary for automated selection and invocation of the correct service. Service availability is also an issue that needs to be resolved. There have been many advances on ontologies to help resolve these difficulties to support the goal of sharing knowledge for various domains of interest. In this paper we examine the use of case-based classification as an alternative/supplement to using ontologies for resolving several questions related to knowledge sharing. While ontologies encompass a formal definition of a domain of interest, case-based reasoning is a problem solving methodology that retrieves and reuses decisions from stored cases to solve new problems, and case-based classification involves applying this methodology to classification tasks. Our approach generalizes well in sparse data, which characterizes our Web Services application. We present our study as it relates to our work on development of the Advanced MetOc Broker, whose objective is the automated application integration of meteorological and oceanographic (MetOc) Web Services.

  10. Perspectives on ontology learning

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, J

    2014-01-01

    Perspectives on Ontology Learning brings together researchers and practitioners from different communities − natural language processing, machine learning, and the semantic web − in order to give an interdisciplinary overview of recent advances in ontology learning.Starting with a comprehensive introduction to the theoretical foundations of ontology learning methods, the edited volume presents the state-of-the-start in automated knowledge acquisition and maintenance. It outlines future challenges in this area with a special focus on technologies suitable for pushing the boundaries beyond the c

  11. Domain Specific Languages for Interactive Web Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus

    This dissertation shows how domain specific languages may be applied to the domain of interactive Web services to obtain flexible, safe, and efficient solutions. We show how each of four key aspects of interactive Web services involving sessions, dynamic creation of HTML/XML documents, form field......, , that supports virtually all aspects of the development of interactive Web services and provides flexible, safe, and efficient solutions....

  12. Ontology-Driven Search and Triage: Design of a Web-Based Visual Interface for MEDLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demelo, Jonathan; Parsons, Paul; Sedig, Kamran

    2017-02-02

    Diverse users need to search health and medical literature to satisfy open-ended goals such as making evidence-based decisions and updating their knowledge. However, doing so is challenging due to at least two major difficulties: (1) articulating information needs using accurate vocabulary and (2) dealing with large document sets returned from searches. Common search interfaces such as PubMed do not provide adequate support for exploratory search tasks. Our objective was to improve support for exploratory search tasks by combining two strategies in the design of an interactive visual interface by (1) using a formal ontology to help users build domain-specific knowledge and vocabulary and (2) providing multi-stage triaging support to help mitigate the information overload problem. We developed a Web-based tool, Ontology-Driven Visual Search and Triage Interface for MEDLINE (OVERT-MED), to test our design ideas. We implemented a custom searchable index of MEDLINE, which comprises approximately 25 million document citations. We chose a popular biomedical ontology, the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO), to test our solution to the vocabulary problem. We implemented multistage triaging support in OVERT-MED, with the aid of interactive visualization techniques, to help users deal with large document sets returned from searches. Formative evaluation suggests that the design features in OVERT-MED are helpful in addressing the two major difficulties described above. Using a formal ontology seems to help users articulate their information needs with more accurate vocabulary. In addition, multistage triaging combined with interactive visualizations shows promise in mitigating the information overload problem. Our strategies appear to be valuable in addressing the two major problems in exploratory search. Although we tested OVERT-MED with a particular ontology and document collection, we anticipate that our strategies can be transferred successfully to other contexts.

  13. CelOWS: an ontology based framework for the provision of semantic web services related to biological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Ely Edison; Campos, Fernanda; Braga, Regina; Palazzi, Daniele

    2010-02-01

    The amount of information generated by biological research has lead to an intensive use of models. Mathematical and computational modeling needs accurate description to share, reuse and simulate models as formulated by original authors. In this paper, we introduce the Cell Component Ontology (CelO), expressed in OWL-DL. This ontology captures both the structure of a cell model and the properties of functional components. We use this ontology in a Web project (CelOWS) to describe, query and compose CellML models, using semantic web services. It aims to improve reuse and composition of existent components and allow semantic validation of new models.

  14. Merging Ontology Navigation with Query Construction for Web-based Medicare Data Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Cui, Licong; Teagno, Joe; Kaebler, David; Koroukian, Siran; Xu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    To enhance web-based exploration of Medicare data, we present a unique query interface merging ontology navigation with query construction, for cohort discovery based on demographics, disease classification codes, medication and other types of clinical data. Our interface seamlessly blends query construction with functions for hierarchical browsing and rendering of terms and associated codes from vocabulary systems and ontologies, such as International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). By unifying ontology navigation activities with query widget generation, a user can perform fine-tuned full boolean queries based on the substructure of the ontology, with flexibility to enable or disable subsumption-based queries. Query performance were evaluated on top disease subtypes of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data, consisting of 5% of 2009 Limited Data Set files (inpatient and outpatient). Such interfaces will help moving the data access paradigm from a hypothesis-driven style to a data-driven one, while improving efficiency as a collective "secondary-use user community."

  15. Advancing data reuse in phyloinformatics using an ontology-driven Semantic Web approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Sheth, Amit P; Ranabahu, Ajith; Vos, Rutger A; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses can resolve historical relationships among genes, organisms or higher taxa. Understanding such relationships can elucidate a wide range of biological phenomena, including, for example, the importance of gene and genome duplications in the evolution of gene function, the role of adaptation as a driver of diversification, or the evolutionary consequences of biogeographic shifts. Phyloinformaticists are developing data standards, databases and communication protocols (e.g. Application Programming Interfaces, APIs) to extend the accessibility of gene trees, species trees, and the metadata necessary to interpret these trees, thus enabling researchers across the life sciences to reuse phylogenetic knowledge. Specifically, Semantic Web technologies are being developed to make phylogenetic knowledge interpretable by web agents, thereby enabling intelligently automated, high-throughput reuse of results generated by phylogenetic research. This manuscript describes an ontology-driven, semantic problem-solving environment for phylogenetic analyses and introduces artefacts that can promote phyloinformatic efforts to promote accessibility of trees and underlying metadata. PhylOnt is an extensible ontology with concepts describing tree types and tree building methodologies including estimation methods, models and programs. In addition we present the PhylAnt platform for annotating scientific articles and NeXML files with PhylOnt concepts. The novelty of this work is the annotation of NeXML files and phylogenetic related documents with PhylOnt Ontology. This approach advances data reuse in phyloinformatics.

  16. Web Approach for Ontology-Based Classification, Integration, and Interdisciplinary Usage of Geoscience Metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ritschel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Semantic Web is a W3C approach that integrates the different sources of semantics within documents and services using ontology-based techniques. The main objective of this approach in the geoscience domain is the improvement of understanding, integration, and usage of Earth and space science related web content in terms of data, information, and knowledge for machines and people. The modeling and representation of semantic attributes and relations within and among documents can be realized by human readable concept maps and machine readable OWL documents. The objectives for the usage of the Semantic Web approach in the GFZ data center ISDC project are the design of an extended classification of metadata documents for product types related to instruments, platforms, and projects as well as the integration of different types of metadata related to data product providers, users, and data centers. Sources of content and semantics for the description of Earth and space science product types and related classes are standardized metadata documents (e.g., DIF documents, publications, grey literature, and Web pages. Other sources are information provided by users, such as tagging data and social navigation information. The integration of controlled vocabularies as well as folksonomies plays an important role in the design of well formed ontologies.

  17. Aber-OWL: a framework for ontology-based data access in biology

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-01-28

    Background: Many ontologies have been developed in biology and these ontologies increasingly contain large volumes of formalized knowledge commonly expressed in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Computational access to the knowledge contained within these ontologies relies on the use of automated reasoning. Results: We have developed the Aber-OWL infrastructure that provides reasoning services for bio-ontologies. Aber-OWL consists of an ontology repository, a set of web services and web interfaces that enable ontology-based semantic access to biological data and literature. Aber-OWL is freely available at http://aber-owl.net. Conclusions: Aber-OWL provides a framework for automatically accessing information that is annotated with ontologies or contains terms used to label classes in ontologies. When using Aber-OWL, access to ontologies and data annotated with them is not merely based on class names or identifiers but rather on the knowledge the ontologies contain and the inferences that can be drawn from it.

  18. Aber-OWL: a framework for ontology-based data access in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Slater, Luke; Schofield, Paul N; Gkoutos, Georgios V

    2015-01-28

    Many ontologies have been developed in biology and these ontologies increasingly contain large volumes of formalized knowledge commonly expressed in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Computational access to the knowledge contained within these ontologies relies on the use of automated reasoning. We have developed the Aber-OWL infrastructure that provides reasoning services for bio-ontologies. Aber-OWL consists of an ontology repository, a set of web services and web interfaces that enable ontology-based semantic access to biological data and literature. Aber-OWL is freely available at http://aber-owl.net . Aber-OWL provides a framework for automatically accessing information that is annotated with ontologies or contains terms used to label classes in ontologies. When using Aber-OWL, access to ontologies and data annotated with them is not merely based on class names or identifiers but rather on the knowledge the ontologies contain and the inferences that can be drawn from it.

  19. Ontology-driven education: Teaching anatomy with intelligent 3D games on the web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Trond

    Human anatomy is a challenging and intimidating subject whose understanding is essential to good medical practice, taught primarily using a combination of lectures and the dissection of human cadavers. Lectures are cheap and scalable, but do a poor job of teaching spatial understanding, whereas dissection lets students experience the body's interior first-hand, but is expensive, cannot be repeated, and is often imperfect. Educational games and online learning activities have the potential to supplement these teaching methods in a cheap and relatively effective way, but they are difficult for educators to customize for particular curricula and lack the tutoring support that human instructors provide. I present an approach to the creation of learning activities for anatomy called ontology-driven education, in which the Foundational Model of Anatomy, an ontological representation of knowledge about anatomy, is leveraged to generate educational content, model student knowledge, and support learning activities and games in a configurable web-based educational framework for anatomy.

  20. Ontobee: A linked ontology data server to support ontology term dereferencing, linkage, query and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Edison; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Yue; Lin, Yu; Zheng, Jie; Mungall, Chris; Courtot, Mélanie; Ruttenberg, Alan; He, Yongqun

    2017-01-04

    Linked Data (LD) aims to achieve interconnected data by representing entities using Unified Resource Identifiers (URIs), and sharing information using Resource Description Frameworks (RDFs) and HTTP. Ontologies, which logically represent entities and relations in specific domains, are the basis of LD. Ontobee (http://www.ontobee.org/) is a linked ontology data server that stores ontology information using RDF triple store technology and supports query, visualization and linkage of ontology terms. Ontobee is also the default linked data server for publishing and browsing biomedical ontologies in the Open Biological Ontology (OBO) Foundry (http://obofoundry.org) library. Ontobee currently hosts more than 180 ontologies (including 131 OBO Foundry Library ontologies) with over four million terms. Ontobee provides a user-friendly web interface for querying and visualizing the details and hierarchy of a specific ontology term. Using the eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) technology, Ontobee is able to dereference a single ontology term URI, and then output RDF/eXtensible Markup Language (XML) for computer processing or display the HTML information on a web browser for human users. Statistics and detailed information are generated and displayed for each ontology listed in Ontobee. In addition, a SPARQL web interface is provided for custom advanced SPARQL queries of one or multiple ontologies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. OntoTrader: an ontological Web trading agent approach for environmental information retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarne, Luis; Padilla, Nicolás; Ayala, Rosa; Asensio, José A; Criado, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Modern Web-based Information Systems (WIS) are becoming increasingly necessary to provide support for users who are in different places with different types of information, by facilitating their access to the information, decision making, workgroups, and so forth. Design of these systems requires the use of standardized methods and techniques that enable a common vocabulary to be defined to represent the underlying knowledge. Thus, mediation elements such as traders enrich the interoperability of web components in open distributed systems. These traders must operate with other third-party traders and/or agents in the system, which must also use a common vocabulary for communication between them. This paper presents the OntoTrader architecture, an Ontological Web Trading agent based on the OMG ODP trading standard. It also presents the ontology needed by some system agents to communicate with the trading agent and the behavioral framework for the SOLERES OntoTrader agent, an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS). This framework implements a "Query-Searching/Recovering-Response" information retrieval model using a trading service, SPARQL notation, and the JADE platform. The paper also presents reflection, delegation and, federation mediation models and describes formalization, an experimental testing environment in three scenarios, and a tool which allows our proposal to be evaluated and validated.

  2. OntoTrader: An Ontological Web Trading Agent Approach for Environmental Information Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Iribarne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Web-based Information Systems (WIS are becoming increasingly necessary to provide support for users who are in different places with different types of information, by facilitating their access to the information, decision making, workgroups, and so forth. Design of these systems requires the use of standardized methods and techniques that enable a common vocabulary to be defined to represent the underlying knowledge. Thus, mediation elements such as traders enrich the interoperability of web components in open distributed systems. These traders must operate with other third-party traders and/or agents in the system, which must also use a common vocabulary for communication between them. This paper presents the OntoTrader architecture, an Ontological Web Trading agent based on the OMG ODP trading standard. It also presents the ontology needed by some system agents to communicate with the trading agent and the behavioral framework for the SOLERES OntoTrader agent, an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS. This framework implements a “Query-Searching/Recovering-Response” information retrieval model using a trading service, SPARQL notation, and the JADE platform. The paper also presents reflection, delegation and, federation mediation models and describes formalization, an experimental testing environment in three scenarios, and a tool which allows our proposal to be evaluated and validated.

  3. ONTOLOGY EXTRACTION FOR AGRICULTURE DOMAIN IN MARATHI LANGUAGE USING NLP TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Dalvi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ontology is defined as shared specification of conceptual vocabulary used for formulating knowledge-level theories about a domain of discourse. Dataset is created by manually collecting information about different diseases related to crops. Ontology modeling is used for knowledge representation of various domains. India is an agricultural based economic country. Majority of Indian population relies on farming but the technologies are sparsely used for the aid of farmers. Ontology based modeling for agricultural knowledge can change this scenario. The farmers can understand it easily in their native language. We proposed a system which will model and extract knowledge in Marathi language. In this paper, we review various existing agriculture ontology’s along with some of Natural Language Processing (NLP models. Model ontology for agriculture domain system aims to retrieve relevant answers to the farmer’s query. We explored Rule-Based and Conditional Random Fields based models for Ontology extraction. The extraction methods and preprocessing phases of proposed system is discussed.

  4. vSPARQL: a view definition language for the semantic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Marianne; Detwiler, Landon T; Noy, Natalya; Brinkley, James; Suciu, Dan

    2011-02-01

    Translational medicine applications would like to leverage the biological and biomedical ontologies, vocabularies, and data sets available on the semantic web. We present a general solution for RDF information set reuse inspired by database views. Our view definition language, vSPARQL, allows applications to specify the exact content that they are interested in and how that content should be restructured or modified. Applications can access relevant content by querying against these view definitions. We evaluate the expressivity of our approach by defining views for practical use cases and comparing our view definition language to existing query languages. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ontology Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Vrandecic, Zdenko

    2010-01-01

    Ontology evaluation is the task of measuring the quality of an ontology. It enables us to answer the following main question: How to assess the quality of an ontology for the Web? In this thesis a theoretical framework and several methods breathing life into the framework are presented. The application to the above scenarios is explored, and the theoretical foundations are thoroughly grounded in the practical usage of the emerging Semantic Web.

  6. An Ontological Approach to Developing Information Operations Applications for Use on the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    of the ontology for use on the Semantic Web. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 147 14. SUBJECT TERMS Information Operations (IO), Psychological Operations...a specific IO capability.</rdfs:comment> </owl:Class> <owl:Class rdf:ID="Tactical_PSYOP_Battalion"> <rdfs:label xml:lang="en"> TPB ...rdfs:comment xml:lang="en">Concrete instance of a land platform associated with IO. Tactical PSYOP Battalions ( TPB ) provide tactical PSYOP support to corps

  7. Persistent identifiers for web service requests relying on a provenance ontology design pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Car, Nicholas; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley; Si, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Delivering provenance information for datasets produced from static inputs is relatively straightforward: we represent the processing actions and data flow using provenance ontologies and link to stored copies of the inputs stored in repositories. If appropriate detail is given, the provenance information can then describe what actions have occurred (transparency) and enable reproducibility. When web service-generated data is used by a process to create a dataset instead of a static inputs, we need to use sophisticated provenance representations of the web service request as we can no longer just link to data stored in a repository. A graph-based provenance representation, such as the W3C's PROV standard, can be used to model the web service request as a single conceptual dataset and also as a small workflow with a number of components within the same provenance report. This dual representation does more than just allow simplified or detailed views of a dataset's production to be used where appropriate. It also allow persistent identifiers to be assigned to instances of a web service requests, thus enabling one form of dynamic data citation, and for those identifiers to resolve to whatever level of detail implementers think appropriate in order for that web service request to be reproduced. In this presentation we detail our reasoning in representing web service requests as small workflows. In outline, this stems from the idea that web service requests are perdurant things and in order to most easily persist knowledge of them for provenance, we should represent them as a nexus of relationships between endurant things, such as datasets and knowledge of particular system types, as these endurant things are far easier to persist. We also describe the ontology design pattern that we use to represent workflows in general and how we apply it to different types of web service requests. We give examples of specific web service requests instances that were made by systems

  8. Research on Extension of Sparql Ontology Query Language Considering the Computation of Indoor Spatial Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Zhu, X.; Guo, W.; Liu, Y.; Huang, H.

    2015-05-01

    A method suitable for indoor complex semantic query considering the computation of indoor spatial relations is provided According to the characteristics of indoor space. This paper designs ontology model describing the space related information of humans, events and Indoor space objects (e.g. Storey and Room) as well as their relations to meet the indoor semantic query. The ontology concepts are used in IndoorSPARQL query language which extends SPARQL syntax for representing and querying indoor space. And four types specific primitives for indoor query, "Adjacent", "Opposite", "Vertical" and "Contain", are defined as query functions in IndoorSPARQL used to support quantitative spatial computations. Also a method is proposed to analysis the query language. Finally this paper adopts this method to realize indoor semantic query on the study area through constructing the ontology model for the study building. The experimental results show that the method proposed in this paper can effectively support complex indoor space semantic query.

  9. Comparative GO: a web application for comparative gene ontology and gene ontology-based gene selection in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Fruzangohar

    Full Text Available The primary means of classifying new functions for genes and proteins relies on Gene Ontology (GO, which defines genes/proteins using a controlled vocabulary in terms of their Molecular Function, Biological Process and Cellular Component. The challenge is to present this information to researchers to compare and discover patterns in multiple datasets using visually comprehensible and user-friendly statistical reports. Importantly, while there are many GO resources available for eukaryotes, there are none suitable for simultaneous, graphical and statistical comparison between multiple datasets. In addition, none of them supports comprehensive resources for bacteria. By using Streptococcus pneumoniae as a model, we identified and collected GO resources including genes, proteins, taxonomy and GO relationships from NCBI, UniProt and GO organisations. Then, we designed database tables in PostgreSQL database server and developed a Java application to extract data from source files and loaded into database automatically. We developed a PHP web application based on Model-View-Control architecture, used a specific data structure as well as current and novel algorithms to estimate GO graphs parameters. We designed different navigation and visualization methods on the graphs and integrated these into graphical reports. This tool is particularly significant when comparing GO groups between multiple samples (including those of pathogenic bacteria from different sources simultaneously. Comparing GO protein distribution among up- or down-regulated genes from different samples can improve understanding of biological pathways, and mechanism(s of infection. It can also aid in the discovery of genes associated with specific function(s for investigation as a novel vaccine or therapeutic targets.http://turing.ersa.edu.au/BacteriaGO.

  10. Knowledge bases built on web languages from the point of view of predicate logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajgl, Marek; Lukasová, Alena; Žáček, Martin

    2017-06-01

    The article undergoes evaluation of formal systems created on the base of web (ontology/concept) languages by simplifying the usual approach of knowledge representation within the FOPL, but sharing its expressiveness, semantic correct-ness, completeness and decidability. Evaluation of two of them - that one based on description logic and that one built on RDF model principles - identifies some of the lacks of those formal systems and presents, if possible, corrections of them. Possibilities to build an inference system capable to obtain new further knowledge over given knowledge bases including those describing domains by giant linked domain databases has been taken into account. Moreover, the directions towards simplifying FOPL language discussed here has been evaluated from the point of view of a possibility to become a web language for fulfilling an idea of semantic web.

  11. Data ontology and an information system realization for web-based management of image measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanov, Dimiter

    2011-01-01

    Image acquisition, processing, and quantification of objects (morphometry) require the integration of data inputs and outputs originating from heterogeneous sources. Management of the data exchange along this workflow in a systematic manner poses several challenges, notably the description of the heterogeneous meta-data and the interoperability between the software used. The use of integrated software solutions for morphometry and management of imaging data in combination with ontologies can reduce meta-data loss and greatly facilitate subsequent data analysis. This paper presents an integrated information system, called LabIS. The system has the objectives to automate (i) the process of storage, annotation, and querying of image measurements and (ii) to provide means for data sharing with third party applications consuming measurement data using open standard communication protocols. LabIS implements 3-tier architecture with a relational database back-end and an application logic middle tier realizing web-based user interface for reporting and annotation and a web-service communication layer. The image processing and morphometry functionality is backed by interoperability with ImageJ, a public domain image processing software, via integrated clients. Instrumental for the latter feat was the construction of a data ontology representing the common measurement data model. LabIS supports user profiling and can store arbitrary types of measurements, regions of interest, calibrations, and ImageJ settings. Interpretation of the stored measurements is facilitated by atlas mapping and ontology-based markup. The system can be used as an experimental workflow management tool allowing for description and reporting of the performed experiments. LabIS can be also used as a measurements repository that can be transparently accessed by computational environments, such as Matlab. Finally, the system can be used as a data sharing tool.

  12. Data ontology and an information system realization for web-based management of image measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimiter eProdanov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Image acquisition, processing and quantification of objects (morphometry require the integration of data inputs and outputs originating from heterogeneous sources. Management of the data exchange along this workflow in a systematic manner poses several challenges, notably the description of the heterogeneous meta data and the interoperability between the software used. The use of integrated software solutions for morphometry and management of imaging data in combination ontologies can reduce metadata data loss and greatly facilitate subsequent data analysis. This paper presents an integrated information system, called LabIS. The system has the objectives to automate (i the process of storage, annotation and querying of image measurements and (ii to provide means for data sharing with 3rd party applications consuming measurement data using open standard communication protocols. LabIS implements 3-tier architecture with a relational database back-end and an application logic middle tier realizing web-based user interface for reporting and annotation and a web service communication layer. The image processing and morphometry functionality is backed by interoperability with ImageJ, a public domain image processing software, via integrated clients. Instrumental for the latter was the construction of a data ontology representing the common measurement data model. LabIS supports user profiling and can store arbitrary types of measurements, regions of interest, calibrations and ImageJ settings. Integration of the stored measurements is facilitated by atlas mapping and ontology-based markup. The system can be used as an experimental workflow management tool allowing for description and reporting of the performed experiments. LabIS can be also used as a measurements repository that can be transparently accessed by computational environments, such as Matlab. Finally, the system can be used as a data sharing tool.

  13. A web-based land cover classification system based on ontology model of different classification systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Chen, X.

    2016-12-01

    Land cover classification systems used in remote sensing image data have been developed to meet the needs for depicting land covers in scientific investigations and policy decisions. However, accuracy assessments of a spate of data sets demonstrate that compared with the real physiognomy, each of the thematic map of specific land cover classification system contains some unavoidable flaws and unintended deviation. This work proposes a web-based land cover classification system, an integrated prototype, based on an ontology model of various classification systems, each of which is assigned the same weight in the final determination of land cover type. Ontology, a formal explication of specific concepts and relations, is employed in this prototype to build up the connections among different systems to resolve the naming conflicts. The process is initialized by measuring semantic similarity between terminologies in the systems and the search key to produce certain set of satisfied classifications, and carries on through searching the predefined relations in concepts of all classification systems to generate classification maps with user-specified land cover type highlighted, based on probability calculated by votes from data sets with different classification system adopted. The present system is verified and validated by comparing the classification results with those most common systems. Due to full consideration and meaningful expression of each classification system using ontology and the convenience that the web brings with itself, this system, as a preliminary model, proposes a flexible and extensible architecture for classification system integration and data fusion, thereby providing a strong foundation for the future work.

  14. Ontology-Based Controlled Natural Language Editor Using CFG with Lexical Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Hyun; Kim, Hong-Gee

    In recent years, CNL (Controlled Natural Language) has received much attention with regard to ontology-based knowledge acquisition systems. CNLs, as subsets of natural languages, can be useful for both humans and computers by eliminating ambiguity of natural languages. Our previous work, OntoPath [10], proposed to edit natural language-like narratives that are structured in RDF (Resource Description Framework) triples, using a domain-specific ontology as their language constituents. However, our previous work and other systems employing CFG for grammar definition have difficulties in enlarging the expression capacity. A newly developed editor, which we propose in this paper, permits grammar definitions through CFG-LD (Context-Free Grammar with Lexical Dependency) that includes sequential and semantic structures of the grammars. With CFG describing the sequential structure of grammar, lexical dependencies between sentence elements can be designated in the definition system. Through the defined grammars, the implemented editor guides users' narratives in more familiar expressions with a domain-specific ontology and translates the content into RDF triples.

  15. Inferring ontology graph structures using OWL reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2018-01-05

    Ontologies are representations of a conceptualization of a domain. Traditionally, ontologies in biology were represented as directed acyclic graphs (DAG) which represent the backbone taxonomy and additional relations between classes. These graphs are widely exploited for data analysis in the form of ontology enrichment or computation of semantic similarity. More recently, ontologies are developed in a formal language such as the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and consist of a set of axioms through which classes are defined or constrained. While the taxonomy of an ontology can be inferred directly from the axioms of an ontology as one of the standard OWL reasoning tasks, creating general graph structures from OWL ontologies that exploit the ontologies\\' semantic content remains a challenge.We developed a method to transform ontologies into graphs using an automated reasoner while taking into account all relations between classes. Searching for (existential) patterns in the deductive closure of ontologies, we can identify relations between classes that are implied but not asserted and generate graph structures that encode for a large part of the ontologies\\' semantic content. We demonstrate the advantages of our method by applying it to inference of protein-protein interactions through semantic similarity over the Gene Ontology and demonstrate that performance is increased when graph structures are inferred using deductive inference according to our method. Our software and experiment results are available at http://github.com/bio-ontology-research-group/Onto2Graph .Onto2Graph is a method to generate graph structures from OWL ontologies using automated reasoning. The resulting graphs can be used for improved ontology visualization and ontology-based data analysis.

  16. How knowledge drives understanding--matching medical ontologies with the needs of medical language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, U; Romacker, M; Schulz, S

    1999-01-01

    In this article, we introduce a knowledge-based approach to medical text understanding. From an in-depth consideration of deep sentence and text understanding we distill basic requirements for an adequate knowledge representation framework. These requirements are then matched with currently available medical ontologies (thesauri, terminologies, etc.). A fundamental trade-off is recognized between large-scale conceptual coverage on the one hand, and formal mechanisms for integrity preservation and conceptual expressiveness on the other hand. We discuss various shortcomings of the most wide-spread ontologies to capture medical knowledge in-the-large. As a result, we argue for the need of a formally sound and expressive model along the lines of KL-ONE-style terminological representation systems in the format of description logics. These provide an adequate methodology for designing more sophisticated, flexible medical ontologies serving the needs of 'deep' knowledge applications which are by no means restricted to medical language processing.

  17. A Posteriori Ontology Engineering for Data-Driven Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessler, Damian Dg; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Verspoor, Karin M.

    2013-05-28

    Science—and biology in particular—has a rich tradition in categorical knowledge management. This continues today in the generation and use of formal ontologies. Unfortunately, the link between hard data and ontological content is predominately qualitative, not quantitative. The usual approach is to construct ontologies of qualitative concepts, and then annotate the data to the ontologies. This process has seen great value, yet it is laborious, and the success to which ontologies are managing and organizing the full information content of the data is uncertain. An alternative approach is the converse: use the data itself to quantitatively drive ontology creation. Under this model, one generates ontologies at the time they are needed, allowing them to change as more data influences both their topology and their concept space. We outline a combined approach to achieve this, taking advantage of two technologies, the mathematical approach of Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) and the semantic web technologies of the Web Ontology Language (OWL).

  18. Supporting spatial data harmonization process with the use of ontologies and Semantic Web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, M.; Iwaniak, A.; Łukowicz, J.; Kaczmarek, I.

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays, spatial information is not only used by professionals, but also by common citizens, who uses it for their daily activities. Open Data initiative states that data should be freely and unreservedly available for all users. It also applies to spatial data. As spatial data becomes widely available it is essential to publish it in form which guarantees the possibility of integrating it with other, heterogeneous data sources. Interoperability is the possibility to combine spatial data sets from different sources in a consistent way as well as providing access to it. Providing syntactic interoperability based on well-known data formats is relatively simple, unlike providing semantic interoperability, due to the multiple possible data interpretation. One of the issues connected with the problem of achieving interoperability is data harmonization. It is a process of providing access to spatial data in a representation that allows combining it with other harmonized data in a coherent way by using a common set of data product specification. Spatial data harmonization is performed by creating definition of reclassification and transformation rules (mapping schema) for source application schema. Creation of those rules is a very demanding task which requires wide domain knowledge and a detailed look into application schemas. The paper focuses on proposing methods for supporting data harmonization process, by automated or supervised creation of mapping schemas with the use of ontologies, ontology matching methods and Semantic Web technologies.

  19. Validating the semantics of a medical iconic language using ontological reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Soualmia, Lina F; Kerdelhué, Gaëtan; Venot, Alain; Duclos, Catherine

    2013-02-01

    To help clinicians read medical texts such as clinical practice guidelines or drug monographs, we proposed an iconic language called VCM. This language can use icons to represent the main medical concepts, including diseases, symptoms, treatments and follow-up procedures, by combining various pictograms, shapes and colors. However, the semantics of this language have not been formalized, and users may create inconsistent icons, e.g. by combining the "tumor" shape and the "sleeping" pictograms into a "tumor of sleeping" icon. This work aims to represent the VCM language using DLs and OWL for evaluating its semantics by reasoners, and in particular for determining inconsistent icons. We designed an ontology for formalized the semantics of VCM icons using the Protégé editor and scripts for translating the VCM lexicon in OWL. We evaluated the ability of the ontology to determine icon consistency for a set of 100 random icons. The evaluation showed good results for determining icon consistency, with a high sensitivity. The ontology may also be useful for the design of mapping between VCM and other medical terminologies, for generating textual labels for icons, and for developing user interfaces for creating VCM icons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Foundations of fuzzy logic and semantic web languages

    CERN Document Server

    Straccia, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Managing vagueness/fuzziness is starting to play an important role in Semantic Web research, with a large number of research efforts underway. Foundations of Fuzzy Logic and Semantic Web Languages provides a rigorous and succinct account of the mathematical methods and tools used for representing and reasoning with fuzzy information within Semantic Web languages. The book focuses on the three main streams of Semantic Web languages: Triple languages RDF and RDFS Conceptual languages OWL and OWL 2, and their profiles OWL EL, OWL QL, and OWL RL Rule-based languages, such as SWRL and RIF Written b

  1. Ontology-based Integration of Web Navigation for Dynamic User Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett HOPPE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of technology for handling information on a Big Data-scale is a buzzing topic of current research. Indeed, improved techniques for knowledge discovery are crucial for scientific and economic exploitation of large-scale raw data. In research collaboration with an industrial actor, we explore the applicability of ontology-based knowledge extraction and representation for today's biggest source of large-scale data, the Web. The goal is to develop a profil-ing application, based on the implicit information that every user leaves while navigating the online, with the goal to identify and model preferences and interests in a detailed user profile. This includes the identification of current tendencies as well as the prediction of possible future interests, as far as they are deducible from the collected browsing information, and integrated expert domain knowledge. The article at hand gives an overview on the current state of the research, the developments made and insights gained.

  2. ComTrustO: Composite Trust-Based Ontology Framework for Information and Decision Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    define trust ontology . Golbeck and Parsia [21] present an ontology - based approach to integrate semantic web based trust networks with provenance...information fusion framework implemented in OWL ( Ontology Web Language). We also show a concrete example that can be processed on the basis of our...information systems to enterprise modeling and knowledge learning. The most im- portant examples to date are the Semantic Web and semantic technologies

  3. Language, logic and ontology: uncovering the structure of commonsense knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Saba, Walid S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (i) we argue that the structure of commonsense knowledge must be discovered, rather than invented; and (ii) we argue that natural language, which is the best known theory of our (shared) commonsense knowledge, should itself be used as a guide to discovering the structure of commonsense knowledge. In addition to suggesting a systematic method to the discovery of the structure of commonsense knowledge, the method we propose seems to also provide an explanat...

  4. A web-based data-querying tool based on ontology-driven methodology and flowchart-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Xiao-Ou; Chung, Yufang; Tseng, Yi-Ju; Liang, Ja-Der; Yang, Pei-Ming; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Lai, Feipei

    2013-10-08

    Because of the increased adoption rate of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, more health care records have been increasingly accumulating in clinical data repositories. Therefore, querying the data stored in these repositories is crucial for retrieving the knowledge from such large volumes of clinical data. The aim of this study is to develop a Web-based approach for enriching the capabilities of the data-querying system along the three following considerations: (1) the interface design used for query formulation, (2) the representation of query results, and (3) the models used for formulating query criteria. The Guideline Interchange Format version 3.5 (GLIF3.5), an ontology-driven clinical guideline representation language, was used for formulating the query tasks based on the GLIF3.5 flowchart in the Protégé environment. The flowchart-based data-querying model (FBDQM) query execution engine was developed and implemented for executing queries and presenting the results through a visual and graphical interface. To examine a broad variety of patient data, the clinical data generator was implemented to automatically generate the clinical data in the repository, and the generated data, thereby, were employed to evaluate the system. The accuracy and time performance of the system for three medical query tasks relevant to liver cancer were evaluated based on the clinical data generator in the experiments with varying numbers of patients. In this study, a prototype system was developed to test the feasibility of applying a methodology for building a query execution engine using FBDQMs by formulating query tasks using the existing GLIF. The FBDQM-based query execution engine was used to successfully retrieve the clinical data based on the query tasks formatted using the GLIF3.5 in the experiments with varying numbers of patients. The accuracy of the three queries (ie, "degree of liver damage," "degree of liver damage when applying a mutually exclusive setting

  5. A Web-Based Data-Querying Tool Based on Ontology-Driven Methodology and Flowchart-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Xiao-Ou; Chung, Yufang; Liang, Ja-Der; Yang, Pei-Ming; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Lai, Feipei

    2013-01-01

    Background Because of the increased adoption rate of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, more health care records have been increasingly accumulating in clinical data repositories. Therefore, querying the data stored in these repositories is crucial for retrieving the knowledge from such large volumes of clinical data. Objective The aim of this study is to develop a Web-based approach for enriching the capabilities of the data-querying system along the three following considerations: (1) the interface design used for query formulation, (2) the representation of query results, and (3) the models used for formulating query criteria. Methods The Guideline Interchange Format version 3.5 (GLIF3.5), an ontology-driven clinical guideline representation language, was used for formulating the query tasks based on the GLIF3.5 flowchart in the Protégé environment. The flowchart-based data-querying model (FBDQM) query execution engine was developed and implemented for executing queries and presenting the results through a visual and graphical interface. To examine a broad variety of patient data, the clinical data generator was implemented to automatically generate the clinical data in the repository, and the generated data, thereby, were employed to evaluate the system. The accuracy and time performance of the system for three medical query tasks relevant to liver cancer were evaluated based on the clinical data generator in the experiments with varying numbers of patients. Results In this study, a prototype system was developed to test the feasibility of applying a methodology for building a query execution engine using FBDQMs by formulating query tasks using the existing GLIF. The FBDQM-based query execution engine was used to successfully retrieve the clinical data based on the query tasks formatted using the GLIF3.5 in the experiments with varying numbers of patients. The accuracy of the three queries (ie, “degree of liver damage,” “degree of liver damage

  6. Semantic similarity from natural language and ontology analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Harispe, Sébastien; Janaqi, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence federates numerous scientific fields in the aim of developing machines able to assist human operators performing complex treatments---most of which demand high cognitive skills (e.g. learning or decision processes). Central to this quest is to give machines the ability to estimate the likeness or similarity between things in the way human beings estimate the similarity between stimuli.In this context, this book focuses on semantic measures: approaches designed for comparing semantic entities such as units of language, e.g. words, sentences, or concepts and instances def

  7. OnWARD: ontology-driven web-based framework for multi-center clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van-Anh; Johnson, Nathan; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2011-12-01

    With a large percentage of clinical trials still using paper forms as the primary data collection tool, there is much potential for increasing efficiency through web-based data collection systems, especially for large-scale multi-center trials. This paper presents OnWARD, an ontology-driven, secure, rapidly-deployed, web-based framework supporting data capture for large-scale multi-center clinical research. Our approach is developed using the agile methodology to provide a flexible, user-centered dynamic form generator, which can be quickly deployed and customized for any clinical study without the need of deep technical expertise. Because of the flexible framework, the data management system can be extended to accommodate a large variety of data types, including genetic, genomic and proteomic data. In this paper, we demonstrate the initial deployment of OnWARD for a Phase II multi-center clinical trial after a development period of merely three months. The study utilizes 23 clinical report forms containing more than 1500 data points. Preliminary evaluation results show that OnWARD exceeded expectations of the clinical investigators in efficiency, flexibility and ease in setting up. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross-Cultural Language Learning and Web Design Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yong

    2015-01-01

    Accepting the fact that culture and language are interrelated in second language learning (SLL), the web sites should be designed to integrate with the cultural aspects. Yet many SLL web sites fail to integrate with the cultural aspects and/or focus on language acquisition only. This study identified three issues: (1) anthropologists'…

  9. The Functional Genetics of Handedness and Language Lateralization: Insights from Gene Ontology, Pathway and Disease Association Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Schmitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Handedness and language lateralization are partially determined by genetic influences. It has been estimated that at least 40 (and potentially more possibly interacting genes may influence the ontogenesis of hemispheric asymmetries. Recently, it has been suggested that analyzing the genetics of hemispheric asymmetries on the level of gene ontology sets, rather than at the level of individual genes, might be more informative for understanding the underlying functional cascades. Here, we performed gene ontology, pathway and disease association analyses on genes that have previously been associated with handedness and language lateralization. Significant gene ontology sets for handedness were anatomical structure development, pattern specification (especially asymmetry formation and biological regulation. Pathway analysis highlighted the importance of the TGF-beta signaling pathway for handedness ontogenesis. Significant gene ontology sets for language lateralization were responses to different stimuli, nervous system development, transport, signaling, and biological regulation. Despite the fact that some authors assume that handedness and language lateralization share a common ontogenetic basis, gene ontology sets barely overlap between phenotypes. Compared to genes involved in handedness, which mostly contribute to structural development, genes involved in language lateralization rather contribute to activity-dependent cognitive processes. Disease association analysis revealed associations of genes involved in handedness with diseases affecting the whole body, while genes involved in language lateralization were specifically engaged in mental and neurological diseases. These findings further support the idea that handedness and language lateralization are ontogenetically independent, complex phenotypes.

  10. Development of an Ontology for Occupational Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    When discussing a scientific domain, the use of a common language is required, particularly when communicating across disciplines. This common language, or ontology, is a prescribed vocabulary and a web of contextual relationships within the vocabulary that describe the given dom...

  11. Logical Characterisation of Ontology Construction using Fuzzy Description Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad; Götzsche, Hans

    had the extension of ontologies with Fuzzy Logic capabilities which plan to make proper backgrounds for ontology driven reasoning and argumentation on vague and imprecise domains. This presentation conceptualises learning from fuzzy classes using the Inductive Logic Programming framework. Then......, employs Description Logics in characterising and analysing fuzzy statements. And finally, provides a conceptual framework describing fuzzy concept learning in ontologies using the Inductive Logic Programming.......Ontologies based on Description Logics (DLs) have proved to be effective in formally sharing knowledge across semantic technologies, e.g. Semantic Web, Natural Language Processing, Text Analytics, Business intelligence. Our main goal is analysing ontology construction considering vagueness. We have...

  12. Ontological engineering versus metaphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataj, Emanuel; Tomanek, Roman; Mulawka, Jan

    2011-10-01

    It has been recognized that ontologies are a semantic version of world wide web and can be found in knowledge-based systems. A recent time survey of this field also suggest that practical artificial intelligence systems may be motivated by this research. Especially strong artificial intelligence as well as concept of homo computer can also benefit from their use. The main objective of this contribution is to present and review already created ontologies and identify the main advantages which derive such approach for knowledge management systems. We would like to present what ontological engineering borrows from metaphysics and what a feedback it can provide to natural language processing, simulations and modelling. The potential topics of further development from philosophical point of view is also underlined.

  13. CiTO, the Citation Typing Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    CiTO, the Citation Typing Ontology, is an ontology for describing the nature of reference citations in scientific research articles and other scholarly works, both to other such publications and also to Web information resources, and for publishing these descriptions on the Semantic Web. Citation are described in terms of the factual and rhetorical relationships between citing publication and cited publication, the in-text and global citation frequencies of each cited work, and the nature of the cited work itself, including its publication and peer review status. This paper describes CiTO and illustrates its usefulness both for the annotation of bibliographic reference lists and for the visualization of citation networks. The latest version of CiTO, which this paper describes, is CiTO Version 1.6, published on 19 March 2010. CiTO is written in the Web Ontology Language OWL, uses the namespace http://purl.org/net/cito/, and is available from http://purl.org/net/cito/. This site uses content negotiation to deliver to the user an OWLDoc Web version of the ontology if accessed via a Web browser, or the OWL ontology itself if accessed from an ontology management tool such as Protégé 4 (http://protege.stanford.edu/). Collaborative work is currently under way to harmonize CiTO with other ontologies describing bibliographies and the rhetorical structure of scientific discourse. PMID:20626926

  14. QuickGO: a user tutorial for the web-based Gene Ontology browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Rachael P; Binns, David; Dimmer, Emily; Barrell, Daniel; O'Donovan, Claire; Apweiler, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) has proven to be a valuable resource for functional annotation of gene products. At well over 27 000 terms, the descriptiveness of GO has increased rapidly in line with the biological data it represents. Therefore, it is vital to be able to easily and quickly mine the functional information that has been made available through these GO terms being associated with gene products. QuickGO is a fast, web-based tool for browsing the GO and all associated GO annotations provided by the GOA group. After undergoing a redevelopment, QuickGO is now able to offer many more features beyond simple browsing. Users have responded well to the new tool and given very positive feedback about its usefulness. This tutorial will demonstrate how some of these features could be useful to the researcher wanting to discover more about their dataset, particular areas of biology or to find new ways of directing their research.Database URL:http://www.ebi.ac.uk/QuickGO.

  15. COMPARISON OF METHODOLOGIES AND TOOLS FOR DEVELOPMENT AND USAGE OF ONTOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Senica, Boštjan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the following thesis is to compare existing approaches, methodologies and tools for ontology development as well as for its usage. Ontologies were exploited in computer science to enhance knowledge sharing and reuse. At the beginning of this thesis onotologies are described, the connection between ontology development and knowledge management is presented, and the vision of the Semantic Web is introduced. In addition ontology languages and their chronological development are de...

  16. Foundations of semantic web technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hitzler, Pascal; Rudolph, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    The Quest for Semantics Building Models Calculating with Knowledge Exchanging Information Semanic Web Technologies RESOURCE DESCRIPTION LANGUAGE (RDF)Simple Ontologies in RDF and RDF SchemaIntroduction to RDF Syntax for RDF Advanced Features Simple Ontologies in RDF Schema Encoding of Special Data Structures An ExampleRDF Formal Semantics Why Semantics? Model-Theoretic Semantics for RDF(S) Syntactic Reasoning with Deduction Rules The Semantic Limits of RDF(S)WEB ONTOLOGY LANGUAGE (OWL) Ontologies in OWL OWL Syntax and Intuitive Semantics OWL Species The Forthcoming OWL 2 StandardOWL Formal Sem

  17. WebQuests as Language-Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Selami

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a review of the literature that examines WebQuests as tools for second-language acquisition and foreign language-learning processes to guide teachers in their teaching activities and researchers in further research on the issue. The study first introduces the theoretical background behind WebQuest use in the mentioned…

  18. Communication and Gamification in the Web-Based Foreign Language Educational System: Web- Based Foreign Language Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Ilya V.; Volinsky, Alex A.; Nikulchev, Evgeny; Prasikova, Anna Y.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes development of the educational online web communication platform for teaching and learning foreign languages. The main objective was to develop a web application for teaching foreigners to understand casual fluent speech. The system is based on the time bank principle, allowing users to teach others their native language along…

  19. Planning with the Semantic Web by fusing Ontologies and Planning Domain Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Marco; Thompson, Simon

    In this paper we describe how we integrated ontological knowledge into a planning domain definition system. We claim that this approach has two main benefits: (i) from the user point of view, existing ontologies previously developed inside the company can be reused (ii) from the planning system point of view ontology semantics can be used to infer domain properties that are not explicitly represented by the user. The specific contribution described in this paper is the use of OWL semantics beyond subsumption to infer knowledge in the planning domain definition. We demonstrate how this is done and describe a system that can utilize the technique to solve practical problems.

  20. Pre-incident Analysis using Multigraphs and Faceted Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    TO GET TO GET BY DIVIDE angstrom atmosphere (normal) bar barn British thermal unit (thermochemical...currently several software products available for building software systems for sophisticated ontology merging. OWL is one of the most pervasive tools...terms and their relationships on the semantic web is the Web Ontology Language or OWL . (See http://www.w3.org/TR/owl2-overview/ for details

  1. Terminology Representation Guidelines for Biomedical Ontologies in the Semantic Web Notations

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Cui; Pathak, Jyotishman; Solbrig, Harold R.; Wei, Wei-Qi; Christopher G. Chute

    2012-01-01

    Terminologies and ontologies are increasingly prevalent in health-care and biomedicine. However they suffer from inconsistent renderings, distribution formats, and syntax that make applications through common terminologies services challenging. To address the problem, one could posit a shared representation syntax, associated schema, and tags. We identified a set of commonly-used elements in biomedical ontologies and terminologies based on our experience with the Common Terminology Services 2...

  2. Auf dem Weg zum Web 3.0: Taxonomien und Ontologien für die medizinische Ausbildung - eine systematische Literaturrecherche [Towards Web 3.0: Taxonomies and ontologies for medical education - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaum, Wolf E.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Both for curricular development and mapping, as well as for orientation within the mounting supply of learning resources in medical education, the Semantic Web ("Web 3.0" poses a low-threshold, effective tool that enables identification of content related items across system boundaries. Replacement of the currently required manual with an automatically generated link, which is based on content and semantics, requires the use of a suitably structured vocabulary for a machine-readable description of object content. Aim of this study is to compile the existing taxonomies and ontologies used for the annotation of medical content and learning resources, to compare those using selected criteria, and to verify their suitability in the context described above.Methods: Based on a systematic literature search, existing taxonomies and ontologies for the description of medical learning resources were identified. Through web searches and/or direct contact with the respective editors, each of the structured vocabularies thus identified were examined in regards to topic, structure, language, scope, maintenance, and technology of the taxonomy/ontology. In addition, suitability for use in the Semantic Web was verified.Results: Among 20 identified publications, 14 structured vocabularies were identified, which differed rather strongly in regards to language, scope, currency, and maintenance. None of the identified vocabularies fulfilled the necessary criteria for content description of medical curricula and learning resources in the German-speaking world. Discussion: While moving towards Web 3.0, a significant problem lies in the selection and use of an appropriate German vocabulary for the machine-readable description of object content. Possible solutions include development, translation and/or combination of existing vocabularies, possibly including partial translations of English vocabularies.[german] Einleitung: Sowohl für die

  3. Materiality, Language and the Production of Knowledge: Art, Subjectivity and Indigenous Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Barrett

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since all theories of knowing deal with the being of subjects, objects, instruments and environments, they can be viewed as onto-epistemological.  This chapter examines key ideas that emerge from the work of Julia Kristeva – 'the speaking subject', 'materiality of language' and 'heterogeneity' – to demonstrate how ontology and epistemology are inextricably entwined in knowledge production. Kristeva also affirms both the agency of matter and  the dimension of human/subjective agency implicated in cultural production. This is contrasted with Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s account creative practice. The article also draws on the artistic work of researcher-practitioner Brian Martin, and his account of the relationship between Indigenous Australian art and culture to demonstrate that in an Indigenous world view, the real, the immaterial, the imaginary and the representational occur concurrently.

  4. Implementation of an onto-wiki toolkit using web services to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of medical ontology co-authoring and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Adela S M

    2009-01-01

    The ICD11 draft was launched by the WHO in order to define ICD ontology by selected experts using a wiki-like structured joint-authoring tool. The challenge of this expert-/community-based ontology co-authoring is how to manage and process the ontology objects in the wiki page. The wiki-tools in the market require lots of time and human effort to organise, process and extract the ontology content from the wiki page for review and analysis. Therefore, this article is to investigate how to apply semantic web technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of ontology co-authoring and analysis. An onto-wiki toolkit that provides a set of web services is proposed for ontology creators to create, co-edit, organise, map and relate the wiki-like structured ontology objects on a wiki page for review and analysis. By using the onto-wiki toolkits, the pace of terminology standardisation, e-patient records integration, exchange and sharing can be improved.

  5. Semantic Web Ontology and Data Integration: a Case Study in Aiding Psychiatric Drug Repurposing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen; Sun, Jingchun; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    There remain significant difficulties selecting probable candidate drugs from existing databases. We describe an ontology-oriented approach to represent the nexus between genes, drugs, phenotypes, symptoms, and diseases from multiple information sources. We also report a case study in which we attempted to explore candidate drugs effective for bipolar disorder and epilepsy. We constructed an ontology incorporating knowledge between the two diseases and performed semantic reasoning tasks with the ontology. The results suggested 48 candidate drugs that hold promise for further breakthrough. The evaluation demonstrated the validity our approach. Our approach prioritizes the candidate drugs that have potential associations among genes, phenotypes and symptoms, and thus facilitates the data integration and drug repurposing in psychiatric disorders.

  6. Automatic Generation of OWL Ontology from XML Data Source

    CERN Document Server

    Yahia, Nora; Ahmed, AbdelWahab

    2012-01-01

    The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) can be used as data exchange format in different domains. It allows different parties to exchange data by providing common understanding of the basic concepts in the domain. XML covers the syntactic level, but lacks support for reasoning. Ontology can provide a semantic representation of domain knowledge which supports efficient reasoning and expressive power. One of the most popular ontology languages is the Web Ontology Language (OWL). It can represent domain knowledge using classes, properties, axioms and instances for the use in a distributed environment such as the World Wide Web. This paper presents a new method for automatic generation of OWL ontology from XML data sources.

  7. Web-Based English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarica, Gulcin Nagehan; Cavus, Nadire

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of another language is an advantage and it gives people to look at the world and in particular to the world's cultures with a broader perspective. Learning English as a second language is the process by which students learn it in addition to their native language. Today, internet is an important part of our lives as English. For this…

  8. Terminology representation guidelines for biomedical ontologies in the semantic web notations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; Pathak, Jyotishman; Solbrig, Harold R; Wei, Wei-Qi; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-02-01

    Terminologies and ontologies are increasingly prevalent in healthcare and biomedicine. However they suffer from inconsistent renderings, distribution formats, and syntax that make applications through common terminologies services challenging. To address the problem, one could posit a shared representation syntax, associated schema, and tags. We identified a set of commonly-used elements in biomedical ontologies and terminologies based on our experience with the Common Terminology Services 2 (CTS2) Specification as well as the Lexical Grid (LexGrid) project. We propose guidelines for precisely such a shared terminology model, and recommend tags assembled from SKOS, OWL, Dublin Core, RDF Schema, and DCMI meta-terms. We divide these guidelines into lexical information (e.g. synonyms, and definitions) and semantic information (e.g. hierarchies). The latter we distinguish for use by informal terminologies vs. formal ontologies. We then evaluate the guidelines with a spectrum of widely used terminologies and ontologies to examine how the lexical guidelines are implemented, and whether our proposed guidelines would enhance interoperability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tuning Ontology Interoperability

    OpenAIRE

    Giunchiglia, Fausto; Pan, Jeff Z.; Serafini, Luciano

    2005-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is the notion of ontology space, which allows us to move from an ontology-centric vision to a constellation-centric vision of the Web, where multiple ontologies and their interactions can be explicitly modeled and studied. This, in turn, allows us to study how OWL ontologies can interoperate, and, in particular, to provide two main results. The first is a formalization of the intended semantics of the OWL importing operator as opaque semantics. This result ...

  10. Light-Weighted Automatic Import of Standardized Ontologies into the Content Management System Drupal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Christoph; Uciteli, Alexandr; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    The amount of ontologies, which are utilizable for widespread domains, is growing steadily. BioPortal alone, embraces over 500 published ontologies with nearly 8 million classes. In contrast, the vast informative content of these ontologies is only directly intelligible by experts. To overcome this deficiency it could be possible to represent ontologies as web portals, which does not require knowledge about ontologies and their semantics, but still carries as much information as possible to the end-user. Furthermore, the conception of a complex web portal is a sophisticated process. Many entities must be analyzed and linked to existing terminologies. Ontologies are a decent solution for gathering and storing this complex data and dependencies. Hence, automated imports of ontologies into web portals could support both mentioned scenarios. The Content Management System (CMS) Drupal 8 is one of many solutions to develop web presentations with less required knowledge about programming languages and it is suitable to represent ontological entities. We developed the Drupal Upper Ontology (DUO), which models concepts of Drupal's architecture, such as nodes, vocabularies and links. DUO can be imported into ontologies to map their entities to Drupal's concepts. Because of Drupal's lack of import capabilities, we implemented the Simple Ontology Loader in Drupal (SOLID), a Drupal 8 module, which allows Drupal administrators to import ontologies based on DUO. Our module generates content in Drupal from existing ontologies and makes it accessible by the general public. Moreover Drupal offers a tagging system which may be amplified with multiple standardized and established terminologies by importing them with SOLID. Our Drupal module shows that ontologies can be used to model content of a CMS and vice versa CMS are suitable to represent ontologies in a user-friendly way. Ontological entities are presented to the user as discrete pages with all appropriate properties, links and

  11. Understanding and using the meaning of statements in a bio-ontology: recasting the Gene Ontology in OWL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranguren Mikel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bio-ontology community falls into two camps: first we have biology domain experts, who actually hold the knowledge we wish to capture in ontologies; second, we have ontology specialists, who hold knowledge about techniques and best practice on ontology development. In the bio-ontology domain, these two camps have often come into conflict, especially where pragmatism comes into conflict with perceived best practice. One of these areas is the insistence of computer scientists on a well-defined semantic basis for the Knowledge Representation language being used. In this article, we will first describe why this community is so insistent. Second, we will illustrate this by examining the semantics of the Web Ontology Language and the semantics placed on the Directed Acyclic Graph as used by the Gene Ontology. Finally we will reconcile the two representations, including the broader Open Biomedical Ontologies format. The ability to exchange between the two representations means that we can capitalise on the features of both languages. Such utility can only arise by the understanding of the semantics of the languages being used. By this illustration of the usefulness of a clear, well-defined language semantics, we wish to promote a wider understanding of the computer science perspective amongst potential users within the biological community.

  12. Experiences with Aber-OWL, an Ontology Repository with OWL EL Reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Slater, Luke

    2016-04-19

    Ontologies are widely used in biology and biomedicine for the annotation and integration of data, and hundreds of ontologies have been developed for this purpose. These ontologies also constitute large volumes of formalized domain knowledge, usually expressed in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). Computational access to the knowledge contained within them relies on the use of automated reasoning. We have developed Aber-OWL, an ontology repository that provides OWL EL reasoning to answer queries and verify the consistency of ontologies. Aber-OWL also provides a set of web services which provide ontology-based access to scientific literature in Pubmed and Pubmed Central, SPARQL query expansion to retrieve linked data, and integration with Bio2RDF. Here, we report on our experiences with Aber-OWL and outline a roadmap for future development. Aber-OWL is freely available at http://aber-owl.net.

  13. USING SEMANTIC WEB AND ONTOLOGIES TO CREATE INTELLIGENT AND PERSONALIZED SYSTEMS FOR LEARNING PURPOSES

    OpenAIRE

    Sungkur, Roopesh; Raheeman, Ibne; Musbally, Yusrah

    2016-01-01

    There was a time when it was thought that the more information someone has, the better it is. Nowadays, there has been a change in the mindset of people where what they want is meaningful and personalized information. The semantic web is an advancement of the current web that is being used, the web 2.0, which comprises mainly of metadata i.e. data about data. The semantic web is a new technology which is being developed and it is seen as the future web where everything will be much more accur...

  14. Practical ontologies for information professionals

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071712

    2016-01-01

    Practical Ontologies for Information Professionals provides an introduction to ontologies and their development, an essential tool for fighting back against information overload. The development of robust and widely used ontologies is an increasingly important tool in the fight against information overload. The publishing and sharing of explicit explanations for a wide variety of conceptualizations, in a machine readable format, has the power to both improve information retrieval and identify new knowledge. This new book provides an accessible introduction to the following: * What is an ontology? Defining the concept and why it is increasingly important to the information professional * Ontologies and the semantic web * Existing ontologies, such as SKOS, OWL, FOAF, schema.org, and the DBpedia Ontology * Adopting and building ontologies, showing how to avoid repetition of work and how to build a simple ontology with Protege * Interrogating semantic web ontologies * The future of ontologies and the role of the ...

  15. A Science Ontology for Goal Driven Datamining in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, E.; Thomas, B.; Teuben, P.; Huang, Z.

    2005-12-01

    An ontology, in the computer science sense, is a formal description of objects, their properties and the relationship between properties. Ontology based systems are able to reason and draw inferences. An important facility of ontological networks is an ability to calculate paths to find all paths that lead to a given goal. Ontology can be used to tag or describe data (tables, columns, rows, data files, etc) in a powerful new way that paves the way for high level query, ie. science based rather than datacentric. We will present the Science ontology in the Web Ontology Language (http://archive.astro.umd.edu/ont/Science.owl) and describe how it will be employed at the UMD Astronomical Data Center (http://adc.astro.umd.edu and http://archive.astro.umd.edu/archive) for goal driven datamining and metadata enhancement.

  16. NanoParticle Ontology for Cancer Nanotechnology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Data generated from cancer nanotechnology research are so diverse and large in volume that it is difficult to share and efficiently use them without informatics tools. In particular, ontologies that provide a unifying knowledge framework for annotating the data are required to facilitate the semantic integration, knowledge-based searching, unambiguous interpretation, mining and inferencing of the data using informatics methods. In this paper, we discuss the design and development of NanoParticle Ontology (NPO), which is developed within the framework of the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO), and implemented in the Ontology Web Language (OWL) using well-defined ontology design principles. The NPO was developed to represent knowledge underlying the preparation, chemical composition, and characterization of nanomaterials involved in cancer research. Public releases of the NPO are available through BioPortal website, maintained by the National Center for Biomedical Ontology. Mechanisms for editorial and governance processes are being developed for the maintenance, review, and growth of the NPO. PMID:20211274

  17. OWL 2 learn profile: an ontology sublanguage for the learning domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiyanthuduwage, Sudath R; Schwitter, Rolf; Orgun, Mehmet A

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental ontologies have been developed for the learning domain for use at different institutions. These ontologies include different OWL/OWL 2 (Web Ontology Language) constructors. However, it is not clear which OWL 2 constructors are the most appropriate ones for designing ontologies for the learning domain. It is possible that the constructors used in these learning domain ontologies match one of the three standard OWL 2 profiles (sublanguages). To investigate whether this is the case, we have analysed a corpus of 14 ontologies designed for the learning domain. We have also compared the constructors used in these ontologies with those of the OWL 2 RL profile, one of the OWL 2 standard profiles. The results of our analysis suggest that the OWL 2 constructors used in these ontologies do not exactly match the standard OWL 2 RL profile, but form a subset of that profile which we call OWL 2 Learn.

  18. Semantic query in a relational database using a local ontology construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed M.Sedighi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Semantic Web refers to a Web of linked data in which data can be shared and reused, allowing more uses than the traditional ‘Web of documents’. However, most of the information on the Web is stored in relational databases and such databases cannot be used by the Semantic Web. Relational databases can, however, be used to construct an ontology as the core of the Semantic Web. We propose a new approach which enables Semantic Web applications to access data actually stored in relational databases using a corresponding ontology. In our approach, domain ontologies can be used to formulate relational database queries in order to simplify the data access of the underlying data sources. The method we propose involves two main phases: the construction of a local ontology from a relational database and a semantic query in a relational database using relational database query language (RDQL. In the first phase, we construct a Web ontology language ontology from data in a relational database. In the second phase, we propose a technique to automatically extract the semantics of relational databases and transform this information into a representation that can be processed and understood by a machine. The method proposed is simulated and implemented using Jena and the simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Therefore, we propose RDQL as a real alternative to the commonly used structured query language access to relational databases.

  19. GOssTo: a stand-alone application and a web tool for calculating semantic similarities on the Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniza, Horacio; Romero, Alfonso E; Heron, Samuel; Yang, Haixuan; Devoto, Alessandra; Frasca, Marco; Mesiti, Marco; Valentini, Giorgio; Paccanaro, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    We present GOssTo, the Gene Ontology semantic similarity Tool, a user-friendly software system for calculating semantic similarities between gene products according to the Gene Ontology. GOssTo is bundled with six semantic similarity measures, including both term- and graph-based measures, and has extension capabilities to allow the user to add new similarities. Importantly, for any measure, GOssTo can also calculate the Random Walk Contribution that has been shown to greatly improve the accuracy of similarity measures. GOssTo is very fast, easy to use, and it allows the calculation of similarities on a genomic scale in a few minutes on a regular desktop machine. alberto@cs.rhul.ac.uk GOssTo is available both as a stand-alone application running on GNU/Linux, Windows and MacOS from www.paccanarolab.org/gossto and as a web application from www.paccanarolab.org/gosstoweb. The stand-alone application features a simple and concise command line interface for easy integration into high-throughput data processing pipelines. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. A Semantic Registry Method Using Sensor Metadata Ontology to Manage Heterogeneous Sensor Information in the Geospatial Sensor Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient information management and precise discovery of heterogeneous sensors in the Geospatial Sensor Web (GSW are a major challenge. Intelligent sensor management requires a registry service to store and process sensor information efficiently. In this paper, we propose a Sensor Metadata Ontology (SMO to achieve a unified semantic description for heterogeneous sensors that is used to express sensor semantics. Through mapping between the sensor registry information model and the SMO, the sensor metadata could be stored with semantic information for the registry. The framework of a Sensor Semantic Registry Service (SSRS has been successfully implemented for the registration and discovery of heterogeneous sensors. The results of GEOSENSOR-SSRS experiments show that the proposed semantic registry method can be used to enable sharing in an open distributed sensor network as well as to promote accuracy and efficiency of discovery.

  1. OBO and OWL: Leveraging Semantic Web Technologies for the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbreich, Christine; Horridge, Matthew; Horrocks, Ian; Motik, Boris; Shearer, Rob

    OBO is an ontology language that has often been used for modeling ontologies in the life sciences. Its definition is relatively informal, so, in this paper, we provide a clear specification for OBO syntax and semantics via a mapping to OWL. This mapping also allows us to apply existing Semantic Web tools and techniques to OBO. We show that Semantic Web reasoners can be used to efficiently reason with OBO ontologies. Furthermore, we show that grounding the OBO language in formal semantics is useful for the ontology development process: using an OWL reasoner, we detected a likely modeling error in one OBO ontology.

  2. Semantic framework for mapping object-oriented model to semantic web languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ježek, Petr; Mouček, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

  3. Semantic Framework for Mapping Object-Oriented Model to Semantic Web Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr eJezek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with and discusses two main approaches in building semantic structures for electrophysiological metadata. It is the use of conventional data structures, repositories, and programming languages on one hand and the use of formal representations of ontologies, known from knowledge representation, such as description logics or semantic web languages on the other hand. Although knowledge engineering offers languages supporting richer semantic means of expression and technological advanced approaches, conventional data structures and repositories are still popular among developers, administrators and users because of their simplicity, overall intelligibility, and lower demands on technical equipment. The choice of conventional data resources and repositories, however, raises the question of how and where to add semantics that cannot be naturally expressed using them. As one of the possible solutions, this semantics can be added into the structures of the programming language that accesses and processes the underlying data. To support this idea we introduced a software prototype that enables its users to add semantically richer expressions into a~Java object-oriented code. This approach does not burden users with additional demands on programming environment since reflective Java annotations were used as an entry for these expressions. Moreover, additional semantics need not to be written by the programmer directly to the code, but it can be collected from non-programmers using a graphic user interface. The mapping that allows the transformation of the semantically enriched Java code into the Semantic Web language OWL was proposed and implemented in a library named the Semantic Framework. This approach was validated by the integration of the Semantic Framework in the EEG/ERP Portal and by the subsequent registration of the EEG/ERP Portal in the Neuroscience Information Framework.

  4. The MMI Device Ontology: Enabling Sensor Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, C.; Galbraith, N.; Morris, R. A.; Bermudez, L. E.; Graybeal, J.; Arko, R. A.; Mmi Device Ontology Working Group

    2010-12-01

    The Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI) project has developed an ontology for devices to describe sensors and sensor networks. This ontology is implemented in the W3C Web Ontology Language (OWL) and provides an extensible conceptual model and controlled vocabularies for describing heterogeneous instrument types, with different data characteristics, and their attributes. It can help users populate metadata records for sensors; associate devices with their platforms, deployments, measurement capabilities and restrictions; aid in discovery of sensor data, both historic and real-time; and improve the interoperability of observational oceanographic data sets. We developed the MMI Device Ontology following a community-based approach. By building on and integrating other models and ontologies from related disciplines, we sought to facilitate semantic interoperability while avoiding duplication. Key concepts and insights from various communities, including the Open Geospatial Consortium (eg., SensorML and Observations and Measurements specifications), Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET), and W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group, have significantly enriched the development of the ontology. Individuals ranging from instrument designers, science data producers and consumers to ontology specialists and other technologists contributed to the work. Applications of the MMI Device Ontology are underway for several community use cases. These include vessel-mounted multibeam mapping sonars for the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program and description of diverse instruments on deepwater Ocean Reference Stations for the OceanSITES program. These trials involve creation of records completely describing instruments, either by individual instances or by manufacturer and model. Individual terms in the MMI Device Ontology can be referenced with their corresponding Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) in sensor-related metadata specifications (e

  5. The Ontological Key: Automatically Understanding and Integrating Forms to Access the Deep Web

    OpenAIRE

    Furche, Tim; Gottlob, Georg; Grasso, Giovanni; Guo, Xiaonan; Orsi, Giorgio; Schallhart, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Forms are our gates to the web. They enable us to access the deep content of web sites. Automatic form understanding provides applications, ranging from crawlers over meta-search engines to service integrators, with a key to this content. Yet, it has received little attention other than as component in specific applications such as crawlers or meta-search engines. No comprehensive approach to form understanding exists, let alone one that produces rich models for semantic services or integrati...

  6. Mining in Ontology with Multi Agent System in Semantic Web : A Novel Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Jain; Prasad, S. V. A. V.

    2014-01-01

    A large amount of data is present on the web. It contains huge number of web pages and to find suitable information from them is very cumbersome task. There is need to organize data in formal manner so that user can easily access and use them. To retrieve information from documents, there are many Information Retrieval (IR) techniques. Current IR techniques are not so advanced that they can be able to exploit semantic knowledge within documents and give precise results. IR technol...

  7. MyE-Wall: Design of a Web Portal Fully Customizable and Ontology Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Roggerone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Web is a measureless growing information source. Here we could have the common user that surf the web for fun, and the particular user surfing the web to work, for instance, the financial analyst that hopes to find some financial information.These users are similar in their habit to visit ever
    a pool of 10-15 websites where they are sure to find interesting information. In this paper, we introduce the architecture of a Rich Internet Application (RIA that uses the power of Semantics to create a new type of Web Portal fully customizable that we will call MyE-Wall. In this portal, the user can’t attach widget, but modules containing each one the section of a particular web site. Therefore, the idea is allow a user to create of a new website composed by a patchwork of different website’s sections selected by himself. Here we use semantics for two reasons: (i to process the structure of a particular website and create the corresponding module to attach on the portal (ii to provide the application of a set of features (reasoning engine, swrl rules, etc... to reason on the information collected, according the preferences that the user
    could have specified in his own profile.

  8. Toxicology ontology perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Apic, Gordana; Carthew, Philip; Clark, Dominic; Cook, David; Dix, Ian; Escher, Sylvia; Hastings, Janna; Heard, David J; Jeliazkova, Nina; Judson, Philip; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Shah, Imran; Spjuth, Ola; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Toldo, Luca; Watson, David; White, Andrew; Yang, Chihae

    2012-01-01

    The field of predictive toxicology requires the development of open, public, computable, standardized toxicology vocabularies and ontologies to support the applications required by in silico, in vitro, and in vivo toxicology methods and related analysis and reporting activities. In this article we review ontology developments based on a set of perspectives showing how ontologies are being used in predictive toxicology initiatives and applications. Perspectives on resources and initiatives reviewed include OpenTox, eTOX, Pistoia Alliance, ToxWiz, Virtual Liver, EU-ADR, BEL, ToxML, and Bioclipse. We also review existing ontology developments in neighboring fields that can contribute to establishing an ontological framework for predictive toxicology. A significant set of resources is already available to provide a foundation for an ontological framework for 21st century mechanistic-based toxicology research. Ontologies such as ToxWiz provide a basis for application to toxicology investigations, whereas other ontologies under development in the biological, chemical, and biomedical communities could be incorporated in an extended future framework. OpenTox has provided a semantic web framework for the implementation of such ontologies into software applications and linked data resources. Bioclipse developers have shown the benefit of interoperability obtained through ontology by being able to link their workbench application with remote OpenTox web services. Although these developments are promising, an increased international coordination of efforts is greatly needed to develop a more unified, standardized, and open toxicology ontology framework.

  9. Ontology or formal ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žáček, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Ontology or formal ontology? Which word is correct? The aim of this article is to introduce correct terms and explain their basis. Ontology describes a particular area of interest (domain) in a formal way - defines the classes of objects that are in that area, and relationships that may exist between them. Meaning of ontology consists mainly in facilitating communication between people, improve collaboration of software systems and in the improvement of systems engineering. Ontology in all these areas offer the possibility of unification of view, maintaining consistency and unambiguity.

  10. Reasoning and Ontologies for Personalized E-Learning in the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Nicola; Dolog, Peter; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The challenge of the semantic web is the provision of distributed information with well-defined meaning, understandable for different parties. Particularly, applications should be able to provide individually optimized access to information by taking the individual needs and requirements of the users into account. In this paper we propose a…

  11. COMM: Designing a Well-Founded Multimedia Ontology for the Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Arndt; R. Troncy (Raphael); S. Staab; L. Hardman (Lynda); M. Vacura; G. Schreiber; K. Aberer

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractSemantic descriptions of non-textual media available on the web can be used to facilitate retrieval and presentation of media assets and documents containing them. While technologies for multimedia semantic descriptions already exist, there is as yet no formal description of a high

  12. Unintended consequences of existential quantifications in biomedical ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeker Martin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO Foundry is a collection of freely available ontologically structured controlled vocabularies in the biomedical domain. Most of them are disseminated via both the OBO Flatfile Format and the semantic web format Web Ontology Language (OWL, which draws upon formal logic. Based on the interpretations underlying OWL description logics (OWL-DL semantics, we scrutinize the OWL-DL releases of OBO ontologies to assess whether their logical axioms correspond to the meaning intended by their authors. Results We analyzed ontologies and ontology cross products available via the OBO Foundry site http://www.obofoundry.org for existential restrictions (someValuesFrom, from which we examined a random sample of 2,836 clauses. According to a rating done by four experts, 23% of all existential restrictions in OBO Foundry candidate ontologies are suspicious (Cohens' κ = 0.78. We found a smaller proportion of existential restrictions in OBO Foundry cross products are suspicious, but in this case an accurate quantitative judgment is not possible due to a low inter-rater agreement (κ = 0.07. We identified several typical modeling problems, for which satisfactory ontology design patterns based on OWL-DL were proposed. We further describe several usability issues with OBO ontologies, including the lack of ontological commitment for several common terms, and the proliferation of domain-specific relations. Conclusions The current OWL releases of OBO Foundry (and Foundry candidate ontologies contain numerous assertions which do not properly describe the underlying biological reality, or are ambiguous and difficult to interpret. The solution is a better anchoring in upper ontologies and a restriction to relatively few, well defined relation types with given domain and range constraints.

  13. Benchmarking the Applicability of Ontology in Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachit Rajbhandari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Geographic Object-based Image Analysis (GEOBIA, identification of image objects is normally achieved using rule-based classification techniques supported by appropriate domain knowledge. However, GEOBIA currently lacks a systematic method to formalise the domain knowledge required for image object identification. Ontology provides a representation vocabulary for characterising domain-specific classes. This study proposes an ontological framework that conceptualises domain knowledge in order to support the application of rule-based classifications. The proposed ontological framework is tested with a landslide case study. The Web Ontology Language (OWL is used to construct an ontology in the landslide domain. The segmented image objects with extracted features are incorporated into the ontology as instances. The classification rules are written in Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL and executed using a semantic reasoner to assign instances to appropriate landslide classes. Machine learning techniques are used to predict new threshold values for feature attributes in the rules. Our framework is compared with published work on landslide detection where ontology was not used for the image classification. Our results demonstrate that a classification derived from the ontological framework accords with non-ontological methods. This study benchmarks the ontological method providing an alternative approach for image classification in the case study of landslides.

  14. A PATTERN LANGUAGE FOR REUSING WEB TEACHING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Bouz-Asal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet enables sharing of content between educators, which can reduce the time and effort needed to create custom teaching materials and improve the quality of students’ learning experiences. There are, however, significant obstacles to effective educational content sharing and reuse, especially in developing countries. To address this problem, we have taken a user-centric approach to discover and analyze teachers’ needs and to understand the main barriers to web content reuse among K-12 educators in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Based on this analysis, we have developed a novel pattern language for reusing web teaching materials.

  15. Classification of web resident sensor resources using latent semantic indexing and ontologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Majavu, W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available on the World Wide Web (WWW) requires structuring of web resources[1]. Large databases containing digital geospatial data make use of the Internet as a platform for distributing these data sets. The growing volumes of sensor data sets published... Moisture Content 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 Surface Moisture 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Desert Island Water 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Water Usage 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Surface Water Supply 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 Ice headings Sea Ice Concentration 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 Sea Ice Elevation 0 0 0 0 1 1 0...

  16. Constructive Ontology Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousan, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of the Semantic Web depends on ontologies for knowledge sharing, semantic annotation, data fusion, and descriptions of data for machine interpretation. However, ontologies are difficult to create and maintain. In addition, their structure and content may vary depending on the application and domain. Several methods described in…

  17. DMTO: a realistic ontology for standard diabetes mellitus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sappagh, Shaker; Kwak, Daehan; Ali, Farman; Kwak, Kyung-Sup

    2018-02-06

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex problem. A clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on massive and distributed electronic health record data can facilitate the automation of this process and enhance its accuracy. The most important component of any CDSS is its knowledge base. This knowledge base can be formulated using ontologies. The formal description logic of ontology supports the inference of hidden knowledge. Building a complete, coherent, consistent, interoperable, and sharable ontology is a challenge. This paper introduces the first version of the newly constructed Diabetes Mellitus Treatment Ontology (DMTO) as a basis for shared-semantics, domain-specific, standard, machine-readable, and interoperable knowledge relevant to T2DM treatment. It is a comprehensive ontology and provides the highest coverage and the most complete picture of coded knowledge about T2DM patients' current conditions, previous profiles, and T2DM-related aspects, including complications, symptoms, lab tests, interactions, treatment plan (TP) frameworks, and glucose-related diseases and medications. It adheres to the design principles recommended by the Open Biomedical Ontologies Foundry and is based on ontological realism that follows the principles of the Basic Formal Ontology and the Ontology for General Medical Science. DMTO is implemented under Protégé 5.0 in Web Ontology Language (OWL) 2 format and is publicly available through the National Center for Biomedical Ontology's BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/DMTO . The current version of DMTO includes more than 10,700 classes, 277 relations, 39,425 annotations, 214 semantic rules, and 62,974 axioms. We provide proof of concept for this approach to modeling TPs. The ontology is able to collect and analyze most features of T2DM as well as customize chronic TPs with the most appropriate drugs, foods, and physical exercises. DMTO is ready to be used as a knowledge base for

  18. Expert2OWL: A Methodology for Pattern-Based Ontology Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahar, Kais; Xu, Jie; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    The formalization of expert knowledge enables a broad spectrum of applications employing ontologies as underlying technology. These include eLearning, Semantic Web and expert systems. However, the manual construction of such ontologies is time-consuming and thus expensive. Moreover, experts are often unfamiliar with the syntax and semantics of formal ontology languages such as OWL and usually have no experience in developing formal ontologies. To overcome these barriers, we developed a new method and tool, called Expert2OWL that provides efficient features to support the construction of OWL ontologies using GFO (General Formal Ontology) as a top-level ontology. This method allows a close and effective collaboration between ontologists and domain experts. Essentially, this tool integrates Excel spreadsheets as part of a pattern-based ontology development and refinement process. Expert2OWL enables us to expedite the development process and modularize the resulting ontologies. We applied this method in the field of Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) and used Expert2OWL to automatically generate an accurate Chinese Herbology ontology (CHO). The expressivity of CHO was tested and evaluated using ontology query languages SPARQL and DL. CHO shows promising results and can generate answers to important scientific questions such as which Chinese herbal formulas contain which substances, which substances treat which diseases, and which ones are the most frequently used in CHM.

  19. From ontology selection and semantic web to an integrated information system for food-borne diseases and food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xianghe; Peng, Yun; Meng, Jianghong; Ruzante, Juliana; Fratamico, Pina M; Huang, Lihan; Juneja, Vijay; Needleman, David S

    2011-01-01

    Several factors have hindered effective use of information and resources related to food safety due to inconsistency among semantically heterogeneous data resources, lack of knowledge on profiling of food-borne pathogens, and knowledge gaps among research communities, government risk assessors/managers, and end-users of the information. This paper discusses technical aspects in the establishment of a comprehensive food safety information system consisting of the following steps: (a) computational collection and compiling publicly available information, including published pathogen genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data; (b) development of ontology libraries on food-borne pathogens and design automatic algorithms with formal inference and fuzzy and probabilistic reasoning to address the consistency and accuracy of distributed information resources (e.g., PulseNet, FoodNet, OutbreakNet, PubMed, NCBI, EMBL, and other online genetic databases and information); (c) integration of collected pathogen profiling data, Foodrisk.org ( http://www.foodrisk.org ), PMP, Combase, and other relevant information into a user-friendly, searchable, "homogeneous" information system available to scientists in academia, the food industry, and government agencies; and (d) development of a computational model in semantic web for greater adaptability and robustness.

  20. CELLO2GO: a web server for protein subCELlular LOcalization prediction with functional gene ontology annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Sheng Yu

    Full Text Available CELLO2GO (http://cello.life.nctu.edu.tw/cello2go/ is a publicly available, web-based system for screening various properties of a targeted protein and its subcellular localization. Herein, we describe how this platform is used to obtain a brief or detailed gene ontology (GO-type categories, including subcellular localization(s, for the queried proteins by combining the CELLO localization-predicting and BLAST homology-searching approaches. Given a query protein sequence, CELLO2GO uses BLAST to search for homologous sequences that are GO annotated in an in-house database derived from the UniProt KnowledgeBase database. At the same time, CELLO attempts predict at least one subcellular localization on the basis of the species in which the protein is found. When homologs for the query sequence have been identified, the number of terms found for each of their GO categories, i.e., cellular compartment, molecular function, and biological process, are summed and presented as pie charts representing possible functional annotations for the queried protein. Although the experimental subcellular localization of a protein may not be known, and thus not annotated, CELLO can confidentially suggest a subcellular localization. CELLO2GO should be a useful tool for research involving complex subcellular systems because it combines CELLO and BLAST into one platform and its output is easily manipulated such that the user-specific questions may be readily addressed.

  1. Voice-enabled Knowledge Engine using Flood Ontology and Natural Language Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermet, M. Y.; Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The IFIS is designed for use by general public, often people with no domain knowledge and limited general science background. To improve effective communication with such audience, we have introduced a voice-enabled knowledge engine on flood related issues in IFIS. Instead of navigating within many features and interfaces of the information system and web-based sources, the system provides dynamic computations based on a collection of built-in data, analysis, and methods. The IFIS Knowledge Engine connects to real-time stream gauges, in-house data sources, analysis and visualization tools to answer natural language questions. Our goal is the systematization of data and modeling results on flood related issues in Iowa, and to provide an interface for definitive answers to factual queries. The goal of the knowledge engine is to make all flood related knowledge in Iowa easily accessible to everyone, and support voice-enabled natural language input. We aim to integrate and curate all flood related data, implement analytical and visualization tools, and make it possible to compute answers from questions. The IFIS explicitly implements analytical methods and models, as algorithms, and curates all flood related data and resources so that all these resources are computable. The IFIS Knowledge Engine computes the answer by deriving it from its computational knowledge base. The knowledge engine processes the statement, access data warehouse, run complex database queries on the server-side and return outputs in various formats. This presentation provides an overview of IFIS Knowledge Engine, its unique information interface and functionality as an educational tool, and discusses the future plans

  2. What Four Million Mappings Can Tell You about Two Hundred Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazvinian, Amir; Noy, Natalya F.; Jonquet, Clement; Shah, Nigam; Musen, Mark A.

    The field of biomedicine has embraced the Semantic Web probably more than any other field. As a result, there is a large number of biomedical ontologies covering overlapping areas of the field. We have developed BioPortal—an open community-based repository of biomedical ontologies. We analyzed ontologies and terminologies in BioPortal and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), creating more than 4 million mappings between concepts in these ontologies and terminologies based on the lexical similarity of concept names and synonyms. We then analyzed the mappings and what they tell us about the ontologies themselves, the structure of the ontology repository, and the ways in which the mappings can help in the process of ontology design and evaluation. For example, we can use the mappings to guide users who are new to a field to the most pertinent ontologies in that field, to identify areas of the domain that are not covered sufficiently by the ontologies in the repository, and to identify which ontologies will serve well as background knowledge in domain-specific tools. While we used a specific (but large) ontology repository for the study, we believe that the lessons we learned about the value of a large-scale set of mappings to ontology users and developers are general and apply in many other domains.

  3. Fuzzy ontologies for semantic interpretation of remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerriri, Khelifa; Malki, Mimoun

    2015-10-01

    Object-based image classification consists in the assignment of object that share similar attributes to object categories. To perform such a task the remote sensing expert uses its personal knowledge, which is rarely formalized. Ontologies have been proposed as solution to represent domain knowledge agreed by domain experts in a formal and machine readable language. Classical ontology languages are not appropriate to deal with imprecision or vagueness in knowledge. Fortunately, Description Logics for the semantic web has been enhanced by various approaches to handle such knowledge. This paper presents the extension of the traditional ontology-based interpretation with fuzzy ontology of main land-cover classes in Landsat8-OLI scenes (vegetation, built-up areas, water bodies, shadow, clouds, forests) objects. A good classification of image objects was obtained and the results highlight the potential of the method to be replicated over time and space in the perspective of transferability of the procedure.

  4. A Process for the Representation of openEHR ADL Archetypes in OWL Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porn, Alex Mateus; Peres, Leticia Mara; Didonet Del Fabro, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    ADL is a formal language to express archetypes, independent of standards or domain. However, its specification is not precise enough in relation to the specialization and semantic of archetypes, presenting difficulties in implementation and a few available tools. Archetypes may be implemented using other languages such as XML or OWL, increasing integration with Semantic Web tools. Exchanging and transforming data can be better implemented with semantics oriented models, for example using OWL which is a language to define and instantiate Web ontologies defined by W3C. OWL permits defining significant, detailed, precise and consistent distinctions among classes, properties and relations by the user, ensuring the consistency of knowledge than using ADL techniques. This paper presents a process of an openEHR ADL archetypes representation in OWL ontologies. This process consists of ADL archetypes conversion in OWL ontologies and validation of OWL resultant ontologies using the mutation test.

  5. What's in a code? Towards a formal account of the relation of ontologies and coding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Alan L

    2007-01-01

    Terminologies are increasingly based on "ontologies" developed in description logics and related languages such as the new Web Ontology Language, OWL. The use of description logic has been expected to reduce ambiguity and make it easier determine logical equivalence, deal with negation, and specify EHRs. However, this promise has not been fully realised: in part because early description logics were relatively inexpressive, in part, because the relation between coding systems, EHRs, and ontologies expressed in description logics has not been fully understood. This paper presents a unifying approach using the expressive formalisms available in the latest version of OWL, OWL 1.1.

  6. Language Learning: The Merge of Teletandem and Web 2.0 Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Ellis, Carla; Ellis, Jason Brent; Carle, Abbie; Blevens, Jared; Decker, Aline; Carvalho, Leticia; Macedo, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The following action research provides an overview of student's perceptions of the incorporation of Web 2.0 technologies into in-tandem language learning activities. American and Brazilian college students were partnered in order to work in-tandem through pre-determined language activities using Web 2.0 technologies to learn a second language,…

  7. Semantic SenseLab: Implementing the vision of the Semantic Web in neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwald, Matthias; Chen, Huajun; Ruttenberg, Alan; Lim, Ernest; Marenco, Luis; Miller, Perry; Shepherd, Gordon; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2010-01-01

    Integrative neuroscience research needs a scalable informatics framework that enables semantic integration of diverse types of neuroscience data. This paper describes the use of the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and other Semantic Web technologies for the representation and integration of molecular-level data provided by several of SenseLab suite of neuroscience databases. Based on the original database structure, we semi-automatically translated the databases into OWL ontologies with manual addition of semantic enrichment. The SenseLab ontologies are extensively linked to other biomedical Semantic Web resources, including the Subcellular Anatomy Ontology, Brain Architecture Management System, the Gene Ontology, BIRNLex and UniProt. The SenseLab ontologies have also been mapped to the Basic Formal Ontology and Relation Ontology, which helps ease interoperability with many other existing and future biomedical ontologies for the Semantic Web. In addition, approaches to representing contradictory research statements are described. The SenseLab ontologies are designed for use on the Semantic Web that enables their integration into a growing collection of biomedical information resources. We demonstrate that our approach can yield significant potential benefits and that the Semantic Web is rapidly becoming mature enough to realize its anticipated promises. The ontologies are available online at http://neuroweb.med.yale.edu/senselab/. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Context-dependent Reasoning for the Semantic Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neli P. Zlatareva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies are the backbone of the emerging Semantic Web, which is envisioned to dramatically improve current web services by extending them with intelligent capabilities such as reasoning and context-awareness. They define a shared vocabulary of common domains accessible to both, humans and computers, and support various types of information management including storage and processing of data. Current ontology languages, which are designed to be decidable to allow for automatic data processing, target simple typed ontologies that are completely and consistently specified. As the size of ontologies and the complexity of web applications grow, the need for more flexible representation and reasoning schemes emerges. This article presents a logical framework utilizing context-dependent rules which are intended to support not fully and/or precisely specified ontologies. A hypothetical application scenario is described to illustrate the type of ontologies targeted, and the type of queries that the presented logical framework is intended to address.

  9. Standardized description of scientific evidence using the Evidence Ontology (ECO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibucos, Marcus C; Mungall, Christopher J; Balakrishnan, Rama; Christie, Karen R; Huntley, Rachael P; White, Owen; Blake, Judith A; Lewis, Suzanna E; Giglio, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The Evidence Ontology (ECO) is a structured, controlled vocabulary for capturing evidence in biological research. ECO includes diverse terms for categorizing evidence that supports annotation assertions including experimental types, computational methods, author statements and curator inferences. Using ECO, annotation assertions can be distinguished according to the evidence they are based on such as those made by curators versus those automatically computed or those made via high-throughput data review versus single test experiments. Originally created for capturing evidence associated with Gene Ontology annotations, ECO is now used in other capacities by many additional annotation resources including UniProt, Mouse Genome Informatics, Saccharomyces Genome Database, PomBase, the Protein Information Resource and others. Information on the development and use of ECO can be found at http://evidenceontology.org. The ontology is freely available under Creative Commons license (CC BY-SA 3.0), and can be downloaded in both Open Biological Ontologies and Web Ontology Language formats at http://code.google.com/p/evidenceontology. Also at this site is a tracker for user submission of term requests and questions. ECO remains under active development in response to user-requested terms and in collaborations with other ontologies and database resources. Database URL: Evidence Ontology Web site: http://evidenceontology.org. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Didactical Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Mencke, Reiner Dumke

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies are a fundamental concept of theSemantic Web envisioned by Tim Berners-Lee [1]. Togetherwith explicit representation of the semantics of data formachine-accessibility such domain theories are the basis forintelligent next generation applications for the web andother areas of interest [2]. Their application for specialaspects within the domain of e-learning is often proposed tosupport the increasing complexity ([3], [4], [5], [6]. So theycan provide a better support for course generation orlearning scenario description [7]. By the modeling ofdidactics-related expertise and their provision for thecreators of courses many improvements like reuse, rapiddevelopment and of course increased learning performancebecome possible due to the separation from other aspects ofe-learning platforms as already proposed in [8].

  11. Language use in Pro-Anorectic web communities

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Tim Kistrup; Ravn, Sidsel; Memic, Inda; Jensen, Maja Bogø

    2010-01-01

    This study treats how online pro-anorectic communities use language to position themselves and fortify their own position in relation to the surrounding society. We have chosen to work with data from the webpage www.ana-beauty.webs.com. Out theory consists of Norman Fairclough’s model for Critical Discourse Analysis, Dick Hebdige’s theory on subculture and Social Identity Theory. These theories are accounted for, and next we apply Fairclough’s model for Critical Discourse Analysis to our sel...

  12. Integrating Mathematics, Science, and Language Arts Instruction Using the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kenneth; Hosticka, Alice; Kent, Judi; Browne, Ron

    1998-01-01

    Addresses issues of access to World Wide Web sites, mathematics and science content-resources available on the Web, and methods for integrating mathematics, science, and language arts instruction. (Author/ASK)

  13. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  14. Healthcare knowledge acquisition: an ontology-based approach using the extensible markup language (XML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Y N; Abidi, S S

    2000-01-01

    The healthcare enterprise requires a great deal of knowledge to maintain premium efficiency in the delivery of quality healthcare. We employ Knowledge Management based knowledge acquisition strategies to procure 'tacit' healthcare knowledge from experienced healthcare practitioners. Situational, problem-specific Scenarios are proposed as viable knowledge acquisition and representation constructs. We present a healthcare Tacit Knowledge Acquisition Info-structure (TKAI) that allows remote healthcare practitioners to record their tacit knowledge. TKAI employs (a) ontologies for standardisation of tacit knowledge and (b) XML to represent scenario instances for their transfer over the Internet to the server-side Scenario-Base and for the global sharing of acquired tacit healthcare knowledge.

  15. Ontology-Driven Information Extraction with OntoSyphon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDowell, Luke K; Cafarella, Michael

    2006-01-01

    .... OntoSyphon operates in an "ontology-driven" manner: taking any ontology as input, OntoSyphon uses the ontology to specify web searches that identify possible semantic instances, relations, and taxonomic information...

  16. Semantic Web Technologies for the Adaptive Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Ontologies and reasoning are the key terms brought into focus by the semantic web community. Formal representation of ontologies in a common data model on the web can be taken as a foundation for adaptive web technologies as well. This chapter describes how ontologies shared on the semantic web p...... are crucial to be formalized by the semantic web ontologies for adaptive web. We use examples from an eLearning domain to illustrate the principles which are broadly applicable to any information domain on the web.......Ontologies and reasoning are the key terms brought into focus by the semantic web community. Formal representation of ontologies in a common data model on the web can be taken as a foundation for adaptive web technologies as well. This chapter describes how ontologies shared on the semantic web...

  17. Cohesion Metrics for Ontology Design and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Haining Yao; Anthony M. Orme; Letha Etzkorn

    2005-01-01

    Recently, domain specific ontology development has been driven by research on the Semantic Web. Ontologies have been suggested for use in many application areas targeted by the Semantic Web, such as dynamic web service composition and general web service matching. Fundamental characteristics of these ontologies must be determined in order to effectively make use of them: for example, Sirin, Hendler and Parsia have suggested that determining fundamental characteristics...

  18. Survey on Ontology Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junwu

    To create a sharable semantic space in which the terms from different domain ontology or knowledge system, Ontology mapping become a hot research point in Semantic Web Community. In this paper, motivated factors of ontology mapping research are given firstly, and then 5 dominating theories and methods, such as information accessing technology, machine learning, linguistics, structure graph and similarity, are illustrated according their technology class. Before we analyses the new requirements and takes a long view, the contributions of these theories and methods are summarized in details. At last, this paper suggest to design a group of semantic connector with the ability of migration learning for OWL-2 extended with constrains and the ontology mapping theory of axiom, so as to provide a new methodology for ontology mapping.

  19. WEB ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING (WALL AND LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (LMS IN VIRTUAL CENTRES FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Ruiperez

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The Web has had different uses in the teaching of modern languages: (a as a source of resources: In a very short time, the Web has become the largest source of resources for the learning of any foreign language; (b as a window of multimedia applications (in this way CD-ROM is replaced by the Web as the main means of storage of multimedia applications.; and (c as an e-learning platform. For an institution to create a Virtual Centre for Foreign Language Learning, certain software must be installed in a computer connected to the Internet. This software is called a Learnig Management Systein (LMS. Apart from the basic functions of the majority of the LMS, we should mention the advanced functions of the LMS: voice chats, digital television channel. mobile telephone services. WAP complementary services and access to the LMS through electronic pocket diaries (PDA. There are many comparative studies of LMS, carried out by consultants, specialist magazines, etc. Despite the proliferation of comparative studies of LMS. they have hardly considered the specific features of CALL software, in which the functions that pronote sound interaction should be more advanced. On the other hand, the subject of standards Iias become relevant. It is logical that the user who introduces contents into a given LMS would want the guarantee of being able to use those contents within another LMS.

  20. An Ontology-Based Approach for Evaluating the Domain Appropriateness and Comprehensibility Approprateness of Modeling Languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, G.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; van Sinderen, Marten J.

    In this paper we present a framework for the evaluation and (re)design of modeling languages. We focus here on the evaluation of the suitability of a language to model a set or real-world phenomena in a given domain. In our approach, this property can be systematically evaluated by comparing the

  1. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Mark A. Musen; Natalya F. Noy; Shah, Nigam H.; Patricia L. Whetzel; Christopher G. Chute; Story, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry

    2011-01-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology is now in its seventh year. The goals of this National Center for Biomedical Computing are to: create and maintain a repository of biomedical ontologies and terminologies; build tools and web services to enable the use of ontologies and terminologies in clinical and translational research; educate their trainees and the scientific community broadly about biomedical ontology and ontology-based technology and best practices; and collaborate with a var...

  2. Semantic Cooperation and Knowledge Reuse by Using Autonomous Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuting; Wang, Kewen; Topor, Rodney; Pan, Jeff Z.; Giunchiglia, Fausto

    Several proposals have been put forward to support distributed agent cooperation in the Semantic Web, by allowing concepts and roles in one ontology be reused in another ontology. In general, these proposals reduce the autonomy of each ontology by defining the semantics of the ontology to depend on the semantics of the other ontologies.

  3. Uso de ontologías y web semántica para apoyar la gestión del conocimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Efigenia Sandoval Cantor

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Los servicios web semánticos son aplicaciones componentes de la Web 2.0, se consolidan como una evolución de los servicios web tradicionales, al estar enriquecidos con descrip-tores que permiten especializar las búsquedas de información, según el signifi cado y enfo-cadas en las necesidades del usuario. Las ontologías son fundamentos semánticos que tienen algunas aplicaciones prácticas desarrolladas en las ciencias de la salud y la fi losofía, especialmente.Los Servicios Web se han consolidado como una tecnología esencial para la cooperación en Internet, pero requieren mecanismos para su integración, estableciéndose como he-rramienta tecnológica que contribuya a la globalización y gestión del conocimiento en las actividades organizacionales o en el campo de la investigación, con servicios que mejoren los tiempos de respuesta a los usuarios, en términos de búsquedas efi cientes y rápidas. Esta Web extendida se apoya en lenguajes universales como la lógica descriptiva, los agentes inteligentes y las ontologías, resolviendo las carencias semánticas que hoy hacen difícil y dispendioso el acceso a la información en Internet.Mientras los estándares relacionados con la composición o colaboración de Servicios Web dan un primer acercamiento, su convergencia con las tecnologías actuales, ofrecen un gran panorama hacia la obtención de un entorno en el cual la búsqueda, efectividad y eje-cución de servicios sea completamente automatizada. De acuerdo a lo anterior, la Web Semántica es una Web perfeccionada, dotada de mayor signifi cado con el cual, cualquier usuario en Internet podrá encontrar respuestas a sus pre-guntas de forma más rápida y sencilla, gracias a una mejor defi nición de la informació

  4. Source Code Plagiarism Detection Method Using Protégé Built Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion SMEUREANU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Software plagiarism is a growing and serious problem that affects computer science universities in particular and the quality of education in general. More and more students tend to copy their thesis’s software from older theses or internet databases. Checking source codes manually, to detect if they are similar or the same, is a laborious and time consuming job, maybe even impossible due to existence of large digital repositories. Ontology is a way of describing a document’s semantic, so it can be easily used for source code files too. OWL Web Ontology Language could find its applicability in describing both vocabulary and taxonomy of a programming language source code. SPARQL is a query language based on SQL that extracts saved or deducted information from ontologies. Our paper proposes a source code plagiarism detection method, based on ontologies created using Protégé editor, which can be applied in scanning students' theses' software source code.

  5. Effects of Locus of Control and Learner-Control on Web-Based Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Mei; Ho, Chiung-Mei

    2009-01-01

    The study explored the effects of students' locus of control and types of control over instruction on their self-efficacy and performance in a web-based language learning environment. A web-based interactive instructional program focusing on the comprehension of news articles for English language learners was developed in two versions: learner-…

  6. Conceptual querying through ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    We present here ail approach to conceptual querying where the aim is, given a collection of textual database objects or documents, to target an abstraction of the entire database content in terms of the concepts appearing in documents, rather than the documents in the collection. The approach...... is motivated by an obvious need for users to survey huge volumes of objects in query answers. An ontology formalism and a special notion of-instantiated ontology" are introduced. The latter is a structure reflecting the content in the document collection in that; it is a restriction of a general world...... knowledge ontology to the concepts instantiated in the collection. The notion of ontology-based similarity is briefly described, language constructs for direct navigation and retrieval of concepts in the ontology are discussed and approaches to conceptual summarization are presented....

  7. Combining Ontologies with Domain Specific Languages: A Case Study from Network Configuration Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksa, Krzysztof; Sabina, Pawel; Kasztelnik, Marek

    One of the important aspects of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) is to consider application-domain variability, which leads to creation of Domain Specific Languages (DSL). As with DSLs models are concise, easy to understand and maintain, this approach greatly increases the productivity and software quality. Usually, the DSLs in MDE are described with a metamodel and a concrete syntax definition. The models expressed in the DSL are linguistic instantiations of the language concepts found in the metamodel.

  8. Ontology Based Access Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgü CAN

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As computer technologies become pervasive, the need for access control mechanisms grow. The purpose of an access control is to limit the operations that a computer system user can perform. Thus, access control ensures to prevent an activity which can lead to a security breach. For the success of Semantic Web, that allows machines to share and reuse the information by using formal semantics for machines to communicate with other machines, access control mechanisms are needed. Access control mechanism indicates certain constraints which must be achieved by the user before performing an operation to provide a secure Semantic Web. In this work, unlike traditional access control mechanisms, an "Ontology Based Access Control" mechanism has been developed by using Semantic Web based policies. In this mechanism, ontologies are used to model the access control knowledge and domain knowledge is used to create policy ontologies.

  9. Ontological problems of contemporary linguistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А В Бондаренко

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The article studies linguistic ontology problems such as evolution of essential-existential views of language, interrelation within Being-Language-Man triad, linguistics gnosiological principles, language essence localization, and «expression» as language metalinguistic unit as well as architectonics of language personality et alia.

  10. Towards Ontological Foundations for UML Conceptual Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, Giancarlo; Herre, Heinrich; Wagner, Gerd; Meerman, Robert; Tari, Zahir

    2002-01-01

    UML class diagrams can be used as a language for expressing a conceptual model of a domain. We use the General Ontological Language (GOL) and its underlying upper level ontology, proposed in [1], to evaluate the ontological correctness of a conceptual UML class model and to develop guidelines for

  11. Materials Ontology: An Infrastructure for Exchanging Materials Information and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Ashino

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have rich information resources for materials science and engineering - raw measurement data, computational simulation methods, digitized handbooks, and digital libraries. However, these resources have a wide variety of formats, terminologies, and concepts, which makes it difficult to find appropriate information for materials design, development, and evaluation. One solution to this problem is to integrate these resources into a computer readable concept map, called a domain ontology, which describes concepts and relationships among the concepts in materials science and engineering. This paper describes a trial that constructs a standard of metadata description using ontology language and demonstrates the validity of this construction through data exchange among heterogeneous material databases. "Materials Ontology," which consists of several sub ontologies corresponding to substance, process, environment, and property, is developed using the ontology language of the Semantic Web, OWL, which enables the definition of a flexible and detailed structure of materials information. A versatile "materials data format" is built on the Materials Ontology as a component of the materials information platform and is applied to exchange data among three different thermal property databases, maintained by two major materials science research institutes in Japan.

  12. Part-of relations in anatomy ontologies: a proposal for RDFS and OWL formalisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, J S; Webber, B L; Bard, J B L

    2004-01-01

    Part-of relations are central to anatomy. However, the definition, formalisation and use of part-of in anatomy ontologies is problematic. This paper surveys existing formal approaches, as well as the use of part-of in the Open Biological Ontologies (OBO) anatomies of model species. Based on this analysis, we propose a minimal ontology for anatomy which is expressed in the Semantic Web languages RDFS and OWL-Full. The paper concludes with a description of the context of this work in capturing cross-species tissue homologies and analogies.

  13. Using a foundational ontology to investigate the semantics behind the concepts of the i* language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi-Silva Souza, R.; Franch, Xavier; Guizzardi, G.; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Castro, J.; Horkhoff, J.; Maiden, N.; Yu, E.

    In the past few years, the community that develops i* has become aware of the problem of having so many variants, since it makes it difficult for newcomers to learn how to use the language and even to experts to efficiently exchange knowledge and disseminate their proposals. Moreover, this problem

  14. Gellish : A generic extensible ontological language - design and application of a universal data structure -

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Renssen, A.S.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Since long data storage and data communication lack a common standard universal data model as well as a common data language for the application domains of database users. This hampers data communication between systems and causes costly data conversion processes. Various solutions have been

  15. Paradoxes of Social Networking in a Structured Web 2.0 Language Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Mathieu; Zourou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This paper critically inquires into social networking as a set of mechanisms and associated practices developed in a structured Web 2.0 language learning community. This type of community can be roughly described as learning spaces featuring (more or less) structured language learning resources displaying at least some notions of language learning…

  16. Ontology Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, J.; Palma, R.; Gómez-Pérez, A.

    2009-01-01

    The growing use and application of ontologies in the last years has led to an increased interest of researchers and practitioners in the development of ontologies, either from scratch o by reusing existing ones. ...

  17. Using Semantic Web technologies to bridge the Language Gap between Academia and Industry in the Construction Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, M.; El-Hasia, A.; Lees, M.

    Semantic Web technologies are emerging technologies which can considerably improve the information sharing process by overcoming the problems of current Web portals. Portals based on Semantic Web technologies represent the next generation of Web portals, however, before industry is willing to adopt Semantic Web technologies it is essential to demonstrate that Semantic Web portals are significantly better than Web portals. This paper focuses on a case study which compares the performance of a traditional Web portal using a keyword-based search engine and a Semantic Web portal using an ontology-based search engine. The empirical results of the comparison performed between these two search engines over an input data set of 100 data provides strong evidence of the tangible benefits of using Semantic Web technologies.

  18. OPPL-Galaxy, a Galaxy tool for enhancing ontology exploitation as part of bioinformatics workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomedical ontologies are key elements for building up the Life Sciences Semantic Web. Reusing and building biomedical ontologies requires flexible and versatile tools to manipulate them efficiently, in particular for enriching their axiomatic content. The Ontology Pre Processor Language (OPPL) is an OWL-based language for automating the changes to be performed in an ontology. OPPL augments the ontologists’ toolbox by providing a more efficient, and less error-prone, mechanism for enriching a biomedical ontology than that obtained by a manual treatment. Results We present OPPL-Galaxy, a wrapper for using OPPL within Galaxy. The functionality delivered by OPPL (i.e. automated ontology manipulation) can be combined with the tools and workflows devised within the Galaxy framework, resulting in an enhancement of OPPL. Use cases are provided in order to demonstrate OPPL-Galaxy’s capability for enriching, modifying and querying biomedical ontologies. Conclusions Coupling OPPL-Galaxy with other bioinformatics tools of the Galaxy framework results in a system that is more than the sum of its parts. OPPL-Galaxy opens a new dimension of analyses and exploitation of biomedical ontologies, including automated reasoning, paving the way towards advanced biological data analyses. PMID:23286517

  19. Ontology-based Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styltsvig, Henrik Bulskov

    In this thesis, we will present methods for introducing ontologies in information retrieval. The main hypothesis is that the inclusion of conceptual knowledge such as ontologies in the information retrieval process can contribute to the solution of major problems currently found in information...... retrieval. This utilization of ontologies has a number of challenges. Our focus is on the use of similarity measures derived from the knowledge about relations between concepts in ontologies, the recognition of semantic information in texts and the mapping of this knowledge into the ontologies in use......, as well as how to fuse together the ideas of ontological similarity and ontological indexing into a realistic information retrieval scenario. To achieve the recognition of semantic knowledge in a text, shallow natural language processing is used during indexing that reveals knowledge to the level of noun...

  20. The Semantic Web: The roles of XML and RDF.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decker, S.; Melnik, S.; van Harmelen, F.A.H.; Fensel, D.A.; Klein, M.; Broekstra, J.; Erdmann, M.; Horrocks, I.

    2000-01-01

    The role of ontologies in the architecture of the Semantic Web was described. Extensible markup language (XML) and resource description framework (RDF) are the current standards for establishing semantic interoperability on the Web, but XML addresses only document structure. RDF better facilitates

  1. Mapping of Core Components Based e-Business Standards into Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalenić, Ivan; Vrdoljak, Boris; Schatten, Markus

    A mapping of Core Components specification based e-business standards to an ontology is presented. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) is used for ontology development. In order to preserve the existing hierarchy of the standards, an emphasis is put on the mapping of Core Components elements to specific constructs in OWL. The main purpose of developing an e-business standards' ontology is to create a foundation for an automated mapping system that would be able to convert concepts from various standards in an independent fashion. The practical applicability and verification of the presented mappings is tested on the mapping of Universal Business Language version 2.0 and Cross Industry Invoice version 2.0 to OWL.

  2. Human Computer Collaboration at the Edge: Enhancing Collective Situation Understanding with Controlled Natural Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-06

    approximately the same expressivity in terms of information modelling as the Web Ontology Language (OWL) [18]. Model elements and instance data are...Summary of ITA Controlled English,” 2010. [Online]. Available: https://www.usukita.org/papers/5658/details.html [18] W3C, “OWL 2 Web Ontology Language...Cambridge University Press, 1997, vol. 1. [25] C. Harris, L. Hedges, and J. Valentine, Handbook of Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis. Russell Sage

  3. OntologicalDiscovery.org: A web resource for the empirical discovery of phenotypic relations across species and experimental systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Erich J [Baylor University; Li, Zuopan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jay, Jeremy J [ORNL; Philip, Vivek M [ORNL; Zhang, Yun [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Langston, Michael A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The Ontological Discovery Environment ( http://ontologicaldiscovery.org ) is a free, public Internet resource for the storage, sharing, retrieval and analysis of phenotype-centered genomic data sets. The intent of this resource is to allow the creation of user-defined phenotype categories based on naturally and experimentally observed biological networks, pathways and systems rather than on externally manifested constructs and semantics such as disease names and processes. By extracting the relationships of complex processes from the technology that produces those relationships, this resource meets a growing demand for data integration and hypothesis discovery across multiple experimental contexts, including broad species and phenotype domains. At a highly processed level, analyses of set similarity, distance and hierarchical relations are performed through a modular suite of tools. The core pivot point of analysis is the creation of a bipartite network of gene-phenotype relations, a unique discrete graph approach to gene-set analysis which enables set-set matching of non-referential data. The central organizing metaphor of a gene set may be created, stored and curated by individual users, shared among virtual working groups, or made publicly available. Gene sets submission incorporates a variety of accession numbers, microarray feature IDs, and gene symbols from model organisms, allowing integration across experimental platforms, literature reviews and other genomic analyses. The sets themselves are annotated with several levels of metadata which may include an unstructured description, publication information and structured community ontologies for anatomy, process and function. Gene set translation to user chosen reference species through gene homology allows translational comparison of models regardless of the face validity of the experimental systems. In addition, computationally derived gene sets can be integrated into phenome interdependency and similarity

  4. Rehabilitation robotics ontology on the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogmus, Zeynep; Papantoniou, Agis; Kilinc, Muhammed; Yildirim, Sibel A; Erdem, Esra; Patoglu, Volkan

    2013-06-01

    We introduce the first formal rehabilitation robotics ontology, called RehabRobo-Onto, to represent information about rehabilitation robots and their properties; and a software system RehabRobo-Query to facilitate access to this ontology. RehabRobo-Query is made available on the cloud, utilizing Amazon Web services, so that 1) rehabilitation robot designers around the world can add/modify information about their robots in RehabRobo-Onto, and 2) rehabilitation robot designers and physical medicine experts around the world can access the knowledge in RehabRobo-Onto by means of questions about robots, in natural language, with the guide of the intelligent userinterface of RehabRobo-Query. The ontology system consisting of RehabRobo-Onto and RehabRobo-Query is of great value to robot designers as well as physical therapists and medical doctors. On the one hand, robot designers can access various properties of the existing robots and to the related publications to further improve the state-of-the-art. On the other hand, physical therapists and medical doctors can utilize the ontology to compare rehabilitation robots and to identify the ones that serve best to cover their needs, or to evaluate the effects of various devices for targeted joint exercises on patients with specific disorders.

  5. Benchmarking ontologies: bigger or better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Yao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A scientific ontology is a formal representation of knowledge within a domain, typically including central concepts, their properties, and relations. With the rise of computers and high-throughput data collection, ontologies have become essential to data mining and sharing across communities in the biomedical sciences. Powerful approaches exist for testing the internal consistency of an ontology, but not for assessing the fidelity of its domain representation. We introduce a family of metrics that describe the breadth and depth with which an ontology represents its knowledge domain. We then test these metrics using (1 four of the most common medical ontologies with respect to a corpus of medical documents and (2 seven of the most popular English thesauri with respect to three corpora that sample language from medicine, news, and novels. Here we show that our approach captures the quality of ontological representation and guides efforts to narrow the breach between ontology and collective discourse within a domain. Our results also demonstrate key features of medical ontologies, English thesauri, and discourse from different domains. Medical ontologies have a small intersection, as do English thesauri. Moreover, dialects characteristic of distinct domains vary strikingly as many of the same words are used quite differently in medicine, news, and novels. As ontologies are intended to mirror the state of knowledge, our methods to tighten the fit between ontology and domain will increase their relevance for new areas of biomedical science and improve the accuracy and power of inferences computed across them.

  6. Benchmarking Ontologies: Bigger or Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lixia; Divoli, Anna; Mayzus, Ilya; Evans, James A.; Rzhetsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    A scientific ontology is a formal representation of knowledge within a domain, typically including central concepts, their properties, and relations. With the rise of computers and high-throughput data collection, ontologies have become essential to data mining and sharing across communities in the biomedical sciences. Powerful approaches exist for testing the internal consistency of an ontology, but not for assessing the fidelity of its domain representation. We introduce a family of metrics that describe the breadth and depth with which an ontology represents its knowledge domain. We then test these metrics using (1) four of the most common medical ontologies with respect to a corpus of medical documents and (2) seven of the most popular English thesauri with respect to three corpora that sample language from medicine, news, and novels. Here we show that our approach captures the quality of ontological representation and guides efforts to narrow the breach between ontology and collective discourse within a domain. Our results also demonstrate key features of medical ontologies, English thesauri, and discourse from different domains. Medical ontologies have a small intersection, as do English thesauri. Moreover, dialects characteristic of distinct domains vary strikingly as many of the same words are used quite differently in medicine, news, and novels. As ontologies are intended to mirror the state of knowledge, our methods to tighten the fit between ontology and domain will increase their relevance for new areas of biomedical science and improve the accuracy and power of inferences computed across them. PMID:21249231

  7. An ontology-based hierarchical semantic modeling approach to clinical pathway workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Jiang, Zhibin; Diao, Xiaodi; Yang, Dong; Du, Gang

    2009-08-01

    This paper proposes an ontology-based approach of modeling clinical pathway workflows at the semantic level for facilitating computerized clinical pathway implementation and efficient delivery of high-quality healthcare services. A clinical pathway ontology (CPO) is formally defined in OWL web ontology language (OWL) to provide common semantic foundation for meaningful representation and exchange of pathway-related knowledge. A CPO-based semantic modeling method is then presented to describe clinical pathways as interconnected hierarchical models including the top-level outcome flow and intervention workflow level along a care timeline. Furthermore, relevant temporal knowledge can be fully represented by combing temporal entities in CPO and temporal rules based on semantic web rule language (SWRL). An illustrative example about a clinical pathway for cesarean section shows the applicability of the proposed methodology in enabling structured semantic descriptions of any real clinical pathway.

  8. WEB-BASED LANGUAGE CLUB AFFECTING EFL LEARNERS’ PROFICIENCY: A CASE OF IRANIAN LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ashraf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Language clubs have been reported to be effective in learning languages, increasing motivation and independence (Gao, 2009. The present study was an attempt to investigate the effect of a web-based language club on the language proficiency of Iranian EFL learners. A number of pre-intermediate learners form two universities (118 were selected among 154 through a test of proficiency (TOEFL PBL, then they were put into experimental and control groups. The participants in experimental group got on line and acted as a member of a virtual language club for a period of 6 months. They got involved with activities like emailing, chatting, and weblogging. Data were collected through TOEFL PBL. The analyzed data from the test of proficiency indicated the outperformance of those in experimental group. Consequently, it might be proposed that web-based language clubs can make language learning easier and more efficient.

  9. Language Practice with Multimedia Supported Web-Based Grammar Revision Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturay, Meltem Huri; Daloglu, Aysegul; Yildirim, Soner

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of elementary-level English language learners towards web-based, multimedia-annotated grammar learning. WEBGRAM, a system designed to provide supplementary web-based grammar revision material, uses audio-visual aids to enrich the contextual presentation of grammar and allows learners to…

  10. Web 2.0 and Second Language Learning: What Does the Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenggao; Vasquez, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews current research on the use of Web 2.0 technologies in second language (L2) learning. Its purpose is to investigate the theoretical perspectives framing it, to identify some of the benefits of using Web 2.0 technologies in L2 learning, and to discuss some of the limitations. The review reveals that blogs and wikis have been…

  11. A Gene Ontology Tutorial in Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesztrocy, Alex Warwick; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    This chapter is a tutorial on using Gene Ontology resources in the Python programming language. This entails querying the Gene Ontology graph, retrieving Gene Ontology annotations, performing gene enrichment analyses, and computing basic semantic similarity between GO terms. An interactive version of the tutorial, including solutions, is available at http://gohandbook.org .

  12. Web-Based Machine Translation as a Tool for Promoting Electronic Literacy and Language Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses a pervasive problem of concern to teachers of many foreign languages: the use of Web-Based Machine Translation (WBMT) by students who do not understand the complexities of this relatively new tool. Although networked technologies have greatly increased access to many language and communication tools, WBMT is still…

  13. From the Field, to the Web, and Back Again: Incorporating Internet Methods into Language Ideology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Chase Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Researchers from a variety of academic disciplines have begun to incorporate Web-based methodologies in their research agendas. Nonetheless, many of those interested in language ideologies--i.e. speakers' beliefs about language, as well as their rationalisation of those beliefs-- vehemently stand by site-specific ethnographic approaches. Rather…

  14. Learning expressive ontologies

    CERN Document Server

    Völker, J

    2009-01-01

    This publication advances the state-of-the-art in ontology learning by presenting a set of novel approaches to the semi-automatic acquisition, refinement and evaluation of logically complex axiomatizations. It has been motivated by the fact that the realization of the semantic web envisioned by Tim Berners-Lee is still hampered by the lack of ontological resources, while at the same time more and more applications of semantic technologies emerge from fast-growing areas such as e-business or life sciences. Such knowledge-intensive applications, requiring large scale reasoning over complex domai

  15. im4Things: An Ontology-Based Natural Language Interface for Controlling Devices in the Internet of Things

    KAUST Repository

    Noguera-Arnaldos, José Ángel

    2017-03-14

    The Internet of Things (IoT) offers opportunities for new applications and services that enable users to access and control their working and home environment from local and remote locations, aiming to perform daily life activities in an easy way. However, the IoT also introduces new challenges, some of which arise from the large range of devices currently available and the heterogeneous interfaces provided for their control. The control and management of this variety of devices and interfaces represent a new challenge for non-expert users, instead of making their life easier. Based on this understanding, in this work we present a natural language interface for the IoT, which takes advantage of Semantic Web technologies to allow non-expert users to control their home environment through an instant messaging application in an easy and intuitive way. We conducted several experiments with a group of end users aiming to evaluate the effectiveness of our approach to control home appliances by means of natural language instructions. The evaluation results proved that without the need for technicalities, the user was able to control the home appliances in an efficient way.

  16. Using Ontologies in Cybersecurity Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Marian GEORGESCU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an exploratory research which aims to improve the cybersecurity field by means of semantic web technologies. The authors present a framework which uses Semantic Web technologies to automatically extract and analyse text in natural language available online. The system provides results that are further analysed by cybersecurity experts to detect black hat hackers’ activities. The authors examine several characteristics of how hacking communities communicate and collaborate online and how much information can be obtained by analysing different types of internet text communication channels. Having online sources as input data, the model proposed extracts and analyses natural language that relates with cybersecurity field, with the aid of ontologies. The main objective is to generate information about possible black hat hacking actions, which later can be analysed punctually by experts. This paper describes the data flow of the framework and it proposes technological solutions so that the model can be applied. In their future work, the authors plan to implement the framework described as a system software application.

  17. Ontology driven modeling for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Sakamoto, Norihiro

    2009-05-12

    For the machine helped exploring the relationships between genetic factors and complex diseases, a well-structured conceptual framework of the background knowledge is needed. However, because of the complexity of determining a genetic susceptibility factor, there is no formalization for the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to disease, which makes the interoperability between systems impossible. Thus, the ontology modeling language OWL was used for formalization in this paper. After introducing the Semantic Web and OWL language propagated by W3C, we applied text mining technology combined with competency questions to specify the classes of the ontology. Then, an N-ary pattern was adopted to describe the relationships among these defined classes. Based on the former work of OGSF-DM (Ontology of Genetic Susceptibility Factors to Diabetes Mellitus), we formalized the definition of "Genetic Susceptibility", "Genetic Susceptibility Factor" and other classes by using OWL-DL modeling language; and a reasoner automatically performed the classification of the class "Genetic Susceptibility Factor". The ontology driven modeling is used for formalization the knowledge of genetic susceptibility to complex diseases. More importantly, when a class has been completely formalized in an ontology, the OWL reasoning can automatically compute the classification of the class, in our case, the class of "Genetic Susceptibility Factors". With more types of genetic susceptibility factors obtained from the laboratory research, our ontologies always needs to be refined, and many new classes must be taken into account to harmonize with the ontologies. Using the ontologies to develop the semantic web needs to be applied in the future.

  18. Teaching a Foreign Language to Deaf People via Vodcasting & Web 2.0 Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigas, Athanasios; Vrettaros, John; Tagoulis, Alexandors; Kouremenos, Dimitris

    This paper presents the design and development of an e-learning course in teaching deaf people in a foreign language, whose first language is the sign language. The course is based in e-material, vodcasting and web 2.0 tools such as social networking and blog The course has been designed especially for deaf people and it is exploring the possibilities that e-learning material vodcasting and web 2.0 tools can offer to enhance the learning process and achieve more effective learning results.

  19. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University; Mark, David [University at Buffalo (SUNY); Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  20. Ontology-oriented retrieval of putative microRNAs in Vitis vinifera via GrapeMiRNA: a web database of de novo predicted grape microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontana Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two complete genome sequences are available for Vitis vinifera Pinot noir. Based on the sequence and gene predictions produced by the IASMA, we performed an in silico detection of putative microRNA genes and of their targets, and collected the most reliable microRNA predictions in a web database. The application is available at http://www.itb.cnr.it/ptp/grapemirna/. Description The program FindMiRNA was used to detect putative microRNA genes in the grape genome. A very high number of predictions was retrieved, calling for validation. Nine parameters were calculated and, based on the grape microRNAs dataset available at miRBase, thresholds were defined and applied to FindMiRNA predictions having targets in gene exons. In the resulting subset, predictions were ranked according to precursor positions and sequence similarity, and to target identity. To further validate FindMiRNA predictions, comparisons to the Arabidopsis genome, to the grape Genoscope genome, and to the grape EST collection were performed. Results were stored in a MySQL database and a web interface was prepared to query the database and retrieve predictions of interest. Conclusion The GrapeMiRNA database encompasses 5,778 microRNA predictions spanning the whole grape genome. Predictions are integrated with information that can be of use in selection procedures. Tools added in the web interface also allow to inspect predictions according to gene ontology classes and metabolic pathways of targets. The GrapeMiRNA database can be of help in selecting candidate microRNA genes to be validated.

  1. Surreptitious, Evolving and Participative Ontology Development: An End-User Oriented Ontology Development Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachore, Zelalem

    2012-01-01

    Ontology not only is considered to be the backbone of the semantic web but also plays a significant role in distributed and heterogeneous information systems. However, ontology still faces limited application and adoption to date. One of the major problems is that prevailing engineering-oriented methodologies for building ontologies do not…

  2. Flexible and Affordable Foreign Language Learning Environment based on Web 2.0 Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Guetl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Web technologies and educational platforms have greatly evolved over the past decade. One of the most significant factors contributing to education on the Internet has been the development of Web 2.0 technologies. These technologies, socially interactive in nature, have much to contribute to the area of Computer Assisted Language Leaning. Unfortunately, Web 2.0 technologies for the most part have been used in an ad hoc manner, permitting language learners acquire knowledge through interaction, but not through a more structured manner as these technologies were not developed to help lean languages as such. The goal of our work is to research and develop an environment, which employs Web 2.0 technology plus online language learning tools to provide a more integrated language learning environment. This paper will explore the technologies and provide information about how tools can be better integrated to provide a more productive working environment for language learners. A first working proof of concept based on our approach introduced is promising supporting modern language requirements and first findings and space for improvements are discussed.

  3. PSOM2—partitioning-based scalable ontology matching using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Sathiya

    2017-11-16

    Nov 16, 2017 ... Abstract. The growth and use of semantic web has led to a drastic increase in the size, heterogeneity and number of ontologies that are available on the web. Correspondingly, scalable ontology matching algorithms that will eliminate the heterogeneity among large ontologies have become a necessity.

  4. Contextualizing ontologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouquet, Paolo; Giunchiglia, Fausto; Van Harmelen, Frank; Serafini, Luciano; Stuckenschmidt, Heiner

    2004-01-01

    Ontologies are shared models of a domain that encode a view which is common to a set of different parties. Contexts are local models that encode a party's subjective view of a domain. In this paper, we show how ontologies can be contextualized, thus acquiring certain useful properties that a pure

  5. Ontological dependency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamper, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Successful ontological analysis depends upon having the right underlying theory. The work described here, exploring how to understand organisations as systems of social norms found that the familiar objectivist position did not work, eventually replacing it with a radically subjectivist ontology

  6. Ontology: ambiguity and accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schiessl

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ambiguity is a major obstacle to information retrieval. It is source of several researches in Information Science. Ontologies have been studied in order to solve problems related to ambiguities. Paradoxically, “ontology” term is also ambiguous and it is understood according to the use by the community. Philosophy and Computer Science seems to have the most accentuated difference related to the term sense. The former holds undisputed tradition and authority. The latter, in despite of being quite recent, holds an informal sense, but pragmatic. Information Science acts ranging from philosophical to computational approaches so as to get organized collections based on balance between users’ necessities and available information. The semantic web requires informational cycle automation and demands studies related to ontologies. Consequently, revisiting relevant approaches for the study of ontologies plays a relevant role as a way to provide useful ideas to researchers maintaining philosophical rigor, and convenience provided by computers.

  7. BAIK– PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE BASED ON INDONESIAN LEXICAL PARSING FOR MULTITIER WEB DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Hasanudin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Business software development with global team is increasing rapidly and the programming language as development tool takes the important role in the global web development. The real user friendly programming language should be written in local language for programmer who has native language is not in English. This paper presents our design of BAIK (Bahasa Anak Indonesia untuk Komputerscripting language which syntax is modeled with Bahasa Indonesian for multitier web development. Researcher propose the implementation of Indonesian Parsing Engine and Binary Search Tree structure for memory allocation of variable and compose the language features that support basic Object Oriented Programming, Common Gateway Interface, HTML style manipulation and database connection. Our goal is to build real programming language from simple structure design for web development using Indonesian lexical words. Pengembangan bisnis perangkat lunak dalam tim berskala global meningkat dengan cepat dan bahasa pemrograman berperan penting dalam pengembangan web secara global. Bahasa pemrograman yang benar-benar ramah terhadap pengguna harus ditulis dalam bahasa lokal programmer yang bahasa ibunya bukan Bahasa Inggris. Paper ini menyajikan desain dari bahasa penulisan BAIK (Bahasa Anak Indonesia untuk Komputer, yang sintaksisnya dimodelkan dengan Bahasa Indonesia untuk pengembangan web multitier. Peneliti mengusulkan implementasi dari parsing engine Bahasa Indonesia dan struktur binary search tree untuk alokasi memori terhadap variabel, serta membuat fitur bahasa yang mendukung dasar pemrograman berbasis objek, common gateway interface, manipulasi gaya HTML, dan koneksi basis data. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menciptakan bahasa pemrograman yang sesungguhnya dan menggunakan desain struktur sederhana untuk pengembangan web dengan menggunakan kata-kata dari Bahasa Indonesia.

  8. The ontology life cycle: Integrated tools for editing, publishing, peer review, and evolution of ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Natalya; Tudorache, Tania; Nyulas, Csongor; Musen, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Ontologies have become a critical component of many applications in biomedical informatics. However, the landscape of the ontology tools today is largely fragmented, with independent tools for ontology editing, publishing, and peer review: users develop an ontology in an ontology editor, such as Protégé; and publish it on a Web server or in an ontology library, such as BioPortal, in order to share it with the community; they use the tools provided by the library or mailing lists and bug trackers to collect feedback from users. In this paper, we present a set of tools that bring the ontology editing and publishing closer together, in an integrated platform for the entire ontology lifecycle. This integration streamlines the workflow for collaborative development and increases integration between the ontologies themselves through the reuse of terms. PMID:21347039

  9. Program Verification with Monadic Second-Order Logic & Languages for Web Service Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders

    , such as maintaining session state and dynamically producing HTML or XML documents. By introducing explicit language-based mechanisms for those issues, we liberate the Web service programmer from the tedious and error-prone alternatives. Specialized program analyses aid the programmer by verifying at compile time......, and syntax-level macros for making additional language extensions. In its newest version, the programming language is designed as an extension of Java. To describe classes of XML documents, we introduce a novel XML schema language aiming to both simplify and generalize existing proposals. All parts...

  10. X-Switch: An Efficient , Multi-User, Multi-Language Web Application Server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumbo Nyirenda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Web applications are usually installed on and accessed through a Web server. For security reasons, these Web servers generally provide very few privileges to Web applications, defaulting to executing them in the realm of a guest ac- count. In addition, performance often is a problem as Web applications may need to be reinitialised with each access. Various solutions have been designed to address these security and performance issues, mostly independently of one another, but most have been language or system-specic. The X-Switch system is proposed as an alternative Web application execution environment, with more secure user-based resource management, persistent application interpreters and support for arbitrary languages/interpreters. Thus it provides a general-purpose environment for developing and deploying Web applications. The X-Switch system's experimental results demonstrated that it can achieve a high level of performance. Further- more it was shown that X-Switch can provide functionality matching that of existing Web application servers but with the added benet of multi-user support. Finally the X-Switch system showed that it is feasible to completely separate the deployment platform from the application code, thus ensuring that the developer does not need to modify his/her code to make it compatible with the deployment platform.

  11. Evolution of Web-Based Applications Using Domain-Specific Markup Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntram Graef

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The lifecycle of Web-based applications is characterized by frequent changes to content, user interface, and functionality. Updating content, improving the services provided to users, drives further development of a Web-based application. The major goal for the success of a Web-based application becomes therefore its evolution. Though, development and maintenance of Web-based applications suffers from the underlying document-based implementation model. A disciplined evolution of Web based applications requires the application of software engineering practice for systematic further development and reuse of software artifacts. In this contribution we suggest to adopt the component paradigm to development and evolution of Web-based applications. The approach is based on a dedicated component technology and component-software architecture. It allows abstracting from many technical aspects related to the Web as an application platform by introducing domain specific markup languages. These languages allow the description of services, which represent domain components in our Web-component-software approach. Domain experts with limited knowledge of technical details can therefore describe application functionality and the evolution of orthogonal aspects of the application can be de-coupled. The whole approach is based on XML to achieve the necessary standardization and economic efficiency for the use in real world projects.

  12. Geographic Ontologies, Gazetteers and Multilingualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Laurini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different languages imply different visions of space, so that terminologies are different in geographic ontologies. In addition to their geometric shapes, geographic features have names, sometimes different in diverse languages. In addition, the role of gazetteers, as dictionaries of place names (toponyms, is to maintain relations between place names and location. The scope of geographic information retrieval is to search for geographic information not against a database, but against the whole Internet: but the Internet stores information in different languages, and it is of paramount importance not to remain stuck to a unique language. In this paper, our first step is to clarify the links between geographic objects as computer representations of geographic features, ontologies and gazetteers designed in various languages. Then, we propose some inference rules for matching not only types, but also relations in geographic ontologies with the assistance of gazetteers.

  13. Ontological Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Alkan

    2017-12-01

    • Is it possible to redefine ontology within the hierarchical structure of planning? We are going to seek answers to some of these questions within the limited scope of this paper and we are going to offer the rest for discussion by just asking them. In light of these assessments, drawing attention, based on ontological knowledge relying on the wholeness of universe, to the question, on macro level planning, of whether or not the ontological realities of man, energy and movements of thinking can provide macro data for planning on a universal level as important factors affecting mankind will be one of the limited objectives of the paper.

  14. Onto-Tools: an ensemble of web-accessible, ontology-based tools for the functional design and interpretation of high-throughput gene expression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Purvesh; Bhavsar, Pratik; Bawa, Gagandeep; Draghici, Sorin

    2004-07-01

    The Onto-Tools suite is composed of an annotation database and five seamlessly integrated web-accessible data mining tools: Onto-Express (OE), Onto-Compare (OC), Onto-Design (OD), Onto-Translate (OT) and Onto-Miner (OM). OM is a new tool that provides a unified access point and an application programming interface for most annotations available. Our database has been enhanced with more than 120 new commercial microarrays and annotations for Rattus norvegicus, Drosophila melanogaster and Carnorhabditis elegans. The Onto-Tools have been redesigned to provide better biological insight, improved performance and user convenience. The new features implemented in OE include support for gene names, LocusLink IDs and Gene Ontology (GO) IDs, ability to specify fold changes for the input genes, links to the KEGG pathway database and detailed output files. OC allows comparisons of the functional bias of more than 170 commercial microarrays. The latest version of OD allows the user to specify keywords if the exact GO term is not known as well as providing more details than the previous version. OE, OC and OD now have an integrated GO browser that allows the user to customize the level of abstraction for each GO category. The Onto-Tools are available online at http://vortex.cs.wayne.edu/Projects.html.

  15. An ontology for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Application to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragozá, Irene; Alcañiz, Mariano; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa; Guixeres, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years the use of medical and biomedical ontologies has increased considerably. It is very common to find applications and semantic webs using this kind of ontologies and a large number of papers have been written explaining why ontologies are useful in these fields. In this paper the use of ontologies for psychology and its benefits is discussed and a first ontology for obesity treatment is presented.

  16. Developing VISO: Vaccine Information Statement Ontology for patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amith, Muhammad; Gong, Yang; Cunningham, Rachel; Boom, Julie; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    To construct a comprehensive vaccine information ontology that can support personal health information applications using patient-consumer lexicon, and lead to outcomes that can improve patient education. The authors composed the Vaccine Information Statement Ontology (VISO) using the web ontology language (OWL). We started with 6 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) documents collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website. Important and relevant selections from the documents were recorded, and knowledge triples were derived. Based on the collection of knowledge triples, the meta-level formalization of the vaccine information domain was developed. Relevant instances and their relationships were created to represent vaccine domain knowledge. The initial iteration of the VISO was realized, based on the 6 Vaccine Information Statements and coded into OWL2 with Protégé. The ontology consisted of 132 concepts (classes and subclasses) with 33 types of relationships between the concepts. The total number of instances from classes totaled at 460, along with 429 knowledge triples in total. Semiotic-based metric scoring was applied to evaluate quality of the ontology.

  17. Ontology-based geospatial data query and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Zhang, C.; Wei, M.; Peng, Z.-R.

    2008-01-01

    Geospatial data sharing is an increasingly important subject as large amount of data is produced by a variety of sources, stored in incompatible formats, and accessible through different GIS applications. Past efforts to enable sharing have produced standardized data format such as GML and data access protocols such as Web Feature Service (WFS). While these standards help enabling client applications to gain access to heterogeneous data stored in different formats from diverse sources, the usability of the access is limited due to the lack of data semantics encoded in the WFS feature types. Past research has used ontology languages to describe the semantics of geospatial data but ontology-based queries cannot be applied directly to legacy data stored in databases or shapefiles, or to feature data in WFS services. This paper presents a method to enable ontology query on spatial data available from WFS services and on data stored in databases. We do not create ontology instances explicitly and thus avoid the problems of data replication. Instead, user queries are rewritten to WFS getFeature requests and SQL queries to database. The method also has the benefits of being able to utilize existing tools of databases, WFS, and GML while enabling query based on ontology semantics. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. The NIFSTD and BIRNLex vocabularies: building comprehensive ontologies for neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bug, William J; Ascoli, Giorgio A; Grethe, Jeffrey S; Gupta, Amarnath; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Laird, Angela R; Larson, Stephen D; Rubin, Daniel; Shepherd, Gordon M; Turner, Jessica A; Martone, Maryann E

    2008-09-01

    A critical component of the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) project is a consistent, flexible terminology for describing and retrieving neuroscience-relevant resources. Although the original NIF specification called for a loosely structured controlled vocabulary for describing neuroscience resources, as the NIF system evolved, the requirement for a formally structured ontology for neuroscience with sufficient granularity to describe and access a diverse collection of information became obvious. This requirement led to the NIF standardized (NIFSTD) ontology, a comprehensive collection of common neuroscience domain terminologies woven into an ontologically consistent, unified representation of the biomedical domains typically used to describe neuroscience data (e.g., anatomy, cell types, techniques), as well as digital resources (tools, databases) being created throughout the neuroscience community. NIFSTD builds upon a structure established by the BIRNLex, a lexicon of concepts covering clinical neuroimaging research developed by the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) project. Each distinct domain module is represented using the Web Ontology Language (OWL). As much as has been practical, NIFSTD reuses existing community ontologies that cover the required biomedical domains, building the more specific concepts required to annotate NIF resources. By following this principle, an extensive vocabulary was assembled in a relatively short period of time for NIF information annotation, organization, and retrieval, in a form that promotes easy extension and modification. We report here on the structure of the NIFSTD, and its predecessor BIRNLex, the principles followed in its construction and provide examples of its use within NIF.

  19. SWEET 2.1 Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    The Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies represent a mid- to upper-level concept space for all of Earth and Planetary Science and associated data and applications The latest version (2.1) has been reorganized to improve long-term maintainability. Accompanying the ontologies is a mapping to the CF Standard Name Table and the GCMD Science Keywords. As a higher level concept space, terms can be readily mapped across these vocabularies through the intermediate use of SWEET.

  20. Benchmarking Web-testing - Selenium versus Watir and the Choice of Programming Language and Browser

    OpenAIRE

    Kuutila, Miikka; Mäntylä, Mika; Raulamo-Jurvanen, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Selenium is claimed to be the most popular software test automation tool. Past academic works have mainly neglected testing tools in favor of more methodological topics. Objective: We investigated the performance of web-testing tools, to provide empirical evidence supporting choices in software test tool selection and configuration. Method: We used 4*5 factorial design to study 20 different configurations for testing a web-store. We studied 5 programming language bindings (C#, Java, ...

  1. The Semantic Web - on the respective Roles of XML and RDF.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decker, S.; van Harmelen, F.A.H.; Broekstra, J.; Erdmann, M.; Fensel, D.A.; Horrocks, I.; Klein, M.C.A.; Melnik, S.

    2000-01-01

    The role of ontologies in the architecture of the Semantic Web was described. Extensible markup language (XML) and resource description framework (RDF) are the current standards for establishing semantic interoperability on the Web, but XML addresses only document structure. RDF better facilitates

  2. Model driven engineering and ontology development

    CERN Document Server

    Gasevic, Dragan; Devedzic, Vladan; Bézivin, Jean; Selic, Bran

    2009-01-01

    Describes technologies, tools, and standards like XML, RDF, OWL, MDA, and UML. This book describes OMG's ODM (Ontology Definition Metamodel) initiative, a specification which is in the form of an OMG language like UML. It also covers applications and practical aspects of developing ontologies using MDA-based languages.

  3. Ontology Assisted Formal Specification Extraction from Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Mihis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the field of knowledge processing, the ontologies are the most important mean. They make possible for the computer to understand better the natural language and to make judgments. In this paper, a method which use ontologies in the semi-automatic extraction of formal specifications from a natural language text is proposed.

  4. Ontology of a scene based on Java 3D architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén González Crespo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article seeks to make an approach to the class hierarchy of a scene built with the architecture Java 3D, to develop an ontology of a scene as from the semantic essential components for the semantic structuring of the Web3D. Java was selected because the language recommended by the W3C Consortium for the Development of the Web3D oriented applications as from X3D standard is Xj3D which compositionof their Schemas is based the architecture of Java3D In first instance identifies the domain and scope of the ontology, defining classes and subclasses that comprise from Java3D architecture and the essential elements of a scene, as its point of origin, the field of rotation, translation The limitation of the scene and the definition of shaders, then define the slots that are declared in RDF as a framework for describing the properties of the classes established from identifying thedomain and range of each class, then develops composition of the OWL ontology on SWOOP Finally, be perform instantiations of the ontology building for a Iconosphere object as from class expressions defined.

  5. Using Web Speech Technology with Language Learning Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the history of human-to-computer interaction based upon the design of sophisticated computerized speech recognition algorithms. Advancements such as the arrival of cloud-based computing and software like Google's Web Speech API allows anyone with an Internet connection and Chrome browser to take advantage of…

  6. Speech and Language Interaction in a Web Theatre Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Dalsgaard, P.; Hulstijn, J.; Lee, C.H.; Heisterkamp, P.; van Hessen, Adrianus J.; Cole, R.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss research on interaction in a virtual theatre that can be accessed through Web pages. In the environment we employ several agents. The virtual theatre allows navigation through keyboard and mouse, but there is also a navigation agent which listens to typed input and spoken commands. We

  7. Integrating reasoning and clinical archetypes using OWL ontologies and SWRL rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezcano, Leonardo; Sicilia, Miguel-Angel; Rodríguez-Solano, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Semantic interoperability is essential to facilitate the computerized support for alerts, workflow management and evidence-based healthcare across heterogeneous electronic health record (EHR) systems. Clinical archetypes, which are formal definitions of specific clinical concepts defined as specializations of a generic reference (information) model, provide a mechanism to express data structures in a shared and interoperable way. However, currently available archetype languages do not provide direct support for mapping to formal ontologies and then exploiting reasoning on clinical knowledge, which are key ingredients of full semantic interoperability, as stated in the SemanticHEALTH report [1]. This paper reports on an approach to translate definitions expressed in the openEHR Archetype Definition Language (ADL) to a formal representation expressed using the Ontology Web Language (OWL). The formal representations are then integrated with rules expressed with Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) expressions, providing an approach to apply the SWRL rules to concrete instances of clinical data. Sharing the knowledge expressed in the form of rules is consistent with the philosophy of open sharing, encouraged by archetypes. Our approach also allows the reuse of formal knowledge, expressed through ontologies, and extends reuse to propositions of declarative knowledge, such as those encoded in clinical guidelines. This paper describes the ADL-to-OWL translation approach, describes the techniques to map archetypes to formal ontologies, and demonstrates how rules can be applied to the resulting representation. We provide examples taken from a patient safety alerting system to illustrate our approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards ontology-driven navigation of the lipid bibliosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher Jo; Kanagasabai, Rajaraman; Ang, Wee Tiong; Veeramani, Anitha; Low, Hong-Sang; Wenk, Markus R

    2008-01-01

    The indexing of scientific literature and content is a relevant and contemporary requirement within life science information systems. Navigating information available in legacy formats continues to be a challenge both in enterprise and academic domains. The emergence of semantic web technologies and their fusion with artificial intelligence techniques has provided a new toolkit with which to address these data integration challenges. In the emerging field of lipidomics such navigation challenges are barriers to the translation of scientific results into actionable knowledge, critical to the treatment of diseases such as Alzheimer's syndrome, Mycobacterium infections and cancer. We present a literature-driven workflow involving document delivery and natural language processing steps generating tagged sentences containing lipid, protein and disease names, which are instantiated to custom designed lipid ontology. We describe the design challenges in capturing lipid nomenclature, the mandate of the ontology and its role as query model in the navigation of the lipid bibliosphere. We illustrate the extent of the description logic-based A-box query capability provided by the instantiated ontology using a graphical query composer to query sentences describing lipid-protein and lipid-disease correlations. As scientists accept the need to readjust the manner in which we search for information and derive knowledge we illustrate a system that can constrain the literature explosion and knowledge navigation problems. Specifically we have focussed on solving this challenge for lipidomics researchers who have to deal with the lack of standardized vocabulary, differing classification schemes, and a wide array of synonyms before being able to derive scientific insights. The use of the OWL-DL variant of the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and description logic reasoning is pivotal in this regard, providing the lipid scientist with advanced query access to the results of text mining

  9. English Language Teaching Aided by Web-Based Training in a Large Class

    OpenAIRE

    前田, 啓朗

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the practice of English language teaching for first-year university students, with the intention of coordinating classroom teaching and individualized learning. A Web-Based Training (WBT) system is used to overcome two problems: 1) productive skills classes are so large that language activities are often difficult to conduct: 2) receptive skills classes are still larger, such that it is often difficult to confirm each student's progress. Under the condition that the tota...

  10. An Unsupervised Rule-Based Method to Populate Ontologies from Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Eduardo; Siqueira, Sean; Andreatta, Alexandre

    An increasing amount of information is available on the web and usually is expressed as text. Semantic information is implicit in these texts, since they are mainly intended for human consumption and interpretation. Because unstructured information is not easily handled automatically, an information extraction process has to be used to identify concepts and establish relations among them. Ontologies are an appropriate way to represent structured knowledge bases, enabling sharing, reuse and inference. In this paper, an information extraction process is used for populating a domain ontology. It targets Brazilian Portuguese texts from a biographical dictionary of music, which requires specific tools due to some language unique aspects. An unsupervised rule-based method is proposed. Through this process, latent concepts and relations expressed in natural language can be extracted and represented as an ontology, allowing new uses and visualizations of the content, such as semantically browsing and inferring new knowledge.

  11. Construction of geographical names knowledge base with ontology and production rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gang; Du, Qingyun

    2009-10-01

    With the rapid development of the gazetteers, more and more geographical names databases has been established. Since the geographical names exit in form of records which provide little qualitative description other than quantitative information, geographical names are hardly shared and interoperable. In order to solve this problem, we urgently need to set up knowledge base for geographical names that shall provide qualitative knowledge to describe the essence of the elements. So, we use ontology and production rules to build geographical name knowledge base, where the geographical names ontology is regarded as the foundation for reuse and sharing of the geographical names information, and production rules are used to enhance the expressivity of the ontology. First of all, we analyzed the geographical names concepts and their semantics, the concepts of space and time and their relationships in geographical names to describe the knowledge structure for this field, used Web Ontology Language (OWL) to provide formal descriptions to give them explicit semantics, and proposed a unified semantic framework for description. Secondly, we established the common-sense rules and spatial relations inference rules coded with Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) which laid the foundation for geographical names knowledge discovery and automatic reasoning. Finally, we established a geographical name knowledge base combining both the geographical names ontology and rules established above. Through the analysis of examples we showed that based on the geographical names knowledge base the geographical names information can be well shared and reused.

  12. Building a semi-automatic ontology learning and construction system for geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, H. A.; Sunderraman, R.; Zhu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We are developing an ontology learning and construction framework that allows continuous, semi-automatic knowledge extraction, verification, validation, and maintenance by potentially a very large group of collaborating domain experts in any geosciences field. The system brings geoscientists from the side-lines to the center stage of ontology building, allowing them to collaboratively construct and enrich new ontologies, and merge, align, and integrate existing ontologies and tools. These constantly evolving ontologies can more effectively address community's interests, purposes, tools, and change. The goal is to minimize the cost and time of building ontologies, and maximize the quality, usability, and adoption of ontologies by the community. Our system will be a domain-independent ontology learning framework that applies natural language processing, allowing users to enter their ontology in a semi-structured form, and a combined Semantic Web and Social Web approach that lets direct participation of geoscientists who have no skill in the design and development of their domain ontologies. A controlled natural language (CNL) interface and an integrated authoring and editing tool automatically convert syntactically correct CNL text into formal OWL constructs. The WebProtege-based system will allow a potentially large group of geoscientists, from multiple domains, to crowd source and participate in the structuring of their knowledge model by sharing their knowledge through critiquing, testing, verifying, adopting, and updating of the concept models (ontologies). We will use cloud storage for all data and knowledge base components of the system, such as users, domain ontologies, discussion forums, and semantic wikis that can be accessed and queried by geoscientists in each domain. We will use NoSQL databases such as MongoDB as a service in the cloud environment. MongoDB uses the lightweight JSON format, which makes it convenient and easy to build Web applications using

  13. Architectural approach for providing relations in biomedical terminologies and ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochhausen, Mathias; Blobel, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The representation of multiple relations is one of the main criteria of ontologies. In formalizing both ontologies and terminologies in biomedicine relations are used to code axioms for the classes of the ontology. However, a huge number of relations represented in medical ontologies and terminologies are derived from language and formal definition is omitted. We present a strategy based on an architectural approach to facility formal analysis of relations for use in ontology systems in biomedicine and in general.

  14. Sign Language Translation in State Administration in Germany: Barrier Free Web Accessibility

    OpenAIRE

    Lišková, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to describe Web accessibility in state administration in the Federal Republic of Germany in relation to the socio-demographic group of deaf sign language users who did not have the opportunity to gain proper knowledge of a written form of the German language. The demand of the Deaf to information in an accessible form as based on legal documents is presented in relation to the theory of translation. How translating from written texts into sign language works in pract...

  15. ELLIPS: providing web-based language learning for Higher Education in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corda, A.; Jager, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the overall considerations and pedagogical approach which were at the basis of the development of an innovative web-based CALL application, Ellips (Electronic Language Learning Interactive Practising System). It describes the program’s most salient features, illustrating in

  16. A Study of Enhanced Structured Web-Based Discussion in a Foreign Language Learning Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Mei; Lin, Mei-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study aimed to investigate the effect of enhanced structured web discussion on EFL students' language production. This effect was measured by the number of T units and by students' use of the cognitive skills identified by Hunt (1965). A total of 27 college students participated in this study. The participants were randomly…

  17. Decreasing Cognitive Load for Learners: Strategy of Web-Based Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive load is one of the important factors that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of web-based foreign language learning. Cognitive load theory assumes that human's cognitive capacity in working memory is limited and if it overloads, learning will be hampered, so that high level of cognitive load can affect the performance of learning…

  18. Proposing a Web-Based Tutorial System to Teach Malay Language Braille Code to the Sighted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah, Lee Lay; Keong, Foo Kok

    2010-01-01

    The "e-KodBrailleBM Tutorial System" is a web-based tutorial system which is specially designed to teach, facilitate and support the learning of Malay Language Braille Code to individuals who are sighted. The targeted group includes special education teachers, pre-service teachers, and parents. Learning Braille code involves memorisation…

  19. Use of Interactive Web-Based Exercises for English as a Foreign Language Learning: Learners' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yen-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the learner perceptions of a CALL component in a blended language learning context. 52 Taiwanese college students attended instructional classroom sessions and did weekly online assignments in the form of interactive web-based exercises over one semester. Their learning performance was measured by means of two computer-based…

  20. Web Based Projects Enhancing English Language and Generic Skills Development for Asian Hospitality Industry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-jung

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated hospitality students' responses toward their learning experiences from undertaking group projects based upon a College web platform, the "Ubiquitous Hospitality English Learning Platform" (U-HELP). Twenty-six students in the Department of Applied Foreign Languages participated in this study. Their attitudes toward…

  1. Exploring topic-based language models for effective web information retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, R.; Kaptein, R.; Hiemstra, D.; Kamps, J.

    2008-01-01

    The main obstacle for providing focused search is the relative opaqueness of search request—searchers tend to express their complex information needs in only a couple of keywords. Our overall aim is to find out if, and how, topic-based language models can leads to more effective web information

  2. Exploring Topic-based Language Models for Effective Web Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, R.; Kaptein, Rianne; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Kamps, Jaap; Hoenkamp, E.; De Cock, M.; Hoste, V.

    2008-01-01

    The main obstacle for providing focused search is the relative opaqueness of search request -- searchers tend to express their complex information needs in only a couple of keywords. Our overall aim is to find out if, and how, topic-based language models can lead to more effective web information

  3. A Metadata Model for E-Learning Coordination through Semantic Web Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elci, Atilla

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a study aiming to develop a metadata model for e-learning coordination based on semantic web languages. A survey of e-learning modes are done initially in order to identify content such as phases, activities, data schema, rules and relations, etc. relevant for a coordination model. In this respect, the study looks into the…

  4. Do Sign Language Videos Improve Web Navigation for Deaf Signer Users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Inmaculada; Parra, Elena; Canas, Jose J.

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of video-based sign language (SL) navigation aids to improve Web search for Deaf Signers was tested by two experiments. Experiment 1 compared 2 navigation aids based on text hyperlinks linked to embedded SL videos, which differed in the spatial contiguity between the text hyperlink and SL video (contiguous vs. distant). Deaf Signers'…

  5. Matching Medline/PubMed data with Web of Science: a routine in R language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotolo, D.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel routine, namely medlineR, based on the R language, that allows the user to match data from Medline/PubMed with records indexed in the ISI Web of Science (WoS) database. The matching allows exploiting the rich and controlled vocabulary of medical subject headings (MeSH) of

  6. RIO: Minimizing User Interaction in Ontology Debugging

    OpenAIRE

    Rodler, Patrick; Shchekotykhin, Kostyantyn; Fleiss, Philipp; Friedrich, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Efficient ontology debugging is a cornerstone for many activities in the context of the Semantic Web, especially when automatic tools produce (parts of) ontologies such as in the field of ontology matching. The best currently known interactive debugging systems rely upon some meta information in terms of fault probabilities, which can speed up the debugging procedure in the good case, but can also have negative impact on the performance in the bad case. The problem is that assessment of the m...

  7. Versioning System for Distributed Ontology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    ontology development approaches assume an open environment for sharing of information across the Internet, or the “ semantic web .” However, we observe that...describe the modular structure for CCER Ontology based on the concept of Topic. Section 2.3 defines the close alignment between the file system structure...guidelines that answers these kinds of questions . Figure 4 illustrates how CCER ontology developers determine the version number for a new CCER Topic when

  8. The Semantic Web: opportunities and challenges for next-generation Web applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a growing interest in the investigation and development of the next generation web - the Semantic Web. While most of the current forms of web content are designed to be presented to humans, but are barely understandable by computers, the content of the Semantic Web is structured in a semantic way so that it is meaningful to computers as well as to humans. In this paper, we report a survey of recent research on the Semantic Web. In particular, we present the opportunities that this revolution will bring to us: web-services, agent-based distributed computing, semantics-based web search engines, and semantics-based digital libraries. We also discuss the technical and cultural challenges of realizing the Semantic Web: the development of ontologies, formal semantics of Semantic Web languages, and trust and proof models. We hope that this will shed some light on the direction of future work on this field.

  9. Social networking for language learners: Creating meaningful output with Web 2.0 tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Chartrand

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has the potential to provide language learners with vast resources of authentic written, audio, and video materials to supplement lessons. Educators can find a wide assortment of materials for learners to study in class or after class for independent learning and to encourage learner autonomy. More recently, however, the immense popularity of social networking websites has created new opportunities for language learners to interact in authentic ways that were previously difficult to achieve. Advances in technology mean that today, learners of a language can easily interact with their peers in meaningful practice that helps foster language acquisition and motivation. That is, tasks that make use of Web 2.0 interactivity can significantly raise students’ potential to generate meaningful output and stimulate their interest in language learning.

  10. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Natalya F; Shah, Nigam H; Whetzel, Patricia L; Chute, Christopher G; Story, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry

    2011-01-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology is now in its seventh year. The goals of this National Center for Biomedical Computing are to: create and maintain a repository of biomedical ontologies and terminologies; build tools and web services to enable the use of ontologies and terminologies in clinical and translational research; educate their trainees and the scientific community broadly about biomedical ontology and ontology-based technology and best practices; and collaborate with a variety of groups who develop and use ontologies and terminologies in biomedicine. The centerpiece of the National Center for Biomedical Ontology is a web-based resource known as BioPortal. BioPortal makes available for research in computationally useful forms more than 270 of the world's biomedical ontologies and terminologies, and supports a wide range of web services that enable investigators to use the ontologies to annotate and retrieve data, to generate value sets and special-purpose lexicons, and to perform advanced analytics on a wide range of biomedical data. PMID:22081220

  11. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musen, Mark A; Noy, Natalya F; Shah, Nigam H; Whetzel, Patricia L; Chute, Christopher G; Story, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology is now in its seventh year. The goals of this National Center for Biomedical Computing are to: create and maintain a repository of biomedical ontologies and terminologies; build tools and web services to enable the use of ontologies and terminologies in clinical and translational research; educate their trainees and the scientific community broadly about biomedical ontology and ontology-based technology and best practices; and collaborate with a variety of groups who develop and use ontologies and terminologies in biomedicine. The centerpiece of the National Center for Biomedical Ontology is a web-based resource known as BioPortal. BioPortal makes available for research in computationally useful forms more than 270 of the world's biomedical ontologies and terminologies, and supports a wide range of web services that enable investigators to use the ontologies to annotate and retrieve data, to generate value sets and special-purpose lexicons, and to perform advanced analytics on a wide range of biomedical data.

  12. SUGOI: automated ontology interchangeability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khan, ZC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available : Automated Ontology Interchangeability Zubeida Casmod Khan and C. Maria Abstract. A foundational ontology can solve interoperability issues among the domain ontologies aligned to it. However, several foundational ontologies have been developed, hence...

  13. A query integrator and manager for the query web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, James F; Detwiler, Landon T

    2012-10-01

    We introduce two concepts: the Query Web as a layer of interconnected queries over the document web and the semantic web, and a Query Web Integrator and Manager (QI) that enables the Query Web to evolve. QI permits users to write, save and reuse queries over any web accessible source, including other queries saved in other installations of QI. The saved queries may be in any language (e.g. SPARQL, XQuery); the only condition for interconnection is that the queries return their results in some form of XML. This condition allows queries to chain off each other, and to be written in whatever language is appropriate for the task. We illustrate the potential use of QI for several biomedical use cases, including ontology view generation using a combination of graph-based and logical approaches, value set generation for clinical data management, image annotation using terminology obtained from an ontology web service, ontology-driven brain imaging data integration, small-scale clinical data integration, and wider-scale clinical data integration. Such use cases illustrate the current range of applications of QI and lead us to speculate about the potential evolution from smaller groups of interconnected queries into a larger query network that layers over the document and semantic web. The resulting Query Web could greatly aid researchers and others who now have to manually navigate through multiple information sources in order to answer specific questions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Query Integrator and Manager for the Query Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, James F.; Detwiler, Landon T.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce two concepts: the Query Web as a layer of interconnected queries over the document web and the semantic web, and a Query Web Integrator and Manager (QI) that enables the Query Web to evolve. QI permits users to write, save and reuse queries over any web accessible source, including other queries saved in other installations of QI. The saved queries may be in any language (e.g. SPARQL, XQuery); the only condition for interconnection is that the queries return their results in some form of XML. This condition allows queries to chain off each other, and to be written in whatever language is appropriate for the task. We illustrate the potential use of QI for several biomedical use cases, including ontology view generation using a combination of graph-based and logical approaches, value set generation for clinical data management, image annotation using terminology obtained from an ontology web service, ontology-driven brain imaging data integration, small-scale clinical data integration, and wider-scale clinical data integration. Such use cases illustrate the current range of applications of QI and lead us to speculate about the potential evolution from smaller groups of interconnected queries into a larger query network that layers over the document and semantic web. The resulting Query Web could greatly aid researchers and others who now have to manually navigate through multiple information sources in order to answer specific questions. PMID:22531831

  15. Design and development of semantic web-based system for computer science domain-specific information retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritika Bansal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In semantic web-based system, the concept of ontology is used to search results by contextual meaning of input query instead of keyword matching. From the research literature, there seems to be a need for a tool which can provide an easy interface for complex queries in natural language that can retrieve the domain-specific information from the ontology. This research paper proposes an IRSCSD system (Information retrieval system for computer science domain as a solution. This system offers advanced querying and browsing of structured data with search results automatically aggregated and rendered directly in a consistent user-interface, thus reducing the manual effort of users. So, the main objective of this research is design and development of semantic web-based system for integrating ontology towards domain-specific retrieval support. Methodology followed is a piecemeal research which involves the following stages. First Stage involves the designing of framework for semantic web-based system. Second stage builds the prototype for the framework using Protégé tool. Third Stage deals with the natural language query conversion into SPARQL query language using Python-based QUEPY framework. Fourth Stage involves firing of converted SPARQL queries to the ontology through Apache's Jena API to fetch the results. Lastly, evaluation of the prototype has been done in order to ensure its efficiency and usability. Thus, this research paper throws light on framework development for semantic web-based system that assists in efficient retrieval of domain-specific information, natural language query interpretation into semantic web language, creation of domain-specific ontology and its mapping with related ontology. This research paper also provides approaches and metrics for ontology evaluation on prototype ontology developed to study the performance based on accessibility of required domain-related information.

  16. Ontologies as integrative tools for plant science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Ramona L.; Athreya, Balaji; Cooper, Laurel; Elser, Justin; Gandolfo, Maria A.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Mungall, Christopher J.; Preece, Justin; Rensing, Stefan; Smith, Barry; Stevenson, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the semantic web. Methods This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to plant science, with a detailed description of the Plant Ontology (PO). We discuss the challenges of building an ontology that covers all green plants (Viridiplantae). Key results Ontologies can advance plant science in four keys areas: (1) comparative genetics, genomics, phenomics, and development; (2) taxonomy and systematics; (3) semantic applications; and (4) education. Conclusions Bio-ontologies offer a flexible framework for comparative plant biology, based on common botanical understanding. As genomic and phenomic data become available for more species, we anticipate that the annotation of data with ontology terms will become less centralized, while at the same time, the need for cross-species queries will become more common, causing more researchers in plant science to turn to ontologies. PMID:22847540

  17. Developing a Philippine Cancer Grid. Part 1: Building a Prototype for a Data Retrieval System for Breast Cancer Research Using Medical Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, Andrei D.; Saldana, Rafael P.

    Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Philippines. Developed within the context of a Philippine Cancer Grid, the present study used web development technologies such as PHP, MySQL, and Apache server to build a prototype data retrieval system for breast cancer research that incorporates medical ontologies from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS).

  18. A Model Theoretic Semantics for Ontology Versioning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heflin, Jeff; Pan, Zhengxiang

    2004-01-01

    .... Since the Web is the product of a diverse community, as opposed to a single agent, this semantics accommodates different viewpoints by having different entailment relations for different ontology perspectives...

  19. A Bayesian Network Approach to Ontology Mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Rong; Ding, Zhongli; Yu, Yang; Peng, Yun

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents our ongoing effort on developing a principled methodology for automatic ontology mapping based on BayesOWL, a probabilistic framework we developed for modeling uncertainty in semantic web...

  20. Analysis of Web Spam for Non-English Content: Toward More Effective Language-Based Classifiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Alsaleh

    Full Text Available Web spammers aim to obtain higher ranks for their web pages by including spam contents that deceive search engines in order to include their pages in search results even when they are not related to the search terms. Search engines continue to develop new web spam detection mechanisms, but spammers also aim to improve their tools to evade detection. In this study, we first explore the effect of the page language on spam detection features and we demonstrate how the best set of detection features varies according to the page language. We also study the performance of Google Penguin, a newly developed anti-web spamming technique for their search engine. Using spam pages in Arabic as a case study, we show that unlike similar English pages, Google anti-spamming techniques are ineffective against a high proportion of Arabic spam pages. We then explore multiple detection features for spam pages to identify an appropriate set of features that yields a high detection accuracy compared with the integrated Google Penguin technique. In order to build and evaluate our classifier, as well as to help researchers to conduct consistent measurement studies, we collected and manually labeled a corpus of Arabic web pages, including both benign and spam pages. Furthermore, we developed a browser plug-in that utilizes our classifier to warn users about spam pages after clicking on a URL and by filtering out search engine results. Using Google Penguin as a benchmark, we provide an illustrative example to show that language-based web spam classifiers are more effective for capturing spam contents.

  1. Analysis of Web Spam for Non-English Content: Toward More Effective Language-Based Classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaleh, Mansour; Alarifi, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Web spammers aim to obtain higher ranks for their web pages by including spam contents that deceive search engines in order to include their pages in search results even when they are not related to the search terms. Search engines continue to develop new web spam detection mechanisms, but spammers also aim to improve their tools to evade detection. In this study, we first explore the effect of the page language on spam detection features and we demonstrate how the best set of detection features varies according to the page language. We also study the performance of Google Penguin, a newly developed anti-web spamming technique for their search engine. Using spam pages in Arabic as a case study, we show that unlike similar English pages, Google anti-spamming techniques are ineffective against a high proportion of Arabic spam pages. We then explore multiple detection features for spam pages to identify an appropriate set of features that yields a high detection accuracy compared with the integrated Google Penguin technique. In order to build and evaluate our classifier, as well as to help researchers to conduct consistent measurement studies, we collected and manually labeled a corpus of Arabic web pages, including both benign and spam pages. Furthermore, we developed a browser plug-in that utilizes our classifier to warn users about spam pages after clicking on a URL and by filtering out search engine results. Using Google Penguin as a benchmark, we provide an illustrative example to show that language-based web spam classifiers are more effective for capturing spam contents.

  2. Comparing Web Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Turkish and English Language Teaching Department Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furkan AYDIN

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In today’s information age, with the developing of technology, the Internet is now used in nearly every field. The Internet, which makes the accessing and sharing of information easier, has become the most used technology of our age. As a result of the Internet’s effect on every sector, the education sector has also witnessed many changes, with technology having affected the education through new teaching approaches and technological tools in education have become widespread. Accordingly, teachers need to make use of the web technologies actively and effectively. Teachers’ development on web usage skills for teaching purposes should start from the pre-service period. From this aspect, besides the content knowledge and pedagogical formation, teachers should have technological, especially Internet knowledge before graduating and should be able to integrate these knowledge areas into their lessons. Especially nowadays, considering the fact that pre-service and in-service education is provided through the Internet, teachers’ web pedagogical content knowledge increases in importance. In consideration of the literature, it was seen that studies on web pedagogical content knowledge increased day by day. However, there has been no comparison between departments which aim to teach languages. Therefore, it was considered that research on language teaching departments’ web pedagogical content knowledge would contribute to the field. In this study, web pedagogical content knowledge of students who studied Turkish and English Language Teaching at Sakarya University’s Faculty of Education in Turkey during the 2014-2015 Spring semester was examined in terms of several variables.

  3. WEB-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL ENVIRONMENTS: TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR EFFECTIVE SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Roman

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of the Internet and especially the World Wide Web for the teaching and learning of foreign languages has grown spectacularly in the past five years. Nevertheless, designing and implementing sound materials for an online learning environment involves timeconsuming processes in which many instructors may be reluctant to participate. For this reason. Web-based course management systems (WCMSs have begun to flourish in the market, in an effoi-t to assist teachers to create learning environments in which students have the necessary means to interact effectively with their peers, their instructors, and the course material. This article reviews the nature of WCMSs, their advantages and disadvantages, and their potential for language learning by focusing on key issues that surround the design implementation, and assessment of Web-based language courses, and by explaining how to integrate WCMSs to increase students' exposure to authentic materials and language-learning related activities, and to motivate them to engage in ineaningful communication processes and collaborative activities.

  4. Ontology mapping specification in description logics for cooperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We develop an architecture for mapping different systems associated with ontologies. In this paper we present the key components and the underlying concepts of a framework and approach for comparing and matching different ontologies. Keywords: Mappings, ontologies, web sémantique, calcul de similarité estimation\\' ...

  5. BioSWR – Semantic Web Services Registry for Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repchevsky, Dmitry; Gelpi, Josep Ll.

    2014-01-01

    Despite of the variety of available Web services registries specially aimed at Life Sciences, their scope is usually restricted to a limited set of well-defined types of services. While dedicated registries are generally tied to a particular format, general-purpose ones are more adherent to standards and usually rely on Web Service Definition Language (WSDL). Although WSDL is quite flexible to support common Web services types, its lack of semantic expressiveness led to various initiatives to describe Web services via ontology languages. Nevertheless, WSDL 2.0 descriptions gained a standard representation based on Web Ontology Language (OWL). BioSWR is a novel Web services registry that provides standard Resource Description Framework (RDF) based Web services descriptions along with the traditional WSDL based ones. The registry provides Web-based interface for Web services registration, querying and annotation, and is also accessible programmatically via Representational State Transfer (REST) API or using a SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language. BioSWR server is located at http://inb.bsc.es/BioSWR/and its code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/bioswr/under the LGPL license. PMID:25233118

  6. BioSWR--semantic web services registry for bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repchevsky, Dmitry; Gelpi, Josep Ll

    2014-01-01

    Despite of the variety of available Web services registries specially aimed at Life Sciences, their scope is usually restricted to a limited set of well-defined types of services. While dedicated registries are generally tied to a particular format, general-purpose ones are more adherent to standards and usually rely on Web Service Definition Language (WSDL). Although WSDL is quite flexible to support common Web services types, its lack of semantic expressiveness led to various initiatives to describe Web services via ontology languages. Nevertheless, WSDL 2.0 descriptions gained a standard representation based on Web Ontology Language (OWL). BioSWR is a novel Web services registry that provides standard Resource Description Framework (RDF) based Web services descriptions along with the traditional WSDL based ones. The registry provides Web-based interface for Web services registration, querying and annotation, and is also accessible programmatically via Representational State Transfer (REST) API or using a SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language. BioSWR server is located at http://inb.bsc.es/BioSWR/and its code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/bioswr/under the LGPL license.

  7. BioSWR--semantic web services registry for bioinformatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Repchevsky

    Full Text Available Despite of the variety of available Web services registries specially aimed at Life Sciences, their scope is usually restricted to a limited set of well-defined types of services. While dedicated registries are generally tied to a particular format, general-purpose ones are more adherent to standards and usually rely on Web Service Definition Language (WSDL. Although WSDL is quite flexible to support common Web services types, its lack of semantic expressiveness led to various initiatives to describe Web services via ontology languages. Nevertheless, WSDL 2.0 descriptions gained a standard representation based on Web Ontology Language (OWL. BioSWR is a novel Web services registry that provides standard Resource Description Framework (RDF based Web services descriptions along with the traditional WSDL based ones. The registry provides Web-based interface for Web services registration, querying and annotation, and is also accessible programmatically via Representational State Transfer (REST API or using a SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language. BioSWR server is located at http://inb.bsc.es/BioSWR/and its code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/bioswr/under the LGPL license.

  8. Diseño de una ontología para aplicaciones en el dominio de la movilidad sostenible: el coche compartido

    OpenAIRE

    Sauras Pérez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    El presente Trabajo Fin de Master diseña y desarrolla una ontología en lenguaje OWL (Ontology Web Language) para una aplicación en el dominio de la movilidad sostenible, como es el coche compartido. Así, se trata de presentar una base para la aplicación de tecnologías de Web Semántica en este tipo de sistemas. De esta forma, se podría facilitar la interoperabilidad entre los distintos portales existentes de coche compartido, de forma que los distintos usuarios puedan llegar a e...

  9. Teaching medicine with a terminology/ontology portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, Julien; Merabti, Tayeb; Griffon, Nicolas; Dahamna, Badisse; Darmoni, Stéfan J

    2012-01-01

    The Health Terminology/Ontology Portal (HeTOP) was developed to provide easy access to health terminologies and ontologie. The repository is not only dedicated to professionals but is also a valuable teaching tool. Currently, it provides access to thirty two health terminologies and ontologies available mainly in French or in English, but also in German, Italian, Chinese, etc. HeTOP can be used by both humans and computers via Web services. To integrate new resources into HeTOP, three steps are necessary: (1) designing a meta-model into which each terminology (or ontology) can be integrated, (2) developing a process to include terminologies into HeTOP, (3) building and integrating existing and new inter & intra-terminology semantic harmonization into HeTOP. Currently, 600 unique machines use the MeSH version of HeTOP every day and restricted terminologies/ontologies are used for teaching purposes in several medical schools in France. The multilingual version of HeTOP is available (URL: http://hetop.eu/) and provides free access to ICD10 and FMA in ten languages. HeTOP is a rich tool, useful for a wide range of applications and users, especially in education and resource indexing but also in information retrieval or performing audits in terminology management.

  10. SEMANTIC WEB TECHNOLOGIES: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Minakshi Sharma *, Chanda Monga, Sakshi Kalra

    2017-01-01

    The term “Semantic Web” is often used more specifi­cally to refer to the formats and technologies that enable it . These technologies include the Resource Description Framework (RDF), a variety of data substitution formats, and notations such as RDF Schema and the Web Ontology Language, all of which are intended to provide a formal description of concepts, terms, and relationships within a given knowl­edge domain. In the last decade the increasing popularity of the World Wide Web has lead to ...

  11. Logical Gene Ontology Annotations (GOAL): exploring gene ontology annotations with OWL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, Simon; Stevens, Robert; Hoehndorf, Robert

    2012-04-24

    Ontologies such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and their use in annotations make cross species comparisons of genes possible, along with a wide range of other analytical activities. The bio-ontologies community, in particular the Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) community, have provided many other ontologies and an increasingly large volume of annotations of gene products that can be exploited in query and analysis. As many annotations with different ontologies centre upon gene products, there is a possibility to explore gene products through multiple ontological perspectives at the same time. Questions could be asked that link a gene product's function, process, cellular location, phenotype and disease. Current tools, such as AmiGO, allow exploration of genes based on their GO annotations, but not through multiple ontological perspectives. In addition, the semantics of these ontology's representations should be able to, through automated reasoning, afford richer query opportunities of the gene product annotations than is currently possible. To do this multi-perspective, richer querying of gene product annotations, we have created the Logical Gene Ontology, or GOAL ontology, in OWL that combines the Gene Ontology, Human Disease Ontology and the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, together with classes that represent the annotations with these ontologies for mouse gene products. Each mouse gene product is represented as a class, with the appropriate relationships to the GO aspects, phenotype and disease with which it has been annotated. We then use defined classes to query these protein classes through automated reasoning, and to build a complex hierarchy of gene products. We have presented this through a Web interface that allows arbitrary queries to be constructed and the results displayed. This standard use of OWL affords a rich interaction with Gene Ontology, Human Disease Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology annotations for the mouse, to give a fine partitioning of

  12. Where to Publish and Find Ontologies? A Survey of Ontology Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Aquin, Mathieu; Noy, Natalya F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the key promises of the Semantic Web is its potential to enable and facilitate data interoperability. The ability of data providers and application developers to share and reuse ontologies is a critical component of this data interoperability: if different applications and data sources use the same set of well defined terms for describing their domain and data, it will be much easier for them to “talk” to one another. Ontology libraries are the systems that collect ontologies from different sources and facilitate the tasks of finding, exploring, and using these ontologies. Thus ontology libraries can serve as a link in enabling diverse users and applications to discover, evaluate, use, and publish ontologies. In this paper, we provide a survey of the growing—and surprisingly diverse—landscape of ontology libraries. We highlight how the varying scope and intended use of the libraries a ects their features, content, and potential exploitation in applications. From reviewing eleven ontology libraries, we identify a core set of questions that ontology practitioners and users should consider in choosing an ontology library for finding ontologies or publishing their own. We also discuss the research challenges that emerge from this survey, for the developers of ontology libraries to address. PMID:22408576

  13. The plant ontology as a tool for comparative plant anatomy and genomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Laurel; Walls, Ramona L; Elser, Justin; Gandolfo, Maria A; Stevenson, Dennis W; Smith, Barry; Preece, Justin; Athreya, Balaji; Mungall, Christopher J; Rensing, Stefan; Hiss, Manuel; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Berardini, Tanya Z; Li, Donghui; Huala, Eva; Schaeffer, Mary; Menda, Naama; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Shrestha, Rosemary; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2013-02-01

    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary ('ontology') of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded to include all green plants. The PO was the first multispecies anatomy ontology developed for the annotation of genes and phenotypes. Also, to our knowledge, it was one of the first biological ontologies that provides translations (via synonyms) in non-English languages such as Japanese and Spanish. As of Release #18 (July 2012), there are about 2.2 million annotations linking PO terms to >110,000 unique data objects representing genes or gene models, proteins, RNAs, germplasm and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from 22 plant species. In this paper, we focus on the plant anatomical entity branch of the PO, describing the organizing principles, resources available to users and examples of how the PO is integrated into other plant genomics databases and web portals. We also provide two examples of comparative analyses, demonstrating how the ontology structure and PO-annotated data can be used to discover the patterns of expression of the LEAFY (LFY) and terpene synthase (TPS) gene homologs.

  14. Do sign language videos improve Web navigation for Deaf Signer users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Inmaculada; Parra, Elena; Cañas, José J

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of video-based sign language (SL) navigation aids to improve Web search for Deaf Signers was tested by two experiments. Experiment 1 compared 2 navigation aids based on text hyperlinks linked to embedded SL videos, which differed in the spatial contiguity between the text hyperlink and SL video (contiguous vs. distant). Deaf Signers' performance was similar in Web search using both aids, but a positive correlation between their word categorization abilities and search efficiency appeared in the distant condition. In Experiment 2, the contiguous condition was compared with a text-only hyperlink condition. Deaf Signers became less disorientated (used shorter paths to find the target) in the text plus SL condition than in the text-only condition. In addition, the positive correlation between word categorization abilities and search only appeared in the text-only condition. These findings suggest that SL videos added to text hyperlinks improve Web search efficiency for Deaf Signers.

  15. Ontorat: automatic generation of new ontology terms, annotations, and axioms based on ontology design patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zuoshuang; Zheng, Jie; Lin, Yu; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    It is time-consuming to build an ontology with many terms and axioms. Thus it is desired to automate the process of ontology development. Ontology Design Patterns (ODPs) provide a reusable solution to solve a recurrent modeling problem in the context of ontology engineering. Because ontology terms often follow specific ODPs, the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) developers proposed a Quick Term Templates (QTTs) process targeted at generating new ontology classes following the same pattern, using term templates in a spreadsheet format. Inspired by the ODPs and QTTs, the Ontorat web application is developed to automatically generate new ontology terms, annotations of terms, and logical axioms based on a specific ODP(s). The inputs of an Ontorat execution include axiom expression settings, an input data file, ID generation settings, and a target ontology (optional). The axiom expression settings can be saved as a predesigned Ontorat setting format text file for reuse. The input data file is generated based on a template file created by a specific ODP (text or Excel format). Ontorat is an efficient tool for ontology expansion. Different use cases are described. For example, Ontorat was applied to automatically generate over 1,000 Japan RIKEN cell line cell terms with both logical axioms and rich annotation axioms in the Cell Line Ontology (CLO). Approximately 800 licensed animal vaccines were represented and annotated in the Vaccine Ontology (VO) by Ontorat. The OBI team used Ontorat to add assay and device terms required by ENCODE project. Ontorat was also used to add missing annotations to all existing Biobank specific terms in the Biobank Ontology. A collection of ODPs and templates with examples are provided on the Ontorat website and can be reused to facilitate ontology development. With ever increasing ontology development and applications, Ontorat provides a timely platform for generating and annotating a large number of ontology terms by following

  16. F-OWL: An Inference Engine for Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Youyong; Finin, Tim; Chen, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Understanding and using the data and knowledge encoded in semantic web documents requires an inference engine. F-OWL is an inference engine for the semantic web language OWL language based on F-logic, an approach to defining frame-based systems in logic. F-OWL is implemented using XSB and Flora-2 and takes full advantage of their features. We describe how F-OWL computes ontology entailment and compare it with other description logic based approaches. We also describe TAGA, a trading agent environment that we have used as a test bed for F-OWL and to explore how multiagent systems can use semantic web concepts and technology.

  17. Ontology of Bio-Medical Educational Objectives (OBEO: ein Vorschlag für eine Ontologie medizinischer Lernziele / A proposal for an Ontology of Bio-Medical Educational Objectives (OBEO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeker, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Ontology of Bio-Medical Educational Objectives (OBEO is a formal ontology for the annotation of educational objective catalogues and learning object resources to improve their usability. OBEO has been designed to allow semantic retrieval and navigation of educational objectives as well as the solution of questions in regard to consistency, sequence and correctness of educational objectives in databases. Methods: To specify OBEO various educational objective taxonomies and catalogues were analyzed and a requirements analysis was performed. OBEO was developed on the foundation of the top-level ontology Descriptive Ontology for Linguistic and Cognitive Engineering (DOLCE and the upper-level ontology BioTop. It was implemented in the Web Ontology Language (OWL. Medical content is bound by links to reference terminologies and ontologies. Results: OBEO provides classes and relations for the correct and almost complete representation of educational objectives. OBEO formalizes the relations between educational objective specifications and the concrete actions which realize them as well as the medical contents which are bound to them. Although OBEO uses only few own classes and relations, its complexity is already extensive. Conclusion: OBEO is a prototypical tool to annotate existing and developing educational objective catalogues and learning object resources for their better usability. OBEO has to be further developed and improved in regard to the representation of medical content in educational objectives and the inclusion of curricular context of educational objectives. The formal representation of OBEO enables the retrieval and navigation of annotated data in regard to content.

  18. The Effects of Web 2.0 Technologies Usage in Programming Languages Lesson on the Academic Success, Interrogative Learning Skills and Attitudes of Students towards Programming Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençtürk, Abdullah Tarik; Korucu, Agah Tugrul

    2017-01-01

    It is observed that teacher candidates receiving education in the department of Computer and Instructional Technologies Education are not able to gain enough experience and knowledge in "Programming Languages" lesson. The goal of this study is to analyse the effects of web 2.0 technologies usage in programming languages lesson on the…

  19. MultiFarm: A Benchmark for Multilingual Ontology Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meilicke, C.; García-Castro, R.; Freitas, F.; van Hage, W.R.; Montiel-Ponsoda, E.; Ribeiro de Azevedo, R.; Stuckenschmidt, H.; Svab-Zamazal, O.; Svatek, V.; Tamalin, A.; Wang, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the MultiFarm dataset, which has been designed as a benchmark for multilingual ontology matching. The MultiFarm dataset is composed of a set of ontologies translated in different languages and the corresponding alignments between these ontologies. It is based on the OntoFarm

  20. AUTOMATIC TAGGING OF PERSIAN WEB PAGES BASED ON N-GRAM LANGUAGE MODELS USING MAPREDUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shahrivari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Page tagging is one of the most important facilities for increasing the accuracy of information retrieval in the web. Tags are simple pieces of data that usually consist of one or several words, and briefly describe a page. Tags provide useful information about a page and can be used for boosting the accuracy of searching, document clustering, and result grouping. The most accurate solution to page tagging is using human experts. However, when the number of pages is large, humans cannot be used, and some automatic solutions should be used instead. We propose a solution called PerTag which can automatically tag a set of Persian web pages. PerTag is based on n-gram models and uses the tf-idf method plus some effective Persian language rules to select proper tags for each web page. Since our target is huge sets of web pages, PerTag is built on top of the MapReduce distributed computing framework. We used a set of more than 500 million Persian web pages during our experiments, and extracted tags for each page using a cluster of 40 machines. The experimental results show that PerTag is both fast and accurate

  1. Building ontologies with basic formal ontology

    CERN Document Server

    Arp, Robert; Spear, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    In the era of "big data," science is increasingly information driven, and the potential for computers to store, manage, and integrate massive amounts of data has given rise to such new disciplinary fields as biomedical informatics. Applied ontology offers a strategy for the organization of scientific information in computer-tractable form, drawing on concepts not only from computer and information science but also from linguistics, logic, and philosophy. This book provides an introduction to the field of applied ontology that is of particular relevance to biomedicine, covering theoretical components of ontologies, best practices for ontology design, and examples of biomedical ontologies in use. After defining an ontology as a representation of the types of entities in a given domain, the book distinguishes between different kinds of ontologies and taxonomies, and shows how applied ontology draws on more traditional ideas from metaphysics. It presents the core features of the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO), now u...

  2. Taxonomía, ontología y folksonomía, ¿qué son y qué beneficios u oportunidades presentan para los usuarios de la web?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor Nancy Díaz Piraquive

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Many persons, public entities and especially private entities are trying to obtain the best out of the use of the technological infrastructure in information and communication. This technology is acquired not only as a tool for the development of processes and activities in their daily tasks but also as an opportunity to build knowledge by means of collaborative learning. This article briefl y describes how topics related with taxonomy, ontology, and folksonomy contribute to the generation of new knowledge in an appropriate manner. Several elements such as ¿what are they? , ¿who uses them? ¿what benefi ts do they bring? And what opportunities they bring to users of the web. Some of the important considerations on taxonomies show how these go on to be the science that deals with the principals, methods and purpose of the classifi cation to become the technology used for an effi cient management of the information and contents. Taxonomy is the essential element in the building of knowledge within the organizations. Regarding the ontologies, we will show how based on them we are able to defi ne vocabularies that may be understood and specifi ed by computer units with enough precision to allow differentiating terms and referencing them in a precise manner, thus making the search in web easier and optimizing the users’ resources. Lastly, on folksonomies we will show that it is a manner of taking advantage of the knowledge people have in an organic and democratic manner by organizing and classifying the information that travels through the Internet based on a collaborative environment through agreements that lead to the achievement of a common goal. This article is directed towards those who are interested in the current topics such as taxonomies, ontologies and folksonomies.

  3. Pitfalls of Ontology in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldosari, Bakheet; Alanazi, Abdullah; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    Much research has been done in the last few decades in clinical research, medicine, life sciences, etc. leading to an exponential increase in the generation of data. Managing this vast information not only requires integration of the data, but also a means to analyze, relate, and retrieve it. Ontology, in the field of medicine, describes the concepts of medical terminologies and the relation between them, thus, enabling the sharing of medical knowledge. Ontology-based analyses are associated with a risk that errors in modeling may deteriorate the results' quality. Identifying flawed practices or anomalies in ontologies is a crucial issue to be addressed by researchers. In this paper, we review the negative sides of ontology in the field of medicine. Our study results show that ontologies are perceived as a mere tool to represent medical knowledge, thus relying more on the computer science-based understanding of medical terms. While this approach may be sufficient for data entry systems, in which the users merely need to browse the hierarchy and select relevant terms, it may not suffice the real-world scenario of dealing with complex patient records, which are not only grammatically complex, but also are sometimes documented in many native languages. In conclusion, more research is required in identifying poor practices and anomalies in the development of ontologies by computer scientists within the field of medicine.

  4. Semantic enrichment for medical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yugyung; Geller, James

    2006-04-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) contains two separate but interconnected knowledge structures, the Semantic Network (upper level) and the Metathesaurus (lower level). In this paper, we have attempted to work out better how the use of such a two-level structure in the medical field has led to notable advances in terminologies and ontologies. However, most ontologies and terminologies do not have such a two-level structure. Therefore, we present a method, called semantic enrichment, which generates a two-level ontology from a given one-level terminology and an auxiliary two-level ontology. During semantic enrichment, concepts of the one-level terminology are assigned to semantic types, which are the building blocks of the upper level of the auxiliary two-level ontology. The result of this process is the desired new two-level ontology. We discuss semantic enrichment of two example terminologies and how we approach the implementation of semantic enrichment in the medical domain. This implementation performs a major part of the semantic enrichment process with the medical terminologies, with difficult cases left to a human expert.

  5. Model Validation in Ontology Based Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Almendros-Jiménez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Model Driven Engineering (MDE is an emerging approach of software engineering. MDE emphasizes the construction of models from which the implementation should be derived by applying model transformations. The Ontology Definition Meta-model (ODM has been proposed as a profile for UML models of the Web Ontology Language (OWL. In this context, transformations of UML models can be mapped into ODM/OWL transformations. On the other hand, model validation is a crucial task in model transformation. Meta-modeling permits to give a syntactic structure to source and target models. However, semantic requirements have to be imposed on source and target models. A given transformation will be sound when source and target models fulfill the syntactic and semantic requirements. In this paper, we present an approach for model validation in ODM based transformations. Adopting a logic programming based transformational approach we will show how it is possible to transform and validate models. Properties to be validated range from structural and semantic requirements of models (pre and post conditions to properties of the transformation (invariants. The approach has been applied to a well-known example of model transformation: the Entity-Relationship (ER to Relational Model (RM transformation.

  6. The eXtensible ontology development (XOD) principles and tool implementation to support ontology interoperability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Zheng, Jie; Lin, Yu; Overton, James A; Ong, Edison

    2018-01-12

    Ontologies are critical to data/metadata and knowledge standardization, sharing, and analysis. With hundreds of biological and biomedical ontologies developed, it has become critical to ensure ontology interoperability and the usage of interoperable ontologies for standardized data representation and integration. The suite of web-based Ontoanimal tools (e.g., Ontofox, Ontorat, and Ontobee) support different aspects of extensible ontology development. By summarizing the common features of Ontoanimal and other similar tools, we identified and proposed an "eXtensible Ontology Development" (XOD) strategy and its associated four principles. These XOD principles reuse existing terms and semantic relations from reliable ontologies, develop and apply well-established ontology design patterns (ODPs), and involve community efforts to support new ontology development, promoting standardized and interoperable data and knowledge representation and integration. The adoption of the XOD strategy, together with robust XOD tool development, will greatly support ontology interoperability and robust ontology applications to support data to be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (i.e., FAIR).

  7. Tool-supported building of DSLs from OWL ontologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ceh, Ines; Crepinsek, Matej; Kosar, Tomaz; Mernik, Marjan; Henriques, Pedro; Pereira, Maria João; Cruz, Daniela; Oliveira, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    Domain-specific languages (DSLs) are computer languages intended for problem solving in a specific domain. Ontology is a formal representation of a set of concepts from a particular domain and the relations between them. An ontology may be used to describe a domain and to reason about the entities within the domain. This paper presents an Ontology2DSL framework to build DSLs from OWL ontologies. Ontology2DSL enables the semi-automated construction of a formal grammar and programs from an O...

  8. Ontology Supported Information Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The exponential growth of information on the web far exceeds the capacity of present day information retrieval systems and search engines, making information integration on the web difficult. In order to overcome this, semantic web technologies were proposed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C to achieve a higher degree of automation and precision in information retrieval systems. Semantic web, with its promise to deliver machine understanding to the traditional web, has attracted a significant amount of research from academia as well as from industries. Semantic web is an extension of the current web in which data can be shared and reused across the internet. RDF and ontology are two essential components of the semantic web architecture which support a common framework for data storage and representation of data semantics, respectively. Ontologies being the backbone of semantic web applications, it is more relevant to study various approaches in their application, usage, and integration into web services. In this article, an effort has been made to review the research work being undertaken in the area of design and development of ontology supported information systems. This paper also briefly explains the emerging semantic web technologies and standards.

  9. Ontological Surprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahu, Lucian

    2016-01-01

    a hybrid approach where machine learning algorithms are used to identify objects as well as connections between them; finally, it argues for remaining open to ontological surprises in machine learning as they may enable the crafting of different relations with and through technologies.......This paper investigates how we might rethink design as the technological crafting of human-machine relations in the context of a machine learning technique called neural networks. It analyzes Google’s Inceptionism project, which uses neural networks for image recognition. The surprising output...

  10. NCBO Ontology Recommender 2.0: an enhanced approach for biomedical ontology recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Romero, Marcos; Jonquet, Clement; O'Connor, Martin J; Graybeal, John; Pazos, Alejandro; Musen, Mark A

    2017-06-07

    and usefulness. Ontology Recommender 2.0 recommends over 500 biomedical ontologies from the NCBO BioPortal platform, where it is openly available (both via the user interface at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/recommender , and via a Web service API).

  11. Ontology authoring with Forza

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Keet, CM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Generic, reusable ontology elements, such as a foundational ontology's categories and part-whole relations, are essential for good and interoperable knowledge representation. Ontology developers, which include domain experts and novices, face...

  12. Siegfried the Dragonslayer Meets the Web: Using Digital Media for Developing Historical Awareness and Advanced Language and Critical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate, German-language course that aimed to improve students' language skills, critical thinking, and declarative knowledge of German history and culture by studying multiple manifestations of the legend of Siegfried the Dragonslayer. The course used web-based e-learning tools to address two major learning…

  13. Our Policies, Their Text: German Language Students' Strategies with and Beliefs about Web-Based Machine Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kelsey D.; Heidrich, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Most educators are aware that some students utilize web-based machine translators for foreign language assignments, however, little research has been done to determine how and why students utilize these programs, or what the implications are for language learning and teaching. In this mixed-methods study we utilized surveys, a translation task,…

  14. Implementation of the principles of object-language integrated learning through tehnology WEB 2.0 in a technical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ксения Григорьевна Григорьева

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In article the CLIL technology is described, and also the principles of the subject and language integrated training are considered. The example of use of the Web 2.0 on the basis of the principles of CLIL is given when forming foreign-language professional competence of students of technical specialties.

  15. An Investigation into Chinese College English Teachers' Beliefs of Students' Web-Based Informal Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahong

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of information and technology, language learners have more ways to acquire the target language. Recently, WILL has gained popularity, for informal web-based learning of English has been depicted as a process driven by the purpose of communication. Thus, teachers have many challenges when teaching learners who have…

  16. Semantic similarity between ontologies at different scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingpeng; Haglin, David J.

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, existing and new knowledge and datasets has been encoded in different ontologies for semantic web and biomedical research. The size of ontologies is often very large in terms of number of concepts and relationships, which makes the analysis of ontologies and the represented knowledge graph computational and time consuming. As the ontologies of various semantic web and biomedical applications usually show explicit hierarchical structures, it is interesting to explore the trade-offs between ontological scales and preservation/precision of results when we analyze ontologies. This paper presents the first effort of examining the capability of this idea via studying the relationship between scaling biomedical ontologies at different levels and the semantic similarity values. We evaluate the semantic similarity between three Gene Ontology slims (Plant, Yeast, and Candida, among which the latter two belong to the same kingdom—Fungi) using four popular measures commonly applied to biomedical ontologies (Resnik, Lin, Jiang-Conrath, and SimRel). The results of this study demonstrate that with proper selection of scaling levels and similarity measures, we can significantly reduce the size of ontologies without losing substantial detail. In particular, the performance of Jiang-Conrath and Lin are more reliable and stable than that of the other two in this experiment, as proven by (a) consistently showing that Yeast and Candida are more similar (as compared to Plant) at different scales, and (b) small deviations of the similarity values after excluding a majority of nodes from several lower scales. This study provides a deeper understanding of the application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies, and shed light on how to choose appropriate semantic similarity measures for biomedical engineering.

  17. Dynamic Generation of Reduced Ontologies to Support Resource Constraints of Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpsher, Dan

    2011-01-01

    As Web Services and the Semantic Web become more important, enabling technologies such as web service ontologies will grow larger. At the same time, use of mobile devices to access web services has doubled in the last year. The ability of these resource constrained devices to download and reason across these ontologies to support service discovery…

  18. Gene Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston K. Mazandu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide coverage and biological relevance of the Gene Ontology (GO, confirmed through its successful use in protein function prediction, have led to the growth in its popularity. In order to exploit the extent of biological knowledge that GO offers in describing genes or groups of genes, there is a need for an efficient, scalable similarity measure for GO terms and GO-annotated proteins. While several GO similarity measures exist, none adequately addresses all issues surrounding the design and usage of the ontology. We introduce a new metric for measuring the distance between two GO terms using the intrinsic topology of the GO-DAG, thus enabling the measurement of functional similarities between proteins based on their GO annotations. We assess the performance of this metric using a ROC analysis on human protein-protein interaction datasets and correlation coefficient analysis on the selected set of protein pairs from the CESSM online tool. This metric achieves good performance compared to the existing annotation-based GO measures. We used this new metric to assess functional similarity between orthologues, and show that it is effective at determining whether orthologues are annotated with similar functions and identifying cases where annotation is inconsistent between orthologues.

  19. Towards exergaming commons: composing the exergame ontology for publishing open game data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamparopoulos, Giorgos; Konstantinidis, Evdokimos; Bratsas, Charalampos; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that exergames have multiple benefits for physical, mental and cognitive health. Only recently, however, researchers have started considering them as health monitoring tools, through collection and analysis of game metrics data. In light of this and initiatives like the Quantified Self, there is an emerging need to open the data produced by health games and their associated metrics in order for them to be evaluated by the research community in an attempt to quantify their potential health, cognitive and physiological benefits. We have developed an ontology that describes exergames using the Web Ontology Language (OWL); it is available at http://purl.org/net/exergame/ns#. After an investigation of key components of exergames, relevant ontologies were incorporated, while necessary classes and properties were defined to model these components. A JavaScript framework was also developed in order to apply the ontology to online exergames. Finally, a SPARQL Endpoint is provided to enable open data access to potential clients through the web. Exergame components include details for players, game sessions, as well as, data produced during these game-playing sessions. The description of the game includes elements such as goals, game controllers and presentation hardware used; what is more, concepts from already existing ontologies are reused/repurposed. Game sessions include information related to the player, the date and venue where the game was played, as well as, the results/scores that were produced/achieved. These games are subsequently played by 14 users in multiple game sessions and the results derived from these sessions are published in a triplestore as open data. We model concepts related to exergames by providing a standardized structure for reference and comparison. This is the first work that publishes data from actual exergame sessions on the web, facilitating the integration and analysis of the data, while allowing open data access through

  20. Summarization by domain ontology navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    A summary is a concise description that reflects the essence of a subject. A text, a collection of text documents, or a query answer can be summarized by simple means such as an automatically generated list of the most frequent words or “advanced” by a meaningful natural language description...... be a simple taxonomy or a generative domain ontology. A domain ontology can be provided by a preanalysis of a domain corpus and can be used to condense improved summaries that better reflects the conceptualization of a given domain....

  1. Documentary languages and knowledge organization systems in the context of the semantic web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilda Lopes Ginez de Lara

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to discuss the need for formal documentary languages as a condition for it to function in the Semantic Web. Based on a bibliographic review, Linked Open Data is presented as an initial condition for the operationalization of the Semantic Web, similar to the movement of Linked Open Vocabularies that aimed to promote interoperability among vocabularies. We highlight the Simple Knowledge Organization System format by analyzing its main characteristics and presenting the new standard ISO 25964-1/2:2011/2012 -Thesauri and interoperability with other vocabularies, that revises previous recommendations, adding requirements for the interoperability and mapping of vocabularies. We discuss conceptual problems in the formalization of vocabularies and the need to invest critically in its operationalization, suggesting alternatives to harness the mapping of vocabularies.

  2. Virtual communities of practice in web-based second language learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The work of Lave and Wenger on learning in 'communities of practice' has evoked a considerable response in e-learning environments through-out the world including Denmark in the last few decades. Within the development of web-based second language learning, the ideas of learning...... in communities of practice and of situated and collaborative learning have deeply inspired educators and teachers and, to a certain degree, become the theoretical and practical framework for developing web-based learning platforms, while findings from this research indicate that students perceive e-learning...... as a far more individual process. The aim of this paper is to investigate aspects of the Danish development of e-learning platforms and, especially students’ and teachers’ very differing perceptions of e-learning and the concepts behind it. The analysis is based on student and teacher interviews, research...

  3. Challenges to web-based learning in pharmacy education in Arabic language speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramez M Alkoudmani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Web-based learning and web 2.0 tools which include new online educational technologies (EdTech and social media websites like Facebook® are playing crucial roles nowadays in pharmacy and medical education among millennial learners. Podcasting, webinars, and online learning management systems like Moodle® and other web 2.0 tools have been used in pharmacy and medical education to interactively share knowledge with peers and students. Learners can use laptops, iPads, iPhones, or tablet devices with a stable and good Internet connection to enroll in many online courses. Implementation of novel online EdTech in pharmacy and medical curricula has been noticed in developed countries such as European countries, the US, Canada, and Australia. However, these trends are scarce in the majority of Arabic language speaking countries (ALSC, where traditional and didactic educational methods are still being used with some exceptions seen in Palestine, Kuwait, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, UAE, and Qatar. Although these new trends are promising to push pharmacy and medical education forward, major barriers regarding adaptation of E-learning and new online EdTech in Arab states have been reported such as higher connectivity costs, information communication technology (ICT problems, language barriers, wars and political conflicts, poor education, financial problems, and lack of qualified ICT-savvy educators. More research efforts are encouraged to study the effectiveness and proper use of web-based learning and emerging online EdTech in pharmacy education not only in ALSC but also in developing and developed countries.

  4. Integrating natural language processing and web GIS for interactive knowledge domain visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fangming

    Recent years have seen a powerful shift towards data-rich environments throughout society. This has extended to a change in how the artifacts and products of scientific knowledge production can be analyzed and understood. Bottom-up approaches are on the rise that combine access to huge amounts of academic publications with advanced computer graphics and data processing tools, including natural language processing. Knowledge domain visualization is one of those multi-technology approaches, with its aim of turning domain-specific human knowledge into highly visual representations in order to better understand the structure and evolution of domain knowledge. For example, network visualizations built from co-author relations contained in academic publications can provide insight on how scholars collaborate with each other in one or multiple domains, and visualizations built from the text content of articles can help us understand the topical structure of knowledge domains. These knowledge domain visualizations need to support interactive viewing and exploration by users. Such spatialization efforts are increasingly looking to geography and GIS as a source of metaphors and practical technology solutions, even when non-georeferenced information is managed, analyzed, and visualized. When it comes to deploying spatialized representations online, web mapping and web GIS can provide practical technology solutions for interactive viewing of knowledge domain visualizations, from panning and zooming to the overlay of additional information. This thesis presents a novel combination of advanced natural language processing - in the form of topic modeling - with dimensionality reduction through self-organizing maps and the deployment of web mapping/GIS technology towards intuitive, GIS-like, exploration of a knowledge domain visualization. A complete workflow is proposed and implemented that processes any corpus of input text documents into a map form and leverages a web

  5. Development of an Web Service Architecture for Enterprise Application Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Jung, Jae-Cheon; Chang, Young-Woo; Chang, Hoon-Seon; Kim, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Hang-Bae [Korea Power Engineering Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Dong-Chul [Korea Electric Power Data Network, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) is to enable the interoperability between two or more enterprise software systems. These systems, for example, can be an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system, an Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) system or a Condition Monitoring system. Traditional EAI approach, based on point-to-point connection, is expensive, vendor specific with limited modules and restricted interoperability with other ERPs and applications. To overcome these drawbacks, the Web Service based EAI has emerged. It allows the integration without point to point linking and with less costs. Many approaches of Web service based EAI are combined with ORACLE, SAP, PeopleSoft, WebSphere, SIEBEL etc. as a system integration platform. The approach still has the restriction that only predefined clients can access the services. This means clients must know exactly the protocol for calling the services and if they don't have the access information they never can get the services. This is because these Web services are based on syntactic service description. In this paper, a semantic based EAI approach, that allows the uninformed clients to access the services, is introduced. The semantic EAI is designed with the Web services that have semantic service descriptions. The Semantic Web Services(SWS) are described in Web Ontology Language for Services(OWL-S), a semantic service ontology language, and advertised in Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI). Clients find desired services through the UDDI and get services from service providers through Web Service Description Language(WSDL)

  6. Applying the functional abnormality ontology pattern to anatomical functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoehndorf Robert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several biomedical ontologies cover the domain of biological functions, including molecular and cellular functions. However, there is currently no publicly available ontology of anatomical functions. Consequently, no explicit relation between anatomical structures and their functions is expressed in the anatomy ontologies that are available for various species. Such an explicit relation between anatomical structures and their functions would be useful both for defining the classes of the anatomy and the phenotype ontologies accurately. Results We provide an ontological analysis of functions and functional abnormalities. From this analysis, we derive an approach to the automatic extraction of anatomical functions from existing ontologies which uses a combination of natural language processing, graph-based analysis of the ontologies and formal inferences. Additionally, we introduce a new relation to link material objects to processes that realize the function of these objects. This relation is introduced to avoid a needless duplication of processes already covered by the Gene Ontology in a new ontology of anatomical functions. Conclusions Ontological considerations on the nature of functional abnormalities and their representation in current phenotype ontologies show that we can extract a skeleton for an ontology of anatomical functions by using a combination of process, phenotype and anatomy ontologies automatically. We identify several limitations of the current ontologies that still need to be addressed to ensure a consistent and complete representation of anatomical functions and their abnormalities. Availability The source code and results of our analysis are available at http://bioonto.de.

  7. An Abstract Semantics for Inference of Types and Effects in a Multi-Tier Web Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letterio Galletta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Types-and-effects are type systems, which allow one to express general semantic properties and to statically reason about program's execution. They have been widely exploited to specify static analyses, for example to track computational side effects, exceptions and communications in concurrent programs. In this paper we adopt abstract interpretation techniques to reconstruct (following the Cousot's methodology a types-and-effects system developed to handle security problems of a multi-tier web language. Our reconstruction allows us to show that this types-and-effects system is not sound with respect to the semantics of the language. In addition, we correct the soundness issues in the analysis and systematically construct a correct analyser.

  8. Geospatial semantic web

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chuanrong; Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    This book covers key issues related to Geospatial Semantic Web, including geospatial web services for spatial data interoperability; geospatial ontology for semantic interoperability; ontology creation, sharing, and integration; querying knowledge and information from heterogeneous data source; interfaces for Geospatial Semantic Web, VGI (Volunteered Geographic Information) and Geospatial Semantic Web; challenges of Geospatial Semantic Web; and development of Geospatial Semantic Web applications. This book also describes state-of-the-art technologies that attempt to solve these problems such as WFS, WMS, RDF, OWL, and GeoSPARQL, and demonstrates how to use the Geospatial Semantic Web technologies to solve practical real-world problems such as spatial data interoperability.

  9. A Query Language for Handling Big Observation Data Sets in the Sensor Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autermann, Christian; Stasch, Christoph; Jirka, Simon; Koppe, Roland

    2017-04-01

    The Sensor Web provides a framework for the standardized Web-based sharing of environmental observations and sensor metadata. While the issue of varying data formats and protocols is addressed by these standards, the fast growing size of observational data is imposing new challenges for the application of these standards. Most solutions for handling big observational datasets currently focus on remote sensing applications, while big in-situ datasets relying on vector features still lack a solid approach. Conventional Sensor Web technologies may not be adequate, as the sheer size of the data transmitted and the amount of metadata accumulated may render traditional OGC Sensor Observation Services (SOS) unusable. Besides novel approaches to store and process observation data in place, e.g. by harnessing big data technologies from mainstream IT, the access layer has to be amended to utilize and integrate these large observational data archives into applications and to enable analysis. For this, an extension to the SOS will be discussed that establishes a query language to dynamically process and filter observations at storage level, similar to the OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS) and it's Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) extension. This will enable applications to request e.g. spatial or temporal aggregated data sets in a resolution it is able to display or it requires. The approach will be developed and implemented in cooperation with the The Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research whose catalogue of data compromises marine observations of physical, chemical and biological phenomena from a wide variety of sensors, including mobile (like research vessels, aircrafts or underwater vehicles) and stationary (like buoys or research stations). Observations are made with a high temporal resolution and the resulting time series may span multiple decades.

  10. Improving Preschoolers’ Language and Literacy Skills through Web-Mediated Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Downer, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    MyTeachingPartner (MTP) is a web-mediated approach that provides ongoing support for teachers to improve the quality of their interactions with children. This study examined the effects of MTP on the preschool language and literacy development of children who are at risk for later academic difficulties. Results of this randomized controlled trial indicated that for English-only classrooms, teachers receiving a high level of support had students who made greater gains in language and literacy skills than teachers who only received access to a curricular supplement. Three implications are drawn from these findings: (1) on-going, video-based consultation holds promise not only for altering teacher-child interactions, but also improving children's learning, (2) technology allows teachers to receive intensive, effective support from a distance, and (3) there is still much to be learned about how professional development can support effective teaching of language and literacy skills to children whose home language is not English. PMID:23105917

  11. Practical experiences for the development of educational sys-tems in the semantic web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª del Mar Sánchez Vera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Semantic Web technologies have been applied in educational settings for different purposes in recent years, with the type of application being mainly defined by the way in which knowledge is represented and exploited. The basic technology for knowledge representation in Semantic Web settings is the ontology, which represents a common, shareable and reusable view of a particular application domain. Ontologies can support different activities in educational settings such as organizing course contents, classifying learning objects or assessing learning levels. Consequently, ontologies can become a very useful tool from a pedagogical perspective. This paper focuses on two different experiences where Semantic Web technologies are used in educational settings, the difference between them lying in how knowledge is obtained and represented. On the one hand, the OeLE platform uses ontologies as a support for assessment processes. Such ontologies have to be designed and implemented in semantic languages apt to be used by OeLE. On the other hand, the ENSEMBLE project pursues the development of semantic web applications by creating specific knowledge representations drawn from user needs. Our paper is consequently going to offer an in-depth analysis of the role played by ontologies, showing how they can be used in different ways drawing a comparison between model patterns and examining the ways in which they can complement each other as well as their practical implications

  12. OntoCAT - an integrated programming toolkit for common ontology application tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Adamusiak; Natalja Kurbatova; Morris A. Swertz; Helen Parkinson

    2011-01-01

    OntoCAT provides high level abstraction for interacting with ontology resources including local ontology files in standard OWL and OBO formats (via OWL API) and public ontology repositories: EBI Ontology Lookup Service (OLS) and NCBO BioPortal. Each resource is wrapped behind easy to learn Java, Bioconductor/R and REST web service commands enabling reuse and integration of ontology software efforts despite variation in technologies.

  13. The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Laurel; Walls, Ramona L.; Elser, Justin; Gandolfo, Maria A.; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Smith, Barry; Preece, Justin; Athreya, Balaji; Mungall, Christopher J.; Rensing, Stefan; Hiss, Manuel; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Li, Donghui; Huala, Eva; Schaeffer, Mary; Menda, Naama; Arnaud, Elizabeth; Shrestha, Rosemary; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Jaiswal, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (‘ontology’) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded to include all green plants. The PO was the first multispecies anatomy ontology developed for the annotation of genes and phenotypes. Also, to our knowledge, it was one of the first biological ontologies that provides translations (via synonyms) in non-English languages such as Japanese and Spanish. As of Release #18 (July 2012), there are about 2.2 million annotations linking PO terms to >110,000 unique data objects representing genes or gene models, proteins, RNAs, germplasm and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from 22 plant species. In this paper, we focus on the plant anatomical entity branch of the PO, describing the organizing principles, resources available to users and examples of how the PO is integrated into other plant genomics databases and web portals. We also provide two examples of comparative analyses, demonstrating how the ontology structure and PO-annotated data can be used to discover the patterns of expression of the LEAFY (LFY) and terpene synthase (TPS) gene homologs. PMID:23220694

  14. An Ontology for Uncertainty in Climate Change Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A. W.

    2011-12-01

    Paraphrasing Albert Einstein's aphorism about scientific quantification: not all uncertainty that counts can be counted, and not all uncertainty that can be counted counts. The meaning of the term "uncertainty" in climate change science and assessment is itself uncertain. Different disciplines and perspectives bring different nuances if not meanings of the term to the conversation. For many scientists, uncertainty is somehow associated with statistical dispersion and standard error. For many users of climate change information, uncertainty is more related to their confidence, or lack thereof, in climate models. These "uncertainties" may be related, but they are not identical, and there is considerable room for confusion and misunderstanding. A knowledge framework, a system of concepts and vocabulary, for communicating uncertainty can add structure to the characterization and quantification of uncertainty and aid communication among scientists and users. I have developed an ontology for uncertainty in climate change projections derived largely from the report of the W3C Uncertainty Reasoning for the World Wide Web Incubator Group (URW3-XG) dealing with the problem of uncertainty representation and reasoning on the World Wide Web. I have adapted this ontology for uncertainty about information to uncertainty about climate change. Elements of the ontology apply with little or no translation to the information of climate change projections, with climate change almost a use case. Other elements can be translated into language used in climate-change discussions; translating aleatory uncertainty in the UncertaintyNature class as irreducible uncertainty is an example. I have added classes for source of uncertainty (UncertaintySource) (different model physics, for example) and metrics of uncertainty (UncertaintyMetric), at least, in the case of the latter, for those instances of uncertainty that can be quantified (i.e., counted). The statistical standard deviation isa member

  15. Semantic Sensor Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, A.; Henson, C.; Thirunarayan, K.

    2008-12-01

    Sensors are distributed across the globe leading to an avalanche of data about our environment. It is possible today to utilize networks of sensors to detect and identify a multitude of observations, from simple phenomena to complex events and situations. The lack of integration and communication between these networks, however, often isolates important data streams and intensifies the existing problem of too much data and not enough knowledge. With a view to addressing this problem, the Semantic Sensor Web (SSW) [1] proposes that sensor data be annotated with semantic metadata that will both increase interoperability and provide contextual information essential for situational knowledge. Kno.e.sis Center's approach to SSW is an evolutionary one. It adds semantic annotations to the existing standard sensor languages of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) defined by OGC. These annotations enhance primarily syntactic XML-based descriptions in OGC's SWE languages with microformats, and W3C's Semantic Web languages- RDF and OWL. In association with semantic annotation and semantic web capabilities including ontologies and rules, SSW supports interoperability, analysis and reasoning over heterogeneous multi-modal sensor data. In this presentation, we will also demonstrate a mashup with support for complex spatio-temporal-thematic queries [2] and semantic analysis that utilize semantic annotations, multiple ontologies and rules. It uses existing services (e.g., GoogleMap) and semantics enhanced SWE's Sensor Observation Service (SOS) over weather and road condition data from various sensors that are part of Ohio's transportation network. Our upcoming plans are to demonstrate end to end (heterogeneous sensor to application) semantics support and study scalability of SSW involving thousands of sensors to about a billion triples. Keywords: Semantic Sensor Web, Spatiotemporal thematic queries, Semantic Web Enablement, Sensor Observation Service [1] Amit Sheth, Cory Henson, Satya

  16. Foreign Language Acquisition: Fostering Social Justice and Internalization within Web 2.0 environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Lojacono

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of mobile teaching the winds of change are coming from the “Steve Job Galaxy” confirming the vision Illich described in Deschooling Society (1971. The success of mobile learning is primarily due to easily searchable databases. Therefore a Copernican Revolution is on the go and will revise the way educational contents are accessed. In this paper we discuss a specific aspect of this the radical shift: collaborative teaching through globally networked learning environments. Within educational institutions, collaboration means the ability to harness ideas, resources and educational practioners from across boundaries. While it is clear that collaboration is acknowledged as a required win-win practice for any business organizations, in the field of education the most important outcome brought by Web 2.0 tools is social justice, in terms of equity in mobility and cross-cultural experiences. Therefore this paper describes practices aimed at fostering social justice within a language learning framework. Internet-based tools are analyzed in terms of hardware and software requirements as well as in terms of second language acquisition theories and cognitive approaches. In sum, this paper is aimed at serving the innovative teacher in the exploration of collaborative teaching in a Web 2.0 context.

  17. Insight: An Ontology-based Integrated Database and Analysis Platform for Epilepsy Self-Management Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Ramesh, Priya; Welter, Elisabeth; Bukach, Ashley; Valdez, Joshua; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Bamps, Yvan; Stoll, Shelley; Jobst, Barbara C.; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    We present Insight as an integrated database and analysis platform for epilepsy self-management research as part of the national Managing Epilepsy Well Network. Insight is the only available informatics platform for accessing and analyzing integrated data from multiple epilepsy self-management research studies with several new data management features and user-friendly functionalities. The features of Insight include, (1) use of Common Data Elements defined by members of the research community and an epilepsy domain ontology for data integration and querying, (2) visualization tools to support real time exploration of data distribution across research studies, and (3) an interactive visual query interface for provenance-enabled research cohort identification. The Insight platform contains data from five completed epilepsy self-management research studies covering various categories of data, including depression, quality of life, seizure frequency, and socioeconomic information. The data represents over 400 epilepsy patients with 7,552 data points. The Insight data exploration and cohort identification query interface has been developed using Ruby on Rails Web technology and open source Web Ontology Language Application Programming Interface to support ontology-based reasoning. We have developed an efficient ontology management module that automatically updates the ontology mappings each time a new version of the Epilepsy and Seizure Ontology is released. The Insight platform features a Role-based Access Control module to authenticate and effectively manage user access to different research studies. User access to Insight is managed by the Managing Epilepsy Well Network database steering committee consisting of representatives of all current collaborating centers of the Managing Epilepsy Well Network. New research studies are being continuously added to the Insight database and the size as well as the unique coverage of the dataset allows investigators to conduct

  18. Verification of product design using regulation knowledge base and Web services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ik June [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Chul; Mun Du Hwan [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Chul [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jin Sang [PartDB Co., Ltd., Daejeom (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chae Ho [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Since product regulations contain important rules or codes that manufacturers must follow, automatic verification of product design with the regulations related to a product is necessary. For this, this study presents a new method for the verification of product design using regulation knowledge base and Web services. Regulation knowledge base consisting of product ontology and rules was built with a hybrid technique combining ontology and programming languages. Web service for design verification was developed ensuring the flexible extension of knowledge base. By virtue of two technical features, design verification is served to various products while the change of system architecture is minimized.

  19. Disease Ontology 2015 update: an expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbe, Warren A; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J; Binder, Janos X; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M

    2015-01-01

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. This will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. An ontology evolution method based on folksonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Folksonomies are increasingly adopted in web systems. These “social taxonomies”, which emerge from collaborative tagging, contrast with the formalism and the systematic creation process applied to ontologies. However, they can play complementary roles, as the knowledge systematically formalized in ontologies by a restricted group can be enriched by the implicit knowledge collaboratively produced by a much wider group. Existing initiatives that involve folksonomies and ontologies are often unidirectional, i.e., ontologies improve tag operations or tags are used to automatically create ontologies. We propose a new fusion approach in which the semantics travels in both directions from folksonomies to ontologies and vice versa. The result of this fusion is our Folksonomized Ontology (FO. In this paper, we present our 3E Steps technique (Extraction, Enrichment, and Evolution, which explores the latent semantics of a given folksonomy (expressed in a FO to support ontology review and enhancement. It was implemented and tested in a visual review/enhancement tool.

  1. Automating Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob L.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-01-22

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  2. Ontological Annotation with WordNet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Whitney, Paul D.; Posse, Christian; Paulson, Patrick R.; Baddeley, Bob; Hohimer, Ryan E.; White, Amanda M.

    2006-06-06

    Semantic Web applications require robust and accurate annotation tools that are capable of automating the assignment of ontological classes to words in naturally occurring text (ontological annotation). Most current ontologies do not include rich lexical databases and are therefore not easily integrated with word sense disambiguation algorithms that are needed to automate ontological annotation. WordNet provides a potentially ideal solution to this problem as it offers a highly structured lexical conceptual representation that has been extensively used to develop word sense disambiguation algorithms. However, WordNet has not been designed as an ontology, and while it can be easily turned into one, the result of doing this would present users with serious practical limitations due to the great number of concepts (synonym sets) it contains. Moreover, mapping WordNet to an existing ontology may be difficult and requires substantial labor. We propose to overcome these limitations by developing an analytical platform that (1) provides a WordNet-based ontology offering a manageable and yet comprehensive set of concept classes, (2) leverages the lexical richness of WordNet to give an extensive characterization of concept class in terms of lexical instances, and (3) integrates a class recognition algorithm that automates the assignment of concept classes to words in naturally occurring text. The ensuing framework makes available an ontological annotation platform that can be effectively integrated with intelligence analysis systems to facilitate evidence marshaling and sustain the creation and validation of inference models.

  3. XML, Ontologies, and Their Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunjiang; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    The development of information technology has resulted in its penetration into every area of clinical research. Various clinical systems have been developed, which produce increasing volumes of clinical data. However, saving, exchanging, querying, and exploiting these data are challenging issues. The development of Extensible Markup Language (XML) has allowed the generation of flexible information formats to facilitate the electronic sharing of structured data via networks, and it has been used widely for clinical data processing. In particular, XML is very useful in the fields of data standardization, data exchange, and data integration. Moreover, ontologies have been attracting increased attention in various clinical fields in recent years. An ontology is the basic level of a knowledge representation scheme, and various ontology repositories have been developed, such as Gene Ontology and BioPortal. The creation of these standardized repositories greatly facilitates clinical research in related fields. In this chapter, we discuss the basic concepts of XML and ontologies, as well as their clinical applications.

  4. Reconciliation of ontology and terminology to cope with linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Robert H; Ceusters, Werner; Ruch, Patrick; Rassinoux, Anne-Marie; Lovis, Christian; Geissbühler, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    To discuss the relationships between ontologies, terminologies and language in the context of Natural Language Processing (NLP) applications in order to show the negative consequences of confusing them. The viewpoints of the terminologist and (computational) linguist are developed separately, and then compared, leading to the presentation of reconciliation among these points of view, with consideration of the role of the ontologist. In order to encourage appropriate usage of terminologies, guidelines are presented advocating the simultaneous publication of pragmatic vocabularies supported by terminological material based on adequate ontological analysis. Ontologies, terminologies and natural languages each have their own purpose. Ontologies support machine understanding, natural languages support human communication, and terminologies should form the bridge between them. Therefore, future terminology standards should be based on sound ontology and do justice to the diversities in natural languages. Moreover, they should support local vocabularies, in order to be easily adaptable to local needs and practices.

  5. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundele OA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Olukunle Ayodeji Ogundele,1 Deshendran Moodley,1 Anban W Pillay,1 Christopher J Seebregts1,2 1UKZN/CSIR Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Health Architecture Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, 2Jembi Health Systems NPC, Cape Town, South Africa Purpose: Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Methods: An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion: The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is

  6. A histological ontology of the human cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazo, Claudia; Salazar, Liliana; Corcho, Oscar; Trujillo, Maria; Alegre, Enrique

    2017-10-02

    In this paper, we describe a histological ontology of the human cardiovascular system developed in collaboration among histology experts and computer scientists. The histological ontology is developed following an existing methodology using Conceptual Models (CMs) and validated using OOPS!, expert evaluation with CMs, and how accurately the ontology can answer the Competency Questions (CQ). It is publicly available at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/HO and https://w3id.org/def/System . The histological ontology is developed to support complex tasks, such as supporting teaching activities, medical practices, and bio-medical research or having natural language interactions.

  7. “Second Language Writing” Publications in Web of Science: A Bibliometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beril T. Arik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several indicators that distinguish an academic discipline, including journals, conferences, and graduate programs. One of them is the presence of academic publications in well-regarded citation indices such as Web of Science (WoS. This study explored the bibliometric characteristics of publications on “second language writing” (SLW covered in the Social Sciences Citation Index and the Arts & Humanities Citation Index of WoS. We found that, while the first appeared in 1992 with a steady increase in recent years, there were a total of 266 SLW publications, mostly in the linguistics research area (92%, in the WoS between 1900 and 2013. The publications included articles, book reviews, and bibliographies written by 1.64 authors per publication, suggesting a low level of collaborations among SLW scholars. They cited 31.44 publications and received citations from 5.90 publications on average. An average SLW title had 2.49 different words and a total of 10.85 words, with an abstract of about five sentences and about six keywords and diverse topics including second language writing, writing, academic writing, error correction, and plagiarism. Our findings will be of value to second language writing scholars, graduate students, and practitioners for examining the status of their field.

  8. Data shopping in an open marketplace: Introducing the Ontogrator web application for marking up data using ontologies and browsing using facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Norman; Hancock, David; Hirschman, Lynette; Dawyndt, Peter; Verslyppe, Bert; Kyrpides, Nikos; Kottmann, Renzo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Grethe, Jeff; Booth, Tim; Sterk, Peter; Nenadic, Goran; Field, Dawn

    2011-04-29

    In the future, we hope to see an open and thriving data market in which users can find and select data from a wide range of data providers. In such an open access market, data are products that must be packaged accordingly. Increasingly, eCommerce sellers present heterogeneous product lines to buyers using faceted browsing. Using this approach we have developed the Ontogrator platform, which allows for rapid retrieval of data in a way that would be familiar to any online shopper. Using Knowledge Organization Systems (KOS), especially ontologies, Ontogrator uses text mining to mark up data and faceted browsing to help users navigate, query and retrieve data. Ontogrator offers the potential to impact scientific research in two major ways: 1) by significantly improving the retrieval of relevant information; and 2) by significantly reducing the time required to compose standard database queries and assemble information for further research. Here we present a pilot implementation developed in collaboration with the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) that includes content from the StrainInfo, GOLD, CAMERA, Silva and Pubmed databases. This implementation demonstrates the power of ontogration and highlights that the usefulness of this approach is fully dependent on both the quality of data and the KOS (ontologies) used. Ideally, the use and further expansion of this collaborative system will help to surface issues associated with the underlying quality of annotation and could lead to a systematic means for accessing integrated data resources.

  9. Ontological Encoding of GeoSciML and INSPIRE geological standard vocabularies and schemas: application to geological mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Piana, Fabrizio; Mimmo, Dario; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Giardino, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Encoding of geologic knowledge in formal languages is an ambitious task, aiming at the interoperability and organic representation of geological data, and semantic characterization of geologic maps. Initiatives such as GeoScience Markup Language (last version is GeoSciML 4, 2015[1]) and INSPIRE "Data Specification on Geology" (an operative simplification of GeoSciML, last version is 3.0 rc3, 2013[2]), as well as the recent terminological shepherding of the Geoscience Terminology Working Group (GTWG[3]) have been promoting information exchange of the geologic knowledge. There have also been limited attempts to encode the knowledge in a machine-readable format, especially in the lithology domain (see e.g. the CGI_Lithology ontology[4]), but a comprehensive ontological model that connect the several knowledge sources is still lacking. This presentation concerns the "OntoGeonous" initiative, which aims at encoding the geologic knowledge, as expressed through the standard vocabularies, schemas and data models mentioned above, through a number of interlinked computational ontologies, based on the languages of the Semantic Web and the paradigm of Linked Open Data. The initiative proceeds in parallel with a concrete case study, concerning the setting up of a synthetic digital geological map of the Piemonte region (NW Italy), named "GEOPiemonteMap" (developed by the CNR Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, CNR IGG, Torino), where the description and classification of GeologicUnits has been supported by the modeling and implementation of the ontologies. We have devised a tripartite ontological model called OntoGeonous that consists of: 1) an ontology of the geologic features (in particular, GeologicUnit, GeomorphologicFeature, and GeologicStructure[5], modeled from the definitions and UML schemata of CGI vocabularies[6], GeoScienceML and INSPIRE, and aligned with the Planetary realm of NASA SWEET ontology[7]), 2) an ontology of the Earth materials (as defined by the

  10. An ontology for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to infer ASD phenotypes from Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugzach, Omri; Peleg, Mor; Bagley, Steven C; Guter, Stephen J; Cook, Edwin H; Altman, Russ B

    2015-08-01

    Our goal is to create an ontology that will allow data integration and reasoning with subject data to classify subjects, and based on this classification, to infer new knowledge on Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and related neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). We take a first step toward this goal by extending an existing autism ontology to allow automatic inference of ASD phenotypes and Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria based on subjects' Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) assessment data. Knowledge regarding diagnostic instruments, ASD phenotypes and risk factors was added to augment an existing autism ontology via Ontology Web Language class definitions and semantic web rules. We developed a custom Protégé plugin for enumerating combinatorial OWL axioms to support the many-to-many relations of ADI-R items to diagnostic categories in the DSM. We utilized a reasoner to infer whether 2642 subjects, whose data was obtained from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, meet DSM-IV-TR (DSM-IV) and DSM-5 diagnostic criteria based on their ADI-R data. We extended the ontology by adding 443 classes and 632 rules that represent phenotypes, along with their synonyms, environmental risk factors, and frequency of comorbidities. Applying the rules on the data set showed that the method produced accurate results: the true positive and true negative rates for inferring autistic disorder diagnosis according to DSM-IV criteria were 1 and 0.065, respectively; the true positive rate for inferring ASD based on DSM-5 criteria was 0.94. The ontology allows automatic inference of subjects' disease phenotypes and diagnosis with high accuracy. The ontology may benefit future studies by serving as a knowledge base for ASD. In addition, by adding knowledge of related NDDs, commonalities and differences in manifestations and risk factors could be automatically inferred, contributing to the understanding of ASD pathophysiology. Copyright

  11. Training Language Teachers to Sustain Self-Directed Language Learning: An Exploration of Advisers' Experiences on a Web-Based Open Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Sophie; Ciekanski, Maud; Guély-Costa, Eglantine

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the rationale for pedagogical, technological and organizational choices in the design of a web-based and open virtual learning environment (VLE) promoting and sustaining self-directed language learning. Based on the last forty years of research on learner autonomy at the CRAPEL according to Holec's definition (1988), we…

  12. Value of Web-based learning activities for nursing students who speak English as a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jane; Salamonson, Yenna; Du, Hui Yun; Andrew, Sharon; Frost, Steven A; Dunncliff, Kirstin; Davidson, Patricia M

    2011-07-01

    There is an increasing need to address the educational needs of students with English as a second language. The authors assessed the value of a Web-based activity to meet the needs of students with English as a second language in a bioscience subject. Using telephone contact, we interviewed 21 Chinese students, 24 non-Chinese students with English as a second language, and 7 native English-speaking students to identify the perception of the value of the intervention. Four themes emerged from the qualitative data: (1) Language is a barrier to achievement and affects self-confidence; (2) Enhancement intervention promoted autonomous learning; (3) Focusing on the spoken word increases interaction capacity and self-confidence; (4) Assessment and examination drive receptivity and sense of importance. Targeted strategies to promote language acculturation and acquisition are valued by students. Linking language acquisition skills to assessment tasks is likely to leverage improvements in competence. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Independence, Interaction, Interdependence and Interrelation: Learner Autonomy in a Web-based Less Commonly Taught Language Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Kostina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, teaching less commonly taught languages has been a very challenging task due to low student enrollment and the high costs of hiring permanent teaching faculty. Therefore, webbased distance learning (DL is beginning to attract serious attention from the less commonly taught languages profession (Fleming, Hiple and Du, 2002. However, DL classes are often associated with student isolation, where learners are deprived of non-verbal clues, vocal expression, and eye contact that are crucial for foreign language learning (White, 2005. Thus, working in a more isolated context requires higher learner autonomy (White, 2005. This article provides a review of literature on autonomy that exists in the foreign language field, and describes four aspects of autonomy that need to be considered by language teachers while developing their web-based courses. It also offers some practical suggestions for the less commonly taught language instructors that foster autonomy and decrease isolation online.

  14. Semantic web technologies for enterprise 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Passant, A

    2010-01-01

    In this book, we detail different theories, methods and implementations combining Web 2.0 paradigms and Semantic Web technologies in Enterprise environments. After introducing those terms, we present the current shortcomings of tools such as blogs and wikis as well as tagging practices in an Enterprise 2.0 context. We define the SemSLATES methodology and the global vision of a middleware architecture based on Semantic Web technologies and Linked Data principles (languages, models, tools and protocols) to solve these issues. Then, we detail the various ontologies that we build to achieve this g

  15. Datamining with Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Schofield, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    The use of ontologies has increased rapidly over the past decade and they now provide a key component of most major databases in biology and biomedicine. Consequently, datamining over these databases benefits from considering the specific structure and content of ontologies, and several methods have been developed to use ontologies in datamining applications. Here, we discuss the principles of ontology structure, and datamining methods that rely on ontologies. The impact of these methods in the biological and biomedical sciences has been profound and is likely to increase as more datasets are becoming available using common, shared ontologies.

  16. The ontology-based answers (OBA) service: a connector for embedded usage of ontologies in applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönitz, Jürgen; Wingender, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    The semantic web depends on the use of ontologies to let electronic systems interpret contextual information. Optimally, the handling and access of ontologies should be completely transparent to the user. As a means to this end, we have developed a service that attempts to bridge the gap between experts in a certain knowledge domain, ontologists, and application developers. The ontology-based answers (OBA) service introduced here can be embedded into custom applications to grant access to the classes of ontologies and their relations as most important structural features as well as to information encoded in the relations between ontology classes. Thus computational biologists can benefit from ontologies without detailed knowledge about the respective ontology. The content of ontologies is mapped to a graph of connected objects which is compatible to the object-oriented programming style in Java. Semantic functions implement knowledge about the complex semantics of an ontology beyond the class hierarchy and "partOf" relations. By using these OBA functions an application can, for example, provide a semantic search function, or (in the examples outlined) map an anatomical structure to the organs it belongs to. The semantic functions relieve the application developer from the necessity of acquiring in-depth knowledge about the semantics and curation guidelines of the used ontologies by implementing the required knowledge. The architecture of the OBA service encapsulates the logic to process ontologies in order to achieve a separation from the application logic. A public server with the current plugins is available and can be used with the provided connector in a custom application in scenarios analogous to the presented use cases. The server and the client are freely available if a project requires the use of custom plugins or non-public ontologies. The OBA service and further documentation is available at http://www.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de/projects/oba.

  17. Gene Ontology annotations and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J A; Dolan, M; Drabkin, H; Hill, D P; Li, Ni; Sitnikov, D; Bridges, S; Burgess, S; Buza, T; McCarthy, F; Peddinti, D; Pillai, L; Carbon, S; Dietze, H; Ireland, A; Lewis, S E; Mungall, C J; Gaudet, P; Chrisholm, R L; Fey, P; Kibbe, W A; Basu, S; Siegele, D A; McIntosh, B K; Renfro, D P; Zweifel, A E; Hu, J C; Brown, N H; Tweedie, S; Alam-Faruque, Y; Apweiler, R; Auchinchloss, A; Axelsen, K; Bely, B; Blatter, M -C; Bonilla, C; Bouguerleret, L; Boutet, E; Breuza, L; Bridge, A; Chan, W M; Chavali, G; Coudert, E; Dimmer, E; Estreicher, A; Famiglietti, L; Feuermann, M; Gos, A; Gruaz-Gumowski, N; Hieta, R; Hinz, C; Hulo, C; Huntley, R; James, J; Jungo, F; Keller, G; Laiho, K; Legge, D; Lemercier, P; Lieberherr, D; Magrane, M; Martin, M J; Masson, P; Mutowo-Muellenet, P; O'Donovan, C; Pedruzzi, I; Pichler, K; Poggioli, D; Porras Millán, P; Poux, S; Rivoire, C; Roechert, B; Sawford, T; Schneider, M; Stutz, A; Sundaram, S; Tognolli, M; Xenarios, I; Foulgar, R; Lomax, J; Roncaglia, P; Khodiyar, V K; Lovering, R C; Talmud, P J; Chibucos, M; Giglio, M Gwinn; Chang, H -Y; Hunter, S; McAnulla, C; Mitchell, A; Sangrador, A; Stephan, R; Harris, M A; Oliver, S G; Rutherford, K; Wood, V; Bahler, J; Lock, A; Kersey, P J; McDowall, D M; Staines, D M; Dwinell, M; Shimoyama, M; Laulederkind, S; Hayman, T; Wang, S -J; Petri, V; Lowry, T; D'Eustachio, P; Matthews, L; Balakrishnan, R; Binkley, G; Cherry, J M; Costanzo, M C; Dwight, S S; Engel, S R; Fisk, D G; Hitz, B C; Hong, E L; Karra, K; Miyasato, S R; Nash, R S; Park, J; Skrzypek, M S; Weng, S; Wong, E D; Berardini, T Z; Huala, E; Mi, H; Thomas, P D; Chan, J; Kishore, R; Sternberg, P; Van Auken, K; Howe, D; Westerfield, M

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium (GOC, http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that classifies gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. Over the past year, the GOC has implemented several processes to increase the quantity, quality and specificity of GO annotations. First, the number of manual, literature-based annotations has grown at an increasing rate. Second, as a result of a new 'phylogenetic annotation' process, manually reviewed, homology-based annotations are becoming available for a broad range of species. Third, the quality of GO annotations has been improved through a streamlined process for, and automated quality checks of, GO annotations deposited by different annotation groups. Fourth, the consistency and correctness of the ontology itself has increased by using automated reasoning tools. Finally, the GO has been expanded not only to cover new areas of biology through focused interaction with experts, but also to capture greater specificity in all areas of the ontology using tools for adding new combinatorial terms. The GOC works closely with other ontology developers to support integrated use of terminologies. The GOC supports its user community through the use of e-mail lists, social media and web-based resources.

  18. The SWAN biomedical discourse ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Wu, Elizabeth; Wong, Gwen; Ocana, Marco; Kinoshita, June; Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim

    2008-10-01

    Developing cures for highly complex diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders, requires extensive interdisciplinary collaboration and exchange of biomedical information in context. Our ability to exchange such information across sub-specialties today is limited by the current scientific knowledge ecosystem's inability to properly contextualize and integrate data and discourse in machine-interpretable form. This inherently limits the productivity of research and the progress toward cures for devastating diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. SWAN (Semantic Web Applications in Neuromedicine) is an interdisciplinary project to develop a practical, common, semantically structured, framework for biomedical discourse initially applied, but not limited, to significant problems in Alzheimer Disease (AD) research. The SWAN ontology has been developed in the context of building a series of applications for biomedical researchers, as well as in extensive discussions and collaborations with the larger bio-ontologies community. In this paper, we present and discuss the SWAN ontology of biomedical discourse. We ground its development theoretically, present its design approach, explain its main classes and their application, and show its relationship to other ongoing activities in biomedicine and bio-ontologies.

  19. EXPRESS: EXPressing REstful Semantic Services Using Domain Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowisheq, Areeb; Millard, David E.; Tiropanis, Thanassis

    Existing approaches to Semantic Web Services (SWS) require a domain ontology and a semantic description of the service. In the case of lightweight SWS approaches, such as SAWSDL, service description is achieved by semantically annotating existing web service interfaces. Other approaches such as OWL-S and WSMO describe services in a separate ontology. So, existing approaches separate service description from domain description, therefore increasing design efforts. We propose EXPRESS a lightweight approach to SWS that requires the domain ontology definition only. Its simplicity stems from the similarities between REST and the Semantic Web such as resource realization, self describing representations, and uniform interfaces. The semantics of a service is elicited from a resource's semantic description in the domain ontology and the semantics of the uniform interface, hence eliminating the need for ontologically describing services. We provide an example that illustrates EXPRESS and then discuss how it compares to SA-REST and WSMO.

  20. An ontology for sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Michael; Neuhaus, Holger; Bermudez, Luis; Cox, Simon

    2010-05-01

    Sensors and networks of sensors are important ways of monitoring and digitizing reality. As the number and size of sensor networks grows, so too does the amount of data collected. Users of such networks typically need to discover the sensors and data that fit their needs without necessarily understanding the complexities of the network itself. The burden on users is eased if the network and its data are expressed in terms of concepts familiar to the users and their job functions, rather than in terms of the network or how it was designed. Furthermore, the task of collecting and combining data from multiple sensor networks is made easier if metadata about the data and the networks is stored in a format and conceptual models that is amenable to machine reasoning and inference. While the OGC's (Open Geospatial Consortium) SWE (Sensor Web Enablement) standards provide for the description and access to data and metadata for sensors, they do not provide facilities for abstraction, categorization, and reasoning consistent with standard technologies. Once sensors and networks are described using rich semantics (that is, by using logic to describe the sensors, the domain of interest, and the measurements) then reasoning and classification can be used to analyse and categorise data, relate measurements with similar information content, and manage, query and task sensors. This will enable types of automated processing and logical assurance built on OGC standards. The W3C SSN-XG (Semantic Sensor Networks Incubator Group) is producing a generic ontology to describe sensors, their environment and the measurements they make. The ontology provides definitions for the structure of sensors and observations, leaving the details of the observed domain unspecified. This allows abstract representations of real world entities, which are not observed directly but through their observable qualities. Domain semantics, units of measurement, time and time series, and location and mobility

  1. Ontology and Knowledgebase of Fractures and Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, A.; Zhong, J.

    2007-12-01

    Fractures and faults are related to many societal and industrial problems including oil and gas exploration and production, CO2 sequestration, and waste isolation. Therefore, an ontology focusing fractures and faults is desirable to facilitate a sound education and communication among this highly diverse community. We developed an ontology for this field. Some high level classes in our ontology include geological structure, deformation mechanism, and property or factor. Throughout our ontology, we emphasis the relationship among the classes, such as structures formed by mechanisms and properties effect the mechanism that will occur. At this stage, there are about 1,000 classes, referencing about 150 articles or textbook and supplemented by about 350 photographs, diagrams, and illustrations. With limited time and resources, we chose a simple application for our ontology - transforming to a knowledgebase made of a series of web pages. Each web page corresponds to one class in the ontology, having discussion, figures, links to subclass and related concepts, as well as references. We believe that our knowledgebase is a valuable resource for finding information about fractures and faults, to both practicing geologists and students who are interested in the related issues either in application or in education and training.

  2. The Development of Ontology from Multiple Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Shahreen; Aswa Omar, Nurul; Fudzee, Mohd Farhan Md; Azhar Ramli, Azizul; Aizi Salamat, Mohamad; Mahdin, Hairulnizam

    2017-08-01

    The area of halal industry is the fastest growing global business across the world. The halal food industry is thus crucial for Muslims all over the world as it serves to ensure them that the food items they consume daily are syariah compliant. Currently, ontology has been widely used in computer sciences area such as web on the heterogeneous information processing, semantic web, and information retrieval. However, ontology has still not been used widely in the halal industry. Today, Muslim community still have problem to verify halal status for products in the market especially foods consisting of E number. This research tried to solve problem in validating the halal status from various halal sources. There are various chemical ontology from multilple databases found to help this ontology development. The E numbers in this chemical ontology are codes for chemicals that can be used as food additives. With this E numbers ontology, Muslim community could identify and verify the halal status effectively for halal products in the market.

  3. BiOSS: A system for biomedical ontology selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Romero, Marcos; Vázquez-Naya, José M; Pereira, Javier; Pazos, Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    In biomedical informatics, ontologies are considered a key technology for annotating, retrieving and sharing the huge volume of publicly available data. Due to the increasing amount, complexity and variety of existing biomedical ontologies, choosing the ones to be used in a semantic annotation problem or to design a specific application is a difficult task. As a consequence, the design of approaches and tools addressed to facilitate the selection of biomedical ontologies is becoming a priority. In this paper we present BiOSS, a novel system for the selection of biomedical ontologies. BiOSS evaluates the adequacy of an ontology to a given domain according to three different criteria: (1) the extent to which the ontology covers the domain; (2) the semantic richness of the ontology in the domain; (3) the popularity of the ontology in the biomedical community. BiOSS has been applied to 5 representative problems of ontology selection. It also has been compared to existing methods and tools. Results are promising and show the usefulness of BiOSS to solve real-world ontology selection problems. BiOSS is openly available both as a web tool and a web service. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Semantic Integration for Marine Science Interoperability Using Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, C.; Bermudez, L.; Graybeal, J.; Isenor, A. W.

    2008-12-01

    The Marine Metadata Interoperability Project, MMI (http://marinemetadata.org) promotes the exchange, integration, and use of marine data through enhanced data publishing, discovery, documentation, and accessibility. A key effort is the definition of an Architectural Framework and Operational Concept for Semantic Interoperability (http://marinemetadata.org/sfc), which is complemented with the development of tools that realize critical use cases in semantic interoperability. In this presentation, we describe a set of such Semantic Web tools that allow performing important interoperability tasks, ranging from the creation of controlled vocabularies and the mapping of terms across multiple ontologies, to the online registration, storage, and search services needed to work with the ontologies (http://mmisw.org). This set of services uses Web standards and technologies, including Resource Description Framework (RDF), Web Ontology language (OWL), Web services, and toolkits for Rich Internet Application development. We will describe the following components: MMI Ontology Registry: The MMI Ontology Registry and Repository provides registry and storage services for ontologies. Entries in the registry are associated with projects defined by the registered users. Also, sophisticated search functions, for example according to metadata items and vocabulary terms, are provided. Client applications can submit search requests using the WC3 SPARQL Query Language for RDF. Voc2RDF: This component converts an ASCII comma-delimited set of terms and definitions into an RDF file. Voc2RDF facilitates the creation of controlled vocabularies by using a simple form-based user interface. Created vocabularies and their descriptive metadata can be submitted to the MMI Ontology Registry for versioning and community access. VINE: The Vocabulary Integration Environment component allows the user to map vocabulary terms across multiple ontologies. Various relationships can be established, for example

  5. Web 2.0 in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: A Research Synthesis and Implications for Instructional Design and Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmaxi, Antigoni; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the research development pertaining to the use of Web 2.0 technologies in the field of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL). Published research manuscripts related to the use of Web 2.0 tools in CALL have been explored, and the following research foci have been determined: (1) Web 2.0 tools that dominate second/foreign…

  6. Effects of Online Instructional Conversation on English as a Foreign Language Learners' WebQuest Writing Performance: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haesong

    2013-01-01

    WebQuests, or inquiry-oriented activities in which learners interact with Web-based information (Dodge, 1995, 1996, 2007), have recently been gaining popularity in education in general and in language education in particular. While it has the advantage of fostering higher-level thinking through authentic assignments, a WebQuest can be challenging…

  7. A Chatbot as a Natural Web Interface to Arabic Web QA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan Abu Shawar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a way to access Arabic Web Question Answering (QA corpus using a chatbot, without the need for sophisticated natural language processing or logical inference. Any Natural Language (NL interface to Question Answer (QA system is constrained to reply with the given answers, so there is no need for NL generation to recreate well-formed answers, or for deep analysis or logical inference to map user input questions onto this logical ontology; simple (but large set of pattern-template matching rules will suffice. In previous research, this approach works properly with English and other European languages. In this paper, we try to see how the same chatbot will react in terms of Arabic Web QA corpus. Initial results shows that 93% of answers were correct, but because of a lot of characteristics related to Arabic language, changing Arabic questions into other forms may lead to no answers.

  8. Incorporating Competency-Based Blended Learning in a Chinese Language Classroom: A Web 2.0 Drupal Module Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Kai; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chiang, Yueh-Hui

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to create a blended learning environment, based on the concept of competency-based training, in a Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) classroom at an American university. Drupal platform and web 2.0 tools were used as supplements to traditional face-to-face classroom instruction. Students completed various selective tasks and…

  9. Generation Y, Learner Autonomy and the Potential of Web 2.0 Tools for Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Liam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the development of learner autonomy and the application of Web 2.0 tools in the language classroom. Design/methodology/approach: The approach taken is that of qualitative action research within an explicit theoretical framework and the data were collected via surveys and…

  10. Ontology mapping specification in description logics for cooperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cooperative systems, which aim to make knowledge from various sources available in spite of their heterogeneities, need to align, merge or integrate the ontologies used to model the information sources. Furthermore, the resolution of differences among ontologies is necessary to process queries or use web services in ...

  11. Interpreting XML documents via an RDF schema ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Many business documents are represented in XML. However XML only describes the structure of data, not its meaning. The meaning of data is required for advanced automated processing, as is envisaged in the "Semantic Web". Ontologies are often used to describe the meaning of data items. Many ontology

  12. Applications of Ontologies in Collaborative Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Hans-Jörg; Maalej, Walid; Seedorf, Stefan

    Making distributed teams more efficient is one main goal of Collaborative Software Development (CSD) research. To this end, ontologies, which are models that capture a shared understanding of a specific domain, provide key benefits. Ontologies have formal, machine-interpretable semantics that allow to define semantic mappings for heterogeneous data and to infer implicit knowledge at run-time. Extending development infrastructures and software architectures with ontologies (of problem and solution domains) will address coordination and knowledge sharing challenges in activities such as documentation, requirements specificationrequirements specification , component reuse, error handling, and test case management. The purpose of this article is to provide systematic account of how ontologies can be applied in CSD, and to describe benefits of both existing applications such as "semantic wikissemantic wikis " as well as visionary scenarios such as a "Software Engineering Semantic Websemantic web ".

  13. The Gene Ontology: enhancements for 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) (http://www.geneontology.org) is a community bioinformatics resource that represents gene product function through the use of structured, controlled vocabularies. The number of GO annotations of gene products has increased due to curation efforts among GO Consortium (GOC) groups, including focused literature-based annotation and ortholog-based functional inference. The GO ontologies continue to expand and improve as a result of targeted ontology development, including the introduction of computable logical definitions and development of new tools for the streamlined addition of terms to the ontology. The GOC continues to support its user community through the use of e-mail lists, social media and web-based resources.

  14. Differences among cell-structure ontologies: FMA, GO, & CCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Alan P; Li, Xiang; Gennari, John H

    2006-01-01

    When different groups create models or ontologies of the same knowledge domain, this creates challenges for knowledge sharing. To identify these challenges, we compare cellular structure as modeled by the Foundational Model of Anatomy(FMA), the Gene Ontology (GO), and the Cell Component Ontology (CCO). These ontologies all model the physical anatomy of a cell, and we expected them to be similar in scope. However, we discovered that the actual differences among the mare substantial. These differences represent variations based on theory-driven vs. emergent construction,as well as differences in how small application ontologies like the CCO are created from reference ontologies. In this paper, we provide a description and analysis of these differences. By studying differences in language, granularity, breadth of coverage,and model organization, we hope to gain a better understanding of how to map between related ontologies.

  15. Exploring biomedical ontology mappings with graph theory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocbek, Simon; Kim, Jin-Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the era of semantic web, life science ontologies play an important role in tasks such as annotating biological objects, linking relevant data pieces, and verifying data consistency. Understanding ontology structures and overlapping ontologies is essential for tasks such as ontology reuse and development. We present an exploratory study where we examine structure and look for patterns in BioPortal, a comprehensive publicly available repository of live science ontologies. We report an analysis of biomedical ontology mapping data over time. We apply graph theory methods such as Modularity Analysis and Betweenness Centrality to analyse data gathered at five different time points. We identify communities, i.e., sets of overlapping ontologies, and define similar and closest communities. We demonstrate evolution of identified communities over time and identify core ontologies of the closest communities. We use BioPortal project and category data to measure community coherence. We also validate identified communities with their mutual mentions in scientific literature. With comparing mapping data gathered at five different time points, we identified similar and closest communities of overlapping ontologies, and demonstrated evolution of communities over time. Results showed that anatomy and health ontologies tend to form more isolated communities compared to other categories. We also showed that communities contain all or the majority of ontologies being used in narrower projects. In addition, we identified major changes in mapping data after migration to BioPortal Version 4.

  16. Ontology and Knowledge Management System on Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Pedro; Sales, Francisco; Nogueira, Ana; Dourado, António

    2010-01-01

    A Knowledge Management System developed for supporting creation, capture, storage and dissemination of information about Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures is presented. We present an Ontology on Epilepsy and a Web-based prototype that together create the KMS.

  17. Application of Ontologies for Big Earth Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T.; Chang, G.; Armstrong, E. M.; Boening, C.

    2014-12-01

    Connected data is smarter data! Earth Science research infrastructure must do more than just being able to support temporal, geospatial discovery of satellite data. As the Earth Science data archives continue to expand across NASA data centers, the research communities are demanding smarter data services. A successful research infrastructure must be able to present researchers the complete picture, that is, datasets with linked citations, related interdisciplinary data, imageries, current events, social media discussions, and scientific data tools that are relevant to the particular dataset. The popular Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies is a collection of ontologies and concepts designed to improve discovery and application of Earth Science data. The SWEET ontologies collection was initially developed to capture the relationships between keywords in the NASA Global Change Master Directory (GCMD). Over the years this popular ontologies collection has expanded to cover over 200 ontologies and 6000 concepts to enable scalable classification of Earth system science concepts and Space science. This presentation discusses the semantic web technologies as the enabling technology for data-intensive science. We will discuss the application of the SWEET ontologies as a critical component in knowledge-driven research infrastructure for some of the recent projects, which include the DARPA Ontological System for Context Artifact and Resources (OSCAR), 2013 NASA ACCESS Virtual Quality Screening Service (VQSS), and the 2013 NASA Sea Level Change Portal (SLCP) projects. The presentation will also discuss the benefits in using semantic web technologies in developing research infrastructure for Big Earth Science Data in an attempt to "accommodate all domains and provide the necessary glue for information to be cross-linked, correlated, and discovered in a semantically rich manner." [1] [1] Savas Parastatidis: A platform for all that we know

  18. Developing a modular hydrogeology ontology by extending the SWEET upper-level ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ajay; Babaie, Hassan A.

    2008-09-01

    Upper-level ontologies comprise general concepts and properties which need to be extended to include more diverse and specific domain vocabularies. We present the extension of NASA's Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies to include part of the hydrogeology domain. We describe a methodology that can be followed by other allied domain experts who intend to adopt the SWEET ontologies in their own discipline. We have maintained the modular design of the SWEET ontologies for maximum extensibility and reusability of our ontology in other fields, to ensure inter-disciplinary knowledge reuse, management, and discovery. The extension of the SWEET ontologies involved identification of the general SWEET concepts (classes) to serve as the super-class of the domain concepts. This was followed by establishing the special inter-relationships between domain concepts (e.g., equivalence for vadose zone and unsaturated zone), and identifying the dependent concepts such as physical properties and units, and their relationship to external concepts. Ontology editing tools such as SWOOP and Protégé were used to analyze and visualize the structure of the existing OWL files. Domain concepts were introduced either as standalone new classes or as subclasses of existing SWEET ontologies. This involved changing the relationships (properties) and/or adding new relationships based on domain theories. In places, in the Owl files, the entire structure of the existing concepts needed to be changed to represent the domain concept more meaningfully. Throughout this process, the orthogonal structure of SWEET ontologies was maintained and the consistency of the concepts was tested using the Racer reasoner. Individuals were added to the new concepts to test the modified ontologies. Our work shows that SWEET ontologies can successfully be extended and reused in any field without losing their modular or reference structure, or disrupting their URI links.

  19. An Approach to Folksonomy-Based Ontology Maintenance for Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasevic, D.; Zouaq, Amal; Torniai, Carlo; Jovanovic, J.; Hatala, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in learning technologies has demonstrated many promising contributions from the use of ontologies and semantic web technologies for the development of advanced learning environments. In spite of those benefits, ontology development and maintenance remain the key research challenges to be solved before ontology-enhanced learning…

  20. Ontology Merging as Social Choice: Judgment Aggregation under the Open World Assumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porello, D.; Endriss, U.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of merging several ontologies has important applications in the Semantic Web, medical ontology engineering and other domains where information from several distinct sources needs to be integrated in a coherent manner. We propose to view ontology merging as a problem of social choice,

  1. Toward the Use of an Upper Ontology for U.S. Government and U.S. Military Domains: An Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semy, Salim K; Pulvermacher, Mary K; Obrst, Leo J

    2004-01-01

    ...) of data and ultimately of applications. Key to the vision of a Semantic Web is the ability to capture data and application semantics in ontologies and map these ontologies together via related concepts...

  2. Learning Ontology from Object-Relational Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaulins Andrejs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method of transformation of object-relational model into ontology. The offered method uses learning rules for such complex data types as object tables and collections – arrays of a variable size, as well as nested tables. Object types and their transformation into ontologies are insufficiently considered in scientific literature. This fact served as motivation for the authors to investigate this issue and to write the article on this matter. In the beginning, we acquaint the reader with complex data types and object-oriented databases. Then we describe an algorithm of transformation of complex data types into ontologies. At the end of the article, some examples of ontologies described in the OWL language are given.

  3. Virtual Learning Spaces Creation Based on the Systematic Population of an Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araújo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The creation of Learning Spaces on the Web, like the exhibition rooms of virtual museums, supported by an ontology that enables a conceptual navigation over the learning objects exposed, is a hard and complex task but of uttermost importance for the success of the knowledge acquisition process. In our opinion, the creation must be systematic and reusable from case to case, based on the query of the ontology instances that describe the museum assets. We will discuss how the ontology definition drives the way SPARQL (SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language queries extract information from the TripleStore to be prepared for visualization. However, to enable this approach, we need to populate the ontology in an automatic way, extracting the data from the annotated documents in the institution repository. We intend to show how that process can be implemented using the Museum of the Person (MP as a case-study, describing the XML2RDF tool developed. To illustrate the complete approach proposed we will include a guided visit to the exhibition rooms of MP created according to that proposal and by our tools.

  4. Ontology-based concept map learning path reasoning system using SWRL rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, K.-K.; Lee, C.-I. [National Univ. of Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Computer Science and Information Learning Technology

    2010-08-13

    Concept maps are graphical representations of knowledge. Concept mapping may reduce students' cognitive load and extend simple memory function. The purpose of this study was on the diagnosis of students' concept map learning abilities and the provision of personally constructive advice dependant on their learning path and progress. Ontology is a useful method with which to represent and store concept map information. Semantic web rule language (SWRL) rules are easy to understand and to use as specific reasoning services. This paper discussed the selection of grade 7 lakes and rivers curriculum for which to devise a concept map learning path reasoning service. The paper defined a concept map e-learning ontology and two SWRL semantic rules, and collected users' concept map learning path data to infer implicit knowledge and to recommend the next learning path for users. It was concluded that the designs devised in this study were feasible and advanced and the ontology kept the domain knowledge preserved. SWRL rules identified an abstraction model for inferred properties. Since they were separate systems, they did not interfere with each other, while ontology or SWRL rules were maintained, ensuring persistent system extensibility and robustness. 15 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  5. Combining machine learning and ontological data handling for multi-source classification of nature conservation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Niklas; Nieland, Simon; Tintrup gen. Suntrup, Gregor; Kleinschmit, Birgit

    2017-02-01

    Manual field surveys for nature conservation management are expensive and time-consuming and could be supplemented and streamlined by using Remote Sensing (RS). RS is critical to meet requirements of existing laws such as the EU Habitats Directive (HabDir) and more importantly to meet future challenges. The full potential of RS has yet to be harnessed as different nomenclatures and procedures hinder interoperability, comparison and provenance. Therefore, automated tools are needed to use RS data to produce comparable, empirical data outputs that lend themselves to data discovery and provenance. These issues are addressed by a novel, semi-automatic ontology-based classification method that uses machine learning algorithms and Web Ontology Language (OWL) ontologies that yields traceable, interoperable and observation-based classification outputs. The method was tested on European Union Nature Information System (EUNIS) grasslands in Rheinland-Palatinate, Germany. The developed methodology is a first step in developing observation-based ontologies in the field of nature conservation. The tests show promising results for the determination of the grassland indicators wetness and alkalinity with an overall accuracy of 85% for alkalinity and 76% for wetness.

  6. COHeRE: Cross-Ontology Hierarchical Relation Examination for Ontology Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Licong

    Biomedical ontologies play a vital role in healthcare information management, data integration, and decision support. Ontology quality assurance (OQA) is an indispensable part of the ontology engineering cycle. Most existing OQA methods are based on the knowledge provided within the targeted ontology. This paper proposes a novel cross-ontology analysis method, Cross-Ontology Hierarchical Relation Examination (COHeRE), to detect inconsistencies and possible errors in hierarchical relations across multiple ontologies. COHeRE leverages the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) knowledge source and the MapReduce cloud computing technique for systematic, large-scale ontology quality assurance work. COHeRE consists of three main steps with the UMLS concepts and relations as the input. First, the relations claimed in source vocabularies are filtered and aggregated for each pair of concepts. Second, inconsistent relations are detected if a concept pair is related by different types of relations in different source vocabularies. Finally, the uncovered inconsistent relations are voted according to their number of occurrences across different source vocabularies. The voting result together with the inconsistent relations serve as the output of COHeRE for possible ontological change. The highest votes provide initial suggestion on how such inconsistencies might be fixed. In UMLS, 138,987 concept pairs were found to have inconsistent relationships across multiple source vocabularies. 40 inconsistent concept pairs involving hierarchical relationships were randomly selected and manually reviewed by a human expert. 95.8% of the inconsistent relations involved in these concept pairs indeed exist in their source vocabularies rather than being introduced by mistake in the UMLS integration process. 73.7% of the concept pairs with suggested relationship were agreed by the human expert. The effectiveness of COHeRE indicates that UMLS provides a promising environment to enhance

  7. Evolution of Web-Based Applications Using Domain-Specific Markup Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Guntram Graef; Martin Gaedke

    2000-01-01

    The lifecycle of Web-based applications is characterized by frequent changes to content, user interface, and functionality. Updating content, improving the services provided to users, drives further development of a Web-based application. The major goal for the success of a Web-based application becomes therefore its evolution. Though, development and maintenance of Web-based applications suffers from the underlying document-based implementation model. A disciplined evolution of Web based app...

  8. Autonomous Mission Operations for Sensor Webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underbrink, A.; Witt, K.; Stanley, J.; Mandl, D.

    2008-12-01

    We present interim results of a 2005 ROSES AIST project entitled, "Using Intelligent Agents to Form a Sensor Web for Autonomous Mission Operations", or SWAMO. The goal of the SWAMO project is to shift the control of spacecraft missions from a ground-based, centrally controlled architecture to a collaborative, distributed set of intelligent agents. The network of intelligent agents intends to reduce management requirements by utilizing model-based system prediction and autonomic model/agent collaboration. SWAMO agents are distributed throughout the Sensor Web environment, which may include multiple spacecraft, aircraft, ground systems, and ocean systems, as well as manned operations centers. The agents monitor and manage sensor platforms, Earth sensing systems, and Earth sensing models and processes. The SWAMO agents form a Sensor Web of agents via peer-to-peer coordination. Some of the intelligent agents are mobile and able to traverse between on-orbit and ground-based systems. Other agents in the network are responsible for encapsulating system models to perform prediction of future behavior of the modeled subsystems and components to which they are assigned. The software agents use semantic web technologies to enable improved information sharing among the operational entities of the Sensor Web. The semantics include ontological conceptualizations of the Sensor Web environment, plus conceptualizations of the SWAMO agents themselves. By conceptualizations of the agents, we mean knowledge of their state, operational capabilities, current operational capacities, Web Service search and discovery results, agent collaboration rules, etc. The need for ontological conceptualizations over the agents is to enable autonomous and autonomic operations of the Sensor Web. The SWAMO ontology enables automated decision making and responses to the dynamic Sensor Web environment and to end user science requests. The current ontology is compatible with Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC

  9. Computational Chemistry Data Management Platform Based on the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Dobosh, Paul A; Chalk, Stuart; Sopek, Mirek; Ostlund, Neil S

    2017-01-12

    This paper presents a formal data publishing platform for computational chemistry using semantic web technologies. This platform encapsulates computational chemistry data from a variety of packages in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file called CSX (Common Standard for eXchange). On the basis of a Gainesville Core (GC) ontology for computational chemistry, a CSX XML file is converted into the JavaScript Object Notation for Linked Data (JSON-LD) format using an XML Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) file. Ultimately the JSON-LD file is converted to subject-predicate-object triples in a Turtle (TTL) file and published on the web portal. By leveraging semantic web technologies, we are able to place computational chemistry data onto web portals as a component of a Giant Global Graph (GGG) such that computer agents, as well as individual chemists, can access the data.

  10. An ontology for major histocompatibility restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Randi; Overton, James A; Seymour, Emily; Sidney, John; Kaufman, Jim; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Ellis, Shirley; Hammond, John; Butcher, Geoff W; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecules are a highly diverse family of proteins that play a key role in cellular immune recognition. Over time, different techniques and terminologies have been developed to identify the specific type(s) of MHC molecule involved in a specific immune recognition context. No consistent nomenclature exists across different vertebrate species. To correctly represent MHC related data in The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), we built upon a previously established MHC ontology and created an ontology to represent MHC molecules as they relate to immunological experiments. This ontology models MHC protein chains from 16 species, deals with different approaches used to identify MHC, such as direct sequencing verses serotyping, relates engineered MHC molecules to naturally occurring ones, connects genetic loci, alleles, protein chains and multi-chain proteins, and establishes evidence codes for MHC restriction. Where available, this work is based on existing ontologies from the OBO foundry. Overall, representing MHC molecules provides a challenging and practically important test case for ontology building, and could serve as an example of how to integrate other ontology building efforts into web resources.

  11. Comparison of response times of a mobile-web EHRs system using PHP and JSP languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Antón-Rodríguez, Míriam; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco Javier; Perozo-Rondón, Freddy José

    2012-12-01

    Performance evaluation is highly important in the Electronic Health Records (EHRs) system implementation. Response time's measurement can be considered as one manner to make that evaluation. In the e-health field, after the creation of EHRs available through different platforms such as Web and/or mobile, a performance evaluation is necessary. The operation of the system in the right way is essential. In this paper, a comparison of the response times for the MEHRmobile system is presented. The first version uses PHP language with a MySQL database and the second one employs JSP with an eXist database. Both versions have got the same functionalities. In addition to the technological aspects, a significant difference is the way the information is stored. The main goal of this paper is choosing the version which offers better response times. We have created a new benchmark to calculate the response times. Better results have been obtained for the PHP version. Nowadays, this version is being used for specialists from Fundación Intras, Spain.

  12. Defeasible Policy Language for Online Social Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahdi Rohaninezhad; Shahrul Azman Mohd Noah; Shereena Mohd Arif

    2017-01-01

    .... These characteristics of OSNs policies fit to defeasible logic formalism. Thus, we contextualized a defeasible policy language and proposed corresponding ontologies to extend an existing ontology framework on policy control called open digital right language...

  13. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Joachim; Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology's GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  14. Transformation of Thematic Cartography Domain Ontology into Java Interfaces and Clasess

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peňáz, Tomáš; Dostál, Radek

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the transformation of an experimental ontology, classifying selected declarative knowledge for the domain of thematic cartography, into classes and interfaces of the Java language...

  15. The Porifera Ontology (PORO): enhancing sponge systematics with an anatomy ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Robert W; Díaz, Maria Cristina; Kerner, Adeline; Vignes-Lebbe, Régine; Segerdell, Erik; Haendel, Melissa A; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Porifera (sponges) are ancient basal metazoans that lack organs. They provide insight into key evolutionary transitions, such as the emergence of multicellularity and the nervous system. In addition, their ability to synthesize unusual compounds offers potential biotechnical applications. However, much of the knowledge of these organisms has not previously been codified in a machine-readable way using modern web standards. The Porifera Ontology is intended as a standardized coding system for sponge anatomical features currently used in systematics. The ontology is available from http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/poro.owl, or from the project homepage http://porifera-ontology.googlecode.com/. The version referred to in this manuscript is permanently available from http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/poro/releases/2014-03-06/. By standardizing character representations, we hope to facilitate more rapid description and identification of sponge taxa, to allow integration with other evolutionary database systems, and to perform character mapping across the major clades of sponges to better understand the evolution of morphological features. Future applications of the ontology will focus on creating (1) ontology-based species descriptions; (2) taxonomic keys that use the nested terms of the ontology to more quickly facilitate species identifications; and (3) methods to map anatomical characters onto molecular phylogenies of sponges. In addition to modern taxa, the ontology is being extended to include features of fossil taxa.

  16. Ontology driven dynamic linking of biology resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechhofer, S K; Stevens, R D; Lord, P W

    2005-01-01

    Biologists were early adopters of the Web and continue to use it as the primary means of delivering data, tools and knowledge to their community. The Web is made by the links between pages, yet these links have many limitations: they are static and maintained by hand; they can only link one lexical item to another single resource; ownership is necessary for the placement of link anchors and the link mechanism is essentially inflexible. Dynamic linking services, supported by ontologies, offer a mechanism to overcome such restrictions. The Conceptual Open Hypermedia Service (COHSE) system enhances web resources through the dynamic addition of hypertext links. These links are derived through the use of an ontology and associated lexicon along with a mapping from concepts to possible link targets. We describe an application of COHSE to Bioinformatics, using the Gene Ontology (GO) as an ontology and associated keyword mappings and GO associations as link targets. The resulting demonstrator (referred to here as GOHSE) provides both glossary functionality and the possibility of building knowledge based hypertext structures linking bioinformatics resources.

  17. Ontology - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us Mi...n of data contents The ontology files that are used in MicrobeDB.jp version 2. Data file (compressed in tar....: ontology.tar.gz File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/microbedb/LATEST/ontology.tar.gz File size: 9...ples Data item Description ontology/meo/meo.ttl An ontology for describing organismal habitats (especially focused on mi...ng environment for metagenome analyses. ontology/mdbv/mdbv.rdf A vocabulary for describing data schema in Mi

  18. The potential for use of semantic web technologies in IK management systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fogwill, T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available and inclusion into current or new IK management systems. These include: an enhanced, ontology based querying facility; a facility to browse the knowledge using ontology navigation; a natural language independent ontology for multilingual data access; and a...

  19. Ontology matters: a commentary on contribution to cultural historical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jenny

    2017-10-01

    This commentary promotes discussion on the imaginary provided by Sanaz Farhangi in her article entitled, Contribution to activity: a lens for understanding students' potential and agency in physics education. The commentary is concerned with aligning ontological assumptions in research accounts of learning and development with transformative aims. A broad definition of ontology as the theory of existence is preferred. Sociocultural approaches share relational ontology as a common foundation. I agree with scholars elaborating Vygotsky's Transformative Activist Stance that a relational ontology does not imply activism. However, I argue that relational ontology provides a necessary and sufficient theoretical grounding for intentional transformation. I draw upon positioning theory to elaborate the moral aspects of language use and to illustrate that a theory of being as relational already eliminates the transcendental position. I draw on Farhangi's article to further the discussion on the necessity and sufficiency of relational ontology and associated grammars in accounting for activism.

  20. Ontological semantics in modified categorial grammar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczak, Bartlomiej Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Categorial Grammar is a well established tool for describing natural language semantics. In the current paper we discuss some of its drawbacks and how it could be extended to overcome them. We use the extended version for deriving ontological semantics from text. A proof-of-concept implementation...

  1. Handbook of metadata, semantics and ontologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel

    2013-01-01

    Metadata research has emerged as a discipline cross-cutting many domains, focused on the provision of distributed descriptions (often called annotations) to Web resources or applications. Such associated descriptions are supposed to serve as a foundation for advanced services in many application areas, including search and location, personalization, federation of repositories and automated delivery of information. Indeed, the Semantic Web is in itself a concrete technological framework for ontology-based metadata. For example, Web-based social networking requires metadata describing people and

  2. ONTOLOGY-DRIVEN TOOL FOR UTILIZING PROGRAMMING STYLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Sidorov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Activities of a programmer will be more effective and the software will be more understandable when within the process of software development, programming styles (standards are used, providing clarity of software texts. Purpose: In this research, we present the tool for the realization of new ontology-based methodology automated reasoning techniques for utilizing programming styles. In particular, we focus on representing programming styles in the form of formal ontologies, and study how description logic reasoner can assist programmers in utilizing programming standards. Our research hypothesis is as follows: ontological representation of programming styles can provide additional benefits over existing approaches in utilizing programmer of programming standards. Our research goal is to develop a tool to support the ontology-based utilizing programming styles. Methods: ontological representation of programming styles; object-oriented programming; ontology-driven utilizing of programming styles. Results: the architecture was obtained and the tool was developed in the Java language, which provide tool support of ontology-driven programming styles application method. On the example of naming of the Java programming language standard, features of implementation and application of the tool are provided. Discussion: application of programming styles in coding of program; lack of automated tools for the processes of programming standards application; tool based on new method of ontology-driven application of programming styles; an example of the implementation of tool architecture for naming rules of the Java language standard.

  3. A UML profile for the OBO relation ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardia, Gabriela D A; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; de Farias, Cléver R G

    2012-01-01

    Ontologies have increasingly been used in the biomedical domain, which has prompted the emergence of different initiatives to facilitate their development and integration. The Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Foundry consortium provides a repository of life-science ontologies, which are developed according to a set of shared principles. This consortium has developed an ontology called OBO Relation Ontology aiming at standardizing the different types of biological entity classes and associated relationships. Since ontologies are primarily intended to be used by humans, the use of graphical notations for ontology development facilitates the capture, comprehension and communication of knowledge between its users. However, OBO Foundry ontologies are captured and represented basically using text-based notations. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) provides a standard and widely-used graphical notation for modeling computer systems. UML provides a well-defined set of modeling elements, which can be extended using a built-in extension mechanism named Profile. Thus, this work aims at developing a UML profile for the OBO Relation Ontology to provide a domain-specific set of modeling elements that can be used to create standard UML-based ontologies in the biomedical domain.

  4. Ontology Maintenance using Textual Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Gargouri

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies are continuously confronted to evolution problem. Due to the complexity of the changes to be made, a maintenance process, at least a semi-automatic one, is more and more necessary to facilitate this task and to ensure its reliability. In this paper, we propose a maintenance ontology model for a domain, whose originality is to be language independent and based on a sequence of text processing in order to extract highly related terms from corpus. Initially, we deploy the document classification technique using GRAMEXCO to generate classes of texts segments having a similar information type and identify their shared lexicon, agreed as highly related to a unique topic. This technique allows a first general and robust exploration of the corpus. Further, we apply the Latent Semantic Indexing method to extract from this shared lexicon, the most associated terms that has to be seriously considered by an expert to eventually confirm their relevance and thus updating the current ontology. Finally, we show how the complementarity between these two techniques, based on cognitive foundation, constitutes a powerful refinement process.

  5. Process attributes in bio-ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, André Q; Blondé, Ward; Hastings, Janna; Schulz, Stefan

    2012-08-28

    Biomedical processes can provide essential information about the (mal-) functioning of an organism and are thus frequently represented in biomedical terminologies and ontologies, including the GO Biological Process branch. These processes often need to be described and categorised in terms of their attributes, such as rates or regularities. The adequate representation of such process attributes has been a contentious issue in bio-ontologies recently; and domain ontologies have correspondingly developed ad hoc workarounds that compromise interoperability and logical consistency. We present a design pattern for the representation of process attributes that is compatible with upper ontology frameworks such as BFO and BioTop. Our solution rests on two key tenets: firstly, that many of the sorts of process attributes which are biomedically interesting can be characterised by the ways that repeated parts of such processes constitute, in combination, an overall process; secondly, that entities for which a full logical definition can be assigned do not need to be treated as primitive within a formal ontology framework. We apply this approach to the challenge of modelling and automatically classifying examples of normal and abnormal rates and patterns of heart beating processes, and discuss the expressivity required in the underlying ontology representation language. We provide full definitions for process attributes at increasing levels of domain complexity. We show that a logical definition of process attributes is feasible, though limited by the expressivity of DL languages so that the creation of primitives is still necessary. This finding may endorse current formal upper-ontology frameworks as a way of ensuring consistency, interoperability and clarity.

  6. Process attributes in bio-ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade André Q

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomedical processes can provide essential information about the (mal- functioning of an organism and are thus frequently represented in biomedical terminologies and ontologies, including the GO Biological Process branch. These processes often need to be described and categorised in terms of their attributes, such as rates or regularities. The adequate representation of such process attributes has been a contentious issue in bio-ontologies recently; and domain ontologies have correspondingly developed ad hoc workarounds that compromise interoperability and logical consistency. Results We present a design pattern for the representation of process attributes that is compatible with upper ontology frameworks such as BFO and BioTop. Our solution rests on two key tenets: firstly, that many of the sorts of process attributes which are biomedically interesting can be characterised by the ways that repeated parts of such processes constitute, in combination, an overall process; secondly, that entities for which a full logical definition can be assigned do not need to be treated as primitive within a formal ontology framework. We apply this approach to the challenge of modelling and automatically classifying examples of normal and abnormal rates and patterns of heart beating processes, and discuss the expressivity required in the underlying ontology representation language. We provide full definitions for process attributes at increasing levels of domain complexity. Conclusions We show that a logical definition of process attributes is feasible, though limited by the expressivity of DL languages so that the creation of primitives is still necessary. This finding may endorse current formal upper-ontology frameworks as a way of ensuring consistency, interoperability and clarity.

  7. Disease Ontology: a backbone for disease semantic integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriml, Lynn Marie; Arze, Cesar; Nadendla, Suvarna; Chang, Yu-Wei Wayne; Mazaitis, Mark; Felix, Victor; Feng, Gang; Kibbe, Warren Alden

    2012-01-01

    The Disease Ontology (DO) database (http://disease-ontology.org) represents a comprehensive knowledge base of 8043 inherited, developmental and acquired human diseases (DO version 3, revision 2510). The DO web browser has been designed for speed, efficiency and robustness through the use of a graph database. Full-text contextual searching functionality using Lucene allows the querying of name, synonym, definition, DOID and cross-reference (xrefs) with complex Boolean search strings. The DO semantically integrates disease and medical vocabularies through extensive cross mapping and integration of MeSH, ICD, NCI's thesaurus, SNOMED CT and OMIM disease-specific terms and identifiers. The DO is utilized for disease annotation by major biomedical databases (e.g. Array Express, NIF, IEDB), as a standard representation of human disease in biomedical ontologies (e.g. IDO, Cell line ontology, NIFSTD ontology, Experimental Factor Ontology, Influenza Ontology), and as an ontological cross mappings resource between DO, MeSH and OMIM (e.g. GeneWiki). The DO project (http://diseaseontology.sf.net) has been incorporated into open source tools (e.g. Gene Answers, FunDO) to connect gene and disease biomedical data through the lens of human disease. The next iteration of the DO web browser will integrate DO's extended relations and logical definition representation along with these biomedical resource cross-mappings.

  8. Publication and Retrieval of Computational Chemical-Physical Data Via the Semantic Web. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostlund, Neil [Chemical Semantics, Inc., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-07-20

    This research showed the feasibility of applying the concepts of the Semantic Web to Computation Chemistry. We have created the first web portal (www.chemsem.com) that allows data created in the calculations of quantum chemistry, and other such chemistry calculations to be placed on the web in a way that makes the data accessible to scientists in a semantic form never before possible. The semantic web nature of the portal allows data to be searched, found, and used as an advance over the usual approach of a relational database. The semantic data on our portal has the nature of a Giant Global Graph (GGG) that can be easily merged with related data and searched globally via a SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) that makes global searches for data easier than with traditional methods. Our Semantic Web Portal requires that the data be understood by a computer and hence defined by an ontology (vocabulary). This ontology is used by the computer in understanding the data. We have created such an ontology for computational chemistry (purl.org/gc) that encapsulates a broad knowledge of the field of computational chemistry. We refer to this ontology as the Gainesville Core. While it is perhaps the first ontology for computational chemistry and is used by our portal, it is only a start of what must be a long multi-partner effort to define computational chemistry. In conjunction with the above efforts we have defined a new potential file standard (Common Standard for eXchange – CSX for computational chemistry data). This CSX file is the precursor of data in the Resource Description Framework (RDF) form that the semantic web requires. Our portal translates CSX files (as well as other computational chemistry data files) into RDF files that are part of the graph database that the semantic web employs. We propose a CSX file as a convenient way to encapsulate computational chemistry data.

  9. Initial Implementation of a comparative Data Analysis Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Prosdocimi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis is used throughout biology. When entities under comparison (e.g. proteins, genomes, species are related by descent, evolutionary theory provides a framework that, in principle, allows N-ary comparisons of entities, while controlling for non-independence due to relatedness. Powerful software tools exist for specialized applications of this approach, yet it remains under-utilized in the absence of a unifying informatics infrastructure. A key step in developing such an infrastructure is the definition of a formal ontology. The analysis of use cases and existing formalisms suggests that a significant component of evolutionary analysis involves a core problem of inferring a character history, relying on key concepts: “Operational Taxonomic Units” (OTUs, representing the entities to be compared; “character-state data” representing the observations compared among OTUs; “phylogenetic tree”, representing the historical path of evolution among the entities; and “transitions”, the inferred evolutionary changes in states of characters that account for observations. Using the Web Ontology Language (OWL, we have defined these and other fundamental concepts in a Comparative Data Analysis Ontology (CDAO. CDAO has been evaluated for its ability to represent token data sets and to support simple forms of reasoning. With further development, CDAO will provide a basis for tools (for semantic transformation, data retrieval, validation, integration, etc. that make it easier for software developers and biomedical researchers to apply evolutionary methods of inference to diverse types of data, so as to integrate this powerful framework for reasoning into their research.

  10. The ontology-based answers (OBA service: A connector for embedded usage of ontologies in applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen eDönitz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The semantic web depends on the use of ontologies to let electronic systems interpret contextualinformation. Optimally, the handling and access of ontologies should be completely transparent to theuser. As a means to this end, we have developed a service that attempts to bridge the gap betweenexperts in a certain knowledge domain, ontologists and application developers. The ontology-basedanswers (OBA service introduced here can be embedded into custom applications to grant access to theclasses of ontologies and their relations as most important structural features as well as to informationencoded in the relations between ontology classes. Thus computational biologists can benefit fromontologies without detailed knowledge about the respective ontology. The content of ontologies ismapped to a graph of connected objects which is compatible to the object-oriented programmingstyle in Java. Semantic functions implement knowledge about the complex semantics of anontology beyond the class hierarchy and partOf-relations. By using these OBA functions anapplication can, for example, provide a semantic search function, or (in the examples outlined mapan anatomical structure to the organs it belongs to. The semantic functions relieve the applicationdeveloper from the necessity of acquiring in-depth knowledge about the semantics and curationguidelines of the used ontologies by implementing the required knowledge. The architecture of theOBA service encapsulates the logic to process ontologies in order to achieve a separation from theapplication logic. A public server with the current plugins is available and can be used with theprovided connector in a custom application in scenarios analogous to the presented use cases. Theserver and the client are freely available if a project requires the use of custom plugins or nonpublicontologies.The OBA service and further documentation is available at: http://www.bioinf.med.unigoettingen.de/projects/oba

  11. Ontologies vs. Classification Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bodil Nistrup; Erdman Thomsen, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    data sets or for obtaining advanced search facilities. In this paper we will present an attempt at answering these questions. We will give a presentation of various types of ontologies and briefly introduce terminological ontologies. Furthermore we will argue that classification systems, e.g. product...

  12. The Ontology of Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Neil

    1995-01-01

    Explores some key existential or ontological concepts to show their applicability to the complex area of disaster impact as it relates to health and social welfare practice. Draws on existentialist philosophy, particularly that of John Paul Sartre, and introduces some key ontological concepts to show how they specifically apply to the experience…

  13. A Formal Theory for Modular ERDF Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyti, Anastasia; Antoniou, Grigoris; Damásio, Carlos Viegas

    The success of the Semantic Web is impossible without any form of modularity, encapsulation, and access control. In an earlier paper, we extended RDF graphs with weak and strong negation, as well as derivation rules. The ERDF #n-stable model semantics of the extended RDF framework (ERDF) is defined, extending RDF(S) semantics. In this paper, we propose a framework for modular ERDF ontologies, called modular ERDF framework, which enables collaborative reasoning over a set of ERDF ontologies, while support for hidden knowledge is also provided. In particular, the modular ERDF stable model semantics of modular ERDF ontologies is defined, extending the ERDF #n-stable model semantics. Our proposed framework supports local semantics and different points of view, local closed-world and open-world assumptions, and scoped negation-as-failure. Several complexity results are provided.

  14. WEB-QUESTS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDYING AND TEACHING AS A VALUABLE RESOURCE AND EFFECTIVE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Pererva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper is a study of innovative methods of learning and teaching English with the help of Internet resources and students motivation to seek the necessary information at homework. Methodology. The main principle of the Web-Quest as a type of English language teaching is to motivate students. For example, by participation in the Web-Quest students, who were unsure of their knowledge, become more confident. Having clear goals and objectives, using computer skills, motivated young people more actively acts as a confident user of English. Findings. According to the technology of We-Quests students were asked to create one or more projects directly related to the successful execution of the work. It is a significant result of all the hard work of students, and it is the subject of evaluation. Evaluation is an essential component of Web-Quest or any other project, and from this point of view, the criteria should be clear and accessible to students from the very beginning. These instructions can and should be changed in order to differentiate and provide an oral presentation and written work. Originality. Basically, Web-Quests are mini-projects in which a higher percentage of the material obtained from the Internet. They can be created by teachers or students, depending on the type of training work. The author detailed the increase of possibilities in the search of Internet projects with other creative types of student work. They may include: review of the literature, essay writing, discussion of read works and other. Practical value. The paper confirmed that the roles and tasks, reflecting the real world, invites to cooperate, stimulate and train the thinking process at a higher level. That is why the use of Web-Quests can improve the language skills of the educational process (reading for information extraction, detailed reading, negotiations, oral and written communication, and other.

  15. An Approach for Learning Expressive Ontologies in Medical Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Alvarado, Ana B; Lopez-Arevalo, Ivan; Tello-Leal, Edgar; Sosa-Sosa, Victor J

    2015-08-01

    The access to medical information (journals, blogs, web-pages, dictionaries, and texts) has been increased due to availability of many digital media. In particular, finding an appropriate structure that represents the information contained in texts is not a trivial task. One of the structures for modeling the knowledge are ontologies. An ontology refers to a conceptualization of a specific domain of knowledge. Ontologies are especially useful because they support the exchange and sharing of information as well as reasoning tasks. The usage of ontologies in medicine is mainly focussed in the representation and organization of medical terminologies. Ontology learning techniques have emerged as a set of techniques to get ontologies from unstructured information. This paper describes a new ontology learning approach that consists of a method for the acquisition of concepts and its corresponding taxonomic relations, where also axioms disjointWith and equivalentClass are learned from text without human intervention. The source of knowledge involves files about medical domain. Our approach is divided into two stages, the first part corresponds to discover hierarchical relations and the second part to the axiom extraction. Our automatic ontology learning approach shows better results compared against previous work, giving rise to more expressive ontologies.

  16. Ayurveda research: Ontological challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakrishna Nayak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative research involving Ayurveda and the current sciences is undoubtedly an imperative and is emerging as an exciting horizon, particularly in basic sciences. Some work in this direction is already going on and outcomes are awaited with bated breath. For instance the ′ASIIA (A Science Initiative In Ayurveda′ projects of Dept of Science and Technology, Govt of India, which include studies such as Ayurvedic Prakriti and Genetics. Further intense and sustained collaborative research needs to overcome a subtle and fundamental challenge-the ontologic divide between Ayurveda and all the current sciences. Ontology, fundamentally, means existence; elaborated, ontology is a particular perspective of an object of existence and the vocabulary developed to share that perspective. The same object of existence is susceptible to several ontologies. Ayurveda and modern biomedical as well as other sciences belong to different ontologies, and as such, collaborative research cannot be carried out at required levels until a mutually acceptable vocabulary is developed.

  17. Semantic Usage Policies for Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Sebastian

    Web Services provide standardized interfaces for accessing software systems and data sources over the Internet. Semantic descriptions of Web Services help to automate the discovery and invocation of new services and their integration into existing applications. However not all services are freely available for every purpose and not all data is in the public domain. Usage policies describe the terms and conditions under which services and data can be used. Current approaches to semantic Web Service description are mostly focused on functional properties and quality attributes, and do not cover usage policies. We plan to develop a formal language for usage policies with clearly defined semantics that relies on ontologies for representing domain specific terms. We will also extend service discovery and ranking algorithms to incorporate usage policies.

  18. A Dynamic Defense Modeling and Simulation Methodology using Semantic Web Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangsun Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Defense Modeling and Simulations require interoperable and autonomous federates in order to fully simulate complex behavior of war-fighters and to dynamically adapt themselves to various war-game events, commands and controls. In this paper, we propose a semantic web service based methodology to develop war-game simulations. Our methodology encapsulates war-game logic into a set of web services with additional semantic information in WSDL (Web Service Description Language and OWL (Web Ontology Language. By utilizing dynamic discovery and binding power of semantic web services, we are able to dynamically reconfigure federates according to various simulation events. An ASuW (Anti-Surface Warfare simulator is constructed to demonstrate the methodology and successfully shows that the level of interoperability and autonomy can be greatly improved.

  19. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  20. Web-based teaching and learning of the German language on the secondary level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Podgoršek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines different forms of integration of technology in teaching German. Specifically it presents only one form, this is a web-based instruction. The success of the integration of web-based teaching depends on several factors. In this paper we focus on the principle of gradualism, which is of key importance in the five stage model introducing web-based learning. In this paper we present the model and analyze its relevance for web-based teaching German.

  1. Buildings classification from airborne LiDAR point clouds through OBIA and ontology driven approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomljenovic, Ivan; Belgiu, Mariana; Lampoltshammer, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    the consistency of the developed ontologies, and logical reasoning is performed to infer implicit relations between defined concepts. The ontology for the definition of building is specified using the Ontology Web Language (OWL). It is the most widely used ontology language that is based on Description Logics (DL). DL allows the description of internal properties of modelled concepts (roof typology, shape, area, height etc.) and relationships between objects (IS_A, MEMBER_OF/INSTANCE_OF). It captures terminological knowledge (TBox) as well as assertional knowledge (ABox) - that represents facts about concept instances, i.e. the buildings in airborne LiDAR data. To assess the classification accuracy, ground truth data generated by visual interpretation and calculated classification results in terms of precision and recall are used. The advantages of this approach are: (i) flexibility, (ii) transferability, and (iii) extendibility - i.e. ontology can be extended with further concepts, data properties and object properties.

  2. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Baran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA, GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations.Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations; examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0 and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  3. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    KAUST Repository

    Baran, Joachim

    2015-05-05

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  4. Web-Based Language Learning Perception and Personality Characteristics of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaee, Meisam; Gharibeh, Sajjad Gharibeh

    2016-01-01

    The significance of learners' personality in language learning/teaching contexts has often been cited in literature but few studies have scrutinized the role it can play in technology-oriented language classes. In modern language teaching/learning contexts, personality differences are important and should be taken into account. This study…

  5. Using WebQuests as Idea Banks for Fostering Autonomy in Online Language Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghian, Shirin; Marandi, S. Susan

    2016-01-01

    The concept of language learner autonomy has influenced Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) to the extent that Schwienhorst (2012) informs us of a paradigm change in CALL design in the light of learner autonomy. CALL is not considered a tool anymore, but a learner environment available to language learners anywhere in the world. Based on a…

  6. SSWAP: A Simple Semantic Web Architecture and Protocol for semantic web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Damian D G; Schiltz, Gary S; May, Greg D; Avraham, Shulamit; Town, Christopher D; Grant, David; Nelson, Rex T

    2009-09-23

    SSWAP (Simple Semantic Web Architecture and Protocol; pronounced "swap") is an architecture, protocol, and platform for using reasoning to semantically integrate heterogeneous disparate data and services on the web. SSWAP was developed as a hybrid semantic web services technology to overcome limitations found in both pure web service technologies and pure semantic web technologies. There are currently over 2400 resources published in SSWAP. Approximately two dozen are custom-written services for QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) and mapping data for legumes and grasses (grains). The remaining are wrappers to Nucleic Acids Research Database and Web Server entries. As an architecture, SSWAP establishes how clients (users of data, services, and ontologies), providers (suppliers of data, services, and ontologies), and discovery servers (semantic search engines) interact to allow for the description, querying, discovery, invocation, and response of semantic web services. As a protocol, SSWAP provides the vocabulary and semantics to allow clients, providers, and discovery servers to engage in semantic web services. The protocol is based on the W3C-sanctioned first-order description logic language OWL DL. As an open source platform, a discovery server running at http://sswap.info (as in to "swap info") uses the description logic reasoner Pellet to integrate semantic resources. The platform hosts an interactive guide to the protocol at http://sswap.info/protocol.jsp, developer tools at http://sswap.info/developer.jsp, and a portal to third-party ontologies at http://sswapmeet.sswap.info (a "swap meet"). SSWAP addresses the three basic requirements of a semantic web services architecture (i.e., a common syntax, shared semantic, and semantic discovery) while addressing three technology limitations common in distributed service systems: i.e., i) the fatal mutability of traditional interfaces, ii) the rigidity and fragility of static subsumption hierarchies, and iii) the

  7. SSWAP: A Simple Semantic Web Architecture and Protocol for semantic web services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Town Christopher D

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SSWAP (Simple Semantic Web Architecture and Protocol; pronounced "swap" is an architecture, protocol, and platform for using reasoning to semantically integrate heterogeneous disparate data and services on the web. SSWAP was developed as a hybrid semantic web services technology to overcome limitations found in both pure web service technologies and pure semantic web technologies. Results There are currently over 2400 resources published in SSWAP. Approximately two dozen are custom-written services for QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci and mapping data for legumes and grasses (grains. The remaining are wrappers to Nucleic Acids Research Database and Web Server entries. As an architecture, SSWAP establishes how clients (users of data, services, and ontologies, providers (suppliers of data, services, and ontologies, and discovery servers (semantic search engines interact to allow for the description, querying, discovery, invocation, and response of semantic web services. As a protocol, SSWAP provides the vocabulary and semantics to allow clients, providers, and discovery servers to engage in semantic web services. The protocol is based on the W3C-sanctioned first-order description logic language OWL DL. As an open source platform, a discovery server running at http://sswap.info (as in to "swap info" uses the description logic reasoner Pellet to integrate semantic resources. The platform hosts an interactive guide to the protocol at http://sswap.info/protocol.jsp, developer tools at http://sswap.info/developer.jsp, and a portal to third-party ontologies at http://sswapmeet.sswap.info (a "swap meet". Conclusion SSWAP addresses the three basic requirements of a semantic web services architecture (i.e., a common syntax, shared semantic, and semantic discovery while addressing three technology limitations common in distributed service systems: i.e., i the fatal mutability of traditional interfaces, ii the rigidity and fragility of static

  8. Ontological foundations for evolutionary economics: A Darwinian social ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoelhorst, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to further the project of generalized Darwinism by developing a social ontology on the basis of a combined commitment to ontological continuity and ontological commonality. Three issues that are central to the development of a social ontology are addressed: (1) the

  9. Collaborative Writing among Second Language Learners in Academic Web-Based Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Greg; Bikowski, Dawn; Boggs, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates Web-based, project oriented, many-to-many collaborative writing for academic purposes. Thirty-eight Fulbright scholars in an orientation program at a large Midwestern university used a Web-based word processing tool to collaboratively plan and report on a research project. The purpose of this study is to explore and…

  10. Ontological leveling and elicitation for complex industrial transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, L.R.; Goldsmith, S.Y.; Spires, S.V.

    1998-11-01

    The authors present an agent-oriented mechanism that uses a central ontology as a means to conduct complex distributed transactions. This is done by instantiating a template object motivated solely by the ontology, then automatically and explicitly linking each temple element to an independently constructed interface component. Validation information is attached directly to the links so that the agent need not know a priori the semantics of data validity, merely how to execute a general validation process to satisfy the conditions given in the link. Ontological leveling is critical: all terms presented to informants must be semantically coherent within the central ontology. To illustrate this approach in an industrial setting, they discuss an existing implementation that conducted international commercial transactions on the World-Wide Web. Agents operating within a federated architecture construct, populate by Web-based elicitation, and manipulate a distributed composite transaction object to effect transport of goods over the US/Mexico border.

  11. Owlready: Ontology-oriented programming in Python with automatic classification and high level constructs for biomedical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-07-01

    Ontologies are widely used in the biomedical domain. While many tools exist for the edition, alignment or evaluation of ontologies, few solutions have been proposed for ontology programming interface, i.e. for accessing and modifying an ontology within a programming language. Existing query languages (such as SPARQL) and APIs (such as OWLAPI) are not as easy-to-use as object programming languages are. Moreover, they provide few solutions to difficulties encountered with biomedical ontologies. Our objective was to design a tool for accessing easily the entities of an OWL ontology, with high-level constructs helping with biomedical ontologies. From our experience on medical ontologies, we identified two difficulties: (1) many entities are represented by classes (rather than individuals), but the existing tools do not permit manipulating classes as easily as individuals, (2) ontologies rely on the open-world assumption, whereas the medical reasoning must consider only evidence-based medical knowledge as true. We designed a Python module for ontology-oriented programming. It allows access to the entities of an OWL ontology as if they were objects in the programming language. We propose a simple high-level syntax for managing classes and the associated "role-filler" constraints. We also propose an algorithm for performing local closed world reasoning in simple situations. We developed Owlready, a Python module for a high-level access to OWL ontologies. The paper describes the architecture and the syntax of the module version 2. It details how we integrated the OWL ontology model with the Python object model. The paper provides examples based on Gene Ontology (GO). We also demonstrate the interest of Owlready in a use case focused on the automatic comparison of the contraindications of several drugs. This use case illustrates the use of the specific syntax proposed for manipulating classes and for performing local closed world reasoning. Owlready has been successfully

  12. Semantic Analysis of Email Using Domain Ontologies and WordNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Keller, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of capturing and accessing knowledge in paper form has been supplanted by a problem of providing structure to vast amounts of electronic information. Systems that can construct semantic links for natural language documents like email messages automatically will be a crucial element of semantic email tools. We have designed an information extraction process that can leverage the knowledge already contained in an existing semantic web, recognizing references in email to existing nodes in a network of ontology instances by using linguistic knowledge and knowledge of the structure of the semantic web. We developed a heuristic score that uses several forms of evidence to detect references in email to existing nodes in the Semanticorganizer repository's network. While these scores cannot directly support automated probabilistic inference, they can be used to rank nodes by relevance and link those deemed most relevant to email messages.

  13. The EDEN-IW ontology model for sharing knowledge and water quality data between heterogenous databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernholm, M.; Poslad, S.; Zuo, L.

    2004-01-01

    a Semantic Web based data model for IW; software agents as an infrastructure to share and reason about the IW se-mantic data model and XML to make the information accessible to Web portals and mainstream Web services. This presentation focuses on the Semantic Web or Onto-logical model. Currently, we have...

  14. Toward a formal ontology for narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciotti, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the rationale and the first draft of a formal ontology for modeling narrative texts are presented. Building on the semiotic and structuralist narratology, and on the work carried out in the late 1980s by Giuseppe Gigliozzi in Italy, the focus of my research are the concepts of character and of narrative world/space. This formal model is expressed in the OWL 2 ontology language. The main reason to adopt a formal modeling approach is that I consider the purely probabilistic-quantitative methods (now widespread in digital literary studies inadequate. An ontology, on one hand provides a tool for the analysis of strictly literary texts. On the other hand (though beyond the scope of the present work, its formalization can also represent a significant contribution towards grounding the application of storytelling methods outside of scholarly contexts.

  15. Integration and publication of heterogeneous text-mined relationships on the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulet, Adrien; Garten, Yael; Dumontier, Michel; Altman, Russ B; Musen, Mark A; Shah, Nigam H

    2011-05-17

    Advances in Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques enable the extraction of fine-grained relationships mentioned in biomedical text. The variability and the complexity of natural language in expressing similar relationships causes the extracted relationships to be highly heterogeneous, which makes the construction of knowledge bases difficult and poses a challenge in using these for data mining or question answering. We report on the semi-automatic construction of the PHARE relationship ontology (the PHArmacogenomic RElationships Ontology) consisting of 200 curated relations from over 40,000 heterogeneous relationships extracted via text-mining. These heterogeneous relations are then mapped to the PHARE ontology using synonyms, entity descriptions and hierarchies of entities and roles. Once mapped, relationships can be normalized and compared using the structure of the ontology to identify relationships that have similar semantics but different syntax. We compare and contrast the manual procedure with a fully automated approach using WordNet to quantify the degree of integration enabled by iterative curation and refinement of the PHARE ontology. The result of such integration is a repository of normalized biomedical relationships, named PHARE-KB, which can be queried using Semantic Web technologies such as SPARQL and can be visualized in the form of a biological network. The PHARE ontology serves as a common semantic framework to integrate more than 40,000 relationships pertinent to pharmacogenomics. The PHARE ontology forms the foundation of a knowledge base named PHARE-KB. Once populated with relationships, PHARE-KB (i) can be visualized in the form of a biological network to guide human tasks such as database curation and (ii) can be queried programmatically to guide bioinformatics applications such as the prediction of molecular interactions. PHARE is available at http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/PHARE.

  16. An Ontology-driven Framework for Supporting Complex Decision Process

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Junyi; Liu, James N. K.

    2011-01-01

    The study proposes a framework of ONTOlogy-based Group Decision Support System (ONTOGDSS) for decision process which exhibits the complex structure of decision-problem and decision-group. It is capable of reducing the complexity of problem structure and group relations. The system allows decision makers to participate in group decision-making through the web environment, via the ontology relation. It facilitates the management of decision process as a whole, from criteria generation, alternat...

  17. Interactive ontology debugging: Two query strategies for efficient fault localization

    OpenAIRE

    Shchekotykhin, Kostyantyn; Friedrich, Gerhard; Fleiss, Philipp; Rodler, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Effective debugging of ontologies is an important prerequisite for their broad application, especially in areas that rely on everyday users to create and maintain knowledge bases, such as the Semantic Web. In such systems ontologies capture formalized vocabularies of terms shared by its users. However in many cases users have different local views of the domain, i.e. of the context in which a given term is used. Inappropriate usage of terms together with natural complications when formulating...

  18. Extending TOPS: Ontology-driven Anomaly Detection and Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Michaelis, A.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) is a flexible modeling software system that integrates ecosystem models with frequent satellite and surface weather observations to produce ecosystem nowcasts (assessments of current conditions) and forecasts useful in natural resources management, public health and disaster management. We have been extending the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) to include a capability for automated anomaly detection and analysis of both on-line (streaming) and off-line data. In order to best capture the knowledge about data hierarchies, Earth science models and implied dependencies between anomalies and occurrences of observable events such as urbanization, deforestation, or fires, we have developed an ontology to serve as a knowledge base. We can query the knowledge base and answer questions about dataset compatibilities, similarities and dependencies so that we can, for example, automatically analyze similar datasets in order to verify a given anomaly occurrence in multiple data sources. We are further extending the system to go beyond anomaly detection towards reasoning about possible causes of anomalies that are also encoded in the knowledge base as either learned or implied knowledge. This enables us to scale up the analysis by eliminating a large number of anomalies early on during the processing by either failure to verify them from other sources, or matching them directly with other observable events without having to perform an extensive and time-consuming exploration and analysis. The knowledge is captured using OWL ontology language, where connections are defined in a schema that is later extended by including specific instances of datasets and models. The information is stored using Sesame server and is accessible through both Java API and web services using SeRQL and SPARQL query languages. Inference is provided using OWLIM component integrated with Sesame.

  19. Data mining for ontology development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, George S.; Strasburg, Jana (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Stampf, David (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Neymotin,Lev (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Czajkowski, Carl (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Shine, Eugene (Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC); Bollinger, James (Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC); Ghosh, Vinita (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Sorokine, Alexandre (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ferrell, Regina (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Ward, Richard (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schoenwald, David Alan

    2010-06-01

    A multi-laboratory ontology construction effort during the summer and fall of 2009 prototyped an ontology for counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. This effort included an ontology development team and an ontology validation methods team. Here the third team of the Ontology Project, the Data Analysis (DA) team reports on their approaches, the tools they used, and results for mining literature for terminology pertinent to counterfeit semiconductor manufacturing. A discussion of the value of ontology-based analysis is presented, with insights drawn from other ontology-based methods regularly used in the analysis of genomic experiments. Finally, suggestions for future work are offered.

  20. An Ontology Design Pattern for Representing Relevance in OWL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobillo, Fernando; Delgado, Miguel; Gómez-Romero, Juan

    Design patterns are widely-used software engineering abstractions which define guidelines for modeling common application scenarios. Ontology design patterns are the extension of software patterns for knowledge acquisition in the Semantic Web. In this work we present a design pattern for representing relevance depending on context in OWL ontologies, i.e. to assert which knowledge from the domain ought to be considered in a given scenario. Besides the formal semantics and the features of the pattern, we describe a reasoning procedure to extract relevant knowledge in the resulting ontology and a plug-in for Protégé which assists pattern use.

  1. Validating EHR clinical models using ontology patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Schulz, Stefan

    2017-11-04

    Clinical models are artefacts that specify how information is structured in electronic health records (EHRs). However, the makeup of clinical models is not guided by any formal constraint beyond a semantically vague information model. We address this gap by advocating ontology design patterns as a mechanism that makes the semantics of clinical models explicit. This paper demonstrates how ontology design patterns can validate existing clinical models using SHACL. Based on the Clinical Information Modelling Initiative (CIMI), we show how ontology patterns detect both modeling and terminology binding errors in CIMI models. SHACL, a W3C constraint language for the validation of RDF graphs, builds on the concept of "Shape", a description of data in terms of expected cardinalities, datatypes and other restrictions. SHACL, as opposed to OWL, subscribes to the Closed World Assumption (CWA) and is therefore more suitable for the validation of clinical models. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the approach by manually describing the correspondences between six CIMI clinical models represented in RDF and two SHACL ontology design patterns. Using a Java-based SHACL implementation, we found at least eleven modeling and binding errors within these CIMI models. This demonstrates the usefulness of ontology design patterns not only as a modeling tool but also as a tool for validation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Integrating systems biology models and biomedical ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Systems biology is an approach to biology that emphasizes the structure and dynamic behavior of biological systems and the interactions that occur within them. To succeed, systems biology crucially depends on the accessibility and integration of data across domains and levels of granularity. Biomedical ontologies were developed to facilitate such an integration of data and are often used to annotate biosimulation models in systems biology. Results We provide a framework to integrate representations of in silico systems biology with those of in vivo biology as described by biomedical ontologies and demonstrate this framework using the Systems Biology Markup Language. We developed the SBML Harvester software that automatically converts annotated SBML models into OWL and we apply our software to those biosimulation models that are contained in the BioModels Database. We utilize the resulting knowledge base for complex biological queries that can bridge levels of granularity, verify models based on the biological phenomenon they represent and provide a means to establish a basic qualitative layer on which to express the semantics of biosimulation models. Conclusions We establish an information flow between biomedical ontologies and biosimulation models and we demonstrate that the integration of annotated biosimulation models and biomedical ontologies enables the verification of models as well as expressive queries. Establishing a bi-directional information flow between systems biology and biomedical ontologies has the potential to enable large-scale analyses of biological systems that span levels of granularity from molecules to organisms. PMID:21835028

  3. Ontologies for Bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Leszczynski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The past twenty years have witnessed an explosion of biological data in diverse database formats governed by heterogeneous infrastructures. Not only are semantics (attribute terms different in meaning across databases, but their organization varies widely. Ontologies are a concept imported from computing science to describe different conceptual frameworks that guide the collection, organization and publication of biological data. An ontology is similar to a paradigm but has very strict implications for formatting and meaning in a computational context. The use of ontologies is a means of communicating and resolving semantic and organizational differences between biological databases in order to enhance their integration. The purpose of interoperability (or sharing between divergent storage and semantic protocols is to allow scientists from around the world to share and communicate with each other. This paper describes the rapid accumulation of biological data, its various organizational structures, and the role that ontologies play in interoperability.

  4. Appreciating ontological struggles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danholt, Peter

    the world in the singular is taken for granted, but where each and every one of us may have different perspectives and understandings of the world. Latour following the work of Brazilian anthropologist Eduardo Viveiros de Castro suggests the concept of multinaturalism. Multinaturalism in contrast...... it in relation, not to Amerindian ontology vs. Euroamerican ontology as Viveiros de Castro does, but in relation to the clinical practice of diabetes treatment. I will argue that by conceiving of the encounter in the clinic between a person with diabetes and a diabetes nurse, not as a matter of treating...... a condition in the world, but as the playing out of an ontological struggle, we become able to appreciate the situation and the treatment differently and in a manner that reconsiders treatment and disease in novel ways. Importantly, when the encounter is conceived of as an ontological struggle it becomes ever...

  5. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Abinaya

    Full Text Available Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies. FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog.

  6. Medizinische Ontologien: das Ende des MeSH / Medical ontologies: the end of MeSH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazan, Constantin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of information technology the complexicity of medical questions and medical information management is an important topic which challenges computer scientists.In the eighties of last century artificial intelligence went awry. Though some core ideas of AI have brought up fruitful results. After all congruent development in a number of different scientific disciplines and the exponential development in computer hardware could meet the high requirements in medical information search. In 2000 Tim Berners-Lee's programmatic request for a Semantic Web gained the ontology topic broader attention. Already 20 years ago NLM started to develop the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS. So in medicine (PubMed ontology integrated into a semantic net is in operation. Hence it is high time for medical librarians and documentalists to get into this topic although it is covered by a smoke screen of terminology from IT. Ontologies can be understood as tools for classification. So essential contributions from library and documentation science could be expected. This paper should open an entrance to the topic. It will explain fundamental elements of UMLS and includes an annotated list of literature for further studies.

  7. Applications of Ontology Design Patterns in Biomedical Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jonathan M.; Horridge, Matthew; Musen, Mark A.; Noy, Natalya F.

    2012-01-01

    Ontology design patterns (ODPs) are a proposed solution to facilitate ontology development, and to help users avoid some of the most frequent modeling mistakes. ODPs originate from similar approaches in software engineering, where software design patterns have become a critical aspect of software development. There is little empirical evidence for ODP prevalence or effectiveness thus far. In this work, we determine the use and applicability of ODPs in a case study of biomedical ontologies. We encoded ontology design patterns from two ODP catalogs. We then searched for these patterns in a set of eight ontologies. We found five patterns of the 69 patterns. Two of the eight ontologies contained these patterns. While ontology design patterns provide a vehicle for capturing formally reoccurring models and best practices in ontology design, we show that today their use in a case study of widely used biomedical ontologies is limited. PMID:23304337

  8. Embedding Web-Based Statistical Translation Models in Cross-Language Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, W.; Nie, J.Y.; Simard, M.

    2003-01-01

    Although more and more language pairs are covered by machine translation (MT) services, there are still many pairs that lack translation resources. Cross-language information retrieval (CUR) is an application that needs translation functionality of a relatively low level of sophistication, since

  9. Web-based mini-games for language learning that support spoken interaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strik, H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The European ‘Lifelong Learning Programme’ (LLP) project ‘Games Online for Basic Language learning’ (GOBL) aimed to provide youths and adults wishing to improve their basic language skills access to materials for the development of communicative...

  10. Pedagogical considerations for a web-based tandem language learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel, C; Mullen, T

    2000-01-01

    Tandem language learning strategies have long been recognised for their pedagogical value. E-mail tandem exchanges have allowed learners to engage in active communicative contact with native speakers of their target language, but research around these exchanges has suffered due to difficulties with

  11. Untangling Word Webs: Graph Theory and the Notion of Density in Second Language Word Association Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Clarissa; Meara, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Examines the implications of the metaphor of the vocabulary network. Takes a formal approach to the exploration of this metaphor by applying the principles of graph theory to word association data to compare the relative densities of the first language and second language lexical networks. (Author/VWL)

  12. Fuzzy knowledge management for the semantic web

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Zongmin; Yan, Li; Cheng, Jingwei

    2014-01-01

    This book goes to great depth concerning the fast growing topic of technologies and approaches of fuzzy logic in the Semantic Web. The topics of this book include fuzzy description logics and fuzzy ontologies, queries of fuzzy description logics and fuzzy ontology knowledge bases, extraction of fuzzy description logics and ontologies from fuzzy data models, storage of fuzzy ontology knowledge bases in fuzzy databases, fuzzy Semantic Web ontology mapping, and fuzzy rules and their interchange in the Semantic Web. The book aims to provide a single record of current research in the fuzzy knowledge representation and reasoning for the Semantic Web. The objective of the book is to provide the state of the art information to researchers, practitioners and graduate students of the Web intelligence and at the same time serve the knowledge and data engineering professional faced with non-traditional applications that make the application of conventional approaches difficult or impossible.

  13. A model-driven approach for representing clinical archetypes for Semantic Web environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Costa, Catalina; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Maldonado, José Alberto

    2009-02-01

    The life-long clinical information of any person supported by electronic means configures his Electronic Health Record (EHR). This information is usually distributed among several independent and heterogeneous systems that may be syntactically or semantically incompatible. There are currently different standards for representing and exchanging EHR information among different systems. In advanced EHR approaches, clinical information is represented by means of archetypes. Most of these approaches use the Archetype Definition Language (ADL) to specify archetypes. However, ADL has some drawbacks when attempting to perform semantic activities in Semantic Web environments. In this work, Semantic Web technologies are used to specify clinical archetypes for advanced EHR architectures. The advantages of using the Ontology Web Language (OWL) instead of ADL are described and discussed in this work. Moreover, a solution combining Semantic Web and Model-driven Engineering technologies is proposed to transform ADL into OWL for the CEN EN13606 EHR architecture.

  14. ONTOLOGY BASED QUALITY EVALUATION FOR SPATIAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yılmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many institutions will be providing data to the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI. Current technical background of the NSDI is based on syntactic web services. It is expected that this will be replaced by semantic web services. The quality of the data provided is important in terms of the decision-making process and the accuracy of transactions. Therefore, the data quality needs to be tested. This topic has been neglected in Turkey. Data quality control for NSDI may be done by private or public “data accreditation” institutions. A methodology is required for data quality evaluation. There are studies for data quality including ISO standards, academic studies and software to evaluate spatial data quality. ISO 19157 standard defines the data quality elements. Proprietary software such as, 1Spatial’s 1Validate and ESRI’s Data Reviewer offers quality evaluation based on their own classification of rules. Commonly, rule based approaches are used for geospatial data quality check. In this study, we look for the technical components to devise and implement a rule based approach with ontologies using free and open source software in semantic web context. Semantic web uses ontologies to deliver well-defined web resources and make them accessible to end-users and processes. We have created an ontology conforming to the geospatial data and defined some sample rules to show how to test data with respect to data quality elements including; attribute, topo-semantic and geometrical consistency using free and open source software. To test data against rules, sample GeoSPARQL queries are created, associated with specifications.

  15. War of ontology worlds: mathematics, computer code, or Esperanto?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Evans, James A

    2011-09-01

    The use of structured knowledge representations-ontologies and terminologies-has become standard in biomedicine. Definitions of ontologies vary widely, as do the values and philosophies that underlie them. In seeking to make these views explicit, we conducted and summarized interviews with a dozen leading ontologists. Their views clustered into three broad perspectives that we summarize as mathematics, computer code, and Esperanto. Ontology as mathematics puts the ultimate premium on rigor and logic, symmetry and consistency of representation across scientific subfields, and the inclusion of only established, non-contradictory knowledge. Ontology as computer code focuses on utility and cultivates diversity, fitting ontologies to their purpose. Like computer languages C++, Prolog, and HTML, the code perspective holds that diverse applications warrant custom designed ontologies. Ontology as Esperanto focuses on facilitating cross-disciplinary communication, knowledge cross-referencing, and computation across datasets from diverse communities. We show how these views align with classical divides in science and suggest how a synthesis of their concerns could strengthen the next generation of biomedical ontologies.

  16. War of ontology worlds: mathematics, computer code, or Esperanto?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Rzhetsky

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of structured knowledge representations-ontologies and terminologies-has become standard in biomedicine. Definitions of ontologies vary widely, as do the values and philosophies that underlie them. In seeking to make these views explicit, we conducted and summarized interviews with a dozen leading ontologists. Their views clustered into three broad perspectives that we summarize as mathematics, computer code, and Esperanto. Ontology as mathematics puts the ultimate premium on rigor and logic, symmetry and consistency of representation across scientific subfields, and the inclusion of only established, non-contradictory knowledge. Ontology as computer code focuses on utility and cultivates diversity, fitting ontologies to their purpose. Like computer languages C++, Prolog, and HTML, the code perspective holds that diverse applications warrant custom designed ontologies. Ontology as Esperanto focuses on facilitating cross-disciplinary communication, knowledge cross-referencing, and computation across datasets from diverse communities. We show how these views align with classical divides in science and suggest how a synthesis of their concerns could strengthen the next generation of biomedical ontologies.

  17. The practical impact of ontologies on biomedical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, J J; Zhu, X

    2006-01-01

    To examine recent research work in the development and evaluation of controlled biomedical terminologies - especially, the representation of structured, controlled definitional knowledge about the terms themselves; such terminologies are often referred to as 'ontologies'. A review of the published literature using PubMed, as well as full-text searches of recent Medinfo and American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) Symposia proceedings, searching for the terms 'ontology' and 'ontologies' and for articles discussing specific, prominent ontological work. We summaries the ontologic aspects of twelve current terminology projects: Galen, the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), the Medical Entities Dictionary (MED), SNOMED-CT, LOINC, the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA), the Gene Ontology (GO), ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnosis, NDF-RT, RxNorm, the NCI Thesaurus, and DOLCE+. We discuss the origins, domain, and ontologic representation of each of these and attempt to summarize the impact that each has had on terminologic work and biomedical applications. We also note the contributions of the Protégé tool to many of these efforts. Terminologic research and development have advanced significantly in the past 20 years, especially since the recent orientation toward controlled biomedical ontologies. This work has had significant impact on the development of terminologies themselves, their acceptance and dissemination as standards, and their use in supporting biomedical information systems.

  18. A bibliometric and visual analysis of global geo-ontology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Liu, Yu; Zhu, Haihong; Ying, Shen; Luo, Qinyao; Luo, Heng; Kuai, Xi; Xia, Hui; Shen, Hang

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the results of a bibliometric and visual analysis of geo-ontology research articles collected from the Web of Science (WOS) database between 1999 and 2014 are presented. The numbers of national institutions and published papers are visualized and a global research heat map is drawn, illustrating an overview of global geo-ontology research. In addition, we present a chord diagram of countries and perform a visual cluster analysis of a knowledge co-citation network of references, disclosing potential academic communities and identifying key points, main research areas, and future research trends. The International Journal of Geographical Information Science, Progress in Human Geography, and Computers & Geosciences are the most active journals. The USA makes the largest contributions to geo-ontology research by virtue of its highest numbers of independent and collaborative papers, and its dominance was also confirmed in the country chord diagram. The majority of institutions are in the USA, Western Europe, and Eastern Asia. Wuhan University, University of Munster, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences are notable geo-ontology institutions. Keywords such as "Semantic Web," "GIS," and "space" have attracted a great deal of attention. "Semantic granularity in ontology-driven geographic information systems, "Ontologies in support of activities in geographical space" and "A translation approach to portable ontology specifications" have the highest cited centrality. Geographical space, computer-human interaction, and ontology cognition are the three main research areas of geo-ontology. The semantic mismatch between the producers and users of ontology data as well as error propagation in interdisciplinary and cross-linguistic data reuse needs to be solved. In addition, the development of geo-ontology modeling primitives based on OWL (Web Ontology Language)and finding methods to automatically rework data in Semantic Web are needed. Furthermore, the topological

  19. Annotating breast cancer microarray samples using ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfang; Li, Xin; Yoon, Victoria; Clarke, Robert

    2008-11-06

    As the most common cancer among women, breast cancer results from the accumulation of mutations in essential genes. Recent advance in high-throughput gene expression microarray technology has inspired researchers to use the technology to assist breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment prediction. However, the high dimensionality of microarray experiments and public access of data from many experiments have caused inconsistencies which initiated the development of controlled terminologies and ontologies for annotating microarray experiments, such as the standard microarray Gene Expression Data (MGED) ontology(MO). In this paper, we developed BCM-CO, anontology tailored specifically for indexing clinical annotations of breast cancer microarray samples from the NCI Thesaurus. Our research showed that the coverage of NCI Thesaurus is very limited with respect to i) terms used by researchers to describe breast cancer histology (covering 22 out of 48 histology terms); ii) breast cancer cell lines (covering one out of 12 cell lines); and iii) classes corresponding to the breast cancer grading and staging. By incorporating a wider range of those terms into BCM-CO, we were able to indexed breast cancer microarray samples from GEO using BCMCO and MGED ontology and developed a prototype system with web interface that allows the retrieval of microarray data based on the ontology annotations.

  20. A Survey on Chinese Students' Online English Language Learning Experience through Synchronous Web Conferencing Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi

    2016-01-01

    The online education industry has had a rapid economic development in China since 2013, but this area received little attention in research. This study investigates Chinese undergraduate students' online English learning experiences and online teacher-learner interaction in synchronous web conferencing classes. This article reports the findings…

  1. A Web-Based Blended Learning Environment for Programming Languages: Students' Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagci, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    A learning environment which increases the desire and efforts of students to attain learning goals leads to greater motivation and success. This study examines the negative and positive opinions of students regarding the effectiveness of the learning process and students' success in a computer programming course in which face-to-face and web-based…

  2. Supporting Analogy-based Effort Estimation with the Use of Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kowalska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns effort estimation of software development projects, in particular, at the level of product delivery stages. It proposes a new approach to model project data to support expert-supervised analogy-based effort estimation. The data is modeled using Semantic Web technologies, such as Resource Description Framework (RDF and Ontology Language for the Web (OWL. Moreover, in the paper, we define a method of supervised case-based reasoning. The method enables to search for similar projects’ tasks at different levels of abstraction. For instance, instead of searching for a task performed by a specific person, one could look for tasks performed by people with similar capabilities. The proposed method relies on ontology that defines the core concepts and relationships. However, it is possible to introduce new classes and relationships, without the need of altering the search mechanisms. Finally, we implemented a prototype tool that was used to preliminary validate the proposed approach. We observed that the proposed approach could potentially help experts in estimating non-trivial tasks that are often underestimated.

  3. The Semantics of Web Services: An Examination in GIScience Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Shi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Web service is a technological solution for software interoperability that supports the seamless integration of diverse applications. In the vision of web service architecture, web services are described by the Web Service Description Language (WSDL, discovered through Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI and communicate by the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP. Such a divination has never been fully accomplished yet. Although it was criticized that WSDL only has a syntactic definition of web services, but was not semantic, prior initiatives in semantic web services did not establish a correct methodology to resolve the problem. This paper examines the distinction and relationship between the syntactic and semantic definitions for web services that characterize different purposes in service computation. Further, this paper proposes that the semantics of web service are neutral and independent from the service interface definition, data types and platform. Such a conclusion can be a universal law in software engineering and service computing. Several use cases in the GIScience application are examined in this paper, while the formalization of geospatial services needs to be constructed by the GIScience community towards a comprehensive ontology of the conceptual definitions and relationships for geospatial computation. Advancements in semantic web services research will happen in domain science applications.

  4. Taking Critical Ontology Seriously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Horn, Laura

    2017-01-01

    research have for fundamental questions of ontology (the central premises on the constitutive elements that underpin social reality), epistemology (the assumptions about how knowledge about this reality can be produced) and methodology (how this knowledge is gathered and ordered)? This chapter offers...... claims and identifies the emancipatory commitment inherent in critical approaches as a distinguishing feature. Drawing on critical realism as an illustration of a philosophy of science and as a critical ontology, the chapter then engages with meta-theoretical questions about why critical perspectives...... privilege ontology over epistemology – that is, why we need to accept that social reality is constituted by complex power relations that evolve from a constant dialectical interplay of structure and agency over time, and that these power relations are revealed in both ideational and material dimensions...

  5. The design ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storga, Mario; Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Marjanovic, Dorian

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the research of the nature, building and practical role of a Design Ontology as a potential framework for the more efficient product development (PD) data-, information- and knowledge- description, -explanation, -understanding and -reusing. In the methodology for development...... of the ontology two steps could be identified: empirical research and computer implementation. Empirical research has included domain documentation analysis (Genetic Design Model System developed by Mortensen 1999), identification of the key concepts and relations between them, and categorisation of the concepts...... physical and abstract world. As a next step the computer thesaurus has been created. Using the thesauri, the knowledge evolved during the PD has been described, and the set of the created concepts and relations instances has been used for the ontology model consistency checking and refinement. The Design...

  6. Ontology construction and application in practice case study of health tourism in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrapornchai, Chantana; Choksuchat, Chidchanok

    2016-01-01

    Ontology is one of the key components in semantic webs. It contains the core knowledge for an effective search. However, building ontology requires the carefully-collected knowledge which is very domain-sensitive. In this work, we present the practice of ontology construction for a case study of health tourism in Thailand. The whole process follows the METHONTOLOGY approach, which consists of phases: information gathering, corpus study, ontology engineering, evaluation, publishing, and the application construction. Different sources of data such as structure web documents like HTML and other documents are acquired in the information gathering process. The tourism corpora from various tourism texts and standards are explored. The ontology is evaluated in two aspects: automatic reasoning using Pellet, and RacerPro, and the questionnaires, used to evaluate by experts of the domains: tourism domain experts and ontology experts. The ontology usability is demonstrated via the semantic web application and via example axioms. The developed ontology is actually the first health tourism ontology in Thailand with the published application.

  7. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: a pattern language representation of a general architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Ekberg, Joakim; Nordfeldt, Sam; Hanberger, Lena

    2008-11-28

    Chronic disease management is a global health concern. By the time they reach adolescence, 10-15% of all children live with a chronic disease. The role of educational interventions in facilitating adaptation to chronic disease is receiving growing recognition, and current care policies advocate greater involvement of patients in self-care. Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for new collaborative Internet services characterized by user participation in developing and managing content. Key elements include Really Simple Syndication (RSS) to rapidly disseminate awareness of new information; weblogs (blogs) to describe new trends, wikis to share knowledge, and podcasts to make information available on personal media players. This study addresses the potential to develop Web 2.0 services for young persons with a chronic disease. It is acknowledged that the management of childhood chronic disease is based on interplay between initiatives and resources on the part of patients, relatives, and health care professionals, and where the balance shifts over time to the patients and their families. Participatory action research was used to stepwise define a design specification in the form of a pattern language. Support for children diagnosed with diabetes Type 1 was used as the example area. Each individual design pattern was determined graphically using card sorting methods, and textually in the form Title, Context, Problem, Solution, Examples and References. Application references were included at the lowest level in the graphical overview in the pattern language but not specified in detail in the textual descriptions. The design patterns are divided into functional and non-functional design elements, and formulated at the levels of organizational, system, and application design. The design elements specify access to materials for development of the competences needed for chronic disease management in specific community settings, endorsement of self-learning through online peer

  8. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: A pattern language representation of a general architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekberg Joakim

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease management is a global health concern. By the time they reach adolescence, 10–15% of all children live with a chronic disease. The role of educational interventions in facilitating adaptation to chronic disease is receiving growing recognition, and current care policies advocate greater involvement of patients in self-care. Web 2.0 is an umbrella term for new collaborative Internet services characterized by user participation in developing and managing content. Key elements include Really Simple Syndication (RSS to rapidly disseminate awareness of new information; weblogs (blogs to describe new trends, wikis to share knowledge, and podcasts to make information available on personal media players. This study addresses the potential to develop Web 2.0 services for young persons with a chronic disease. It is acknowledged that the management of childhood chronic disease is based on interplay between initiatives and resources on the part of patients, relatives, and health care professionals, and where the balance shifts over time to the patients and their families. Methods Participatory action research was used to stepwise define a design specification in the form of a pattern language. Support for children diagnosed with diabetes Type 1 was used as the example area. Each individual design pattern was determined graphically using card sorting methods, and textually in the form Title, Context, Problem, Solution, Examples and References. Application references were included at the lowest level in the graphical overview in the pattern language but not specified in detail in the textual descriptions. Results The design patterns are divided into functional and non-functional design elements, and formulated at the levels of organizational, system, and application design. The design elements specify access to materials for development of the competences needed for chronic disease management in specific community

  9. Feasibility of automated foundational ontology interchangeability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khan, ZC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While a foundational ontology can solve interoperability issues among the domain ontologies aligned to it, multiple foundational ontologies have been developed. Thus, there are still interoperability issues among domain ontologies aligned...

  10. Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T.; Chung, N. T.; Mukherjee, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) program is a portfolio of programs, managed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It was established to revolutionize how DoD designs, verifies, and manufactures complex defense systems and vehicles. The Component, Context, and Manufacturing Model Library (C2M2L; pronounced "camel") seeks to develop domain-specific models needed to enable design, verification, and fabrication of the Fast Adaptable Next-Generation (FANG) infantry fighting vehicle using in its overall infrastructure. Terrain models are being developed to represent the surface/fluid that an amphibious infantry fighting vehicle would traverse, ranging from paved road surfaces to rocky, mountainous terrain, slope, discrete obstacles, mud, sand snow, and water fording. Context models are being developed to provide additional data for environmental factors, such as: humidity, wind speed, particulate presence and character, solar radiation, cloud cover, precipitation, and more. The Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources (OSCAR) designed and developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is semantic web data system that enables context artifacts to be registered and searched according to their meaning, rather than indexed according to their syntactic structure alone (as in the case for traditional search engines). The system leverages heavily on the Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies to model physical terrain environment and context model characteristics. In this talk, we focus on the application of the SWEET ontologies and the design of the OSCAR system architecture.

  11. Using multiple ontologies as background knowledge in ontology matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksovski, Zharko; Ten Kate, Warner; Van Harmelen, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Using ontology as a background knowledge in ontology match- ing is being actively investigated. Recently the idea attracted attention because of the growing number of available ontologies, which in turn opens up new opportunities, and reduces the problem of nding candi- date background knowledge.

  12. Anticipation and ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechsner, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Anticipation has recently been rediscovered by psychologists as a fundamental aspect of human cognitive-motoric activity. Cognitive anticipation is connected to goal directedness and purposefulness of mental activity. Humans perceive and cogitate in service of goals and purposes, i.e. in an action-related and action-relevant way that gives special status to goals and anticipation. With this in mind, I suggest that there are three fundamental and distinct kinds of prototypical situational schemes, or naïve event ontologies, which are defined and distinguished by the underlying causal scheme. These three ontologies are characterized by prototypical anticipatory schemes.

  13. A Semi-Automatic Approach to Construct Vietnamese Ontology from Online Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bao-An; Yang, Don-Lin

    2012-01-01

    An ontology is an effective formal representation of knowledge used commonly in artificial intelligence, semantic web, software engineering, and information retrieval. In open and distance learning, ontologies are used as knowledge bases for e-learning supplements, educational recommenders, and question answering systems that support students with…

  14. An Evolutive Process to Convert Glossaries into Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Hilera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method to generate ontologies from glossaries of terms. The proposed method presupposes an evolutionary life cycle based on successive transformations of the original glossary that lead to products of intermediate knowledge representation (dictionary, taxonomy, and thesaurus. These products are characterized by an increase in semantic expressiveness in comparison to the product obtained in the previous transformation, with the ontology as the end product. Although this method has been applied to produce an ontology from the “IEEE Standard Glossary of Software Engineering Terminology,” it could be applied to any glossary of any knowledge domain to generate an ontology that may be used to index or search for information resources and documents stored in libraries or on the Semantic Web.

  15. Pharmacogenomic knowledge representation, reasoning and genome-based clinical decision support based on OWL 2 DL ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwald, Matthias; Miñarro Giménez, Jose Antonio; Boyce, Richard D; Freimuth, Robert R; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-02-22

    Every year, hundreds of thousands of patients experience treatment failure or adverse drug reactions (ADRs), many of which could be prevented by pharmacogenomic testing. However, the primary knowledge needed for clinical pharmacogenomics is currently dispersed over disparate data structures and captured in unstructured or semi-structured formalizations. This is a source of potential ambiguity and complexity, making it difficult to create reliable information technology systems for enabling clinical pharmacogenomics. We developed Web Ontology Language (OWL) ontologies and automated reasoning methodologies to meet the following goals: 1) provide a simple and concise formalism for representing pharmacogenomic knowledge, 2) finde errors and insufficient definitions in pharmacogenomic knowledge bases, 3) automatically assign alleles and phenotypes to patients, 4) match patients to clinically appropriate pharmacogenomic guidelines and clinical decision support messages and 5) facilitate the detection of inconsistencies and overlaps between pharmacogenomic treatment guidelines from different sources. We evaluated different reasoning systems and test our approach with a large collection of publicly available genetic profiles. Our methodology proved to be a novel and useful choice for representing, analyzing and using pharmacogenomic data. The Genomic Clinical Decision Support (Genomic CDS) ontology represents 336 SNPs with 707 variants; 665 haplotypes related to 43 genes; 22 rules related to drug-response phenotypes; and 308 clinical decision support rules. OWL reasoning identified CDS rules with overlapping target populations but differing treatment recommendations. Only a modest number of clinical decision support rules were triggered for a collection of 943 public genetic profiles. We found significant performance differences across available OWL reasoners. The ontology-based framework we developed can be used to represent, organize and reason over the growing wealth of

  16. An effective method of large scale ontology matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Gayo

    2014-01-01

    We are currently facing a proliferation of heterogeneous biomedical data sources accessible through various knowledge-based applications. These data are annotated by increasingly extensive and widely disseminated knowledge organisation systems ranging from simple terminologies and structured vocabularies to formal ontologies. In order to solve the interoperability issue, which arises due to the heterogeneity of these ontologies, an alignment task is usually performed. However, while significant effort has been made to provide tools that automatically align small ontologies containing hundreds or thousands of entities, little attention has been paid to the matching of large sized ontologies in the life sciences domain. We have designed and implemented ServOMap, an effective method for large scale ontology matching. It is a fast and efficient high precision system able to perform matching of input ontologies containing hundreds of thousands of entities. The system, which was included in the 2012 and 2013 editions of the Ontology Alignment Evaluation Initiative campaign, performed very well. It was ranked among the top systems for the large ontologies matching. We proposed an approach for large scale ontology matching relying on Information Retrieval (IR) techniques and the combination of lexical and machine learning contextual similarity computing for the generation of candidate mappings. It is particularly adapted to the life sciences domain as many of the ontologies in this domain benefit from synonym terms taken from the Unified Medical Language System and that can be used by our IR strategy. The ServOMap system we implemented is able to deal with hundreds of thousands entities with an efficient computation time.

  17. Physical properties of biological entities: an introduction to the ontology of physics for biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel L; Bookstein, Fred L; Gennari, John H

    2011-01-01

    As biomedical investigators strive to integrate data and analyses across spatiotemporal scales and biomedical domains, they have recognized the benefits of formalizing languages and terminologies via computational ontologies. Although ontologies for biological entities-molecules, cells, organs-are well-established, there are no principled ontologies of physical properties-energies, volumes, flow rates-of those entities. In this paper, we introduce the Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB), a reference ontology of classical physics designed for annotating biophysical content of growing repositories of biomedical datasets and analytical models. The OPB's semantic framework, traceable to James Clerk Maxwell, encompasses modern theories of system dynamics and thermodynamics, and is implemented as a computational ontology that references available upper ontologies. In this paper we focus on the OPB classes that are designed for annotating physical properties encoded in biomedical datasets and computational models, and we discuss how the OPB framework will facilitate biomedical knowledge integration. © 2011 Cook et al.

  18. Physical properties of biological entities: an introduction to the ontology of physics for biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Cook

    Full Text Available As biomedical investigators strive to integrate data and analyses across spatiotemporal scales and biomedical domains, they have recognized the benefits of formalizing languages and terminologies via computational ontologies. Although ontologies for biological entities-molecules, cells, organs-are well-established, there are no principled ontologies of physical properties-energies, volumes, flow rates-of those entities. In this paper, we introduce the Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB, a reference ontology of classical physics designed for annotating biophysical content of growing repositories of biomedical datasets and analytical models. The OPB's semantic framework, traceable to James Clerk Maxwell, encompasses modern theories of system dynamics and thermodynamics, and is implemented as a computational ontology that references available upper ontologies. In this paper we focus on the OPB classes that are designed for annotating physical properties encoded in biomedical datasets and computational models, and we discuss how the OPB framework will facilitate biomedical knowledge integration.

  19. Affordances of Web 2.0 Technologies for Collaborative Advanced Writing in a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl. Carola

    2014-01-01

    Can online collaboration yield a positive effect on academic writing in a foreign language? If so, what exactly is the added value, compared to individual writing, and (how) does it translate to better output? These are the central questions addressed in this paper. L2 writing research has long highlighted the benefits of collaboration in terms of…

  20. WebDSL : A Case Study in Domain-Specific Language Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.

    2008-01-01

    Preprint of paper published in: GITTSE 2007 - International Summer School Generative and Transformational Techniques in Software Engineering, 2-7 July 2007, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 5235; doi:10.1007/978-3-540-88643-3_7 The goal of domain-specific languages (DSLs) is to increase the