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Sample records for weapons-grade tungsten alloy

  1. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  2. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  3. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  4. Controlling Weapons-Grade Fissile Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotblat, J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the problems of controlling weapons-grade fissionable material. Projections of the growth of fission nuclear reactors indicates sufficient materials will be available to construct 300,000 atomic bombs each containing 10 kilograms of plutonium by 1990. (SL)

  5. Deuterium blistering in tungsten and tungsten vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Kameel; Yuan, Yue; Cheng, Long; Wang, Jun [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Zhang-Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), Beijing 100083 (China); De Temmerman, Gregory [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: lgh@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-06-15

    In order to evaluate D blistering behavior in W based plasma facing materials, rolled W and different grades of W-V targets were exposed to high flux of 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, low energy (38 eV) D plasma at two different surface temperatures. The blistering behavior was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, accompanied by electron back-scattering diffraction. Highest numbers of blisters were observed on the surface of rolled tungsten. The addition of V precursor to W suppressed D blister formation. In the case of W-V alloys, comparatively submicron V-containing materials have shown high tendency but small size blisters formation than micron V-containing samples. A high density of blisters was observed near the (111) plane on the surface of both V-containing alloys. Nano-sized blisters were also observed on V enriched surface.

  6. Tungsten carbide laser alloying of a low alloyed steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Mihai; Taca, Mihaela

    1996-10-01

    Laser alloying is a way to change the composition of metal surfaces in order to improve their corrosion-resistance, high-temperature strength and hardness. The results of a structural and phase analysis of a tungsten carbide based surface layer prepared by laser alloying of a low carbon steel substrate are presented. Structure, phase composition and microhardness of surface alloyed layers have been investigated. The surface of the samples exhibited a thin layer with a different chemical and phase composition. An increase in alloyed surface hardness and wear-resistance was observed.

  7. High-strength tungsten alloy with improved ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, W. D.; Raffo, P. L.; Rubenstein, L. S.; Witzke, W. R.

    1967-01-01

    Alloy combines superior strength at elevated temperatures with improved ductility at lower temperatures relative to unalloyed tungsten. Composed of tungsten, rhenium, hafnium, and carbon, the alloy is prepared by consumable electrode vacuum arc-melting and can be fabricated into rod, plate, and sheet.

  8. Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS-6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-14-73 Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten ...Technology, Boise State University, Army Research Laboratory Project Title: Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten -bearing Alloys and Composites...strength, we made them better suited to study the mechanical alloying of tungsten -transition metal couples in which interdiffusion during mechanical

  9. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  10. COMPUTER NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN HEAVY ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A microstructure model of tungsten heavy alloys has been developed. On the basis of the model and several assumptions, the macro-mechanical properties of 90 W heavy alloy under quasi-static tensile deformation and the effects of microstructural parameters (mechanical properties of the matrix phase and tungsten content) on them have been analyzed by computer numerical simulation. The mechanical properties of the alloy have been found to be dependent on the mechanical parameters of the matrix phase. As the elastic modulus and yield strength of the matrix phase increase, the tensile strength of the alloy increases, while the elongation decreases. If the mechanical parameters except the tensile strength of the matrix phase are constant, both the tensile strength and the elongation of the alloy increase linearly with the increase of tensile strength of the matrix phase. The properties of the alloy are very sensitive to the hardening modulus of the matrix phase. As the hardening modulus increases, both the tensile strength and the elongation of the alloy exponentially decrease. The elongation of the alloys monotonically decreases with the increase of tungsten content, while the decrease of tensile strength is not monotonic. When the tungsten content < 85 %, the strength of tungsten heavy alloys increases with the increase of tungsten content, while decreases when the tungsten content >85 %. The maximum of tensile strength of the alloys appears at the tungsten content of 85 %. The results showed that the binder phase with a higher strength and a lower hardening modulus is advantageous to obtaining an optimum combination of mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys.

  11. Tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy and method of producing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, James M.; Riley, Robert E.

    1977-03-15

    An improved tungsten alloy having a tungsten content of approximately 95 weight percent, a nickel content of about 3 weight percent, and the balance being cobalt of about 2 weight percent is described. A method for producing said tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloy is further described and comprises (a) coating the tungsten particles with a nickel-cobalt alloy, (b) pressing the coated particles into a compact shape, (c) heating said compact in hydrogen to a temperature in the range of 1400.degree. C and holding at this elevated temperature for a period of about 2 hours, (d) increasing this elevated temperature to about 1500.degree. C and holding for 1 hour at this temperature, (e) cooling to about 1200.degree. C and replacing the hydrogen atmosphere with an inert argon atmosphere while maintaining this elevated temperature for a period of about 1/2 hour, and (f) cooling the resulting alloy to room temperature in this argon atmosphere.

  12. Hydrodynamic Analysis to Process of Hydrostatic Extrusion for Tungsten Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuchi WANG; Zhaohui ZHANG; Shukui LI

    2001-01-01

    The hydrodynamic analysis to the process of the hydrostatic extrusion for tungsten alloy is carried through the hydrodynamic lubrication theory and Reynolds equation in this paper. The critical velocity equation when the hydrodynamic lubrication conditions appear between the surfaces of the work- piece and the die is obtained, and the relationship between the critical velocity and the extrusion parameters is discussed, which build the theoretical bases to the application of the hydrostatic extrusion for tungsten alloy.

  13. Vacuum arc melting of tungsten-hafnium-carbon alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum arc casting of tungsten alloys, which contain carbon as an alloy addition, require special melting procedures in order to produce melts of consistent controlled levels of alloy content. A melting procedure will be described in which elemental components of a tungsten 0.35% HfC alloy are assembled to form an electrode for ac vacuum arc melting to produce 3-in.-diam ingots. Melting procedures and analytical chemistry are discussed and compared with data for ingots produced by other techniques.

  14. New tungsten alloy has high strength at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten-hafnium-carbon alloy has tensile strengths of 88,200 psi at 3000 deg F and 62,500 psi at 3500 deg F. Possible industrial applications for this alloy would include electrical components such as switches and spark plugs, die materials for die casting steels, and heating elements.

  15. Microstructure and properties of liquid-phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys by using ultra-fine tungsten powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洋; 王尔德

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of liquid-phase sintered 93W-4.9Ni-2.1Fe tungsten heavy alloys using ultra-fine tungsten powders (medium particle size of 700 nm) and original tungsten powders (medium particle size of 3 μm) were investigated respectively. Commercial tungsten powders (original tungsten powders) were mechanically milled in a high-energy attritor mill for 35 h. Ultra-fine tungsten powders and commercial Ni, Fe powders were consolidated into green compacts by using CIP method and liquid-phase sintering at 1 465 ℃ for 30 min in the dissociated ammonia atmosphere. Liquid-phase sintered tungsten heavy alloys using ultra-fine tungsten powders exhibit full densification (above 99% in relative density) and higher strength and elongation compared with conventional liquidphase sintered alloys using original tungsten powders due to lower sintering temperature at 1 465 ℃ and short sintering time. The mechanical properties of sintered tungsten heavy alloy are found to be mainly dependent on the particles size of raw tungsten powders and liquid-phase sintering temperature.

  16. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  17. Recent Progress in Processing of Tungsten Heavy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Şahin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten heavy alloys (WHAs belong to a group of two-phase composites, based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe alloys. Due to their combinations of high density, strength, and ductility, WHAs are used as radiation shields, vibration dampers, kinetic energy penetrators and heavy-duty electrical contacts. This paper presents recent progresses in processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of WHAs. Various processing techniques for the fabrication of WHAs such as conventional powder metallurgy (PM, advent of powder injection molding (PIM, high-energy ball milling (MA, microwave sintering (MW, and spark-plasma sintering (SPS are reviewed for alloys. This review reveals that key factors affecting the performance of WHAs are the microstructural factors such as tungsten and matrix composition, chemistry, shape, size and distributions of tungsten particles in matrix, and interface-bonding strength between the tungsten particle and matrix in addition to processing factors. SPS approach has a better performance than those of others, followed by extrusion process. Moreover, deformation behaviors of WHA penetrator and depleted uranium (DU Ti alloy impacting at normal incidence both rigid and thick mild steel target are studied and modelled as elastic thermoviscoplastic. Height of the mushroomed region is smaller for α=0.3 and it forms sooner in each penetrator as compared to that for α=0.2.

  18. Mechanical-property evaluation of a series of commercial tungsten alloys. Memorandum report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchey, W.J.; Montiel, D.M.

    1987-06-01

    A series of commercially available tungsten alloys ranging in tungsten content from 75% to 95% were evaluated. Typical tensile and compressive engineering properties are reported. These tests were conducted in support of penetrator ballistic-test programs.

  19. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  20. Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

    1992-10-01

    In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

  1. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean A., E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai [University of Utah, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Oya, Yasuhisa [Shizuoka University, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Third Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and performed initial studies on a high temperature gas-driven permeation cell capable of operating at temperatures up to 1150 °C and at pressures between 0.1–1 atm. • Permeation measurements on ITER grade tungsten compare well with past studies by Frauenfelder and Zahkarov in the temperature range from 500 to 1000 °C. • First permeation measurements on Ti dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grained tungsten show higher permeation at 500 °C, but very similar permeation with ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. Diffusion along grain boundaries may be playing a role for this type of material. - Abstract: To address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D{sub 2} pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation

  2. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  3. Studing Tungsten-containing Electroerosion Powders and Alloys Synthesized from Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Ageev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the X-ray spectral microanalysis of the powder obtained using electroerosion dispersion of tungsten-containing wastes in distilled water, and the alloy powder synthesized from this powder are presented in the article. It is shown that the basic elements both in the powder obtained using electroerosion dispersion of tungsten-containing wastes in distilled water and in the synthesized alloy are tungsten, molybdenum, iron, oxygen and carbon.

  4. Application of the Backpropagation Neural Network Method in Designing Tungsten Heavy Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhao-hui; WANG Wei-jie; WANG Fu-chi; LI Shu-kui

    2006-01-01

    The model describing the dependence of the mechanical properties on the chemical composition and as deformation techniques of tungsten heavy alloy is established by the method of improved the backpropagation neural network. The mechanical properties' parameters of tungsten alloy and deformation techniques for tungsten alloy are used as the inputs. The chemical composition and deformation amount of tungsten alloy are used as the outputs. Then they are used for training the neural network. At the same time,the optimal number of the hidden neurons is obtained through the experiential equations,and the varied step learning method is adopted to ensure the stability of the training process. According to the requirements for mechanical properties,the chemical composition and the deformation condition for tungsten heavy alloy can be designed by this artificial neural network system.

  5. Tensile behavior of tungsten and tungsten-alloy wires from 1300 to 1600 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Man Yun

    1988-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a 200-micrometer-diameter tungsten lamp (218CS-W), tungsten + 1.0 atomic percent (a/o) thoria (ST300-W), and tungsten + 0.4 a/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) wires was determined over the temperature range 1300 t0 1600 K at strain rates of 3.3 X 10 to the -2 to 3.3 X 10 to the -5/sec. Although most tests were conducted on as-drawn materials, one series of tests was undertaken on ST300-W wires in four different conditions: as-drawn and vacuum-annealed at 1535 K for 1 hr, with and without electroplating. Whereas heat treatment had no effect on tensile properties, electropolishing significantly increased both the proportional limit and ductility, but not the ultimate tensile strength. Comparison of the behavior of the three alloys indicates that the HfC-dispersed material possesses superior tensile properties. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength/ductility advantage of WHfC is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  6. Modeling corrosion behavior of gas tungsten arc welded titanium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The pitting corrosion characteristics of pulse TIG welded Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy in marine environment were explained.Besides the rapid advance of titanium metallurgy, this is also due to the successful solution of problems associated with the development of titanium alloy welding. The preferred welding process of titanium alloy is frequently gas tungsten arc(GTA) welding due to its comparatively easier applicability and better economy. In the case of single pass GTA welding of thinner section of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. The benefit of the process is utilized to obtain better quality titanium weldments. Four factors, five levels, central composite, rotatable design matrix are used to optimize the required number of experiments. The mathematical models have been developed by response surface method(RSM). The results reveal that the titanium alloy can form a protective scale in marine environment and is resistant to pitting corrosion. Experimental results are provided to illustrate the proposed approach.

  7. Effect of alloying addition and microstructural parameters on mechanical properties of 93% tungsten heavy alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi Kiran, U., E-mail: uravikiran@gmail.com [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Panchal, A.; Sankaranarayana, M. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nageswara Rao, G.V.S. [National Institute of Technology, Warangal 506004 (India); Nandy, T.K. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India)

    2015-07-29

    Liquid phase sintering, heat treatment and swaging studies on three tungsten heavy alloys, 93W–4.9Ni–2.1Fe (wt%), 93W–4.2Ni–1.2Fe–1.6Co (wt%) and 93W–4.9Ni–1.9Fe–0.2Re (wt%) were carried out in detail with respect to microstructure, tensile and impact properties. All the alloys were sintered and swaged to 40% deformation. The results indicate that Re addition reduces the grain size of the alloy compared to W–Ni–Fe and W-Ni-Fe-Co alloys. W–Ni–Fe–Re alloy shows superior tensile properties in heat treated condition as compared to W–Ni–Fe and W–Ni–Fe–Co alloys. SEM study of fractured specimens clearly indicates that the failure in case of W–Ni–Fe–Re was due to transgranular cleavage of tungsten grains and W–W de-cohesion. W–Ni–Fe and W–Ni–Fe–Co alloys also failed by mixed mode failure. However, in these cases, ductile dimples corresponding the failure of the matrix phase was rarely seen. Thermo-mechanical processing resulted in significant changes in mechanical properties. While W–Ni–Fe–Re alloy showed the highest tensile strength (1380 MPa), W–Ni–Fe–Co exhibited the highest elongation (12%) to failure. A detailed analysis involving microstructure, mechanical properties and failure behavior was undertaken in order to understand the property trends.

  8. The Influence of Impurities in Tungsten and Matrix Composition on the Tungsten-Matrix Interfacial Properties of Heavy Metal Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Impurities in Tungsten and Nov 79 - Nov 82 Matrix Composition on the Tungsten-Matrix Interfacial Properties of Heavy Metal Alloys 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...fundamental change both in structure of the heavy metal and in fracture behaviour: The samples which were merely pre-reduced or sintered for very short...features of a satisfactory heavy metal : mainly transgranular fracture, considerable binder deformation and only rather few and small sintering necks in

  9. Influences of sub-micrometer Ta and Co dopants on microstructure and properties of tungsten heavy alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭兴龙; 冷邦义; 邱绍宇; 李强; 何文艳; 王传海; 雷代富

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are aggregates of particles of tungsten bonded with Ni/Fe or Ni/Cu via liquidphase sintering. The sub-micrometer Ta Co powder was added to this aggregate to strengthen the bonding phase. It is found that the main fracture pattern of the alloys is cleavage of tungsten grains and ductile rupture of bond phase,leading to improved tensile strength and elongation. Dopant Ta can act as grain size inhibitor in tungsten heavy alloys.

  10. TiNi shape memory alloy coated with tungsten : A novel approach for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Huafang; Zheng, Yufeng; Pei, Y. T.; de Hosson, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the use of DC magnetron sputtering tungsten thin films for surface modification of TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) targeting for biomedical applications. SEM, AFM and automatic contact angle meter instrument were used to determine the surface characteristics of the tungsten thin fi

  11. Demonstration of Shear Localization in Ultrafine Grained Tungsten Alloys via Powder Metallurgy Processing Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Hardness Vickers microhardness tests were performed to determine the hardness of the material. Indents were analyzed to determine basic information...shear banding observed in depleted uranium. Microhardness testing indicated that the boron containing sample had a higher propensity to shear...18 cm3) tungsten based alloy tested in the as-sintered state. 15. SUBJECT TERMS tungsten, shear localization, kinetic energy penetrator, depleted

  12. TiNi shape memory alloy coated with tungsten : A novel approach for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Huafang; Zheng, Yufeng; Pei, Y. T.; de Hosson, Jeff

    This study explores the use of DC magnetron sputtering tungsten thin films for surface modification of TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) targeting for biomedical applications. SEM, AFM and automatic contact angle meter instrument were used to determine the surface characteristics of the tungsten thin

  13. Progress toward a tungsten alloy wire/high temperature alloy composite turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzert, F. J.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A tungsten alloy wire reinforced high temperature alloy composite is being developed for potential application as a hollow turbine blade for advanced rocket engine turbopumps. The W-24Re-HfC alloy wire used for these composite blades provides an excellent balance of strength and wire ductility. Preliminary fabrication, specimen design, and characterization studies were conducted by using commercially available W218 tungsten wire in place of the W-24Re-Hfc wire. Subsequently, two-ply, 50 vol pct composite panels using the W-24Re-HfC wire were fabricated. Tensile tests and metallographic studies were performed to determine the material viability. Tensile strengths of a Waspaloy matrix composite at 870 C were 90 pct of the value expected from rule-of-mixtures calculations. During processing of this Waspaloy matrix composite, a brittle phase was formed at the wire/matrix interface. Circumferential wire cracks were found in this phase. Wire coating and process evaluation efforts were performed in an attempt to solve the reaction problem. Although problems were encountered in this study, wire reinforced high temperature alloy composites continue to show promise for turbopump turbine blade material improvement.

  14. Solution and diffusion of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten-rhenium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fei; Yin, Wen; Yu, Quanzhi; Jia, Xuejun; Zhao, Zongfang; Wang, Baotian

    2017-08-01

    Rhenium is one of the main transmutation elements forming in tungsten under neutron irradiation. Therefore, it is essential to understand the influence of rhenium impurity on hydrogen isotopes retention in tungsten. First-principle calculations were used to study the properties of hydrogen solution and diffusion in perfect tungsten-rhenium lattice. The interstitial hydrogen still prefers the tetrahedral site in presence of rhenium, and rhenium atom cannot act directly as a trapping site of hydrogen. The presence of rhenium in tungsten raises the solution energy and the real normal modes of vibration on the ground state and the transition state, compared to hydrogen in pure tungsten. Without zero point energy corrections, the presence of rhenium decreases slightly the migration barrier. It is found that although the solution energy would tend to increase slightly with the rising of the concentration of rhenium, but which does not influence noticeably the solution energy of hydrogen in tungsten-rhenium alloy. The solubility and diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in perfect tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloy have been estimated, according to Sievert's law and harmonic transition state theory. The results show the solubility of hydrogen in tungsten agrees well the experimental data, and the presence of Re would decrease the solubility and increase the diffusivity for the perfect crystals.

  15. Effect of composition on the high rate dynamic behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Kesemen; Kaan, Çalışkan N.; Emrah, Konokman H.; Nuri, Durlu

    2015-09-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are currently used as kinetic energy penetrators in military applications due to their high density and superior mechanical properties. In the literature, quasi-static properties of different tungsten heavy alloys based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe ternary systems are well documented and presented. However, comparison of the dynamic behaviour of these alloys in terms of the correlation between quasi-static mechanical characterization and dynamical properties is lacking. In the present study, dynamic properties of tungsten heavy alloys having different binder phase compositions (90W-7Ni-3Cu and 90W-8Ni-2Fe) at different projectile velocities were investigated. The examined and tested alloys were produced through the conventional powder metallurgy route of mixing, cold compaction and sintering. Mechanical characterization of these alloys was performed. In the ballistic tests, cylindrical tungsten heavy alloys with L/D ratio of 3 were impacted to hardened steel target at different projectile velocities. After the ballistic tests, deformation characteristics of test specimens during dynamic loading were evaluated by comparing the change of length and diameter of the specimens versus kinetic energy densities. The study concluded that 90W-8Ni-2Fe alloy has better perforation characteristics than 90W-7Ni-3Cu alloy.

  16. Effect of composition on the high rate dynamic behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Kesemen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten heavy alloys are currently used as kinetic energy penetrators in military applications due to their high density and superior mechanical properties. In the literature, quasi-static properties of different tungsten heavy alloys based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe ternary systems are well documented and presented. However, comparison of the dynamic behaviour of these alloys in terms of the correlation between quasi-static mechanical characterization and dynamical properties is lacking. In the present study, dynamic properties of tungsten heavy alloys having different binder phase compositions (90W-7Ni-3Cu and 90W-8Ni-2Fe at different projectile velocities were investigated. The examined and tested alloys were produced through the conventional powder metallurgy route of mixing, cold compaction and sintering. Mechanical characterization of these alloys was performed. In the ballistic tests, cylindrical tungsten heavy alloys with L/D ratio of 3 were impacted to hardened steel target at different projectile velocities. After the ballistic tests, deformation characteristics of test specimens during dynamic loading were evaluated by comparing the change of length and diameter of the specimens versus kinetic energy densities. The study concluded that 90W-8Ni-2Fe alloy has better perforation characteristics than 90W-7Ni-3Cu alloy.

  17. Impact of Sodium Tungstate and Tungsten Alloys on the Growth of Selected Microorganisms with Environmental Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    TUNGSTEN ALLOYS ON THE GROWTH OF SELECTED MICROORGANISMS WITH ENVIROMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE 5a. Contract Number: 5b. Grant Number: 5c. Program Element...either of these effects would be an issue in environmental settings is unclear. The water-soluble components of both alloys inhibited bacterial

  18. Numerical simulation of tungsten alloy in powder injection molding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhen-xing; XIA Wei; ZHOU Zhao-yao; ZHU Quan-li

    2008-01-01

    The flow behavior of feedstock for the tungsten alloy powder in the mold cavity was approximately described using Hele-Shaw flow model. The math model consisting of momentum equation, consecutive equation and thermo-conduction equation for describing the injection process was established. The equations are solved by the finite element/finite difference hybrid method that means dispersing the feedstock model with finite element method, resolving the model along the depth with finite difference methpd, and tracking the movable boundary with control volume method, then the pressure equation and energy equation can be resolved in turn. The numerical simulation of the injection process and the identification of the process parameters were realized by the Moldflow software. The results indicate that there is low temperature gradient in the cavity while the pressure and shear rate gradient are high at high flow rate. The selection of the flow rate is affected by the structure of the gate. The shear rate and the pressure near the gate can be decreased by properly widening the dimension of the gate. There is a good agreement between the process parameters obtained by the numerical simulation and the actual ones.

  19. Constitutive modelling of a tungsten heavy metal alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, P.

    2003-09-01

    The dynamic mechanical behaviour of a tungsten heavy metal alloy (WHA) with potential use as a kinetic energy penetrator is investigated. Mechanical properties related to tensile loading are measured at strain rates up to 400 s^{-1} and at temperatures from 20 ^{circ}C to about 500 ^{circ}C. From the experimental data parameters for the constitutive equations developed by Johnson and Cook (J&C) as well as Zerilli and Armstrong (Z&A) are determined. From the extracted models isothermal and adiabatic flow stress curves are calculated and compared to experiments. At high strain rates or high temperatures the J&C model deviates about 5-10% from experimental results, while the Z&A model shows a better agreement with the collected data. It should be emphasised that the Z&A model used in this work is developed for materials with body centred crystals whereas the WHA is a composite with both face centredand body centred crystals.

  20. Surface modification of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma and its impact on deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Terentyev, D.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Samples of tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloy (with 5 mass per cent of Ta) were exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma at different fluences. The surface modification was studied with scanning electron microscopy, and deuterium retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). In the

  1. Study of neutron induced outgassing from tungsten alloy for ATLAS FCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, C; Cheplakov, A P; Golikov, V; Golubyh, S M; Kulagin, E; Kukhtin, V; Luschikov, V

    1999-01-01

    The use of sintered tungsten alloy slugs as absorber in the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter (FCAL) raised concern that it could possibly poison the liquid argon during the detector operation in the hard radiation environment expected at LHC. A vacuum container filled with tungsten slugs was exposed to the fast neutron fluence of 1.5$\\cdot$10$^{16}$~n~cm$^{-2}$ at the IBR-30 reactor of JINR, Dubna. The residual gas pressure was analysed. The study was completed by mass spectrometer measurements. An upper limit value of 0.1~ppm was determined for the pollution of liquid argon in FCAL due to outgassing from tungsten slugs under irradiation.

  2. Genotoxic Changes to Rodent Cells Exposed in Vitro to Tungsten, Nickel, Cobalt and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bardack

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted.

  3. Genotoxic changes to rodent cells exposed in vitro to tungsten, nickel, cobalt and iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardack, Stephanie; Dalgard, Clifton L; Kalinich, John F; Kasper, Christine E

    2014-03-10

    Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted.

  4. Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

  5. Recycling high density tungsten alloy powder by oxidization-reduction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆森; 陈立宝; 贺跃辉; 黄伯云

    2002-01-01

    The processes of directly recycling high density tungsten alloy by oxidation-reduction technique were investigated. The particle size of recycled powder is fine, and the shape of powder particle is regular when the final reduction temperature is 850℃, in which the average size of the tungsten alloy particles reduced is about 1.5μm. The average size of the alloy particles increase to 6μm and 9μm when increasing the reduction temperature to 900℃ and 950℃, respectively. However, if the reduction temperature is higher than 900℃, the surface feature of powder is complicated. Increasing reduction temperature from 900℃ to 950℃, the content of oxygen of recycled powder decreases from 0.2314% to 0.1700%, and powder particles grow slightly. It has been also found that the chemical composition of the recycled alloy powder is the same as the initial powder.

  6. TiNi shape memory alloy coated with tungsten: a novel approach for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huafang; Zheng, Yufeng; Pei, Y T; De Hosson, J Th M

    2014-05-01

    This study explores the use of DC magnetron sputtering tungsten thin films for surface modification of TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) targeting for biomedical applications. SEM, AFM and automatic contact angle meter instrument were used to determine the surface characteristics of the tungsten thin films. The hardness of the TiNi SMA with and without tungsten thin films was measured by nanoindentation tests. It is demonstrated that the tungsten thin films deposited at different magnetron sputtering conditions are characterized by a columnar microstructure and exhibit different surface morphology and roughness. The hardness of the TiNi SMA was improved significantly by tungsten thin films. The ion release, hemolysis rate, cell adhesion and cell proliferation have been investigated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, CCK-8 assay and alkaline phosphatase activity test. The experimental findings indicate that TiNi SMA coated with tungsten thin film shows a substantial reduction in the release of nickel. Therefore, it has a better in vitro biocompatibility, in particular, reduced hemolysis rate, enhanced cell adhesion and differentiation due to the hydrophilic properties of the tungsten films.

  7. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This is a progress report on a continuing research project to acquire a fundamental understanding of the metallurgical processes in the welding of vanadium alloys. It also has the goal of developing techniques for welding structural vanadium alloys. The alloy V-4Cr-4Ti is used as a representative alloy of the group; it is also the prime candidate vanadium alloy for the U.S. Fusion Program at the present time. However, other alloys of this class were used in the research as necessary. The present work focuses on recent findings of hydrogen embrittlement found in vanadium alloy welds. It was concluded that the atmosphere in the inert gas glove box was insufficient for welding 6mm thick vanadium alloy plates.

  8. Experimental and numerical simulations of ELM-like transient damage behaviors to different grade tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Lian, Youyun; Chen, Lei; Chen, Zhenkui; Chen, Jiming; Duan, Xuru; Fan, Jinlian; Song, Jiupeng

    2015-08-01

    Transient heat loads, such as plasma disruptions and ELMs, could induce plastic deformations, cracking, melting, even fatigue cracks and creep of tungsten (W) surface. A high purity W, CVD-W coating, TiC dispersion strengthened and K doped tungsten alloys were tested in a 60 kW electron-beam facility by simulating the transient load events under different base temperatures. It was found that CVD-W, W-TiC and W-K alloys have higher crack thresholds than high purity W, meanwhile CVD-W is more sensitive to the crack disappearing at elevated base temperatures. On the other hand, repetitive pulse loading like ELMs can induce serious network cracks even the power density was quite lower than the crack threshold determined by a single shot. The ABAQUS code was used to simulate the crack behaviors of ITER grade pure W by a single shot and a FE-SAFE code was adopted to estimate the fatigue life under ELMs-like loads. A good agreement with experiment results was found.

  9. Laser surface infiltration of tungsten-carbide in steel and aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahotre, N.B.; Mukherjee, K. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    It has been demonstrated that surface modification in metals and alloys can be achieved by laser melting in conjunction with injection of particulate alloying elements in the heated zone. In our current experiments the authors have successfully implanted tungsten-carbide particles on the surface of several grades of carbon-steels as well as on the surface of a structural aluminum alloy. In both cases a significant increase in microhardness has been detected. Hardness profile from the interaction zone to the heat affected zone (HAZ) has been determined. The microstructural features of both the implanted zone and HAZ also have been determined. Effect of laser input energy, nature of tungsten-carbide particle size, size distribution and method of powder injection on the hardness profile have been investigated. Some preliminary examination of surface wear of such implanted material is also conducted. These results are discussed in detail.

  10. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  11. Effect of dilute tungsten alloying on the dynamic strength of tantalum under ramp compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. S.; Brown, J. L.; Millett, J. C. F.; Whiteman, G.; Asay, J. R.; Bourne, N. K.

    2015-06-01

    The strength of tantalum and tantalum alloys are of considerable interest due to their widespread use in both military and industrial applications. Previous work has shown that strength in these materials is tied to dislocation density and mobility within the microstructure. Accordingly, strength has been observed to increase with dilute alloying which serves to increase the dislocation density. In this study, we examine the effect of alloying on the strength of a dilute tantalum-tungsten alloy (2.5 weight percent W) under ramp compression. The strength of the alloy is measured using the ``self-consistent'' technique which examines the response under longitudinal unloading from peak compression. The results are compared to previous studies of pure tantalum and dilute tantalum-tungsten alloys under both shock and ramp compression and indicate strengthening of the alloy when compared to pure tantalum. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Diffusion Bonding of Tungsten to Copper and Its Alloy with Ti Foil and Ti/Ni/Ti Multiple Interlayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guisheng ZOU; Jun YANG; Aaiping WU; Genghua HUANG; Deku ZHANG; Jialie REN; Qing WANG

    2003-01-01

    Ti foil and Ti/Ni/Ti multiple interlayers were selected for the bonding of tungsten to copper and CuCrZr alloy. Theeffects of processing conditions on the microstructures and shear strength of the joints were investigated.

  13. Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    12 8 Nickel-Tungsten deposit properties Property Test method Result Microstructure XRD Nanocrystalline Structure Microscopy Micro-cracked...Composition Chemical Analysis Ni 60 wt.%: W 40 wt.% Residual Stress Bent strip 12 ~ 16 kpsi tensile Hardness Microhardness (Vickers) 660 ~ 690 HV Hydrogen...embrittlement ASTM F519 1a.1 notched bar Pass without bake Ductility Bend test 1.6% Abrasive wear Taber 14 mg/1000 cycle Friction coefficient

  14. Spark plasma sintering and mechanical properties of zirconium micro-alloyed tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z. M.; Liu, R.; Fang, Q. F.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Dense pure tungsten and W-(0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0) wt% Zr alloys were fabricated through spark plasma sintering method. The relative density of all the samples was about 97%. The FESEM and TEM analysis, tensile tests and Vickers micro-hardness measurements were exploited to characterize these samples. It is found that Zr could capture impurity oxygen in tungsten and form nanometer scaled ZrO2 particles. With the increase of Zr addition from 0 to 0.2 wt%, the room-temperature fracture strength increased from 154 MPa to 265 MPa, and the fracture energy density elevated from 3.73 × 104 J/m3 to 9.22 × 104 J/m3. However, more Zr addition would increase the size of Zr-O particles and significantly decrease the fracture strength and toughness of tungsten.

  15. DYNAMIC STRENGTH AND STRAIN RATE EFFECTS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF TUNGSTEN AND TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Zurek, A; G. Gray

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the stress-strain response as a function of strain rate, spall strength, and dynamic fracture behavior of pure W, W-26Re, W-Ni- Fe and W-Ni-Fe-Co has been performed. Spall strength measurements, obtained in symmetric-impact tests, showed an increase in spall strength from 0.4 GPa for pure tungsten to 3.8 GPa for 90W-7Ni-3Fe. Concurrent with the increase in spall strength was a change in fracture mode from cleavage (for pure W) to a mixture of transgranular and intergranula...

  16. In vitro profiling of epigenetic modifications underlying heavy metal toxicity of tungsten-alloy and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ranjana; Xu, Xiufen; Jaiswal, Manoj K; Olsen, Cara; Mears, David; Caretti, Giuseppina; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2011-06-15

    Tungsten-alloy has carcinogenic potential as demonstrated by cancer development in rats with intramuscular implanted tungsten-alloy pellets. This suggests a potential involvement of epigenetic events previously implicated as environmental triggers of cancer. Here, we tested metal induced cytotoxicity and epigenetic modifications including H3 acetylation, H3-Ser10 phosphorylation and H3-K4 trimethylation. We exposed human embryonic kidney (HEK293), human neuroepithelioma (SKNMC), and mouse myoblast (C2C12) cultures for 1-day and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures for 1-week to 50-200 μg/ml of tungsten-alloy (91% tungsten/6% nickel/3% cobalt), tungsten, nickel, and cobalt. We also examined the potential role of intracellular calcium in metal mediated histone modifications by addition of calcium channel blockers/chelators to the metal solutions. Tungsten and its alloy showed cytotoxicity at concentrations > 50 μg/ml, while we found significant toxicity with cobalt and nickel for most tested concentrations. Diverse cell-specific toxic effects were observed, with C2C12 being relatively resistant to tungsten-alloy mediated toxic impact. Tungsten-alloy, but not tungsten, caused almost complete dephosphorylation of H3-Ser10 in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with H3-hypoacetylation in C2C12. Dramatic H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation was found in all cobalt treated cultures with a decrease in H3 pan-acetylation in C2C12, SKNMC and HEK293. Trimethylation of H3-K4 was not affected. Both tungsten-alloy and cobalt mediated H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation were reversed with BAPTA-AM, highlighting the role of intracellular calcium, confirmed with 2-photon calcium imaging. In summary, our results for the first time reveal epigenetic modifications triggered by tungsten-alloy exposure in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures suggesting the underlying synergistic effects of tungsten, nickel and cobalt mediated by changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis and

  17. Simultaneous determination of trace niobium, tantalum and tungsten in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilaros, G L; Byrnes, C J

    1976-03-01

    A method is presented for the determination of niobium, tantalum and tungsten in steel and non-ferrous alloys, based on hydrolysis with sulphurous acid followed by X-ray fluorescence measurements. The limit of determination is about 0.002% and the standard deviation is 0.002 at the 0.05% level. Results below 0.01% by this method are only semiquantitative.

  18. Tensile fracture and shear localization under high loading rate in tungsten alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Couque, H.; Lankford, J.; Bose, A

    1992-01-01

    The influence of loading rate and microstructure on the tensile and compressive failure properties of three microstructurally dissimilar tungsten alloys has been investigated. Dynamic tensile fracture properties were characterized through fracture toughness tests performed at a stress intensity loading rate of 106 MPa $\\sqrt{{\\rm m}}$ s-1, and by tensile testing at a strain rate of 103 s-1. Shear banding phenomena were investigated by means of compression tests performed at strain rates of 5 ...

  19. Structural and Mechanical Characterization of Nanocrystalline Tungsten and Tungsten-Based Alloy Thin Films for Extreme Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gustavo

    Extreme environments associated with nuclear applications often results in degradation of the physical, mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of the materials. Tungsten (W) exhibits unique physical and mechanical properties, which makes tungsten a good candidate for nuclear applications; however, intrinsic W exhibits low fracture toughness at all temperatures in addition to a high ductile to brittle transition. In the present work, nanocrystalline W, W-Y and W-Mo alloys were nanoengineered for nuclear applications. Nanocrystalline tungsten coatings with a thickness of 1 microm were deposited onto Silicon (100) and Sapphire (C-plane) using RF and DC sputtering techniques under various growth conditions. Yttrium content in W-Y alloys has been varied to enhance the irradiation tolerance under optimum concentration. The W, W-Y coatings were characterized to understand the structure and morphology and to establish a mapping of conditions to obtain phase and size controlled materials. The samples were then subjected to depth-controlled irradiation by neutrons and Au3+ ions. Solid solution strengthening was achieved by doping molybdenum (Mo) solute atoms to W matrix under varied sputtering pressures and temperatures with the intention of creating interstitial point defects in the crystals that impede dislocation motion, increasing the hardness and young modulus of the material. The effect of PAr (3-19 mTorr) was also investigated and associated microstructure are significant on the mechanical characteristics; the hardness (H) and modulus of elasticity (Er) of the nc W-Mo thin films were higher at lower pressures but decreases continuously with increasing PAr. Using nano-indentation and nano-scratch technique, mechanical characterization testing was performed before and after irradiation. The structure, mechanics and irradiation stability of the W and W-Y coatings will be presented and discussed to demonstrate that Y-addition coupled with nano-scale features

  20. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, B E; Roszell, L E; Murr, L E; Ramirez, D A; Demaree, J D; Klotz, B R; Rosencrance, A B; Dennis, W E; Bao, W; Perkins, E J; Dillman, J F; Bannon, D I

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up-regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down-regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin-dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas.

  1. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  2. Diode Laser Surface Alloying of Armor Steel with Tungsten Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janicki D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composite (MMC surface layers reinforced by WC were fabricated on armor steel ARMOX 500T plates via a laser surface alloying process. The microstructure of the layers was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  3. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, B.E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Roszell, L.E. [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States); Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Demaree, J.D. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Klotz, B.R. [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005‐5609 (United States); Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E. [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702‐5010 (United States); Bao, W. [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States); Perkins, E.J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States); Dillman, J.F. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5400 (United States); Bannon, D.I., E-mail: desmond.bannon@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  4. Powder metallurgical processing of self-passivating tungsten alloys for fusion first wall application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Ruiz, P.; Ordás, N.; Iturriza, I. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Walter, M.; Gaganidze, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Lindig, S.; Koch, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); García-Rosales, C., E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    Self-passivating tungsten based alloys are expected to provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten, presently the main candidate material for first wall armour of future fusion reactors. In case of a loss of coolant accident with simultaneous air ingress, a protective oxide scale will be formed on the surface of W avoiding the formation of volatile and radioactive WO{sub 3}. Bulk WCr12Ti2.5 alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and their properties compared to bulk WCr10Si10 alloys from previous work. The MA parameters were adjusted to obtain the best balance between lowest possible amount of contaminants and effective alloying of the elemental powders. After HIP, a density >99% is achieved for the WCr12Ti2.5 alloy and a very fine and homogeneous microstructure with grains in the submicron range is obtained. Unlike the WCr10Si10 material, no intergranular ODS phase inhibiting grain growth was detected. The thermal and mechanical properties of the WCr10Si10 material are dominated by the silicide (W,Cr){sub 5}Si{sub 3}; it shows a sharp ductile-to brittle transition in the range 1273–1323 K. The thermal conductivity of the WCr12Ti2.5 alloy is close to 50 W/mK in the temperature range of operation; it exhibits significantly higher strength and lower DBTT – around 1170 K – than the WCr10Si10 material.

  5. Thermal reaction of SiC films with tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y. [Univ Bordeaux 1, Lab Composites Thermostruct, CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1, UMR 5801, F-33600 Pessac, (France); Roger, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LTEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Solid-state reactions between SiC films and W-xRe (x = 0, 5 and 25 at%) substrates on thermal annealing between 1673 K and 1873 K for various durations have been investigated. SiC coatings were deposited on metallic wires by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) from a gas mixture of tetramethyl-silane (TMS) and hydrogen at 1373 K under normal pressure. The interface zones were characterized using scanning electron and optical microscopies, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe microanalysis. All analyses reveal that SiC reacts with substrates. Various metal silicides and carbides were formed in layered reaction and the presence of these phases was confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. The effects of rhenium on the reactivity were established by the determination of growth kinetics deducted from the thicknesses of reaction zones as a function of annealing time. It has been found that an increase in the diffusion kinetics and activation energy with the quantity of rhenium in the tungsten wire. (authors)

  6. Self-passivating bulk tungsten-based alloys manufactured by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, P.; Ordás, N.; Lindig, S.; Koch, F.; Iturriza, I.; García-Rosales, C.

    2011-12-01

    Self-passivating tungsten-based alloys are expected to provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten, which is at present the main candidate material for the first wall armour of future fusion reactors. WC10Si10 alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) in a Planetary mill and subsequent hot isostatic pressing (HIP), achieving densities above 95%. Different MA conditions were studied. After MA under optimized conditions, a core with heterogeneous microstructure was found in larger powder particles, resulting in the presence of some large W grains after HIP. Nevertheless, the obtained microstructure is significantly refined compared to previous work. First MA trials were also performed on the Si-free system WCr12Ti2.5. In this case a very homogeneous structure inside the powder particles was obtained, and a majority ternary metastable bcc phase was found, indicating that almost complete alloying occurred. Therefore, a very fine and homogeneous microstructure can be expected after HIP in future work.

  7. Tensile and stress-rupture behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-rupture strength of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile strength of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-rupture properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-rupture strengths to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress rupture strength at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  8. Manufacturing of self-passivating tungsten based alloys by different powder metallurgical routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, A.; Ordás, N.; Iturriza, I.; Pastor, J. Y.; Tejado, E.; Palacios, T.; García-Rosales, C.

    2016-02-01

    Self-passivating tungsten based alloys will provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten when used as first wall armor of future fusion reactors, due to the formation of a protective oxide layer which prevents the formation of volatile and radioactive WO3 in case of a loss of coolant accident with simultaneous air ingress. Bulk WCr10Ti2 alloys were manufactured by two different powder metallurgical routes: (1) mechanical alloying (MA) followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of metallic capsules, and (2) MA, compaction, pressureless sintering in H2 and subsequent HIPing without encapsulation. Both routes resulted in fully dense materials with homogeneous microstructure and grain sizes of 300 nm and 1 μm, respectively. The content of impurities remained unchanged after HIP, but it increased after sintering due to binder residue. It was not possible to produce large samples by route (2) due to difficulties in the uniaxial compaction stage. Flexural strength and fracture toughness measured on samples produced by route (1) revealed a ductile-to-brittle-transition temperature (DBTT) of about 950 °C. The strength increased from room temperature to 800 °C, decreasing significantly in the plastic region. An increase of fracture toughness is observed around the DBTT.

  9. 自生成钨基高密度合金中间层的钨/钢真空扩散连接%Diffusion Bonding Tungsten to Steel in Vacuum with Tungsten Heavy Alloy Interlayer Formed on Tungsten Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宗辉; 沈以赴; 李晓泉

    2013-01-01

    采用90W-6Mn-4Ni(质量分数)混合粉末/镍箔复合中间层,在加压5 MPa、连接温度1 100℃、保温10 min、30 min、60 min及120 min的工艺条件下,对纯钨(W)和0Cr13钢进行真空扩散连接.利用扫描电镜、能谱仪和电子万能试验机等手段研究接头的微观组织、成分分布、力学性能及断口特征.结果表明,连接接头均由钨母材/钨基高密度合金层/镍/钢母材组成.接头中的钨基高密度合金层由90W-6Mn-4Ni混合粉末液相烧结生成,其富Mn-Ni黏结相和钨颗粒相冶金结合且分布均匀,保温时间对该层的组织形态无明显影响.钨基高密度合金层与钨母材以加压钎焊机制实现了良好结合.接头抗剪强度为202~217 MPa时,断裂均发生在连接界面两侧的钨母材和钨基高密度合金层中,前者断口为典型的解理脆断,后者断口为钨颗粒相的W-W界面分离断裂及黏结相的韧性断裂.%Bonding between tungsten and 0Crl3 steel using a 90W-6Mn-4Ni (mass fraction) powder mixtures/Ni multi-interiayer, was carried out in vacuum at 1 100 ℃ for 10 min, 30 min, 60 min, 120 min with 5 MPa. The microstructures, composition distribution and fracture characteristics of the joints are studied by scanning electron microscope(SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS) and their mechanical properties are tested by shear experiments. The results show that the joints comprised tungsten/tungsten heavy alloy layer/Ni/0Crl3 steel. Among them, the tungsten heavy alloy layer is formed through liquid phase sintering of 90W-6Mn-4Ni mixed powder. Holding time has no significant effect on the microstructure of tungsten heavy alloy layer, which composes of metallurgical bonded and evenly distributed MnNi-rich phase and tungsten phase. Good bonding between tungsten matrix and tungsten heavy alloy layer is realized based on press brazing mechanism. The shear strength of joints is from 202 MPa to 217 MPa. All fractures occur in bonding zone of

  10. Thermo-mechanical processing, microstructure and tensile properties of a tungsten heavy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Jiten, E-mail: das.jiten@gmail.com [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Rao, G. Appa [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India); Pabi, S.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2014-09-08

    The effect of heat treatment and swaging on microstructure and mechanical properties of a tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) of composition 90.5W–7.1Ni–1.65Fe–0.5Co–0.25Mo (wt%) has been examined in this study. The volume fraction and the contiguity of W-grains in the sintered microstructure decrease from 80% to 75% and 0.7 to 0.3, respectively, following an intermediate heat treatment comprising annealing at 1373 K followed by oil quenching. The average aspect ratio of W-grain increases with the increase in swaging deformation. While the bulk hardness of the alloy increases with increase in swaging deformation, a minor drop in hardness is observed following intermediate heat treatment. Peak broadening is observed in the X-ray diffractograms following thermo-mechanical processing with full width at half maxima (FWHM) of W{sub 110} peak exhibiting a similar trend as that of hardness. The as-sintered alloy exhibits low yield strength, tensile strength and very low elongation to failure. Subsequent thermo-mechanical treatment results in substantial improvement of both strength and elongation. A strength value of 1427 MPa with elongation of 5–6% has been achieved following 40% swaging. Work hardening behavior of the alloy in heat treated condition has been studied and the results are correlated with slip lines and dislocation behavior of the alloy.

  11. Surface cracking of tungsten-vanadium alloys under transient heat loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameel Arshad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate high heat load performance of tungsten-vanadium (W-V alloys as a potential candidate for plasma facing materials of fusion devices, the target materials with three different V concentrations (1, 5 and 10 wt% are exposed to thermal shock loading. The alloys are fabricated by cold isostatic pressing and subsequently sintered in a vacuum furnace. Thereafter, they are exposed to different high heat flux densities ranging from 340 to 675 MW/m2 for single shot of 5 ms duration in an intense electron beam test facility. The alloys with lowest V concentration (1 wt% are highly damaged in form of seriously cracking. The ones with intermediate V content (5 wt% has shown comparatively better performance than both highest and lowest V contents alloys. The results indicate that improved mechanical properties and reduced thermal conductivity due to V addition comprehensively affect the cracking behavior of W-V alloy under transient thermal shock.

  12. Mechanical properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy after first-wall coating with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Takuya, E-mail: nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Watanabe, Hideo [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta; Iwata, Noriyuki; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    A first-wall coating was fabricated with tungsten on a reference V-4Cr-4Ti alloy (NIFS-HEAT-2, NH2) substrate by a vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process and brazing (BR). The hardness, fracture stress, and elastic modulus of tungsten (W) coating applied by the vacuum plasma spray process (VPS-W) were lower than the tungsten used for brazing (BR-W). The low mass density and defects of VPS-W are thought to be responsible for the degradation of the strength. The NH2 substrate indicated hardening and embrittlement produced by the W coating and some post-coating heat treatment (PCHT). Hardening and embrittlement by a VPS coating can be recovered by removing hydrogen from the NH2 substrate in a vacuum by annealing at 673 K. Oxygen transfer from the W coating to the NH2 substrate was indicated above 1173 K but did not induce embrittlement of the substrate. Hardening by the BR process can be recovered by PCHT at 1273 K, but embrittlement was not improved. The mechanisms of the hardening and embrittlement are discussed based on a microstructural analysis.

  13. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ► Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ► W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ► W

  14. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedel, Erik Q; Cafasso, Danielle E; Lee, Karen W M; Pierce, Lisa M

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals.

  15. Tungsten alloyed with rhenium as an advanced material for heat-resistant silicon ICs interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A. N.; Chaplygin, Yu. A.; Golishnikov, A. A.; Kostyukov, D. A.; Putrya, M. G.; Safonov, S. O.; Shevyakov, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the results of comparative analysis of the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the tungsten and tungsten alloyed with rhenium films deposited on silicon, from the point of view of their use as interconnects in silicon ICs. W and W (Re-5%) alloyed with rhenium films were made by magnetron deposition. Sheet resistivity for W and W (Re- 5%) was 13 and 27 μOhm·cm respectively. Elemental composition the formed films was examined by Auger spectroscopy. To investigate the electromigration resistance of the conductors a methodology based on the accelerated electromigration testing at constant temperature was used. A comparative analysis of the mechanical stresses carried out in the W and W(Re - 5%) films. For this purpose was applied non-destructive method for optical laser scanning. At the same time, these films explored their ability of adhesion to silicon and silicon oxide. It is shown that the pull force of the W(Re - 5%) films was 1500 G/mm2, of the W films 700 G/mm2

  16. Dilatometric analysis on shrinkage behavior during non-isothermal sintering of nanocrystalline tungsten mechanically alloyed with molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastav, Ajeet K., E-mail: ajeetshri@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Murty, B.S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alloying with Mo reduces the WC contamination during milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kirkendall effect assisted enhanced diffusion influences the densification of W-Mo alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Densification kinetics improved with Mo alloying in nanocrystalline tungsten. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Densification starts with Mo diffusion and later W and Mo both diffuse along the grain boundaries. - Abstract: The paper attempts to study the shrinkage behavior of nanocrystalline tungsten mechanically alloyed with molybdenum (5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.%). The dilatometric analysis was performed by Setsys Evolution TMA (ambient to 1600 Degree-Sign C) using constant heating rate (CHR) method. The significant improvement in shrinkage with alloying of molybdenum is attributed to reduced grain size, lowered tungsten carbide contamination and enhanced diffusion kinetics. The initial stage sintering kinetics of W-20Mo alloy has been investigated. The densification starts with Mo diffusion (calculated activation energy = 128 kJ/mol) and proceeds with the diffusion of both along the grain boundaries (calculated activation energy = 307 {+-} 1 kJ/mol).

  17. Evaluation of health and environmental risks associated with the life-cycle of tungsten-based ammunition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, J.P.; Horst, R.M. van der; Carol-Visser, J.; Hulst, M. van; Grand, N.P. le; Elst, O.A.A.M. ter; Lander, H.J.; Brekelmans, F.J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten-based ammunition is generally considered to be less harmful and more environmentally friendly than ammunition based on depleted uranium. However, recent studies have shown severe health effects in rats after embedding fragments of weapons grade Tungsten/Nickel/Cobalt in their leg muscle tis

  18. A first-principles model for anomalous segregation in dilute ternary tungsten-rhenium-vacancy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, J. S.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of segregation in dilute alloys under irradiation is a highly unusual phenomenon that has recently attracted attention, stimulated by the interest in the fundamental properties of alloys as well as by their applications. The fact that solute atoms segregate in alloys that, according to equilibrium thermodynamics, should exhibit full solubility, has significant practical implications, as the formation of precipitates strongly affects physical and mechanical properties of alloys. A lattice Hamiltonian, generalizing the so-called ‘ABV’ Ising model and including collective many-body inter-atomic interactions, has been developed to treat rhenium solute atoms and vacancies in tungsten as components of a ternary alloy. The phase stability of W–Re-vacancy alloys is assessed using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and cluster expansion (CE) simulations. The accuracy of CE parametrization is evaluated against the DFT data, and the cross-validation error is found to be less than 4.2 meV/atom. The free energy of W–Re-vacancy ternary alloys is computed as a function of temperature using quasi-canonical Monte Carlo simulations, using effective two, three and four-body interactions. In the low rhenium concentration range (<5 at. % Re), solute segregation is found to occur in the form of voids decorated by Re atoms. These vacancy-rhenium clusters remain stable over a broad temperature range from 800 K to 1600 K. At lower temperatures, simulations predict the formation of Re-rich rhenium–vacancy clusters taking the form of sponge-like configurations that contain from 30 to 50 at. % Re. The anomalous vacancy-mediated segregation of Re atoms in W can be rationalized by analyzing binding energy dependence as a function of Re to vacancy ratio as well as chemical Re–W and Re-vacancy interactions and short-range order parameters. DFT calculations show that rhenium–vacancy binding energies can be as high as 1.5 eV if the

  19. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  20. Brazing development and interfacial metallurgy study of tungsten and copper joints with eutectic gold copper brazing alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easton, David, E-mail: david.easton@strath.ac.uk [University of Strathclyde, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yuxuan; Wood, James; Galloway, Alexander; Robbie, Mikael Olsson [University of Strathclyde, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Hardie, Christopher [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A eutectic gold–copper brazing alloy has been successfully used to produce a highly wetted brazed joint between tungsten and copper. • Relevant materials for fusion applications. • Mechanical testing of W–AuCu–Cu soon to be performed. - Abstract: Current proposals for the divertor component of a thermonuclear fusion reactor include tungsten and copper as potentially suitable materials. This paper presents the procedures developed for the successful brazing of tungsten to oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper using a fusion appropriate gold based brazing alloy, Orobraze 890 (Au80Cu20). The objectives were to develop preparation techniques and brazing procedures in order to produce a repeatable, defect free butt joint for tungsten to copper. Multiple brazing methods were utilised and brazing parameters altered to achieve the best joint possible. Successful and unsuccessful brazed specimens were sectioned and analysed using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDX analysis and ultrasonic evaluation. It has been determined that brazing with Au80Cu20 has the potential to be a suitable joining method for a tungsten to copper joint.

  1. Effect of shock wave duration on dynamic failure of tungsten heavy alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, J. P.; Trujillo, C. P.; Cerreta, E. K.; Gray, G. T., III; Brown, E. N.

    2014-05-01

    It has been well established that dynamic fracture or spall is a complex process strongly influenced by both microstructure and the loading profile imparted to the specimen. Having previously considered ductile materials with damage and deformation kinetics that are volume additive and therefore relative slow, here we consider a brittle material with damage and deformation kinetics that are fast. The present study elucidates the effect of loading profile on the fundamental mechanisms of brittle fracture in brittle tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) specimens. Spall experiments are performed with two significantly distinct shock pulse durations and accompanying unloading rates. For both profiles, it is observed that the failure in WHA is by brittle trans-particle crack growth with additional energy dissipation through crack branching in the more brittle tungsten particles. We also observe that for the 15.4 GPa peak shock stress, the wave profile does not influence the spall strength significantly. This is believed to be directly linked to the relative insensitivity of WHA to time dependent processes.

  2. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S D; Wong, F M G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-09-07

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the Yucca Mountain waste package program has been the integrity of container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal to determine their relative corrosion behavior in SCW at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the electrochemical behavior in the three tested solutions.

  3. Dissolution energetics and its strain dependence of transition metal alloying elements in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wen-Li; Zhou, Hong-Bo, E-mail: hbzhou@buaa.edu.cn; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn

    2015-01-15

    We have systematically investigated the dissolution energetics of all 3d–5d transition metal alloying elements (AEs) in tungsten (W) using a first-principles method. It is found that Ti is the easiest one to dissolve with the solution energy of −0.81 eV in the intrinsic bulk W, while La is the most difficult one with the solution energy as large as 3.91 eV. The d-electrons play a determining role in the dissolution of AEs in W. We have demonstrated that the solution energies of AEs is a linear monotonic function of strain. The binding energy results indicate that the interaction between AEs is repulsive for the early elements and then becomes attractive for the late elements in each series. This study provides a good reference for developing W materials as a plasma facing material.

  4. Development of brazing foils to join monocrystalline tungsten alloys with ODS-EUROFER steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalin, B.A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: BAKalin@mephi.ru; Fedotov, V.T. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Sevrjukov, O.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, A.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Suchkov, A.N. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), 31 Kashirskoye Sh., Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Moeslang, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rohde, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung I, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for brazing W with W and monocrystalline W with EUROFER steel (FS) are presented. Rapidly quenched powder-type filler metals based on Ti{sub bal}-V-Cr-Be were developed to braze polycrystalline W with monocrystalline W. In addition, Fe{sub bal}-Ta-Ge-Si-B-Pd alloys were developed to braze monocrystalline W with FS for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma-facing components. The W to FS brazed joints were fabricated under vacuum at 1150 {sup o}C, using a Ta spacer of 0.1 mm in thickness to account for the different thermal expansions. The monocrystalline tungsten as well as the related brazed joints withstood 30 cycles between 750 {sup o}C/20 min and air cooling/3-5 min.

  5. Double-sided gas tungsten arc welding process on TC4 titanium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong-ming; BAI Yan; YANG Tian-dong

    2005-01-01

    TC4 titanium alloy was welded by double-sided gas tungsten arc welding(GTAW) process in comparison with conventional GTAW process, the microstructure and mechanical performance of weld were also studied. The results indicate that double-sided GTAW is superior over regular single-sided GTAW on the aspects of increasing penetration, reducing welding deformation and improving welding efficiency. Good weld joint was obtained, which can reach 96.14% tensile strength and 70.85 % elongation percentage of the base metal. The grains in heat-affected zone(HAZ) are thin and equiaxed and the degree of grain coarsening increases as one moves to the weld center line,and the interior of grains are α and α' structures. The coarse columned and equiaxed grains, which interlace martensitic structures α' and acicular α structures, are observed in weld zone. The fracture mode is ductile fracture.

  6. Extrinsic Hardening of Superhard Tungsten Tetraboride Alloys with Group 4 Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopov, Georgiy; Yeung, Michael T; Turner, Christopher L; Mohammadi, Reza; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-05-04

    Alloys of tungsten tetraboride (WB4) with the group 4 transition metals, titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), and hafnium (Hf), of different concentrations (0-50 at. % on a metals basis) were synthesized by arc-melting in order to study their mechanical properties. The phase composition and purity of the as-synthesized samples were confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The solubility limit as determined by PXRD is 20 at. % for Ti, 10 at. % for Zr, and 8 at. % for Hf. Vickers indentation measurements of WB4 alloys with 8 at. % Ti, 8 at. % Zr, and 6 at. % Hf gave hardness values, Hv, of 50.9 ± 2.2, 55.9 ± 2.7 and 51.6 ± 2.8 GPa, respectively, compared to 43.3 GPa for pure WB4 under an applied load of 0.49 N. Each of the aforementioned compositions are considered superhard (Hv > 40 GPa), likely due to extrinsic hardening that plays a key role in these superhard metal borides. Furthermore, these materials exhibit a significantly reduced indentation size effect, which can be seen in the plateauing hardness values for the W1-xZrxB4 alloy. In addition, W0.92Zr0.08B4, a product of spinoidal decomposition, possesses nanostructured grains and enhanced grain hardening. The hardness of W0.92Zr0.08B4 is 34.7 ± 0.65 GPa under an applied load of 4.9 N, the highest value obtained for any superhard metal at this relatively high loading. In addition, the WB4 alloys with Ti, Zr, and Hf showed a substantially increased oxidation resistance up to ∼460 °C, ∼510 °C, and ∼490 °C, respectively, compared to ∼400 °C for pure WB4.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF AES AND XPS FOR THE ION BOMBARDED CARBON FILMS ON THE SURFACE OF TUNGSTEN ALLOY%离子束轰击钨合金表面碳膜的AES和XPS分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 高剑; 张一云; 吴丽萍; 黄宁康; 赵纯培

    2000-01-01

    Tungsten alloy with special properties is a useful material in medical and weapon devices. Surface modification of ion technique is used to improve the surface hardness and wear resistance of tungsten alloy, where carbon films deposited with magnetron sputtering on the surface of tungsten alloy were bombarded by ion beam with different species AES and XPS analyses for these speciment show that tungsten carbide and tungsten nitride were formed due to N+ bombardment. Which is beneficial to the Surface hardness and wear resistance of tungsten alloy,but no carbide or no nitride as above with other ion species. Again,ion bombardness leads to mixing between the carbon and tungsten alloy hence improve the adhere of carbon film to the substrate.

  9. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain); Tobar, M.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)], E-mail: cote@udc.es; Alvarez, J.C.; Lamas, J.; Yanez, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed.

  10. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene ®) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Alvarez, J. C.; Lamas, J.; Yáñez, A.

    2009-03-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene ® powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase ®). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed.

  11. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc.

  12. Heat load behaviors of plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on copper alloys with different compliant layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, F.L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)], E-mail: flch@ipp.ac.cn; Chen, J.L.; Li, J.G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, D.Y.; Zheng, X.B. [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2008-04-15

    Plasma sprayed tungsten (PS-W) coatings with the compliant layers of titanium (Ti), nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys and W/Cu mixtures were fabricated on copper alloys, and their properties of the porosity, oxygen content, thermal conductivity and bonding strength were measured. High heat flux tests of actively cooled W coatings were performed by means of an electron beam facility. The results indicated that APS-W coating showed a poorer heat transfer capability and thermo-mechanical properties than VPS-W coating, and the compliant layers improved W coating performance under the heat flux load. Among three compliant layers, W/Cu was the preferable because of its better effects on heat removal and stress alleviating. The optimization of W/Cu compliant layer found that 0.1 mm and 25 vol.%W was optimum compliant layer structure for 1 mm W coating, which induced a 23% reduction of the maximum stress compared to the sharp interface, and the plastic strain was reduced to 0.01% from 1.55%.

  13. Heat load behaviors of plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on copper alloys with different compliant layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, F. L.; Chen, J. L.; Li, J. G.; Hu, D. Y.; Zheng, X. B.

    2008-04-01

    Plasma sprayed tungsten (PS-W) coatings with the compliant layers of titanium (Ti), nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys and W/Cu mixtures were fabricated on copper alloys, and their properties of the porosity, oxygen content, thermal conductivity and bonding strength were measured. High heat flux tests of actively cooled W coatings were performed by means of an electron beam facility. The results indicated that APS-W coating showed a poorer heat transfer capability and thermo-mechanical properties than VPS-W coating, and the compliant layers improved W coating performance under the heat flux load. Among three compliant layers, W/Cu was the preferable because of its better effects on heat removal and stress alleviating. The optimization of W/Cu compliant layer found that 0.1 mm and 25 vol.%W was optimum compliant layer structure for 1 mm W coating, which induced a 23% reduction of the maximum stress compared to the sharp interface, and the plastic strain was reduced to 0.01% from 1.55%.

  14. Two-dimensional molybdenum tungsten diselenide alloys: photoluminescence, Raman scattering, and electrical transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Wu, Juanxia; Zhu, Yiming; Dumcenco, Dumitru O; Hong, Jinhua; Mao, Nannan; Deng, Shibin; Chen, Yanfeng; Yang, Yanlian; Jin, Chuanhong; Chaki, Sunil H; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Zhang, Jin; Xie, Liming

    2014-07-22

    Two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide alloys have attracted intense attention due to their tunable band gaps. In the present work, photoluminescence, Raman scattering, and electrical transport properties of monolayer and few-layer molybdenum tungsten diselenide alloys (Mo1-xWxSe2, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) are systematically investigated. The strong photoluminescence emissions from Mo1-xWxSe2 monolayers indicate composition-tunable direct band gaps (from 1.56 to 1.65 eV), while weak and broad emissions from the bilayers indicate indirect band gaps. The first-order Raman modes are assigned by polarized Raman spectroscopy. Second-order Raman modes are assigned according to its frequencies. As composition changes in Mo1-xWxSe2 monolayers and few layers, the out-of-plane A1g mode showed one-mode behavior, while B2g(1) (only observed in few layers), in-plane E2g(1), and all observed second-order Raman modes showed two-mode behaviors. Electrical transport measurement revealed n-type semiconducting transport behavior with a high on/off ratio (>10(5)) for Mo1-xWxSe2 monolayers.

  15. Sinter-hardening of Ni-Mo pre-alloyed powders with tungsten addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper was to present the benefits of powder metallurgy technology and development ofsinter-hardening process. The mechanical properties, focusing in particular on hardness and wear resistance, oftwo different carbon levels pre-alloyed steel powders processed with sinter-hardening method, were described.Microstructure characteristic of produced sinter-hardened Ni-Mo steels with increasing amount of tungsten(from 0 to 0.3% wt. was taken under consideration.Design/methodology/approach: Different compositions have been tested in order to investigate the influenceof various tungsten additions into low (0.4% and high (0.6% carbon content of pre-alloyed steel powders.Powders, with addition of 0.7% lubricant, were pressed in a 2000kN hydraulic press. De-waxing process at550ºC for 60 minutes in a fully nitrogen atmosphere was performed before the sintering. Sintering was carriedout in vacuum furnace with argon backfilling. The furnace was equipped with a cooling zone to provideaccelerated cooling from the sintering temperature. Green compacts were sintered at the temperature 1120ºC for1 hour and rapidly cooled with a rate 2.5ºC/s.Findings: The applied sinter-hardening process resulted with achievement of material characterized by goodwear resistance. The investigation of Ni-Mo and Ni-Mo-W sinter-hardened steels with low and high carboncontent proved that applied process of sintering under vacuum and rapid cooling brought expected outcome.Research limitations/implications: Considering the achieved outcome, it was revealed that chemical compositionand applied process of steels preparation, sinter-hardening with the cooling rate 2.5ºC/s, results in achieving materialswith relatively high hardness and significant resistance to abrasion. Anyhow, further research should be performed.Originality/value: Sinter-hardening of Ni-Mo pre-alloyed powders with the addition of different additions oftungsten, especially in terms of

  16. A new alloy design concept for austenitic stainless steel with tungsten modification for bipolar plate application in PEMFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Min; Kim, Kyoo Young

    The feasibility of a new alloy design concept utilizing the principle of 'tungsten bronze effect' is critically evaluated for the development of metallic bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). An austenitic stainless steel (ASS) is modified with W and La to improve the stability of the passive film in an acidic environment as well as to reduce the contact resistance by the tungsten bronze effect. The experimental ASS containing W and La was evaluated in a simulated PEMFC environment of H 3PO 4 and H 2SO 4 solutions at 80 °C, and the electrical property was evaluated by performing a contact resistance test. The test results show that the ASS modified with W and La has good passive film stability for corrosion resistance and low contact resistance. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis clearly suggests the possibility of the tungsten bronze effect from the change in valency state of W 6+ to W 5+ in the passive film formed on the modified ASS. The feasibility of a new alloy design concept utilizing the 'tungsten bronze effect' is well demonstrated; however, more study is highly required for the development of metallic bipolar plates of PEMFC.

  17. A Review of Tungsten Heavy Alloy Utilization in Isotope Transport Containers - 13380

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Steven G. [ATI Firth Sterling, Madison, AL (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A common requirement for radioisotope transport containers is that they provide both durable and efficient shielding of penetrating gamma radiation. This is the case for transport of both spent nuclear fuel as well as intentionally created radioisotopes for medical or other uses. Tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) provides a unique engineering property set for such shielding - easily surpassing more commonly used lead alloys in both strength and attenuation. This family of alloys contains typically 90-98 wt.% W in combination with transition metals such as Ni and Fe. WHA is manufactured in near net shape blanks by liquid phase sintering of compacted powder shapes to full metallurgical density parts. This powder metallurgy approach is described in its ability to provide excellent material utilization and affords efficient manufacturing of various shapes required for gamma shields or collimators. WHAs offer very high density (approaching 19 g/cc) in combination with relatively high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, ambient corrosion resistance, and can be provided with mechanical properties comparable to many medium carbon steels. As such, they can be machined to complex, damage resistant geometries using common metal cutting tools and methods. WHA additionally provides a lower toxicity alternative to Pb- or U-based gamma shielding. Given the specialty nature of WHA, specific metallurgical characteristics are reviewed to assist shielding designers who may otherwise encounter difficulties locating important alloy selection and fabrication details. Contained within this materials and applications overview are guidelines for WHA component design, alloy selection, and practical machining, finishing, and assembly considerations. The microstructure of WHA is that of a metal matrix composite. This factor has specific implications in the design of components for stress service as well as their protection in the presence of electrolytes. WHA is also discussed in the

  18. Hardness and microstructure of tungsten heavy alloy subjected to severe plastic deformation and post-processing heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Zachary S., E-mail: zlevin1@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, Mechanical Engineering Department, College Station, TX 77843-3123 (United States); Ted Hartwig, K., E-mail: thartwig@tamu.edu [220 Reed McDonald Building, Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843-3003 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The hardness and thermal stability of 90W–8Ni–2Fe tungsten heavy alloy (WHA), following severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular extrusion, are reported. Square bars measuring 25×25×150 mm{sup 3} were processed at 300 °C to plastic strains of 2.68. The hardness of WHA increased with increased strain, from 29 Rockwell Hardness C (HRC) in the as-received condition, to ~50 HRC. ECAE refined the grain size of the tungsten particles from tens of microns to 270 nm. This decrease in tungsten grain size correlates with the increase in hardness following a Hall–Petch relationship. Annealing results indicate that the matrix phase recrystallizes at 500 °C, while the tungsten-rich phase begins to recrystallize at near ~800 °C. The morphology of the tungsten-rich particles changes from near-spherical to elongated platelets or ellipsoids, depending on processing strain path. The results suggest ECAE is an effective technique for manipulating the microstructure, phase morphology, and mechanical properties of WHA.

  19. Electrical and materials characterization of tungsten-titanium diffusion barrier layers and alloyed silver metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Shekhar Kumar

    With the constant miniaturization of semiconductor devices, research is always ongoing to obtain the best materials and/or materials systems which fulfill all the requirements of an ideal interconnect. Silver (Ag) and silver based alloys are front runners among other metals and alloys being investigated. Ag has a low electrical resistivity (1.59 micro-ohm-centimeters for bulk), very high thermal conductivity (4.25 Watt per centimeters per Kelvin), and has better electromigration resistance than aluminum (Al). In the pure form, however, it has several drawbacks (e.g., a tendency to diffuse in silicon substrate at higher temperatures, inadequate adhesion to silicon dioxide, poor corrosion resistance, and agglomeration at higher temperatures). These drawbacks can be circumvented by the addition of diffusion barrier layers and/or alloying in silver. The present study investigates both routes to make silver a legitimate interconnect material. Initially this study focuses on thermal stability and behavior of tungsten-titanium (W-Ti) barrier layers for Ag metallization. It is shown that Ag thin films are thermally stable up to 650 degrees centigrade with the presence of W-Ti under layers. The effect of a W-Ti layer on the {111} texture formation in Ag thin film is also evaluated in detail. Insertion of a thin W-Ti over layer on Ag thin films is investigated with respect to their thermal stability. This research also evaluates the diffusion of Ag into silicon dioxide and W-Ti barriers. This project shows that W-Ti is an effective barrier layer for silver metallization. Later, the study investigates the effect of Cu addition in silver metallization and its impact on electromigration resistance. It is shown that Cu addition enhances the electromigration lifetime for silver metallization.

  20. Numerical Simulation on Process of Hydrostatic Extrusion for Tungsten Alloy through Concave Dies with Equal-strain Contour Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohui ZHANG; Fuchi WANG

    2001-01-01

    The numerical simulation to the process of hydrostatic extrusion for tungsten alloy through the concave dies with the equal-strain contour lines was carried out in this paper by the large deformation and elasto-plastic finite theory and ANSYS software. Both the pressure in the process of extrusion and the stress-strain distribution in the sample were analyzed, which founds a basis to the engineering application.

  1. Effects of Tungsten Addition on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Fe-3.5B Alloy in Liquid Zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Mengmeng; Yin, Fucheng; Ouyang, Xuemei; Li, Zhi

    2017-04-10

    The effects of tungsten addition on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of Fe-3.5B alloys in a liquid zinc bath at 520 °C were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe micro-analysis. The microstructure evolution in different alloys is analyzed and discussed using an extrapolated Fe-B-W ternary phase diagram. Experimental results show that there are three kinds of borides, the reticular (Fe, W)₂B, the rod-like (Fe, W)₃B and flower-like FeWB. The addition of tungsten can refine the microstructure and improve the stability of the reticular borides. Besides, it is beneficial to the formation of the metastable (Fe, W)₃B phase. The resultant Fe-3.5B-11W (wt %) alloy possesses excellent corrosion resistance to liquid zinc. When tungsten content exceeds 11 wt %, the formed flower-like FeWB phase destroys the integrity of the reticular borides and results in the deterioration of the corrosion resistance. Also, the corrosion failure resulting from the spalling of borides due to the initiation of micro-cracks in the grain boundary of borides is discussed in this paper.

  2. Optimizing pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding parameters of AA6061 aluminium alloy using Hooke and Jeeves algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. BABU; T. SENTHIL KUMAR; V. BALASUBRAMANIAN

    2008-01-01

    Though the preferred welding process to weld aluminium alloy is frequently constant current gas tungsten arc welding (CCGTAW), it resulted in grain coarsening at the fusion zone and heat affected zone(HAZ). Hence, pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding(PCGTAW) was performed, to yield finer fusion zone grains, which leads to higher strength of AA6061 (Al-Mg-Si) aluminium alloy joints. In order to determine the most influential control factors which will yield minimum fusion zone grain size and maximum tensile strength of the joints, the traditional Hooke and Jeeves pattern search method was used. The experiments were carried out based on central composite design with 31 runs and an algorithm was developed to optimize the fusion zone grain size and the tensile strength of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded AA6061 aluminium aUoy joints. The results indicate that the peak current (Ip) and base current (IB) are the most significant parameters, to decide the fusion zone grain size and the tensile strength of the AA6061 aluminum alloy joints.

  3. Cooperative Studies in the Utilization and Storage of Excess Weapons-Grade Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolyatko, V. V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russia)

    1998-01-29

    This technical report is a tangible and verifiable deliverable associated with the Nuclear Group subproject “Cooperative Studies in the Utilization and Storage of Excess Weapons-grade Plutonium.” This report is an assessment ofthe work performed by the Russian party from 1 October 1995 through 30 September 1996 regarding milestones defined in the contract between the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES). In these interactions, TEES serves as agent of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium (ANRCP) in the capacity oflead institution for the Nuclear Group of the ANRCP. The official Statement ofWork dated 8 April 1996 enumerates specific milestones and deliverables. In its present form, this report is an edited version ofthe translation submitted to TEES by MEPhI on 7 October 1996. The principal investigators for this subproject are Dr. Paul Nelson of TEES and Dr. Victor Bolyatko of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute.

  4. Influence of alloying and testing conditions on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of 〈100〉 tungsten-based single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skotnicova, Katerina, E-mail: Katerina.Skotnicova@vsb.cz [VSB – Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Department of Regional Materials Science and Technology Centre, Avenue 17 Listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Kirillova, Valentina M.; Ermishkin, Vjacheslav A. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninski Prospect 49, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cegan, Tomas; Jurica, Jan; Kraus, Martin [VSB – Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Department of Regional Materials Science and Technology Centre, Avenue 17 Listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Burkhanov, Gennadij S. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninski Prospect 49, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-11

    The results of the pressure testing of mechanical properties of single crystals of pure tungsten and low-alloyed alloys W–2Re and W–1Re–1Mo (wt%) with a crystallographic orientation 〈100〉 which were prepared by plasma-arc melting are summarized. The effect of alloying and the deformation rate on these properties have also been investigated and the fracture surfaces of the individual single crystals have been evaluated with the aid of the photometric method. The differences in the deformation behavior of pure tungsten and W–Re and W–1Mo–Re alloys were observed, which relate to the particularities of rhenium and molybdenum action in the tungsten solid solution. It can be seen from the observed results that tungsten alloying with low rhenium and molybdenum contents decreased all mechanical properties when applying the deformation rate of 0.2 mm/min. The biggest decrease was observed for the offset yield strength value. When testing with the deformation rate of 2 mm/min, the strength limit of the W–2Re alloy increased to 2013 MPa, while R{sub pt0.2} decreased by 33% in comparison with the pure tungsten single crystal. However, the ε{sub r} value remained at the same level ∼30%. In the W–1Re–1Mo single crystal, the R{sub pt0.2} and R{sub mt} values decreased, while ε{sub r} increased slightly.

  5. The dynamic failure behavior of tungsten heavy alloys subjected to transverse loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcza, Kenneth Robert

    Tungsten heavy alloys (WHA), a category of particulate composites used in defense applications as kinetic energy penetrators, have been studied for many years. Even so, their dynamic failure behavior is not fully understood and cannot be predicted by numerical models presently in use. In this experimental investigation, a comprehensive understanding of the high-rate transverse-loading fracture behavior of WHA has been developed. Dynamic fracture events spanning a range of strain rates and loading conditions were created via mechanical testing and used to determine the influence of surface condition and microstructure on damage initiation, accumulation, and sample failure under different loading conditions. Using standard scanning electron microscopy metallographic and fractographic techniques, sample surface condition is shown to be extremely influential to the manner in which WHA fails, causing a fundamental change from externally to internally nucleated failures as surface condition is improved. Surface condition is characterized using electron microscopy and surface profilometry. Fracture surface analysis is conducted using electron microscopy, and linear elastic fracture mechanics is used to understand the influence of surface condition, specifically initial flaw size, on sample failure behavior. Loading conditions leading to failure are deduced from numerical modeling and experimental observation. The results highlight parameters and considerations critical to the understanding of dynamic WHA fracture and the development of dynamic WHA failure models.

  6. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

    2006-05-08

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes.

  7. Characterization and Cytotoxic Assessment of Ballistic Aerosol Particulates for Tungsten Alloy Penetrators into Steel Target Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Schuster

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature and constituents of ballistic aerosol created by kinetic energy penetrator rods of tungsten heavy alloys (W-Fe-Ni and W-Fe-Co perforating steel target plates was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These aerosol regimes, which can occur in closed, armored military vehicle penetration, are of concern for potential health effects, especially as a consequence of being inhaled. In a controlled volume containing 10 equispaced steel target plates, particulates were systematically collected onto special filters. Filter collections were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM which included energy-dispersive (X-ray spectrometry (EDS. Dark-field TEM identified a significant nanoparticle concentration while EDS in the SEM identified the propensity of mass fraction particulates to consist of Fe and FeO, representing target erosion and formation of an accumulating debris field. Direct exposure of human epithelial cells (A549, a model for lung tissue, to particulates (especially nanoparticulates collected on individual filters demonstrated induction of rapid and global cell death to the extent that production of inflammatory cytokines was entirely inhibited. These observations along with comparisons of a wide range of other nanoparticulate species exhibiting cell death in A549 culture may suggest severe human toxicity potential for inhaled ballistic aerosol, but the complexity of the aerosol (particulate mix has not yet allowed any particular chemical composition to be identified.

  8. Experimental investigations of visco-plastic properties of the aluminium and tungsten alloys used in KE projectiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magier M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of studies on dynamic behaviour of construction materials at high strain rates is to determine the variation of mechanical properties (strength, plasticity in function of the strain rate and temperature. On the basis of results of dynamic tests on the properties of constructional materials the constitutive models are formulated to create numerical codes applied to solve constructional problems with computer simulation methods. In the case of military applications connected with the phenomena of gunshot and terminal ballistics it’s particularly important to develop a model of strength and armour penetration with KE projectile founded on reliable results of dynamic experiments and constituting the base for further analyses and optimization of projectile designs in order to achieve required penetration depth. Static and dynamic results of strength investigations of the EN AW-7012 aluminium alloy (sabot and tungsten alloy (penetrator are discussed in this paper. Static testing was carried out with the INSTRON testing machine. Dynamic tests have been conducted using the split Hopkinson pressure bars technique at strain rates up to 1,2 ⋅ 104s−1 (for aluminium alloy and 6 ⋅ 103s−1 (for tungsten alloy.

  9. Mechanical characterization and modeling of brazed tungsten and Cu-Cr-Zr alloy using stress relief interlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dandan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Yum, Youngjin; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-12-01

    A rapidly solidified foil-type Ti-Zr based amorphous filler with a melting temperature of 850 °C was used to braze tungsten to Cu-Cr-Zr alloy for water cooled divertors and plasma facing components application. Brazed joints of dissimilar materials suffer from a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion. In order to release the residual stress caused by the mismatch, brazed joints of tungsten and Cu-Cr-Zr alloy using different interlayers were studied. The shear strength tests of brazed W/Cu joints show that the average strength of the joint with a W70Cu30 composite plate interlayer reached 119.8 MPa, and the average strength of the joint with oxygen free high conductivity copper (OFHC Cu)/Mo multi-interlayers reached 140.8 MPa, while the joint without interlayer was only 16.6 MPa. Finite element method (FEM) has been performed to investigate the stress distribution and effect of stress relief interlayers. FEM results show that the maximum von Mises stress occurs in the tungsten/filler interface and that the filler suffers the peak residual stresses and becomes the weakest zone. And the use of OFHC Cu/Mo multi-interlayers can reduce the residual stress significantly, which agrees with the mechanical experiment data.

  10. The effect of low energy helium ion irradiation on tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys under fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonderman, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, tungsten remains the best candidate for plasma-facing components (PFCs) for future fusion devices because of its high melting point, low erosion, and strong mechanical properties. However, continued investigation has shown tungsten to undergo severe morphology changes under fusion-like conditions. These results motivate the study of innovative PFC materials which are resistant to surface morphology evolution. The goal of this work is to examine tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys, a potential PFC material, and their response to low energy helium ion irradiation. Specifically, W-Ta samples are exposed to 100 eV helium irradiations with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, at 873 K, 1023 K, and 1173 K for 1 h duration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals significant changes in surface deterioration due to helium ion irradiation as a function of both temperature and tantalum concentration in W-Ta samples. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) studies show a slight lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples compared to pure W samples. The observed lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples (proportional to increasing Ta wt.% concentrations) reflect significant differences observed in the evolution of surface morphology, i.e., fuzz development processes for both increasing Ta wt.% concentration and target temperature. These results suggest a correlation between the observed morphology differences and the induced crystal structure change caused by the presence of tantalum. Shifts in the XRD peaks before and after 100 eV helium irradiation with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, 1023 K, for 1 h showed a significant difference in the magnitude of the shift. This has suggested a possible link between the atomic spacing of the material and the accumulated damage. Ongoing research is needed on W-Ta alloys and other innovative materials for their application as irradiation resistant materials in future fusion or irradiation environments.

  11. Alloying the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer with tungsten carbide by the use of a high power diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrzanski, L.A. [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland); Bonek, M. [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland)]. E-mail: mb@zmn.mt.polsl.gliwice.pl; Hajduczek, E. [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland); Klimpel, A. [Welding Department, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego St. 18A (Poland)

    2005-07-15

    The paper presents the effect of alloying with tungsten carbide on properties of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer, using the high power diode laser (HPDL). Selection of laser operating conditions is discussed, as well as thickness of the alloying layer, and their influence on structure and chemical composition of the steel. Analysis of the influence of the process conditions on the thicknesses of the alloyed layer and heat-affected zone is presented.

  12. Alloying the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer with tungsten carbide by the use of a high power diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzański, L. A.; Bonek, M.; Hajduczek, E.; Klimpel, A.

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents the effect of alloying with tungsten carbide on properties of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface layer, using the high power diode laser (HPDL). Selection of laser operating conditions is discussed, as well as thickness of the alloying layer, and their influence on structure and chemical composition of the steel. Analysis of the influence of the process conditions on the thicknesses of the alloyed layer and heat-affected zone is presented.

  13. Electro-deposition metallic tungsten coatings in a Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-WO{sub 3} melt on copper based alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.H., E-mail: dreamerhong77@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Y.C.; Liu, Q.Z.; Li, X.L.; Jiang, F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tungsten coating (>1 mm) was obtained by electro-deposition method in molten salt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different thickness tungsten coatings were obtained by using different durations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good performance of coating was obtained when pulse parameters were modulated. - Abstract: The tungsten coating was prepared by electro-deposition technique on copper alloy substrate in a Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-WO{sub 3} melt. The coating's surface and cross-section morphologies as well as its impurities were investigated by XPS, SEM and line analysis. Various plating durations were investigated in order to obtain an optimal coating's thickness. The results demonstrated that the electro-deposited coating was compact, voidless, crackless and free from impurities. The tungsten coating's maximum Vickers hardness was measured to be 520 HV. The tungsten coating's minimum oxygen content was determined to be 0.018 wt%. Its maximum thickness was measured to be 1043.67 {mu}m when the duration of electrolysis was set to 100 h. The result of this study has demonstrated the feasibility of having thicker tungsten coatings on copper alloy substrates. These electrodeposited tungsten coatings can be potentially implemented as reliable armour for the medium heat flux plasma facing component (PFC).

  14. Conversion of Russian weapon-grade plutonium into oxide for mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagovski, E.; Zakharkin, B. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolotilov, Y. [Specialized State Design Institute, GSPI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolenko, Y.; Skobtsov, A. [Mayak Production Association, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Zygmunt, S.; Mason, C.; Hahn, W.; Durrer, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., Nuclear Materials and Technology Div. NMT, Los Alamos, N.M. (United States); Thomas, S. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington DC (United States); Sicard, B.; Brossard, P.; Herlet, N. [CEA Marcoule 30 (France); Fraize, G.; Villa, A. [Cogema, 78 - Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2001-07-01

    Progress has been made in the Russian Federation towards the conversion of Russian weapons-grade plutonium (W-Pu) into plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) suitable for further manufacture into mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. This program is funded both by French Commissariat at the Atomic Energy (CEA) and the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The French program was started in the frame of the two cooperation agreements signed between Russian Federation and France in November 1992 concerning dismantling of nuclear weapons and the use of their nuclear materials for civilian purposes. The US program was started in 1998 in response to US proliferation concerns and the acknowledged international need to decrease available W-Pu. Russia has selected both the conversion process and the manufacturing site. This paper discusses the present state of development towards fulfilling this mission: the demonstration plant designed to process small amounts of Pu and validate all process stages and the industrial plant that will process up to 5 metric tons of Pu per year. (author)

  15. LOW TEMPERATURE THERMAL DEBINDING BEHAVIOR OF WAX-BASED MULTI-COMPONENT BINDER FOR TUNGSTEN HEAVY ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    To control the defects in thermal debinding stage, low temperature thermal debinding behavior of wax in the multi-component binder for tungsten heavy alloy was studied. The wax burnout temperature is below 250 ℃, at which the defects mainly occur. The debinding rate is controlled by the diffusion of wax in the polymer to the inner surface of pores and then to the external environment. The experiment proved the amount of removed wax as an exponential function of time, the reciprocal sample thickness and temperature coeffcient.

  16. The effects of ion irradiation on the micromechanical fracture strength and hardness of a self-passivating tungsten alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmann, Moritz T.; Sudić, Ivan; Fazinić, Stjepko; Tadić, Tonči; Calvo, Aida; Hardie, Christopher D.; Porton, Michael; García-Rosales, Carmen; Mummery, Paul M.

    2017-04-01

    An ultra-fine grained self-passivating tungsten alloy (W88-Cr10-Ti2 in wt.%) has been implanted with iodine ions to average doses of 0.7 and 7 dpa, as well as with helium ions to an average concentration of 650 appm. Pile-up corrected Berkovich nanoindentation reveals significant irradiation hardening, with a maximum hardening of 1.9 GPa (17.5%) observed. The brittle fracture strength of the material in all implantation conditions was measured through un-notched cantilever bending at the microscopic scale. All cantilever beams failed catastrophically in an intergranular fashion. A statistically confirmed small decrease in strength is observed after low dose implantation (-6%), whilst the high dose implantation results in a significant increase in fracture strength (+9%), further increased by additional helium implantation (+16%). The use of iodine ions as the implantation ion type is justified through a comparison of the hardening behaviour of pure tungsten under tungsten and iodine implantation.

  17. Criticality Safety Scoping Study for the Transport of Weapons-Grade Mixed-Oxide Fuel Using the MO-1 Shipping Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M.E.; Fox, P.B.

    1999-05-01

    This report provides the criticality safety information needed for obtaining certification of the shipment of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel using the MO-1 [USA/9069/B()F] shipping package. Specifically, this report addresses the shipment of non-weapons-grade MOX fuel as certified under Certificate of Compliance 9069, Revision 10. The report further addresses the shipment of weapons-grade MOX fuel using a possible Westinghouse fuel design. Criticality safety analysis information is provided to demonstrate that the requirements of 10 CFR S 71.55 and 71.59 are satisfied for the MO-1 package. Using NUREG/CR-5661 as a guide, a transport index (TI) for criticality control is determined for the shipment of non-weapons-grade MOX fuel as specified in Certificate of Compliance 9069, Revision 10. A TI for criticality control is also determined for the shipment of weapons-grade MOX fuel. Since the possible weapons-grade fuel design is preliminary in nature, this report is considered to be a scoping evaluation and is not intended as a substitute for the final criticality safety analysis of the MO-1 shipping package. However, the criticality safety evaluation information that is presented in this report does demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining certification for the transport of weapons-grade MOX lead test fuel using the MO-1 shipping package.

  18. Surplus weapons-grade plutonium: a resource for exploring and terraforming Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscatello, A.C.; Houts, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    With the end of the Cold War, greater than 100 metric tons (MT) of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) have become surplus to defense needs in the United States and the Former Soviet Union. This paper is a proposal for an option for WGPu disposition, i.e., use of the plutonium as a fuel for nuclear reactors for Mars exploration and eventual terraforming. WGPu was used in nuclear weapons because it has a much smaller critical mass than highly enriched uranium, allowing lighter weapons with consequent longer ranges. Similarly, WGPu reactors would also require smaller amounts of fuel to attain a critical mass, making the reactor much lighter overall and resulting in large savings in launch costs. The greater than 100 MT of WGPu would generate about 1000 billion kilowatt hours of heat energy, much of which could be converted into electricity. The waste heat would also be useful to a Martian outpost or colony. A potential way of getting the WGPu reactors into space is a large gas gun like that being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to orbit materials by achieving high velocity at the surface, greatly reducing launch costs and enhancing reliability. Reactor components would be launched on conventional rockets or space shuttles, the reactor fuel rods would be injected into orbit using the gas gun, and the reactor would be assembled in space. Implementation of this proposal would allow disposition of a serious, expensive problem on earth by removing the WGPu from the planet and simultaneously provide a very large energy resource for Mars exploration and terraforming.

  19. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

  20. Mechanical properties of tungsten alloys with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and titanium additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, M.V., E-mail: mariavega.aguirre@upm.es [Departamento de Tecnologias Especiales Aplicadas a la Aeronautica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E.U.I.T. Aeronautica, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Martin, A.; Pastor, J.Y. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CISDEM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); LLorca, J. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CISDEM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados en Materiales (Instituto IMDEA-Materiales), Ingenieros de Caminos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    In this research the mechanical behaviour of pure tungsten (W) and its alloys (2 wt.% Ti-0.47 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 4 wt.% Ti-0.5 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is compared. These tungsten alloys, have been obtained by powder metallurgy. The yield strength, fracture toughness and elastic modulus have been studied in the temperature interval of 25 deg. C to 1000 deg. C. The results have shown that the addition of Ti substantially improves the bending strength and toughness of W, but it also dramatically increases the DBTT. On the other hand, the addition of 0.5% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is enough to improve noticeably the oxidation behaviour at the higher temperatures. The grain size, fractography and microstructure are studied in these materials. Titanium is a good grain growth inhibitor and effective precursor of liquid phase in HIP. The simultaneous presence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ti permits to obtain materials with low pores presence.

  1. Synthesis, structure and properties of nickel-iron-tungsten alloy electrodeposits - part I: Effect of synthesis parameters on chemical composition, microstructure and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic and operational electrolysis parameters determine the polarization characteristics, electrodeposition current efficiency, morphology, chemical composition and microstructure of nickel/iron/tungsten alloy deposits. The alloys electrodeposited at a current density of 50 mAcm-2 to 1000 mAcm-2 contain an amorphous phase and nanocrystals of an FCC solid solution of iron and tungsten in nickel. During annealing at temperatures above 500ºC, amorphous phase crystallization, crystalline grain growth of the FCC phase and a reduction in both internal microstrain and minimum density of chaotically distributed dislocations take place in the alloy. Milling the spongy deposit of the alloy causes amorphous phase crystallization, FCC-phase crystalline grain growth, and size reduction and rounding of powder particles. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172057

  2. Gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 6XXX. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. [6061 and 6063

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1003 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.516 inch; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23) or ER5356 (F-22); shielding gas is argon.

  3. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc dc welding of aluminum alloys 6XXX. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. [6061 and 6063

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1007 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.125 to 2.0 inch; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); current is direct, shielding gas is helium.

  4. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  5. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  6. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  7. High Temperature Corrosion studies on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Alloy C-276 in Molten Salt Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, M.; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.; Puneeth, T.; Sivakumar, N.; Murugan, B. Arul; Sathishkumar, M.; Sivalingam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Alloy C-276 is widely used in the power plant environment due to high strength and corrosion in highly aggressive environment. The investigation on high- temperature corrosion resistance of the alloy C-276 PCGTA weldment is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. Investigation has been carried out on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding by autogenous and different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERNiCrMo-4) under molten state of K2SO4-60% NaCl environment at 675oC under cyclic condition. Thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. Weight gained in the molten salt reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. PCGTA ERNiCrMo-3 shows the higher parabolic constant compared to others. The scale formed on the weldment samples upon hot corrosion was characterized by using X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDAX analysis to understand the degradation mechanisms. From the results of the experiment the major phases are identified as Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and NiCr2O4. The result showed that weld fabricated by ERNiCrMo-3 found to be more prone to degradation than base metal and ERNiCrMo-4 filler wire due to higher segregation of alloying element of Mo and W in the weldment

  8. Effect of composition of titanium in silver-copper-titanium braze alloy on dissimilar laser brazing of binder-less cubic boron nitride and tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechi, Yoshihisa; Nagatsuka, Kimiaki; Nakata, Kazuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Laser brazing with Ti as an active element in silver-copper alloy braze metal has been carried out for binder-less cubic boron nitride and tungsten carbide, using silver-copper- titanium braze alloys with titanium content that varied between 0.28 mass% and 1.68 mass%. Observations of the interface using electron probe microanalysis and scanning acoustic microscopy show that efficient interface adhesion between binder-less cubic boron nitride and the silver-copper-titanium braze alloy was achieved for the braze with a titanium content of 0. 28 mass%.

  9. Impact of d -band filling on the dislocation properties of bcc transition metals: The case of tantalum-tungsten alloys investigated by density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Draxl, Claudia; Wurster, Stefan; Pippan, Reinhard; Romaner, Lorenz

    2017-03-01

    We address the impact of tantalum alloying on dislocation properties of tungsten. To that aim, we calculate elastic constants, atomic-row displacement energy, dislocation core energy, and Peierls stress for different degrees of alloying within the framework of density-functional theory. We show that the elastic shear constants decrease monotonously with Ta content. Conversely, atomic-row displacement energy and, consequently, core energy and Peierls stress show a nonmonotonous behavior. These quantities peak at 25 at% Ta, indicating a tendency for embrittlement of W at such alloying concentrations. Our findings are in agreement with the experimental literature.

  10. A novel technique for production of nano-crystalline mono tungsten carbide single phase via mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, Mansour, E-mail: m-razavi@merc.ac.ir [Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), P.O. Box 14155-4777, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani-Rad, Rahim [Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), P.O. Box 14155-4777, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-09

    Highlights: > By adding WC to mixture of tungsten and carbon black unlike the system which does not contain any additive, it can lead to synthesized mono carbide tungsten. > However, the synthesize time has been reduced significantly. > Crystalline size of two systems were in nano-meter scale, this amount in system contain primary WC which was smaller than system without WC. - Abstract: Due to simultaneous synthesis of WC and W{sub 2}C phases in most of the synthesis processes and lower mechanical properties of W{sub 2}C than WC, in this work the possibility of production of nano-crystalline WC single phase as a useful refractory ceramic by means of mechanical alloying has been investigated. The raw materials containing W and C with WC were milled in a planetary ball mill. The sampling has been done in different times. As it was expected, XRD studies showed that after 75 h of milling the WC with W{sub 2}C were produced. By adding WC to the raw materials in the beginning of the process it led to the fact that after 50 h of milling WC was synthesized only without any other phases which remained stable at the higher times while milling. During broadening of XRD peaks, the size of synthesized crystalline WC was estimated in the order of nano-meter. Crystalline size and mean strain of synthesized WC in the system without additive were higher and lower than the system containing WC, respectively.

  11. Tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of aluminum alloy EN AW-AlZn5.5MgCu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of aluminium alloy 7075-T6 in the butt joint, with single-V edge preparation. The sample dimensions were 100 × 75 × 20 mm3. The TIG welding was done with 2 mm diameter filler wire made of 5183 (AlMg4,5Mn at four preheating temperatures. During the welding a temperature was measured at six locations with thermocouples. For successfully welded samples tensile test were done and microstructure of base metal, heat affected zone and weld was analysed. The welds brake at heat affected zone between base metal and the weld. The optimal preheating temperature was at 200 °C.

  12. Determination of aluminium in molybdenum and tungsten metals, iron, steel and ferrous and non-ferrous alloys with pyrocatechol violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, E M

    1971-09-01

    A method for determining 0.001-0.10% of aluminium in molybdenum and tungsten metals is described. After sample dissolution, aluminium is separated from the matrix materials by chloroform extraction of its acetylacetone complex, at pH 6.5, from an ammonium acetate-hydrogen peroxide medium, then back-extracted into 12M hydrochloric add. Following separation of most co-extracted elements, except for beryllium and small amounts of chroinium(III) and copper(II), by a combined ammonium pyrrolidincdithiocarbamate-cupfen-on-chlorofonn extraction, aluminium is determined spectrophotometrically with Pyrocatechol Violet at 578 nm. Chromium interferes during colour development but beryllium, in amounts equivalent to the aluminium concentration, does not cause significant error in the results. Interference from copper(II) is eliminated by reduction with ascorbic acid. The proposed method is also applicable to iron, steel, ferrovanadium, and copper-base alloys after preliminary removal of the matrix elements by a mercury cathode separation.

  13. Synthesis, structure and properties of nickel-iron-tungsten alloy electrodeposits - Part II: Effect of microstructure on hardness, electrical and magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured nickel-iron-tungsten alloys were produced by electrodeposition from an ammoniacal citrate bath. The tungsten content of the alloy ranged from 0.8 wt.% to 11 wt.%, and the crystal grain size of the FCC phase of the solid solution of iron and tungsten in nickel was between 14 nm and 3.3 nm. The amorphous phase content of the alloy increases with decreasing crystal grain size. As the amorphous phase content increases, the magnetization, electrical conductivity and hardness of the alloy decrease. Annealing the alloy to crystallization temperature results in structural relaxation during which the alloy undergoes short-range ordering in conjunction with decreases in the density of chaotically distributed dislocations and internal microstrain level, which increases the exchange integral value, the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, the mean free path of electrons, the ordering and the mean size of cluster in the sliding plane and results in more uniform orientation of dipole moments of certain nanoparticles. These changes: a increase the mobility of magnetic domain walls, facilitate the orientation of domains in the external magnetic field and cause an increase in magnetization; b cause a decrease in electrical resistance, and c impede the sliding of grain boundaries and increase the hardness of the alloy. Annealing the alloys at temperatures above 400ºC results in amorphous phase crystallization and larger crystal grains of the FCC phase, along with a decrease in the density of chaotically distributed dislocations and a decrease in internal microstrain level. The formation of larger crystal grains reduces the hardness of the alloy, decreases its specific electrical resistance and impedes both the orientation of certain magnetic domains and the shift of walls of already oriented domains, thus inducing a decrease in magnetization. The heat released during the milling of Ni87.3Fe11.3W1.4 alloy with FCC-phase crystal grains 8

  14. Fabricating high performance tungsten alloys through zirconium micro-alloying and nano-sized yttria dispersion strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Xie, Z. M.; Hao, T.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.

    2014-08-01

    Pure W, W-0.2wt%Zr (WZ), and W-0.2wt%Zr-1.0wt%Y2O3 (WZY) with a relative density of above 97% were fabricated by spark-plasma-sintering method. The tensile tests indicated that the WZ and WZY alloys exhibited a DBTT between 400 and 500 °C, about 200 °C lower than pure W. The ultimate tensile strength of WZY alloy at 700 °C is 534 MPa, which is 81% and 58% higher than those of WZ alloy (295 MPa) and pure W (337 MPa), respectively. The grain size of WZY alloy is about 3.2 μm, smaller than that of WZ alloy and pure W. Besides, at room temperature the fracture strength and hardness of the WZY alloy is higher than that of pure W. The improved mechanical property of the WZY alloy was suggested to be originated from the enhanced grain boundaries cohesion by Zr micro-alloying and nano-sized yttria dispersion strengthening.

  15. Manufacturing and testing of self-passivating tungsten alloys of different composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Calvo

    2016-12-01

    Bulk W-15Cr, W-10Cr-2Ti and W-12Cr-0.5Y alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying followed by can encapsulation and HIP. This route resulted in fully dense materials with nano-structured grains. The ability of Ti and especially of Y to inhibit grain growth was observed in the W-10Cr-2Ti and W-12Cr-0.5Y alloys. Besides, Y formed Y-rich oxide nano-precipitates at the grain boundaries, and is thus expected to improve the mechanical behaviour of the Y-containing alloy. Isothermal oxidation tests at 800 ºC (1073K and oxidation tests under accident-like conditions revealed that the W-12Cr-0.5Y alloy exhibits the best oxidation behaviour of all alloys, especially in the accident-like scenario. Preliminary HHF tests performed at GLADIS indicated that the W-10Cr-2Ti alloy is able to withstand power densities of 2 MW/m2 without significant damage of the bulk structure. Thermo-shock tests at JUDITH-1 to simulate mitigated disruptions resulted in chipping of part of the surface of the as-HIPed W-10Cr-2Ti alloy. An additional thermal treatment at 1600 °C (1873K improves the thermo-shock resistance of the W-10Cr-2Ti alloy since only crack formation is observed.

  16. Surface modification of cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloy using octadecyltrichlorosilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, Gopinath [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Feldman, Marc D. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); The Department of Veteran Affairs South Texas Health Care System, 7400 Merton Minter Blvd., San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Oh, Sunho [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Agrawal, C. Mauli [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States)], E-mail: Mauli.Agrawal@utsa.edu

    2009-03-15

    Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys have been extensively used for medical implants because of their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. This first time study reports the formation and stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a Co-Cr-W-Ni alloy. SAMs of octadecyltrichlorosilanes (OTS) were coated on sputtered Co-Cr-W-Ni alloy thin film and bulk Co-Cr-W-Ni alloy. OTS SAM coated alloy specimens were characterized using contact angle goniometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Contact angle analysis and FTIR suggested that ordered monolayers were coated on both sputtered and bulk alloy. XPS suggested the selective dissolution of cobalt from the alloy during the formation of OTS SAM. The bonding between the alloy and the OTS SAM was mainly attributed to Si-O-Cr and Si-O-W covalent bonds and a smaller contribution from Si-O-Co bonds. AFM images showed the distribution of islands of monolayers coated on the alloy. The height of monolayers in majority of the islands was closer to the theoretical length of fully extended OTS molecules oriented perpendicular to the surface. The stability of OTS SAM was investigated in tris-buffered saline at 37 {sup o}C for up to 7 days. Contact angle, FTIR, and XPS collectively confirmed that the monolayers remain ordered and bound to the alloy surface under this condition. This study shows that Co-Cr alloys can be surface modified using SAMs for potential biomedical applications.

  17. Process Parameter Optimization of the Pulsed Current Argon Tungsten Arc Welding of Titanium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Balasubramanian; V.Jayabalan; V.Balasubramanian

    2008-01-01

    The selection of process parameters for obtaining optimal tensile properties in the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding is presented. The tensile properties include ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and notch tensile strength. All these characteristics are considered together in the selection of process parameters by modified taguchi method to analyse the effect of each welding process parameter on tensile properties. Experimental results are furnished to illustrate the approach.

  18. Hard Alloy Synthesis from Tungsten-containing Electroerosion Powders of Micro- and Nanometric Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Ageev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the studies of the composition, structure and properties of the hard alloy produced using hot-pressing technique with the high current passage from the powder produced using electroerosion dispersion of sintered hard alloys wastes in lamp kerosene and distilled water.

  19. Electrochemical deposition of Al–Mg alloys on tungsten wires from AlCl{sub 3}–NaCl–KCl melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaling; Zhao, Peng; Dai, Yinhai; Yao, Mengqi; Gan, Haibo; Hu, Wencheng, E-mail: huwc@uestc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • The method of electrochemical deposition is used to prepare Al–Mg alloys on tungsten wires. • AlCl{sub 3}–NaCl–KCl melts as a non-aqueous electrolyte is used in electrochemical deposition. • The effects of deposition voltage and molten salt temperature on the surface morphology and magnesium content of the Al–Mg deposits are studied. • Al–Mg alloys with 9.14 at.% Mg are obtained. - Abstract: This paper studies the electrochemical method that obtains the Al–Mg alloys on tungsten wires from AlCl{sub 3}–NaCl–KCl melts containing a mass fraction of 3% MgCl{sub 2}. Electrochemical experiments are performed with a three electrode system. Linear sweep voltammetry is used to determine the electrodeposition potential of Al–Mg alloys in molten salts. X-ray diffraction is employed to examine the crystallographic structure of Al–Mg alloy electrodeposits. Results show that the Al–Mg alloy coating consists of an Al (Mg) solid solution and the amorphous phase. The effects of the electrodeposition potential and temperature on the morphology of Al–Mg electrodeposits are demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Sintering and Cold Swaging of Tungsten Heavy Alloys Prepared from Various Grades of W Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, S.

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, sintering and cold swaging of 92.5W-5.25Ni-2.25Fe heavy alloys prepared from various grades of W powder were investigated. The mean particle sizes of the W powder grades were 3.4 µm, 10.5 µm, and 28.0 µm. It was observed that linear shrinkage decreased with increasing W particle size. The sintering behavior of the alloys was discussed in terms of liquid capillarity and W particle size. The alloy prepared from the 28.0-µm grade W powder exhibited incomplete densification. This alloy could not be swaged because of the poor mechanical properties. The alloys of the other grades were fully densified. They exhibited better ductility and swageability. The alloy of the 10.5-µm grade W powder had good mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength 1300 MPa, hardness 38 HRC after 10% cold swaging) that were equivalent to those of the alloy of the fine-grade W powder (3.4 µm).

  1. Numerical Simulation on Temperature Field of TIG Welding for Iridium-tungsten Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO; Hong-yi; TANG; Xian; QIN; Shao-peng; LIU; Guo-hui; MA; Hui-min

    2013-01-01

    Ir-W alloy had the advantages of high temperature resistance,corrosion resistance,high hardness The clads produced with Ir-W alloy were sealed with TIG welding.According to energy conservation principle and characteristics of TIG welding,the numerical model of non-steady TIG welding pool shape under moving arc was established.By introducing the heat enthalpy and Gauss heat model of surface

  2. Tungsten-zirconium carbide-rhenium alloys with extraordinary thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.D. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xie, Z.M.; Miao, S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Liu, R.; Jiang, W.B. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, T., E-mail: zhangtao@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, X.P., E-mail: xpwang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fang, Q.F. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Liu, C.S., E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Luo, G.N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, X. [Southwest Institute of Plasma Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2016-05-15

    The low recrystallization temperature (1200 °C) of pure W is a serious limitation for application as facing plasma materials in fusion reactor. In this paper, W-0.5wt.%ZrC-1wt.%Re (WZR) alloy with recrystallization temperature up to 1800 °C was prepared by mechanical milling and spark plasma sintering. The grain size of WZR alloy is about 2.6 μm, smaller than that of pure W (4.4 μm), which keeps unchanged until the annealing temperature increases to 1800 °C. Tensile tests indicate that the WZR alloys exhibit excellent comprehensive properties: the ductile to brittle transition temperature of WZR is in the range from 400 °C to 500 °C, about 200 °C lower than that of pure W prepared by the same process; the total elongation (TE) of WZR at 600 °C is above 30%, which is about 2 times that of pure W (at 700 °C). Meanwhile its tensile strength keeps ∼450 MPa before and after 1800 °C annealing as well as its TE increases after annealing. WZR alloy exhibits higher hardness (489HV) than that of pure W (453HV) at room temperature. Microstructure analysis indicates that the strengthening of nano-sized ZrC particles dispersion and Re solid solution improve tensile properties and thermal stability of WZR alloy.

  3. On the microstructure of tungsten disulfide films alloyed with carbon and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossa, A. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao, Instituto Politecnico da Guarda, Guarda (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [ICEMS, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Engenharia Mecnica-GEMS, Polo II - Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030201, Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: albano.cavaleiro@dem.uc.pt; Carvalho, N.J.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Science Centre and Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Kooi, B.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Science Centre and Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Hosson, J.Th.M. de [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Science Centre and Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2005-07-22

    This work aimed at studying the effect of a Ti interlayer and the alloying with carbon and nitrogen of W-S-C(N) films on the mechanical and tribological properties. The W-S-C and W-S-N films were deposited by r.f. magnetron reactive sputtering with CH{sub 4} or N{sub 2} as reactive gases and analysed by high resolution electron microscopy techniques. The hardness showed an improvement with the addition of the alloying element, which was attributed to the densification of the morphology, the decrease of the grain size, and the precipitation of new phases harder than WS{sub 2}. The formation of either TiC or TiN at the interface between the Ti interlayer and the W-S-C(N) films promoted the enhancement of adhesion in the alloyed films. These improvements led to an enhanced tribological behaviour, in particularly the lowering of the wear coefficients.

  4. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the 233U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshalkin, V. E.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium-uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D2O, H2O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the 233U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  5. Experimental investigation of the behaviour of tungsten and molybdenum alloys at high strain-rate and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scapin Martina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction in recent years of new, extremely energetic particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC gives impulse to the development and testing of refractory metals and alloys based on molybdenum and tungsten to be used as structural materials. In this perspective, in this work the experimental results of a tests campaign on Inermet®  IT180 and pure Molybdenum (sintered by two different producers are presented. The investigation of the mechanical behaviour was performed in tension varying the strain-rates, the temperatures and both of them. Overall six orders of magnitude in strain-rate (between 10−3 and 103 s−1 were covered, starting from quasi-static up to high dynamic loading conditions. The high strain-rate tests were performed using a direct Hopkinson Bar setup. Both in quasi-static and high strain-rate conditions, the heating of the specimens was obtained with an induction coil system, controlled in feedback loop, based on measurements from thermocouples directly welded on the specimen. The temperature range varied between 25 and 1000°C. The experimental data were, finally, used to extract the parameters of the Zerilli-Armstrong model used to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of the investigated materials.

  6. Experimental investigation of the behaviour of tungsten and molybdenum alloys at high strain-rate and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Scapin, Martina; Carra, Federico; Peroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The introduction in recent years of new, extremely energetic particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) gives impulse to the development and testing of refractory metals and alloys based on molybdenum and tungsten to be used as structural materials. In this perspective, in this work the experimental results of a tests campaign on Inermet® IT180 and pure Molybdenum (sintered by two different producers) are presented. The investigation of the mechanical behaviour was performed in tension varying the strain-rates, the temperatures and both of them. Overall six orders of magnitude in strain-rate (between 10−3 and 103 s−1) were covered, starting from quasi-static up to high dynamic loading conditions. The high strain-rate tests were performed using a direct Hopkinson Bar setup. Both in quasi-static and high strain-rate conditions, the heating of the specimens was obtained with an induction coil system, controlled in feedback loop, based on measurements from thermocouples directly welded on...

  7. Dynamic tensile deformation behavior of Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten or tantalum fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungsoo; Kim, Gyeong Su; Jeon, Changwoo; Sohn, Seok Su; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-07-01

    Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten (W) or tantalum (Ta) continuous fibers were fabricated by liquid pressing process. Their dynamic tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructures and deformation mechanisms by using a split Hopkinson tension bar. The dynamic tensile test results indicated that the maximum strength of the W-fiber-reinforced composite (757 MPa) was much lower than the quasi-statically measured strength, whereas the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite showed very high maximum strength (2129 MPa). In the W-fiber-reinforced composite, the fracture abruptly occurred in perpendicular to the tensile direction because W fibers did not play a role in blocking cracks propagated from the amorphous matrix, thereby resulting in abrupt fracture within elastic range and consequent low tensile strength. The very high dynamic tensile strength of the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite could be explained by the presence of ductile Ta fibers in terms of mechanisms such as (1) interrupted propagation of cracks initiated in the amorphous matrix, (2) formation of lots of cracks in the amorphous matrix, and (3) sharing of loads and severe deformation (necking) of Ta fibers in cracked regions.

  8. Gallium suboxide vapor attack on chromium, cobalt, molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys at 1200 [degrees] C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolman, D. G. (David G.); Taylor, T. N. (Thomas N.); Park, Y. (Youngsoo); Stan, M. (Marius); Butt, D. P. (Darryl P.); Maggiore, C. J. (Carl J.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Havrilla, G. J. (George J.)

    2004-01-01

    Our prior work elucidated the failure mechanism of furnace materi als (304 SS, 316 SS, and Hastelloy C-276) exposed to gallium suboxide (Ga{sub 2}O) and/or gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) during plutonium - gallium compound processing. Failure was hypothesized to result from concurrent alloy oxidation/Ga compound reduction followed by Ga uptake. The aim of the current work is to screen candidate replacement materials. Alloys Haynes 25 (49 Co - 20 Cr - 15 W - 10 Ni - 3 Fe - 2 Mn - 0.4 Si, wt%), 52 Mo - 48 Re (wt%), 62 W - 38 Cu (wt%), and commercially pure Cr, Co, Mo, W, and alumina were examined. Preliminary assessments of commercially pure W and Mo - Re suggest that these materials may be suitable for furnace construction. Thermodynamics calculations indicating that materials containing Al, Cr, Mn, Si, and V would be susceptible to oxidation in the presence of Ga{sub 2}O were validated by experimental results. In contrast to that reported previously, an alternate reaction mechanism for Ga uptake, which does not require concurrent alloy oxidation, controls Ga uptake for certain materials. A correlation between Ga solubility and uptake was noted.

  9. A Novel Tungsten-Nickel Alloy Ohmic Contact to SiC at 900 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Evans, Laura J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Morris, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    A novel tungsten-nickel ohmic contact metallization on 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC capable of surviving temperatures as high as 900 C is reported. Preliminary results revealed the following: 1) ohmic contact on n-type 4H-SiC having net doping levels (Nd's) of 1.4 and 2 x 10(exp 19) per cubic centimeter, with specific contact resistances rhosNd's of 7.69 x 10(exp -4) and 5.81 x 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeters, respectively, after rapid thermal annealing (RTA), and 5.9 x 10(exp -3) and 2.51 x 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeters, respectively, after subsequent soak at 900 C for 1 h in argon, and 2) ohmic contact on n- and p-type 6H-SiC having Nd > 2 x 10(exp 19) and Na > 1 x 10(exp 20) per cubic centimeter, with rhosNd = 5 x 10(exp -5) and rhosNa = 2 X 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeter, respectively, after RTA, and rhosNd = 2.5 x 10 (exp -5) and rhosNa = 1.5 x 10(exp -4) OMEGA (raised dot) square centimeter after subsequent treatment at 900 C for 1 h in argon, respectively.

  10. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  11. Composition effects on mechanical properties of tungsten-rhenium-hafnium-carbon alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical properties of rod and sheet fabricated from arc melted W-4Re-Hf-C alloys containing up to about 0.8 mol percent hafnium carbide (HfC) were evaluated in the as-worked condition. The DBTT's of electropolished bend and tensile specimens were independent of HfC content in this range but dependent on excess Hf or C above that required for stoichiometric HfC. Low temperature ductility was a maximum at Hf contents slightly in excess of stoichiometric. Variations in high temperature strength were also dependent on excess Hf and C. Maximum creep strengthening also occurred at Hf contents in excess of stoichiometric. Analysis of extracted second phase particles indicated that creep strength was reduced by increasing WC content in the HfC particles.

  12. Surface morphology, composition and thermal behavior of tungsten-containing anodic spark coatings on aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukiyanchuk, I.V.; Rudnev, V.S.; Kuryavyi, V.G.; Boguta, D.L.; Bulanova, S.B.; Gordienko, P.S

    2004-01-01

    Anodic spark coatings on aluminium alloy were prepared in aqueous electrolytes with sodium tungstate. The influence of boric acid addition in the electrolyte on the surface morphology, elemental and phase composition of the coatings was investigated. In both cases the coatings contained O, Al and W. The coatings obtained in electrolyte with boric acid and sodium tungstate contain also B at approximately 1 at.%. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the coatings had three layers: the grey underlayer of anodic alumina, the second black layer of crystalline or amorphous aluminium tungstate agglomerated into fibers and the outer green layer of WO{sub 3}. It was proposed that isopoly- and heteropolyanions in the electrolyte used take part in the coating growth.

  13. Effect of tungsten metal particle sizes on the solubility of molten alloy melt: Experimental observation of Gibbs-Thomson effect in nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. H.; Das, J.; Sordelet, D. J.; Eckert, J.; Hurd, A. J.

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the effect of tungsten particle sizes on the thermal stability and reactivity of uniformly dispersed W particles in molten Hf-based alloy melt at elevated temperature (1673 K). The solubility of particles less than 100 nm in radius is significantly enhanced. In case of fine W particles with 20 nm diameter, their solubility increases remarkably around 700% compared to that of coarse micrometer-scale particles. The mechanisms and kinetics of this dynamic growth of particle are discussed as well as techniques developed to obtain frozen microstructure of particle-reinforced composites by rapid solidification.

  14. Impact tests of the tungsten coated stainless steels prepared by using magnetron sputtering with ion beam mixing or electron beam alloying treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu; Zhan, Chang-Yong; Yang, Bin; Wu, Jian-Chun

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) with ion beam mixing (IBM) or electron beam alloying (EBA) treatment. The ductile-brittle transition behaviors of the specimens were investigated by means of instrumented Charpy impact test at a series of temperature, and SEM was used to observe the morphology of the cross section. Impact tests show that different treatment methods with W films do not have much influence on crack initiation, while EBA treatment with W films can more effectively prevent crack propagation, namely improve the impact toughness of SS than using IBM treatment. The reason that caused this difference was discussed.

  15. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshalkin, V. E., E-mail: marshalkin@vniief.ru; Povyshev, V. M. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium–uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  16. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    W-3.0% Ni-1.6% Fe and a zirconium foil (2 mils ) laminate. In addition, a GTE tungsten alloy (tungsten blended with 8% nickel and 2% iron) was...vescide.Wolframbleche sollten des- direction. i.e. the longitudinal direction. qu’elles sont lonaitudinales ou transver- ’AIM 1btakeristalliso tion noch 1 Stunde

  17. Tungsten as an innovative alloy element in the development of seamless tubular steels; Wolfram als neuartiges Legierungselement bei der Entwicklung von nahtlosen Leitungsrohrstaehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardun, M. [Mannesmann Forschungsinstitut, Duisburg (Germany); Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes, Muelheim (Germany); Kloster, G.; Koschlig, B.; Niederhoff, K. [Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    This article presents a new alloying concept, which has been developed by Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes together with the Mannesmann Research Institute for seamless linepipe. The key role of this concept is played by the alloying element tungsten. The impulse for using tungsten, which is known to be a precipitation hardener, derived from its property to stabilise the yield strength at higher service temperatures. Different laboratory heats with tungsten contents between 0.25 and 0.50% and C-equivalents acc. to IIW between 0.33 and 0.42% were tested. Apart from the more general aspect of applicability of tungsten for seamless linepipe steels and its influence on the yield strength at elevated temperatures, special attention was paid to the following targets: Development of a steel for seamless linepipe of API Grade X60 to X70 with low Carbon equivalent (tungsten is not included in the common formulas), Investigation of the weldability of tungsten alloyed steels, Improvement of corrosion resistance under sour gas conditions (substitution of manganese, which is supposed to promote segregation, by tungsten) In this paper a comprehensive overview is given about the hole development work, from the laboratory step up to the first successful mill rolling at the Pilger mill Duesseldorf-Rath of the Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes. Particular attention is paid not only to the production of pipes and description of mechanical properties but also to corrosion properties and weldability. (orig.) [German] Im vorliegenden Beitrag wird ueber ein neuartiges Legierungskonzept berichtet, das bei Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Mannesmann Forschungsinstitut MFI fuer nahtlos gewalzte Leitungsrohre entwickelt wurde. Dabei spielt das Legierungselement Wolfram eine entscheidende Rolle. Den Ahstoss fuer den Einsatz von Wolfram lieferte die Erkenntnis, dass das als ausscheidungshaertend bekannte Element Wolfram bei warmfesten Staehlen die Streckgrenze bei erhoehten

  18. Diffusion of liquid uranium into foils of tantalum metal and tantalum-10 wt% tungsten alloy up to 1350/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznietz, M.; Livne, Z.; Cotler, C.; Erez, G.

    1988-05-01

    Immersion experiments have been performed to investigate the diffusion of liquid uranium into 0.3 mm thick foils of tantalum metal and tantalum-10wt% tungsten alloy in the temperature range of 1160/sup 0/C to 1350/sup 0/C, for reaction times up to 20 h, in zirconia crucibles. The orginal and uranium-reacted foils have been studied microscopically (SEM-EDAX) and a multilayer structure is revealed in the reacted foils. Layers identified for tantalum immersed in uranium: Uranium-tantalum (U/Ta approx. = 1), precipitated columnar tantalum (< 1wt% U), inner uranium, and inner tantalum (with grown grains and uranium along grain boundaries). Layers identified for Ta-10wt% W alloy immersed in uranium: Uranium-tantalum (U/Ta approx. = 1, 0.3wt% W), precipitated tantalum (< 1wt% U, down to 1-2wt% W), and inner Escher-type grains of tantalum-tungsten (up to 18wt% W) and of uranium (< 2wt% Ta, < 0.4wt% W). A mechanism for the multilayer formation and the intrusion of liquid uranium into the solid foils is proposed and substantiated.

  19. Tungsten toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Mark L; Sheppard, Paul R; Witten, Brandon L

    2012-04-05

    There is emerging evidence that tungsten has toxic health effects. We summarize the recent tungsten toxicity research in this short review. Tungsten is widely used in many commercial and military applications because it has the second highest melting temperature of any element. Consequently, it is important to elucidate the potential health effects of tungsten.

  20. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc (DC) welding to aluminum alloys 1XXX and 3003 to 6XXX. [1060, 1100, and 3003 to 6061 and 6063

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2207 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys 1060, 1100, and 3003 (P-21) to 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.125 to 0.516; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); current is direct; shielding gas is helium.

  1. 钨合金和钛合金绝热剪切破坏研究%Researches on Adiabatic Shear Failure of Tungsten Heavy Alloy and Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞吉林; 李剑荣; 魏志刚

    2003-01-01

    An overview is given of the researches at USTC on adiabatic shear deformation and failure of tungsten heavy alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy. SHPB tests of truncated-conic and pre-twisted inclined cylindrical tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) specimens are conducted. The mechanism of shear instability and adiabatic shear band (ASB) formarion in the specimens is analyzed by microscopic observation and numerical simulation. It is found that the meso-structure of the tungsten heavy alloy and the stress state of the specimens have significant influences on the sensitivity and localization of ASB. The relationship between adiabatic shearing and dynamic failure is investigated by plugging experiment of Ti6Al4V alloy plates. It is found that fracture occurs by a process of void nucleation and coalescence within and along the shear band, leading to the final plug formation. In all these cases, the adiabatic shear band plays a dominant role in the formation and growth of cracks, and is responsible for the dynamic fracture of specimens.%介绍了中国科学技术大学在钨合金和钛合金的绝热剪切变形和破坏研究方面的工作.对截头圆锥形和预扭斜切圆柱形钨合金试件进行了分离式Hopkinson压杆试验,通过微观观察和数值模拟分析了试件中剪切失稳和绝热剪切带形成的机理,发现钨合金的细观结构和试件的应力状态对绝热剪切带形成的敏感性和位置有重要影响.通过钛合金板的冲塞实验研究了绝热剪切和动态破坏的联系,发现由于沿剪切带的孔洞形核和合并过程而出现断裂,最后导致冲塞.所有这些情况下,绝热剪切带在裂纹形成和扩展中起支配作用,正是绝热剪切带造成了试件的动态断裂.

  2. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ying, E-mail: csudengying@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng, Bing [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Xu, Guofu, E-mail: csuxgf66@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying [Northeast Light Alloy Co. Ltd., Hei Longjiang, Harbin 150060 (China)

    2015-07-15

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and understanding of the mechanisms of electroplating of nanocrystalline–amorphous nickel–tungsten alloys using in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Majid; Guinel, Maxime J-F., E-mail: maxime.guinel@upr.edu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Nanocrystalline–amorphous Ni–W alloys were electro co-deposited. •A better understanding of the co-deposition mechanisms was achieved. •The in situ EIS results were modeled and simulated to an equivalent circuit. •The deposited films were characterized using SEM, XRD and HRTEM. -- Abstract: In this study, a series of Nickel (Ni)–Tungsten (W) alloys were electrodeposited onto copper (Cu) substrates using electroplating baths and tri-sodium citrate (Na{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}) as the complex agent. The electro co-deposition of Ni–W alloys was carried out by varying several important experimental parameters: the tungstate ion [WO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} concentration, the bath temperature and the speed of stirring. Potentio-dynamic polarization and in-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques were used as electroplating methods to study the processes. The phases present in the films were identified using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron diffraction (ED). The films were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their elemental compositions determined using X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS). The electrodeposited films were found to be a mixture of amorphous and nanocrystalline Ni–W. This study has allowed us to reach a better understanding of the complex mechanisms and effective parameters of co-deposition of Ni and W using citrate ions complex baths.

  4. Effect of the militarily-relevant heavy metals, depleted uranium and heavy metal tungsten-alloy on gene expression in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Brooks, Kia; Smith, Jan; Page, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) and heavy-metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) are dense heavy-metals used primarily in military applications. Chemically similar to natural uranium, but depleted of the higher activity 235U and 234U isotopes, DU is a low specific activity, high-density heavy metal. In contrast, the non-radioactive HMTAs are composed of a mixture of tungsten (91-93%), nickel (3-5%), and cobalt (2-4%) particles. The use of DU and HMTAs in military munitions could result in their internalization in humans. Limited data exist however, regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU and HMTAs in humans. Both DU and HMTAs possess a tumorigenic transforming potential and are genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro. Using insoluble DU-UO2 and a reconstituted mixture of tungsten, nickel, cobalt (rWNiCo), we tested their ability to induce stress genes in thirteen different recombinant cell lines generated from human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2). The commercially available CAT-Tox (L) cellular assay consists of a panel of cell lines stably transfected with reporter genes consisting of a coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under transcriptional control by mammalian stress gene regulatory sequences. DU, (5-50 microg/ml) produced a complex profile of activity demonstrating significant dose-dependent induction of the hMTIIA FOS, p53RE, Gadd153, Gadd45, NFkappaBRE, CRE, HSP70, RARE, and GRP78 promoters. The rWNiCo mixture (5-50 microg/ml) showed dose-related induction of the GSTYA, hMTIIA, p53RE, FOS, NFkappaBRE, HSP70, and CRE promoters. An examination of the pure metals, tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), and cobalt (Co), comprising the rWNiCo mixture, demonstrated that each metal exhibited a similar pattern of gene induction, but at a significantly decreased magnitude than that of the rWNiCo mixture. These data showed a synergistic activation of gene expression by the metals in the rWNiCo mixture. Our data show for the first time that DU and rWNiCo can

  5. Microstructures and mechanical properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded joints of new Al–Mg–Sc and Al–Mg–Er alloy plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Le [Key Laboratory of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials of Hunan Province, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Peng, Yongyi, E-mail: pengyongyi@126.com [Key Laboratory of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials of Hunan Province, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Huang, Jiwu; Deng, Ying; Yin, Zhimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2015-01-03

    The effect of microalloy element Sc and Er on Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) joints of Al–Mg alloy was studied by comparative method. The microstructures and mechanical properties of Al–Mg–Sc and Al–Mg–Er alloy welded joint were examined by microhardness measurement, tensile test, optical microscopy and transmission electron microscope. The strength of Al–Mg–Sc welded joint is higher than that of Al–Mg–Er welded joint. The differences of the two welded joints can be attributed to the different thermal stability and the effect of Al{sub 3}(Sc{sub 1−x},Zr{sub x}) particles and Al{sub 3}(Er{sub 1−x},Zr{sub x}) particles. Al{sub 3}(Sc{sub 1−x},Zr{sub x}) particles, which have higher thermal stability, are still coherent with Al matrix in the HAZ, can strongly pin dislocations and subgrain boundaries of the HAZ. There are strain strengthening and precipitation strengthening in the HAZ of Al–Mg–Sc welded joints. Notable coarsening of Al{sub 3}(Er{sub 1−x},Zr{sub x}) particles and recrystallization in the HAZ of Al–Mg–Er welded joint lead to the reduction and disappearance of strain strengthening and precipitation strengthening.

  6. Preparation of fine-grained tungsten heavy alloys by spark plasma sintered W–7Ni–3Fe composite powders with different ball milling time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.P., E-mail: dpxiang@hainu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Tropical Island Resources, Ministry of Education, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ding, L. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Tropical Island Resources, Ministry of Education, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); Li, Y.Y.; Chen, G.B. [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhao, Y.W. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Tropical Island Resources, Ministry of Education, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We fabricate fine-grained W–7Ni–3Fe alloys using HEBM assisted SPS method. ► The γ-(Ni, Fe, W) phase is not observed in HEBM raw powders. ► The density of the WHAs gradually decreased with increasing HEBM time. ► The hardness and bending strength of the WHAs show different trends of variation. ► The intergranular fracture was the main bending fracture mode of the WHAs. -- Abstract: The fine-grained tungsten heavy alloys (WHAs) with grain size of about 1–3 μm were successfully prepared by spark plasma sintered W–7Ni–3Fe composite powders with different high-energy ball milling (HEBM) time. This study analyzes the effects of HEBM time not only on the composite powders but on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WHAs. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate the microstructure and phase evolution rules of powders and alloys, respectively. The γ-(Ni, Fe, W) is not observed in XRD patterns of the ball milled powders. With prolonging HEBM time, the W phase diffraction peak becomes increasingly wider, and its intensity continues to decline. However, the completely amorphous structures are not formed even after HEBM 40 h. The relative density of the WHAs prepared by HEBM assisted SPS technique decreases gradually with increasing the ball milling time. For the WHAs sintered in 1150 °C for 8 min, the W grains grow finer and the content of the γ-(Ni, Fe, W) binding phase greatly increases with prolonging the HEBM time. Meanwhile, over 5 h of HEBM time, the bending strength continuously decreases and the hardness slightly increases. The intergranular fracture of the W grains is the main bending fracture mode in all the WHAs. The microporous of different sizes are distributed on the bending fracture and progressively increased with prolonging the ball milling time.

  7. Fracture Mechanism of Tungsten Alloy Spheres Embedded in Cylinders under Explosive Loading%圆筒内嵌钨合金球爆炸加载条件下断裂机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王星; 李树奎; 王迎春; 殷社萍

    2011-01-01

    Considering the brittleness of tungsten alloys as pre-fabricated fragment ammunition after armour-piercing, tungsten alloy spheres embedded in cylinders were employed; the microstructure and fracture mechanism of 97.5W-Ni-Fe alloy were investigated under explosive loading before and after armour-piercing. The results show that high strain rate explosive loading induces a large amount of deformation twins in tungsten particles. The twining deformation after armour-piercing induces lots of micro-cracks and these micro-cracks extend to connect with the W-W interface fracture, becoming macro-cracks due to the tensile stress. As a result, the tungsten alloy spheres are fractured to efficient fragments and the second damage ability is enhanced.%针对钨合金作为预制破片战斗部穿甲后的易碎性,采用圆筒内嵌钨合金球战斗部,研究了97.5W-Ni-Fe合金在圆筒内嵌式爆炸加载穿靶前后的微观组织以及断裂机制.结果表明,97.5W-Ni-Fe合金爆炸加载后在钨颗粒内部产生大量形变孪晶,穿透靶板后形变孪晶诱发大量微观裂纹,微裂纹在穿靶后的拉应力作用下扩展并与W-W界面断裂相互连接,使钨合金球断裂成有效破片,增强了钨合金的二次毁伤能力.

  8. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Leszczyńska-Sejda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II ions from aqueous nickel(II nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders.

  9. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder-Metallurgy-Produced Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, T. R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Frederick, D. A.; Contescu, C. I.; Chen, W.; Lim, Y. C.; Peter, W. H.; Feng, Z.

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was undertaken using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas-forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap, where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal and minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders are critical for achieving equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  10. 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis detects metabolic disturbances in rat urine on acute exposure to heavy metal tungsten alloy based metals salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ritu; Rana, Poonam; Gupta, Mamta; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Srivastava, Shatakshi; Roy, Raja; Khushu, Subash

    2014-03-25

    Heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) have been found to be safer alternatives for making military munitions. Recently, some studies demonstrating the toxic potential of HMTAs have raised concern over the safety issues, and further propose that HMTAs exposure may lead to physiological disturbances as well. To look for the systemic effect of acute toxicity of HMTA based metals salt, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopic profiling of rat urine was carried out. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered (intraperitoneal) low and high dose of mixture of HMTA based metals salt and NMR spectroscopy was carried out in urine samples collected at 8, 24, 72 and 120 h post dosing (p.d.). Serum biochemical parameters and liver histopathology were also conducted. The (1)H NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate analysis techniques to show the time- and dose-dependent biochemical variations in post HMTA based metals salt exposure. Urine metabolomic analysis showed changes associated with energy metabolism, amino acids, N-methyl nicotinamide, membrane and gut flora metabolites. Multivariate analysis showed maximum variation with best classification of control and treated groups at 24h p.d. At the end of the study, for the low dose group most of the changes at metabolite level reverted to control except for the energy metabolites; whereas, in the high dose group some of the changes still persisted. The observations were well correlated with histopathological and serum biochemical parameters. Further, metabolic pathway analysis clarified that amongst all the metabolic pathways analysed, tricarboxylic acid cycle was most affected at all the time points indicating a switchover in energy metabolism from aerobic to anaerobic. These results suggest that exposure of rats to acute doses of HMTA based metals salt disrupts physiological metabolism with moderate injury to the liver, which might indirectly result from heavy metals induced oxidative stress.

  11. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... is to act both as a diffusion barrier for chromium and provide better protection against high temperature oxidation than a pure cobalt coating. This work presents a characterization of a cobalt-tungsten alloy coating electrodeposited on the ferritic steel Crofer 22 H which subsequently was oxidized in air...... of oxidation time. The coating had completely oxidized during the 300 h oxidation time. GDOES measurements showed that the tungsten was located in an inner zone in the coating/substrate interface. The outer layer of the coating did not contain any tungsten after oxidation but consisted mainly of cobalt...

  12. Effects of Cobalt on the Sintering Behavior of Mechanically Activated Tungsten Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tungsten alloys were prepared with mechanically activated powder added microelement cobalt in order to improve the process and properties of alloys. Properties of alloys such as density, hardness and bending strength were measured. The results show that through mechanical activation, cobalt can accelerate the sintering process of these alloys. By the combination of mechanical activation and adding microelement cobalt, tungsten alloys with higher density and better properties can be obtained.

  13. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  14. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  15. Recycling Process of Silver and Tungsten from Waste Ag-W Alloy Contact%报废银钨触头回收银和钨的工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琪; 娄德大; 徐元萍; 周全法

    2011-01-01

    银钨合金触点是重要的电接触材料,报废银钨触点中银钨的分离和资源化问题引起了越来越多的重视.以报废银钨触头为原料,提出了“一次分银-焙烧-二次分银”的回收工艺,考察了银钨分离的工艺条件,通过实践验证了其可靠性,银、钨的回收率达到99%以上.回收得到的银和钨可分别深加工成粒度为0.3~0.6 μm的超细银粉和纯净的WO3产品.%Ag-W alloy contact is one kind of important electrical contact materials, and the separation and recycling of sliver and tungsten from waste Ag-W alloy contact has attracted more and more attention for the resource value and secondary pollution during the recycling process. A novel process about the separation and recycling of sliver and tungsten from waste Ag-W alloy contact has been proposed, which includes 4 steps of first leaching silver, roasting, secondary leaching silver and ammonia leaching. The result shows that the recovery rate of Ag and W is higher than 99%, and 0.3-0.6 urn superfine silver powders and pure WO3 powders can be obtained during the recycling process.

  16. Analysis of niobium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, T A

    1968-09-01

    An ion-exchange method was applied to the analysis of synthetic mixtures representing various niobium-base alloys. The alloying elements which were separated and determined include vanadium, zirconium, hafnium, titanium, molybdenum, tungsten and tantalum. Mixtures containing zirconium or hafnium, tungsten, tantalum and niobium were separated by means of a single short column. Coupled columns were employed for the resolution of mixtures containing vanadium, zirconium or titanium, molybdenum, tungsten and niobium. The separation procedures and the methods employed for the determination of the alloying elements in their separate fractions are described.

  17. 钨合金球形破片侵彻陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶的弹道极限速度%Ballistic limit velocity of tungsten alloy spherical fragment penetrating ceramic/DFRP composite target plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛亮; 王华; 姜春兰; 李明

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study on ballistic limit velocities (v50 )of tungsten alloy spherical fragment penetrating ceramic /DFRP composite target plates was performed.Firstly,tungsten alloy spherical fragments vertically impacting ceramic /DFRP composite target plates with different thickness ratio was tested by using a ballistic gun equipment. According to the ballistic experimental results,the relationship between ballistic limit velocity (v50 )and area density (AD)of composite target was obtained.Secondly,using the dimensional analysis method and the similarity theory,the simulation law of tungsten alloy spherical fragments penetrating ceramic /DFRP composite target plates was studied.Based on the above results,the empirical formula of the ballistic limit velocity v50 was built.The predicted values using the empirical formula agreed well with the experimental results.The study results were valuable for optimally designing fragment warheads and light armor protective structures.%研究钨合金球形破片垂直侵彻陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶的弹道极限速度 v50。首先,利用弹道枪动加载设备,对钨合金球形破片垂直撞击不同厚度比的陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶进行了实验研究,获得了弹道极限速度(v50)与复合靶面密度(AD)之间的关系;其次,根据量纲分析和相似理论,研究了钨合金球形破片侵彻陶瓷/DFRP 复合靶的模拟律,并建立了弹道极限速度 v50的经验关系式。经验关系的预测值与实验结果吻合较好。研究结果对破片式战斗部及轻型装甲防护结构的优化设计都具有十分重要的应用价值。

  18. Microstructures and dissolution of carbides occurring during the laser cladding of steel with tungsten carbide reinforced Ni- and Co-hard-alloys; Gefuegeausbildung und Karbidaufloesung beim Laserbeschichten von Stahl mit Wolframkarbid-verstaerkten Ni- und Co-Hartlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luft, A. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany); Techel, A. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany); Nowotny, S. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany); Reitzenstein, W. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany)

    1995-05-01

    Wear resistant layers on steel were produced by laser cladding of powder mixtures consisting of a Ni- or Co-base hard alloy and coarse grained WC or fused tungsten carbide, respectively. The microstructure of the clad composite layers were investigated by metallography, SEM, EDX and image analysis. The four binder/carbide systems were found to differ strongly in the degree of partial carbide dissolution and the formation of new hard phases. (orig.) [Deutsch] Verschleissfeste Schutzschichten auf Stahl werden durch Laserbeschichten mit Pulvergemischen aus einer Ni- bzw. Co-Hartlegierung und grobkoernigem WC bzw. Wolframschmelzkarbid hergestellt. Die erzeugten Dispersionsgefuege werden mittels Metallographie, REM, EDX und Bildanalyse untersucht. Der Vergleich der vier Schichtsysteme liefert deutliche Unterschiede im Ausmass der Karbidaufloesung und der Bildung neuer Hartphasen. (orig.)

  19. The shielding against radiation produced by powder metallurgy with tungsten copper alloy applied on transport equipment for radio-pharmaceutical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cione, Francisco C.; Sene, Frank F.; Souza, Armando C. de; Betini, Evandro G.; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: fceoni@hotmail.com, E-mail: ffsene@hotmail.com, E-mail: armandocirilo@yahoo.com, E-mail: evandrobetini@gmail.com, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rizzuto, Marcia A., E-mail: marizzutto@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    Safety is mandatory on medicine radiopharmaceutical transportation and dependent on radiation shielding material. The focus of the present work is to minimize the use of harmful materials as lead and depleted uranium usually used in packages transportation. The tungsten-copper composite obtained by powder metallurgy (PM) is non-toxic. In powder metallurgy the density and the porosity of the compacted parts depends basically upon particle size distribution of each component, mixture, compacting pressure and sintering temperature cycle. The tungsten-copper composite, when used for shielding charged particles, X-rays, gamma photons or other photons of lower energy require proper interpretation of the radiation transport phenomena. The radioactive energy reduction varies according to the porosity and density of the materials used as shielding. The main factor for radiation attenuation is the cross section value for tungsten. The motivation research factor is an optimization of the tungsten and cooper composition in order to achieve the best linear absorption coefficient given by equation I{sub (x)} = I{sub 0}e{sup (-ux)}. Experiments were conducted to quantify the effective radiation shielding properties of tungsten-copper composite produced by PM, varying the cooper amount in the composite. The studied compositions were 15%, 20% and 25% copper in mass. The Compaction pressure was 270 MPa and the sintering atmosphere was in 1.1 atm in N{sub 2}+H{sub 2}. The sintering temperature was 980 deg C for 2 h. The linear absorption coefficient factor was similar either for the green and the sintered compacts, due the amount of porosity did not affect the radiation attenuation. Thus the sintered was meant for size reduction and mechanical properties enhancement. (author)

  20. Elaboration, physical and electrochemical characterizations of CO tolerant PEMFC anode materials. Study of platinum-molybdenum and platinum-tungsten alloys and composites; Elaborations et caracterisations electrochimiques et physiques de materiaux d'anode de PEMFC peu sensibles a l'empoisonnement par CO: etude d'alliages et de composites a base de platine-molybdene et de platine-tungstene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrelade, E.

    2005-06-15

    PEMFC development is hindered by the CO poisoning ability of the anode platinum catalyst. It has been previously shown that the oxidation potential of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the platinum atoms can be lowered using specific Pt based catalysts, either metallic alloys or composites. The objective is then to realize a catalyst for which the CO oxidation is compatible with the working potential of a PEMFC anode. In our approach, to enhance the CO tolerance of platinum based catalyst supported on carbon, we studied platinum-tungsten and platinum-molybdenum alloys and platinum-metal oxide materials (Pt-WO{sub x} and Pt-MoO{sub x}). The platinum based alloys demonstrate a small effect of the second metal towards the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The platinum composites show a better tolerance to carbon monoxide. Electrochemical studies on both Pt-MoO{sub x} and Pt-WO{sub x} demonstrate the ability of the metal-oxides to promote the ability of Pt to oxidize CO at low potentials. However, chrono-amperometric tests reveal a bigger influence of the tungsten oxide. Complex chemistry reactions on the molybdenum oxide surface make it more difficult to observe. (author)

  1. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  2. Fabricating fine-grained tungsten heavy alloy by spark plasma sintering of low-energy ball-milled W–2Mo–7Ni–3Fe powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.P., E-mail: dpxiang@hainu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Tropical Island Resources, Ministry of Education, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ding, L. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Tropical Island Resources, Ministry of Education, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); Li, Y.Y. [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen, X.Y.; Zhang, T.M. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Tropical Island Resources, Ministry of Education, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China)

    2013-08-20

    Fine-grained W–2Mo–7Ni–3Fe heavy alloys were fabricated by low-energy ball milling (LEBM)-assisted spark plasma sintering at a temperature range of 1000–1250 °C. The effects of sintering temperature on the phase evolution, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical properties of the alloys were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hardness testing, and universal testing. The XRD results show that small intermetallic compounds, such as NiW and Ni{sub 2}W{sub 4}C, form in the alloys. The W–2Mo–7Ni–3Fe alloys are characterized by white W grains, a gray W-rich microstructure that contains Mo, and a black γ–(Ni, Fe, W, Mo) binding phase. The X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDS) shows that the Mo, Ni, and Fe that form a solid solution with W in the gray structure gradually decrease with increasing temperature. The hardness and bending strength of the alloys initially increase and then decrease with rising sintering temperature. Moreover, the alloys sintered at different temperatures exhibit dissimilar bending fracture modes.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Interception Effect of New Electromagnetic Launching Interception Projectile on the Tungsten-alloy Long Rod%新型电磁发射拦截弹对钨合金长杆弹拦截效果的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李治源; 孙鹏; 赵科义

    2012-01-01

    This paper presented a new electromagnetic launching interception projectile,taking the process of interception projectile impacting on tungsten-alloy long rod as an example,a 3-D finite element simulating model for the interception projectile and tungsten-alloy long rod was set up by using the LS-DYNA procedure.Through numerical simulation study on the interception effect of interception projectile on the tungsten-alloy long rod target,the interception effect under different interception angles and tungsten-alloy long rod velocities was attained,then the changes of velocity and performance were analyzed after interception projectile impacting against armour-piercing.The results reveal that the interception effect was well,and directly affected the piercing effect after impacting.%本文提出了一种新型电磁发射拦截弹,以拦截弹与钨合金长杆弹碰撞过程为例,使用LS-DYNA程序建立了拦截弹和钨合金长杆弹的三维有限元模型。在拦截弹对钨合金长杆弹的拦截效果问题上进行了数值模拟分析,并得出了不同着角和钨合金长杆弹运动速度对拦截效果影响的关系曲线,给出了拦截弹与钨合金长杆弹碰撞后的速度变化及状态改变情况,结果表明,拦截弹对钨合金长杆弹起到了较好的拦截作用,两者碰撞后,钨合金长杆弹对装甲车辆的穿甲效果明显降低。

  4. Performance and microstructure of 90W­Ni­Fe high­density tungsten alloy fabricated by vacuum sintering%真空烧结制备90W­Ni­Fe高密度钨合金的性能与显微结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹俭鹏; 张兆森

    2013-01-01

      采用真空烧结法制备90W­7Ni­3Fe 高密度钨合金,通过材料试验机、SEM、XRD 等表征了材料的性能与显微结构。结果表明:钨合金的相对密度、强度、塑性均随烧结温度升高先上升后下降,1440℃烧结试样的性能最佳,其相对密度、抗弯强度、抗拉强度、伸长率和断面收缩率分别为99.2%、1920.5 MPa、1086.7 MPa、22.8%和24.4%。钨合金单纯由体心立方的钨相和面心立方的Fe3Ni2固溶体相组成,未出现其他杂质相。在1360~1460℃的烧结温度范围内,随温度的升高,钨合金断裂形态依次发生以下转变:沿晶脆性断裂、穿晶脆性断裂、韧窝韧性断裂、粘接相撕裂韧性断裂和穿晶脆性断裂。%90W­7Ni­3Fe high­density tungsten alloys were fabricated by vacuum sintering method. Material testing machine, SEM and XRD were adopted to characterize the performance and microstructure of the alloys. The results show that the relative density, strength and plasticity of tungsten alloys increase at first and decrease afterwards with the increase of the sintering temperature. The sample sintered at 1 440℃demonstrates the optimal performance. Its relative density, bending strength, tensile strength, elongation and cross section shrinkage ratio are 99.2%, 1 920 MPa, 886 MPa, 22.83%and 24.37%, respectively. The tungsten alloy is simply made up of body centered cubic tungsten phase and face centered cubic Fe3Ni2 solid solution phase. With the increase of sintering temperature, the fracture morphology of tungsten alloy is transformed from intergranular brittle fracture to transgranular brittle fracture, dimple ductile fracture, bonding phase tearing ductile fracture and transgranular brittle fracture subsequently during the sintering temperature range from 1 360 to 1 460℃.

  5. Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2014-07-01

    The Mg98.5Gd1Zn0.5 alloy produced by a powder metallurgy route was studied and compared with the same alloy produced by extrusion of ingots. Atomized powders were cold compacted and extruded at 623 K and 673 K (350 °C and 400 °C). The microstructure of extruded materials was characterized by α-Mg grains, and Mg3Gd and 14H-LPSO particles located at grain boundaries. Grain size decreased from 6.8 μm in the extruded ingot, down to 1.6 μm for powders extruded at 623 K (350 °C). Grain refinement resulted in an increase in mechanical properties at room and high temperatures. Moreover, at high temperatures the PM alloy showed superplasticity at high strain rates, with elongations to failure up to 700 pct.

  6. High-temperature alloys for high-power thermionic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang S.; Jacobson, D.L.; D' cruz, L.; Luo, Anhua; Chen, Bor-Ling.

    1990-08-01

    The need for structural materials with useful strength above 1600 k has stimulated interest in refractory-metal alloys. Tungsten possesses an extreme high modulus of elasticity as well as the highest melting temperature among metals, and hence is being considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for high temperature structural applications such as space nuclear power systems. This report is divided into three chapters covering the following: (1) the processing of tungsten base alloys; (2) the tensile properties of tungsten base alloys; and (3) creep behavior of tungsten base alloys. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter. (SC)

  7. Feasibility study of tungsten as a diffusion barrier between nickel-chromium-aluminum and Gamma/Gamma prime - Delta eutectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. G.; Zellars, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Coating systems proposed for potential use on eutectic alloy components in high-temperature gas turbine engines were studied with emphasis on deterioration of such systems by diffusion. A 1-mil thick W sheet was placed between eutectic alloys and a NiCrAl layer. Layered test specimens were aged at 1100 C for as long as long as 500 hours. Without the W barrier, the delta phase of the eutectic deteriorated by diffusion of Nb into the NiCrAl. Insertion of the W barrier stopped the diffusion of Nb from delta. Chromium diffusion from the NiCrAl into the gamma/gamma prime phase of the eutectic was greatly reduced by the barrier. However, the barrier thickness decreased with time; and W diffused into both the NiCrAl and the eutectic. When the delta platelets were alined parallel to the NiCrAl layer, rather than perpendicular, diffusion into the eutectic was reduced.

  8. The microstructure of chromium-tungsten steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueh, R. L.; Maziasz, P. J.

    1989-03-01

    Chromium-tungsten steels are being developed to replace the Cr-Mo steels for fusion-reactor applications. Eight experimental steels were produced and examined by optical and electron microscopy. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9 and 12 pct were used. Steels with these chromium compositions and with 2 pct W and 0.25 pct V were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, three other 2.25Cr steels were produced as follows: an alloy with 2 pct W and 0 pct V and alloys with 0 and 1 pct W and 0.25 pct V. A 9Cr steel containing 2 pct W, 0.25 pct V, and 0.07 pct Ta also was studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1 pct. Two pct tungsten was required in the 2.25Cr steels to produce 100 pct bainite (no polygonal ferrite). The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100 pct martensite, but the 12Cr steel contained about 25 pct delta-ferrite. Precipitate morphology and precipitate types varied, depending on the chromium content. For the 2.25Cr steels, M3C and M7C3 were the primary precipitates; for the 9Cr and 12Cr steels, M23C6 was the primary precipitate. The 5Cr steel contained M7C3 and M23C6. All of the steels with vanadium also contained MC.

  9. Surface Tension of Molten Nickel-Tungsten Alloy%熔融Ni-W合金的表面张力研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖锋; 刘兰霄; 杨仁辉; 傅亚; 方亮; 赵红凯

    2008-01-01

    Surface tension of molten Ni-(5~10)W (mass fraction,%)alloys was measured at the temperature range of 1773~1873 K using an improved sessile drop method with an alumina substrate in an Ar+3%H2 atmosphere.The surface tension of molten Ni-W alloys decreases with increasing of temperature.On the basis of experimental data,the surface tension of molten Ni-W alloys was also theoretically deduced both as functions of concentration and temperature using a model of Butler's equation.The surface segregation in Ni-W system was calculated.The measured results agree well with a model for the surface tension.The surface concentration oftungsten is lower than that in bulk.%采用改进静滴法测定了1773~1873 K温度范围内熔融Ni-(5~10)W(质量分数,%)合金在Al2O3基板上于Ar+3%H2气氛下的表面张力数据.熔融Ni-W合金的表面张力随着温度的升高而降低.在此基础上采用Butler模型推导了表面张力随温度与浓度的变化情况,计算了合金体系中元素的偏聚情况.表面张力的计算结果与测量值的符合度较高.W在合金表面的浓度低于体相浓度.

  10. Analysis of the temperature and thermal stress in pure tungsten monoblock during heat loading and the influences of alloying and dispersion strengthening on these responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Makoto, E-mail: makoto.fukuda@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-aza Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Nogami, Shuhei; Guan, Wenhai; Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-aza Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • The heat load response of pure W and its alloys monoblock was investigated by FEA. • The effect of alloying on heat load response of W was not clearly observed. • The possibility of cracking during cooling phase after heat load was suggested. • The effects of recrystallization and irradiation embrittlement were discussed. • W alloys will show better reliability than pure W during fusion reactor operation. - Abstract: The effects of 3% Re addition and K-bubble dispersion on temperature and stress values and the distributions thereof in a W monoblock during heat loading were investigated using finite element analysis. K-doped W-3%Re exhibited the highest recrystallization resistance but showed a higher surface temperature than pure W or K-doped W during the heat loading. The effect of K-bubble dispersion and 3% Re addition on thermal stress distribution during heat loading was not clearly observed, and residual tensile stress after heat loading, which could possibly cause cracking, was observed at the top surfaces of all materials. Because of the higher strength and temperature at which recrystallization starts for the K-doped W-3%Re and K-doped W, the probability of crack formation at the top surface might be lower compared to that in pure W. The improvement in the material properties and resistance to crack initiation and propagation in W during cyclic heat loading is crucial for the design and development of plasma-facing components. This work suggests possibility of the crack formation in a pure W monoblock in the cooling phase after a 20 MW/m{sup 2} heat loading cycle and the effectiveness of K-bubble dispersion and Re addition for improving the heat loading resistance of monoblock W.

  11. Dislocation mechanism of deuterium retention in tungsten under plasma implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinko, V I; Grigorev, P; Bakaev, A; Terentyev, D; van Oost, G; Gao, F; Van Neck, D; Zhurkin, E E

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new theoretical model for deuterium (D) retention in tungsten-based alloys on the basis of its being trapped at dislocations and transported to the surface via the dislocation network with parameters determined by ab initio calculations. The model is used to explain experimentally observed trends of D retention under sub-threshold implantation, which does not produce stable lattice defects to act as traps for D in conventional models. Saturation of D retention with implantation dose and effects due to alloying of tungsten with, e.g. tantalum, are evaluated, and comparison of the model predictions with experimental observations under high-flux plasma implantation conditions is presented.

  12. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  13. High strength alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  14. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  15. Interdiffusion behavior of tungsten or rhenium and group 5 and 6 elements and alloys of the periodic table. Part 2A: Appendices A-G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Arc cast W, CVD, W, CVD Re, and powder metallurgy Re materials were hot isostatically pressure welded to ten different refractory metals and alloys and thermally aged at 10 to the minus 8th power torr at 1200 C, 1500 C, 1630 C, 1800 C, and 2000 C for 100 hours to 2000 hours. Electron beam microprobe analysis was used to characterize the interdiffusion zone width of each couple system as a function of age time and temperature. Each system was least squares fitted to the equation: In (delta X sq/t) = B/T + A, where delta X is net interdiffusion zone width, t is age time, and T is age temperature. Detailed descriptions of experimental and analytical procedures utilized in conducting the experimental program are provided. For Vol. 1, see N74-34046.

  16. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  17. Temperature field analysis in tungsten-copper alloy powder preparation by molten salt electrolysis%熔盐电解制备钨铜合金粉体槽内温场条件分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭; 周才英; 廖春发

    2014-01-01

    在熔盐电解法由Na2WO4和CuO制取钨铜合金粉体的研究基础上,分析电解槽内的温度场分布,特别是电极区域的温度分布情况对电解行为的影响。通过位移法测量,采取比较法分析实验误差,结果表明:电解过程中2个主要的外部条件,即电解槽内温场分布与电场分布是联动的;温度条件影响着电极电位;同时,外部槽电压通过电流扰动槽内温场,使电极区域温场分布不均。%Based on the research of preparing tungsten copper alloy powder from Na 2WO4 and CuO by molten salt electrolysis method, the temperature field distribution of the electrolysis cell and the influence of the electrochemical behavior around temperature distribution nearby the electrode area are analyzed. Temperature is measured by the displacement method and the experimental error is analyzed. The results show that temperature field distribution and electric field distribution in the electrolytic cell interact with each other, and the electrode potential is affected by temperature conditions. In the meanwhile, the external electric field disturbs the temperature field in electrolysis cell to make the uneven distribution of temperature field around electrode area.

  18. 固相烧结低钨含量W-Ni-Fe合金的微观结构与力学性能%Microstructure and mechanical property of W-Ni-Fe alloys with lower tungsten content fabricated by solid state sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐欢; 曹顺华; 陈炳煌; 肖彬; 李世康

    2016-01-01

    采用固相烧结工艺(1300℃保温1 h)制备低钨含量(质量分数为60%~80%)的W-Ni-Fe合金,测定合金的抗拉强度、抗压强度和伸长率,利用金相显微镜观察合金的显微组织,并通过扫描电镜(SEM)观察合金断口形貌,研究钨含量对固相烧结W-Ni-Fe合金力学性能与微观结构的影响。结果表明:随钨含量降低,合金的孔隙率和平均孔径减小,抗拉强度增大,伸长率显著提高,抗压强度变化不大。W含量为60%~80%的W-Ni-Fe合金,其孔隙率为17.8%~21.4%,抗拉强度为231~262 MPa,抗压强度2450~2550 MPa,伸长率为0.3%~2.3%,压拉比为9.45~11.04,都能满足易碎型穿甲弹弹芯材料的性能要求。%W-Ni-Fe alloys with low tungsten content (60%−80%, mass fraction) were prepared by solid state sintering. The mechanical properties including tensile strength, compression strength and elongation of the sample were tested. The microstructure and fracture morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of tungsten content on mechanical properties and microstructure of W-Ni-Fe alloys after solid state sintering were also studied. The results show that, with decreasing tungsten content, the porosity and average pore size of alloys decrease, tensile strength increases, elongation increases significantly, and compression strength changes a little. The W-Ni-Fe alloys with tungsten content in the range of 60%−80% have porosity of 17.8%−21.4%, tensile strength of 231−262 MPa, compressive strength of 2 450−2 550MPa, elongation of 0.3%−2.3%, and the proportion of compressive strength and tensile strength of 9.45−11.04, which all meet the requirements of the fragile armour-piercing projectile.

  19. Homogenous Silver-Tungsten Composite Production for Electrical Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid M. Azhar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver-tungsten composite materials have been widely used as medium duty electrical contacts since they offer the advantages of both refractory tungsten (welding and erosion resistance and silver (efficient electro-thermal conductivities. Since there is no alloying between the two elements (Ag and W, the properties of the composite depends on their composition. So for any particular application, a balance must be struck between the desirable properties of the two metals. Both welding and erosion resistance properties of silver-tungsten contacts depend on particle size, morphology and distribution of both elements within the composite, with finer W particles in Ag matrix give better performance. The main objective of this study is to produce an intimately mixed silver-tungsten powder with homogeneous distribution of both phases (silver and tungsten in the composite. Thus, to produce homogenous elemental silver-tungsten powder, the reduction behavior of each tungstate is studied at various reduction temperatures using TGA technique. Based on the results obtained from TGA, the reduction of silver tungstate carried out in two stage reduction process for producing elemental silver-tungsten powder with controlled particle size of tungsten. Also, small quantities of Fe and Co as sinter aids are introduced into tungstates by co-precipitation technique. However, the precipitated Fe and Co doped silver tungstates are reduced to yield Iron and cobalt doped silver-tungsten powders. The effect of Fe and Co on the morphology and particle size of the tungsten is studied using SEM. The reduced products will be used for subsequent sintering experiments to produce high density sintered compact for contact fabrication.

  20. Yield Properties of Tungsten and Tungsten Heavy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Alexandria, VA 22304-6145’ 2 ATTN: DTIC-FDAC 1 MIAC/ CINDAS , Purdue University, 2595 Yeager Road, West Lafayette, IN 47905 Commander, Army Research...Henry Cialone 1 Dr. Alan Clauer Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 1 ATTN: Mr, William Gurwell 1 Dr. Gordon... Williams 1 Dr. Robert Tuffiaa Ceracon, Inc., 1101 N. Market Boulevard, Suite 9, Sacramento, CA 95834 1 ATTN: Dr. Ramas Raman 1 Mr. Sundeep Rele Southwest

  1. Deuterium blistering in tungsten and tungsten vanadium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arshad, K.; Yuan, Y.; Cheng, L.; Wang, J.; Zhou, Z. J.; De Temmerman, G.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate D blistering behavior in W based plasma facing materials, rolled W and different grades of W-V targets were exposed to high flux of 1.2 × 1024 m−2 s−1, low energy (38 eV) D plasma at two different surface temperatures. The blistering behavior was investigated by means of scannin

  2. Interdiffusion behavior of tungsten or rhenium and group 5 and 6 elements and alloys of the periodic table, part 1. [at dissimilar metal joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Arc cast W, CVD W, CVD Re, and powder metallurgy Re materials were hot isostatically pressure welded to ten different refractory metals and alloys (Cb, Cb-1Zr, Ta, Ta-10W, T-111, ASTAR-811C, W-25Re, Mo-50Re, W-30Re-20Mo, ect.) and thermally aged at 10 to the minus 8th power torr at 1200, 1500, 1630, 1800, and 2000 C for 100 to 2000 hours. Electron beam microprobe analysis was used to characterize the interdiffusion zone width of each couple system as a function of age time and temperature. Extrapolations of interdiffusion zone thickness to 10,000 hours were made. Classic interdiffusion analysis was performed for several of the systems by Boltzmann-Matano analysis. A method of inhibiting Kirkendall voids from forming during thermal ageing of dissimilar metal junctions was devised and experimentally demonstrated. An electron beam weld study of Cb-1Zr to Re and W-25Re demonstrated the limited acceptability of these welds.

  3. The relationship between the microstructure and thermal diffusivity of plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, C. [National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada); Boire-Lavigne, S.; Saint-Jacques, R.G. [INRS-Energie et Materiaux, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Tungsten and tungsten alloy coatings are candidate materials for plasma facing components of divertor plates in future fusion reactors. In normal operation, the sprayed coatings will be submitted to intense heat fluxes and particle bombardment. This work intends to investigate the relationship between the microstructure of plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings and their thermal diffusivity as determined by the laser flash method. The microstructural investigation was carried out on copper-infiltrated coatings. Such a preparation technique permitted the measurement of the total real contact area between the lamellae within the tungsten coatings. The spraying atmosphere was found to strongly influence the interfacial contact between lamellae and coating thermal diffusivity.

  4. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  5. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  6. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  7. AZ31B镁合金薄板的钨极氩弧焊组织与性能研究%Microstructure and Properties of Argon Tungsten Arc Welding Joints of AZ31 B Magnesium Alloy Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜双明; 杨亮

    2011-01-01

    The technical characteristics of argon tungsten arc welding for AZ31B magnesium alloy plates with 2 mm thickness were discussed. The microstructure, phase composition, mechanical properties and fracture morphology of welding joints were investigated using metalloscope, X-ray diffractometer, universal tensile testing machine and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that, at 50 A welding currents, the welded joint can get good weld formation and high welding quality, with no pore and crack inside. The tensile strength of the welded joint gets to 210 Mpa, which is about 87% of the base materials. Fractures occurring in weld zones are ductile-brittle fractures. The microstnicture is fine equiaxed grain in welded zone, which mainly consists of ct-Mg and Mg17Al12. The microstructure of heat affected zones is coarser. The results of hardness test show that the hardness of the weld zone is higher than the base materials.%探讨了2mm厚的AZ31B镁合金钨极交流氩弧焊焊接的工艺特点,利用金相显微镜、X射线衍射仪、万能拉伸试验机、扫描电子显微镜等手段对焊接接头显微组织、焊缝相组成、接头力学性能、断口形貌特征等进行了分析.结果表明:焊接电流为50A时,外观成型良好,焊缝质量高,内部几乎无气孔和裂纹等缺陷,焊接接头的抗拉强度达到210 MPa,约为母材强度的87%,断裂发生在焊缝区,表现为韧-脆混合断裂.焊缝区组织呈细小的等轴晶,主要存在α-Mg和Mg17A112两种相,热影响区组织较粗大.硬度测试结果显示,焊缝区域的硬度高于母材.

  8. The Effectof Underwater Explosion on the Kinetics of Alkaline Leaching of Roasted Tungsten Carbide Scraps for Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    BAIK, Seung Woo; Shibayama, Atsushi; Murata, Kenji; Fujita, Toyohisa

    2004-01-01

    Wasted tungsten scraps are important resources for recycling, however, the mechanical recycle process of tungsten has a difficulty for recycling due to its mechanical strength. Underwater explosion fracturing technique was designed for solving this problem. The kinetics for alkaline leaching of roasted tungsten alloy scraps with different size distribution prepared by two ways of crushing technique has been investigated to evaluate the effect of the underwater explosion-crushing. The merit of...

  9. Effects of alloy composition in alleviating embrittlement problems associated with the tantalum alloy T-111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The causes of aging embrittlement in T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) and the effect of alloy modification were investigated. Results show that T-111 possesses a critical combination of tungsten and hafnium that leads to loss in ductility at -196 C after aging near 1040 C. It was found that this occurs because tungsten enhances hafnium segregation to grain boundaries, which also leads to increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Aging embrittlement was not observed in tantalum alloys with reduced tungsten or hafnium contents; most of the alloys studied have lower strengths than T-111 and exhibit susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement.

  10. AZ31B镁合金TIG焊接件应力腐蚀性能研究%Research on the Properties of Stress Corrosion Cracking for Tungsten Inert-Gas Arc Welded AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛茂忠; 项建云; 张永康

    2013-01-01

    为了研究AZ31B镁合金钨极氩弧焊接件应力腐蚀性能,室温下采用三点加载的方式,在去离子水中对试样进行应力腐蚀试验.利用光学显微镜(OM)观测试样微观结构,利用扫描电镜(SEM)观测应力腐蚀断口,利用X-350A型X射线应力仪和CHI660B型电化学工作站分别测定试样表面残余应力和动电位极化曲线.试验结果表明:采用单面焊双面成型工艺,在45~50 A的焊接电流及合适的焊接速度条件下,焊接2.2 mm厚AZ31B镁合金薄板时,钨极氩弧焊能够获得理想的焊接接头,抗拉强度达到209 MPa;焊接件热影响区表面残余拉应力为60 MPa;同母材相比,焊接件自腐蚀电位减小27 mV,腐蚀电流增大了41.4%,从而增加焊接件腐蚀倾向;AZ31B焊接件在去离子水中浸没192 h后出现应力腐蚀开裂,属于穿晶型脆性断裂,这表明AZ31B镁合金焊接件在去离子水中具有很高的应力腐蚀敏感性.%In order to study the properties of the stress corrosion cracking (SCO for the tungsten inert-gas (TIG) arc welded AZ31B magnesium alloy sheets, the SCC susceptibility of the welded samples was assessed by three points loading method in deionized water at room temperature. The microstructure of specimens and fracture surfaces were analyzed by OM and SEM, respectively. Surface residual stress and potentiodynamic polarization behaviors of the welded samples were examined by using X-ray diffraction technology and a CHI660B electrochemical workstation, respectively. The results show that when TIG arc welding was used to weld AZ31B Mg alloy plates with the thickness of 2. 2 mm by using single-side welding double-side molding process, the ideal welding joints can be obtained at the welding current range from 45 A to 50 A and appropriate welding speed, the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints is 209 Mpa; The residual tensile stress is 60 Mpa in the surface of heat effected zone of the welded joints; corrosion potential

  11. Hydrofluoric-nitric-sulphuric-acid surface treatment of tungsten for carbon fibre-reinforced composite hybrids in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, M.; Johansson, L.-S.; Campbell, J. M.; Revitzer, H.; Sarlin, E.; Brander, T.; Saarela, O.

    2015-02-01

    Hybrid material systems, such as combinations of tungsten foils and carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), are replacing metal alloy concepts in spacecraft enclosures. However, a good adhesion between the tungsten oxide scale and the epoxy resin used is required. Here, the effects of a hydrofluoric-nitric-sulphuric-acid (HFNS) treatment on tungsten oxides and subsequent adhesion to CFRP are analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fracture testing. The work shows that HFNS treatment results in decreased oxygen content, over 50% thinner tungsten trioxide (WO3) layer and increased nano-roughness on thin tungsten foils. Fracture testing established a 39% increase in the average critical strain for tungsten-CFRP specimens after HFNS treatment was carried out on tungsten. The effect of the oxide scale modification regarding the critical strain energy release rate was ΔGc≈ 8.4 J/m2.

  12. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WROUGHT TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanical properties of wrought tungsten vol. II. Creep rupture test data from 1500 to 5000 F, and tensile test data from room temperature to 5000 F at various strain rates for tungsten sheet material.

  13. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickstein, S.S.; Friedman, E.

    1979-10-01

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates.

  14. Behavior of tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten based on single fiber push-out study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jasper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten (W, a tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten-composite material (Wf/W is under development. The composite addresses the brittleness of W by extrinsic toughening through the introduction of energy dissipation mechanisms. These mechanisms allow the reduction of stress peaks and thus improve the materials resistance against crack growth. They do not rely on the intrinsinc material properties such as ductility. By utilizing powder metallurgy (PM one could benefit from available industrialized approaches for composite production and alloying routes. In this contribution the PM method of hot isostatic pressing (HIP is used to produce Wf/W samples containing W fibers coated with an Er2O3 interface. Analysis of the matrix material demonstrates a dense tungsten bulk, a deformed fiber and a deformed, but still intact interface layer. Metallographic analysis reveals indentations of powder particles in the interface, forming a complex 3D structure. Special emphasis is placed on push-out tests of single fiber HIP samples, where a load is applied via a small indenter on the fiber, to test the debonding and frictional properties of the Er2O3 interface region enabling the energy dissipation mechanisms. Together with the obtained experimental results, an axisymmetric finite element model is discussed and compared to existing work. In the HIP Wf/W composites the matrix adhesion is rather large and can dominate the push-out behavior. This is in contrast to the previously tested CVD produced samples.

  15. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J.-H. Pee; G.H. Kim; H.Y. Lee; Y.J. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide...

  16. Thermomechanical Studies of Tungsten Heavy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    background can be found in references [1,2]. A power law expression of the form; o = A (de/dtry (1) describes the dependance between strain rate and stress...in flow stress after the peak is related to the rate of recrystallization [7]. It is also known that the temerature dependance of the critical strain

  17. Carcinogenicity of Embedded Tungsten Alloys in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    been shown to accumulate depleted uranium after chronic ingestion (Dublineau et al. 2006). Inhalation results in the exposure of epithelial cells and...phagocytizing small metal particulates and can concentrate these metals in the phagolysosomal vesicles before exiting through the lymphatic system...method of Kalinich and McClain (2001), Molt-4, a human T-cell leukemia line, and REH, a human B-cell lymphoma line, did not appear to internalize DU

  18. Measurement and Analysis of Density of Molten Ni-W Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XIAO Feng; TAO Zainan; MuKai Kusuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The density of molten Ni-W alloys was measured with a modified pycnometric method. It is found that the density of the molten Ni- W alloys decreases with temperature rising, but increases with the increase of tungsten concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of molten Ni- W binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and tungsten concentration. The partial molar volume of tungsten in liquid Ni- W binary alloy has been calculated approximately as ( - 1.59+ 5.64 × 10-3 T) × 10-6m3 ·mol-1.

  19. Tungsten diffusion in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Van Orman, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion of tungsten has been characterized in synthetic forsterite and natural olivine (Fo90) under dry conditions. The source of diffusant was a mixture of magnesium tungstate and olivine powders. Experiments were prepared by sealing the source material and polished olivine under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers to buffer at NNO or IW. Prepared capsules were annealed in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 45 min to several weeks, at temperatures from 1050 to 1450 °C. Tungsten distributions in the olivine were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation is obtained for W diffusion in forsterite: D=1.0×10-8exp(-365±28 kJ mol/RT) m s Diffusivities for the synthetic forsterite and natural Fe-bearing olivine are similar, and tungsten diffusion in olivine shows little dependence on crystallographic orientation or oxygen fugacity. The slow diffusivities measured for W in olivine indicate that Hf-W ages in olivine-metal systems will close to diffusive exchange at higher temperatures than other chronometers commonly used in cosmochronology, and that tungsten isotopic signatures will be less likely to be reset by subsequent thermal events.

  20. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  1. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  2. Mechanical properties of tantalum-tungsten interlayer between tungsten tile and thimble to prevent helium leak from He-cooled divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Shen, Weiping; Zhou, Yanan; Zhang, Qingling

    2013-03-01

    The tungsten parts made of pure tungsten tile and dispersion strengthened tungsten thimble with 3 mm interlayer of tantalum-tungsten alloy are fabricated by Spark Plasmas Sintering (SPS). The process of SPS is that the temperature is raised to 1700 °C at a rate of 100 °C/min and kept for 3 min, under a constant pressure of 50MPa along the Z-axis. The mechanical properties of the interlayer with different percent of tantalum are measured. The results show that with increasing percent of tantalum, the hardness first increases and then decreases; and as the indentation on the sample is closer to dispersion strengthened tungsten, the value of Vickers hardness is much higher. The Vickers hardness of interlayer is the highest when the content of tantalum is 50% and the indentation is next to dispersion strengthened tungsten. Bending strength drops with increasing content of tantalum, when the content of tantalum is 100% the value of bending strength is the lowest. The fracture toughness is highest as the content of tantalum is 25%, the value is 9.89MPa•m1/2. The toughening tungsten-tantalum interlayer between tungsten tile and thimble would better prevent helium leak from He-cooled divertor for DEMO.

  3. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J. B.; Carvalho, P. A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-09-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  4. Laser deposition of Inconel 625/tungsten carbide composite coatings by powder and wire feedstock

    OpenAIRE

    Abioye, Taiwo E.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing global demand to extend the life span of down-hole drilling tools in order to improve operation effectiveness and efficiency of oil and gas production. Laser cladding of tungsten carbide/Ni-based alloy metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings is currently being utilised for this purpose. However, the effect of tungsten carbide dissolution on the corrosion performance of the MMC coatings has not been completely understood. In this work, a study was carried out in which lase...

  5. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels; Etude et developpement des flux solides en vue d'application en soudage ATIG applique au titane et ses alliages ainsi qu'aux aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, N

    2000-06-15

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  6. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum on hardness of molybdenum. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary molybdenum alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to molybdenum, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons that molybdenum failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and molybdenum.

  7. Mineral resource of the month: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on tungsten. It says that tungsten is a metal found in chemical compounds such as in the scheelite and ore minerals wolframite. It states that tungsten has the highest melting point and it forms a compound as hard as diamond when combined with carbon. It states that tungsten can be used as a substitute for lead in fishing weights, ammunition, and hunting shot. Moreover, China started to export tungsten materials and products instead of tungsten raw materials.

  8. Boron - Molybdenum - Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Marina; Heulens, Jeroen

    This document is part of Volume 11 `Ternary Alloy Systems: Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data', Subvolume E `Refractory Metal Systems', of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV `Physical Chemistry'.

  9. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  10. NAK80模具钢表面激光熔覆Ni基碳化钨合金涂层的组织和性能%Microstructure and Properties of Laser Cladding Ni-based Tungsten Carbide Alloy Coating on NAK80 Mold Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程虎; 方志刚; 赵先锐; 戴晟; 高玉新

    2011-01-01

    The Ni-based tungsten carbide alloy coating was fabricated on NAK80 mold steel by laser cladding technology. The characteristic of microstructure, micro-hardness and the formation mechanics were examined. The resuits show that the metallurgical bonding is good between the cladding coating and the steel substrate, the microstructure of laser cladding coating is composed of fir-tree crystal Cr23C6, un-melted tungsten carbide granular crystal, y-Ni solid solution and NiCr, CrB2. The micro-hardness of laser cladding coating is considerably higher than the substrate, so the wear-resisting property of mold surface is improved to some extent.%采用激光熔覆技术,在NAK80模具钢表面制备了Ni基碳化钨合金涂层.研究了激光熔覆涂层的组织结构特点及形成规律,测试分析了其显微硬度的分布特征.结果表明:涂层与基体之间呈良好冶金结合,熔覆层组织主要由树枝晶CrC、未熔碳化钨颗粒相、γ-Ni固溶体及少量分布于固溶体中的NiCr和CrB相组成;涂层的硬度远高于NAK80模具钢基体,从一定程度上改善了模具表面的耐磨性能.

  11. Assessing tungsten transport in the vadose zone: from dissolution studies to soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Gulsah Sen; Braida, Washington; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Strickland, David

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates the dissolution, sorption, leachability, and plant uptake of tungsten and alloying metals from canister round munitions in the presence of model, well characterized soils. The source of tungsten was canister round munitions, composed mainly of tungsten (95%) with iron and nickel making up the remaining fraction. Three soils were chosen for the lysimeter studies while four model soils were selected for the adsorption studies. Lysimeter soils were representatives of the typical range of soils across the continental USA; muck-peat, clay-loamy and sandy-quartzose soil. Adsorption equilibrium data on the four model soils were modeled with Langmuir and linear isotherms and the model parameters were obtained. The adsorption affinity of soils for tungsten follows the order: Pahokee peat>kaolinite>montmorillonite>illite. A canister round munition dissolution study was also performed. After 24 d, the measured dissolved concentrations were: 61.97, 3.56, 15.83 mg L(-1) for tungsten, iron and nickel, respectively. Lysimeter transport studies show muck peat and sandy quartzose soils having higher tungsten concentration, up to 150 mg kg(-1) in the upper layers of the lysimeters and a sharp decline with depth suggesting strong retardation processes along the soil profile. The concentrations of tungsten, iron and nickel in soil lysimeter effluents were very low in terms of posing any environmental concern; although no regulatory limits have been established for tungsten in natural waters. The substantial uptake of tungsten and nickel by ryegrass after 120 d of exposure to soils containing canister round munition suggests the possibility of tungsten and nickel entering the food chain.

  12. Determination of cobalt, nickel, iron, niobium, tantalum, vanadium and chrome in tungsten-based hard alloy by microwave digestion-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry%微波消解-电感耦合等离子体原子发射光谱法测定钨基硬质合金中钴镍铁铌钽钒铬

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成勇; 彭慧仙; 袁金红; 胡金荣

    2013-01-01

    以硝酸和磷酸(V(HNO3)∶V(H3PO4)=5∶1)作为消解试剂,采取高压密闭微波加热方法对钨钴或钨镍类钨基硬质合金样品进行消解,消解液用水定容后直接以电感耦合等离子体原子发射光谱法(ICP-AES)测定0.005%~10% Co、Ni和0.005%~1% Fe、Nb、Ta、V、Cr、Mo的含量.考察了消解试剂中的硝酸和磷酸量对试样消解的影响以及微波控制参数等最佳消解条件,建立了微波消解-无机试剂络合基体钨的样品消解方法,从而避免了因钨酸沉淀析出而导致部分待测元素损失和使用有机络合剂对光谱测定的干扰影响.实验结果表明:采用以5 min升温至130℃并保持5 min,再以5 min升温至190℃并保持15 min的消解程序,样品的消解效果较好.试验通过优选元素分析谱线,基体匹配和同步背景校正法消除了高钨基体的影响和光谱干扰,确保了方法的可靠性.背景等效浓度值从5 μg/L (Nb)至18 μg/L(Fc),元素检出限从4 μg/L (Nb)至13 μg/L (Fe).方法用于钨基硬质合金样品中上述合金或杂质元素的测定,RSD<3%,加标回收率在97%~104%之间,测定结果与国家标准方法检测结果对照一致.%The tungsten-based hard alloy samples (such as tungsten-cobalt and tungsten-nickel) were digested by high pressure closed microwave heating method using nitric acid-phosphoric acid (V(HNO3) : V(H3PO4)=5 :1) as digestion reagent. After dilution with water, the content of Co, Ni (0.005%-10%), Fe, Nb, Ta, V, Cr and Mo (0. 005%-l%) in digestion solution was directly determined by microwave digestion-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The effect of nitric acid and phosphoric acid concentration on sample digestion was investigated. The optimal digestion conditions such as microwave control parameters were studied. The sample digestion method by microwave digestion was established. The matrix tungsten was complexed with inorganic reagents

  13. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service. [ 74 FR 16143, Apr. 9,...

  14. Iron binary and ternary coatings with molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, Gulmira, E-mail: gulmira-alma-ata@mail.ru [Institute Experimental and Theoretical Physics Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 050038, Al-Farabi av., 71, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ved, Maryna; Sakhnenko, Nikolay; Karakurkchi, Anna; Yermolenko, Iryna [National Technical University “Kharkov Polytechnic Institute”, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • High quality coatings of double Fe-Mo and ternary Fe-Mo-W electrolytic alloys can be produced both in a dc and a pulsed mode. • Application of unipolar pulsed current allows receiving an increased content of the alloying components and their more uniform distribution over the surface. • It is established that Fe-Mo and Fe-Mo-W coatings have an amorphous structure and exhibit improved corrosion resistance and microhardness as compared with the steel substrate due to the inclusion molybdenum and tungsten. - Abstract: Electrodeposition of Fe-Mo-W and Fe-Mo layers from a citrate solution containing iron(III) on steel and iron substrates is compared. The utilization of iron(III) compounds significantly improved the electrolyte stability eliminating side anodic redox reactions. The influence of concentration ratios and electrodeposition mode on quality, chemical composition, and functional properties of the alloys is determined. It has been found that alloys deposited in pulse mode have more uniform surface morphology and chemical composition and contain less impurities. Improvement in physical and mechanical properties as well as corrosion resistance of Fe-Mo and Fe-Mo-W deposits when compared with main alloy forming metals is driven by alloying components chemical passivity as well as by alloys amorphous structure. Indicated deposits can be considered promising materials in surface hardening technologies and repair of worn out items.

  15. Tungsten carbide promoted Pd and Pd-Co electrocatalysts for formic acid electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Huang, Yunjie; Cleemann, Lars N.; Bjerrum, Niels J.; Xing, Wei

    2012-12-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) promoted palladium (Pd) and palladium-cobalt (Pd-Co) nanocatalysts are prepared and characterized for formic acid electrooxidation. The WC as the dopant to carbon supports is found to enhance the CO tolerance and promote the activity of the Pd-based catalysts for formic acid oxidation. Alloying of Pd with Co further improves the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the WC supported catalysts, attributable to a synergistic effect of the carbide support and PdCo alloy nanoparticles.

  16. Simulation on the deformation and fracture of long-rod projectile of tungsten alloy penetrating into 45# steel%钨合金杆式弹侵彻45#钢变形失效行为的数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王猛; 黄德武; 曲家惠; 荣光

    2012-01-01

    高速撞击条件下,弹、靶材料的变形失效机制是穿甲侵彻机理研究的重要内容,利用ANSYS/LS-DYNA动力学程序对钨合金杆式弹侵彻45#钢板进行数值模拟.结果表明,撞击瞬间,强压缩冲击波沿弹芯和靶板的撞击接触面分别向弹芯和靶板内部传递,波后的等效应力超过材料的强度极限,因而发生剧烈塑性变形甚至破碎.侵彻过程中,钨合金弹芯前端3mm~4mm处热软化效应显著,应力强度发生塌陷,导致塑性变形流动而形成“蘑菇头”.45#钢的破坏方式主要是延性扩孔,对应弹、靶材料的塑性变形较均匀,整个侵彻不发生绝热剪切局部化行为.%The deformation and fracture behaviour of projectile penetrating into target act the major role in armour-piercing mechanism. ANSYS/LS-DYNA explicit dynamic program was employed to simulate the interaction of long-rod penetrator of tungsten alloy impacting at 45# steel target It shows that two compressive shock waves are induced and transmit along opposite directions from the contact interface. The value of equivalent stress increased rapidly over the stress limit causes severe plastic deformation even fracture at the contact interface. For thermal softening resulted from such severe plastic deformation, plastic flow is induced and finally "mushroom head" is formed at the region 3mm~4mm in front of the head of the tungsten alloy penetrator. For the 45 # steel, the form of perforating fracture is mainly ductile hole expanding, the plastic deformation is more uniform and no adia-batic shear localization occurs during penetratioa

  17. Deposition and Coating Properties on CVD Tungsten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ji-hong; LI Zheng-xiang; LIU Gao-jian; ZHOU Hui-Huang; CHUN liang

    2004-01-01

    Surface characterization and microstructure studies are performed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten coating. There is about 2 μm thickness diffusion layer of tungsten in the molybdenum substrate. The thermal shock test shows tungsten coating has good adhesion with molybdenum substrate, but the elements of oxygen and carbon in the tungsten coating have the bad affection to the adhesion. The result of high-temperature diffusion experiment is the diffusion rate from molybdenum substrate to tungsten coating is faster.

  18. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  19. Studies on yttrium-containing smart alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Felix; Wegener, Tobias; Litnovsky, Andrey; Rasinski, Marcin; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany); Mayer, Joachim [Ernst Ruska-Centrum, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Tungsten is the main candidate as plasma-facing armour material for future fusion reactors, like DEMO. Advantages of tungsten include high melting point, high thermal conductivity, low tritium retention, and low erosion yield. A problem is oxide volatilisation under accidental conditions where the temperature of the first wall can reach 1200 K to 1450 K and air ingress occurs. Therefore smart tungsten alloys are developed. Smart alloys are supposed to preserve properties of tungsten during plasma operation coupled with suppressed tungsten oxide formation in case of an accident. Lab-scale tungsten-chromium-yttrium (W-Cr-Y) samples prepared by magnetron sputtering are used as model system. The mechanisms of oxidation and its dynamics are studied using a thermogravimetric system, focussed ion beam, and electron microscopy. A composition scan was conducted: The new material composition featuring W, ∝ 12 wt.% Cr, ∝ 0.3 wt.% Y showed strongest suppression of oxidation, no pores, and least internal oxidation. At 1273 K in argon-oxygen atmosphere an oxidation rate of 3 . 10{sup -6} mg{sup 2}cm{sup -4}s{sup -1} was measured. At 1473 K ternary W-Cr-Y alloys suppressed evaporation up to 20 min while for W-Cr evaporation was already evident after 5 min. Comparison of passivation in dry and humid atmosphere, at temperatures of 1073 K to 1473 K is performed.

  20. Tungsten resources of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Max Gregg

    1974-01-01

    Brazilian tungsten production, 85 percent of which is exported, comes almost entirely from scheelite-bearing tactites in northeast Brazil, and has reached an annual rate of about 2,000 metric tons (2,200 short tons) of scheelite concentrate with 70 percent WO3. Scheelite ore reserves, located principally in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, are estimated to be as high as 8,300,000 tons (9,100,000 short tons) containing 0.7 percent WO3. Minor deposits (or those about which only minimal information is available) of wolframite, with which some cassiterite is associated, are located in Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul. Both the scheelite and the wolframite deposits are considered . to be late Precambrian A (620 to 900 m.y.) or early Cambrian in age.

  1. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  2. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  3. Global Tungsten Demand and Supply Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořáček, Jaroslav; Sousedíková, Radmila; Vrátný, Tomáš; Jureková, Zdenka

    2017-03-01

    An estimate of the world tungsten demand and supply until 2018 has been made. The figures were obtained by extrapolating from past trends of tungsten production from1905, and its demand from 1964. In addition, estimate suggestions of major production and investment companies were taken into account with regard to implementations of new projects for mining of tungsten or possible termination of its standing extraction. It can be assumed that tungsten supply will match demand by 2018. This suggestion is conditioned by successful implementation of new tungsten extraction projects, and full application of tungsten recycling methods.

  4. Preparation and characterization of electroplated amorphous gold-nickel alloy film for electrical contact applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togasaki, Norihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Okinaka, Yutaka [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Homma, Takayuki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Osaka, Tetsuya [Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan and Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: osakatet@waseda.jp

    2005-11-10

    A process for electroplating amorphous gold-nickel alloy with the atomic ratio of unity was developed. The plating bath was prepared by adding potassium cyanoaurate(I) into a known plating bath which produces amorphous nickel-tungsten alloy. At a sufficiently high gold concentration, the alloy deposit did not contain any tungsten. The amorphous nature of the Au-Ni alloy produced in the new bath was confirmed by using TEM and THEED. Hardness, resistivity, and contact resistance of this new alloy were determined, and the results are discussed for applications as an electrical contact material.

  5. China’s Tungsten Resources Supply and Demand Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>China’s production of tungsten products mainly includes tungsten ore concentrates and a series of intermediate tungsten products such as ferro-tungsten, tungstic acid, sodium tungstate, calcium tungstate, tungsten trioxide, tungsten blue oxide, ammonium paratungstate, ammonium metatungstate, tungsten powder etc. During the period between 1949-1997, China produced 1.85 million tons of tungsten ore concentrates, in which 873,000 tons were exported with US$3.1 billion in value.

  6. Further development of the tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietl, Hanns; Hoeschen, Till; Riesch, Johann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumann, Martin; Coenen, Jan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Huber, Philipp [Lehrstuhl fuer Textilmaschinenbau und Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the use in a fusion device tungsten has a unique property combination. The brittleness below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the embrittlement during operation e.g. by overheating, neutron irradiation are the main drawbacks for the use of pure tungsten. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites utilize extrinsic mechanisms to improve the toughness. After proofing that this idea works in principle the next step is the conceptual proof for the applicability in fusion reactors. This will be done by producing mock-ups and testing them in cyclic high heat load tests. For this step all constituents of the composite, which are fibre, matrix and interface, and all process steps need to be investigated. Tungsten fibres are investigated by means of tension tests to find the optimum diameter and pretreatment. New interface concepts are investigated to meet the requirements in a fusion reactor, e.g. high thermal conductivity, low activation. In addition weaving processes are evaluated for their use in the fibre preform production. This development is accompanied by an extensive investigation of the materials properties e.g. single fibre tension tests.

  7. The effects of tantalum addition on the microtexture and mechanical behaviour of tungsten for ITER applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejado, E., E-mail: elena.tejado@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CIME, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Carvalho, P.A. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Munoz, A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III, Leganés (Spain); Dias, M. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2015-12-15

    Tungsten (W) and its alloys are very promising materials for producing plasma-facing components (PFCs) in the fusion power reactors of the near future, even as a structural part in them. However, whereas the properties of pure tungsten are suitable for a PFC, its structural applications are still limited due to its low toughness, ductile to brittle transition temperature and recrystallization behaviour. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve its performance by alloying tungsten with other elements. Hence, in this investigation, the thermo-mechanical performance of two new tungsten-tantalum materials has been evaluated. Materials with W–5wt.%Ta and W–15wt.%Ta were processed by mechanical alloying (MA) and later consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), with distinct settings for each composition. Thus, it was possible to determine the relationship between the microstructure and the addition of Ta with the macroscopic mechanical properties. These were measured by means of hardness, flexural strength and fracture toughness, in the temperature range of 300–1473 K. The microstructure and the fracture surfaces features of the tested materials were analysed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

  8. The effects of tantalum addition on the microtexture and mechanical behaviour of tungsten for ITER applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejado, E.; Carvalho, P. A.; Munoz, A.; Dias, M.; Correia, J. B.; Mardolcar, U. V.; Pastor, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and its alloys are very promising materials for producing plasma-facing components (PFCs) in the fusion power reactors of the near future, even as a structural part in them. However, whereas the properties of pure tungsten are suitable for a PFC, its structural applications are still limited due to its low toughness, ductile to brittle transition temperature and recrystallization behaviour. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve its performance by alloying tungsten with other elements. Hence, in this investigation, the thermo-mechanical performance of two new tungsten-tantalum materials has been evaluated. Materials with W-5wt.%Ta and W-15wt.%Ta were processed by mechanical alloying (MA) and later consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), with distinct settings for each composition. Thus, it was possible to determine the relationship between the microstructure and the addition of Ta with the macroscopic mechanical properties. These were measured by means of hardness, flexural strength and fracture toughness, in the temperature range of 300-1473 K. The microstructure and the fracture surfaces features of the tested materials were analysed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

  9. Characterization of exposures among cemented tungsten carbide workers. Part I: Size-fractionated exposures to airborne cobalt and tungsten particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2009-07-01

    As many as 30,000 workers in the United States of America are exposed to cemented tungsten carbides (CTC), alloys composed primarily of tungsten carbide and cobalt, which are used in cutting tools. Inhalation of cobalt-containing particles may be sufficient for the development of occupational asthma, whereas tungsten carbide particles in association with cobalt particles are associated with the development of hard metal disease (HMD) and lung cancer. Historical epidemiology and exposure studies of CTC workers often rely only on measures of total airborne cobalt mass concentration. In this study, we characterized cobalt- and tungsten-containing aerosols generated during the production of CTC with emphasis on (1) aerosol "total" mass (n=252 closed-face 37 mm cassette samples) and particle size-selective mass concentrations (n=108 eight-stage cascade impactor samples); (2) particle size distributions; and (3) comparison of exposures obtained using personal cassette and impactor samplers. Total cobalt and tungsten exposures were highest in work areas that handled powders (e.g., powder mixing) and lowest in areas that handled finished product (e.g., grinding). Inhalable, thoracic, and respirable cobalt and tungsten exposures were observed in all work areas, indicating potential for co-exposures to particles capable of getting deposited in the upper airways and alveolar region of the lung. Understanding the risk of CTC-induced adverse health effects may require two exposure regimes: one for asthma and the other for HMD and lung cancer. All sizes of cobalt-containing particles that deposit in the lung and airways have potential to cause asthma, thus a thoracic exposure metric is likely biologically appropriate. Cobalt-tungsten mixtures that deposit in the alveolar region of the lung may potentially cause HMD and lung cancer, thus a respirable exposure metric for both metals is likely biologically appropriate. By characterizing size-selective and co-exposures as well as

  10. Factors affecting miniature Izod impact strength of tungsten-fiber-metal-matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsa, E. A.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The miniature Izod and Charpy impact strengths of copper, copper-nickel, and nickel-base superalloy uniaxially reinforced with continuous tungsten fibers were studied. In most cases, impact strength was increased by increasing fiber or matrix toughness, decreasing fibermatrix reaction, increasing test temperature, hot working, or heat treating. Notch sensitivity was reduced by increasing fiber content or matrix toughness. An equation relating impact strength to fiber and matrix properties and fiber content was developed. Program results imply that tungsten alloy-fiber/superalloy matrix composites can be made with adequate impact resistance for turbine blade or vane applications.

  11. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.; Bol, E.; Krijgen, G.; Wolterbeek, H.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native–native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t1/2 = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mM, of

  12. The tungsten metallome of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Bol, E.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The tungsten metallome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated using electroanalytical metal analysis and native-native 2D-PAGE with the radioactive tungsten isotope W-187 (t(1/2) = 23.9 h). P. furiosus cells have an intracellular tungsten concentration of 29 mu M

  13. Tungsten:Balance between Demand and Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2011,the tungsten market remained basically consistent with macro economic trends. In the first half of 2011, under the backdrop of upward economic situation,tungsten export and domestic consumption grew significantly and tungsten enterprises achieved remarkable economic benefits. However, as European debt crisis deepened in the second half of 2011, the global economic growth slowed down and

  14. Tungsten:Value Regression Is Inevitable Trend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>China boasts rich reserve of tungsten resources,which accounts for about 65% of proved global tungsten mineral resource reserve,ranking top in the world.Judging from global production in the past five years,China’s tungsten production also far outstrips those of other countries,about

  15. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Bioaccumulation of Tungsten in Plants Natural Sources • Trees & shrubs in Rocky Mountain region, USA • Siberian pine, willows, mosses & lichen in tungsten...Transitional metal ion binding • Peptidase activity • DNA & protein binding BUILDING STRONG® Geochemistry: • Aging of tungsten in soil results in

  16. MICROSTRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF INTERFACIAL LAYER WITH TUNGSTEN INERT GAS WELDING-BRAZING JOINT OF ALUMINUM ALLOY/STAINLESS STEEL%铝合金/不锈钢钨极氩弧熔-钎焊接头界面层的微观结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林三宝; 宋建岭; 杨春利; 马广超

    2009-01-01

    Against the background of the required weight reduction in transportation through lightweight construction, the application of hybrid structures, where aluminum alloy and steel are jointed together, has a high technical and economical potential. But jointing of material combinations of aluminum alloy and steel is problematic by fusion welding since brittle intermetallic compounds (IMCs) are formed between aluminum alloy and steel. Nowadays, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding-brazing offers a great potential for aluminum alloy and steel jointing. In this process, the sheet and filler metal are heated or melted by TIG heat, and the joint has a dual characteristic: in aluminum alloy side it is a welding joint, while in steel side it is a brazing joint. However, in the dynamic heating process, the heating temperature changes so quickly and the reaction time between the liquid filler metal and solid steel is so short that it is more difficult to control the IMC layer's growth, predominantly its thickness and microstructures. Most of past reports about the brazing of aluminum alloy and steel indicate Al-Fe binary IMC layers, e.g., Fe_2Al_5 and FeAl_3, formed in the brazing joint, which are detrimental to the mechanical properties of the joint. Si additions are used to limit the growth of the brittle Al-Fe IMC layer between aluminum alloy and steel by replacing Al-Fe phases with less detrimental Al-Fe-Si phases in aluminizing and furnace brazing of aluminum alloy and steel. By now, there have been few reports of investigating the interfacial layer of TIG welding-brazing joint of aluminum alloy and stainless steel. In this paper, a butt TIG welding-brazing joint of aluminum alloy/stainless steel was formed using Al-Si eutectic filler wire with modified Noclock flux precoated on a steel surface. The microstructure characteristics of the welded seam-steel interfacial layer were analyzed by OM, SEM and EDS and its mechanical properties were measured by dynamic ultra

  17. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  18. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  19. Many-body central force potentials for tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Bakaev, A.; Grigorev, P.; Van Neck, D.

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten and tungsten-based alloys are the primary candidate materials for plasma facing components in fusion reactors. The exposure to high-energy radiation, however, severely degrades the performance and lifetime limits of the in-vessel components. In an effort to better understand the mechanisms driving the materials' degradation at the atomic level, large-scale atomistic simulations are performed to complement experimental investigations. At the core of such simulations lies the interatomic potential, on which all subsequent results hinge. In this work we review 19 central force many-body potentials and benchmark their performance against experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. As basic features we consider the relative lattice stability, elastic constants and point-defect properties. In addition, we also investigate extended lattice defects, namely: free surfaces, symmetric tilt grain boundaries, the 1/2{1 1 0} and 1/2 {1 1 2} stacking fault energy profiles and the 1/2 screw dislocation core. We also provide the Peierls stress for the 1/2 edge and screw dislocations as well as the glide path of the latter at zero Kelvin. The presented results serve as an initial guide and reference list for both the modelling of atomically-driven phenomena in bcc tungsten, and the further development of its potentials.

  20. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  1. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  2. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  3. Thermal response of nanostructured tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajita, Shin; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, Thomas; van Eden, Stein; de Kruif, Thijs; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal response of nanostructured tungsten, which was fabricated in the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II, was investigated using pulsed plasma in the MAGNUM-PSI device and by using high powered laser pulses. The temperature evolution in response to the pulses was measured with an infrared fa

  4. Mineral of the month: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals, one of the highest densities and, when combined with carbon, is almost as hard as diamond. These and other properties make it useful in a wide variety of important commercial, industrial and military applications.

  5. Tungsten biochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten is the heaviest element that exhibits biological activity (atomic number 74), when it is present in an enzyme. It is taken up by cells in the form of tungstate, and it is subsequently processed into an organic cofactor referred to as tungstopterin, which is found as active center in several

  6. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  7. Hydrofluoric–nitric–sulphuric-acid surface treatment of tungsten for carbon fibre-reinforced composite hybrids in space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanerva, M., E-mail: Mikko.Kanerva@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Applied Mechanics, P.O.B. 14300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Johansson, L.-S.; Campbell, J.M. [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, P.O.B. 16300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Revitzer, H. [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, P.O.B. 16300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Sarlin, E. [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O.B. 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Brander, T.; Saarela, O. [Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Applied Mechanics, P.O.B. 14300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • XPS and AFM analysis of the effect of hydrofluoric–nitric–sulphuric-acid on tungsten. • Dreiling's model established 54.4% thinning of WO{sub 3} due to 67 s treatment. • Strain energy release rate increased ≈8.4 J/m{sup 2} at the interface. • Failure loci analysis expressed the oxide and carbon fibre surfaces as weak points. - Abstract: Hybrid material systems, such as combinations of tungsten foils and carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), are replacing metal alloy concepts in spacecraft enclosures. However, a good adhesion between the tungsten oxide scale and the epoxy resin used is required. Here, the effects of a hydrofluoric–nitric–sulphuric-acid (HFNS) treatment on tungsten oxides and subsequent adhesion to CFRP are analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fracture testing. The work shows that HFNS treatment results in decreased oxygen content, over 50% thinner tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) layer and increased nano-roughness on thin tungsten foils. Fracture testing established a 39% increase in the average critical strain for tungsten–CFRP specimens after HFNS treatment was carried out on tungsten. The effect of the oxide scale modification regarding the critical strain energy release rate was ΔG{sub c}≈ 8.4 J/m{sup 2}.

  8. Tungsten- and cobalt-dominated heavy metal contamination of mangrove sediments in Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songjun; Lin, Chuxia; Qiu, Penghua; Song, Yan; Yang, Wenhuai; Xu, Guanchang; Feng, Xiaodan; Yang, Qian; Yang, Xiu; Niu, Anyi

    2015-11-15

    A baseline investigation into heavy metal status in the mangrove sediments was conducted in Shenzhen, China where rapid urban development has caused severe environmental contamination. It is found that heavy metal contamination in this mangrove wetland is characterized by the dominant presence of tungsten and cobalt, which is markedly different from the neighboring Hong Kong and other parts of the world. The vertical variation pattern of these two metals along the sediment profile differed from other heavy metals, suggesting an increasing influx of tungsten and cobalt into the investigated mangrove habitat, as a result of uncontrolled discharge of industrial wastewater from factories that produce or use chemical compounds or alloys containing these two heavy metals. Laboratory simulation experiment indicated that seawater had a stronger capacity to mobilize sediment-borne tungsten and cobalt, as compared to deionized water, diluted acetic, sulfuric and nitric acids.

  9. Optimizing the Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Balasubramanian; V. Jayabalan; V. Balasubramanian

    2006-01-01

    The selection of process parameter in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of titanium alloy was presented for obtaining optimum grain size and hardness. Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) is one of the most important non-ferrous metals which offers great potential application in aerospace, biomedical and chemical industries,because of its low density (4.5 g/cm3), excellent corrosion resistance, high strength, attractive fracture behaviour and high melting point (1678℃). The preferred welding process for titanium alloy is frequent GTA welding due to its comparatively easier applicability and better economy. In the case of single pass (GTA)welding of thinner section of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. Many considerations come into the picture and one needs to carefully balance various pulse current parameters to reach an optimum combination. Four factors, five level, central composite, rotatable design matrix were used to optimize the required number of experimental conditions. Mathematical models were developed to predict the fusion zone grain size using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. The developed models were optimized using the traditional Hooke and Jeeve's algorithm. Experimental results were provided to illustrate the proposed approach.

  10. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  11. Clustering of transmutation elements tantalum, rhenium and osmium in tungsten in a fusion environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-08-01

    The formation of transmutation solute-rich precipitates has been reported to seriously degrade the mechanical properties of tungsten in a fusion environment. However, the underlying mechanisms controlling the formation of the precipitates are still unknown. In this study, first-principles calculations are therefore performed to systemically determine the stable structures and binding energies of solute clusters in tungsten consisting of tantalum, rhenium and osmium atoms as well as irradiation-induced vacancies. These clusters are known to act as precursors for the formation of precipitates. We find that osmium can easily segregate to form clusters even in defect-free tungsten alloys, whereas extremely high tantalum and rhenium concentrations are required for the formation of clusters. Vacancies greatly facilitate the clustering of rhenium and osmium, while tantalum is an exception. The binding energies of vacancy-osmium clusters are found to be much higher than those of vacancy-tantalum and vacancy-rhenium clusters. Osmium is observed to strongly promote the formation of vacancy-rhenium clusters, while tantalum can suppress the formation of vacancy-rhenium and vacancy-osmium clusters. The local strain and electronic structure are analyzed to reveal the underlying mechanisms governing the cluster formation. Employing the law of mass action, we predict the evolution of the relative concentration of vacancy-rhenium clusters. This work presents a microscopic picture describing the nucleation and growth of solute clusters in tungsten alloys in a fusion reactor environment, and thereby explains recent experimental phenomena.

  12. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam welding of AA5083-H321

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Subbaiah; M Geetha; B Shanmugarajan; S R Koteswara Rao

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the size of the fusion zone and heat affected zone compared to tungsten inert gas welding process. High speed LB welding and fast heating and cooling of LB welding process hinders grain growth compared to TIG welding process. The effect of vapourization of volatile alloying elements is also considered. It seems that magnesium evaporation is relatively less in LB welding compared to TIG welding. Tensile testing of the welded joints revealed that LB welding results in superior mechanical properties. It is concluded that LB welding process is more suitable to join AA5083-H321.

  13. Development of feedstock of tungsten-nickel-iron- polyformaldehyde for MIM technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, D. V.; Parkhomenko, A. V.; Amosov, A. P.; Samboruk, A. R.; Chemashkin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The article presents the results of the research and development of technology and formulation of the feedstock from domestic metal powders and polymers to fabricate complexshaped components from heavy alloy of VNZh 7-3 brand (90 wt. % tungsten - 7% nickel - 3% iron) by Metal Injection Molding (MIM technology). The metal part of the feedstock is composed of powders of tungsten, nickel and iron, and the polymer part is composed of polyformaldehyde with the addition of low-density polyethylene and beeswax. The modes of mixing the components and the influence of the composition of the feedstock on the melt flow rate and the homogeneity of the feedstock were investigated. The optimal formulation of the feedstock was determined. Microstructure, density and hardness of control samples fabricated by MIM technology from the developed feedstock, correspond to, and in some respects are superior to the samples of VNZh 7-3 alloy fabricated by technology of traditional powder metallurgy.

  14. Hardness behavior of binary and ternary niobium alloys at 77 and 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of alloy additions of zirconium, hafnium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, ruthenium, osmium, rhodium, and iridium on the hardness of niobium was determined. Both binary and ternary alloys were investigated by means of hardness tests at 77 K and 300 K. Results showed that atomic size misfit plays a dominant role in controlling hardness of binary niobium alloys. Alloy softening, which occurred at dilute solute additions, is most likely due to an extrinsic mechanism involving interaction between solute elements and interstitial impurities.

  15. Laser cleaning of tungsten ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Aniruddha, E-mail: nontee65@rediffmail.com [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, Maharashtra, 401504 (India); Sonar, V.R.; Das, D.K.; Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd.; Kumar, Arun [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, Maharashtra, 401504 (India); Nilaya, J.P.; Biswas, D.J. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, 400085 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Removal of a thin oxide layer from a tungsten ribbon was achieved using the fundamental, second and third harmonic radiation from a Q- switched Nd-YAG laser. It was found that beyond the threshold, oxide removal was achieved at all wavelengths for a wide range of fluence values. The removal mechanism of the oxide layer was found to be critically dependent on both wavelength and fluence of the incident radiation and has been identified as ejection or sublimation. The un-cleaned and cleaned surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Laser cleaned tungsten ribbons were used in a thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS) to determine isotopic composition of Neodymium atoms.

  16. Synthesis of nanosized tungsten powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Nanosized tungsten powder was synthesized by means of different methods and under different conditions with nanosized WO3 powder. The powder and the intermediate products were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM, BET (Brunauer Emmett Teller Procedure) and SAXS (X-ray diffracto-spectrometer/Kratky small angle scattering goniometer). The results show that nanosized WO3 can be completely reduced to WO2 at 600℃ after 40 min, and WO2 can be reduced to W at 700℃ after 90 min, moreover, the mean size of W particles is less than 40 nm. Furthermore, the process of WO3→WO2→W excelled that of WO3→W in getting stable nanosized tungsten powder with less grain size.

  17. Does speciation matter for tungsten ecotoxicology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigul, Nikolay

    2010-09-01

    Tungsten is a widely used transition metal that has not been thoroughly investigated with regards to its ecotoxicological effects. Tungsten anions polymerize in environmental systems as well as under physiological conditions in living organisms. These polymerization/condensation reactions result in the development of several types of stable polyoxoanions. Certain chemical properties (in particular redox and acidic properties) differentiate these polyanions from monotungstates. However, our current state of knowledge on tungsten toxicology, biological and environmental effects is based entirely on experiments where monotungstates were used and assumed by the authors to be the form of tungsten that was present and that produced the observed effect. Recent discoveries indicate that tungsten speciation may be important to ecotoxicology. New results obtained by different research groups demonstrate that polytungstates develop and persist in environmental systems, and that polyoxotungstates are much more toxic than monotungstates. This paper reviews the available toxicological information from the standpoint of tungsten speciation and identifies knowledge gaps and pertinent future research directions.

  18. Crack Free Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Ni(Cr) Layers obtained by Laser Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Amado Paz, José Manuel; Tobar Vidal, María José; YAÑEZ CASAL, ARMANDO JOSE; Amigó Borrás, Vicente; Candel Bou, Juan Jose

    2011-01-01

    The development of hardfacing coatings has become technologically significant in many industries A common approach is the production of metal matrix composites (MMC) layers. In this work NiCr-WC MMC hardfacing layers are deposited on C25 steel by means of laser cladding. Spheroidal fused tungsten carbides is used as reinforcement phase. Three different NiCr alloys with different Cr content were tested. Optimum conditions to obtain dense, uniform carbide distribution and hardness close to nomi...

  19. Influence of tungsten and titanium on the structure of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the as-cast state structure of chromium cast iron designed for operation under harsh impact-abrasive conditions. In the process of chromium iron castings manufacture, very strong influence on the structure of this material have the parameters of the technological process. Among others, adding to the Fe-Cr-C alloy the alloying elements like tungsten and titanium leads to the formation of additional carbides in the structure of this cast iron, which may favourably affect the casting properties, including the resistance to abrasive wear.

  20. Fine grain tungsten produced with nanoscale powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Lin; Fang Zhao; Liying Zhang; Chengyi Wu; Zhimeng Guo

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale tungsten powder was prepared by reducing nanoscale tungsten trioxide in hydrogen to WO2.90 and further to W powder. After compacted with a rubber die, the nanoscale tungsten powder was sintered in a high-temperature dilatometer to investigate its shrinkage process. The results show that the compact of the nanoscale tungsten powder starts to shrink at 1050℃ and ends at 1500℃. The shrinkage rate reaches the maximum value at 1210℃. The relative density of sintered samples is 96.4%, and its grain size is about 5.8 μm.

  1. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  2. Handbook of International alloy Compositions and Designations. Volume II. Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    Melted Alloys. Type VMA15: Nickel base-10% cobalt 10% tungsten 9% chromium b.5% aluminium 2.5% tantalum 1.5% hafnium 1.5% titanium vacuum melted... Aluminium Nb — Niobium C - Chromium S - Silicon D — Molybdenum T — Titanium Fe- Iron Ta - Tantalum G — Magnesium U — Copper H - Thorium V...chromium- aluminium -tungsten- molybdenum-nlobium alloy castings (Cr 11.0, AI6.0, W3.5,Mo3.0, Nb2.0) M Gr 1 (ISBN: 0 580 07218 5) 0&73

  3. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  4. A new nondestructive instrument for bulk residual stress measurement using tungsten kα1 X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ce; Dou, Zuo-yong; Chen, Li; Li, Yun; Tan, Xiao; Dong, Ping; Zhang, Jin; Zheng, Lin; Zhang, Peng-cheng

    2016-11-01

    We describe an experimental instrument used for measuring nondestructively the residual stress using short wavelength X-ray, tungsten kα1. By introducing a photon energy screening technology, the monochromatic X-ray diffraction of tungsten kα1 was realized using a CdTe detector. A high precision Huber goniometer is utilized in order to reduce the error in residual stress measurement. This paper summarizes the main performance of this instrument, measurement depth, stress error, as opposed to the neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress. Here, we demonstrate an application on the determination of residual stress in an aluminum alloy welded by the friction stir welding.

  5. Some features of sintering of tungsten powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreiev Igor Viktorovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of activating the sintering process for tungsten powders using a closed reaction space and hydrogen, steam-saturated water was observed. This sintering process is allowed to activate super coarse-grained (1000μm tungsten powder sat relatively low temperatures (1000-1200°C.

  6. Structures and transitions in tungsten grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhu, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marian, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization of tungsten for magnetic fusion applications being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  7. Tribological properties of sputtered tungsten and tungsten nitride thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wong; K.M.; ShenY.G.; Wong; P.L.

    2001-01-01

    The surface roughness, hardness and tribological properties of tungsten (W) and tung-sten nitride (WNx) thin films prepared by dc magnetron sputtering and reactive magnetron sputter-ing in Ar-N2 gas mixtures have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindenta-tion measurements and ball-on-disc wear testing. A pronounced surface roughness was observedonly for films under compressive strains. The surface was flat under tension but rough under com-pression. Similar hardness with value about 20 GPa were observed in the W and WNx (x=0.3)films. This is thought to be due to the fact the grains are restricted to a very small size in the coat-ings. The higher coefficients of friction (0.4 for W and 0.9 for WN0.3) suggest that WN0.3 is not theoptimum phase. Finally, discussions are made with tribological test results.

  8. Structural and electrical properties in tungsten/tungsten oxide multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacucci, Arnaud [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Potin, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.potin@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Imhoff, Luc [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Martin, Nicolas [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174 CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 Avenue de l' observatoire, F-25044, BESANCON Cedex (France)

    2014-02-28

    Tungsten and tungsten oxide periodic nanometric multilayers have been deposited by DC reactive sputtering using the reactive gas pulsing process. Different pulsing periods have been used for each deposition to produce metal-oxide periodic alternations ranging from 3.3 to 71.5 nm. The morphology, crystallinity and chemical composition of these films have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The produced multilayers exhibited an amorphous structure and the composition stability of WO{sub 3} sub-layers has been pointed out. Moreover, electrical properties have also been studied by the van der Pauw technique. It revealed a clear stability of resistivity versus temperature for almost all samples and an influence of the multilayered structure on the resistivity behavior. - Highlights: • W/WO{sub 3} multilayers with nanometric periods are produced by gas pulsing. • Multilayers are mainly amorphous and the oxide sub-layers composed of WO{sub 3}. • Crystallized inclusions of β-W and β-W{sub 3}O phases in metallic sub-layers • Metallic-like behavior with low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  9. Seed growth of tungsten diselenide nanotubes from tungsten oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seok Joon; Park, Jin Cheol; Park, Min Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-05-13

    We report growth of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with a two-zone furnace. WO3 nanowires were first grown by annealing tungsten thin films under argon ambient. WSe2 nanotubes were then grown at the tips of WO3 nanowires through selenization via two steps: (i) formation of tubular WSe2 structures on the outside of WO3 nanowires, resulting in core (WO3)-shell (WSe2) and (ii) growth of WSe2 nanotubes at the tips of WO3 nanowires. The observed seed growth is markedly different from existing substitutional growth of WSe2 nanotubes, where oxygen atoms are replaced by selenium atoms in WO3 nanowires to form WSe2 nanotubes. Another advantage of our growth is that WSe2 film was grown by simply supplying hydrogen gas, where the native oxides were reduced to thin film instead of forming oxide nanowires. Our findings will contribute to engineer other transition metal dichacogenide growth such as MoS2, WS2, and MoSe2.

  10. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  11. Downsizing of single crystalline high aspect ratio tungsten nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan [IMDEA Materials Institute, Eric Kandel 2, 28906, Getafe (Spain); Drensler, Stefanie [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040, Linz (Austria); Hassel, Achim Walter [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040, Linz (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry, Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040, Linz (Austria)

    2015-06-15

    Directional solidification of eutectic NiAl-W alloys offers an intuitive method to produce tungsten nanowires. Through the use of two different methods, the well-established Bridgman method and a newer type floating zone method, the direct influence of process parameters, like the withdrawal rate and the temperature gradient, onto the sample microstructure were studied. The sharp temperature gradient, built up using a four mirror system focusing the light emitted by halogen lamps inside the optical floating zone furnace allows producing nanowires with a diameter as small as 75 nm. Differences in the solid/liquid interface morphology depending on the solidification method used are discussed. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  13. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  14. Fracture behaviour of polycrystalline tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Rupp, Daniel; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-03-01

    Fracture behaviour of round blank polycrystalline tungsten was studied by means of three point bending Fracture-Mechanical (FM) tests at temperatures between RT and 1000 °C and under high vacuum. To study the influence of the anisotropic microstructure on the fracture toughness (FT) and ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) the specimens were extracted in three different, i.e. longitudinal, radial and circumferential orientations. The FM tests yielded distinctive fracture behaviour for each specimen orientation. The crack propagation was predominantly intergranular for longitudinal orientation up to 600 °C, whereas transgranular cleavage was observed at low test temperatures for radial and circumferentially oriented specimens. At intermediate test temperatures the change of the fracture mode took place for radial and circumferential orientations. Above 800 °C all three specimen types showed large ductile deformation without noticeable crack advancement. For longitudinal specimens the influence of the loading rate on the FT and DBT was studied in the loading rate range between 0.06 and 18 MPa m1/2/s. Though an increase of the FT was observed for the lowest loading rate, no resolvable dependence of the DBT on the loading rate was found partly due to loss of FT validity. A Master Curve approach is proposed to describe FT vs. test temperature data on polycrystalline tungsten. Fracture safe design space was identified by analysis compiled FT data.

  15. Effect of tungsten additions on the mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Heeman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Cook Hall, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States); Abkowitz, Susan M. [Dynamet Technology Inc., Eight A Street, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States); Abkowitz, Stanley [Dynamet Technology Inc., Eight A Street, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States); Dunand, David C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Cook Hall, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)]. E-mail: dunand@northwestern.edu

    2005-04-15

    The alloy Ti-6Al-4V was modified by addition of 10 wt.% tungsten through powder metallurgy. Depending on the initial W powder size, different materials were formed after powder densification: (i) 'alloys' for fine (0.7 and 2 {mu}m) W powders which were almost completely dissolved in the Ti-6Al-4V matrix; (ii) 'alloyed composites' for intermediate (12 and <45 {mu}m) W powders which were partially dissolved; (iii) and 'composites' for coarse (<250 {mu}m) W powders which were nearly un-dissolved. In all cases, tungsten strengthens Ti-6Al-4V, but much more so when dissolved in the matrix than as a second phase. Ductility was not affected by W additions for the fully-dissolved alloys, but was reduced in the case of composites with W particles, which exhibited fracture or pull-out from the matrix. Flaw sensitivity was apparent from strain hardening being much lower in tension than in compression, and from a much reduced ductility exhibited by one specimen with residual porosity.

  16. The influence of transition metal solutes on the dislocation core structure and values of the Peierls stress and barrier in tungsten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samolyuk, G D; Osetsky, Y N; Stoller, R E

    2013-01-16

    Several transition metals were examined to evaluate their potential for improving the ductility of tungsten. The dislocation core structure and Peierls stress and barrier of 1/2 screw dislocations in binary tungsten-transition metal alloys (W(1-x)TM(x)) were investigated using density functional theory calculations. The periodic quadrupole approach was applied to model the structure of the 1/2 dislocation. Alloying with transition metals was modeled using the virtual crystal approximation and the applicability of this approach was assessed by calculating the equilibrium lattice parameter and elastic constants of the tungsten alloys. Reasonable agreement was obtained with experimental data and with results obtained from the conventional supercell approach. Increasing the concentration of a transition metal from the VIIIA group, i.e. the elements in columns headed by Fe, Co and Ni, leads to reduction of the C' elastic constant and increase of the elastic anisotropy A = C(44)/C'. Alloying W with a group VIIIA transition metal changes the structure of the dislocation core from symmetric to asymmetric, similarly to results obtained for W(1-x)Re(x) alloys in the earlier work of Romaner et al (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 195503). In addition to a change in the core symmetry, the values of the Peierls stress and barrier are reduced. The latter effect could lead to increased ductility in a tungsten-based alloy. Our results demonstrate that alloying with any of the transition metals from the VIIIA group should have a similar effect to alloying with Re.

  17. Effect of tungsten dissolution on the mechanical properties of Ti-W composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Heeman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Abkowitz, Susan M. [Dynamet Technology Inc., Eight A Street, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States); Abkowitz, Stanley [Dynamet Technology Inc., Eight A Street, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States); Dunand, David C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)]. E-mail: dunand@northwestern.edu

    2005-03-22

    Blends of 90 wt.% Ti and 10 wt.% W powders were consolidated by powder metallurgy, using an initial W powder size that was very fine (0.7 and 2 {mu}m) or very coarse (<250 {mu}m). Dissolution of W powders in the Ti matrix during consolidation was almost complete for the former blends (thus forming Ti-10W 'alloys') but very limited for the latter blend (thus forming a Ti-10W 'composite'). The Ti-10W alloys exhibit much higher yield and tensile strengths than the Ti-10W composite, indicating that tungsten strengthens titanium more efficiently as a solute atom (solid-solution strengthening) than as a second phase (composite strengthening by load transfer). The Ti-10W alloys also exhibit much higher ductility than the Ti-10W composite, whose brittle W particles exhibit fracture or pull-out from the matrix.

  18. Wear behaviour of laser surface hardfaced steels with tungsten carbide powder injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelis, D. (Ecole Centrale Paris, Lab. MSS/MAT, 92 - Chatenay-Malabry (France)); Michaud, H. (IRSID-UNIEUX, Coatings Service, USINOR-SACILOR Group, 42 - Firminy (France)); Freitas, M. de (Inst. Superior Tecnico, CEMUL (INIC), Lisboa (Portugal))

    1993-05-28

    The use of a laser beam for surface alloying with carbide powder injection gives thick coatings (750-800 [mu]m) without defects such as porosity and cracks. A precise correlation between the treatment parameters and the phenomena induced during the laser-material interaction is established. Optimum treatment conditions are found and applied to laser alloying of 4140 and high speed M2 tool steels with tungsten carbide injection. The laser surface treated zones, for both steels, are strongly alloyed and present a very fine microstructure with various morphologies and very high average values of the microhardness (900 HV 50 gf and 1200 HV 50 gf) compared with those of the substrates (300 HV 50 gf and 250 HV 50 gf respectively). Friction and wear tests (using a plane-ring experimental device), revealed that the laser surface coatings on both steels present wear resistances considerably higher than that of a conventional plasma-sprayed coating. (orig.)

  19. 钨纤维复合材料穿甲弹芯侵彻时的自锐现象%Self-sharpening phenomena of tungsten fiber composite material penetrators during penetration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣光; 黄德武

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of the penetrating rods, which were made of tungsten heavy alloy and tungsten-fiber-reinforced Zr-based metallic glass composite material, respectively, were used to penetrate the 30CrMnMo steel target plates in the penetration experiments. In the penetration process, the tungsten heavy alloy rod head formed as a mushroom head and the grains in the head were radially compressed. But in the head of the tungsten-fiber-reinforced Zr-based metallic glass composite rod, the failure along the adiabatic shear bands was observed, which indicated that the tungsten-fiber-reinforced penetrators took on self-sharpening behaviors. A thin edge layer was developed in the tungsten-fiber-reinforced penetrator head and only in this layer the metallic base was broken, the tungsten fibers were ruptured, the temperature increased and the mass was wasted. Evidently, the penetration ability of the tungsten-fiber-reinforced composite material penetrator is evidently greater than that of the tungsten alloy one.%对钨合金穿甲弹和钨纤维/Zr合金金属玻璃基复合材料穿甲弹进行了靶场对比侵彻实验.穿甲弹侵彻过程中,钨合金弹芯头部形成蘑菇头、头部晶粒被径向压扁;钨纤维复合材料弹芯头部在侵彻过程中,发生了绝热剪切破坏,具有自锐行为,且在弹芯头部形成很薄的边缘层,仅在这层中金属玻璃基体破碎,钨纤维断裂,温度升高,质量消蚀.钨纤维复合材料穿甲弹的侵彻能力明显高于钨合金穿甲弹.

  20. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. [6061 and 6063

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2,0 inch; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW).

  1. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bowen; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  2. The electron affinity of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, A.O.; Andersson, P.; Klason, P.; Hanstorp, D. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Diehl, C. [Institut fur Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitat, Mainz (Germany); Present Address: Max-Planck-Institut fur Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Forstner, O. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Wien (Austria)

    2010-11-15

    The electron affinity of tungsten has been measured using laser photodetachment threshold spectroscopy in a collinear geometry. The electron affinity was determined to 6583.6(6) cm{sup -1} by observing the onset of the process when W{sup -} ions in the 5d{sup 5}6s{sup 2} {sup 6}S{sub 5/2} ground state are photo-detached producing neutral W atoms in the 5d{sup 4}6s{sup 2} {sup 5}D{sub 0} ground state. The measured value is in agreement with previous measurements and improves the accuracy by almost two orders of magnitude. Further, a photodetachment signal below the ground state photodetachment threshold was found, which indicates the existence of a bound excited state in W{sup -}. (authors)

  3. Viscosity of liquid undercooled tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Paul-François; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    2005-05-01

    Knowledge of the viscosity and its temperature dependence is essential to improve metallurgical processes as well as to validate theoretical and empirical models of liquid metals. However, data for metals with melting points above 2504K could not be determined yet due to contamination and containment problems. Here we report the viscosity of tungsten, the highest melting point metal (3695K), measured by a levitation technique. Over the 3350-3700-K temperature range, which includes the undercooled region by 345K, the viscosity data could be fitted as η(T )=0.108exp[1.28×105/(RT)](mPas). At the melting point, the datum agrees with the proposed theoretical and empirical models of liquid metals but presents atypical temperature dependence, suggesting a basic change in the mechanism of momentum transfer.

  4. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2017-02-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V ( vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  5. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasempour, Fariba [Plasma Physics Research Centre, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 147789-3855, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azimirad, Rouhollah [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Abbas [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Kingswood, NSW 2751 (Australia); Akhavan, Omid, E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Synthesis of tungsten oxide nano/micro-structures on W foils using KOH as a catalyst. • Strong antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods under visible light irradiation. • Decrease in photoinactivation of bacteria on tungsten oxide nano/micro-rods doped by potassium. - Abstract: Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400–800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50–90 nm and crystalline phase of WO{sub 3}) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO{sub 3} nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K{sub 2}W{sub 6}O{sub 19} microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  6. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2016-10-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V (vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  7. Effect of process parameters on induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide from tungsten metal powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tungsten carbide deposit was made directly from tungsten metal powder through the reaction with methane in radio frequency induction plasma. Effect of major process parameters on the induction plasma reactive deposition of tungsten carbide was studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, water displacement method, and microhardness test. The results show that methane flow rate, powder feed rate, particle size, reaction chamber pressure and deposition distance have significant influences on the phase composition, density, and microhardness of the deposit. Extra carbon is necessary to ensure the complete conversion of tungsten metal into the carbide.

  8. Thermal stability of warm-rolled tungsten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfonso Lopez, Angel

    Pure tungsten is considered as armor material for the most critical parts of fusion reactors (thedivertor and the blanket first wall), mainly due to its high melting point (3422 °C). This is becauseboth the divertor and the first wall have to withstand high temperatures during service which...... and recrystallization occur in tungsten, and quantifying the kinetics and microstructuralaspects of these restoration processes. Two warm-rolled tungsten plates are annealed attemperatures between 1100 °C and 1350 °C, under vacuum conditions or argon atmosphere. Theeffects of annealing on the microstructure...... on these activation energies) to lower annealingtemperatures allows predicting the lifespan of these tungsten plates under fusion reactor conditions.A much longer lifetime at normal operating temperatures was found for the plate W67 (e.g. at least1 million years at 800 °C) as compared to the plate W90 (e.g 71 years...

  9. Recent progress in research on tungsten materials for nuclear fusion applications in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieth, M., E-mail: Michael.rieth@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gonzalez de Vicente, S.M. [EFDA-Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Aktaa, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahlgren, T. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Antusch, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Armstrong, D.E.J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Baluc, N. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, CRPP EPFL - Materials, 5232 Villigen/PSI (Switzerland); Barthe, M.-F. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue, de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, Polytech ou Faculte des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Basuki, W.W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe (Germany); Battabyal, M. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, CRPP EPFL - Materials, 5232 Villigen/PSI (Switzerland); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations, UMR 8207, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Blagoeva, D. [NRG, Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands); Boldyryeva, H. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Praha (Czech Republic); and others

    2013-01-15

    The current magnetic confinement nuclear fusion power reactor concepts going beyond ITER are based on assumptions about the availability of materials with extreme mechanical, heat, and neutron load capacity. In Europe, the development of such structural and armour materials together with the necessary production, machining, and fabrication technologies is pursued within the EFDA long-term fusion materials programme. This paper reviews the progress of work within the programme in the area of tungsten and tungsten alloys. Results, conclusions, and future projections are summarized for each of the programme's main subtopics, which are: (1) fabrication, (2) structural W materials, (3) W armour materials, and (4) materials science and modelling. It gives a detailed overview of the latest results on materials research, fabrication processes, joining options, high heat flux testing, plasticity studies, modelling, and validation experiments.

  10. The thermal stability of nanocrystalline copper cryogenically milled with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwater, Mark A., E-mail: maatwat2@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, EB I, Room 3002 Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Roy, Debdas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, EB I, Room 3002 Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, NIFFT, Ranchi 834003 (India); Darling, Kristopher A.; Butler, Brady G. [US Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Scattergood, Ronald O.; Koch, Carl C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, EB I, Room 3002 Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Copper (Cu) was cryogenically milled with tungsten (W) in a high-energy ball mill. The process created W particles dispersed in a nanocrystalline Cu matrix. These 'alloys' were then annealed to a maximum temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C. The addition of W stabilized the Cu at{approx}40 nm during annealing to 400 Degree-Sign C for a 1 at% W composition and to 600 Degree-Sign C for 10 at% W. As evidenced through hardness measurement, the W provided a significant increase in strength over pure Cu, and the 10 at% W material maintained a 2.6 GPa hardness after annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C. The stabilization and strengthening mechanisms are compared against theoretical prediction and found to be in good agreement. Although the strength and stability are significantly improved over pure Cu, the maximum benefit was hindered by an extremely broad W particle size distribution ({approx}5-5000 nm). For the 10 at% W alloy, only half of the added W was reduced to nanoscale where kinetic pinning and strengthening become most effective.

  11. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide and cobalt were evaluated. Zinc volatility was suppressed by the enclosed graphite crucible and zinc volatilization pressure was produced in the reaction graphite crucible inside an electric furnace for ZDP (Zinc Decomposition Process. Decomposition reaction was done for 2hours at 650°, which 100% decomposed the tungsten scraps that were over 30 mm thick. Decomposed scraps were pulverized under 75μm and were composed of tungsten carbide and cobalt identified by the XRD (X-ray Diffraction. To produce the WC(Tungsten Carbide powder directly from decomposed scraps, pulverized powders were reacted with hydrochloric acid to remove the cobalt binder. Also to produce the tungstic acid, pulverized powders were reacted with aqua regia to remove the cobalt binder and oxidize the tungsten carbide. Tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders were identified by XRD and chemical composition analysis.

  12. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  13. Advanced tungsten materials for plasma-facing components of DEMO and fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, R., E-mail: Rudolf.Neu@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultät für Maschinenbau, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riesch, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Coenen, J.W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Brinkmann, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Calvo, A. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Elgeti, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); García-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Greuner, H.; Hoeschen, T.; Holzner, G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Klein, F. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Koch, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Development of W-fibre enhanced W-composites incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. • Production of a large sample (more than 2000 long fibres) for mechanical and thermal testing. • Even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms are still effective. • Emissions of volatile W-oxides can be suppressed by alloying W with elements forming stable oxides. • WCr10Ti2 has been successfully tested under accidental conditions and high heat fluxes. - Abstract: Tungsten is the major candidate material for the armour of plasma facing components in future fusion devices. To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten, which strongly limits its operational window, a W-fibre enhanced W-composite material (W{sub f}/W) has been developed incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. Small W{sub f}/W samples show a large increase in toughness. Recently, a large sample (50 mm × 50 mm × 3 mm) with more than 2000 long fibres has been successfully produced allowing further mechanical and thermal testing. It could be shown that even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms as crack bridging by intact fibres, as well as the energy dissipation by fibre-matrix interface debonding and crack deflection are still effective. A potential problem with the use of pure W in a fusion reactor is the formation of radioactive and highly volatile WO{sub 3} compounds and their potential release under accidental conditions. It has been shown that the oxidation of W can be strongly suppressed by alloying with elements forming stable oxides. WCr10Ti2 alloy has been produced on a technical scale and has been successfully tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS. Recently, W-Cr-Y alloys have been produced on a lab-scale. They seem to have even improved properties compared to the previously investigated W alloys.

  14. Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Trioxide Micro-spheres, Tungsten Carbide Microspheres and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube-tungsten Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hongzhi; YAN Taining

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide micropheres were prepared by spray pyrolysis, and tungsten carbidemicrospheres were produced by spray pyrolysis-low temperature reduction and carbonization technology.Multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide composites were prepared by the continuous reductionand carbonization process using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and WO_3 precursor by mo-lecular level mixing and calcination. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized byscanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the crystal phase was identified by X-ray diffraction. The electrocatalytic activity of the sample was analyzed by means of me-thanol oxidation. Tungsten carbide microspheres were catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction.Nevertheless tungsten trioxide microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide compos-ites were not catalytic active for methanol oxidation reaction. These results indicate that tungsten carbide micropheres are promising catalyst for methanol oxidation.

  15. Mechanical characterization and modelling of the heavy tungsten allow IT180

    CERN Document Server

    Scapin, M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the mechanical characterization and the consequent material modeling of the tungsten alloy INERMET® IT180 were performed. The material is actually used in the collimation system of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and several studies are currently under development in order to be able to numerically predict the material damage in case of energy beamimpact, but to do this, a confident strength model has to be obtained. This is the basis of this work, in which a test campaign in compression and tension at different strain-rates and tempe...

  16. Crack Free Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Ni(Cr) Layers obtained by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Yáñez, A.; Amigó, V.; Candel, J. J.

    The development of hardfacing coatings has become technologically significant in many industries A common approach is the production of metal matrix composites (MMC) layers. In this work NiCr-WC MMC hardfacing layers are deposited on C25 steel by means of laser cladding. Spheroidal fused tungsten carbides is used as reinforcement phase. Three different NiCr alloys with different Cr content were tested. Optimum conditions to obtain dense, uniform carbide distribution and hardness close to nominal values were defined. The effect of Cr content respect to the microstructure, susceptibility for cracking and the wear rate of the resulting coating will also be discussed.

  17. Scandia doped tungsten matrix for impregnated cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinshu; WANG Yanchun; LIU Wei; LI Hongyi; ZHOU Meiling

    2008-01-01

    As a matrix for Sc-type impregnated cathode,scandia doped tungsten with a uniform ldistribution of SC2O3 was obtained by powder metallurgy combined with the liquid-solid doping method.The microstructure and composition of the powder and the anti-ion bombardment behavior of scandium in the matrix were studied by means of SEM,EDS,XRD,and in-situ AES methods.Tungsten powder covered with scandium oxide,an ideal scandium oxide-doped tungsten powder for the preparation of Sc-type impregnated cathode,was obtained using the liquid-solid doping method.Compared with the matrix prepared with the mechanically mixed powder of tungsten and scandium oxide,SC2O3-W matrix prepared with this kind of powder had smaller grain size and uniform distribution of scandium.Sc on the surface of Sc2O3 doped tungsten mauix had good high temperature stability and good anti-ion bombardment capability.

  18. Ultrasonic drawing of tungsten wire for incandescent lamps production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordyuk, B N; Mordyuk, V S; Buryak, V V

    2004-04-01

    An influence of ultrasonic treatment (drawing) on structure, high temperature durability, evaporation and creep behaviours of tungsten single crystal and wires were investigated. A relation of tungsten wires properties with dislocation distribution was determined.

  19. Electroanalytical determination of tungsten and molybdenum in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, P L; van't Slot, P; van Leeuwen, H P; Hagen, W R

    2001-10-01

    Recent crystal structure determinations accelerated the progress in the biochemistry of tungsten-containing enzymes. In order to characterize these enzymes, a sensitive determination of this metal in protein-containing samples is necessary. An electroanalytical tungsten determination has successfully been adapted to determine the tungsten and molybdenum content in enzymes. The tungsten and molybdenum content can be measured simultaneously from 1 to 10 microg of purified protein with little or no sample handling. More crude protein samples require precipitation of interfering surface active material with 10% perchloric acid. This method affords the isolation of novel molybdenum- and tungsten-containing proteins via molybdenum and tungsten monitoring of column fractions, without using radioactive isotopes. A screening of soluble proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus for tungsten, using anion-exchange column chromatography to separate the proteins, has been performed. The three known tungsten-containing enzymes from P. furiosus were recovered with this screening.

  20. Study on Properties of Tungsten Carbide in Nickel-based Self-lfuxing Alloy Coating in Couple Technique%两种工艺下碳化钨在镍基自熔合金涂层中的性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭; 胡宇; 高峰; 马尧; 张清华; 杜倩

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the morphologies of two mixed Nickel-base tungsten carbide coatings were studied, under the spray process of laser claddingand flame spray respectively. The decomposition and diffusion mechanism of tungsten carbide were discussed. It showed that tungsten carbide was easier to precipitate by laser cladding andη phase was found which led to the decrease of the final coating hardness.%本文研究了激光熔覆和火焰喷焊的工艺条件下,两种混合型镍基碳化钨涂层中碳化钨的组织形貌变化,分析碳化钨分解和扩散机理。结果表明:激光熔覆工艺更容易促进碳化钨溶解,并在周围析出η相,从而导致涂层硬度低于火焰喷焊工艺。

  1. Process for the recovery of tungsten in a pure form from tungsten-containing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, M.; Moscovici, A.

    1986-12-16

    A process is described for the recovery of tungsten from tungsten-containing materials which comprises the steps of (i) admixing the tungsten-containing material with a melt at a temperature of between 680/sup 0/C and 750/sup 0/C. The melt consists of a salt selected from the group consisting of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and mixtures thereof in a substantially stoichiometrical amount to the tungsten constituent of the tungsten-containing material. This is done to disintegrate the tungsten-containing material and to form sodium tungstate, cooling the melt, and leaching the cooled melt with water to obtain an aqueous solution of sodium tungstate; (ii) admixing a solution of calcium chloride with the aqueous solution of sodium tungstate at a temperature of between 40/sup 0/C and 95/sup 0/C to form a calcium tungstate precipitate and separating the calcium tungstate; (iii) admixing the calcium tungstate with a preheated concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to form a tungstic acid precipitate and a CaCl/sub 2/ solution having a concentration of between 80 g/l and 180 g/l free HCl and separating the tungstic acid precipitate and obtaining tungstic acid which is substantially free of calcium ions, and (iv) calcining the tungstic acid to convert it to tungstic oxide and reducing the tungstic oxide to form metallic tungsten.

  2. The Newly Released Export Quota for Tungsten Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>China’s Ministry of Commerce recently announced the second lot of export quota for tungsten products in 2005. Based on the new quota, the second lot for Ammonium Paratung-state (APT) and Ammonium Metatungstate (AMT) will be 1,232 tons. The second lot for tungsten trioxide and blue tungsten oxide will be 1,480 tons and the second lot for tungsten powder and its products will be 428 tons.

  3. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México DF (Mexico); DuBois, R.D. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies.

  4. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  5. Raman scattering from rapid thermally annealed tungsten silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Samhita; Jackson, Howard E.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1987-01-01

    Raman scattering as a technique for studying the formation of tungsten silicide is presented. The tungsten silicide films have been formed by rapid thermal annealing of thin tungsten films sputter deposited on silicon substrates. The Raman data are interpreted by using data from resistivity measurements, Auger and Rutherford backscattering measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  7. Studies on the effect of vibration on hot cracking and Grain size in AA7075 Aluminum alloy Welding

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this present study is to investigate the vibration effect which is applied during Gas tungsten Arc welding (GTAW) welding in order to improve the quality of high strength Aluminum alloy weldment. An important metallurgical difficulty in arc welding of high strength aluminum alloys is formation of hot cracking. When Aluminum alloy is welded by GTAW process, weld fusion zone shows coarse columnar grains during weld metal solidification. This often leads to poor resistance to hot crac...

  8. Electrodeposition of amorphous gold alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masaru; Senda, Kazutaka [Central Research Laboratory, Kanto Chemical Co., Inc., Saitama 340-0003 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Musha, Yuta [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sasano, Junji [Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Okinaka, Yutaka [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Osaka, Tetsuya [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: osakatet@waseda.jp

    2007-11-20

    The process for electroplating amorphous gold-nickel-tungsten alloy that we developed previously based on the addition of a gold salt to a known amorphous Ni-W electroplating solution was investigated further using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method for the purpose of quickly surveying the effects of various experimental variables on the microstructure of the alloy. In this system the gold concentration in the plating bath was found to be critical; i.e., when it is either very low or very high, the deposit becomes crystalline to XRD. The deposit composition varies linearly with the mole ratio of Au to Ni in solution, and the alloy deposit is amorphous to XRD when the atomic ratio of Au/Ni in the deposit is between 0.5 and 1.5. At suitable concentrations of the metal ions, the deposit contains essentially no tungsten. By extending the work on the Au-Ni-W system, an amorphous Au-Co alloy plating process was also developed.

  9. Characterization of novel W alloys produced by HIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monge, M.A.; Auger, M.A.; Leguey, T.; Pareja, R. [Universidad Carlos 3, Dept. de Fisica, Madrid (Spain); Bolzoni, L.; Gordo, E. [Universidad Carlos 3, Dept. de Ciencias de Materiales, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is considered as a candidate material for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a future fusion power reactor because of its refractory characteristics, low tritium retention and low sputtering yielding. However, its use in PFCs requires the development of a tungsten material that, in addition to these properties, maintains good mechanical properties after a prolonged exposure at high temperatures. Sintering would be the most suitable method to produce tungsten materials for these applications if their recrystallization temperature is high enough and the grain growth is restrained. Usual sintering conditions for tungsten requires very high temperatures that induces a coarse grained structure in the sintered material, and a low recrystallization temperature in the hot worked material. This causes the failure of its mechanical properties. The combined addition of a sintering activator, which lowers the sintering temperature and favors the densification, and an insoluble oxide that produces a dispersion strengthening and grain growth inhibition, may result in a tungsten material with improved mechanical characteristics. Cu, Ni and Fe are the most used activators to produce tungsten heavy alloys but they may be no recommendable for PFCs. The present work assesses the possibility of using jointly Ti as sintering activator and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles as strengthening dispersoids in tungsten. Pure tungsten and tungsten alloys having 0.5 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, x wt % Ti and 0.5 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}+ x wt % Ti have been prepared by powder metallurgy; 0{<=}x{<=}4%. Elemental powders were blended or ball milled, canned, out-gassed and finally consolidated by a two-stage HIP process under a pressure of 200 MPa. The first stage was performed at 1523 K for 2 h, and after un-canning, the second HIP at 1973 K for 30 min. It is found that Ti addition favors the densification attaining a fully dense material, while pure W and W-0.5Y{sub 2

  10. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  11. Liquid phase surface alloying of AZ91D magnesium alloy with Al and Ni powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elahi, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: m.r_elahi@alumni.ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohi, Mahmoud Heydarzadeh; Safaei, Abdolghayoom [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, liquid phase surface alloying of AZ91D magnesium alloy was carried out by pre-placing of Al and Ni powder mixture and subsequent tungsten inert gas (TIG) melting process. The effects of TIG processing parameters on both microstructures and resulting hardness were investigated. Microstructures of alloyed layers were studied by optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer, and the phases were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis. The microhardness of the surface alloyed layer was also measured. The surface hardness was increased from 80 HV{sub 0.1} for AZ91D magnesium alloy to as high as 162 HV{sub 0.1} for alloyed sample due to the formation of Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and AlNi{sub 3} intermetallic compounds in the alloyed region and structural refinement. Hardness improvement reduced the wear rate of the surface alloyed layer to almost half of that of the untreated substrate.

  12. Thermal cycling and high power density hydrogen ion beam irradiation of tungsten layers on tungsten substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gretskaya, I. Yu; Grunin, A. V.; Dyachenko, M. Yu; Puntakov, N. A.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten layers with iron impurity were deposited on tungsten substrates modeling re-deposited layers in a fusion device. The samples were tested by thermocycling and hydrogen ion beam tests. Thermocycling revealed globule formation on the surface. The size of the globules depended on iron impurity content in the coating deposited. Pore formation was observed which in some cases lead to exfoliation of the coatings. Hydrogen ion irradiation lead to formation of blisters on the coating and finally its exfoliation.

  13. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01

    A aluminum matrix-W rod/wire structural material in support of DARPA initiative BAA 08-23 was developed and its density and mechanical strength ascertained, both being part of the DARPA matrices. Aluminum tubes and four 90 degree cross-ply tungsten fiber layers were arranged such that under extreme static pressure conditions the aluminum would viscoplastically flow into the tungsten arrangement to create a metal matrix composite. It was found that a cold isostatic process induced "Brazilian" ...

  14. Microstructures and Hardness/Wear Performance of High-Carbon Stellite Alloys Containing Molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Yao, J. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yao, M. X.; Collier, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Conventional high-carbon Stellite alloys contain a certain amount of tungsten which mainly serves to provide strengthening to the solid solution matrix. These alloys are designed for combating severe wear. High-carbon molybdenum-containing Stellite alloys are newly developed 700 series of Stellite family, with molybdenum replacing tungsten, which are particularly employed in severe wear condition with corrosion also involved. Three high-carbon Stellite alloys, designated as Stellite 706, Stellite 712, and Stellite 720, with different carbon and molybdenum contents, are studied experimentally in this research, focusing on microstructure and phases, hardness, and wear resistance, using SEM/EDX/XRD techniques, a Rockwell hardness tester, and a pin-on-disk tribometer. It is found that both carbon and molybdenum contents influence the microstructures of these alloys significantly. The former determines the volume fraction of carbides in the alloys, and the latter governs the amount of molybdenum-rich carbides precipitated in the alloys. The hardness and wear resistance of these alloys are increased with the carbide volume fraction. However, with the same or similar carbon content, high-carbon CoCrMo Stellite alloys exhibit worse wear resistance than high-carbon CoCrW Stellite alloys.

  15. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  16. A Study of Scandia Doped Tungsten Nano-Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Scandia and rhenium doped tungsten powders were prepared by solid-liquid doping combined with two-step reduction method. The particle size of doped tungsten and distribution of scandia and rhenium were studied by SEM, EDS, XRD and granularity analysis. Experimental results showed that scandia distributed evenly on the surface of tungsten particles. Addition of scandia and rhenium decreased the particle size of doped tungsten, and the more the content of scandia and rhenium, the smaller the doped tungsten particles. Tungsten powders doped with 3% Sc2O3 and 3% Re (mass fraction) had an average size of about 80 nm in diameter. The mechanism of the decrease in the tungsten particle size was discussed.

  17. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Fariba; Azimirad, Rouhollah; Amini, Abbas; Akhavan, Omid

    2015-05-01

    Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400-800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50-90 nm and crystalline phase of WO3) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K2W6O19 crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO3 nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K2W6O19 microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  18. Refractory alloy technology for space nuclear power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Hoffman, E.E. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this symposium is twofold: (1) to review and document the status of refractory alloy technology for structural and fuel-cladding applications in space nuclear power systems, and (2) to identify and document the refractory alloy research and development needs for the SP-100 Program in both the short and the long term. In this symposium, an effort was made to recapture the space reactor refractory alloy technology that was cut off in midstream around 1973 when the national space nuclear reactor program began in the early 1960s, was terminated. The six technical areas covered in the program are compatibility, processing and production, welding and component fabrication, mechanical and physical properties, effects of irradiation, and machinability. The refractory alloys considered are niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. Thirteen of the 14 pages have been abstracted separately. The remaining paper summarizes key needs for further R and D on refractory alloys. (DLC)

  19. Deuterium implantation into tungsten at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Balden, Martin; Schmid, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To study the interaction of hydrogen isotopes with tungsten many experiments are conducted in linear plasma devices, which provide high enough hydrogen fluxes to supersaturate the tungsten sample and create defects such as blister. Here an alternative approach is presented. Instead of achieving a high deuterium concentration via high flux exposure, the sample temperature is reduced and the implantation energy of deuterium into tungsten is increased. The lower temperature associated with a reduction in diffusivity as well as the deeper implantation of deuterium lead to an increase of deuterium concentration within the implantation zone. Deuterium is stepwise implanted into polycrystalline tungsten up to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 22} D/m{sup 2} with an energy of 3.0 keV/D at a sample temperature of 134 K. The retained deuterium is measured in-situ by nuclear reaction analysis. For low fluence approximately 100 % of the implanted deuterium is retained, while for higher fluence the retention saturates. Close to the surface deuterium concentrations up to 64 % are reached. This leads to massive grain orientation dependent blistering with blister sizes between 100-1000 nm at depths between 30-150 nm. Besides the characterization of the blisters their influence on deuterium transport is studied.

  20. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  1. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  2. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2.64E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  3. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.7E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  4. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.85E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  5. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 2E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  6. Proton Induced Effects on Tungsten Powder

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In the HRMT-10 experiment, that took place in HiRadMat facility of CERN/SPS, the effects of a high-power incident proton beam on a tungsten powder target were investigated. In this video, 1.3E11 protons @ 440 GeV are impinging on the target.

  7. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity...

  8. Microstructure and Properties of W-Cu Alloys Prepared with Mechanically Activated Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    W-15% Cu (mass fraction) alloys were sintered with mechanically activated powder in order to develop new preparing processes and improve properties of alloys. The microstructures of the activated powder and the sintered alloy were observed. Properties such as density were measured. The results show that through mechanical activation, the particle size of the powder becomes finer to sub-micron or nanometer level, some copper was soluble in tungsten, and high density W-Cu alloys can be obtained by mechanically activated powder for its action to the activation sintering.

  9. Hardness behavior of binary and ternary niobium alloys at 77 and 300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of zirconium, hafnium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, ruthenium, osmium, rhodium, and iridium on the hardness of niobium. Both binary and ternary alloys were investigated by means of hardness tests at 77 and 300 K. Results showed that atomic size misfit plays a dominant role in controlling the hardness of binary niobium alloys. Alloy softening, which occurred at dilute solute additions, is most likely due to an extrinsic mechanism involving interaction between solute elements and interstitial impurities.

  10. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  11. Chemical etching of Tungsten thin films for high-temperature surface acoustic wave-based sensor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, M., E-mail: m.spindler@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Herold, S.; Acker, J. [BTU Cottbus – Senftenberg, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 101548, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany); Brachmann, E.; Oswald, S.; Menzel, S.; Rane, G. [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave devices are widely used as wireless sensors in different application fields. Recent developments aimed to utilize those devices as temperature sensors even in the high temperature range (T > 300 °C) and in harsh environmental conditions. Therefore, conventional materials, which are used for the substrate and for the interdigital transducer finger electrodes such as multilayers or alloys based on Al or Cu have to be exchanged by materials, which fulfill some important criteria regarding temperature related effects. Electron beam evaporation as a standard fabrication method is not well applicable for depositing high temperature stable electrode materials because of their very high melting points. Magnetron sputtering is an alternative deposition process but is also not applicable for lift-off structuring without any further improvement of the structuring process. Due to a relatively high Ar gas pressure of about 10{sup −1} Pa, the sidewalls of the photoresist line structures are also covered by the metallization, which subsequently prevents a successful lift-off process. In this study, we investigate the chemical etching of thin tungsten films as an intermediate step between magnetron sputtering deposition of thin tungsten finger electrodes and the lift-off process to remove sidewall covering for a successful patterning process of interdigital transducers. - Highlights: • We fabricated Tungsten SAW Electrodes by magnetron sputtering technology. • An etching process removes sidewall covering of photoresist, which allows lift-off. • Tungsten etching rates based on a hydrogen peroxide solutions were determined.

  12. The effect of tungsten addition on metallurgical state and solute content in nanocrystalline electrodeposited nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakibi Nia, N., E-mail: niusha.shakibi_nia@univ-lr.fr; Creus, J.; Feaugas, X.; Savall, C.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • The contamination in Ni and Ni–W deposited alloys is influenced by the elaboration conditions. • In nickel deposits the light elements contamination increased with grain size refinement. • According to SIMS analysis, H and O were distributed almost uniformly in Ni–W deposited alloys. • A maximum contamination for H, O and N around 10 at.% of W was found by the hot extraction method. - Abstract: It is usually difficult to control the incorporation of foreign species in electrodeposited coatings originating from the solvent or the chemical species used for the electrodeposition bath. However, the presence of these impurities can modify their physicochemical properties. In the present study, complementary analytical techniques were used to evaluate the chemical contamination in nickel and nickel–tungsten alloys, electrodeposited from additive free baths. In order to better understand the relationship between impurity content and grain size refinement, the concentration of light elements (H, O and N) was systematically quantified by hot extraction analysis. Also, the distribution of contaminants was evaluated by SIMS analysis. We have shown that in nanocrystalline electrodeposited nickel the grain size refinement and the impurity contents are strongly related. However, in Ni–W alloys the evolution of the contamination is more complex, with a maximum amount for W contents around 10 at.%.

  13. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions Containing Organic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-04

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel based alloy containing alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum and tungsten. It is highly corrosion resistant both under reducing and under oxidizing conditions. Electrochemical studies such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. Tests were also carried out in NaCl solutions containing oxalic acid or acetic acid. It is shown that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was higher in a solution containing oxalic acid than in a solution of the same pH acidified with HCl. Acetic acid was not corrosive to Alloy 22. The corrosivity of oxalic acid was attributed to its capacity to form stable complex species with metallic cations from Alloy 22.

  14. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Epitaxial growth of tungsten nanoparticles on alumina and spinel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Suarez, T; Lopez-Esteban, S; Pecharroman, C; Esteban-Cubillo, A; Moya, J S [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L A; Torrecillas, R [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research Center (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), C/ Francisco Pintado Fe 26, 33011, Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Gremillard, L [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 20 avenue Albert Einstein, Villeurbanne F-69621 (France)], E-mail: jsmoya@icmm.csic.es

    2008-05-28

    Isolated tungsten nanoparticles ({alpha}-W and {beta}-W phase) were synthesized and epitaxially grown on alumina and spinel particle surfaces with an average tungsten size of {<=}20 nm for a low tungsten content (of {<=}1.5 vol%). Using tungsten (VI) ethoxide alcoholic solutions, tungsten trioxide hydrated precursors were attached to a ceramic grains surface as a nanoparticle coating. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) micrographs showed epitaxial interfaces between alumina, spinel and metallic tungsten. This epitaxial growth is assumed to be due to the effect of water vapour on the sublimation of ortho-tungstic acid during the reduction process in a hydrogen atmosphere. The planes involved in the epitaxy were found to be (22-bar 0){sub Al2O3} parallel (121){sub W} and (311){sub MgAl2O4} parallel (110){sub W}.

  16. Induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten and molybdenum powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The melting, evaporation and oxidation behaviors as well as the solidification phenomena of tungsten and molybdenum in induction plasma were studied. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology and the cross section of plasma-processed powders. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the oxides formed on the particle surface of these two metals. The influence of spray chamber pressure on the spheroidization and oxidation phenomena was discussed. The results show that fewer Mo particles than W particles are spheroidized at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spray condition although molybdenum has a lower melting point. A small fraction of tungsten is evaporized and condensed either on the surface of tungsten particles nearby or on the wall of spray chamber. Tungsten oxides were found in tungsten powder processed under soft vacuum condition. Extremely large grains form inside some spheroidized particles of tungsten powder.

  17. Synthesis and electrical characterization of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Rui; Zhu Jing; Yu Rong

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires of diameters ranging from 7 to 200 nm are prepared on a tungsten rod substrate by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method with vapour-solid (VS) mechanism. Tin powders are used to control oxygen concentration in the furnace, thereby assisting the growth of the tungsten oxide nanowires. The grown tungsten oxide nanowires are determined to be of crystalline W18O49. Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are measured by an in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the electrical properties of the nanowires. All of the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves observed are symmetric, which reveals that the tungsten oxide nanowires are semiconducting. Quantitative analyses of the experimental I V curves by using a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) model give some intrinsic parameters of the tungsten oxide nanowires, such as the carrier concentration, the carrier mobility and the conductivity.

  18. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    thus are composed of single minerals. Iron minerals used in fitting included ferrihydrite, hematite , goethite, biotite, hornblende, and pyrite, which...tungstate adsorbing on ferrihy- drite. Ferrihydrite was selected for these tests as earlier X-ray microprobe studies indicated that this was the primary ...Camp Edwards soil profile 31T as a function of depth. The spectra all indicate that the primary coordination sphere of tungsten is dominated by

  19. Effect of reduction of strategic columbium additions in Inconel 718 alloy on the structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, K.; Wallace, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The amount of columbium which can be removed from Inconel alloy 718 without degrading its high temperature properties was determined. The elements that are substituted are: vanadium and tungsten together and separately; increasing the molybdenum level from 3.0% to 5.8% and increasing the boron to 0.04%.

  20. Reducing non value adding aluminium alloy in production of parts through high pressure die casting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pereira, MFVT

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties and issues associated with the economics of the process and die life in casting Aluminium alloys, as experienced by the high pressure die casting industry, were reasons behind undertaking this research project. The use of a tungsten...

  1. Effect of C and milling parameters on the synthesis of WC powders by mechanical alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bolokang, S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the amount of carbon and the effects of milling parameters in production of tungsten-carbide (WC) powder were evaluated. Mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental W and C powders at different carbon-rich and carbon...

  2. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d' Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  3. Defect and electrical properties of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xin-Sheng; Wang Yu; Dong Liang; Qi Li-Zhen; Zhang Feng

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide particles were prepared by a wet-chemical method. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis shows that the average grain size is about 15nm. The oxygen deficiency of nanometre-sized sample is higher than that of ordinary tungsten trioxide. The electric conductivity increases because of high oxygen deficiency. Ironic relaxation polarization and crystallographic shear (CS) planes theory were used to explain the unusual dielectric characteristic of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide.

  4. The Tungsten Demand and Supply Situation in Recent Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Tungsten is an important and valuable resource listed by the State as a kind of special minerals under the State protection. By the end of 2005, China had 310 tungsten mining areas with the total tungsten deposit amounting to 5.69 million tons. Among the total deposit, wolframite accounts for approximately 20.8 per cent and scheelite accounts for about 70 per cent with

  5. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten and tungsten silicide layers for applications in novel silicon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F X

    2002-01-01

    This work was a detailed investigation into the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of tungsten and tungsten silicide for potential applications in integrated circuit (IC) and other microelectronic devices. These materials may find novel applications in contact schemes for transistors in advanced ICs, buried high conductivity layers in novel Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology and in power electronic devices. The CVD techniques developed may also be used for metal coating of recessed or enclosed features which may occur in novel electronic or electromechanical devices. CVD of tungsten was investigated using the silicon reduction reaction of WF sub 6. W layers with an optimum self-limiting thickness of 100 nm and resistivity 20 mu OMEGA centre dot cm were produced self-aligned to silicon. A hydrogen passivation technique was developed as part of the wafer pre-clean schedule and proved essential in achieving optimum layer thickness. Layers produced by this approach are ideal for intimate contact to shallow junct...

  6. Secondary electron emission from plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, M.; Raitses, Y.; Wirz, R.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, several researchers [e.g., Yang et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 10959 (2015)] have shown that tungsten fuzz can grow on a hot tungsten surface under bombardment by energetic helium ions in different plasma discharges and applications, including magnetic fusion devices with plasma facing tungsten components. This work reports the direct measurements of the total effective secondary electron emission (SEE) from tungsten fuzz. Using dedicated material surface diagnostics and in-situ characterization, we find two important results: (1) SEE values for tungsten fuzz are 40%-63% lower than for smooth tungsten and (2) the SEE values for tungsten fuzz are independent of the angle of the incident electron. The reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz is most pronounced at high incident angles, which has important implications for many plasma devices since in a negative-going sheath the potential structure leads to relatively high incident angles for the electrons at the plasma confining walls. Overall, low SEE will create a relatively higher sheath potential difference that reduces plasma electron energy loss to the confining wall. Thus, the presence or self-generation in a plasma of a low SEE surface such as tungsten fuzz can be desirable for improved performance of many plasma devices.

  7. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA seq. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data shows the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. PMID:26164860

  8. Toxicologic evaluation of tungsten: 28-day inhalation study of tungsten blue oxide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Narayanan; Hu, Shu-Chieh; Sullivan, Dennis; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J; Venezia, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity and toxicokinetics of tungsten blue oxide (TBO) were examined. TBO is an intermediate in the production of tungsten powder, and has shown the potential to cause cellular damage in in vitro studies. However, in vivo evidence seems to indicate a lack of adverse effects. The present study was undertaken to address the dearth of longer-term inhalation toxicity studies of tungsten oxides by investigating the biological responses induced by TBO when administered via nose-only inhalation to rats at levels of 0.08, 0.325, and 0.65 mg TBO/L of air for 6 h/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day recovery period. Inhaled TBO was absorbed systemically and blood levels of tungsten increased as inhaled concentration increased. Among the tissues analyzed for tungsten levels, lung, femur and kidney showed increased levels, with lung at least an order of magnitude greater than kidney or femur. By exposure day 14, tungsten concentration in tissues had reached steady-state. Increased lung weight was noted for both terminal and recovery animals and was attributed to deposition of TBO in the lungs, inducing a macrophage influx. Microscopic evaluation of tissues revealed a dose-related increase in alveolar pigmented macrophages, alveolar foreign material and individual alveolar foamy macrophages in lung. After a recovery period there was a slight reduction in the incidence and severity of histopathological findings. Based on the absence of other adverse effects, the increased lung weights and the microscopic findings were interpreted as nonadverse response to exposure and were not considered a specific reaction to TBO.

  9. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  10. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  11. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  12. Effect of direct current density on performance of tungsten coating electroplated from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-WO{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fan, E-mail: jiangfan1109@163.com [Department of Materials Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, 219 Ningliu Road, Nanjing 210044, Jiangsu Province (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 10083 (China); Shao, Shaofeng; Wu, Hongyan [Department of Materials Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, 219 Ningliu Road, Nanjing 210044, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were electroplated from the Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-WO{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt. • Tungsten coating comprised a tooth-like layer and a columnar growth layer. • The surface roughness increases as increasing current density. • At high current densities the coating process favors the growth of the (211) orientation. • The growth rate of tungsten crystal nucleus is higher than the nucleation rate. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings with body-centered cubic (bbc) structure were successfully electroplated from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-WO{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} molten salt at 1153 K. Compact and void-free coatings were obtained from the molten salt when the current density was below 80 mA cm{sup −2}. As the increasing of current density, the trend of crystal growth was promoted and the grain size and surface roughness of tungsten coatings increased. The preferred orientation of the coatings changed from (200) to (211). All coatings comprised an inner layer of tooth-like grains and an outer layer of columnar grains. It could be concluded that the nucleation easily occurred on Cu alloy substrate for tungsten atom. When the current density was up to 100 mA cm{sup −2}, the show increase of the thickness was responsible for the rapid decreases of current efficiency. All the tungsten coatings and copper alloy substrates exhibited excellent interface bonding with an adhesive strength which is over 32 MPa.

  13. Separation of rhenium from molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium, platinum metals and other elements by reduction and solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatirajam, V; Kakkar, L R

    1970-08-01

    Reduction in 1 M H(2)SO(4) with liquid zinc amalgam and extraction with isopentanol from 3M H(2)SO(4), separates rhenium from almost all the interfering elements of importance in rhenium determination. The small amounts of Mo, U, Fe and Ru still accompanying rhenium are removed by the thiocyanate-pentyl acetate or the oxine-chloroform extraction. The method is simple, rapid and of very wide applicability. It is particularly useful in the determination of rhenium in various alloys and tungsten-containing samples.

  14. Investigation of applicability of high purity tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate to Re-Ni alloy powder production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Majewski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for preparation of high purity tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate is presented. This method comprises reacting of a concentrated solution of ammonia water with high purity anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate(VII. The resulting tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate is reduced under dissociated ammonia conditions, to obtain Re-Ni alloy powder. The article also provides information on selected physicochemical properties of the produced powder. Such Re-Ni alloy powder can be applied for tungsten heavy alloys production. Keywords: tetraaminenickel(II perrhenate, reduction, heavy alloys, rhenium

  15. Mechanical characterisation of tungsten-1 wt.% yttrium oxide as a function of temperature and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, T.; Jiménez, A.; Muñóz, A.; Monge, M. A.; Ballesteros, C.; Pastor, J. Y.

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates the mechanical behaviour of an Y2O3-dispersed tungsten (W) alloy and compares it to a pure W reference material. Both materials were processed via mechanical alloying (MA) and subsequent hot isostatic pressing (HIP). We performed non-standard three-point bending (TPB) tests in both an oxidising atmosphere and vacuum across a temperature range from 77 K, obtained via immersion in liquid nitrogen, to 1473 K to determine the mechanical strength, yield strength and fracture toughness. This research aims to evaluate how the mechanical behaviour of the alloy is affected by oxides formed within the material at high temperatures, primarily from 873 K, when the materials undergo a massive thermal degradation. The results indicate that the alloy is brittle to a high temperature (1473 K) under both atmospheres and that the mechanical properties degrade significantly above 873 K. We also used Vickers microhardness tests and the dynamic modulus by impulse excitation technique (IET) to determine the elastic modulus at room temperature. Moreover, we performed nanoindentation tests to determine the effect of size on the hardness and elastic modulus; however, no significant differences were found. Additionally, we calculated the relative density of the samples to assess the porosity of the alloy. Finally, we analysed the microstructure and fracture surfaces of the tested materials via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this way, the relationship between the macroscopic mechanical properties and micromechanisms of failure could be determined based on the temperature and oxides formed.

  16. Investigation on the formation of tungsten carbide in tungsten-containing diamond like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strondl, C.; Carvalho, N.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Kolk, G.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    A series of tungsten-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC) coatings have been produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering using a Hauzer HTC-1000 production PVD system. Sputtering from WC targets has been used to form W-C:H coatings. The metal to carbon ratio has been varied to study changes in th

  17. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  18. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A.

    1978-08-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min/sup -1/ can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected.

  19. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature. Peri

  20. Preparation and Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Carbide Nanorod Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High density tungsten carbide nanorod arrays have been prepared by magnetron sputtering (MS) using the aluminum lattice membrane (ALM) as template. Electrocatalytic properties of nitromethane electroreduction on the tungsten carbide nanorod arrays electrode were investigated by electrochemical method, and their electrocatalytic activity is approached to that of the Pt foil electrode.

  1. Tungsten and other refractory metals for VLSI applications II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on tungsten and other refractory metals for VLSI applications. Topics include the following: Selectivity loss and nucleation on insulators, fundamental reaction and growth studies, chemical vapor deposition of tungsten, chemical vapor deposition of molybdenum, reactive ion etching of refractory metal films; and properties of refractory metals deposited by sputtering.

  2. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  3. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  4. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  5. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  6. Aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  7. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C. [Lab. of Special Ceramic and P/M, University of Science and Technology, 100083 Beijing (China); Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [FZJ-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association Euratom-FZJ, Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Postfach 1913, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Song, S.X. [Research Center on Fusion Materials (RCFM), University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 {mu}m, 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m{sup 2} respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2}. Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 {mu}m size at 0.33 GW/m{sup 2} and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 {mu}m size at 0.55 GW/m{sup 2}. The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 {mu}m size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m{sup 2}. The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 {mu}m size has

  8. Properties of Mechanically Alloyed W-Ti Materials with Dual Phase Particle Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Lukáč

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available W alloys are currently widely studied materials for their potential application in future fusion reactors. In the presented study, we report on the preparation and properties of mechanically alloyed W-Ti powders compacted by pulsed electric current sintering. Four different powder compositions of W-(3%–7%Ti with Hf or HfC were prepared. The alloys’ structure contains only high-melting-point phases, namely the W-Ti matrix, complex carbide (Ti,W,HfC and HfO2 particle dispersion; Ti in the form of a separate phase is not present. The bending strength of the alloys depends on the amount of Ti added. The addition of 3 wt. % Ti led to an increase whereas 7 wt. % Ti led to a major decrease in strength when compared to unalloyed tungsten sintered at similar conditions. The addition of Ti significantly lowered the room-temperature thermal conductivity of all prepared materials. However, unlike pure tungsten, the conductivity of the prepared alloys increased with the temperature. Thus, the thermal conductivity of the alloys at 1300 °C approached the value of the unalloyed tungsten.

  9. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingchen Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup, while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  10. Double phase conjugation in tungsten bronze crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, E J; Clark Iii, W W; Miller, M J; Wood, G L; Monson, B; Salamo, G J; Neurgaonkar, R R

    1990-02-20

    In this paper we report a new method for double phase conjugation particularly suited to the tungsten bronze crystal strontium barium niobate. It has also been observed to produce conjugate waves in BaTiO(3) and BSKNN. This new arrangement is called the bridge conjugator because the two beams enter opposing [100] crystal faces and fan together to form a bridge without reflection off a crystal face. Our measurements indicate that the bridge conjugator is competitive with previously reported double phase conjugate mirrors in reflectivity, response time, ease of alignment, and fidelity.

  11. Electrical properties of complex tungsten bronze ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhee, R.; Das, Piyush R.

    2014-09-01

    This paper highlights the electrical properties of two new complex tungsten bronze ceramics (K2Pb2Eu2W2Ti4Nb4O30 and K2Pb2Pr2W2Ti4Nb4O30) which were prepared by high temperature mixed oxide method. Variation of impedance parameters with temperature (27-500 °C) and frequency (1 kHz to 5 MHz) shows the grain and grain boundary effects in the samples. The variation of dielectric parameters with frequency is also studied. The ac conductivity variation with temperature clearly exhibits that the materials have thermally activated transport properties of Arrhenius type.

  12. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Mavromanolakis

    2007-12-01

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 layers and depth of 7.2 0 at normal incidence, having in total 3024 channels of 1 cm2, was tested recently with - beam. We describe the prototype and discuss some preliminary testbeam results on its performance with respect to position resolution, response inhomogeneity and transverse containment.

  13. Addition of oxygen to and distribution of oxides in tantalum alloy T-111 at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1975-01-01

    Oxygen was added at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about .0003 torr. The technique permitted predetermined and reproducible oxygen doping of the tantalum alloy (T-111). Based on the temperature dependency of the doping reaction, it was concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the tantalum and tungsten oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and oxygen from other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C but not at 820 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent effect on the doping reaction.

  14. Experimental Investigation and Analytical Modeling of Solid-Particle Erosion Behavior of Stellite Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsoesie, Sydney

    Stellite alloys are a range of cobalt-chromium alloys, also containing tungsten or molybdenum and a small amount (corrosion, wear and erosion environments. In this research a group of Stellite alloys that are commonly employed or potentially materials for erosion resistance application are studied under solid-particle erosion test. Two particle impact velocities (84 m/s and 98 m/s) and two impingement angles (30 degree and 90 degree) are used in the test. It is demonstrated that Stellite alloys are more resistant to erosion at 90 degree impingement angle than at 30 degree impingement angle and the erosion damage of Stellite alloys increases with the particle impact velocity. The erosion resistance of Stellite alloys is controlled mainly by their carbon content, but the tungsten and molybdenum contents also play an important role, because these elements determine the volume fractions of carbides and intermetallics in Stellite alloys. The eroded surfaces are analyzed using SEM to further understand the erosion test results. An erosion model, originally developed by Sheldon and Kanhere (1972), known as S-K model, has been modified for use on Stellite alloys, with the support of experimental data. The significant contribution of this modification is that the effect of particle impingement angle has been included. With this modified S-K model, for a Stellite alloy that has a similar chemical composition to one of the alloys studied in this research, the erosion rate for a set particle impact, velocity at an impingement angle between 30 degree and 90 degree can, be estimated. This modified S-K model can be used for erosion characterization of existing Stellite alloys and in the designing of new Stellite alloys for erosion resistance application.

  15. A study on consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun; Wang Yuxin; Feng Jicai

    2009-01-01

    A consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding method has been studied. This method is different from the traditional TIG welding because it introduces an MIG welding torch into the traditional TIG welding system. An indirect arc is generated between the consumable electrode of the MIG welding torch and the tungsten electrode of the TIG welding torch, but not generated between the tungsten electrode of the welding torch and the base metal. Welding current flows from the consumable electrode to the tungsten electrode in the free-burning indirect arc. The consumable aided tungsten indirect arc welding not only rapidly melts the welding wire but also effectively restrains the excessive fusion of the base metal. The welding experiment and the theoretical analysis confirm that this method can obtain a high deposition rate and a low dilution ratio during the welding process.

  16. Plasma spray forming of tungsten coatings on copper electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xian-liang(蒋显亮); F.Gitzhofer; M.I.Boulos

    2004-01-01

    Both direct current dc plasma and radio frequency induction plasma were used to deposit tungsten coatings on copper electrodes. Fine tungsten powder with mean particle size of 5μm and coarse tungsten powder with particle size in the range from 45 μm to 75 μm were used as plasma spray feedstock. It is found that dc plasma is only applicable to spray the fine tungsten powder and induction plasma can be used to spray both the coarse powder and the fine powder. The tungsten coating deposited by the induction plasma spraying of the coarse powder is extremely dense. Such a coating with an interlocking structure and an integral interface with the copper substrate demonstrates high cohesion strength and adhesion strength.

  17. Tungsten recycling in the United States in 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2011-01-01

    This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition in 2000, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of tungsten's many diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 2000, an estimated 46 percent of U.S. tungsten supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of tungsten consumed from new scrap to that consumed from old scrap was estimated to be 20:80. Of all the tungsten in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 66 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  18. Explosive compact-coating of tungsten–copper alloy to a copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xiaojie; Yan, Honghao; Wang, Xiaohong; Miao, Yusong

    2017-03-01

    This study proposed a new method for coating tungsten–copper alloy to copper surface. First, the tungsten–copper alloy powder was pre-compacted to the copper surface. Then, the powder in the hydrogen atmosphere was sintered, and the pre-compacted powder was compacted by explosive compact-coating. Finally, diffusion sintering was conducted to improve the density of the coating layer. The theoretical density of the coating reached 99.3%. Microstructure characteristics indicated that tungsten and copper powders were well mixed. Tungsten particles were larger than copper particles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) fracture surface analysis was different from the traditional fracture of metals. Coating and substrate joint surfaces, which were analyzed by SEM, indicated that the tungsten–copper alloy was sintered on the copper surface. The hardness of the coating layer was 197.6–245.2 HV, and the hardness of the substrate was approximately 55 HV.

  19. Microstructural characterization and field emission properties of tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chia-Hsiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Su, Cherng-Yuh, E-mail: cysu@ntut.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yan-Fu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-01

    Tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires were synthesized by using the DC magnetron sputtering and infrared furnace annealing processes. Scanning election microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to evaluate the topography and sizes. X-ray diffraction (XRD), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to analyze the composition and structure. From the results of HRTEM, it was discovered that the prepared nanowires have a monoclinic single-crystal phase of W{sub 18}O{sub 49} with lattice growth along the (010) lattice plane, and the lattice spacing is 0.378 nm, which agrees with XRD and GI-XRD results. The prepared tungsten oxide and titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires have turn-on voltage of 3.06 V/μm and 1.46 V/μm respectively. They also possess superior field enhancement factors of 5103 and 10667 respectively. Their behavior thus follows the Fowler-Nordheim expression for tunneling. - Highlights: • A simple method to prepare tungsten oxide nanowires by annealing tungsten film. • High aspect ratio of the 1D titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires. • High field enhancement factor of titanium-oxide-doped tungsten oxide nanowires.

  20. Thermal transport properties of multiphase sintered metals microstructures. The copper-tungsten system: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Autissier, Emmanuel; Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Richou, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    The thermal diffusivity of Cu-W sintered alloys microstructures is measured at room temperature at different compositions, using rear face flash experiments. The samples are synthesized with the Spark Plasma Sintering technique. The resulting microstructures are slightly porous and consist of angular nanoscale grains of tungsten with medium sphericity in a copper matrix. The tungsten particles are at the nanoscale with an average grain size of 250 nm in contrast to the copper matrix for which the average grain size lies in the range 20 μm-30 μm; this is large enough to avoid the grains boundary effect upon the thermal transport. The overall porosity of the microstructures lies within the range: 6 %≤P ≤12 % . Along with the experimental work, a predictive model describing the effective thermal conductivity of multiphasic macrostructures is proposed in order to explain the obtained experimental results. The model was developed based only on physical considerations and contains no empirical parameters; it takes into account the type of microstructure and the microstructure parameters: porosity, grain shape, grain size, and grain size distribution. The agreement between the experiments and the model is found to be excellent.

  1. ITER-relevant transient heat loads on tungsten exposed to plasma and beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J. H.; Doerner, R. P.; Dittmar, T.; Höschen, T.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Baldwin, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten (W) is presently the most attractive plasma facing material for future fusion reactors. Off-normal transient events such as edge localized modes and disruptions are simulated with a pulsed laser system in the PISCES-B facility, providing pulses with 1-10 ms duration with absorbed heat flux factors up to ˜90 MJ m-2 s-1/2. This paper characterizes surface morphology changes and damage thresholds under transient heating on W exposed to He plasma or D plasma with and without Be coatings. W is damaged in the form of grain growth, surface roughening, melting and cracking. With a Be coating on the order of μm thick, the laser pulse produces a variety of Be surface changes including Be-W alloying, vaporization of the Be layer, melting and delamination.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of tungsten carbide thin films on silicon (100) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Y.; Nakazono, T.; Ebihara, K.; Baba, K.

    1997-01-01

    A method of synthesizing tungsten carbide (WC) thin films by a pulsed YAG laser deposition is investigated. WC thin films are deposited on silicon (100) substrates by using WC5%Co alloy targets. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction shows that the strong peaks of W 2C appear at the substrate temperature of 500°C. Beside the strong peaks of W 2C, weak peaks of WC and W 3Co 3C appear at the substrate temperature of 650°C. Auger electron spectroscopy shows that the almost stoichiometric WC films are deposited at the methane gas pressure of 1.0 Pa. Morphological features of the samples have been obtained by employing the technique of scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to obtain structural and compositional information about the samples.

  3. Review on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieth, M., E-mail: Michael.rieth@imf.fzk.de [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boutard, J.L. [EFDA-Close Support Unit, Garching (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Ahlgren, T. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Antusch, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baluc, N. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Barthe, M.-F. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, Polytech ou Faculte des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Becquart, C.S. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Ciupinski, L. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Correia, J.B. [IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Domain, C. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Fikar, J. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Fortuna, E. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Fu, C.-C. [CEA, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Saclay (France); Gaganidze, E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe (Germany); Galan, T.L. [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Materials Science and Engineering, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT, San Sebastian (Spain); Gludovatz, B. [OAW, Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Leoben (Austria); Greuner, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Heinola, K. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-10-01

    All the recent DEMO design studies for helium cooled divertors utilize tungsten materials and alloys, mainly due to their high temperature strength, good thermal conductivity, low erosion, and comparably low activation under neutron irradiation. The long-term objective of the EFDA fusion materials programme is to develop structural as well as armor materials in combination with the necessary production and fabrication technologies for future divertor concepts. The programmatic roadmap is structured into four engineering research lines which comprise fabrication process development, structural material development, armor material optimization, and irradiation performance testing, which are complemented by a fundamental research programme on 'Materials Science and Modeling'. This paper presents the current research status of the EFDA experimental and testing investigations, and gives a detailed overview of the latest results on fabrication, joining, high heat flux testing, plasticity, modeling, and validation experiments.

  4. Phase Transformations upon Doping in Tungsten Trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wennie; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an emerging semiconductor material, with a growing number of applications in Li-ion batteries, photocatalysis, gas sensors and electrochromic devices. As an electrochromic material, WO3 turns from transparent to blue upon doping with monovalent species. Due to it having an empty A-site in the ABO3 perovskite structure, high doping concentrations are possible through intercalation. Tungsten trioxide has been experimentally shown to transform from the ground-state monoclinic symmetry to cubic symmetry with increasing monovalent doping. We use first-principles calculations to understand this transformation. Our calculations show that the addition of electrons to the conduction band is a primary driver of the phase transformation. We quantify the energetics and structural aspects of this transformation using density functional theory, allowing us to elucidate the mechanism. Comparison with experiment, role of the dopant species, and implications of structural changes for device applications will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE and NSF GRFP.

  5. Concentration dependent hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.

    2016-10-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten is studied as a function of temperature, hydrogen concentration and pressure using Molecular Dynamics technique. A new analysis method to determine diffusion coefficients that accounts for the random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position is presented. The results indicate that the hydrogen migration barrier of 0.25 eV should be used instead of the presently recommended value of 0.39 eV. This conclusion is supported by both experiments and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the migration volume at the saddle point for H in W is found to be positive: ΔVm ≈ 0.488 Å3, leading to a decrease in the diffusivity at high pressures. At high H concentrations, a dramatic reduction in the diffusion coefficient is observed, due to site blocking and the repulsive H-H interaction. The results of this study indicates that high flux hydrogen irradiation leads to much higher H concentrations in tungsten than expected.

  6. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  7. Morphology and microstructure characterization of 95W-3.5Ni-1.5Fe powder prepared by mechanical alloying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Islam S. Humail; Xuanhui Qu; Chengchang Jia; Mingli Qin; Xinbo He

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of mechanical solid-state reactions for formation of tungsten heavy alloy powder was discussed. A highenergy ball mill operating at room temperature was used for preparing tungsten heavy alloy powders, starting from elemental tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), and iron (Fe) powders. X-ray diffraction (XRD), particle size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to follow the progress of the mechanical solid-state reaction of W, Ni, and Fe powders. These morphological studies revealed three stages in the milling process. In the first stage, the particle deformation changes the irregular structure of the as-received powder particles to flattened morphology, and the average particle size increases. In the second stage, the powder is sufficiently deformed and the tendency to fracture predominates over welding, and the particle size decreases. With continuous milling, the system reaches steady state, and relatively small and uniform particle size distribution is obtained after 20 h of milling.

  8. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  9. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  10. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  11. Study on the Tribological Properties of Porous Titanium Sliding against Tungsten Carbide YG6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the metal cutting process, the friction and wear behavior between the cutting tool and machined surface is the most important factor that affects the surface quality and the service life of the cutter. The irregular pore structure of porous titanium alloy has changed its mechanical properties and the processing technology. The friction and wear mechanism of the cutting tool and the machined surface is greatly different from the traditional dense metal processing because of the crumbling at the edges, tearing phenomenon and the pore agglomeration effect of chips. In this paper, the tribological characteristics and the wear mechanism of friction pair which was formed by porous titanium alloy material and hard alloy cutter were studied from cutting force, cutting speed and temperature in micro-cutting condition, and the influence of porosity on the wear rate and friction coefficient was analyzed. Results show that the main factor which influences the friction coefficient and wear rate is the porosity. The wear mechanisms of porous titanium materials were abrasive and oxidation wear while the wear mechanism of tungsten carbide YG6 was abrasive wear. The friction coefficient and wear rate of the relatively stable state are beneficial to improve the surface quality and tool life. As a result, in the micro-cutting process of porous titanium alloys, the best choice of machining parameters for different porosity materials are as follows: the load is about 8 N, the sliding speed is about 400 r/min and the temperature is about 300 °C.

  12. Obtaining of films of tungsten trioxide (WO3) by resistive heating of a tungsten filament

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Thin film of tungsten oxide (WO3) has been studied extensively as an electrochromic material and has numerous applications in electrochromic devices, smart windows, gas sensors and optical windows. In order to explore the possibility of using it in electrochromic devices, thorough study the optical properties of the WO3 is an important step. The WO3 layers have been grown by hot-filament metal oxide deposition technique under atmospheric pressure and an oxygen atmosphere. By FTIR and Raman sc...

  13. The interface in tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1989-01-01

    The creep resistance of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites was evaluated. The interface region between the fiber and matrix was characterized by microhardness and electron probe microanalysis measurements which indicated that its properties were between those of fiber and matrix. However, the measured properties of the composite exceeded those calculated by the rule of mixtures even when the interface zone was assumed to retain all the strength of the fiber. The composite structure appeared to enhance the strengths of both the fibers and the matrix above what they exhibited in stand-alone tests. The effect of fiber orientation and matrix alloy composition on the fiber/matrix interface were also evaluated. Small alloying additions of zirconium and tungsten to the niobium matrix affected the creep resistance of the composites only slightly. A decrease in the creep resistance of the composite with increasing zirconium content in the matrix was ascribed to an increase in the diffusion rate of the fiber/matrix interdiffusion reaction, and a slight increase in the creep resistance of the composite was observed with an addition of 9 w percent tungsten to the matrix. In addition, Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis.

  14. Dense Pure Tungsten Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianzheng Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing using tungsten, a brittle material, is difficult because of its high melting point, thermal conductivity, and oxidation tendency. In this study, pure tungsten parts with densities of up to 18.53 g/cm3 (i.e., 96.0% of the theoretical density were fabricated by selective laser melting. In order to minimize balling effects, the raw polyhedral tungsten powders underwent a spheroidization process before laser consolidation. Compared with polyhedral powders, the spherical powders showed increased laser absorptivity and packing density, which helped in the formation of a continuous molten track and promoted densification.

  15. The preparation, characterisation and catalytic activity of tungsten bronzes

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Sheena

    1987-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The structure and catalytic aspects of tungsten bronzes have been considered. A series of potassium tungsten bronzes, KxW03, 0.05 =< x =< 0.8, and the corresponding series of sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxW03, 0.05 =< x =< 0.8 were prepared by a thermal method. The thermal stability of the prepared samples was studied in the presence of both an oxidising and a reducing gas. The number and...

  16. Electrode potentials of tungsten in fused alkali chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. B.; Volkovich, V. A.; Poskryakov, D. A.; Vasin, B. D.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2016-09-01

    Anodic dissolution of tungsten was studied at 823-1173 K in the melts based on NaCl-CsCl, NaCl-KCl-CsCl and LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic mixtures. The process results in the formation of W(IV) ions. Prolonged contact with silica results in oxidation W(IV) ions and decreasing tungsten concentration in the electrolyte due to formation of volatile higher oxidation state chloro- and oxychloro-species. Tungsten electrode potentials were measured in NaCl-CsCl and NaCl-KCl-CsCl based melts using potentiometry.

  17. Preparation of nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode by swaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发展; 诸葛飞; 张晖; 丁秉钧

    2002-01-01

    By using the high energy ball milling method,the nanosized ThO2 powders were obtained.Through mixing powders,sintering and hot swaging processing,a nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode was fabricated.The relative density of the nanocomposite material is near 100%.The microstructure of nanocomposite cathode is quite different from that of conventional thoriated tungsten cathode.Most of thoria particles are less than 100 nm in diameter,and distribute on the boundaries of tungsten grains.The nanocomposite cathode shows a much lower arc starting field than that of conventional cathode,which will improve the performance of the cathode significantly.

  18. Tungsten Export Price Raised Due to Customs Tax Regulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Affected by the export tax rise, China’s tungsten export price rose by about 40 per cent in the first 10 months of 2006. The average price of Ammonium Paratungstate (APT) was US$23,000/MT, up by 43.5 per cent year-on-year, and that of ferro-tungsten, blue tungsten oxide as well as yellow oxide also increased by 32.4 per cent to US$24,000/MT, 27.4 per cent to US$25,000/MT and 42.6 per cent to US$26,000/MT respectively.

  19. Low-Temperature Strengths and Ductility of Various Tungsten Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Hiraoka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used three kinds of tungsten sheets in this study. First, we examined microstructure such as grain size distribution using an optical microscope. Secondly, we carried out three-point bend tests at temperatures between about 290 and 500 K. Then, we examined fracture surface of a failed specimen using a scanning electron microscope. Lastly, by analyzing all these results, we evaluated apparent intergranular and transgranular fracture strengths and discussed strengths and ductility of tungsten. Additionally, we compared mechanical properties of tungsten with those of molybdenum.

  20. Density-functional studies of tungsten trioxide, tungsten bronzes, and related systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ingham, B; Chong, S V; Tallon, J L

    2005-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide adopts a variety of structures which can be intercalated with charged species to alter the electronic properties, thus forming `tungsten bronzes'. Similar optical effects are observed upon removing oxygen from WO_3, although the electronic properties are slightly different. Here we present a computational study of cubic and hexagonal alkali bronzes and examine the effects on cell size and band structure as the size of the intercalated ion is increased. With the exception of hydrogen (which is predicted to be unstable as an intercalate), the behaviour of the bronzes are relatively consistent. NaWO_3 is the most stable of the cubic systems, although in the hexagonal system the larger ions are more stable. The band structures are identical, with the intercalated atom donating its single electron to the tungsten 5d valence band. Next, this was extended to a study of fractional doping in the Na_xWO_3 system (0 < x < 1). A linear variation in cell parameter, and a systematic change in the po...

  1. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys.

  2. Laser irradiation of carbon-tungsten materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Marin, A.; Lungu, C. P.; Grigorescu, C. E. A.; Demitri, N.; Ursescu, D.; Porosnicu, C.; Osiceanu, P.; Kizane, G.; Grigoriu, C.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp2-sp3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses.

  3. Magneto photoluminescence measurements of tungsten disulphide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Jan; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Heimbrodt, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides have attracted great interest in the last few years. Thinned down to the monolayer limit they change from an indirect band structure to a direct band gap in the visible region. Due to the monolayer thickness the inversion symmetry of the crystal is broken and spin and valley are coupled to each other. The degeneracy between the two equivalent valleys, K and K‧, respectively, can be lifted by applying an external magnetic field. Here, we present photoluminescence measurements of CVD-grown tungsten disulphide (WS2) monolayers at temperatures of 2 K. By applying magnetic fields up to 7 T in Faraday geometry, a splitting of the photoluminescence peaks can be observed. The magnetic field dependence of the A-exciton, the trion and three bound exciton states is discussed and the corresponding g-factors are determined.

  4. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  5. Xiamen Tungsten Co.,Ltd Verified the Largest Tungsten Mine Worldwide with a Potential Value Topping 300 Billion Yuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>On June 5,the Ministry of Land and Resources announced that,in Dahutang area of Wuning County,Jiujiang City.Jiangxi Province,a tungsten mine with a reserve of 1.06 million tonnes has been prospected;it is the largest tungsten mine in the world today.One of the investors of this prospecting activity is Xiamen Tungsten Co.,Ltd,a public listed company from Fujian Province.According to data of The Ministry of Land and Resources,

  6. Enhanced toughness and stable crack propagation in a novel tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite produced by chemical vapour infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten is a promising candidate for the plasma-facing components of a future fusion reactor, but its use is strongly restricted by its inherent brittleness. An innovative concept to overcome this problem is tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite. In this paper we present the first mechanical test of such a composite material using a sample containing multiple fibres. The in situ fracture experiment was performed in a scanning electron microscope for close observation of the propagating crack. Stable crack propagation accompanied with rising load bearing capacity is observed. The fracture toughness is estimated using the test results and the surface observation.

  7. Underwater explosive welding of thin tungsten foils and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, P., E-mail: manikandan_exp@yahoo.com [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Lee, J.O.; Mizumachi, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Mori, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Raghukandan, K. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Cuddalore District, Tamilnadu 608 002 (India); Hokamoto, K. [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Underwater explosive welding was used to clad tungsten and copper. > The preset inclination was varied and the microstructure was observed. > Microstructure reveals a clear wavy interface for higher preset inclination. > High pressure and high strain rate leads to plastic flow of tungsten. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the ability to clad pure tungsten foils on copper plate using underwater shock waves generated by the detonation of explosive. Microstructural characterization revealed that a higher preset inclination results in wavy morphology. Weld formed at lower inclination exhibit a planar interfacial layer comprising fine grained particles of both components. The plastic flow of tungsten is ascribed to the synergistic influence of high pressure and high strain rate at the collision point.

  8. Advances in Thermionic Cathode of Tungsten and Molybdenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several kinds of tungsten thermonic cathodes have been introduced. As a promising alternative for thoriated tungsten, rare earth doped molybdenum cathode has been studied. Compared with the traditional thoriated tungsten, La-Mo cathode has higher emission current density at lower temperature, but it has poor emission stability. In order to improve the emission stability, systematical study on the emission mechanism of La-Mo cathode has been carried out. The life of La-Mo cathode has been improved and has achieved 1400 h, which exceeds the minimum life for practical uses (1000 h). As another alternative for thoriated tungsten cathode, Y-Mo cathode has shown better performance. The thermionic emission capability of Y-Mo cathode is between that of La-Mo cathode and Th-W cathode.

  9. Preparation and catalytic properties of tungsten oxides with different morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Yunfei, E-mail: beiyf2003@yahoo.com.cn [Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, 18 Xue Yuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China); Li Dadong; Nie Hong [Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, 18 Xue Yuan Road, 100083 Beijing (China)

    2010-09-01

    Tungsten oxides with different morphologies including platelet-like sheets, nanobelts, and nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by changing the ions in the synthetic solution. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared analysis and N{sub 2} adsorption were employed to reveal the morphological evolution, and results show that the morphological evolution can be attributed to the alteration of coordination environment of tungstenic cations contained in the synthetic solution. Furthermore, these products have been applied into hydrodesulfurization measurement to investigate the relationship between the morphologies of tungsten oxides and their catalytic properties. It is concluded that the catalysts originating from nanobelt-like tungsten oxides have highest catalytic activity and excellent selectivity due to their scrolled character and strong metallic edges.

  10. Calibration and temperature profile of a tungsten filament lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Izarra, Charles [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Gitton, Jean-Michel, E-mail: Charles.De_Izarra@univ-orleans.f [College Littre, 10 rue Littre, Bourges (France)

    2010-07-15

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament lamp (lamp used in automotive lighting) and then tested on a standard tungsten ribbon lamp. The calibration procedure developed was checked by determining the calibration point of the tungsten ribbon lamp with an accuracy of 2%. In addition, for low current intensity, it was observed that the temperature of the filament was not uniform; an explanation is proposed by considering a simple heat transfer model.

  11. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  12. INDUCTION PLASMA REACTIVE DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTENCARBIDE FROM TUNGSTEN METAL POWDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.L. Jiang; M.I. Boulos

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results are reported on the primary carburization reaction between the tungsten powder and methane in the induction plasma, and the secondary carburization of the deposit on substrate at high temperature. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructures of starting tungsten powder, carburized powder, and deposit. X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and microhardness measurement were used to characterize the structures and properties of the powder and the deposit. It is found that the primary carburization reaction in the induction plasma starts from the surface of tungsten particles when the particles are melted. Tungsten particles are partially carburized inside the reactive plasma. Complete carburization is achieved through the secondary carburization reaction of the deposit on substrate at high temperature.``

  13. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.; de Jong, M.M.; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric pressures

  14. Underwater explosive welding of thin tungsten foils and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, P.; Lee, J. O.; Mizumachi, K.; Mori, A.; Raghukandan, K.; Hokamoto, K.

    2011-11-01

    This study demonstrates the ability to clad pure tungsten foils on copper plate using underwater shock waves generated by the detonation of explosive. Microstructural characterization revealed that a higher preset inclination results in wavy morphology. Weld formed at lower inclination exhibit a planar interfacial layer comprising fine grained particles of both components. The plastic flow of tungsten is ascribed to the synergistic influence of high pressure and high strain rate at the collision point.

  15. China Limits the Mining Quantity of Tungsten and Rare Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Based on a notice issued by the Ministry of Land Resources, China’s tungsten mining quantity in 2006 will be controlled to 59,060 tons in concentrates form, which include 4,250 tons of recycled tungsten. And the rare earth mining quantity in 2006 will also be controlled to 86,620 tons (REO) including 8,320 tons of heavy rare earth and 78,200 tons of light rare earth.

  16. Effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Klimenkov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two grades of pure tungsten, single and polycrystalline, were irradiated for 282 days in the HFR reactor, Petten, at 900 °C to an average damage level of 1.6dpa. Each grade of tungsten was investigated using the transmission electron microscope (TEM to assess the effect of neutron irradiation on tungsten microstructure. Investigations revealed the formation of faceted cavities, whose diameter varies from 4 to 14nm in both materials. The cavities are homogeneously distributed only inside single crystalline tungsten. The local distribution of cavities in polycrystalline tungsten is strongly influenced by grain boundaries. The number densities of cavities were measured to be 4×1021 m−3 for polycrystalline and 2.5×1021 m−3 for single crystalline tungsten. This corresponds to volumetric densities of 0.45% and 0.33% respectively. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM revealed that faces of cavities are oriented in (110 plane. Analytical investigations showed precipitation of rhenium and osmium produced by a transmutation reaction around cavities and at grain boundaries.

  17. Degradation of tungsten under the action of a plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. V.; Sud'enkov, Yu. V.; Semenov, B. N.; Atroshenko, S. A.; Naumova, N. S.

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of the surface and structure of single-crystal tungsten and sintered powder tungsten during the action of a pulsed plasma jet is studied. It is shown that the degradation of a tungsten target during the action of a plasma jet with an energy flux density of 0.25-1 MJ/m2 is accompanied by surface evaporation and melting and the fracture of surface layers on scales of 150-250 μm. The results of a numerical simulation of the thermomechanical processes that occur in a tungsten target during the action of a plasma jet are presented. The degradation of tungsten during the action of a plasma jet is shown to proceed almost continuously from the action (evaporation, melting) to the times that are more than three orders of magnitude longer than the action time, which is caused by the thermomechanical processes occurring in the tungsten target. Moreover, the action of thermal stresses leads to structural and morphological changes throughout the sample volume, and these changes are accompanied by recrystallization in adiabatic shear bands.

  18. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  19. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780°C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0×1025 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22°C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22°C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  20. Oxidation behaviour of bulk W-Cr-Ti alloys prepared by mechanical alloying and HIPing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Rosales, C., E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); López-Ruiz, P.; Alvarez-Martín, S.; Calvo, A.; Ordás, N. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Koch, F.; Brinkmann, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Self-passivating tungsten based alloys are expected to provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten when used as first wall armour of future fusion reactors, due to the formation of a protective oxide scale, preventing the formation of volatile and radioactive WO{sub 3} in case of a loss of coolant accident with simultaneous air ingress. In this work results of isothermal oxidations tests at 800 and 1000 °C on bulk alloy WCr12Ti2.5 performed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and by exposure to flowing air in a furnace are presented. In both cases a thin, dense Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is found at the outer surface, below which a Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} scale and Ti{sub 2}CrO{sub 5} layers alternating with WO{sub 3} are formed. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}WO{sub 6} and Ti{sub 2}CrO{sub 5} scales act as protective barriers against fast inward O{sup 2−} diffusion. The oxidation kinetics seems to be linear for the furnace exposure tests while for the TGA tests at 800 °C the kinetics is first parabolic, transforming into linear after an initial phase. The linear oxidation rates are 2–3 orders of magnitude lower than for pure W.

  1. Refining Tungsten Purification by Electron Beam Melting Based on the Thermal Equilibrium Calculation and Tungsten Loss Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Luping; Liu, Wensheng; Ma, Yunzhu; Liu, Ye; Liu, Shuhua

    2015-10-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) technology has been considered as one of the key steps for preparing high purity tungsten, and reasonable setting of process parameters is the premise. In this paper, the optimum process parameters obtained from thermal equilibrium calculation and evaporation loss control of tungsten are presented. Effective power is closely related to melting temperature, and the required power for maintaining the superheating melt linearly increases with the increase of melt superheat temperature. The evaporation loss behavior of tungsten is significantly influenced by melting rate and melting temperature. Analysis of experiments show that the best results are realized at melting rate of 1.82 g/s, melting temperature of 4200 K, and the corresponding melting power of 130 kW, in which the main impurity elements in tungsten, such as As, Cd, Mg and Sn, present high removal ratio of 90%, 95%, 85.7% and 90%, respectively.

  2. Jiangxi Discovered a Large Tungsten Mine Which May Create the World’s Largest Tungsten Mineral Deposit Reserve Record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    It has been learned from the Jiangxi Province Geological and Mineral Resource Bureau Work Conference for 2015 held on January 21 that,the Zhuxi Tungsten and Copper Mine Project confirmed by the bureau at Fuliang County in Jingdezhen,Jiangxi in 2014 might create the world’s largest tungsten deposit reserve record.According to Peng Zezhou,Director of Jiangxi Province Geological and Mineral Resource

  3. Research for the method of image acquisition of the molten pool in the TIG welding of aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建军; 林涛; 陈善本; 王伟

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining the image of molten pool aluminum alloy's tungsten inert gas(TIG)welding becomes a challenging problem in the welding field. In this paper, a bran-new optical sensor based analyzing the light spectrum was designed, and the clear image of the molten pool during the aluminum alloy's welding using the common industrial CCD camera was obtained. And with the new algorithm provided by myself, the desirable characteristic parameters of the molten pool of aluminum alloy's welding were obtained, and it provides a good base for advanced monitor welding quality.

  4. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; /UCLA; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab; Heppelmann, Steven; /Penn State U.; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics

  5. Creep and Creep-Fatigue of Alloy 617 Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Jill K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Laura J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Richard N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Alloy 617 is the primary candidate material for the heat exchanger of a very high temperature gas cooled reactor intended to operate up to 950°C. While this alloy is currently qualified in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for non-nuclear construction, it is not currently allowed for use in nuclear designs. A draft Code Case to qualify Alloy 617 for nuclear pressure boundary applications was submitted in 1992, but was withdrawn prior to approval. Prior to withdrawal of the draft, comments were received indicating that there was insufficient knowledge of the creep and creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 welds. In this report the results of recent experiments and analysis of the creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 617 welds prepared using the gas tungsten arc process with Alloy 617 filler wire. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue properties of weldments are also discussed. The experiments cover a range of temperatures from 750 to 1000°C to support development of a new Code Case to qualify the material for elevated temperature nuclear design. Properties of the welded material are compared to results of extensive characterization of solution annealed plate base metal.

  6. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys.

  7. 塑料模具钢表面激光熔覆WxC/Ni基合金涂层的组织及性能%Microstructure and properties of laser clad Ni-based tungsten carbide alloy layer on a plastic mould steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵先锐; 左敦稳; 程虎; 李勤涛; 戴晟; 冯尚申

    2013-01-01

    采用TJ-HL-5000横流CO2连续激光器在2738塑料模具钢表面制备了WxC/Ni基合金涂层.利用金相显微镜、SEM、EDS、XRD、显微硬度计以及摩擦磨损试验机等检测设备研究了激光熔覆涂层组织及性能.XRD分析结果表明,熔覆层的主要物相有γ-Ni、W2C、WC、M23C6(M=Cr,Ni,Mo,W)、NiCr和Cr2O3等.金相显微镜、SEM和EDS分析结果表明,结合区为良好冶金结合,结合区为FeNiCrW合金,厚度为20 μm左右;基体对熔覆层合金的稀释度很低;熔覆层从界面向外依次分布着平面晶区、细等轴晶区、粗树枝晶区以及表面细晶区.显微硬度计结果表明,熔覆层的硬度值平均约900 HV1,是基体硬度的2.8倍左右.摩擦磨损试验结果表明,与基体相比熔覆层的耐磨性有了很大提高.%The WxC /Ni-based alloy layer was successfully coated onto 2738 plastic mould steel surface by using a TJ-HL-5000 transverse-flow CO2 continuous laser. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were investigated by metallographic microscope, SEM/ EDS, XRD, Vickers microhardness tester and friction-abrasion testing machine. XRD results show that the clad layer consists of WC, γ-nickel, Ni4B3, Cr7C3, W2C, M23 C6 ( M = Cr, Ni, Mo, W), NiCr and Cr2O3 phases. SEM and EDS results indicate that the metallurgical bonding is formed between the cladding coating and the steel substrate, and the interface zone is FeNiCrW alloy with thickness of 20 μm or so. From the interface to surface, the clad coatings consist of plane crystal layer, fine equiaxial crystal layer, coarse dendrite layer and surface fine-grain layer. The results of Vickers microhardness tesing show that the average micro-hardness of the laser clad coating is about 900 HV1, which is 1. 8 times higher than that of the steel substrate. The results of friction-wear test indicate that the wear resistance of the steel with clad layer is improved significantly compared with the substrate.

  8. The Strengthening of Weight Heavy Alloys During Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaczorowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies of W-Ni-Co-Fe experimental alloy, with chemical composition assuring a possibility of producing Ni-basedsupersaturated solid solution are presented. The alloy was prepared from tungsten, nickel, cobalt and iron powders which were first mixedthen melted in a ceramic crucible where they slowly solidified in hydrogen atmosphere. Next specimens were cut from the casting andheated at a temperature 950oC. After solution treatment the specimens were water quenched and then aged for 20 h at a temperature 300oC.The specimens were subjected to microhardness measurements and structure investigations. The latter included both conventionalmetallography and SEM observations. Moreover, for some specimens X-ray diffractometry studies and TEM investigations wereconducted. It was concluded that quenching lead to an increase of tungsten concentration in nickel matrix which was confirmed by Nilattice parameter increase. Aging of supersaturated solid solution caused strengthening of the Ni-based matrix, which was proved byhardness measurements. The TEM observation did not yield explicit proofs that the precipitation process could be responsible forstrengthening of the alloy.

  9. 面向等离子体钨基材料的增韧研究最新进展%Recent progress on toughening of tungsten-based materials as plasma facing materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何培; 姚伟志; 吕建明; 张向东

    2016-01-01

    Pure tungsten and tungsten-based materials are promising candidates as plasma facing materials in fu-sion application due to their high melting point,good thermal conductivity,low vapor pressure,low sputter rates and low radioactivity.However,the intrinsic brittleness is considered as the main restricting factor for tungsten-based materials and draws the maj or focus of the international fusion materials community.This paper reviews recent progress of three main strategies on toughening of tungsten-based materials:alloying,dispersion strengthening and composite.Presently only Rehnium addition is known to improve tungsten fracture properties by alloying.Proper mechanical working/treatment decreases ductile-brittle transition temperature of dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys.The ductile-brittle transition temperature of tungsten foil laminates by brazing is decreased to 150 ℃.%钨及钨基材料由于其高熔点、高热导率、低蒸气压、低溅射产额及低辐照放射性等优异性能,成为具有广阔应用前景的面向等离子体材料.然而,钨基材料的本征脆性成为其作为聚变材料的主要限制因素,也成为国际聚变材料界的研究热点.本文综述了通过合金化、弥散强化以及复合材料等3种途径来增加钨基材料韧性的最新研究进展.目前合金元素中只有铼的添加能够显著改善钨的韧性;单一弥散强化方式难以有效提高钨的韧性,适当的热机械加工能够明显降低钨基材料的韧脆转变温度;通过钨箔钎焊制备出的钨层压结构复合材料的韧脆转变温度降低到了150℃.

  10. The DAMPE silicon–tungsten tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarello, P., E-mail: philipp.azzarello@unige.ch [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Ambrosi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Asfandiyarov, R. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cadoux, F. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Caprai, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Domenjoz, M. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Dong, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Duranti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Fan, R. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV–10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon–tungsten tracker–converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m{sup 2}. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  11. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  12. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  13. Tungsten Oxides for Photocatalysis, Electrochemistry, and Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen-Feng; Song, Jiajia; Pan, Lun; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li; Zou, Ji-Jun

    2015-09-23

    The conversion, storage, and utilization of renewable energy have all become more important than ever before as a response to ever-growing energy and environment concerns. The performance of energy-related technologies strongly relies on the structure and property of the material used. The earth-abundant family of tungsten oxides (WOx ≤3 ) receives considerable attention in photocatalysis, electrochemistry, and phototherapy due to their highly tunable structures and unique physicochemical properties. Great breakthroughs have been made in enhancing the optical absorption, charge separation, redox capability, and electrical conductivity of WOx ≤3 through control of the composition, crystal structure, morphology, and construction of composite structures with other materials, which significantly promotes the efficiency of processes and devices based on this material. Herein, the properties and synthesis of WOx ≤3 family are reviewed, and then their energy-related applications are highlighted, including solar-light-driven water splitting, CO2 reduction, and pollutant removal, electrochromism, supercapacitors, lithium batteries, solar and fuel cells, non-volatile memory devices, gas sensors, and cancer therapy, from the aspect of function-oriented structure design and control.

  14. Growth of silicon on tungsten diselenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qirong; van Bremen, Rik; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Here, we report a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of the growth of silicon on a tungsten diselenide (WSe2) substrate. We have found convincing experimental evidence that silicon does not remain on the WSe2 substrate but rather intercalates between the top layers of WSe2. Upon silicon deposition, the flat WSe2 surface converts into a surface with a hill-and-valley structure. The lattice constant of the hill-and-valley structure is identical to the lattice constant of WSe2 and the transition from hills to valleys is very gradual, suggesting that the top layer is composed of pristine WSe2. In order to verify this conjecture, we have removed the height information from our scanning tunneling microscopy signal and obtained chemical contrast of the surface by recording dI/dz, rather than the conventional regulation voltage of the z-piezo. The spatially resolved dI/dz maps provide compelling evidence that the deposited silicon does indeed not reside on top of the WSe2 substrate.

  15. VARIATION OF RESOLVED PROPORTIONAL LIMIT WITH MOSAIC ANGLE FROM 77K TO 973K IN ZONE REFINED TUNGSTEN,

    Science.gov (United States)

    TUNGSTEN, *FRACTOGRAPHY), (*CRYSTAL SUBSTRUCTURE, TUNGSTEN), ZONE MELTING, DISLOCATIONS, GRAIN BOUNDARIES, ELECTRON BEAM MELTING , STRAIN(MECHANICS), IMPURITIES, TENSILE PROPERTIES, SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYOGENICS, HIGH TEMPERATURE

  16. Influence of metallurgical parameters on the electrochemical behavior of electrodeposited Ni and Ni-W nanocrystalline alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibi Nia, N.; Creus, J.; Feaugas, X.; Savall, C.

    2016-05-01

    The electrochemical behavior of electrodeposited nickel and Ni-W nanostructured alloys is discussed by studying the polarization curves in acidic medium. As tungsten content varies, several metallurgical parameters that can influence the electrochemical behavior are also modified, namely grain size, nature of grain boundaries, crystallographic texture and light element contamination. Comparing the behavior of Ni-W coatings with that of pure nickel and annealed coatings highlights that tungsten incorporation enhances anodic dissolution and has a detrimental influence on passive film, whereas grain size and grain boundary character behave as second-order parameters.

  17. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  18. Alloy Design Challenge: Development of Low Density Superalloys for Turbine Blade Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Smialek, James L.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2009-01-01

    New low density single crystal (LDS) alloys have been developed for turbine blade applications, which have the potential for significant improvements in the thrust to weight ratio over current production alloys. An innovative alloying strategy was identified to achieve high temperature creep resistance, alloy density reductions, microstructural stability, and cyclic oxidation resistance. The approach relies on the use of molybdenum (Mo) as a potent solid solution strengthener for the nickel (Ni)-base superalloy; Mo has a density much closer to Ni than other refractory elements, such as rhenium (Re) or tungsten (W). A host of testing and microstructural examinations was conducted on the superalloy single crystals, including creep rupture testing, microstructural stability, cyclic oxidation, and hot corrosion. The paper will provide an overview of the single crystal properties that were generated in this new superalloy design space. The paper will also demonstrate the feasibility of this innovative approach of low density single crystal superalloy design. It will be shown that the best LDS alloy possesses the best attributes of three generations of single crystal alloys: the low density of first-generation single crystal alloys, the excellent oxidation resistance of second-generation single crystal alloys, and a creep strength which exceeds that of second and third generation alloys.

  19. Tungsten Contact and Line Resistance Reduction with Advanced Pulsed Nucleation Layer and Low Resistivity Tungsten Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Anand; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jasmine; Humayun, Raashina; Wongsenakhum, Panya; Chang, Sean; Danek, Michal; Itou, Takamasa; Nakayama, Tomoo; Kariya, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Masazumi; Hizume, Shunichi

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes electrical testing results of new tungsten chemical vapor deposition (CVD-W) process concepts that were developed to address the W contact and bitline scaling issues on 55 nm node devices. Contact resistance (Rc) measurements in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices indicate that the new CVD-W process for sub-32 nm and beyond - consisting of an advanced pulsed nucleation layer (PNL) combined with low resistivity tungsten (LRW) initiation - produces a 20-30% drop in Rc for diffused NiSi contacts. From cross-sectional bright field and dark field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, such Rc improvement can be attributed to improved plugfill and larger in-feature W grain size with the advanced PNL+LRW process. More experiments that measured contact resistance for different feature sizes point to favorable Rc scaling with the advanced PNL+LRW process. Finally, 40% improvement in line resistance was observed with this process as tested on 55 nm embedded dynamic random access memory (DRAM) devices, confirming that the advanced PNL+LRW process can be an effective metallization solution for sub-32 nm devices.

  20. Chemically deposited tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten – The way to a mock-up for divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Riesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced materials is essential for sophisticated energy systems like a future fusion reactor. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W utilize extrinsic toughening mechanisms and therefore overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and its sensitivity to operational embrittlement. This material has been successfully produced and tested during the last years and the focus is now put on the technological realisation for the use in plasma facing components of fusion devices. In this contribution, we present a way to utilize Wf/W composites for divertor applications by a fabrication route based on the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of tungsten. Mock-ups based on the ITER typical design can be realized by the implementation of Wf/W tiles. A concept based on a layered deposition approach allows the production of such tiles in the required geometry. One fibre layer after the other is positioned and ingrown into the W-matrix until the final sample size is reached. Charpy impact tests on these samples showed an increased fracture energy mainly due to the ductile deformation of the tungsten fibres. The use of Wf/W could broaden the operation temperature window of tungsten significantly and mitigate problems of deep cracking occurring typically in cyclic high heat flux loading. Textile techniques are utilized to optimise the tungsten wire positioning and process speed of preform production. A new device dedicated to the chemical deposition of W enhances significantly, the available machine time for processing and optimisation. Modelling shows that good deposition results are achievable by the use of a convectional flow and a directed temperature profile in an infiltration process.

  1. Mechanical Properties of the TiAl IRIS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Thomas; Monchoux, Jean-Philippe; Thomas, Marc; Deshayes, Christophe; Couret, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study of the mechanical properties at room and high temperature of the boron and tungsten containing IRIS alloy (Ti-48Al-2W-0.08B at. pct). This alloy was densified by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The resultant microstructure consists of small lamellar colonies surrounded by γ regions containing B2 precipitates. Tensile tests are performed from room temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C). Creep properties are determined at 973 K (700 °C)/300 MPa, 1023 K (750 °C)/120 MPa, and 1023 K (750 °C)/200 MPa. The tensile strength and the creep resistance at high temperature are found to be very high compared to the data reported in the current literature while a plastic elongation of 1.6 pct is preserved at room temperature. A grain size dependence of both ductility and strength is highlighted at room temperature. The deformation mechanisms are studied by post-mortem analyses on deformed samples and by in situ straining experiments, both performed in a transmission electron microscope. In particular, a low mobility of non-screw segments of dislocations at room temperature and the activation of a mixed-climb mechanism during creep have been identified. The mechanical properties of this IRIS alloy processed by SPS are compared to those of other TiAl alloys developed for high-temperature structural applications as well as to those of similar tungsten containing alloys obtained by more conventional processing techniques. Finally, the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructural features together with the elementary deformation mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Impact of Embedded Military Metal Alloys on Skeletal Physiology in an Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    tumorigenic phenotype by heavy metal -tungsten alloy particles: indfuction of genotoxic effects . Carcinogenesis 22:115-25 35. Miller AC, Stewart M, Rivas...levels of organ physiology. Additional studies that examined the effect of these metals on local tissue determined that immediate genotoxic changes...time metal has demonstrated bone growth across multiple measures of bone physiology. Effect of problems or obstacles on the results: No problems

  3. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics studies of He Bubble Growth in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberuaga, Blas; Sandoval, Luis; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how materials respond to extreme environments is critical for predicting and improving performance. In materials such as tungsten exposed to plasmas for nuclear fusion applications, novel nanoscale fuzzes, comprised of tendrils of tungsten, form as a consequence of the implantation of He into the near surface. However, the detailed mechanisms that link He bubble formation to the ultimate development of fuzz are unclear. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into the He implantation process, but are necessarily performed at implantation rates that are orders of magnitudes faster than experiment. Here, using accelerated molecular dynamics methods, we examine the role of He implantation rates on the physical evolution of He bubbles in tungsten. We find that, as the He rate is reduced, new types of events involving the response of the tungsten matrix to the pressure in the bubble become competitive and change the overall evolution of the bubble as well as the subsequent morphology of the tungsten surface. We have also examined how bubble growth differs at various microstructural features. These results highlight the importance of performing simulations at experimentally relevant conditions in order to correctly capture the contributions of the various significant kinetic processes and predict the overall response of the material.

  4. Ambient Pressure Synthesis of Nanostructured Tungsten Oxide Crystalline Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures of the obtained samples have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and Raman scattering, respectively. Different morphologies were observed for different substrate temperatures, but otherwise identical growth conditions. The experimental measurements reveal the evolutions of the crystalline states and bond structures following the substrate temperatures. Besides, different substrate materials also affected the tungsten oxide nanostructures. Bundles of wire-type tungsten oxide nanowires with a length of up to 5 mm were obtained on Al2O3 substrate. Furthermore, the sensitive properties of the super long nanowires to the gas and different temperature were investigated. The dependence of the sensitivity of tungsten oxide nanowires to the methane as a function of the time was obtained. The sensitive properties of the tungsten oxide nanowires have almost linear relationship with the temperature.

  5. Measurements and modelling of hydrogen dynamics in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas; Schmid, Klaus; Toussaint, Udo von; Jacob, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Although hydrogen retention in defect free tungsten is low it can be significantly altered by plasma wetting. Thus understanding the interaction and dynamics of hydrogen in tungsten becomes an important issue. Present understanding distinguishes between solute and trapped hydrogen inventory. The solute hydrogen is located in the tetrahedral interstitial sites of bbc tungsten and can diffuse rapidly due to the low activation energy of 0.2-0.4 eV. The trapped hydrogen inventory resides at defects like vacancies, grain boundaries or dislocations, with de-trapping energies between 0.8-2.0 eV and is therefore less mobile. Common ex-situ experiments only allow the investigation of hydrogen retained in traps, while the solute is out of experimental reach due to its fast out-gassing at ambient temperatures. In this study the dynamics of the solute hydrogen in tungsten is measured in-situ for the first time. Diffusion/trapping simulations reveal that for low temperature e.g. 200 K, the solute hydrogen dominates the total inventory and its out-gassing after implantation is slowed down to the timescale of hours. Therefore in-situ hydrogen implantation and nuclear reaction analysis of tungsten samples are conducted at temperatures down to 140 K investigating experimentally the dynamics of solute hydrogen.

  6. 75 FR 75694 - Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing... United States after importation of certain semiconductor integrated circuits using tungsten metallization... following six respondents ] remained in the investigation: Tower Semiconductor, Ltd. of Israel;...

  7. Largest domestic tungsten and molybdenum deep processing project finding its home in Luan-chuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Recently, a tungsten and molybdenum deep processing project was formally executed with a joint investment of 300 million yuan from Luanchuan Molybdenum Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd, Beijing Tian-Long Tungsten & Mo-

  8. Characterization of thermomechanical damage on tungsten surfaces during long-duration plasma transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, David; Crosby, Tamer; Sheng, Andrew; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2014-12-01

    A new experimental facility constructed at UCLA for the simulation of high heat flux effects on plasma-facing materials is described. The High Energy Flux Test Facility (HEFTY) is equipped with a Praxair model SG-100 plasma gun, which is nominally rated at 80 kW of continuous operation, of which approximately 30 kW reaches the target due to thermal losses. The gun is used to impart high intermittent heat flux to metal samples mounted within a cylindrical chamber. The system is capable of delivering an instantaneous heat flux in the range of 30-300 MW/m2, depending on sample proximity to the gun. The duration of the plasma heat flux is in the range of 1-1000 s, making it ideal for studies of mild plasma transients of relatively long duration. Tungsten and tungsten-copper alloy metal samples are tested in these transient heat flux conditions, and the surface is characterized for damage evaluation using optical, SEM, XRD, and micro-fabrication techniques. Results from a Finite Element (FE) thermo-elastoplasticity model indicate that during the heat-up phase of a plasma transient pulse, the majority of the sample surface is under compressive stresses leading to plastic deformation of the surface. Upon sample cooling, the recovered elastic strain of cooler parts of the sample exceeds that from parts that deformed plastically, resulting in a tensile surface self-stress (residual surface stress). The intensity of the residual tensile surface stress is experimentally correlated with the onset of complex surface fracture morphology on the tungsten surface, and extending below the surface region. Micro-compression mechanical tests of W micro-pillars show that the material has significant plasticity, failing by a "barreling" mode before plasma exposure, and by normal dislocation slip and localized shear after plasma exposure. Ongoing modeling of the complex thermo-fracture process, coupled with elasto-plasticity is based on a phase field approach for distributed fracture, and

  9. Characterization of thermomechanical damage on tungsten surfaces during long-duration plasma transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, David, E-mail: david.rivera.ucla@gmail.com; Crosby, Tamer; Sheng, Andrew; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2014-12-15

    A new experimental facility constructed at UCLA for the simulation of high heat flux effects on plasma-facing materials is described. The High Energy Flux Test Facility (HEFTY) is equipped with a Praxair model SG-100 plasma gun, which is nominally rated at 80 kW of continuous operation, of which approximately 30 kW reaches the target due to thermal losses. The gun is used to impart high intermittent heat flux to metal samples mounted within a cylindrical chamber. The system is capable of delivering an instantaneous heat flux in the range of 30–300 MW/m{sup 2}, depending on sample proximity to the gun. The duration of the plasma heat flux is in the range of 1–1000 s, making it ideal for studies of mild plasma transients of relatively long duration. Tungsten and tungsten-copper alloy metal samples are tested in these transient heat flux conditions, and the surface is characterized for damage evaluation using optical, SEM, XRD, and micro-fabrication techniques. Results from a Finite Element (FE) thermo-elastoplasticity model indicate that during the heat-up phase of a plasma transient pulse, the majority of the sample surface is under compressive stresses leading to plastic deformation of the surface. Upon sample cooling, the recovered elastic strain of cooler parts of the sample exceeds that from parts that deformed plastically, resulting in a tensile surface self-stress (residual surface stress). The intensity of the residual tensile surface stress is experimentally correlated with the onset of complex surface fracture morphology on the tungsten surface, and extending below the surface region. Micro-compression mechanical tests of W micro-pillars show that the material has significant plasticity, failing by a “barreling” mode before plasma exposure, and by normal dislocation slip and localized shear after plasma exposure. Ongoing modeling of the complex thermo-fracture process, coupled with elasto-plasticity is based on a phase field approach for distributed

  10. Welding development for V-Cr-Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A vanadium structure, cooled with helium, is a favored concept for an advanced breeding blanket for fusion systems. The objective of this task is to develop the metallurgical and technological base for the welding of thick sections of V-Cr-Ti. The subsize Charpy test results for electron beam weld metal from the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy has shown significant improvement in Charpy fracture energy compared to both gas tungsten arc weld metal and the base metal itself. These results are preliminary, however, and additional confirmation testing and analysis will be required to explain this improvement in properties.

  11. Plating on some difficult-to-plate metals and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1980-02-01

    Electrodeposition of coatings on metals such as beryllium, beryllium-copper, Kovar, lead, magnesium, thorium, titanium, tungsten, uranium, zirconium, and their alloys can be problematic. This is due in most cases to a natural oxide surface film that readily reforms after being removed. The procedures we recommend for plating on these metals rely on replacing the oxide film with a displacement coating, or etching to allow mechanical keying between the substrate and plated deposit. The effectiveness of the procedures is demonstrated by interface bond strengths found in ring-shear and conical-head tensile tests.

  12. Optimization of pulsed TIG welding process parameters on mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Warangal 506 004 (India)], E-mail: adepu_kumar7@yahoo.co.in; Sundarrajan, S. [Scientist ' G' , Defence Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 028 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The present work pertains to the improvement of mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds through pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. Taguchi method was employed to optimize the pulsed TIG welding process parameters of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds for increasing the mechanical properties. Regression models were developed. Analysis of variance was employed to check the adequacy of the developed models. The effect of planishing on mechanical properties was also studied and observed that there was improvement in mechanical properties. Microstructures of all the welds were studied and correlated with the mechanical properties.

  13. Change of electrical and magnetic properties in Pd-W system alloys at hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berseneva, F.N.; Volkenshtein, N.V.; Galoshina, Eh.V.; Gromov, V.I.; Timofeev, N.I.; Shubina, T.S.

    1984-02-01

    Magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistance of hydrated solid solutions of the Pdsub(100-x)Wsub(x) (x=0, 1, 5, 7 and 8) system (H/Pd <= 0.5) are measured. The temperature coefficient of resistance (drho/dT) in Pd alloys, as well as susceptibility decrease with the growth of tungsten concentration. Magnetic susceptibility of alloys during hydrogenation charges in the same way as in the Pd-W system it linearly drops with the H content increase. The obtained results for the Pd-W system are discussed taking into account the electron spectrum variations, for the Pd-W-H systems taking into account the phase composition.

  14. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Brendakov Roman; Shvab Alexander; Brendakov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create ...

  15. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-10-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of [001] oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 °C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247.* For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta plus W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of γ' volume fraction, γ-γ' lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  16. Properties of drawn W wire used as high performance fibre in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Fuhr, M.; Gietl, H.; Han, Y.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Travitzky, N.; Zhao, P.; Neu, R.

    2016-07-01

    High strength and creep resistance also at high temperature, combined with a high thermal conductivity and high melting point make tungsten (W) an ideal material for highly loaded areas in future fusion reactors. However, as a typical bcc metal tungsten features an intrinsic brittleness up to very high temperature and is prone to operational embrittlement. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite (Wf/W) utilizes extrinsic toughening mechanisms similar to ceramic fibre-reinforced ceramics and therefore overcomes the brittleness problem. The properties of the composite are to a large extend determined by the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as reinforcement fibres. W wire exhibits a superior strength and shows ductile behaviour with exceptional local plasticity. Beside the typical mechanisms observed for ceramic composites the ductile deformation of the fibres is therefore an additional very effective toughening mechanism. Tension tests were used to investigate this phenomenon in more detail. Results show that there is a region of enhanced localized plastic deformation. The specific energy consumption in this region was estimated and used to suggest optimisation options for Wf/W composites.

  17. The Corrosion Behaviour of WC-Co-Ru Alloys in Aggressive Chloride Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Potgieter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hardmetals possess excellent wear resistance, making them suitable alloys in several industrial applications. Mine waters with both dissolved chloride and sulphate salts can be severely corrosive and can limit the application of hardmetal tools in the mining industry. Ru additions to these alloys can refine and improve selected mechanical properties, but its influence on the corrosion resistance is unknown. A series of WC-Co-Ru alloys was evaluated in different chloride containing media to investigate their corrosion resistance. Standard electrochemical corrosion tests, chronoamperometric measurements, and surface analyses with Raman spectroscopy were conducted. An increasing amount of Ru improves the corrosion resistance of all the alloys. The effect is not as dramatic as that observed with stainless steels containing Ru in corrosive media. In both corrosive media Ru decreased the cathodic Tafel constant and has a retarding influence on the cathodic part of the corrosion reaction. Raman analyses indicated the presence of tungsten oxide, hydrated tungsten oxide compounds, and CoO and Co3O4 formed on the alloy surfaces during the corrosion process.

  18. Preparation of ternary Mg-Li-Sn alloys from molten salt by electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng CAO; Milin ZHANG; Wei HAN; Yongde YAN; Lijun CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of Mg,Li and Sn on tungsten electrodes in LiCl-KCl-MgCl2-SnCl2 melts at 873 K was investigated.Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed that the underpotential deposition (UPD) of magnesium on pre-deposited tin leads to the formation of a Mg-Sn alloy,and the succeeding underpotential deposition of lithium on pre-deposited Mg-Sn alloy leads to the formation of a Mg-Li-Sn alloy.Chronopotentiometric measurements indicated that the codepositon of Mg,Li and Sn occurs at current densities more negative than -1.16 A.cm-2.X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that Mg2Sn phase is formed via galvanostatic electrolysis.The element Mg distributes homogeneously and Sn locates mainly on the grain boundaries in the MgLi-Sn alloy.

  19. Methods to Predict Stresses in Cutting Inserts Brazed Using Iron-Carbon Brazing Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovodov, V. V.; Valentov, A. V.; Retuynskiy, O. Yu; Esekuev, Sh B.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes a method for predicting residual and operating stresses in a flat-form tool insert made of tungsten free carbides brazed using iron-carbon alloy. According to the studies’ results it is concluded that the recommendations relating to the limitation of a melting point of tool brazing alloys (950-1100°C according to different data) are connected with a negative impact on tools as a composite made of dissimilar materials rather than on hard alloys as a tool material. Due to the cooling process stresses inevitably occur in the brazed joint of dissimilar materials, and these stresses increase with the higher solidification temperature of the brazing alloy.

  20. Synthesis of Tungsten Diselenide Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Condensation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Tolochko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline tungsten diselenide (WSe2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a gas phase reaction using tungsten hexacarbonyl and elemental selenium as precursors. The WSe2 nanoparticle morphology varies from the spherical shape to flake-like layered structures. Mean size in smaller dimension are less than 5 nm and the number of layers decreased linearly with decreasing of reaction time and concentration of carbonyl in the gas phase. The mean value of interlayer distance in <0001> direction is comparable with the microscopic values. The selenium-to-tungsten atomic ratios of 2.07, 2.19 and 2.19 were determined respectively, approach to the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1. Main impurities are oxygen and carbon and strongly interrelated with carbonyl concentration in the gas phase.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7356

  1. 3D-microscopy of hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeper, K., E-mail: katrin.peeper@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Moser, M.; Reichart, P. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Markina, E.; Mayer, M.; Lindig, S.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The mapping of hydrogen distributions in 3 dimensions and its correlation with structural features allow further insight into mechanisms of hydrogen trapping in tungsten. We studied hydrogen distributions in 25 μm thick polycrystalline tungsten foils by 3D hydrogen microscopy using a proton–proton-scattering method. Two types of tungsten samples were prepared: (i) at 1200 K annealed foils and using 1.8 MeV implantation energy (ii) at 2000 K annealed foils using 200 eV implantation energy. It has been found that large variations of surface hydrogen contamination occur within different samples. Nevertheless, a statistically significant variation of the hydrogen content across grain boundaries has been observed.

  2. Field-emission spectroscopy of beryllium atoms adsorbed on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, J.J.; Grzesiak, W.; Krajniak, J. (Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Field emission energy distributions (FEED) have been measured for the beryllium-tungsten (023) adsorption system over the 78-450 K temperature range. A temperature dependence of the normalized half-width, ..delta../d, of FEED peaks changed significantly due to beryllium adsorption; and the curve, ..delta../d vs p, for the Be/W adsorption system was identical in character to the calculated curve based on the free electron model in contrast to the curve for the clean tungsten surface. In the last part of this paper Gadzuk's theory of the resonance-tunneling effect is applied to the beryllium atom on tungsten. Experimental and theoretical curves of the enhancement factor as a function of energy have been discussed.

  3. Recombination of open-f-shell tungsten ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, C.; Badnell, N. R.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-03-01

    We review experimental and theoretical efforts aimed at a detailed understanding of the recombination of electrons with highly charged tungsten ions characterised by an open 4f sub-shell. Highly charged tungsten occurs as a plasma contaminant in ITER-like tokamak experiments, where it acts as an unwanted cooling agent. Modelling of the charge state populations in a plasma requires reliable thermal rate coefficients for charge-changing electron collisions. The electron recombination of medium-charged tungsten species with open 4f sub-shells is especially challenging to compute reliably. Storage-ring experiments have been conducted that yielded recombination rate coefficients at high energy resolution and well-understood systematics. Significant deviations compared to simplified, but prevalent, computational models have been found. A new class of ab initio numerical calculations has been developed that provides reliable predictions of the total plasma recombination rate coefficients for these ions.

  4. Microstructure and Texture Changes of Tungsten-Rhenium coated on Carbon Fiber Composite during Annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXiang; XUZengyu; S.Tamura; N.Yoshida

    2002-01-01

    Since tungsten was chose as the divertor tiles of 1TER, the investigation of tungsten and its coating as plasma facing material (PFM) have been paid more attentions by fusion scientists all over the world. Recent years, tungsten coatings have been successfully

  5. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; De Temmerman, G.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Ji, G.; Zhou, H. B.; Wang, B.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼1024 ions m−2 s−1 to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the

  6. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  7. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  8. 75 FR 39678 - Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing....: 13163-000. c. Date filed: April 3, 2008. d. Applicant: Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC. e. Name of.... Hicks, Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC, 9050 Pine Creek Road, Bishop, CA 93514, phone (760) 387-2080....

  9. Loss of Balance between Tungsten Reserve and Mining, China’s Resource Advantage Is Weakening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>China’s tungsten reserve, product output, export trade volume and consumption all rank top in the world. By offering supply for more than 80% global tungsten consumption with less than 50% of global tungsten ore resource, China has made significant contribution to the development of

  10. 75 FR 66082 - Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... October 20, 2010. On November 9, 2009, Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC filed an application for a... Tungsten Development, LLC, 725 9050 Pine Creek Road, Bishop, CA 93514; phone: (706) 387-2080. FERC...

  11. 75 FR 66079 - Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2010. On November 9, 2009, Bishop Tungsten Development, LLC filed an application for a preliminary... be 26,300,000 kilowatt-hours. Applicant Contact: Douglas A. Hicks, Bishop Tungsten Development,...

  12. Microstructure and high temperature stability of age hardenable AA2219 aluminium alloy modified by Sc, Mg and Zr additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naga Raju, P. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, IIT-Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)], E-mail: puvvala_nagaraju@yahoo.com; Srinivasa Rao, K. [Metallurgical Engineering Department, Andhra University, Visakapatnam 530003 (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500258 (India); Kamaraj, M.; Prasad Rao, K. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, IIT-Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2007-08-25

    The present work pertains to the improvement of high temperature stability of age hardenable AA2219 aluminium-copper (6.3%) alloy. Addition of scandium, magnesium and zirconium to the base metal AA2219 was adopted to improve this high temperature stability. These additions were systematically varied by preparing alloys of different composition using gas tungsten arc melting. Long time ageing studies and impression creep technique were used to study the high temperature stability of the alloys. These modified compositions of the alloy resulted in fine equiaxed grains, refined eutectics, large number of high temperature stable and finer precipitates. Among all the compositions, 0.8% Sc + 0.45% Mg + 0.2% Zr addition was found to be significant in improving the high temperature stability of AA2219 alloy. This may be attributed to the possible microstructural changes, solute enrichment of the matrix and pinning of the grain boundaries by the finer precipitates.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Ni-Mo filler brazing alloy for Mo-W joining for microwave tube technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ferrer Sene

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A brazing process based on Ni-Mo alloy was developed to join porous tungsten cathode bottom and dense molybdenum cathode body for microwave tubes manufacture. The Ni-Mo alloy was obtained by mixing and milling powders in the eutectic composition, and applied on the surface of the components. The brazing was made at 1400 °C by using induction heating in hydrogen for 5 minutes. Alumina surfaces were coated with the binder and analyzed by Energy Dispersive X-rays Fluorescence. The brazed samples were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled to Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Stress-strain tests were performed to determine the mechanical behavior of the joining. The quality of the brazing was evaluated by assuring the presence of a "meniscus" formed by the Ni-Mo alloy on the border of the tungsten and molybdenum joint, the absence of microstructural defects in the interface between the tungsten and molybdenum alloys, and the adhesion of the brazed components.

  14. L-SHELL IONIZATION MEASUREMENT OF TUNGSTEN BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG XIU-FENG; HE FU-QING; LONG XIAN-GUAN

    2000-01-01

    L-shell partial production cross sections of Lα- , Lβ-, Lγ- rays by electron impact were measured by observing the counts of X-ray from impacted thin tungsten target. Total production cross sections and mean ionization cross sections were deduced from these measured results. The electron beam energy range was from 11 to 36 keV. Tungsten was sputtered onto a carbon backing to reduce bremsstrahlung of the backing. The effect of electrons reflected by the backing has been corrected. Comparison with two theoretical calculations has performed. The experimental results agree rather well with the theoretical predications.

  15. The WiZard/CAPRICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Celletti, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Grandi, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Papini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Perego, A. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Piccardi, S. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Spillantini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Bidoli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Candusso, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Casolino, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Morselli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Picozza, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Sparvoli, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `Tor Vergata`, and Sezione INFN di Roma 1I (Italy); Basini, G. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN, Frascati (Italy); Mazzenga, G. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN, Frascati (Italy); Ricci, M. [Laboratori Nazionali INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bronzini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita `La Sapienza`, and Sezione INFN di Roma (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Boezio, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bravar, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Fratnik, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Schiavon, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Universita, Trieste and Sezione INFN di Trie (Italy)

    1996-02-21

    A silicon-tungsten calorimeter has been developed to be flown in the WiZard/CAPRICE balloon borne experiment to measure the flux of antiprotons, positrons and light nuclei in the cosmic radiation. The calorimeter is composed of 8 x,y silicon sampling planes [active area (48 x 48) cm{sup 2}] interleaved with 7 tungsten absorbers (7 radiation lengths); it provides the topology of the interacting events together with an independent measurement of the deposited energy. Details of the front-end electronics and of the read-out system are given and the overall performances during pre-flight ground operations are described as well. (orig.).

  16. The WiZard/CAPRICE silicon-tungsten calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocciolini, M.; Celletti, F.; Finetti, N.; Grandi, M.; Papini, P.; Perego, A.; Piccardi, S.; Spillantini, P. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Bidoli, V.; Candusso, M. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione di Roma II (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A silicon-tungsten calorimeter has been developed to be flown in the WiZard/ CAPRICE balloon borne experiment to measure the flux of antiprotons, positrons and light nuclei in the cosmic radiation. The calorimeter is composed of 8 x, y silicon sampling planes (active area (48x48) cm{sup 2}) interleaved with 7 tungsten absorbers (7 radiation lengths); it provides the topology of the interacting events together with an independent measurement of the deposited energy. Details of the front-end electronics and of the read-out system are given and the overall performances during pre-flight ground operations are described as well.

  17. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J.L.; Butler, D.L.; Sim, L.M.; Jarfors, A.E.W. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-11-15

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable. (orig.)

  18. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. L.; Butler, D. L.; Sim, L. M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.

    2010-11-01

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable.

  19. Electronic transport and scattering times in tungsten-decorated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Jamie A.; Henriksen, Erik A.

    2017-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of a monolayer graphene device have been studied before and after the deposition of a dilute coating of tungsten adatoms on the surface. For coverages up to 2.5% of a monolayer, we find tungsten adatoms simultaneously donate electrons to graphene and reduce the carrier mobility, impacting the zero- and finite-field transport properties. Two independent transport analyses suggest the adatoms lie nearly 1 nm above the surface. The presence of adatoms is also seen to impact the low-field magnetoresistance, altering the signatures of weak localization.

  20. Quantum-Accurate Molecular Dynamics Potential for Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Mitchell; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this short contribution is to report on the development of a Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP) for tungsten. We have focused on the characterization of elastic and defect properties of the pure material in order to support molecular dynamics simulations of plasma-facing materials in fusion reactors. A parallel genetic algorithm approach was used to efficiently search for fitting parameters optimized against a large number of objective functions. In addition, we have shown that this many-body tungsten potential can be used in conjunction with a simple helium pair potential1 to produce accurate defect formation energies for the W-He binary system.