WorldWideScience

Sample records for weak wind effects

  1. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  2. The magnetosphere under weak solar wind forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere was very strongly disturbed during the passage of the strong shock and the following interacting ejecta on 21–25 October 2001. These disturbances included two intense storms (Dst*≈−250 and −180 nT, respectively. The cessation of this activity at the start of 24 October ushered in a peculiar state of the magnetosphere which lasted for about 28 h and which we discuss in this paper. The interplanetary field was dominated by the sunward component [B=(4.29±0.77, −0.30±0.71, 0.49±0.45 nT]. We analyze global indicators of geomagnetic disturbances, polar cap precipitation, ground magnetometer records, and ionospheric convection as obtained from SuperDARN radars. The state of the magnetosphere is characterized by the following features: (i generally weak and patchy (in time low-latitude dayside reconnection or reconnection poleward of the cusps; (ii absence of substorms; (iii a monotonic recovery from the previous storm activity (Dst corrected for magnetopause currents decreasing from ~−65 to ~−35 nT, giving an unforced decreased of ~1.1 nT/h; (iv the probable absence of viscous-type interaction originating from the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability; (v a cross-polar cap potential of just 20–30 kV; (vi a persistent, polar cap region containing (vii very weak, and sometimes absent, electron precipitation and no systematic inter-hemisphere asymmetry. Whereas we therefore infer the presence of a moderate amount of open flux, the convection is generally weak and patchy, which we ascribe to the lack of solar wind driver. This magnetospheric state approaches that predicted by Cowley and Lockwood (1992 but has never yet been observed.

  3. Power control for wind turbines in weak grids: Project summary

    OpenAIRE

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    In many parts of the world and certainly in Europe large areas exist where the wind resources are good or very good and the grid is relatively weak due to a small population. In these areas the capacity of the grid can very often be a limiting factor forthe exploitation of the wind resource. There are two main problems concerned with wind power and weak grids. The first is the steady state voltage level. When the power consumption is low e.g. during the night the voltage of the grid can incre...

  4. Power control for wind turbines in weak grids: Project summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    . There are two main problems concerned with wind power and weak grids. The first is the steady state voltage level. When the power consumption is low e.g. during the night the voltage of the grid can increase tolevels above the limits if the wind power input is high. The other main problem is voltage...... fluctuations. Because the wind is fluctuating the output from the wind turbines is also fluctuating. This together with wind turbine cut-ins can result in voltagefluctuations that are above the flicker limit. Some or all of the these problems can be avoided if a so-called power control concept is applied...... together with the wind farm. The idea behind the power control concept is to eliminate the violations of thesteady state voltage level by buffering the power from the wind turbines in periods where the voltage limits might be violated and then release it when the voltage level is lower and combine...

  5. Dynamic Modelling of a Wind Farm and Analysis of Its Impact on a Weak Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Suvire, Gastón Orlando; Mercado, Pedro Enrique

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the model aspects and the impact of wind power onto a weak power system have been described. A wind system model was presented that takes into account factors such as a rapidly varying turbulence component of the wind and the aerodynamic effects associated to the layout of wind turbines throughout the farm. A test system was used and case studies for different instances of wind farm operation were analyzed, aiming at evaluating the interaction of the wind farm with the power ...

  6. Winding out of the Swamp: Evading the weak gravity conjecture with F-term winding inflation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Hebecker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new model of large field inflation along a winding trajectory in the field space of two axionic fields, where the “axions” originate from the complex structure moduli sector of a Calabi–Yau 3-fold at large complex structure. The winding trajectory arises from fixing one combination of axions by bulk fluxes and allows for a transplanckian effective field range. The inflaton potential arises from small “instantonic” corrections to the geometry and realises natural inflation. By working in a regime of large complex structure for two complex structure moduli the inflaton potential can be made subdominant without severe tuning. We also discuss the impact of the recent ‘no-go theorems’ for transplanckian axion periodicities on our work. Interestingly, our setup seems to realise a loophole pointed out in arXiv:1503.00795 and arXiv:1503.04783: our construction is a candidate for a string theory model of large field inflation which is consistent with the mild form of the weak gravity conjecture for axions.

  7. Weak characteristic information extraction from early fault of wind turbine generator gearbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiuli

    2017-09-01

    Given the weak early degradation characteristic information during early fault evolution in gearbox of wind turbine generator, traditional singular value decomposition (SVD)-based denoising may result in loss of useful information. A weak characteristic information extraction based on μ-SVD and local mean decomposition (LMD) is developed to address this problem. The basic principle of the method is as follows: Determine the denoising order based on cumulative contribution rate, perform signal reconstruction, extract and subject the noisy part of signal to LMD and μ-SVD denoising, and obtain denoised signal through superposition. Experimental results show that this method can significantly weaken signal noise, effectively extract the weak characteristic information of early fault, and facilitate the early fault warning and dynamic predictive maintenance.

  8. Power control for wind turbines in weak grids: Concepts development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Presently, high wind potentials in remote areas may not be utilized for electricity production due to limited grid transmission capacity and/or difficulties in matching the electricity production with the demand. The overall project objective is to helpovercome these bottlenecks, i.e. to identify...... for controlling the power output from a wind farm connected to aweak grid have been investigated. The investigation includes development of different control strategies, use of different storage types, development of a framework for comparing different options and tools needed as part of the framework...... technology in combination with wind farms can also contribute to the development of remote regions because such technology will improve theinfrastructure of the region and therefore increasing the conditions for local trade and industry...

  9. Power quality and integration of wind farms in weak grids in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, P.; Hauge Madsen, P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept.; Vikkelsoe, A.; Koelbaek Jensen, K. [Danske Elvaerkers Forening Udredningsafdelingen (DEFU), Lyngby (Denmark); Fathima, K.A.; Unnikrishnan, A.K.

    2000-04-01

    This is the final report of a joint Danish and Indian project' Power Quality and Integration of Wind Farms in Weak Grids'. The power quality issues have been studied and analysed with the Indian conditions as a case. On the basis of meetings with Danish wind turbine industry, Indian electricity boards, nodal agencies, wind turbine industry and authorities, the critical power quality as-pects in India have been identified. Measurements on selected wind farms and wind turbines have quantified the power quality, and analyses of power quality issues, especially reactive power compensation, have been performed. Based on measurements and analyses, preliminary recommendations for grid integration of wind turbines in weak grids have been formulated. (au)

  10. Power quality and integration of wind farms in weak grids in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Madsen, Peter Hauge; Vikkelsø, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report of a joint Danish and Indian project "Power Quality and Integration of Wind Farms in Weak Grids". The power quality issues have been studied and analysed with the Indian conditions as a case. On the basis of meetings with Danishwind turbine industry, Indian electricity...... boards, nodal agencies, wind turbine industry and authorities, the critical power quality as-pects in India have been identified. Measurements on selected wind farms and wind turbines have quantified the powerquality, and analyses of power quality issues, especially reactive power compensation, have been...

  11. Overview of DFIG-based Wind Power System Resonances under Weak Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    The wind power generation techniques are continuing to develop and increasing numbers of Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG)-based wind power systems are connecting to the on-shore and off-shore grids, local standalone weak networks, and also micro grid applications. The impedances of the weak...... weak network respectively. This paper will discuss the SSR and the HFR phenomena based on the impedance modeling of the DFIG system and the weak networks, and the cause of these two resonances will be explained in details. The following factors including 1) transformer configuration; 2) different power...... networks are too large to be neglected and require careful attention. Due to the impedance interaction between the weak network and the DFIG system, both Sub- Synchronous Resonance (SSR) and High Frequency Resonance (HFR) may occur when the DFIG system is connected to the series or parallel compensated...

  12. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arboleda, Juan David, E-mail: juan.arboledaj@udea.edu.co; Arnache Olmos, Oscar [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Ramos, Rafael [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Spin Quantum Rectification Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Anadon, Alberto [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-06-06

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  13. Harvesting wind energy to detect weak signals using mechanical stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Barbara J.; Rix, Jillian G.; Ross, Samuel J.; Yu, Yue; Lindner, John F.; Mathewson, Nathan; Wainwright, Elliot R.; Wilson, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Wind is free and ubiquitous and can be harnessed in multiple ways. We demonstrate mechanical stochastic resonance in a tabletop experiment in which wind energy is harvested to amplify weak periodic signals detected via the movement of an inverted pendulum. Unlike earlier mechanical stochastic resonance experiments, where noise was added via electrically driven vibrations, our broad-spectrum noise source is a single flapping flag. The regime of the experiment is readily accessible, with wind speeds ˜20 m/s and signal frequencies ˜1 Hz. We readily obtain signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 10 dB.

  14. Comparison of weak-wind characteristics across different Surface Types in stable stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, Anita; Rehberg, Ingo; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric transport in weak winds and very stable conditions is often characterized by phenomena collectively referred to as submeso motions since their time and spatial scales exceed those of turbulence, but are smaller than synoptic motions. Evidence is mounting that submeso motions invalidate models for turbulent dispersion and diffusion since their physics are not captured by current similarity theories. Typical phenomena in the weak-wind stable boundary layer include meandering motions, quasi two-dimensional pancake-vortices or wavelike motions. These motions may be subject to non-local forcing and sensitive to small topographic undulations. The invalidity of Taylor's hypothesis of frozen turbulence for submeso motions requires the use of sensor networks to provide observations in both time and space domains simultaneously. We present the results from the series of Advanced Resolution Canopy Flow Observations (ARCFLO) experiments using a sensor network consisting of 12 sonic anemometers and 12 thermohygrometers. The objective of ARCFLO was to observe the flow and the turbulent and submeso transport at a high spatial and temporal resolution at 4 different sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA. These sites represented a variable degree of terrain complexity (flat to mountainous) and vegetation architecture (grass to forest, open to dense). In our study, a distinct weak-wind regime was identified for each site using the threshold velocity at which the friction velocity becomes dependent upon the mean horizontal wind speed. Here we used the scalar mean of the wind speed because the friction velocity showed a clearer dependence on the scalar mean compared to the vector mean of the wind velocity. It was found that the critical speed for the weak wind regime is higher in denser vegetation. For an open agricultural area (Botany and Plant Pathology Farm) we found a critical wind speed of v_crit= (0.24±0.05) ms-1 while for a very dense forest (Mary's River Douglas Fir

  15. Adaptive Voltage Control Strategy for Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Connected to a Weak Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abulanwar, Elsayed; Hu, Weihao; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    continuous operation. This study investigates and analyses the repercussions raised by integrating a doubly-fed induction generator wind turbine into an ac network of different parameters and very weak conditions. An adaptive voltage control (AVC) strategy is proposed to retain voltage constancy...

  16. Flux-Tube Texture of the Solar Wind: Weakly Compressible MHD Theory and Direct Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sarkar, A.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2012-10-01

    Over the years, there has been a steady accumulation of observational evidence that the solar wind may be thought of as a network of individual magnetic flux tubes each with its own magnetic and plasma characteristics [Bartley et al. 1966, Marliani et al. 1973, Tu and Marsch 1990, Bruno et al. 2001, Borovsky 2008]. The weakly compressible MHD (WC-MHD) model [Bhattacharjee et al., 1998], which incorporates the effect of background spatial inhomogeneities, has been used recently to characterize the anisotropic magnetic fluctuation spectra (the so-called variance anisotropy) observed by ACE spacecraft. For a model of local pressure-driven interchange turbulence in a generic solar wind flux tube, the WC-MHD theory uses the Invariance Principle approach [Connor and Taylor 1997, Bhattacharjee and Hameiri 1988] to calculate explicitly the scaling of magnetic field fluctuations with plasma beta and other background plasma parameters. We test these theoretical predictions by direct numerical simulations of interchange turbulence in a flux tube using the DEBS MHD code. Synthetic variance anisotropy within a generic flux tube is computed in the high-Lundquist-number regime, and shows remarkable similarity with ACE observations.

  17. A Case Study of Wind-PV-Thermal-Bundled AC/DC Power Transmission from a Weak AC Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, H. W.; Du, W. J.; Wang, H. F.; Song, Y. T.; Wang, Q.; Ding, J.; Chen, D. Z.; Wei, W.

    2017-05-01

    Wind power generation and photovoltaic (PV) power generation bundled with the support by conventional thermal generation enables the generation controllable and more suitable for being sent over to remote load centre which are beneficial for the stability of weak sending end systems. Meanwhile, HVDC for long-distance power transmission is of many significant technique advantages. Hence the effects of wind-PV-thermal-bundled power transmission by AC/DC on power system have become an actively pursued research subject recently. Firstly, this paper introduces the technical merits and difficulties of wind-photovoltaic-thermal bundled power transmission by AC/DC systems in terms of meeting the requirement of large-scale renewable power transmission. Secondly, a system model which contains a weak wind-PV-thermal-bundled sending end system and a receiving end system in together with a parallel AC/DC interconnection transmission system is established. Finally, the significant impacts of several factors which includes the power transmission ratio between the DC and AC line, the distance between the sending end system and receiving end system, the penetration rate of wind power and the sending end system structure on system stability are studied.

  18. Thermorheological effect on magnetoconvection in weak electrically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The thermorheological effect on magnetoconvection in fluids with weak elec- trical conductivity is studied numerically under 1g and μg conditions. The results with a non-linear thermorheological equation considered in the problem when compared with those of the classical approach with constant viscosity ...

  19. Integration of large wind farms into weak power grids. Emphasis on the Ethiopian interconnected system (ICS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bantyirga Gessesse, Belachew

    2013-07-18

    The impact of increased wind power on the steady state and dynamic behavior of the Ethiopian power system is the main focus of this thesis. The integration of wind power to the existing grid with conventional generators introduces new set of challenges regarding system security and operational planning, the main cause of the difference arising from the uncertainty of the primary source of energy and the response time following a disturbance. For incorporating wind turbine models into the overall dynamic model of the system and investigating the effect of wind on the dynamic behavior of the wind first models of wind turbine components were put together by reviewing the current state of the art in wind turbine modeling and control concepts. The theoretical insight thus gained was applied to the Ethiopian power system as a case study. Since the models of the installed turbines were either not available or incomplete, an alternative modeling approach based on generic models was adopted. The generic model, in addition to obviating the need for technology or manufacturer specific models, reduces the complexity the dynamic model. Using this procedure, generic dynamic models for wind farm in the system were developed. The capability of dynamic models to reproduce the dynamic response of the system has been verified by comparing simulation results obtained with a detailed and generic wind farm model. It could be shown that the generic wind turbine model is simple, but accurate enough to represent any wind turbine types or entire wind farms for power system stability analysis. The next task was the study of the effect of increased wind power level on the general behavior of the Ethiopian system. It is observed that overall the impact of wind turbines on the operational indices of the system was -as could be expected- more pronounced in the vicinity of the wind farm. But the power angle oscillation following a disturbance was observed across the whole system. Further, as a

  20. Improved FRT Control Scheme for DFIG Wind Turbine Connected to a Weak Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Abulanwar, Elsayed; Chen, Zhe; Iov, Florin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved coordinated fault ridethrough (FRT) control strategy for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind turbine, (WT), in a weak grid. A technique for grid synchronization against voltage excursions, i.e., a Dual Second Order Generalized Integrator – Frequency Locked Loop (DSOGIFLL) is utilized to extract a robust grid voltage synchronizationsignal irrespective of the mains condition to enhance the overall system performance. Besides, a decoupled double syn...

  1. On the Weak-Wind Problem in Massive Stars: X-Ray Spectra Reveal a Massive Hot Wind in mu Columbae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Ignace, Richard; Waldron, Wayne L.; Todt, Helge; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Kitamoto, Shunji

    2012-01-01

    Mu Columbae is a prototypical weak-wind O star for which we have obtained a high-resolution X-ray spectrum with the Chandra LETG/ACIS instrument and a low-resolution spectrum with Suzaku. This allows us, for the first time, to investigate the role of X-rays on the wind structure in a bona fide weak-wind system and to determine whether there actually is a massive hot wind. The X-ray emission measure indicates that the outflow is an order of magnitude greater than that derived from UV lines and is commensurate with the nominal wind-luminosity relationship for O stars. Therefore, the "weak-wind problem"--identified from cool wind UV/optical spectra--is largely resolved by accounting for the hot wind seen in X-rays. From X-ray line profiles, Doppler shifts, and relative strengths, we find that this weak-wind star is typical of other late O dwarfs. The X-ray spectra do not suggest a magnetically confined plasma-the spectrum is soft and lines are broadened; Suzaku spectra confirm the lack of emission above 2 keV. Nor do the relative line shifts and widths suggest any wind decoupling by ions. The He-like triplets indicate that the bulk of the X-ray emission is formed rather close to the star, within five stellar radii. Our results challenge the idea that some OB stars are "weak-wind" stars that deviate from the standard wind-luminosity relationship. The wind is not weak, but it is hot and its bulk is only detectable in X-rays.

  2. Generation of intermediately-long sea waves by weakly sheared winds

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyavski, V M; Golbraikh, E; Mond, M

    2010-01-01

    The present work concerns the numeric modeling of the sea-wave instability under the effect of the logarithmic wind at hurricane conditions (ignoring non-linear effects, such as wave breaking, foam production, etc. Powell et al. (2003)^1, Shtemler et al. (2003)^2. The central point of the study is the calculation of the growth rate, which is proportional to the fractional input energy from the wind to the wave exponentially varied with time. The present modeling demonstrates that the Miles-type model applying Charnock's formula Charnock (1955)^3 for roughness to the hurricane -wind parameters underestimates the growth rate of the wind waves 5-40 times as compared with the model employing the roughness and friction velocity adopted from experimental data for hurricane winds.^1 This occurs due to Charnock's formula fails at large wind speeds. The stability characteristics obtained on the base of the hurricane-wind experimental parameters are self-consistent with the other results of the observations. A maximum ...

  3. Improved FRT Control Scheme for DFIG Wind Turbine Connected to a Weak Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abulanwar, Elsayed; Chen, Zhe; Iov, Florin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved coordinated fault ridethrough (FRT) control strategy for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind turbine, (WT), in a weak grid. A technique for grid synchronization against voltage excursions, i.e., a Dual Second Order Generalized Integrator – Frequency......), controller to counteract current ripples and tackle the DC link voltage fluctuations. Also, a reactive power support scheme to manage the DFIG reactive power during contingencies and fulfill the grid codes obligations is presented. Moreover, additional control terms are employed with the DFIG converters...

  4. Weak gravity conjecture and effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    The weak gravity conjecture (WGC) is a proposed constraint on theories with gauge fields and gravity, requiring the existence of light charged particles and/or imposing an upper bound on the field theory cutoff Λ . If taken as a consistency requirement for effective field theories (EFTs), it rules out possibilities for model building including some models of inflation. I demonstrate simple models which satisfy all forms of the WGC, but which through Higgsing of the original gauge fields produce low-energy EFTs with gauge forces that badly violate the WGC. These models illustrate specific loopholes in arguments that motivate the WGC from a bottom-up perspective; for example the arguments based on magnetic monopoles are evaded when the magnetic confinement that occurs in a Higgs phase is accounted for. This indicates that the WGC should not be taken as a veto on EFTs, even if it turns out to be a robust property of UV quantum gravity theories. However, if the latter is true, then parametric violation of the WGC at low energy comes at the cost of nonminimal field content in the UV. I propose that only a very weak constraint is applicable to EFTs, Λ ≲(log 1/g )-1 /2Mpl , where g is the gauge coupling, motivated by entropy bounds. Remarkably, EFTs produced by Higgsing a theory that satisfies the WGC can saturate but not violate this bound.

  5. Generation of intermediately-long sea waves by weakly sheared winds

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyavski, V M; Golbraikh, E; Mond, M

    2010-01-01

    The present work concerns the numeric modeling of the sea-wave instability under the effect of the logarithmic-wind profile at hurricane conditions. Non-linear effects, such as wave breaking, foam production, etc. Powell et al. (2003), Shtemler et al. (2010) are ignored. The central point of the study is the calculation of the wave growth rate, which is proportional to the fractional input energy from the wind to the wave exponentially varied with time. The present modeling demonstrates that the Miles-type model applying Charnock's formula for roughness to the hurricane-wind parameters underestimates the growth rate from 5 to 40 times as compared with the model employing the roughness and friction velocity adopted from experimental data for hurricane winds.1 This occurs due to Charnock's formula fails at large wind speeds. The stability characteristics found on the base of the hurricane-wind experimental parameters are consistent with the other results of the observations. Obtained in the present study a maxi...

  6. Impact of (α, n) reactions on weak r-process in neutrino-driven winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, J.; Arcones, A.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.

    2017-05-01

    After a successful core-collapse supernova, a neutrino-driven wind develops where it is possible to synthesize lighter heavy elements (30 critical to redistribute the matter and allow it to move from light to heavy elements after nuclear statistical equilibrium freezes out. In this first sensitivity study, we vary all (α, n) reactions by given constant factors which are justified based on the uncertainties of the statistical model and its nuclear physics input, mainly alpha optical potentials for weak r-process conditions. Our results show that (α, n) rate uncertainties are indeed crucial to predict abundances. Therefore, further studies will follow to identify individual critical reactions. Since the nucleosynthesis path is close to stability, these reactions can be measured in the near future. Since much of the other nuclear data for the weak r-process are known, the reduction in nuclear physics uncertainties provided by these experiments will allow astronomical observations to directly constrain the astronomical conditions in the wind.

  7. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, S.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  8. Neutrino-heated winds from millisecond protomagnetars as sources of the weak r-process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Andrey D.; Metzger, Brian D.; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2017-06-01

    We explore heavy element nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds from rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized protoneutron stars ('millisecond protomagnetars') for which the magnetic dipole is aligned with the rotation axis, and the field is assumed to be a static force-free configuration. We process the protomagnetar wind trajectories calculated by Vlasov, Metzger & Thompson through the r-process nuclear reaction network SkyNet using contemporary models for the evolution of the wind electron fraction during the protoneutron star cooling phase. Although we do not find a successful second or third-peak r-process for any rotation period P, we show that protomagnetars with P ˜ 1-5 ms produce heavy element abundance distributions that extend to higher nuclear mass number than from otherwise equivalent spherical winds (with the mass fractions of some elements enhanced by factors of ≳100-1000). The heaviest elements are synthesized by outflows emerging along flux tubes that graze the closed zone and pass near the equatorial plane outside the light cylinder. Due to dependence of the nucleosynthesis pattern on the magnetic field strength and rotation rate of the protoneutron star, natural variations in these quantities between core collapse events could contribute to the observed diversity of the abundances of weak r-process nuclei in metal-poor stars. Further diversity, including possibly even a successful third-peak r-process, could be achieved for misaligned rotators with non-zero magnetic inclination with respect to the rotation axis. If protomagnetars are central engines for GRBs, their relativistic jets should contain a high-mass fraction of heavy nuclei of characteristic mass number \\bar{A}≈ 100, providing a possible source for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays comprised of heavy nuclei with an energy spectrum that extends beyond the nominal Grezin-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off for protons or iron nuclei.

  9. A new approach for power quality improvement of DFIG based wind farms connected to weak utility grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mahvash

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of power quality problems for grid connected doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs with wind turbine include flicker, variations of voltage RMS profile, and injected harmonics due to switching in DFIG converters. Flicker phenomenon is the most important problem in wind power systems. This paper described an effective method for mitigating flicker emission and power quality improvement for a fairly weak grid connected to a wind farm with DFIGs. The method was applied in the rotor side converter (RSC of the DFIG to control the output reactive power. q axis reference current was directly derived according to the mathematical relation between rotor q axis current and DFIG output reactive power without using PI controller. To extract the reference reactive power, the stator voltage control loop with the droop coefficient was proposed to regulate the grid voltage level in each operational condition. The DFIG output active power was separately controlled in d axis considering the stator voltage orientation control (SVOC. Different simulations were carried out on the test system and the flicker short term severity index (Pst was calculated for each case study using the discrete flickermeter model according to IEC 61400 standard. The obtained results validated flicker mitigation and power quality enhancement for the grid.

  10. Weak relationship between risk assessment studies and recorded mortality in wind farms

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer, Miguel; Lucas, Manuela de; Janss, Guyonne, F.E.; Casado, Eva; Muñoz, Antonio R.; Bechard, Mark J.; Calabuig, Cecilia P.

    2012-01-01

    Wind farms generate little or no pollution. However, one of their main adverse impacts is bird mortality through collisions with turbine rotors. Environmental impact assessment (EIA) studies have been based on observations of birds before the construction of wind farms. We analysed data from 53 EIAs in relation to the actual recorded bird mortalities at 20 fully installed wind farms to determine whether this method is accurate in predicting the risk of new wind farm installations. Bird data f...

  11. Effect of Wind Direction on ENVISAT ASAR Wind Speed Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeyama, Yuko; Ohsawa, Teruo; Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of effects of wind directions (NCEP, MANAL, QuickSCAT and WRF) on the sea surface wind speed retrieval from 75 ENVISAT ASAR images with four C-band Geophysical model functions, CMOD4, CMOD_IFR2, CMOD5 and CMOD5N at two target areas, Hiratsuka and Shirahama...

  12. A weakly nonlinear model for multi-modal evolution of wind-generated long internal waves in a closed basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sakai

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A weakly nonlinear evolution model that accounts for multi-modal interaction in a small, continuously stratified lake of variable depth is derived. In particular, an evolution model for the first two vertical modes in a lake that is subject to wind stress forcing is numerically simulated. Defining modal energies, energy transfer between the first and the second vertical modes is calculated for several different forms of the density stratification. Modal energy transfer mainly occurs during reflection of mode-one waves at the vertical end walls, and it is shown that the amount of energy transfer from the first to the second mode is greatly dependent on the shape of the stratification profile. Also, the initial modal energy partition at the wind setup is shown to depend significantly on the penetration depth of the internal shear stress induced by the wind stress, especially if the stress distribution extends into the upper levels of the metalimnion.

  13. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Fatigue (Feeling Weak and Very Tired)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Fatigue (Feeling weak and very tired) Why do I feel ... level. Some people write down how they are feeling each day in a notebook to share with ...

  14. Possibilities by using a self-commutated voltage source inverter connected to a weak grid in wind parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Jan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Electric Power Engineering

    1996-12-01

    In this paper the hybrid wind farm connected to a weak grid is investigated. By combining different electrical wind power plant systems a cost-efficient solution is obtained. The point of common connection voltage level can be controlled by injecting reactive power from a phase-compensating capacitor battery and a voltage source inverter (VSI). If the short-circuit impedance ratio is lower than 1, the demanded reactive power injection to keep the voltage at nominal level is unrealistic. For short-circuit impedance ratios of 2 or higher the demanded reactive power level is acceptable. When using both induction generators and thyristor inverters the reactive power injector VSI size should be about 0.2 pu. If the hybrid farm consists of THYs, IGs and VSIs and the active power is equally shared between the systems, the VSI had to be scaled up by 5% to handle both active and reactive power. 7 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Effectiveness of Changing Wind Turbine Cut-in Speed to Reduce Bat Fatalities at Wind Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huso, Manuela M. P. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Hayes, John P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This report details an experiment on the effectiveness of changing wind turbine cut-in speed on reducing bat fatality from wind turbines at the Casselman Wind Project in Somerset County, Pennsylvania.

  16. Effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Demiglio, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of precipitation on wind turbine power output was analyzed. The tests were conducted on the two bladed Mod-0 horizontal axis wind turbine with three different rotor configurations. Experimental data from these tests are presented which clearly indicate that the performance of the Mod-0 wind turbine is affected by rain. Light rainfall degraded performance by as much as 20 percent while heavy rainfall degraded performance by as much as 30 percent. Snow mixed with drizzle degraded performance by as much as 36 percent at low windspeeds. Also presented are the results of an analysis to predict the effect of rain on wind turbine performance. This analysis used a blade element/momentum code with modified airfoil characteristics to account for the effect of rain and predicted a loss in performance of 31 percent in high winds with moderate rainfall rates. These predicted results agreed well with experimental data.

  17. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aavishkar A.; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Sachdev, Subir; Swingle, Brian

    2017-07-01

    We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov) exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z >1 .

  18. Evaluation on the implementation effect of wind power policies in china

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhuhan; Wang, Yuqing; Ye, Jiawen; Zeng, Ming; Wang, Xiaorong; Wang, Xinying

    2017-05-01

    To promote the development of wind power generation, China has introduced a series of supporting wind power policies. However, it is difficult to quantitatively evaluate the implementation effect of these policies. In order to evaluate the implementation effect of these policies, this paper puts forward a comprehensive evaluation method of policy implementation effects; it firstly quantitatively evaluates the weak link of effect through the effect indexes, and then evaluates the policy implementation and the existing problems through the action weight of policies. The conclusion can provide a reference to improve the wind power policy-making.

  19. EFFECT OF MASKED REGIONS ON WEAK-LENSING STATISTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hamana, Takashi, E-mail: masato.shirasaki@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

    2013-09-10

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple {chi}{sup 2} analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg{sup 2} survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting {chi}{sup 2}/n{sub dof} = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard {Lambda}CDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  20. Didactic discussion of stochastic resonance effects and weak signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, R K

    1996-01-01

    A simple, paradigmatic, model is used to illustrate some general properties of effects subsumed under the label "stochastic resonance." In particular, analyses of the transparent model show that 1) a small amount of noise added to a much larger signal can greatly increase the response to the signal, but 2) a weak signal added to much larger noise will not generate a substantial added response. The conclusions drawn from the model illustrate the general result that stochastic resonance effects do not provide an avenue for signals that are much smaller than noise to affect biology. A further analysis demonstrates the effects of small signals in the shifting of biologically important chemical equilibria under conditions where stochastic resonance effects are significant.

  1. Empirical investigation of wind farm blockage effects in Horn Rev 1 offshore wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitraszewski, Karol; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Nygaard, Nicolai

    We present an empirical study of wind farm blockage effects based on Horns Rev 1 SCADA data. The mean inflow non-uniformities in wind speed are analyzed by calculating the mean power outputs of turbines located along the outer edges of the farm for different wind directions, wind speeds...... and stability conditions. This forms a basis for understanding of the blockage effects and their influence on wind farm production....

  2. Radiative Impact of Aerosols on the Regional Boundary Layer Features in Strong and Weak Wind Conditions using WRF Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, R. A.; Sharan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play a vital role in the Earth's radiative energy budget. They exert a net cooling influence on climate by directly reflecting the solar radiation to space and by modifying the shortwave reflective properties of clouds. Radiation is the main source that regulates the surface energy budget. Surface temperature and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height depends on accurate calculation of both shortwave and longwave radiation. The weakening of the ambient winds is known to influence the structure of PBL. This study examines the sensitivity of the performance of Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) ARW Model to the use of different radiation schemes [For Long wave Radiation: Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM), Eta Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Goddard, New Goddard, NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 3.0), New Goddard scheme, Fu-Liou-Gu scheme and for Short wave Radiation: Dudhia scheme, Eta Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 3.0), New Goddard scheme]. Two different simulations are conducted one for the summer (14-15 May 2009) and winter (14-15 Dec 2008) season characterized by strong and weak wind conditions over India. Comparison of surface temperatures from different schemes for different cities (New Delhi, Ahmedabad, Lucknow, Kanpur, Jaipur and Jodhpur) on 14-15 May 2009 and 14-15 Dec 2008 with those observed shows the simulation with RRTM , New Goddard, and Fu-Liou-Gu schemes are closer to the observations as compared to other schemes. The temperature simulated from all the radiation schemes have more than 0.9 correlation coefficient but the root mean square error is relatively less in summer compared to winter season. It is surmised that Fu-Liou-Gu scheme performs better in almost all the cases. The reason behind can be the greater absorption of solar and IR radiative fluxes in the atmosphere and the surface provided in Fu-Liou-Gu radiation scheme than those computed in

  3. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aavishkar A. Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z>1.

  4. Wave Influenced Wind and the Effect on Offshore Wind Turbine Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kalvig, Siri; Manger, Eirik; Bjørn H. Hjertager; Jakobsen, Jasna B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the effect of wave influenced wind on offshore wind turbines is studied numerically. The wave is seen as a dynamical roughness that influences the wind flow and hence the wind turbine performance. An actuator line representation of the NREL's 5 MW offshore baseline wind turbine is placed in a simulation domain with a moving mesh that resolves the ocean waves. These wave influenced wind turbine simulations, WIWiTS, show that the wave will influence the wind field at the turbine r...

  5. Effects of Yaw Error on Wind Turbine Running Characteristics Based on the Equivalent Wind Speed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuting Wan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural wind is stochastic, being characterized by its speed and direction which change randomly and frequently. Because of the certain lag in control systems and the yaw body itself, wind turbines cannot be accurately aligned toward the wind direction when the wind speed and wind direction change frequently. Thus, wind turbines often suffer from a series of engineering issues during operation, including frequent yaw, vibration overruns and downtime. This paper aims to study the effects of yaw error on wind turbine running characteristics at different wind speeds and control stages by establishing a wind turbine model, yaw error model and the equivalent wind speed model that includes the wind shear and tower shadow effects. Formulas for the relevant effect coefficients Tc, Sc and Pc were derived. The simulation results indicate that the effects of the aerodynamic torque, rotor speed and power output due to yaw error at different running stages are different and that the effect rules for each coefficient are not identical when the yaw error varies. These results may provide theoretical support for optimizing the yaw control strategies for each stage to increase the running stability of wind turbines and the utilization rate of wind energy.

  6. The Effect of Weak Collisions on the Plasma Wave Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carrie; Germaschewski, Kai; Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2008-11-01

    It has been shown recently that weak collisions, which are a singular perturbation on the collisionless Vlasov equation, have a profound effect on the underlying spectrum for linear plasma waves by eliminating the Case-Van Kampen continuous spectrum and replacing it with a complete class of discrete eigenmodes [C.S. Ng, A. Bhattacharjee, F. Skiff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1974 (1999); 92, 065002 (2004).]. This discovery has important consequences for the regime of validity of C. H. Su and C. Oberman's classical theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 20, 427 (1968)] on the collisional decay of plasma wave echoes. Using a fully nonlinear one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson system solver including the Lenard-Bernstein collision operator, we have studied the effects of collisions on the echoes. We have identified the Su-Oberman regime on intermediate time scales. The long-time asymptotics of the system and its relation to the complete set of discrete eigenmodes found by Ng, Bhattacharjee and Skiff will be discussed.

  7. Effect of weak measurement on entanglement distribution over noisy channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Wen; Yu, Sixia; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Oh, C H

    2016-03-03

    Being able to implement effective entanglement distribution in noisy environments is a key step towards practical quantum communication, and long-term efforts have been made on the development of it. Recently, it has been found that the null-result weak measurement (NRWM) can be used to enhance probabilistically the entanglement of a single copy of amplitude-damped entangled state. This paper investigates remote distributions of bipartite and multipartite entangled states in the amplitudedamping environment by combining NRWMs and entanglement distillation protocols (EDPs). We show that the NRWM has no positive effect on the distribution of bipartite maximally entangled states and multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, although it is able to increase the amount of entanglement of each source state (noisy entangled state) of EDPs with a certain probability. However, we find that the NRWM would contribute to remote distributions of multipartite W states. We demonstrate that the NRWM can not only reduce the fidelity thresholds for distillability of decohered W states, but also raise the distillation efficiencies of W states. Our results suggest a new idea for quantifying the ability of a local filtering operation in protecting entanglement from decoherence.

  8. Wind Turbine Power Curve Design for Optimal Power Generation in Wind Farms Considering Wake Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Dao; Su, Chi

    2017-01-01

    In modern wind farms, maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is widely implemented. Using the MPPT method, each individual wind turbine is controlled by its pitch angle and tip speed ratio to generate the maximum active power. In a wind farm, the upstream wind turbine may cause power loss to its...... downstream wind turbines due to the wake effect. According to the wake model, downstream power loss is also determined by the pitch angle and tip speed ratio of the upstream wind turbine. By optimizing the pitch angle and tip speed ratio of each wind turbine, the total active power of the wind farm can...... be increased. In this paper, the optimal pitch angle and tip speed ratio are selected for each wind turbine by the exhausted search. Considering the estimation error of the wake model, a solution to implement the optimized pitch angle and tip speed ratio is proposed, which is to generate the optimal control...

  9. Mechano-chemical effects in weakly charged porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholkovskij, Emiliy K; Yaroshchuk, Andriy E; Koval'chuk, Volodymyr I; Bondarenko, Mykola P

    2015-08-01

    The paper is concerned with mechano-chemical effects, namely, osmosis and pressure-driven separation of ions that can be observed when a charged porous medium is placed between two electrolyte solutions. The study is focused on porous systems with low equilibrium interfacial potentials (about 30 mV or lower). At such low potentials, osmosis and pressure-driven separation of ions noticeably manifest themselves provided that the ions in the electrolyte solutions have different diffusion coefficients. The analysis is conducted by combining the irreversible thermodynamic approach and the linearized (in terms of the normalized equilibrium interfacial potential) version of the Standard Electrokinetic Model. Osmosis and the pressure-driven separation of ions are considered for an arbitrary mixed electrolyte solution and various porous space geometries. It is shown that the effects under consideration are proportional to a geometrical factor which, for all the considered geometries of porous space, can be expressed as a function of porosity and the Λ- parameter of porous medium normalized by the Debye length. For all the studied geometries, this function turns out to be weakly dependent on both the porosity and the geometry type. The latter allows for a rough evaluation of the geometrical factor from experimental data on electric conductivity and hydraulic permeability without previous knowledge of the porous space geometry. The obtained results are used to illustrate how the composition of electrolyte solution affects the mechano-chemical effects. For various examples of electrolyte solution compositions, the obtained results are capable of describing positive, negative and anomalous osmosis, positive and negative rejection of binary electrolytes, and pressure-driven separation of binary electrolyte mixtures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  11. Effectiveness of WRF wind direction for retrieving coastal sea surface wind from synthetic aperture radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeyama, Yuko; Ohsawa, Teruo; Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Wind direction is required as input to the geophysical model function (GMF) for the retrieval of sea surface wind speed from a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The present study verifies the effectiveness of using the wind direction obtained from the weather research and forecasting model...... directions: the meso‐analysis of the Japan Meteorological Agency (MANAL), the SeaWinds microwave scatterometer on QuikSCAT and the National Center for Environmental Prediction final operational global analysis data (NCEP FNL). In comparison with the errors of the SAR‐retrieved wind speeds obtained using...

  12. Health effects and wind turbines: a review of the literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knopper, Loren D; Ollson, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Wind power has been harnessed as a source of power around the world. Debate is ongoing with respect to the relationship between reported health effects and wind turbines, specifically in terms of audible and inaudible noise...

  13. Wind tunnel evaluation of Hi-Vol TSP effectiveness data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wind tunnel evaluation of EPA's Hi-Vol TSP sampler for sampling effectiveness with regards to aerodynamic particle diameter (5 to 35 microns), wind speed (2, 8, 24...

  14. Intense Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Coronal Holes Under the Weak Solar-Wind Conditions of Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, S.

    2018-02-01

    The activity of Solar Cycle 24 has been extraordinarily low. The yearly averaged solar-wind speed is also lower in Cycle 24 than in Cycles 22 and 23. The yearly averaged speed in the rising phase of Cycle 21 is as low as that of Cycle 24, although the solar activity of Cycle 21 is higher than that of Cycle 24. The relationship between the solar-wind temperature and its speed is preserved under the solar-wind conditions of Cycle 24. Previous studies have shown that only a few percent of intense geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst solar-wind flows from coronal holes. We identify two geomagnetic storms associated with coronal holes within the 19 intense geomagnetic storms that took place in Cycle 24.

  15. Effects of solar wind ultralow-frequency fluctuations on plasma sheet electron temperature: Regression analysis with support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Yue, Chao; Weygand, James M.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Chu, Xiangning

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether ultralow-frequency (ULF) fluctuations from 0.5 to 8.3 mHz in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can affect the plasma sheet electron temperature (Te) near geosynchronous distances, we use a support vector regression machine technique to decouple the effects from different solar wind parameters and their ULF fluctuation power. Te in this region varies from 0.1 to 10 keV with a median of 1.3 keV. We find that when the solar wind ULF power is weak, Te increases with increasing southward IMF Bz and solar wind speed, while it varies weakly with solar wind density. As the ULF power becomes stronger during weak IMF Bz ( 0) or northward IMF, Te becomes significantly enhanced, by a factor of up to 10. We also find that mesoscale disturbances in a time scale of a few to tens of minutes as indicated by AE during substorm expansion and recovery phases are more enhanced when the ULF power is stronger. The effect of ULF powers may be explained by stronger inward radial diffusion resulting from stronger mesoscale disturbances under higher ULF powers, which can bring high-energy plasma sheet electrons further toward geosynchronous distance. This effect of ULF powers is particularly important during weak southward IMF or northward IMF when convection electric drift is weak.

  16. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W T; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A G

    2015-11-05

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern 'wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  17. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  18. Committee Effectiveness in Higher Education: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Group Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on five models of committee effectiveness for purposes of this assessment will lend insight into the strengths and weaknesses of utilizing a structured action plan as a guide to achieving and maintaining optimum committee effectiveness in higher education. In the compilation of the strengths and weaknesses of committee decision making,…

  19. Numerical study of ocean wave effect on offshore wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lian; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Wind power at sea has become increasingly important in renewable energy study. For energy harvesting, winds over oceans have many advantages over winds on land, for example, larger and open surface area, faster wind speed, and more wind resource close to high population regions. On the other hand, the presence of ocean waves introduces complexities to wind turbines. There is a critical need to study the dynamical interactions among marine atmospheric boundary layer, ocean wave field, and floating turbines. In this research, we study offshore wind farm by performing large-eddy simulations for winds coupled with potential-flow-theory based simulations for broadband irregular waves, with the wind turbines represented by an actuator disk model. Our results show that windseas at different development stages result in different sea-surface roughness and have an appreciable effect on wind profile and the energy extraction rate of the turbines. If swells are present, swell-to-wind momentum and energy transfer further changes the wind field to introduce oscillations in as well as modify the mean of the wind power. DY and LS acknowledge the support of NSF-CBET-1341062. CM acknowledges the support of NSF-AGS-1045189 and NSF-OISE-1243482.

  20. The effect of microphone wind noise on the amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise and its mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Paul; von Hünerbein, Sabine; Cox, Trevor J

    2016-07-01

    Microphone wind noise can corrupt outdoor recordings even when wind shields are used. When monitoring wind turbine noise, microphone wind noise is almost inevitable because measurements cannot be made in still conditions. The effect of microphone wind noise on two amplitude modulation (AM) metrics is quantified in a simulation, showing that even at low wind speeds of 2.5 m/s errors of over 4 dBA can result. As microphone wind noise is intermittent, a wind noise detection algorithm is used to automatically find uncorrupted sections of the recording, and so recover the true AM metrics to within ±2/±0.5 dBA.

  1. Estimation of Rotor Effective Wind Speed: A Comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Knudsen, Torben; Svenstrup, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Modern wind turbine controllers use wind speed information to improve power production and reduce loads on the turbine components. The turbine top wind speed measurement is unfortunately imprecise and not a good representative of the rotor effective wind speed. Consequently, many different model......-based algorithms have been proposed that are able to estimate the wind speed using common turbine measurements. In this paper, we present a concise yet comprehensive analysis and comparison of these techniques, reviewing their advantages and drawbacks. We implement these techniques and compare the results on both...

  2. Penetración eólica con diferentes tecnologías de aerogeneradores en presencia de una red débil; Wind Penetration with different wind turbine technologies in a weak grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Santos Fuentefria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available La integración de la energía eólica en los sistemas eléctricos puede ocasionar problemas de estabilidad ligados fundamentalmente a la variación aleatoria del viento, lo que provoca que la tensión en el nodo de conexión varíe. Si el sistema al que se conecta es débil esta variación tiene una mayor influencia. Otro factor importante es el tipo de tecnología utilizada, ya que losaerogeneradores de velocidad fija conectados directamente a la red tienen un gran consumo de potencia reactiva, esta puede ser compensada utilizando diferentes dispositivos (banco de condensadores, SVC o STATCOM. Los aerogeneradores de velocidad variable poseen un convertidor que controla el consumo de reactivo para mantener la tensión en el nodo de conexión lomás estable posible. En este trabajo se hace una comparación entre los diferentes tipos de tecnologías de aerogeneradores utilizadas y su impacto en el límite de generación eólica cuando el sistema se va debilitando. The insertion of wind energy into electric network may provoke stability problems due to stochastic character of wind. The variation in the wind causes voltage variation in the Point of Common Coupling (PCC. In a weakest system that variation is high. Another important factor is wind turbine technology. The use of grid-connected fixed speed wind generator introduces a great consumption of reactive power that can be compensated using different devices as capacitors bank or static var compensator (SVC or STATCOM. In the other hand the variable speed wind turbine have anelectronic converter to control the reactive consumption to maintain the PCC voltage more stable. In this paper a comparison between the different types of wind turbines technology is show. It’s analyzing the impact in wind power limit for different wind turbine technologies in a weak system.

  3. A combined HST and XMM-Newton campaign for the magnetic O9.7 V star HD 54879. Constraining the weak-wind problem of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenar, T.; Oskinova, L. M.; Järvinen, S. P.; Luckas, P.; Hainich, R.; Todt, H.; Hubrig, S.; Sander, A. A. C.; Ilyin, I.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2017-10-01

    Context. HD 54879 (O9.7 V) is one of a dozen O-stars for which an organized atmospheric magnetic field has been detected. Despite their importance, little is known about the winds and evolution of magnetized massive stars. Aims: To gain insights into the interplay between atmospheres, winds, and magnetic fields of massive stars, we acquired UV and X-ray data of HD 54879 using the Hubble Space Telescope and the XMM-Newton satellite. In addition, 35 optical amateur spectra were secured to study the variability of HD 54879. Methods: A multiwavelength (X-ray to optical) spectral analysis is performed using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code and the xspec software. Results: The photospheric parameters (T∗ = 30.5 kK, log g = 4.0 [cm s-2], log L = 4.45 [L⊙]) are typical for an O9.7 V star. The microturbulent, macroturbulent, and projected rotational velocities are lower than previously suggested (ξph,vmac,vsini ≤ 4 km s-1). An initial mass of 16 M⊙ and an age of 5 Myr are inferred from evolutionary tracks. We derive a mean X-ray emitting temperature of log TX = 6.7 [K] and an X-ray luminosity of LX = 1 × 1032 erg s-1. Short- and long-scale variability is seen in the Hα line, but only a very long period of P ≈ 5 yr could be estimated. Assessing the circumstellar density of HD 54879 using UV spectra, we can roughly estimate the mass-loss rate HD 54879 would have in the absence of a magnetic field as log ṀB = 0 ≈ -9.0 [M⊙ yr-1]. The magnetic field traps the stellar wind up to the Alfvén radius rA ≳ 12 R∗, implying that its true mass-loss rate is log Ṁ ≲ -10.2 [M⊙ yr-1]. Hence, density enhancements around magnetic stars can be exploited to estimate mass-loss rates of non-magnetic stars of similar spectral types, essential for resolving the weak wind problem. Conclusions: Our study confirms that strongly magnetized stars lose little or no mass, and supplies important constraints on the weak-wind problem of massive main sequence

  4. Observation of the Imbert-Fedorov effect via weak value amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaswal, G.; Mistura, G.; Merano, M.

    2014-04-01

    Weak measurements have recently allowed for the observation of the spin-Hall effect of light in reflection or transmission, which is a spin-dependent light beam shift orthogonal to the plane of incidence. We report here the observation of the Imbert-Fedorov shift via a weak value amplification scheme. The Imbert-Fedorov effect does not depend on the spin of the incident photon only, but it has richer polarization dependence. We prove that weak measurements allow for a complete experimental characterization of the polarization properties of this tiny optical effect.

  5. Bayesian Information Sharing Between Noise And Regression Models Improves Prediction of Weak Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Gillberg, Jussi; Marttinen, Pekka; Pirinen, Matti; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kaski, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    We consider the prediction of weak effects in a multiple-output regression setup, when covariates are expected to explain a small amount, less than $\\approx 1%$, of the variance of the target variables. To facilitate the prediction of the weak effects, we constrain our model structure by introducing a novel Bayesian approach of sharing information between the regression model and the noise model. Further reduction of the effective number of parameters is achieved by introducing an infinite sh...

  6. Transport of airborne pollen into the city of Thessaloniki: the effects of wind direction, speed and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damialis, Athanasios; Gioulekas, Dimitrios; Lazopoulou, Chariklia; Balafoutis, Christos; Vokou, Despina

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effect of the wind vector analyzed into its three components (direction, speed and persistence), on the circulation of pollen from differe nt plant taxa prominent in the Thessaloniki area for a 4-year period (1996- 1999). These plant taxa were Ambrosia spp., Artemisia spp., Chenopodiaceae, spp., Cupressaceae, Olea europaea, Pinaceae, Platanus spp., Poaceae, Populus spp., Quercus spp., and Urticaceae. Airborne pollen of Cupressaceae, Urticaceae, Quercus spp. and O. europaea make up approximately 70% of the total average annual pollen counts. The set of data that we worked with represented days without precipitation and time intervals during which winds blew from the same direction for at least 4 consecutive hours. We did this in order to study the effect of the different wind components independently of precipitation, and to avoid secondary effects produced by pollen resuspension phenomena. Factorial regression analysis among the summed bi-hourly pollen counts for each taxon and the values of wind speed and persistence per wind direction gave significant results in 22 cases (combinations of plant taxa and wind directions). The pollen concentrations of all taxa correlated significantly with at least one of the three wind components. In seven out of the 22 taxon-wind direction combinations, the pollen counts correlated positively with wind persistence, whereas this was the case for only two of the taxon-wind speed combinations. In seven cases, pollen counts correlated with the interaction effect of wind speed and persistence. This shows the importance of wind persistence in pollen transport, particularly when weak winds prevail for a considerable part of the year, as is the case for Thessaloniki. Medium/long-distance pollen transport was evidenced for Olea (NW, SW directions), Corylus (NW, SW), Poaceae (SW) and Populus (NW).

  7. Are winds in cities always slower than in the countryside? Modelling the Urban Wind Island Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droste, Arjan; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan

    2017-04-01

    Though the Urban Heat Island has been extensively studied, relatively little has been documented about differences in wind between the city as a whole and the countryside. Urban winds are difficult to capture in both observations and modelling, due to the complex urban canyon and neighbourhood geometry. This study uses a straightforward mixed-layer model (Tennekes & Driedonks, 1981) to investigate the contrast between the diurnal cycle of wind in the urban and the rural environment. The model contains one urban and one rural column, to identify differences in wind patterns between city and countryside under equal geostrophic forcing. The model has been evaluated against rural observations from the 213 m. Cabauw tower (the Netherlands), and the urban observations from the BUBBLE campaign (Basel, Rotach et al., 2005). The influence of the urban fabric on the wind is investigated by varying the surface underneath the column model using the 10 urban Local Climate Zones, thereby altering building height, fraction of impervious surface, and initial boundary-layer depth. First results show that for high initial urban boundary-layer depths compared to the rural boundary-layer depth, the urban column can be much windier than its rural counterpart: i.e. the urban Wind Island Effect. The effect appears to be most prominent in the morning and the late afternoon (up to 1 m/s), for Local Climate Zones with lower buildings (3 or 7). BUBBLE observations confirm the timing of the Wind Island Effect, though with weaker magnitude.

  8. Hofmeister Effect on PNIPAM in Bulk and at an Interface: Surface Partitioning of Weakly Hydrated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Saeed Zajforoushan; Thormann, Esben

    2017-01-01

    microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. The results indicate a surface partitioning of the weakly hydrated anions, i.e., thiocyanate and trichloroacetate, and the findings are discussed in terms of anion-induced electrostatic stabilization. Although attractive polymer-ion interactions are suggested...... for thiocyanate and trichloroacetate, a salting-out effect is found for sodium trichloroacetate. This apparent contradiction is explained by a combination of previously suggested mechanisms for the salting-out effect by weakly hydrated anions....

  9. Feedback first: the surprisingly weak effects of magnetic fields, viscosity, conduction and metal diffusion on sub-L* galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kung-Yi; Hopkins, Philip F.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan; Ma, Xiangcheng; Robles, Victor H.

    2017-10-01

    Using high-resolution simulations with explicit treatment of stellar feedback physics based on the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project, we study how galaxy formation and the interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by magnetic fields, anisotropic Spitzer-Braginskii conduction and viscosity, and sub-grid metal diffusion from unresolved turbulence. We consider controlled simulations of isolated (non-cosmological) galaxies but also a limited set of cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. Although simulations have shown significant effects from these physics with weak or absent stellar feedback, the effects are much weaker than those of stellar feedback when the latter is modelled explicitly. The additional physics have no systematic effect on galactic star formation rates (SFRs). In contrast, removing stellar feedback leads to SFRs being overpredicted by factors of ∼10-100. Without feedback, neither galactic winds nor volume-filling hot-phase gas exist, and discs tend to runaway collapse to ultra-thin scaleheights with unphysically dense clumps congregating at the galactic centre. With stellar feedback, a multi-phase, turbulent medium with galactic fountains and winds is established. At currently achievable resolutions and for the investigated halo mass range 1010-1013 M⊙, the additional physics investigated here (magnetohydrodynamic, conduction, viscosity, metal diffusion) have only weak (∼10 per cent-level) effects on regulating SFR and altering the balance of phases, outflows or the energy in ISM turbulence, consistent with simple equipartition arguments. We conclude that galactic star formation and the ISM are primarily governed by a combination of turbulence, gravitational instabilities and feedback. We add the caveat that active galactic nucleus feedback is not included in the present work.

  10. Weak amplification of the magnetocaloric effect in manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamzatov, A. G.; Batdalov, A. B.; Ramazanova, G. G.; Nevruzova, L. G.

    2014-03-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been measured by direct method in La0.8Ag0.15MnO3 and La0.85Ag0.15MnO3 before and after coating of Fe-Co layer on the surfaces of manganites. An evaporated film thickness has been 500 nm. The measurements have shown the MCE to be increased by 7%-8% under 26 kOe after Fe-Co coating on the flat surfaces.

  11. Dust Effects on a Free Presheaths in Weakly Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, I. J.; Bae, M. K.; Chp, S. G.; Kim, S. Y.; Hong, S. H.; Choi, H. G.; Oh, Y. S.; Oh, H. T.; Park, I. S.; Lho, T.; Chung, K. S.

    2016-10-01

    Dust effects on a diffusion coefficient and a connection length at a free presheath regions have been investigated as a part of experimental simulation of dust interaction with plasmas and plasma edge transport at Divertor Plasma Simulator - 2 (DiPS-2) with the following conditions: plasma density 1 10 × 1012 cm3, electron temperature 1 10 eV and magnetic field 1 kG, where the characteristics of DiPS-2 is the following: 12 V and 280 A for LaB6 heating, 50 - 100 V and 20 - 40 A for plasma discharge. Pulsed laser beams by a 250 mJ Nd:YAG laser were injected to a tungsten target for production of dust particles. Free presheaths were artificially generated by inserting a tungsten perturbing object with diameter = 1.5 cm at the center of plasmas in DiPS-2. Radial plasma profiles were measured by using a fast scanning probe (FSP) system with triple probe (TP) and Mach probe (MP) and a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system. Dust effects on a diffusion coefficient and a connection length in the presheath region were analysed by comparing the plasma parameter of dusty and pure plasmas.

  12. Study of Wind Effects on Unique Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenkov, V.; Puzyrev, P.

    2017-11-01

    The article deals with a numerical simulation of wind effects on the building of the Church of the Intercession of the Holy Virgin in the village Bulzi of the Chelyabinsk region. We presented a calculation algorithm and obtained pressure fields, velocity fields and the fields of kinetic energy of a wind stream, as well as streamlines. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) evolved three decades ago at the interfaces of calculus mathematics and theoretical hydromechanics and has become a separate branch of science the subject of which is a numerical simulation of different fluid and gas flows as well as the solution of arising problems with the help of methods that involve computer systems. This scientific field which is of a great practical value is intensively developing. The increase in CFD-calculations is caused by the improvement of computer technologies, creation of multipurpose easy-to-use CFD-packagers that are available to a wide group of researchers and cope with various tasks. Such programs are not only competitive in comparison with physical experiments but sometimes they provide the only opportunity to answer the research questions. The following advantages of computer simulation can be pointed out: a) Reduction in time spent on design and development of a model in comparison with a real experiment (variation of boundary conditions). b) Numerical experiment allows for the simulation of conditions that are not reproducible with environmental tests (use of ideal gas as environment). c) Use of computational gas dynamics methods provides a researcher with a complete and ample information that is necessary to fully describe different processes of the experiment. d) Economic efficiency of computer calculations is more attractive than an experiment. e) Possibility to modify a computational model which ensures efficient timing (change of the sizes of wall layer cells in accordance with the chosen turbulence model).

  13. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for wind turbines.

    OpenAIRE

    Arabian-Hoseynabadi, H.; Oraee, H.; Tavner, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) method has been used to study the reliability of many different power generation systems. This paper now applies that method to a wind turbine (WT) system using a proprietary software reliability analysis tool. Comparison is made between the quantitative results of an FMEA and reliability field data from real wind turbine systems and their assemblies. These results are discussed to establish relationships which are useful for future wind turbine d...

  14. Wall modeled LES of wind turbine wakes with geometrical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricteux, Laurent; Benard, Pierre; Zeoli, Stephanie; Moureau, Vincent; Lartigue, Ghislain; Vire, Axelle

    2017-11-01

    This study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes when geometrical effects such as nacelle, tower, and built environment, are taken into account. The aim is to demonstrate the ability of a high order unstructured solver called YALES2 to perform wall modeled LES of wind turbine wake turbulence. The wind turbine rotor is modeled using an Actuator Line Model (ALM) while the geometrical details are explicitly meshed thanks to the use of an unstructured grid. As high Reynolds number flows are considered, sub-grid scale models as well as wall modeling are required. The first test case investigated concerns a wind turbine flow located in a wind tunnel that allows to validate the proposed methodology using experimental data. The second test case concerns the simulation of a wind turbine wake in a complex environment (e.g. a Building) using realistic turbulent inflow conditions.

  15. Simulating coastal effects on an offshore wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Volker, Patrick

    are build in the vicinity of a coastline. In this study, we simulate the effect of the Danish Peninsula Djursland on the Anholt offshore wind farm, using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) setup.2 The coastline is modeled as a roughness change, the wind turbines are represented by actuator disks...

  16. Simulation of wake effects between two wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Palma, Jose

    2015-01-01

    SCADA data, recorded on the downstream wind farm, has been used to identify flow cases with visible clustering effects. The inflow condition is derived from a partly undisturbed wind turbine, due to lack of mast measurements. The SCADA data analysis concludes that centre of the deficit for the do...

  17. Challenges in simulating coastal effects on an offshore wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, M. P.; Peña, A.; Volker, P.; Hansen, K. S.; Sørensen, N. N.; Ott, S.; Hasager, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of a coastline on an offshore wind farm is investigated with a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model. The trends of the RANS model compare relatively well with results from a mesoscale model and measurements of wind turbine power. In addition, challenges of modeling a large domain in RANS are discussed.

  18. Challenges in simulating coastal effects on an offshore wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul; Peña, Alfredo; Volker, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a coastline on an offshore wind farm is investigated with a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model. The trends of the RANS model compare relatively well with results from a mesoscale model and measurements of wind turbine power. In addition, challenges of modeling a large domain...

  19. Effects of offshore wind farms on birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ib Krag; Fox, Anthony David; Desholm, Mark

    På konferencen "Offshore Wind Energy Development Site Assessment and Characterization: Evaluation of the Current Status and European Experience" blev der gjort rede for danske erfaringer med effekten af havvindmølleparker på havfugle.......På konferencen "Offshore Wind Energy Development Site Assessment and Characterization: Evaluation of the Current Status and European Experience" blev der gjort rede for danske erfaringer med effekten af havvindmølleparker på havfugle....

  20. The Effect of Limber and Flat-sky Approximations on Galaxy Weak Lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Pablo; Challinor, Anthony; Efstathiou, George

    2018-01-01

    We review the effect of the commonly-used Limber and flat-sky approximations on the calculation of shear power spectra and correlation functions for galaxy weak lensing. These approximations are accurate at small scales, but it has been claimed recently that their impact on low multipoles could lead to an increase in the amplitude of the mass fluctuations inferred from surveys such as CFHTLenS, reducing the tension between galaxy weak lensing and the amplitude determined by Planck from observations of the cosmic microwave background. Here, we explore the impact of these approximations on cosmological parameters derived from weak lensing surveys, using the CFHTLenS data as a test case. We conclude that the use of small-angle approximations for cosmological parameter estimation is negligible for current data, and does not contribute to the tension between current weak lensing surveys and Planck.

  1. Size Effect on the Mechanical Properties of CF Winding Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuqing; Yin, Zhongwei

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical properties of filament winding composites are usually tested by NOL ring samples. Few people have studied the size effect of winding composite samples on the testing result of mechanical property. In this research, winding composite thickness, diameter, and geometry of NOL ring samples were prepared to investigate the size effect on the mechanical strength of carbon fiber (CF) winding composite. The CF T700, T1000, M40, and M50 were adopted for the winding composite, while the matrix was epoxy resin. Test results show that the tensile strength and ILSS of composites decreases monotonically with an increase of thickness from 1 mm to 4 mm. The mechanical strength of composite samples increases monotonically with the increase in diameter from 100 mm to 189 mm. The mechanical strength of composite samples with two flat sides are higher than those of cyclic annular samples.

  2. Effects of wind shear and temperature inversion on sound propagation from wind turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, Henk de [Golder Associates (Canada)], email: Henk_deHaan@golder.com

    2011-07-01

    Noise impact assessment of wind turbines usually takes into account sound speed and propagation at ground level, and those are influenced by wind shear and atmospheric temperature changes. This paper focuses on a week-long monitoring study and presents the observed and anticipated effects of wind shear and temperature on the level of ground sound emitted from a 65m high wind turbine. Working with anemometers at ground level and turbine height, it is shown that wind shear can influence sound propagation, and that atmospheric stability must be taken into account for accurate wind speed calculations to be made. Temperature must also be addressed and the heating of the earth by solar radiation and the re-radiation of that heat in a day-night cycle, resulting in temperature inversion in the atmosphere, must be taken into account. Observations of temperature changes over a week can then yield sound speed and sound power levels with respect to altitude, and show that sound power levels are higher at ground levels during the night.

  3. Effects of wind turbines on human health and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanan, G. [RV College of Engineering, Bangalore (India); Pandian, A.; Gowda, G.; Raghunandan, A. [MS RAMAIAH Institute of Technology, Bangalore (India)

    2012-07-01

    The impact of climate change through global warming has been a concern for some time now. Targets are being set for ratifying countries to reduce their CO{sup 2} emissions. In order to achieve reduction in CO{sup 2} emissions, there must be sustained move in the production of electricity from renewable sources other than fossil fuel combustion. Of the renewable energy sources, the most realistic and economic is Wind Power. The Asian continent is developing into one of the main powerhouses of Wind Energy. The strongest market leader in Wind Energy in the continent is India. On the flip side, there are some effects of Wind Turbines which are hazardous to human health like noise generated. Such hazards are also likely and known to affect the migratory birds during transition. This paper will address the effects of Wind Turbine on Human Health and Environment. The paper will focus on the following questions: (1)What are the potential health and environmental impacts of Wind Turbines? (2)How is exposure to Wind Turbine Noise assessed? (3)What consultation process with the community is required before Wind Farms are constructed? (Author)

  4. Active Power Dispatch Method for a Wind Farm Central Controller Considering Wake Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Su, Chi; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Optimization (PSO) is used to obtain the optimal wind power for each wind turbine. A case study is carried out. The available wind power of the wind farm was compared between the traditional dispatch method and the proposed dispatch method with the consideration of the wake effect.......With the increasing integration of the wind power into the power system, wind farm are required to be controlled as a single unit and have all the same control tasks as conventional power plants. The wind farm central controller receives control orders from Transmission System Operator (TSO...... efficient of upstream wind turbines in the wind farm influences the downstream wind speed which determines the available wind power of the downstream wind turbine. Optimize the wind power production of each wind turbine in the wind farm by the optimization of the pitch angle and tip-speed-ratio of each...

  5. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabian-Hoseynabadi, H.; Oraee, H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Tavner, P.J. [Energy Group School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    The Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) method has been used to study the reliability of many different power generation systems. This paper now applies that method to a wind turbine (WT) system using a proprietary software reliability analysis tool. Comparison is made between the quantitative results of an FMEA and reliability field data from real wind turbine systems and their assemblies. These results are discussed to establish relationships which are useful for future wind turbine designs. The main system studied is an existing design 2 MW wind turbine with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), which is then compared with a hypothetical wind turbine system using the Brushless Doubly Fed Generator (BDFG) of the same rating. The software reliability analysis tool used for these studies was Relex Reliability Studio 2007 Version 2. (author)

  6. Effect of a weak layer at the base of an oceanic plate on subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carluccio, Roberta; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The plate tectonics model relies on the concept of a relatively rigid lithospheric lid moving over a weaker asthenosphere. In this frame, the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is a first-order discontinuity that accommodates differential motions between tectonic plates and the underlying mantle. Recent seismic studies have revealed the existence of a low velocity and high electrical conductivity layer at the base of subducting tectonic plates. This thin layer has been interpreted as being weak and slightly buoyant and was suggested to affect the dynamics of subducting plates. However, geodynamically, the role of a weak layer at the base of the lithosphere remains poorly studied, especially at subduction zones. Therefore, we here use numerical models to investigate the first-order effects of a weak buoyant layer at the LAB on subduction dynamics. We employ both 2-D and 3-D models in which the slab and mantle are either linear viscous or have a more realistic temperature-dependent visco-elastic-plastic rheology. Results show that a weak layer affects the dynamics of the plates, foremost by increasing the subduction speed. The impact of this effect depends on the thickness of the layer and the viscosity contrast between the mantle and the weak layer. For moderate viscosity contrasts (1000), it can also change the morphology of the subduction itself, perhaps because this changes the overall effective viscosity contrast between the slab the and the mantle. For thinner layers, the overall effect is reduced. Yet, if seismological observations are correct that suggests that this layer is 10 km thick and partially molten, such that the viscosity is 1000 times lower than that of the mantle, our models suggest that this effect should be measurable. Some of our models also show a pile-up of weak material in the bending zone of the subducting plate, consistent with recent seismological observations.

  7. Evaluation of Dynamical Downscaling Resolution Effect on Wind Energy Forecast Value for a Wind Farm in Central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosgaard, Martin; Hahmann, Andrea; Skov Nielsen, Torben; Giebel, Gregor; Ejnar Sørensen, Poul; Madsen, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    For any energy system relying on wind power, accurate forecasts of wind fluctuations are essential for efficient integration into the power grid. Increased forecast precision allows end-users to plan day-ahead operation with reduced risk of penalties which in turn supports the feasibility of wind energy. This study aims to quantify value added to wind energy forecasts in the 12-48 hour leadtime by downscaling global numerical weather prediction (NWP) data using a limited-area NWP model. The accuracy of statistical wind power forecasting tools depends strongly on this NWP input. Typical performance metrics are mean absolute error or root mean square error for predicted- against observed wind power production, and these metrics are closely related to wind speed forecast bias and correlation with observations. Wind speed bias can be handled in the statistical wind power forecasting model, though it is entirely up to it's NWP input to describe the wind speed correlation correctly. The basis of comparison for forecasts is data from the Stor-Rotliden wind farm in central Sweden. The surrounding forest adds to the forecasting challenge, thus motivating the downscaling experiment as the potential for wind power forecast improvement is higher in complex terrain. The 40 Vestas V90 turbines were erected in 2009 and correspond to 78MWe installed electrical capacity. Forecasts from global and limited-area NWP models, together covering five different horizontal computational grid spacings of ~50km down to ~1km, are studied for a yearlong, continuous time period. The preliminary results shown quantify forecast strengths and weaknesses for each NWP model resolution.

  8. 3-D numerical simulations of eruption clouds: Effects of the environmental wind on the turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y. J.; Koyaguchi, T.

    2011-12-01

    the other hand, a "weak plume" develops following a bent-over trajectory as a result of the strong wind advection. In this case, the plume height is lower than that for the no-wind case, which means that the turbulent mixing is more efficient (i.e., the effective value of k is larger than 0.10). The 3-D images of the flows indicate that the vortical structures in the weak plume are affected by the presence of environmental wind; they are largely elongated along the direction of the wind compared with those in the strong plume. The result that the efficiency of turbulent mixing is enhanced by wind is supported by recent observations in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-Dake, Japan. The effective values of k are estimated from the relationship between plume height and mass discharge rate on the basis of the 1-D model. The effective value of k is about 0.10 for the March 13 eruption in a calm environment, whereas it is substantially larger than 0.10 (~0.13) in the January 26 - 27 eruptions during which the seasonal wind from west prevailed.

  9. On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caralis, George [InFlow, Wind Energy Consultants (Greece); Perivolaris, Yiannis [InFlow, Wind Energy Consultants (Greece); Rados, Konstantinos [Department of Pollution Control Technologies, Technological Educational Institute of West Macedonia (Greece); Zervos, Arthouros [School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

    2008-01-15

    Wind energy is now a mature technology and can be considered as a significant contributor in reducing CO{sub 2} emissions and protecting the environment. To meet the wind energy national targets, effective implementation of massive wind power installed capacity in the power supply system is required. Additionally, capacity credit is an important issue for an unstable power supply system as in Greece. To achieve high and reliable wind energy penetration levels into the system, the effect of spatial dispersion of wind energy installations within a very wide area (e.g. national level) on the power capacity credit should be accounted for. In the present paper, a methodology for estimating the effect of spatial dispersion of wind farm installations on the capacity credit is presented and applied for the power supply system of Greece. The method is based on probability theory and makes use of wind forecasting models to represent the wind energy potential over any candidate area for future wind farm installations in the country. Representative wind power development scenarios are studied and evaluated. Results show that the spatial dispersion of wind power plants contributes beneficially to the wind capacity credit.

  10. Overcoming icing effects on wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maissan, J. [Yukon Energy Corp., Whitehorse, YT (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Wind turbine blades in the Whitehorse area are often subjected to rime icing. High energy winds on ridges, hilltops and mountains result in cloud and rime ice formation. Reliable models and detectors for rime and glaze icing are needed in order to measure the duration and severity of icing. Currently, there is a limited supply of good models on the market, and they do not appear to cope well with severe rime icing. A two heated anemometer approach appears to be reasonably reliable. This paper describes a wind speed and icing event monitoring study at Haeckel Hill in which the performance of an iced turbine was compared with the performance of an ice-free turbine. Technological advancement in the area of blade icing include: the development of low temperature synthetic lubricants and fluids; heated wind instruments and ultrasonics; after-market blade heating systems and blade coatings; and, reductions in energy losses. The challenges that still need to be addressed include: ice detection for severe conditions; off-the-shelf blade heating systems; further reductions in energy losses; and, adaptations of turbine control algorithms. The paper includes a list of manufacturers who are working on equipment for use in cold/icing environments. The large turbine manufacturers include Vestas, Bonus, NEG Micon, Enercon, and Lagerwey. The small turbine manufacturers include Atlantic Orient, Vergnet, Northern Power Systems, and Bergey. 10 figs.

  11. Feasibility of wind power integration in weak grids in non-coastal areas of Sub-Saharan Africa: the case of Mali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ivan; Kamissoko, Famakan; Nørgård, Per Bromand

    2017-01-01

    wind conditions, with average wind speeds of below 5 m/s at 50 m above ground level in the south, while there are larger areas in the northern part with average wind speeds of above 7 m/s at 50 m above ground level. Overall the research shows that in countries with generally poor wind conditions...

  12. Pressure Effect on Magnetic Properties of Weak Itinerant Electron Ferromagnet CrAlGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Soshi; Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Umetsu, Rie Y.; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Koyama, Keiichi

    2018-01-01

    The Pressure effect on the magnetic properties of the weak itinerant electron ferromagnet CrAlGe was investigated at pressures up to 1.0 GPa. The spontaneous magnetic moment ps and Curie temperature TC decreased with increasing applied pressure P. The pressure derivatives of ps and TC were dps/dP = -3.98 × 10-5 μB/MPa and dTC/dP = -6.58 × 10-3 K/MPa, respectively. These obtained results are discussed on the basis of Takahashi's spin fluctuation theory for weak itinerant electron ferromagnets. The characteristic parameters T0 and TA increased with pressure.

  13. Relativistic effects in the study of weakly bound F and Be nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FAHIME REZVANI

    2018-01-03

    Jan 3, 2018 ... Abstract. Relativistic effects are employed to describe the weakly bound nuclei of 17F and 11Be. In order to calculate the energy levels of the ground state and the excited states of these nuclei, we solved the Dirac equation with pseudospin symmetry in the shell model by using the basic concept of ...

  14. Relativistic effects in the study of weakly bound 17 F and 11 Be nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relativistic effects are employed to describe the weakly bound nuclei of 17 F and 11 B e . In order to calculate the energy levels of the ground state and the excited states of these nuclei, we solved the Dirac equation with pseudospin symmetry in the shell model by using the basic concept of supersymmetric shape ...

  15. Review Article: The weak interactive characteristic of resonance cells and broadband effect of metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials are artificial media designed to control electromagnetic wave propagation. Due to resonance, most present-day metamaterials inevitably suffer from narrow bandwidth, extremely limiting their practical applications. On the basis of tailored properties, a metamaterial within which each distinct unit cell resonates at its inherent frequency and has almost no coupling effect with the other ones, termed as weak interaction system, can be formulated. The total response of a weak interaction system can be treated as an overlap of the single resonance spectrum of each type of different unit cells. This intriguing feature therefore makes it possible to accomplish multiband or broadband metamaterials in a simple way. By introducing defects into metamaterials to form a weak interaction system, multiband and broadband electromagnetic metamaterials have first been experimentally demonstrated by our group. The similar concept can also be readily extended to acoustic and seismic metamaterials.

  16. Effects of distributing wind energy generation over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebel, G. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Using data from 60 meteorological stations distributed all over Europe in conjunction with the National Grid Model (NGM) from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, the effects of the large-scale distribution of wind energy generation are studied. In some regions of Europe, wind energy already covers a significant proportion of the electricity demand. But the intermittence of the wind resource is always a limiting factor when penetration levels are high. Studies for single countries have shown that distributing the generation over a large area reduces the variability of the output and hence makes wind energy more appealing to utilities, since the stability requirement of the network are easier to fulfil. The data are analysed in terms of absolute highs and lows, temporal and spatial correlations. To assess the financial benefits, the NGM is used to evaluate the match of electricity demand and generation as well as the possibel savings of fossil fuel in an electricity grid incorporating various capacities of wind energy generation. To assess the value of wind energy on a trans-national scale, the European plant mix is modelled, and the NGM is used to simulate the scheduling of these plants in the presence of different penetrations of wind energy. (au) EU-JOULE-3. 11 refs.

  17. Dynamic wind effects on suspension and cable-stayed bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Allan; Larose, Guy L.

    2015-01-01

    Cable supported bridges are flexible structures which may be excited into oscillations by the wind. The excitation forces acting on cable supported bridges are aerodynamic by nature, but are for a large part set into play by the underlying structural dynamics of the bridge structures. The paper discusses the various types of dynamic wind effects commonly encountered for suspension and cable-stayed bridges emphasizing the importance of the structural dynamics.

  18. Predicting wind shear effects: A study of Minnesota wind data collected at heights up to 70 meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Minnesota Department of Public Service (DPS) collects wind data at carefully selected sites around the state and analyzes the data to determine Minnesota`s wind power potential. DPS recently installed advanced new monitoring equipment at these sites and began to collect wind data at 30, 50, and 70 meters above ground level, with two anemometers at each level. Previously, the Department had not collected data at heights above ground level higher than 30 meters. DPS also, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), installed four sophisticated monitoring sites as part of a Tall Tower Wind Shear Study that is assessing the effects of wind shear on wind power potential. At these sites, wind data are being collected at the 10, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 meter heights. This paper presents the preliminary results of the analysis of wind data from all sites. These preliminary results indicate that the traditional 1/7 power law does not effectively predict wind shear in Minnesota, and the result is an underestimation of Minnesota`s wind power potential at higher heights. Using a power factor of 1/5 or 1/4 may be more accurate and provide sound justification for installing wind turbines on taller towers in Minnesota.

  19. Health effects and wind turbines: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Wind power has been harnessed as a source of power around the world. Debate is ongoing with respect to the relationship between reported health effects and wind turbines, specifically in terms of audible and inaudible noise. As a result, minimum setback distances have been established world-wide to reduce or avoid potential complaints from, or potential effects to, people living in proximity to wind turbines. People interested in this debate turn to two sources of information to make informed decisions: scientific peer-reviewed studies published in scientific journals and the popular literature and internet. Methods The purpose of this paper is to review the peer-reviewed scientific literature, government agency reports, and the most prominent information found in the popular literature. Combinations of key words were entered into the Thomson Reuters Web of KnowledgeSM and the internet search engine Google. The review was conducted in the spirit of the evaluation process outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Results Conclusions of the peer reviewed literature differ in some ways from those in the popular literature. In peer reviewed studies, wind turbine annoyance has been statistically associated with wind turbine noise, but found to be more strongly related to visual impact, attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to noise. To date, no peer reviewed articles demonstrate a direct causal link between people living in proximity to modern wind turbines, the noise they emit and resulting physiological health effects. If anything, reported health effects are likely attributed to a number of environmental stressors that result in an annoyed/stressed state in a segment of the population. In the popular literature, self-reported health outcomes are related to distance from turbines and the claim is made that infrasound is the causative factor for the reported effects, even though sound pressure levels are not measured

  20. Health effects and wind turbines: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollson Christopher A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wind power has been harnessed as a source of power around the world. Debate is ongoing with respect to the relationship between reported health effects and wind turbines, specifically in terms of audible and inaudible noise. As a result, minimum setback distances have been established world-wide to reduce or avoid potential complaints from, or potential effects to, people living in proximity to wind turbines. People interested in this debate turn to two sources of information to make informed decisions: scientific peer-reviewed studies published in scientific journals and the popular literature and internet. Methods The purpose of this paper is to review the peer-reviewed scientific literature, government agency reports, and the most prominent information found in the popular literature. Combinations of key words were entered into the Thomson Reuters Web of KnowledgeSM and the internet search engine Google. The review was conducted in the spirit of the evaluation process outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Results Conclusions of the peer reviewed literature differ in some ways from those in the popular literature. In peer reviewed studies, wind turbine annoyance has been statistically associated with wind turbine noise, but found to be more strongly related to visual impact, attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to noise. To date, no peer reviewed articles demonstrate a direct causal link between people living in proximity to modern wind turbines, the noise they emit and resulting physiological health effects. If anything, reported health effects are likely attributed to a number of environmental stressors that result in an annoyed/stressed state in a segment of the population. In the popular literature, self-reported health outcomes are related to distance from turbines and the claim is made that infrasound is the causative factor for the reported effects, even though sound pressure

  1. Health effects and wind turbines: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopper, Loren D; Ollson, Christopher A

    2011-09-14

    Wind power has been harnessed as a source of power around the world. Debate is ongoing with respect to the relationship between reported health effects and wind turbines, specifically in terms of audible and inaudible noise. As a result, minimum setback distances have been established world-wide to reduce or avoid potential complaints from, or potential effects to, people living in proximity to wind turbines. People interested in this debate turn to two sources of information to make informed decisions: scientific peer-reviewed studies published in scientific journals and the popular literature and internet. The purpose of this paper is to review the peer-reviewed scientific literature, government agency reports, and the most prominent information found in the popular literature. Combinations of key words were entered into the Thomson Reuters Web of KnowledgeSM and the internet search engine Google. The review was conducted in the spirit of the evaluation process outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Conclusions of the peer reviewed literature differ in some ways from those in the popular literature. In peer reviewed studies, wind turbine annoyance has been statistically associated with wind turbine noise, but found to be more strongly related to visual impact, attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to noise. To date, no peer reviewed articles demonstrate a direct causal link between people living in proximity to modern wind turbines, the noise they emit and resulting physiological health effects. If anything, reported health effects are likely attributed to a number of environmental stressors that result in an annoyed/stressed state in a segment of the population. In the popular literature, self-reported health outcomes are related to distance from turbines and the claim is made that infrasound is the causative factor for the reported effects, even though sound pressure levels are not measured. What both types of studies

  2. [Modulating effect of weak combined magnetic fields on duration of mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor metamorphosis stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that an exposure of pupae of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor to the combined static (42 μT) and very weak alternating (250 nT) magnetic fields exerts different influence, depending on the frequency of the alternating magnetic field, on duration of metamorphosis processes in these insects. For instance, an exposure of pupae to weak combined magnetic fields, adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for glutaminic acid (4,4 Hz), stimulates metamorphosis process--a transitional stage from pupae to imago lasts shorter. An inhibiting effect was observed when adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for Ca2 (32,2 Hz). At some frequencies this effect is not seen. For instance, an exposure at a frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for K+ (16,5 Hz) exerts no noticeable effect on the duration of the pupal metamorphosis stage.

  3. Effect of Tower Shadow and Wind Shear in a Wind Farm on AC Tie-Line Power Oscillations of Interconnected Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Tan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a frequency domain approach for evaluating the impact of tower shadow and wind shear effects (TSWS on tie-line power oscillations. A simplified frequency domain model of an interconnected power system with a wind farm is developed. The transfer function, which relates the tie-line power variation to the mechanical power variation of a wind turbine, and the expression of the maximum magnitude of tie-line power oscillations are derived to identify the resonant condition and evaluate the potential risk. The effects of the parameters on the resonant magnitude of the tie-line power are also discussed. The frequency domain analysis reveals that TSWS can excite large tie-line power oscillations if the frequency of TSWS approaches the tie-line resonant frequency, especially in the case that the wind farm is integrated into a relatively small grid and the tie-line of the interconnected system is weak. Furthermore, the results of the theoretical analysis are validated through time domain simulations conducted in the two-area four-generator system and the Western Electric Coordinating Council 127 bus system.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Wind Conditions for Roof-Mounted Wind Turbines: Effects of Wind Direction and Horizontal Aspect Ratio of a High-Rise Cuboid Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available From the viewpoint of installing small wind turbines (SWTs on rooftops, this study investigated the effects of wind direction and horizontal aspect ratio (HAR = width/length of a high-rise cuboid building on wind conditions above the roof by conducting large eddy simulations (LESs. The LES results confirmed that as HAR decreases (i.e., as the building width decreases, the variation in wind velocity over the roof tends to decrease. This tendency is more prominent as the angle between the wind direction and the normal vector of the building’s leeward face with longer roof edge increases. Moreover, at windward corners of the roof, wind conditions are generally favorable at relatively low heights. In contrast, at the midpoint of the roof's windward edge, wind conditions are generally not favorable at relatively low heights. At leeward representative locations of the roof, the bottoms of the height range of favorable wind conditions are typically higher than those at the windward representative locations, but the favorable wind conditions are much better at the leeward representative locations. When there is no prevailing wind direction, the center of the roof is more favorable for installing SWTs than the corners or the edge midpoints of the roof.

  5. On the integration of wind generators on weak grids and island grids; Sur l'integration des generateurs eoliens dans les reseaux faibles ou insulaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverdure, N

    2005-12-15

    Wind energy is now an energy that can not be ignored. Because of intrinsic characteristics (scattered primary energy, generators with different technologies, use of power electronics interface), wind energy system integration in distribution grids leads to real problems in terms of impacts. With recent standard changes, it is necessary to study the possibilities of each technology of wind turbines to answer or not to these new constraints. This PhD thesis focuses on a comparison of the main present wind turbines concerning three points of discussion: energy quality, fault ride through, ancillary services (voltage and frequency). It insists on the possibilities in terms of control laws for variable speed wind turbines. (author)

  6. Modeling the nonlinear effect of wind on rectilinear tidal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruessink, B. G.; Houwman, K. T.; Grasmeijer, B. T.

    2006-10-01

    Observations of near-bed alongshore flow in 4-10 m depth at Terschelling, Netherlands, show that strong alongshore winds (≈15-20 m/s) in the flood direction reduce the tide current range and alter the tidal flow curve by bringing maximum flood flow forward in time and delaying maximum ebb flow. These nonlinear effects, which are more pronounced in shallower water, are reproduced well by a single-point model in the vertical driven by large-scale (O(km)) sea surface gradients and wind stress, using a quadratic bottom stress formulation and a time-dependent eddy viscosity derived from a k-ɛ turbulence closure model. Subsequent idealized model simulations using a (Terschelling based) M2 sea-surface gradient and wind speeds between 0 and 20 m/s show that the wind-induced modifications of the tidal flow are consistent with the interaction of the wind-induced flow with the tidal flow through the quadratic bed stress. The wind-driven flow enhances friction during the flood phase more than it reduces friction during the ebb flow, thereby increasing friction over a tidal cycle and, as a consequence, reducing the tide current range. The predicted increase in asymmetry of bed friction during flood and ebb flow with increasing wind speed also increases (decreases) the M4 (M6) amplitude, consistent with the observations. The M4/M2 amplitude ratio is predicted to be largest when the flow has just become unidirectional (that is, when the wind-driven flow equals the tidal current).

  7. Effects of weak electromagnetic irradiation on various types of behavior in the mealworm Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiman, I M; Kreshchenko, N D

    2010-10-01

    The effects of weak electromagnetic irradiation on simple forms of behavior were studied using adult Tenebrio molitor mealworms. The beetles' motor behavior was studied in conditions of different motivations, i.e., positive (food) and negative (avoidance of light), in otherwise identical experimental conditions. The beetles had to navigate a defined space to reach their target - potato or cover from light. Experiments consisted of one trial per day for five days. Target attainment time was measured in groups of beetles. Behavior in both cases developed as follows: an initial orientation reaction appeared and was followed by adaptation to the apparatus. Exposure to weak electromagnetic irradiation led to increases in the response time at the initial stages of the experiments. The effects of irradiation were seasonal in nature and differed in the two types of behavior.

  8. Potentiometric Investigation of Specific Ionic Effects on Interactions between Bovine Serum Albumin and Weak Polyelectrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Mutka, Saniela; Njegić Džakula, Branka; Kovačević, Davor

    2008-01-01

    The effect of salt on the behaviour of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in solution and on the interactions between BSA and the weakly charged polyelectrolytes poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) was investigated by potentiometric titrations. Titrations of pure BSA solution and of the BSA solution with the addition of polyelectrolyte were performed in the presence of different salts. Three electrolytes having the same anion and a different cation were used. lithi...

  9. Estimation of turbulence intensity using rotor effective wind speed in Lillgrund and Horns Rev-I offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögmen, Tuhfe; Giebel, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    varies over the extent of the wind farm. This paper describes a method to estimate the TI at individual turbine locations by using the rotor effective wind speed calculated via high frequency turbine data. The method is applied to Lillgrund and Horns Rev-I offshore wind farms and the results are compared...... with TI derived from the meteorological mast, nacelle mounted anemometer on the turbines and estimation based on the standard deviation of power. The results show that the proposed TI estimation method is in the best agreement with the meteorological mast. Therefore, the rotor effective wind speed...

  10. TradeWind Deliverable 5.1: Effects of increasing wind power penetration on the power flows in European grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemström, Bettina; Uski-Joutsenvuo, Sanna; Holttinen, Hannele

    2008-01-01

    flow simulations with a grid and market model developed in TradeWind Work Package 3, led by Sintef Energy Research. VTT, Sintef Energy Research and Risø have carried out the simulations of the different scenarios, analysed the results and written Chapter 4 about the impact of wind power on cross......This report presents the main activities and results of Work Package 5 – Effects of increasing wind power penetration on the power flows in European grids in the TradeWind project. VTT is the leader of Work Package 5 and carries the overall responsibility of this report. The work is based on power......-border transmission. Risø has written section 4.2 about the impact of prediction errors of wind power production. VTT has carried out the model evaluation described in Chapter 3. Furthermore VTT has analysed the wind speed data, studied the moving weather effects and the capacity factor method presented in section 2...

  11. Impacts of Wake Effect and Time Delay on the Dynamic Analysis of Wind Farms Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fouly, Tarek H. M.; El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the impacts of proper modeling of the wake effects and wind speed delays, between different wind turbines' rows, on the dynamic performance accuracy of the wind farms models. Three different modeling scenarios were compared to highlight the impacts of wake effects and wind speed time-delay models. In the first scenario,…

  12. Neighborhood Effects in Wind Farm Performance: A Regression Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ritter

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of turbine density in wind farms entails a trade-off between the usage of scarce, expensive land and power losses through turbine wake effects. A quantification and prediction of the wake effect, however, is challenging because of the complex aerodynamic nature of the interdependencies of turbines. In this paper, we propose a parsimonious data driven regression wake model that can be used to predict production losses of existing and potential wind farms. Motivated by simple engineering wake models, the predicting variables are wind speed, the turbine alignment angle, and distance. By utilizing data from two wind farms in Germany, we show that our models can compete with the standard Jensen model in predicting wake effect losses. A scenario analysis reveals that a distance between turbines can be reduced by up to three times the rotor size, without entailing substantial production losses. In contrast, an unfavorable configuration of turbines with respect to the main wind direction can result in production losses that are much higher than in an optimal case.

  13. Effective higher-order nonlinear coefficients of composites with weakly nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natenapit, Mayuree; Thongboonrithi, Chaivej

    2010-05-01

    The field equations, based on the third-order perturbation expansion of electrostatic potential, are derived, and our general formulae for higher-order effective nonlinear coefficients based on the energy definition, are presented and applied to dielectric composites consisting of dilute linear cylindrical inclusions randomly dispersed in a weakly nonlinear host media. The effective nonlinear coefficients are determined up to the ninth order. In addition, the results are also compared to those obtained using the average field method and likely to provide more accurate predictions of effective higher-order nonlinear responses.

  14. Simulation of wake effects between two wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K. S.; Réthoré, P.-E.; Palma, J.; Hevia, B. G.; Prospathopoulos, J.; Peña, A.; Ott, S.; Schepers, G.; Palomares, A.; van der Laan, M. P.; Volker, P.

    2015-06-01

    SCADA data, recorded on the downstream wind farm, has been used to identify flow cases with visible clustering effects. The inflow condition is derived from a partly undisturbed wind turbine, due to lack of mast measurements. The SCADA data analysis concludes that centre of the deficit for the downstream wind farm with disturbed inflow has a distinct visible maximum deficit zone located only 5-10D downstream from the entrance. This zone, representing 20-30% speed reduction, increases and moves downstream for increasing cluster effect and is not visible outside a flow sector of 20-30°. The eight flow models represented in this benchmark include both RANS models, mesoscale models and engineering models. The flow cases, identified according to the wind speed level and inflow sector, have been simulated and validated with the SCADA results. The model validation concludes that all models more or less are able to predict the location and size of the deficit zone inside the downwind wind farm.

  15. Effects of wind-energy facilities on grassland bird distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Jill A.; Buhl, Deb

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of renewable energy to meet worldwide demand continues to grow. Wind energy is one of the fastest growing renewable sectors, but new wind facilities are often placed in prime wildlife habitat. Long-term studies that incorporate a rigorous statistical design to evaluate the effects of wind facilities on wildlife are rare. We conducted a before-after-control-impact (BACI) assessment to determine if wind facilities placed in native mixed-grass prairies displaced breeding grassland birds. During 2003–2012, we monitored changes in bird density in 3 study areas in North Dakota and South Dakota (U.S.A.). We examined whether displacement or attraction occurred 1 year after construction (immediate effect) and the average displacement or attraction 2–5 years after construction (delayed effect). We tested for these effects overall and within distance bands of 100, 200, 300, and >300 m from turbines. We observed displacement for 7 of 9 species. One species was unaffected by wind facilities and one species exhibited attraction. Displacement and attraction generally occurred within 100 m and often extended up to 300 m. In a few instances, displacement extended beyond 300 m. Displacement and attraction occurred 1 year after construction and persisted at least 5 years. Our research provides a framework for applying a BACI design to displacement studies and highlights the erroneous conclusions that can be made without the benefit of adopting such a design. More broadly, species-specific behaviors can be used to inform management decisions about turbine placement and the potential impact to individual species. Additionally, the avoidance distance metrics we estimated can facilitate future development of models evaluating impacts of wind facilities under differing land-use scenarios.

  16. Weak relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Selleri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Weak Relativity is an equivalent theory to Special Relativity according to Reichenbach’s definition, where the parameter epsilon equals to 0. It formulates a Neo-Lorentzian approach by replacing the Lorentz transformations with a new set named “Inertial Transformations”, thus explaining the Sagnac effect, the twin paradox and the trip from the future to the past in an easy and elegant way. The cosmic microwave background is suggested as a possible privileged reference system. Most importantly, being a theory based on experimental proofs, rather than mutual consensus, it offers a physical description of reality independent of the human observation.

  17. Effect of wind turbine generator model and siting on wind power changes out of large WECS arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleuter, R. A.; Park, G. L.; Lotfalian, M.; Dorsey, J.; Shayanfar, H.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of reducing the WECS generation change through selection of the wind turbine model for each site, selection of an appropriate siting configuration, and wind array controls are discussed. An analysis of wind generation change from an echelon and a farm for passage of a thunderstorm is presented. Reduction of the wind generation change over ten minutes is shown to reduce the increase in spinning reserve, unloadable generation and load following requirements on unit commitment when significant WECS generation is present and the farm penetration constraint is satisfied. Controls on the blade pitch angle of all wind turbines in an array or a battery control are shown to reduce both the wind generation change out of an array and the effective farm penetration in anticipation of a storm so that the farm penetration constraint may be satisfied.

  18. Wake-Effect Minimising Optimal Control of Wind Farms, with Load Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchersen, Anders Bech; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Sivabalan, Senthuran

    2014-01-01

    the wake effects in the farm, while maintaining optimal power output. A feature which enables the MPC to spare certain turbines, while maintaining the power output is also implemented. The MPC controller is able to minimize the wake effect in the wind farm, when the power demand is not using the full......A power generating wind turbine causes a speed reduction and an added turbulence to the wind. Wind turbines in wind farms are often caught in these wakes and are found to have a higher structural load than non affected wind turbines. This article investigates the possibility of designing a control...... strategy which optimizes the power production, while minimizing the effect of the wakes in the wind farm. A generic wind farm model which is able to calculate the wind turbines influence on each other is developed. Models for the reduction in wind speed as well as turbulence in the wake effects...

  19. The effect of metal enrichment and galactic winds on galaxy formation in cosmological zoom simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; Naab, Thorsten; Davé, Romeel; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Oser, Ludwig; Genzel, Reinhard; Tacconi, Linda J.; Förster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Burkert, Andreas; Genel, Shy

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the differential effects of metal cooling and galactic stellar winds on the cosmological formation of individual galaxies with three sets of cosmological, hydrodynamical zoom simulations of 45 haloes in the mass range 1011 < Mhalo < 1013 M⊙. Models including both galactic winds and metal cooling (i) suppress early star formation at z ≳ 1 and predict reasonable star formation histories for galaxies in present-day haloes of ≲1012 M⊙, (ii) produce galaxies with high cold gas fractions (30-60 per cent) at high redshift, (iii) significantly reduce the galaxy formation efficiencies for haloes (Mhalo ≲ 1012 M⊙) at all redshifts in overall good agreement with recent observational data and constraints from abundance matching, (iv) result in high-redshift galaxies with reduced circular velocities in agreement with the observed Tully-Fisher relation at z ˜ 2 and (v) significantly increase the sizes of low-mass galaxies (Mstellar ≲ 3 × 1010 M⊙) at high redshift resulting in a weak size evolution - a trend in agreement with observations. However, the low-redshift (z < 0.5) star formation rates of more massive galaxies are higher than observed (up to 10 times). No tested model predicts the observed size evolution for low-mass and high-mass galaxies simultaneously. Without winds the sizes of low-mass galaxies evolve rapidly, and with winds the size evolution of massive galaxies is too weak. Due to the delayed onset of star formation in the wind models, the metal enrichment of gas and stars is delayed and agrees well with observational constraints. Metal cooling and stellar winds are both found to increase the ratio of in situ formed to accreted stars - the relative importance of dissipative versus dissipationless assembly. For halo masses below ˜1012 M⊙, this is mainly caused by less stellar accretion and compares well to predictions from semi-analytical models and but differs from abundance matching models as the in situ formed fractions of

  20. Wind energy in the built environment: concentrator effects of buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens, S.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with wind energy conversion in the built environment. It gives a description of the wind resources in the built environment that can be converted into energy by a wind turbine. With a focus on maximum energy yield of the wind turbine, it especially deals with the integration of wind turbine and building in such a way that the building concentrates the wind energy for the wind turbine. Three different basic principles of such "buildings that concentrate the wind" or concentra...

  1. Effective long-time phase dynamics of limit-cycle oscillators driven by weak colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hiroya; Teramae, Jun-nosuke; Goldobin, Denis S.; Kuramoto, Yoshiki

    2010-09-01

    An effective white-noise Langevin equation is derived that describes long-time phase dynamics of a limit-cycle oscillator driven by weak stationary colored noise. Effective drift and diffusion coefficients are given in terms of the phase sensitivity of the oscillator and the correlation function of the noise, and are explicitly calculated for oscillators with sinusoidal phase sensitivity functions driven by two typical colored Gaussian processes. The results are verified by numerical simulations using several types of stochastic or chaotic noise. The drift and diffusion coefficients of oscillators driven by chaotic noise exhibit anomalous dependence on the oscillator frequency, reflecting the peculiar power spectrum of the chaotic noise.

  2. Comparisons of Wind Field Effects on Radar Rainfall Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.; Han, D.; Rico-Ramirez, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Weather radar-based rainfall estimates are prone to many sources of uncertainties due to its complicated measurement procedure and intricate synoptic regimes. Rain gauge measurement as the "ground-truth" is widely implemented in radar data adjustments, which is crucial and essential to reduce their systematic bias in hydrological applications, especially for radar bias corrections in spatial matching of precipitation patterns with rain gauge. The conventional practice is to build radar-gauge pairs on the basis of their vertical projection on the ground, which assumes the rainfall observed by radar falls vertically to the ground and should be in accordance with the surface rainfall directly below each radar pixel. Since wind is a typical weather factor, which not only incurs measurement error of rain gauge, but also induces the raindrops observed by radar drifting to the ground, consequently, it could contribute inconsistent spatial relationship between radar and gauge measurements. As a result, this study explores the trajectory of raindrops in the air based on the previous study which incorporates the wind field effect into a bias correlation scheme using downscaled 3-D wind data from weather research and forecasting model (WRF). The new prompted adjustment method is to simulate the raindrop trajectory by implementing the 3-D wind field created by WRF directly. The displacement of rainfall is estimated and radar-gauge spatial relationships are reconstructed and compared. Based on these, this study attempts to compare and evaluate two different adjustment methods on radar data with and without consideration of the wind-drift effect in different rainfall events and locations. The proposed adjustment method is expected to be a promising improvement to minimize wind-drift effect.

  3. Applications of Weak Localization to the Study of Kondo Effect, Tunneling Effect and the Anomalous Coulomb Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei

    Weak localization is a new quantum coherence effect for electron waves at low temperatures. It is a very powerful tool in investigating the various scattering phenomena in solids. The magnetoresistance in weak localization is a time-of-flight experiment for conduction electrons which allows the determination of the scattering rates. Because weak localization is sensitive to the dephasing caused by magnetic impurities, it is applied to the study of the Kondo effect in Kondo systems with Co as the impurities and noble metals as the hosts. A new surface Kondo system for Co on the surface of Cu is discovered with Kondo temperature T_{ rm K} = 23K, as the peak in the temperature dependence of the magnetic scattering is revealed by weak localization. It is also found that Co in the bulk of Cu shows no magnetic moment. The system of Co on the surface of Au is found to be a Kondo system with T_ {rm K} = 19K. A new type of tunneling experiment in which the current flows in the direction parallel to the tunneling junction is made possible with the method of weak localization. The coupling of the dephasing rates of the electrons in two films due to the tunneling influences the magnetoresistance, and the tunneling rate is determined as a function of the thickness of the insulating layer. Tunneling resistance of the order of muOmega/mm ^2 can be investigated with this new method. In addition, it is found experimentally that the anomalous Coulomb effect in the films on both sides of the insulating layer is decoupled, when the tunneling time is longer than the thermal coherence time, which is characteristic of the anomalous Coulomb effect. This challenges the present theoretical picture that the dynamic Coulomb potential in thin and disordered films should have a long range, and therefore these two films close to each other should behave essentially as one film for the Coulomb anomaly. (Copies available exclusively from Micrographics Department, Doheny Library, USC, Los Angeles

  4. Harbour porpoises on Horns Reef - Effects of the Horns Reef wind farm. Annual status report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tougaard, J.; Carstensen, J.; Wisz, M.S.; Teilmann, J.; Bech, N.I. [National Environmental Res. Inst., Roskilde (Denmark); Skov, H. [DHI - Water and Environment, Hoersholm (Denmark); Henriksen, Oluf, D. [DDH-Consulting A/S, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2005-07-15

    This report describes the monitoring of harbour porpoises at Horns Reef Offshore Wind Farm, Denmark, with emphasis on data collected in 2004. Three 2-day surveys with line transect observations of porpoises were conducted in 2004 and data from acoustic data loggers (TPODs) were collected from January through July. Although new data from 2004 was included in the analysis there were no significant additions to conclusions from previous years' reports. On the contrary, the general conclusions regarding effects of construction and operation of the wind farm on porpoise abundance inside and outside the wind farm area have been weakened somewhat compared to previous reports. The specific conclusions regarding short-time effects of construction activities (especially pile drivings) has not been changed, however. Modelling of the spatial distribution of porpoises in the area demonstrated very weak correlations with static environmental variables (water depth, change in water depth and distance to 6 m depth contour). This highlights the importance of dynamic environmental variables, in particular tide and salinity, in determining the fine-scale distribution of porpoises and their prey in the area. a strong correlation between tide and porpoise abundance observed in the T-POD data on some parts of the reef (high abundance at high tide, low at low tide) supports the importance of this variable. Tide and salinity will be included in a forthcoming analysis of the entire dataset from the monitoring program. (au)

  5. [Effects of grafting on photosynthesis of sweet pepper seedlings under low temperature and weak light intensity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan; Wang, Mei-ling; Wang, Hong-tao; Ai, Xi-zhen

    2009-03-01

    Sweet pepper 'Chifengtexuan' seedlings were grafted onto 'Weishi' and 'Buyeding' rootstocks, treated with low temperature (8 degrees C/ 5 degrees C) and weak light intensity (100 micromol x m(-2) s(-1)) for 7 days, and then recovered under normal conditions (25 degrees C/ 18 degrees C, PFD 550-600 micromol x s(-1)) for 3 days to study the variations of their gas exchange parameters, carboxylation efficiency, and fluorescence parameters, with the own-rooted 'Chifengtexuan' seedlings as the control. The results showed that on the 3rd day of low temperature and weak light intensity stress, the photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of both own-rooted and grafted seedling leaves decreased more than 50%, and after then, the Pn and Gs tended to stable while CE decreased continually. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) declined first, but enhanced after the 4th day of the stress. Low temperature and weak light intensity decreased the maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II in darkness (Fv/Fm), actual photochemical efficiency of PS II during illumination (phi (PS II)) and electron transport rate (ETR), but increased the initial fluorescence (Fo), which implied that the stress caused definite damage of photosynthetic apparatus. However, the damage diminished after 3 days of recovery. Comparing with those of own-rooted seedlings, the Pn, Gs, CE, phi(PS II), and Fv/Fm of grafted seedlings increased to various degrees, and Fo decreased markedly during the stress. It was concluded that grafting could promote the photosynthetic function, and alleviate the effects of low temperature and weak light intensity on the photosynthesis of sweet pepper seedlings.

  6. The effects of muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zeng, Zhi-Li; Tong, Jian-Hua; Zhen, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Shuang; Yu, Yan; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Whether muscle weakness is a cause, or result, of degenerative spondylolisthesis is not currently well understood. Little biomechanical evidence is available to offer an explanation for the mechanism behind exercise therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of back muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis and to tease out the biomechanical mechanism of exercise therapy. A nonlinear 3-D finite element model of L3-L5 was constructed. Forces representing global back muscles and global abdominal muscles, follower loads and an upper body weight were applied. The force of the global back muscles was reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% to simulate different degrees of back muscle weakness. An additional boundary condition which represented the loads from other muscles after exercise therapy was set up to keep the spine in a neutral standing position. Shear forces, intradiscal pressure, facet joint forces and von Mises equivalent stresses in the annuli were calculated. The intervertebral rotations of L3-L4 and L4-L5 were within the range of in vitro experimental data. The calculated intradiscal pressure of L4-L5 for standing was 0.57MPa, which is similar to previous in vivo data. With the back muscles were reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% force, the shear force moved increasingly in a ventral direction. Due to the additional stabilizing force and moment provided by boundary conditions, the shear force varied less than 15%. Reducing the force of global back muscles might lead to, or aggravate, degenerative spondylolisthesis with forward slipping from biomechanical point of view. Exercise therapy may improve the spinal biomechanical environment. However, the intrinsic correlation between back muscle weakness and degenerative spondylolisthesis needs more clinical in vivo study and biomechanical analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AWSM. Ground and wind shear effects in aerodynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    In order to design more advanced and efficient wind turbines, more accurate results coming from numerical predictions are mandatory. This need became more and more important in the last years due to the growth of wind turbines, especially for offshore scenarios. The diameter of a modern MW class wind turbine can easily be greater than 100m, on which the effect of wind shear and incoherent atmospheric structures on blade loads play a much more significant role. Most of the available codes are based on Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. The main advantage of this class of codes is the fact that they are very fast to calculate the loads and performance of a wind turbine. This makes BEM codes very convenient especially in the very extensive wind turbine design and load calculations, but due to all the hypotheses of the theory, there are several restrictions for BEM codes usage. By using full Navier-Stokes based codes, for example, there are no limitations about the geometry and no restrictive hypotheses related with the aerodynamics, so it is possible to perform both detailed fluid-dynamics studies and general performance-oriented analyses in very general conditions. The drawback is the big demand in terms of computational resources, computational time and expertise. A code, named Aerodynamic Windturbine Simulation Module (AWSM), has been developed at Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). The main scope was to keep the advantages of BEM codes in terms of calculation time and ease of use, but to obtain a superior quality, especially concerning wake and time dependent wake-related phenomena. The presence of the ground during the analyses, as well as the presence of a nonuniform wind introduce sensitive effects in the numerical predictions. These effects regard both the response of the blade and the evolution of the wake. During UpWind project, part of the research was focused on these two effects and their inclusion in the calculations. The aim of the

  8. Wake Effects on Lifetime Distribution in DFIG-based Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Dao; Su, Chi

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing size of the wind farms, the impact of the wake effect on the energy yields and lifetime consumption of wind turbine can no longer be neglected. In this paper, the affecting factors like the wind speed and wind direction are investigated in terms of the single wake and multiple...

  9. Analysis of the reduced wake effect for available wind power calculation during curtailment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Perez Moreno, S.; Ummels, B. C.; Zaayer, M B

    2017-01-01

    With the increase of installed wind power capacity, the contribution of wind power curtailment to power balancing becomes more relevant. Determining the available power during curtailment at the wind farm level is not trivial, as curtailment changes the wake effects in a wind farm. Current best

  10. Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Weihao; Su, Chi; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    presents a simulation model of a variable speed wind farm with permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSGs) and fullscale back-to-back converters in the simulation tool of DIgSILENT/PowerFactory. In this paper, the impacts of wind shear and tower shadow effects on the small signal stability of power...

  11. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldan, Peter Fisker

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies...... frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions...... and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases...

  12. The Effect of Wind Power Installations on Coastal Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willett Kempton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We surveyed more than 1,000 randomly sampled, out-of-state tourists at Delaware, USA beaches in 2007. After providing respondents with wind turbine project photo-simulations at several distances, we inquired about the effect development would have on visitation. Approximately one-quarter stated that they would switch beaches if an offshore wind project was located 10 km from the coast, with avoidance diminishing with greater distance from shore. Stated avoidance is less than: avoidance with a fossil fuel power plant located the same distance inland; attraction to a beach with offshore wind turbines; and the percentage stating they would likely pay to take a boat tour.

  13. The effect of wind on burning rate of wood cribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney

    2016-01-01

    Wood cribs are often used as ignition sources for room fire tests. A wood crib may also apply to studies of burning rate in wildland fires, because wildland fuel beds are porous and three dimensional. A unique aspect of wildland fires is the ubiquitous presence of wind. However, very little is known about what effect the increased ventilation has on the...

  14. External effects related to biogas and wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Liselotte Schleisner; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    1998-01-01

    will focus on estimates of externalities related to wind and biogas energy supplies using the ExternE methodology developed in a major study launched by the European Comission. External costs are the costs imporsed on society that are not included in the market price (e.g. effects of air pollution on health......, buildings, crops, forests and global warming, emissions of noise etc.)....

  15. [Effect of weak combined magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A M; Lednev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+ and extremely weak alternating magnetic field on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor have been studied. It was shown that the exposure of pupas of insects to all above-indicated types of fields stimulates the metamorphosis. However, after the exposure to weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+, the number of insects with anomalies increases, which is not observed by the action of the weak alternating magnetic field.

  16. Constituent quark-light vector mesons effective couplings in a weak background magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2018-01-01

    Effective couplings between light SU(2) vector and axial mesons and constituent quarks are calculated in the presence of a background electromagnetic field by considering a one dressed gluon exchange quark-quark interaction. The effective coupling constants, obtained from a large quark mass expansion, are expressed in terms of the Lagrangian parameters of the initial model and of components of the quark and nonperturbative gluon propagators. In spite of many possible couplings, only a few coupling constants emerge. As a second step, constituent quark-vector and axial mesons effective coupling constants are redefined to show explicit dependence on a weak background magnetic field. Ratios between the effective coupling constants are found in the limit of large quark effective mass and numerical estimates are presented.

  17. Density Measurements in Low Pressure, Weakly Magnetized, RF Plasmas: Experimental Verification of the Sheath Expansion Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunchao Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study shows the validity of Sheridan's method in determining plasma density in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas using ion saturation current data measured by a planar Langmuir probe. The ion density derived from Sheridan's method which takes into account the sheath expansion around the negatively biased probe tip, presents a good consistency with the electron density measured by a cylindrical RF-compensated Langmuir probe using the Druyvesteyn theory. The ion density obtained from the simplified method which neglects the sheath expansion effect, overestimates the true density magnitude, e.g., by a factor of 3 to 12 for the present experiment.

  18. Weak Anderson localisation in reverberation rooms and its effect on the uncertainty of sound power measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    The effect known as ‘weak Anderson localisation’, ‘coherent backscattering’ or ‘enhanced backscattering’ is a physical phenomenon that occurs in random systems, e.g., disordered media and linear wave systems, including reverberation rooms: the mean square response is increased at the drive point....... In a reverberation room this means that one can expect an increase of the reverberant sound field at the position of the source that generates the sound field. This affects the sound power output of the source and is therefore of practical concern. However, because of the stronger direct sound field at the source...... for the uncertainty of sound power measurements....

  19. Density measurements in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas: experimental verification of the sheath expansion effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick W.

    2017-07-01

    This experimental study shows the validity of Sheridan's method in determining plasma density in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas using ion saturation current data measured by a planar Langmuir probe. The ion density derived from Sheridan's method which takes into account the sheath expansion around the negatively biased probe tip, presents a good consistency with the electron density measured by a cylindrical RF-compensated Langmuir probe using the Druyvesteyn theory. The ion density obtained from the simplified method which neglects the sheath expansion effect, overestimates the true density magnitude, e.g., by a factor of 3 to 12 for the present experiment.

  20. High-Temperature-Superconducting Weak Link Defined by the Ferroelectric Field Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégon-Lours, L.; Rouco, V.; Sander, A.; Trastoy, J.; Bernard, R.; Jacquet, E.; Bouzehouane, K.; Fusil, S.; Garcia, V.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Santamaría, J.; Villegas, J. E.

    2017-06-01

    In all-oxide ferroelectric (F E ) superconductors (S ), due to the low carrier concentration of oxides compared to transition metals, the F E interfacial polarization charges induce an accumulation (or depletion) of charge carriers in the S . This effect leads either to an enhancement or a depression of its critical temperature, depending on the F E polarization direction. Here, we exploit this effect at a local scale to define planar weak links in high-temperature-superconducting wires. These experiments are realized in BiFeO3 (F E ) /YBa2Cu3O7 -x (S ) bilayers in which the remnant F E domain structure is "written" by locally applying voltage pulses with a conductive-tip atomic force microscope. In this fashion, the F E domain pattern defines a spatial modulation of superconductivity. This characteristic allows us to "write" a device whose electrical transport shows different temperature regimes and magnetic-field-matching effects that are characteristic of Josephson coupled weak links. This behavior illustrates the potential of the ferroelectric approach for the realization of high-temperature-superconducting devices.

  1. Implications of Weak Link Effects on Thermal Characteristics of Transition-Edge Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, C. N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Chevenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kally, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Weak link behavior in transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters creates the need for a more careful characterization of a device's thermal characteristics through its transition. This is particularly true for small TESs where a small change in the bias current results in large changes in effective transition temperature. To correctly interpret measurements, especially complex impedance, it is crucial to know the temperature-dependent thermal conductance, G(T), and heat capacity, C(T), at each point through the transition. We present data illustrating these effects and discuss how we overcome the challenges that are present in accurately determining G and T from I-V curves. We also show how these weak link effects vary wi.th TES size. Additionally, we use this improVed understanding of G(T) to determine that, for these TES microcalorimeters. Kaptiza boundary resistance dominates the G of devices with absorbers while the electron-phonon coupling also needs to be considered when determining G for devices without absorbers

  2. Filtering effect of wind flow turbulence on atmospheric pollutant dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Mohamed F

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a model for coupling the statistics of wind velocity distribution and atmospheric pollutant dispersion. The effect of wind velocity distribution is modeled as a three-dimensional finite-impulse response (3D-FIR) filter. A phase space representation of the 3D-FIR filter window is discussed. The resulting pollutant dispersion is the multiplication in the phase space of the 3-D Fourier transform of the pollutant concentration and the volume described by the filter window coefficients. The shape of the filter window in the phase space enables representing such effects as vortex shedding thermal currents, etc. The impact of spatial distribution of the sensors on the resulting pollutant spatial distribution and the 3-D FIR filter model employed also discuss. The case of a neutrally buoyant plume emitted from an elevated point source in a turbulent boundary layer considers. The results show that wind turbulence is an important factor in the pollutant dispersion and introduces expected random fluctuations in pollutant distribution and leads to spreading the distribution due to wind mixing.

  3. Geo-effectiveness of Solar Wind Extremes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... However, the high speed streams below the threshold with -ve IMF are 1.1 times more effective in enhancing geomagnetic activity than those with +ve IMF. The violent solar activity period (October–November 2003) of cycle 23 presents a very special case during which many severe and strong effects were ...

  4. Effects of weak nonlinearity on dispersion relations and frequency band-gaps of periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2015-01-01

    . Determination of band-gaps and the corresponding attenuation levels is an im-portant practical problem. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants, and the method of space-harmonics. However, application...... of these for nonlinear problems is impossible or cumbersome, since Floquet theory is applicable for linear systems only. Thus the nonlinear effects for periodic structures are not yet fully uncovered, while at the same time applica-tions may demand effects of nonlinearity on structural response to be accounted for....... The present work deals with analytically predicting dynamic responses for nonlinear continuous elastic periodic structures. Specifically, the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion re-lation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending os-cillations are analyzed...

  5. Discovering protein complexes in protein interaction networks via exploring the weak ties effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoke; Gao, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Studying protein complexes is very important in biological processes since it helps reveal the structure-functionality relationships in biological networks and much attention has been paid to accurately predict protein complexes from the increasing amount of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. Most of the available algorithms are based on the assumption that dense subgraphs correspond to complexes, failing to take into account the inherence organization within protein complex and the roles of edges. Thus, there is a critical need to investigate the possibility of discovering protein complexes using the topological information hidden in edges. To provide an investigation of the roles of edges in PPI networks, we show that the edges connecting less similar vertices in topology are more significant in maintaining the global connectivity, indicating the weak ties phenomenon in PPI networks. We further demonstrate that there is a negative relation between the weak tie strength and the topological similarity. By using the bridges, a reliable virtual network is constructed, in which each maximal clique corresponds to the core of a complex. By this notion, the detection of the protein complexes is transformed into a classic all-clique problem. A novel core-attachment based method is developed, which detects the cores and attachments, respectively. A comprehensive comparison among the existing algorithms and our algorithm has been made by comparing the predicted complexes against benchmark complexes. We proved that the weak tie effect exists in the PPI network and demonstrated that the density is insufficient to characterize the topological structure of protein complexes. Furthermore, the experimental results on the yeast PPI network show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms. The analysis of detected modules by the present algorithm suggests that most of these modules have well biological significance in context of complexes, suggesting

  6. Roughness Effects on Wind-Turbine Wake Dynamics in a Boundary-Layer Wind Tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Buckingham, Sophia; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Increasing demand in wind energy has resulted in increasingly clustered wind farms, and raised the interest in wake research dramatically in the last couple of years. To this end, the present work employs an experimental approach with scaled three-bladed wind-turbine models in a large boundary...

  7. Investigation of the effects of wind turbine noise annoyance on the sleep disturbance among workers of Manjil wind farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abbasi

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In this study, workers with more wind turbine noise annoyance had more sleep disturbance. Therefore, in addition to the direct effects of noise on sleep disturbance, it can indirectly exacerbate sleep disturbances.

  8. Weak trophic links between a crab-spider and the effective pollinators of a rewardless orchid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Carolina; Corley, Juan C.; Aizen, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Sit and wait predators hunting on flowers are considered to be exploiters of plant-pollinator mutualisms. Several studies have shown that plant-pollinator interactions can be highly susceptible to the impact of a third trophic level, via consumptive (direct) and non-consumptive (indirect) effects that alter pollinator behavior and, ultimately, plant fitness. However, most flowering plants attract a wide array of flower visitors, from which only a subset will be effective pollinators. Hence, a negative effect of an ambush predator on plant fitness should be expected only when: (i) the effective pollinators are part of the predators' diet and/or (ii) the non-consumptive effects of predator presence (e.g. dead prey) alter the behavior of effective pollinators and pollen movement among individual plants. We analyzed the direct and indirect effects of a crab-spider (Misumenops pallidus), on the pollination and reproductive success of Chloraea alpina, a Patagonian rewardless orchid. Our results indicate that most of the flower visitors do not behave as effective pollinators and most effective pollinators were not observed as prey for the crab-spider. In terms of non-consumptive effects, inflorescences with and without spiders and/or dead-prey did not vary the frequency of flower visitors, nor pollinia removal or deposition. Hence, it is not surprising that M. pallidus has a neutral effect on pollinia removal and deposition as well as on fruit and seed set. Similar to other rewardless orchids, the low reproductive success of C. alpina (∼6% fruit set) was associated with the limited number of visits by effective pollinators. Negative top-down effects of a flower-visitor predator on plant pollination may not be anticipated without studying the direct and indirect effects of this predator on the effective pollinators. In pollination systems where effective pollinators visited flowers erratically, such as in deceptive orchids, we expect weak or no effect of predators on

  9. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei, E-mail: lwliu2007@sinano.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications-CAS and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Guangtong [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  10. Weak antilocalization effect in exfoliated black phosphorus revealed by temperature- and angle-dependent magnetoconductivity

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng

    2018-01-10

    Recently, there have been increasingly debates on whether there exists a surface resonance state (SRS) in black phosphorus (BP), as suggested by recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results. To resolve this issue, we have performed temperature- and angle-dependent magnetoconductivity measurements on exfoliated, high-quality BP single crystals. A pronounced weak-antilocalization (WAL) effect was observed within a narrow temperature range of 8 - 16 K, with the electrical current flowing parallel to the cleaved ac-plane (along the a- or c-axis) and the magnetic field along the b-axis. The angle-dependent magnetoconductivity and the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka (HLN) model-fitted results have revealed that the observed WAL effect shows surface-bulk coherent features, which supports the existence of SRS in black phosphorus.

  11. Zeeman effect of weak La I lines investigated by the use of optogalvanic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Ł. M.; Windholz, L.; Kwela, J.

    2017-03-01

    New Landé- gJ factors of 35 energy levels of La I, found from investigations of 40 spectral lines in the wavelength range 562.959÷609.537 nm, were determined. As a source of free La atoms a hollow cathode discharge lamp was used. We monitored the signal of the optogalvanic effect appearing when a laser beam is passing through the hollow cathode. Spectra were recorded in the presence of a magnetic field of about 800 G produced by a permanent magnet, for two linear polarizations of the exciting laser light. Optogalvanic spectroscopy is a very sensitive method, so we were able to observe the Zeeman effect of very weak atomic lines. In this way we have determined for the first time the Landé-gJ factors for 35 recently found levels of neutral La. The Landé gJ- factors for several other levels were reinvestigated.

  12. Effect of Weak Binding on the Apparent Spin-Orbit Splitting in Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, B. P.; Hoffman, C. R.; Macchiavelli, A. O.

    2017-11-01

    The apparent splitting between orbitals that are spin-orbit partners can be substantially influenced by the effects of weak binding. In particular, such effects can account for the observed decrease in separation of the neutron 1 p3 /2 and 1 p1 /2 orbitals between the 41Ca and 35Si isotopes. This behavior has been the subject of recent experimental and theoretical works and cited as evidence for a proton "bubble" in 34Si causing an explicit weakening of the spin-orbit interaction. The results reported here suggest that the change in the separation between the 1 p3 /2 and 1 p1 /2 partners occurs dominantly because of the behavior of the energies of these 1 p neutron states near zero binding.

  13. Effect of Our Galaxy's Motion on Weak Lensing Measurements of Shear and Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, J B

    2013-01-01

    In this work we investigate the effect on weak-lensing shear and convergence measurements due to distortions from the Lorentz boost induced by our Galaxy's motion. While no ellipticity is induced in an image from the Lorentz boost to first order in beta = v/c, the image is magnified. This affects the inferred convergence at a 10 per cent level and is most notable for low multipoles in the convergence power spectrum, C {\\kappa}{\\kappa}, and for surveys with large sky coverage like LSST. Experiments which image only small fractions of the sky and convergence power spectrum determinations at l > 5 can safely neglect the boost effect to first order in beta.

  14. Weak associations between sociodemographic factors and breast cancer: possible effects of early detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robsahm, T E; Tretli, S

    2005-02-01

    Differences in incidence and survival of breast cancer have been observed to vary with regard to sociodemographic factors. This might be related to variation in frequency of doctor consultation and in time of diagnosis, since sociodemographic factors appear to influence the individual's attention to cancer symptoms and susceptibility to participate in screening programmes. This study aimed to examine the variation in breast cancer incidence and case fatality in sociodemographic groups in Norway, and to discuss whether any variation can result from temporal variation in detection time. The study included 589 521 women with information on residential history, childbearing pattern, educational level and occupational physical activity. Analyses were conducted using Poisson and Cox regression models. Although all the associations were weak, breast cancer incidence was associated with residence in urban areas, high age at first childbirth and high level of education. The urban women also tended to have better survival compared with the rural women. Childlessness was associated with high incidence and high case fatality. A high educational level was associated with the lowest case fatality. This study may emphasize the importance of discussing potential effects of early cancer detection. This is particularly important in epidemiological studies revealing weak associations between sociodemographic factors and breast cancer. Mortality rates may be less influenced by problems associated with early detection and, thus, analyses of breast cancer-specific mortality could give additional information.

  15. Manifestations of phase-coherent transport in graphene : The Josephson effect, weak localization, and aperiodic conductance fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heersche, H.B.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Oostinga, J.B.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.; Morpurgoa, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of graphene exhibit pronounced differences from those of conventional two dimensional electron systems investigated in the past. As a consequence, well established phenomena such as the integer quantum Hall effect and weak localization manifest themselves

  16. Offshore Wind Turbines - Estimated Noise from Offshore Wind Turbine, Monhegan Island, Maine: Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pamela M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-23

    Deep C Wind, a consortium headed by the University of Maine will test the first U.S. offshore wind platforms in 2012. In advance of final siting and permitting of the test turbines off Monhegan Island, residents of the island off Maine require reassurance that the noise levels from the test turbines will not disturb them. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the request of the University of Maine, and with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program, modeled the acoustic output of the planned test turbines.

  17. Transient Thunderstorm Downbursts and Their Effects on Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu H. Nguyen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC Standard 61400-1 for the design of wind turbines does not explicitly address site-specific conditions associated with anomalous atmospheric events or conditions. Examples of off-standard atmospheric conditions include thunderstorm downbursts, hurricanes, tornadoes, low-level jets, etc. The simulation of thunderstorm downbursts and associated loads on a utility-scale wind turbine is the focus of this study. Since the problem has not received sufficient attention, especially in terms of design, we thus focus in this paper on practical aspects. A wind field model that incorporates component non-turbulent and turbulent parts is described and employed in inflow simulations. The non-turbulent part is based on an available analytical model with some modifications, while the turbulent part is simulated as a stochastic process using standard turbulence power spectral density functions and coherence functions whose defining parameters are related to the downburst characteristics such as the storm translation velocity. Available information on recorded downbursts is used to define two storm scenarios that are studied. Rotor loads are generated using stochastic simulation of the aeroelastic response of a model of a utility-scale 5-MW turbine. An illustrative single storm simulation and the associated turbine response are used to discuss load characteristics and to highlight storm-related and environmental parameters of interest. Extensive simulations for two downbursts are then conducted while varying the storm’s location and track relative to the turbine. Results suggest that wind turbine yaw and pitch control systems clearly influence overall system response. Results also highlight the important effects of both the turbulence as well as the downburst mean wind profiles on turbine extreme loads.

  18. Wind turbine power curve prediction with consideration of rotational augmentation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X.; Huang, X.; Sun, S.; Peng, R.

    2016-11-01

    Wind turbine power curve expresses the relationship between the rotor power and the hub wind speed. Wind turbine power curve prediction is of vital importance for power control and wind energy management. To predict power curve, the Blade Element Moment (BEM) method is used in both academic and industrial communities. Due to the limited range of angles of attack measured in wind tunnel testing and the three-dimensional (3D) rotational augmentation effects in rotating turbines, wind turbine power curve prediction remains a challenge especially at high wind speeds. This paper presents an investigation of considering the rotational augmentation effects using characterized lift and drag coefficients from 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations coupled in the BEM method. A Matlab code was developed to implement the numerical calculation. The predicted power outputs were compared with the NREL Phase VI wind turbine measurements. The results demonstrate that the coupled method improves the wind turbine power curve prediction.

  19. Effects of setting angle and chord length on performance of four blades bionic wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z. X.; Li, G. S.; Song, L.; Bai, Y. F.

    2017-11-01

    With the energy crisis and the increasing environmental pollution, more and more efforts have been made about wind power development. In this paper, a four blades bionic wind turbine was proposed, and the outline of wind turbine was constructed by the fitted curve. This paper attempted to research the effects of setting angle and chord length on performance of four blades bionic wind turbine by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results showed that the setting angle and chord length of the bionic wind turbine has some significant effects on the efficiency of the wind turbine, and within the range of wind speed from 7 m/s to 15 m/s, the wind turbine achieved maximum efficiency when the setting angle is 31 degree and the chord length is 125 mm. The conclusion will work as a guideline for the improvement of wind turbine design

  20. Effective turbulence models and fatigue reliability in wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Tarp-Johansen, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Modeling of turbulence within wind farms with 100 or more wind turbines is important both for extreme and fatigue limit states. Behind a wind turbine a wake is formed where the mean wind speed decreases slightly and the turbulence intensity increases significantly. This increase ill turbulence...... intensity in wakes behind wind turbines can imply a significant reduction in the fatigue lifetime of wind turbines placed in wakes. Ill this paper the design code model ill the wind turbine code [IEC 61400-1, Wind turbine generator systems - Part 1: Safety requirements. 2005] is evaluated from...

  1. Effect of Phytoplankton Richness on Phytoplankton Biomass Is Weak Where the Distribution of Herbivores is Patchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Jerome J

    2016-01-01

    Positive effects of competitor species richness on competitor productivity can be more pronounced at a scale that includes heterogeneity in 'bottom-up' environmental factors, such as the supply of limiting nutrients. The effect of species richness is not well understood in landscapes where variation in 'top-down' factors, such as the abundance of predators or herbivores, has a strong influence competitor communities. I asked how phytoplankton species richness directly influenced standing phytoplankton biomass in replicate microcosm regions where one patch had a population of herbivores (Daphnia pulicaria) and one patch did not have herbivores. The effect of phytoplankton richness on standing phytoplankton biomass was positive but weak and not statistically significant at this regional scale. Among no-Daphnia patches, there was a significant positive effect of phytoplankton richness that resulted from positive selection effects for two dominant and productive species in polycultures. Among with-Daphnia patches there was not a significant effect of phytoplankton richness. The same two species dominated species-rich polycultures in no- and with-Daphnia patches but both species were relatively vulnerable to consumption by Daphnia. Consistent with previous studies, this experiment shows a measurable positive influence of primary producer richness on biomass when herbivores were absent. It also shows that given the patchy distribution of herbivores at a regional scale, a regional positive effect was not detected.

  2. Community investment in wind farms: funding structure effects in wind energy infrastructure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Joshua A; Day, Jennifer E

    2015-03-03

    Wind energy development is an increasingly popular form of renewable energy infrastructure in rural areas. Communities generally perceive socioeconomic benefits accrue and that community funding structures are preferable to corporate structures, yet lack supporting quantitative data to inform energy policy. This study uses the Everpower wind development, to be located in Midwestern Ohio, as a hypothetical modeling environment to identify and examine socioeconomic impact trends arising from corporate, community and diversified funding structures. Analysis of five National Renewable Energy Laboratory Jobs and Economic Development Impact models incorporating local economic data and review of relevant literature were conducted. The findings suggest that community and diversified funding structures exhibit 40-100% higher socioeconomic impact levels than corporate structures. Prioritization of funding sources and retention of federal tax incentives were identified as key elements. The incorporation of local shares was found to mitigate the negative effects of foreign private equity, local debt financing increased economic output and opportunities for private equity investment were identified. The results provide the groundwork for energy policies focused to maximize socioeconomic impacts while creating opportunities for inclusive economic participation and improved social acceptance levels fundamental to the deployment of renewable energy technology.

  3. The effect of mountain wind on the falling snow deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    The air-flow over morphologic prominence is of vital importance for the temporal and spatial variations of snow distribution, which may further affect the hydrological cycle, climate system, ecological evolution as well as other natural processes. Most previous studies have neglected the effect of non-uniform mountain wind on the trajectory of falling snow particle and thus the uneven snow distribution over complex terrain is little known. Here in this paper, we carry out a numerical study on the deposition process of mixed grain size snow particles over mountain terrains. A three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) code is used to predict the wind field and the fluid-solid coupling effect is considered, the Lagrangian particle tracking method is employed to track the movement of each falling snow particle. Our results suggest the boundary layer flow over steep slopes or complex terrains exhibits obvious uneven characteristics. The mountain wind has obvious effect on the motion of snow particles and finally results in a non-uniform distribution of snow. This research is of significance to understand the evolution of high resolution snow distribution in cold highland areas.

  4. Wind Farms’ Spatial Distribution Effect on Power System Reserves Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The wind power development during last millennium was typically based on small wind turbines dispersed over large areas, leading to a significant smoothing of the wind power fluctuations in a power system balancing area. The present development goes towards much larger wind farms, concentrated...... in smaller areas, which causes the total wind power fluctuations in power system areas to increase significantly. The impact of future large wind farms spatial distribution with respect to the power system reserve requirements is analyzed in this paper. For this purpose, Correlated Wind (CorWind) power time...... series simulation model developed to simulate wind power variability over a large area is used. As a study case, two scenarios for short term offshore wind power development in the West Danish power system region are used. The first scenario assumes that all the wind farms are built in the region...

  5. Before-after field study of effects of wind turbine noise on polysomnographic sleep parameters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leila Jalali; Philip Bigelow; Mohammad-Reza Nezhad-Ahmadi; Mahmood Gohari; Diane Williams; Steve McColl

    2016-01-01

    .... However, alleged health-related effects of exposure to wind turbine (WT) noise have attracted much public attention and various symptoms, such as sleep disturbance, have been reported by residents living close to wind developments...

  6. Effects of wind application on thermal perception and self-paced performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, L.P.J.; Haan, A. de; Koning, J.J. de; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological and perceptual effects of wind cooling are often intertwined and have scarcely been studied in self-paced exercise. Therefore, we aimed to investigate (1) the independent perceptual effect of wind cooling and its impact on performance and (2) the responses to temporary wind cooling

  7. Effects of vernal equinox solar eclipse on temperature and wind direction in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Werner; Emmel, Carmen; Wolf, Sebastian; Buchmann, Nina; McFadden, Joseph P.; Whiteman, Charles David

    2017-12-01

    The vernal equinox total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 produced a maximum occultation of 65.8-70.1 % over Switzerland during the morning hours (09:22 to 11:48 CET). Skies were generally clear over the Swiss Alps due to a persistent high-pressure band between the UK and Russia associated with a rather weak pressure gradient over the continent. To assess the effects of penumbral shading on near-surface meteorology across Switzerland, air temperature data measured at 10 min intervals at 184 MeteoSwiss weather stations were used. Wind speed and direction data were available from 165 of these stations. Additionally, six Swiss FluxNet eddy covariance flux (ECF) sites provided turbulent measurements at 20 Hz resolution. During maximum occultation, the temperature drop was up to 5.8 K at a mountain site where cold air can pool in a topographic depression. The bootstrapped average of the maximum temperature drops of all 184 MeteoSwiss sites during the solar eclipse was 1.51 ± 0.02 K (mean ± SE). A detailed comparison with literature values since 1834 showed a temperature decrease of 2.6 ± 1.7 K (average of all reports), with extreme values up to 11 K. On fair weather days under weak larger-scale pressure gradients, local thermo-topographic wind systems develop that are driven by small-scale pressure and temperature gradients. At one ECF site, the penumbral shading delayed the morning transition from down-valley to up-valley wind conditions. At another site, it prevented this transition from occurring at all. Data from the 165 MeteoSwiss sites measuring wind direction did not show a consistent pattern of wind direction response to the passing of the penumbral shadow. These results suggest that the local topographic setting had an important influence on the temperature drop and the wind flow patterns during the eclipse. A significant cyclonic effect of the passing penumbral shadow was found in the elevation range ≈ 1700-2700 m a. s. l., but not at lower

  8. Effects of vernal equinox solar eclipse on temperature and wind direction in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Eugster

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The vernal equinox total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 produced a maximum occultation of 65.8–70.1 % over Switzerland during the morning hours (09:22 to 11:48 CET. Skies were generally clear over the Swiss Alps due to a persistent high-pressure band between the UK and Russia associated with a rather weak pressure gradient over the continent. To assess the effects of penumbral shading on near-surface meteorology across Switzerland, air temperature data measured at 10 min intervals at 184 MeteoSwiss weather stations were used. Wind speed and direction data were available from 165 of these stations. Additionally, six Swiss FluxNet eddy covariance flux (ECF sites provided turbulent measurements at 20 Hz resolution. During maximum occultation, the temperature drop was up to 5.8 K at a mountain site where cold air can pool in a topographic depression. The bootstrapped average of the maximum temperature drops of all 184 MeteoSwiss sites during the solar eclipse was 1.51 ± 0.02 K (mean ± SE. A detailed comparison with literature values since 1834 showed a temperature decrease of 2.6 ± 1.7 K (average of all reports, with extreme values up to 11 K. On fair weather days under weak larger-scale pressure gradients, local thermo-topographic wind systems develop that are driven by small-scale pressure and temperature gradients. At one ECF site, the penumbral shading delayed the morning transition from down-valley to up-valley wind conditions. At another site, it prevented this transition from occurring at all. Data from the 165 MeteoSwiss sites measuring wind direction did not show a consistent pattern of wind direction response to the passing of the penumbral shadow. These results suggest that the local topographic setting had an important influence on the temperature drop and the wind flow patterns during the eclipse. A significant cyclonic effect of the passing penumbral shadow was found in the elevation range

  9. Theory of tunneling ionization of molecules: Weak-field asymptotics including dipole effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of the parabolic adiabatic expansion approach to the problem of ionization of atomic systems in a static electric field, originally developed for the axially symmetric case [ Phys. Rev. A 82 023416 (2010)], is generalized to arbitrary potentials. This approach is used to rederive...... the asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization in the weak-field limit. In the atomic case, the resulting formulas for the ionization rate coincide with previously known results. In addition, the present theory accounts for the possible existence of a permanent dipole moment of the unperturbed system and, hence......, applies to polar molecules. Accounting for dipole effects constitutes an important difference of the present theory from the so-called molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory. The theory is illustrated by comparing exact and asymptotic results for a set of model polar molecules and a realistic molecular...

  10. Effective combination of solar and wind energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Souliotis, M.; Makris, T. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Physics; Chemisana, D. [Lleida Univ. (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal solar energy collectors (PV/T) and small wind turbines (WT) are renewable energy systems that can supplement each other to adapt energy demand and to achieve optimal use of solar and wind energy. The PV/T/WT systems are suitable in rural and remote areas, with electricity supply from stand-alone units or mini-grid connection. The use of these subsystems can cover a great part of energy load in electricity and heat of buildings, contributing to conventional energy saving and to the protection of the environment by reducing CO{sub 2} emission. In this paper we present the experimental set-up of a suggested PV/T/WT system and the obtained results from the tested system. The results are analysed and discussed, regarding the effectiveness of system for practical application. (orig.)

  11. MHD effects of the solar wind flow around planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Biernat

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction of the solar wind with magnetized and unmagnetized planets forms a central topic of space research. Focussing on planetary magnetosheaths, we review some major developments in this field. Magnetosheath structures depend crucially on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, the solar wind Alfvén Mach number, the shape of the obstacle (axisymmetric/non-axisymmetric, etc., the boundary conditions at the magnetopause (low/high magnetic shear, and the degree of thermal anisotropy of the plasma. We illustrate the cases of Earth, Jupiter and Venus. The terrestrial magnetosphere is axisymmetric and has been probed in-situ by many spacecraft. Jupiter's magnetosphere is highly non-axisymmetric. Furthermore, we study magnetohydrodynamic effects in the Venus magnetosheath.

  12. Effects of setting angle on performance of fish-bionic wind wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. S.; Yang, Z. X.; Song, L.; Chen, Q.; Li, Y. B.; Chen, W.

    2016-08-01

    With the energy crisis and the increasing environmental pollutionmore and more efforts have been made about wind power development. In this paper, a new type of vertical axis named the fish-bionic wind wheel was proposed, and the outline of wind wheel was constructed by curve of Fourier fitting and polynomial equations. This paper attempted to research the relationship between the setting angle and the wind turbine characteristics by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results showed that the setting angle of the fish-bionic wind wheel has some significant effects on the efficiency of the wind turbine, Within the range of wind speed from 13m/s to 15m/s, wind wheel achieves the maximum efficiency when the setting angle is at 37 degree. The conclusion will work as a guideline for the improvement of wind turbine design.

  13. Experimental study on gyroscopic effect of rotating rotor and wind heading angle on floating wind turbine responses

    OpenAIRE

    Bahramiasl, Shabnam; Abbaspour, Madjid; Karimirad, Madjid

    2017-01-01

    Limited fossil resources, daily increasing rate of demand for energy and the environmental pollution fact, have made people revert to renewable sources of energy as a solution. One type of renewable energy is offshore wind energy which has high potential without any sound and visual noises. Recently a lot of researchers have carried out on the issue of offshore wind turbine. Because of incapability of most of software programs to simulate gyroscopic effect of rotating rotors, in this articles...

  14. Fatigue Reliability and Effective Turbulence Models in Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frandsen, S.; Tarp-Johansen, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    Offshore wind farms with 100 or more wind turbines are expected to be installed many places during the next years. Behind a wind turbine a wake is formed where the mean wind speed decreases slightly and the turbulence intensity increases significantly. This increase in turbulence intensity in wakes...

  15. Wind energy in the built environment : Concentrator effects of buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, S.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis deals with wind energy conversion in the built environment. It gives a description of the wind resources in the built environment that can be converted into energy by a wind turbine. With a focus on maximum energy yield of the wind turbine, it especially deals with the integration of

  16. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisker Skjoldan, P.

    2011-03-15

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e.g., with an unbalanced rotor or operating in wind shear, are treated with the general approaches of Floquet analysis or Hill's method which do not provide a unique reference frame for observing the modal frequency, to which any multiple of the rotor speed can be added. This indeterminacy is resolved by requiring that the periodic mode shape be as constant as possible in the inertial frame. The modal frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases are small, but indicate that the controller creates nonlinear damping. In isotropic conditions the periodic mode shape contains up to three harmonic components, but in anisotropic conditions it can contain an infinite number of harmonic components with frequencies that are multiples of the rotor speed. These harmonics appear in calculated frequency responses of the turbine. Extreme wind shear changes the modal damping when the flow is separated due to an interaction between

  17. Effects of wind fences on the wind environment around Jang Bogo Antarctic Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jang-Woon; Kim, Jae-Jin; Choi, Wonsik; Mun, Da-Som; Kang, Jung-Eun; Kwon, Hataek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Han, Kyung-Soo

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the flow characteristics altered by Jang Bogo Antarctic Research Station using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. The topography and buildings around Jang Bogo Station were constructed with computer-aided-design data in the CFD model domain. We simulated 16 cases with different inflow directions, and compared the flow characteristics with and without Jang Bogo Station for each inflow direction. The wind data recorded by the site's automatic weather station (AWS) were used for comparison. Wind rose analysis showed that the wind speed and direction after the construction of Jang Bogo Station were quite different from those before construction. We also investigated how virtual wind fences would modify the flow patterns, changing the distance of the fence from the station as well as the porosity of the fence. For westerly inflows, when the AWS was downwind of Jang Bogo Station, the decrease in wind speed was maximized (-81% for west-northwesterly). The wind speed reduction was also greater as the distance of the fence was closer to Jang Bogo Station. With the same distance, the fence with medium porosity (25%-33%) maximized the wind speed reduction. These results suggest that the location and material of the wind fence should be selected carefully, or AWS data should be interpreted cautiously, for particular prevailing wind directions.

  18. Internal tide modelling and the influence of wind effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip; Davies, Alan M.

    2007-05-01

    Initially the development of shallow sea three-dimensional barotropic tidal models is briefly reviewed with a view to determining what were the key measurements that allowed progress in this field and rigorous model validation. Subsequently this is extended to a brief review of baroclinic tidal models to try to determine a "way forward" for baroclinic model development. The difficulty of high spatial variability, and wind influence are identified as possibly important issues that must be considered in validating baroclinic tidal models. These are examined using a three-dimensional unstructured grid model of the M2 internal tide on the shelf edge region off the west coast of Scotland. The model is used to investigate the spatial variability of the M2 internal tide, and associated turbulence energy and mixing in the region. Initial calculations are performed with tidal forcing only, with subsequent calculations briefly examining how the tidal distribution is modified by down-welling and up-welling favourable winds. Calculations with tidal forcing only, show that there is significant spatial variability in the internal tide and associated mixing in the region. In addition, these are influenced by wind effects which may have to be taken into account in any model validation exercise. The paper ends by discussing the comprehensive nature of data sets that need to be collected to validate internal tidal models to the same level currently attained with three dimensional barotropic tidal models.

  19. A Cyber-Based Data-Enabled Virtual Organization for Wind Load Effects on Civil Infrastructures: VORTEX-Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Kareem

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite many advances in the area of wind effects on structures in recent decades, research has been traditionally conducted within limited resources scattered geographically. With the trend toward increasingly complex designs of civil infrastructure combined with the escalating potential for losses by extreme wind events, a new culture of research needs to be established based on innovative and collaborative solutions for better management of the impact of extreme wind events. To address this change, this paper presents a new paradigm of a multiscale cyber-based laboratory framework for the analysis/design, modeling, and simulation of wind load effects based on an ongoing collaborative cyberinfrastructure-based platform, Virtual Organization for Reducing the Toll of EXtreme Winds (VORTEX-Winds, https://vortex-winds.org, and discusses its current status since its inception in 2007 and ongoing developments. This collaborative framework as it evolves would enable a paradigm shift by offering advanced cyber-enabled modules (e-modules for accelerating advances in research and education to achieve improved understanding and better modeling of wind effects on structures. Accordingly, it will enhance wind community’s analysis and design capabilities to address next-generation challenges posed by wind. Through empowering those without computational or experimental resources, the e-modules will encompass a large set of subject areas and topics categorized as Database-enabled design, Full-scale/Field site data repository, Statistical/Stochastic toolboxes, Tele-experimentation, Uncertainty modeling, Damage assessment, and Computational platforms. This prototype will allow access to the individual e-module, while it is envisaged that next level of development in VORTEX-Winds will have the capability for an automated and integrated analysis/design through a nexus of e-modules. A highlight of the e-modules currently completed or in development is presented

  20. Optimal Control to Increase Energy Production of Wind Farm Considering Wake Effect and Lifetime Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Dao; Su, Chi

    2017-01-01

    In a wind farm, the upstream wind turbine may cause power loss to the downstream wind turbines due to the wake effect. Meanwhile, the energy production is determined by the power generation and the lifetime of the wind turbine. In this paper, an optimal active power control method is proposed......, the pitch angle curve and active power curve are optimized with the aim of Maximum Power Generation (MPG) of the wind farm. Afterwards, considering the lifetime of wind turbines, a comparison is offered between the MPPT method and the MPG method for energy production using a simplified two-turbine wind farm...... as an example. Due to the small range of the effective wake area, it is found that the energy production is almost the same. Finally, the pitch angle curve and active power curve are optimized according to the Maximum Energy Production (MEP) of a wind farm. Upon considering and contrasting the MPPT method...

  1. Effect of Opening the Sash of a Centre-Pivot Roof Window on Wind Pressure Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Wigö, Hans; Heiselberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of outward opening the sash of a window on local and overall wind pressures. Wind tunnel experiments were used for the purpose of evaluation. A centre-pivot roof window on a pitched roof in a modelled scaled building was used in the analysis of wind pressures. The ...... pressure distribution nearby the window. The use of wind pressure coefficients from the analysis of sealed plain surface may lead to erroneous estimation of airflow rate........ The wind pressures were defined in terms of wind pressure coefficients. Traditionally wind pressure coefficients are extracted from the analysis of sealed plain surface. These wind pressure coefficients are used to estimate the natural ventilation rate through windows/openings due to wind effect. Surface...... averaged wind pressure coefficients do not accurately estimate the airflow rates. Therefore, local wind pressure coefficients are needed especially for dynamic calculation of airflow rates. From the wind tunnel experiments, it is concluded that outward opening the sash can significantly affect the wind...

  2. Effect of artificially-generated wind on removing guttation and dew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence and severity of leaf and panicle blasts were efficiently reduced in the wind-treated fields. Artificially-generated wind was performed on rice paddy field in order to measure the changes in temperature and humidity during and after the blowing process and to investigate the effects of sending wind on the ...

  3. 76 FR 76153 - Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status; Caney River Wind Project, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... Wholesale Generator Status; Caney River Wind Project, LLC, Mesquite Solar 1, LLC, Copper Crossing Solar LLC, Copper Mountain Solar 1, LLC, Pinnacle Wind, LLC, Bellevue Solar, LLC, Yamhill Solar, LLC, Osage Wind...-captioned entities as Exempt Wholesale Generators became effective by operation of the Commission's...

  4. Large eddy simulation studies of the effects of alignment and wind farm length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Gayme, Dennice F.; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Large eddy simulations of wind farms are performed to study the effects of wind turbine row alignment with respect to the incoming flow direction. Various wind farms with fixed stream-wise spacing (7.85 rotor diameters) and varying lateral displacements and span-wise turbine spacings are considered,

  5. Effects of exogenous epibrassinolide on photosynthetic characteristics in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) seedlings under weak light stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Jiang, Weijie; Yu, Hongjun

    2010-03-24

    The effects of three concentrations (0.1, 0.01, 0.001 mg/kg) of exogenous 24-epibrassinolide on leaf photosynthesis, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and parameters of light response curve in tomato seedlings under 150 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) weak light stress were studied, with two tomato cultivars, 'Zhongza9', tolerant, and 'Zhongshu6', sensitive to weak light stress. The results showed that the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), maximal photochemical quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), light saturation point (LSP), and dark respiration rate (Rd) decreased remarkably under weak light, but the chlorophyll content, especially chlorophyll b (chlb) content, increased obviously compared with normal light intensity control. However, exogenous 24-epibrassinolide alleviated the decrease of leaf Pn and Fv/Fm and induced the further increase of chlb content as well as the further decrease of Rd and chla/chlb under weak light stress, which indicated that exogenous 24-epibrassinolide could enhance plant tolerance to weak light and diminish damage from weak light. However, the optimum concentrations were different between the two cultivars; 0.1 mg/kg 24-epibrassinolide showed the best induction effects in 'Zhongshu6', and the best level for 'Zhongza9' was 0.01 mg/kg 24-epibrassinolide.

  6. The Effect of Wind Forcing on Modeling Coastal Circulation at a Marine Renewable Test Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic circulation in estuaries is primarily driven by tides, river inflows and surface winds. While tidal and river data can be quite easily obtained for input to hydrodynamic models, sourcing accurate surface wind data is problematic. Inaccurate wind data can lead to inaccuracies in the surface currents computed by three-dimensional hydrodynamic models. In this research, a high-resolution wind model was coupled with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed estuary on the west coast of Ireland, to investigate the effect of wind forcing on model accuracy. Two wind-forcing conditions were investigated: (1 using wind data measured onshore on the NUI Galway campus (NUIG and (2 using offshore wind data provided by a high resolution wind model (HR. A scenario with no wind forcing (NW was also assessed. The onshore wind data varied with time but the speed and direction were applied across the full model domain. The modeled offshore wind fields varied with both time and space. The effect of wind forcing on modeled hydrodynamics was assessed via comparison of modeled surface currents with surface current measurements obtained from a High-Frequency (HF radar Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar (CODAR observation system. Results indicated that winds were most significant in simulating the north-south surface velocity component. The model using high resolution temporally- and spatially-varying wind data achieved better agreement with the CODAR surface currents than the model using the onshore wind measurements and the model without any wind forcing.

  7. Effect of Wind Turbine Noise on Workers' Sleep Disorder: A Case Study of Manjil Wind Farm in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Milad; Monnazzam, Mohammad Reza; Zakerian, Sayedabbolfazl; Yousefzadeh, Arsalan

    2015-04-01

    Noise from wind turbines is one of the most important factors affecting the health, welfare, and human sleep. This research was carried out to study the effect of wind turbine noise on workers' sleep disorder. For this, Manjil Wind Farm, because of the greater number of staff and turbines than other wind farms in Iran, was chosen as case study. A total number of 53 participants took part in this survey. They were classified into three groups of mechanics, security, and official. In this study, daytime sleepiness data of workers were gathered using Epworth Sleepiness Scales (ESS) was used to determine the level of daytime sleepiness among the workers. The 8-h equivalent sound level (LAeq,8h) was measured to determine the individuals' exposure at each occupational group. Finally, the effect of sound, age, and workers' experience on individuals' sleep disorder was analyzed through multiple regression analysis in the R software. The results showed that there was a positive and significant relationship between age, workers' experience, equivalent sound level, and the level of sleep disorder. When age is constant, sleep disorder will increase by 26% as per each 1 dB increase in equivalent sound level. In situations where equivalent sound level is constant, an increase of 17% in sleep disorder is occurred as per each year of work experience. Because of the difference in sound exposure in different occupational groups. The effect of noise in repairing group was about 6.5 times of official group and also 3.4 times of the security group. Sleep disorder effect caused by wind turbine noise in the security group is almost two times more than the official group. Unlike most studies on wind turbine noise that address the sleep disorder among inhabitants nearby wind farms, this study, for the first time in the world, examines the impact of wind turbine noise on sleep disorder of workers who are more closer to wind turbines and exposed to higher levels of noise. So despite all the

  8. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km. Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere. In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity, which can be hardly explained by chance. Furthermore, the results agree with possible physical mechanisms of off-equatorial influence of the QBO, as well

  9. Weak antilocalization effect and noncentrosymmetric superconductivity in a topologically nontrivial semimetal LuPdBi

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Guizhou

    2014-07-21

    A large number of half-Heusler compounds have been recently proposed as three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) with tunable physical properties. However, no transport measurements associated with the topological surface states have been observed in these half-Heusler candidates due to the dominating contribution from bulk electrical conductance. Here we show that, by reducing the mobility of bulk carriers, a two-dimensional (2D) weak antilocalization (WAL) effect, one of the hallmarks of topological surface states, was experimentally revealed from the tilted magnetic field dependence of magnetoconductance in a topologically nontrivial semimetal LuPdBi. Besides the observation of a 2D WAL effect, a superconducting transition was revealed at T c ∼ 1.7â.K in the same bulk LuPdBi. Quantitative analysis within the framework of a generalized BCS theory leads to the conclusion that the noncentrosymmetric superconductivity of LuPdBi is fully gapped with a possibly unconventional pairing character. The co-existence of superconductivity and the transport signature of topological surface states in the same bulk alloy suggests that LuPdBi represents a very promising candidate as a topological superconductor.

  10. The effect of wave-particle interactions on the polar wind: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, A. R.; Barghouthi, I. A.

    1994-11-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation was developed in order to study the effects of wave-particle interactions (WPI) on the plasma outflow in the polar wind. The simulation also considered the other mechanisms included in the `classical' polar wind studies such as gravity, the polarization electrostatic field, and the divergence of geomagnetic field lines. Although the plasma consisted of electrons, H(+) and O(+) ions, we emphasized the behavior of H(+) in this preliminary study. The ion distribution function, as well as the profiles of its moments (density, drift velocity, temperatures, etc.) were found for different levels of WPI, that is, for different values of normalized diffusion rates in the velocity space (normalized D(sub perpendicular) H(+)). We found that as the WPI strength increases: (1) the ion drift velocity increases and its density decreases; (2) the perpendicular temperature T(sub perpendicular) (H(+)) increases; (3) the parallel temperature T(sub parallel) (H(+)) first decreases and then increases due to the balance between the parallel adiabatic cooling and the transfer of the energy from the perpendicular to the parallel direction; and (4) the temperature anisotropy ((T(sub parallel) (H(+))/T(sub perpendicular) (H(+)) is reduced and even reversed in some cases. For strong WPI (normalized D(sub perpendicular) (H(+) much greater than 1), the ion distribution function shows weak conic features at high altitudes.

  11. The effect of wave-particle interactions on the polar wind: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, A. R.; Barghouthi, I. A.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation was developed in order to study the effects of wave-particle interactions (WPI) on the plasma outflow in the polar wind. The simulation also considered the other mechanisms included in the `classical' polar wind studies such as gravity, the polarization electrostatic field, and the divergence of geomagnetic field lines. Although the plasma consisted of electrons, H(+) and O(+) ions, we emphasized the behavior of H(+) in this preliminary study. The ion distribution function, as well as the profiles of its moments (density, drift velocity, temperatures, etc.) were found for different levels of WPI, that is, for different values of normalized diffusion rates in the velocity space (normalized D(sub perpendicular) H(+)). We found that as the WPI strength increases: (1) the ion drift velocity increases and its density decreases; (2) the perpendicular temperature T(sub perpendicular) (H(+)) increases; (3) the parallel temperature T(sub parallel) (H(+)) first decreases and then increases due to the balance between the parallel adiabatic cooling and the transfer of the energy from the perpendicular to the parallel direction; and (4) the temperature anisotropy ((T(sub parallel) (H(+))/T(sub perpendicular) (H(+)) is reduced and even reversed in some cases. For strong WPI (normalized D(sub perpendicular) (H(+) much greater than 1), the ion distribution function shows weak conic features at high altitudes.

  12. Weak gravitational lensing of quantum perturbed lukewarm black holes and cosmological constant effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarnejad, Hossein; Mojahedi, Mojtaba Amir

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the paper is to study weak gravitational lensing of quantum (perturbed) and classical lukewarm black holes (QLBHs and CLBHs respectively) in the presence of cosmological parameter Λ. We apply a numerical method to evaluate the deflection angle of bending light rays, image locations θ of sample source β =-\\tfrac{π }{4}, and corresponding magnifications μ. There are no obtained real values for Einstein ring locations {θ }E(β =0) for CLBHs but we calculate them for QLBHs. As an experimental test of our calculations, we choose mass M of 60 types of the most massive observed galactic black holes acting as a gravitational lens and study quantum matter field effects on the angle of bending light rays in the presence of cosmological constant effects. We calculate locations of non-relativistic images and corresponding magnifications. Numerical diagrams show that the quantum matter effects cause absolute values of the quantum deflection angle to be reduced with respect to the classical ones. The sign of the quantum deflection angle is changed with respect to the classical values in the presence of the cosmological constant. This means dominance of the anti-gravity counterpart of the cosmological horizon on the angle of bending light rays with respect to absorbing effects of 60 local types of the most massive observed black holes. Variations of the image positions and magnifications are negligible when increasing dimensionless cosmological constant ɛ =\\tfrac{16{{Λ }}{M}2}{3}. The deflection angle takes positive (negative) values for CLBHs (QLBHs) and they decrease very fast (slowly) by increasing the closest distance x 0 of bending light ray and/or dimensionless cosmological parameter for sample giant black holes with 0.001< ɛ < 0.01.

  13. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ← H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa . © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. XML Investigation of the effects of wind turbine noise annoyance on the sleep disturbance among workers of Manjil wind farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abbasi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Installation of wind turbines in residential areas due to their unique sound characteristics may cause noise annoyance. Noise annoyance can increase the risk of health problems and sleep disturbance. Thus, this study was conducted to assess the effect of wind turbine noise annoyance on sleep disturbance among the Manjil wind farm workers. Material and Method: All the Manjil wind farm workers have been divided into three groups according to their noise exposure levels, including maintenance, security, and administrative workers. The equivalent A weighted noise levels were measured for each of the study working groups, using ISO 9612 standard method. Information related to the noise annoyance and sleep disturbance were determined by ISO15666 standard and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, respectively. Data were analyzed using R software. Result: Findings of ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis statistical tests showed that noise annoyance and sleep disturbance were statistically different among workers with various occupational, age, and work experience groups. Also, noise annoyance and sleep disturbance had a significant association in a way that regardless of the effects of other variables, it can be stated that for every one unit increase in noise annoyance, 0.26 units will be added to the amount of sleep disturbance. Conclusion: In this study, workers with more wind turbine noise annoyance had more sleep disturbance. Therefore, in addition to the direct effects of noise on sleep disturbance, it can indirectly exacerbate sleep disturbances.

  15. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2018-01-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  16. Effect of a weak transverse magnetic field on the microstructure in directionally solidified peritectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Lu, Zhenyuan; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Moreau, Rene; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-11-01

    Effect of a weak transverse magnetic field on the microstructures in directionally solidified Fe-Ni and Pb-Bi peritectic alloys has been investigated experimentally. The results indicate that the magnetic field can induce the formation of banded and island-like structures and refine the primary phase in peritectic alloys. The above results are enhanced with increasing magnetic field. Furthermore, electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) analysis reveals that the magnetic field increases the Ni solute content on one side and enhances the solid solubility in the primary phase in the Fe-Ni alloy. The thermoelectric (TE) power difference at the liquid/solid interface of the Pb-Bi peritectic alloy is measured in situ, and the results show that a TE power difference exists at the liquid/solid interface. 3 D numerical simulations for the TE magnetic convection in the liquid are performed, and the results show that a unidirectional TE magnetic convection forms in the liquid near the liquid/solid interface during directional solidification under a transverse magnetic field and that the amplitude of the TE magnetic convection at different scales is different. The TE magnetic convections on the macroscopic interface and the cell/dendrite scales are responsible for the modification of microstructures during directional solidification under a magnetic field.

  17. The effect of 12C + 12C rate uncertainties on the weak s-process component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hungerford, Aimee L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hirschi, Raphael [KEELE UNIV.; Pignatari, Marco [TRIUMF; Bennett, Michael E [KEELE UNIV.; Diehl, Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herwig, Falk [CANADA; Hillary, William [CANADA; Richman, Debra [CANADA; Rockefeller, Gabriel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Timmes, Frank X [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Wiescher, Michael [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

    2010-09-10

    The contribution by massive stars (M > 15M{sub {circle_dot}}) to the weak s-process component of the solar system abundances is primarily due to the {sup 22}Ne neutron source, which is activated near the end of helium-core burning. The residual {sup 22}Ne left over from helium-core burning is then reignited during carbon burning, initiating further s-processing that modifies the isotopic distribution. This modification is sensitive to the stellar structure and the carbon burning reaction rate. Recent work on the {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C reaction suggests that resonances located within the Gamow peak may exist, causing a strong increase in the astrophysical S-factor and consequently the reaction rate. To investigate the effect of such a rate, 25M{sub {circle_dot}} stellar models with different carbon burning rates, at solar metallicity, were generated using the Geneva Stellar Evolution Code (GENEC) with nucleosynthesis post-processing calculated using the NuGrid Multi-zone Post-Processing Network code (MPPNP). A strongly enhanced rate can cause carbon burning to occur in a convective core rather than a radiative one and the convective core mixes the matter synthesized there up into the carbon shell, significantly altering the initial composition of the carbon-shell. In addition, an enhanced rate causes carbon-shell burning episodes to ignite earlier in the evolution of the star, igniting the {sup 22}Ne source at lower temperatures and reducing the neutron density.

  18. Electro-osmosis of nematic liquid crystals under weak anchoring and second-order surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Antarip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-07-01

    Advent of nematic liquid crystal flows has attracted renewed attention in view of microfluidic transport phenomena. Among various transport processes, electro-osmosis stands as one of the efficient flow actuation mechanisms through narrow confinements. In the present study, we explore the electrically actuated flow of an ordered nematic fluid with ionic inclusions, taking into account the influences from surface-induced elasticity and electrical double layer (EDL) phenomena. Toward this, we devise the coupled flow governing equations from fundamental free-energy analysis, considering the contributions from first- and second-order elastic, dielectric, flexoelectric, charged surface polarization, ionic and entropic energies. The present study focuses on the influence of surface charge and elasticity effects in the resulting linear electro-osmosis through a slit-type microchannel whose surfaces are chemically treated to display a homeotropic-type weak anchoring state. An optical periodic stripe configuration of the nematic director has been observed, especially for higher electric fields, wherein the Ericksen number for the dynamic study is restricted to the order of unity. Contrary to the isotropic electrolytes, the EDL potential in this case was found to be dependent on the external field strength. Through a systematic investigation, we brought out the fact that the wavelength of the oscillating patterns is dictated mainly by the external field, while the amplitude depends on most of the physical variables ranging from the anchoring strength and the flexoelectric coefficients to the surface charge density and electrical double layer thickness.

  19. Weak localization and percolation effects in annealed In2O3-ZnO thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shinozaki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the temperature T and magnetic field H dependences of the sheet resistance R□ of thin (In2O30.975-(ZnO0.025 films with different resistivities and carrier densities prepared by postannealing in air at various annealing temperatures Ta. Regarding the magnetoconductance Δσ(H ≡ 1/R□(H − 1/R□(0 of films with large values of sheet resistance R□, agreement between weak localization theory and the data cannot be obtained for any value of the localization length L in (T=Dτ in (T, where D and τin are the diffusion constant and inelastic scattering time, respectively. Taking account of the inhomogeneous morphology confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM observation, we introduced the effective sheet resistance R□eff given by R□eff = α × R□meas., where the strength of reduction factor α is less than unit, α ⩽ 1. Using a suitable value of α(Ta, we successfully fitted the theory to data for Δσeff(H, T, regarding Lin2(T as a fitting parameter in the region 2.0 K⩽T ⩽ 50 K. It was confirmed that the rate 1/τin(T is given by the sum of the electron-electron and electron-phonon inelastic scattering rates.

  20. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2017-11-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  1. Electro-Weak Dark Matter: Non-perturbative effect confronting indirect detections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eung Jin Chun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We update indirect constraints on Electro-Weak Dark Matter (EWDM considering the Sommerfeld–Ramsauer–Townsend (SRT effect for its annihilations into a pair of standard model gauge bosons assuming that EWDM accounts for the observed dark matter (DM relic density for a given DM mass and mass gaps among the multiplet components. For the radiative or smaller mass splitting, the hypercharged triplet and higher multiplet EWDMs are ruled out up to the DM mass ≈10–20 TeV by the combination of the most recent data from AMS-02 (antiproton, Fermi-LAT (gamma-ray, and HESS (gamma-line. The Majorana triplet (wino-like EWDM can evade all the indirect constraints only around Ramsauer–Townsend dips which can occur for a tiny mass splitting of order 10 MeV or less. In the case of the doublet (Higgsino-like EWDM, a wide range of its mass ≳500 GeV is allowed except Sommerfeld peak regions. Such a stringent limit on the triplet DM can be evaded by employing a larger mass gap of the order of 10 GeV which allows its mass larger than about 1 TeV. However, the future CTA experiment will be able to cover most of the unconstrained parameter space.

  2. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 1: Wilcox effect revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rybanský

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A sun-weather correlation, namely the link between solar magnetic sector boundary passage (SBP by the Earth and upper-level tropospheric vorticity area index (VAI, that was found by Wilcox et al. (1974 and shown to be statistically significant by Hines and Halevy (1977 is revisited. A minimum in the VAI one day after SBP followed by an increase a few days later was observed. Using the ECMWF ERA-40 re-analysis dataset for the original period from 1963 to 1973 and extending it to 2002, we have verified what has become known as the "Wilcox effect" for the Northern as well as the Southern Hemisphere winters. The effect persists through years of high and low volcanic aerosol loading except for the Northern Hemisphere at 500 mb, when the VAI minimum is weak during the low aerosol years after 1973, particularly for sector boundaries associated with south-to-north reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF BZ component. The "disappearance" of the Wilcox effect was found previously by Tinsley et al. (1994 who suggested that enhanced stratospheric volcanic aerosols and changes in air-earth current density are necessary conditions for the effect. The present results indicate that the Wilcox effect does not require high aerosol loading to be detected. The results are corroborated by a correlation with coronal holes where the fast solar wind originates. Ground-based measurements of the green coronal emission line (Fe XIV, 530.3 nm are used in the superposed epoch analysis keyed by the times of sector boundary passage to show a one-to-one correspondence between the mean VAI variations and coronal holes. The VAI is modulated by high-speed solar wind streams with a delay of 1–2 days. The Fourier spectra of VAI time series show peaks at periods similar to those found in the solar corona and solar wind time series. In the modulation of VAI by solar wind the IMF BZ seems to control the phase of the Wilcox effect and the depth of the VAI minimum. The

  3. Method for evaluating wind turbine wake effects on wind farm performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Spera, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method of testing the performance of a cluster of wind turbine units an data analysis equations are presented which together form a simple and direct procedure for determining the reduction in energy output caused by the wake of an upwind turbine. This method appears to solve the problems presented by data scatter and wind variability. Test data from the three-unit Mod-2 wind turbine cluster at Goldendale, Washington, are analyzed to illustrate the application of the proposed method. In this sample case the reduction in energy was found to be about 10 percent when the Mod-2 units were separated a distance equal to seven diameters and winds were below rated.

  4. Method for evaluating wind turbine wake effects on wind farm performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Spera, D. A.

    A method of testing the performance of a cluster of wind turbine units an data analysis equations are presented which together form a simple and direct procedure for determining the reduction in energy output caused by the wake of an upwind turbine. This method appears to solve the problems presented by data scatter and wind variability. Test data from the three-unit Mod-2 wind turbine cluster at Goldendale, Washington, are analyzed to illustrate the application of the proposed method. In this sample case the reduction in energy was found to be about 10 percent when the Mod-2 units were separated a distance equal to seven diameters and winds were below rated.

  5. Anechoic wind tunnel study of turbulence effects on wind turbine broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, B.; Harris, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent results obtained at MIT on the experimental and theoretical modelling of aerodynamic broadband noise generated by a downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine. The aerodynamic broadband noise generated by the wind turbine rotor is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The turbulence was generated in the MIT anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of biplanar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the aerodynamic broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of wind turbine performance parameters. Specifically, the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence, the size scale of turbulence, the number of turbine blades, and free stream velocity were varied. Simultaneous measurements of acoustic and turbulence signals were made. The sound pressure level was found to vary directly with the integral scale of the ingested turbulence but not with its intensity level. A theoretical model based on unsteady aerodynamics is proposed.

  6. PROFILES WITH COANDA EFFECT, NECESSARIES TO WIND TURBINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Sorina ANGHEL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The air flow separation around profiles and the wind turbine rotor vibration leading to theblade breaking is a well known phenomenon based on which the present work is conceived. The paperis focused on theoretic and experimental researches effectuated on any profiles with Coanda effect,which are followed with the patenting of three similar profiles.In the frame of theoretical researches the molecular attraction forces of adhesion and cohesion in thenumerical integration of viscous fluid flow around a breaking plate even to the angle of 45o areintroduced, highlighting the advantageous Henri Coanda effect.The experimental researches are effectuated on a profile with Coanda effect, measuring with atwo-component strain gauge balance the lift and aerodynamic drag forces for different profile attackangle, highlighting the increasing of the attack angle from the usual value of 11o to over the 27o forthat profile when the flow separation takes place.

  7. Collisional effects in weakly collisional plasmas: nonlinear electrostatic waves and recurrence phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, E.; Pezzi, O.; Valentini, F.

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding problem of collisions in plasmas is a very fascinating and huge topic in plasma physics. The 'natural' operator that describes the Coulombian interactions between charged particles is the Landau (LAN) integral operator. The LAN operator is a nonlinear, integro-differential and Fokker-Planck type operator which satisfies the H theorem for the entropy growth. Due to its nonlinear nature and multi-dimensionality, any approach to the solution of the Landau integral is almost prohibitive. Therefore collisions are usually modeled by simplified collisional operators. Here collisional effects are modeled by i) the one-dimensional Lenard-Bernstein (LB) operator and ii) the three-dimensional Dougherty (DG) operator. In the first case i), by focusing on a 1D-1V phase space, we study recurrence effects in a weakly collisional plasma, being collisions modeled by the LB operator. By decomposing the linear Vlasov-Poisson system in the Fourier-Hermite space, the recurrence problem is investigated in the linear regime of the damping of a Langmuir wave and of the onset of the bump-on-tail instability. The analysis is then confirmed and extended to the nonlinear regime through a Eulerian collisional Vlasov-Poisson code. Despite being routinely used, an artificial collisionality is not in general a viable way of preventing recurrence in numerical simulations. Moreover, recursive phenomena affect both the linear exponential growth and the nonlinear saturation of a linear instability by producing a fake growth in the electric field, thus showing that, although the filamentation is usually associated with low amplitude fluctuations contexts, it can occur also in nonlinear phenomena. On the other hand ii), the effects of electron-electron collisions on the propagation of nonlinear electrostatic waves are shown by means of Eulerian simulations in a 1D-3V (one dimension in physical space, three dimensions in velocity space) phase space. The nonlinear regime of the symmetric

  8. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2010-04-01

    With an increasing number of communities considering nearby wind power developments, there is a need to empirically investigate community concerns about wind project development. One such concern is that property values may be adversely affected by wind energy facilities, and relatively little research exists on the subject. The present research investigates roughly 7,500 sales of single-family homes surrounding 24 existing U.S. wind facilities. Across four different hedonic models the results are consistent: neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have a statistically significant effect on home sales prices.

  9. Effects of Capcitor Bank on Fault Ride Through Capibility of Induction Generator Based Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Y; Chen, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    power system stability and supply security. Some existing wind turbines are still based on fixed speed induction generators, the effects of capacitor bank on such generators are discussed in this paper. The simulation study shows the capacitor bank may costeffectively improve the dynamic performance......Wind turbine installation is increasing rapidly. In some networks, wind power penetration is significantly high and the performance of wind turbine plays an important role in power system operation and control. Especially, the behavior of wind turbines during a power system disturbance would affect...... of the induction generators....

  10. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore as compared to sites on land. The higher wind speeds have to compensate the additional cost of offshore developments. However, not only the mean wind speed is different, but the whole flow......-Obukhov theory, a simple correction method to account for this effect has been developed and is tested in the same way. The models for the estimation of the sea surface roughness were found to lead only to small differences. For the purpose of wind resource assessment, even the assumption of a constant roughness...

  11. Wind Velocity Decreasing Effects of Windbreak Fence for Snowfall Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Pyo You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological observatories use measuring boards on even ground in open areas to measure the amount of snowfall. In order to measure the amount of snowfall, areas unaffected by wind should be found. This study tried to determine the internal wind flow inside a windbreak fence, identifying an area unaffected by wind in order to measure the snowfall. We performed a computational fluid dynamics analysis and wind tunnel test, conducted field measurements of the type and height of the windbreak fence, and analyzed the wind flow inside the fence. The results showed that a double windbreak fence was better than a single windbreak fence for decreasing wind velocity. The double fence (width 4 m, height 60 cm, and fixed on the bottom has the greatest wind velocity decrease rate at the central part of octagonal windbreak.

  12. Effective Short-term Forecasting of Wind Farms Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Bogalecka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting a specific wind farm’s (WF generation capacity within a 24 hour perspective requires both a reliable forecast of wind, as well as supporting tools. This tool is a dedicated model of wind farm power. This model should include not only general rules of wind to mechanical energy conversion, but also the farm’s specific features. There are many factors that influence a farm’s generation capacity, and any forecast of it, even with an accurate weather forecast, carries error. This paper presents analytical, statistical, and neuron models of wind farm power. The study is based on data from a real wind farm. Most attention is paid to the neuron models, due to a neuron network’s capability to restore farm-specific details. The research aims to answer the headline question: whether and to what extent a wind farm’s power can be forecast short-term?

  13. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resor, Brian Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Berg, Jonathan Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Richards, Phillip William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  14. Effects of wind turbine wake on atmospheric sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the sound propagation from a wind turbine considering the effects of wake-induced velocity deficit and turbulence. In order to address this issue, an advanced approach was developed in which both scalar and vector parabolic equations in two dimensions are solved. Flow...... source. Unsteady acoustic simulations were carried out with the AL/LES input for three cases with different incoming turbulence intensity, and a moving source approach to mimic the rotating turbine blades. The results show a non-negligible effect of the wake on far-field noise prediction. Particularly...... under stable atmospheric conditions, SPL amplification reaches up to 7.5dB at the wake centre. Furthermore, it was observed that when the turbulence intensity level of the incoming flow is higher, the SPL difference between the moving and the steady source is lower....

  15. Selective and effective binding of pillar[5,6]arenes toward secondary ammonium salts with a weakly coordinating counteranion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunju; Shu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jian; Fan, Jiazeng; Chen, Zhenxia; Weng, Linhong; Jia, Xueshun

    2012-08-17

    The selective and effective binding of secondary ammoniums with a weakly coordinating tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BArF) counteranion by per-ethylated pillar[5,6]arenes is reported. The construction of a first pillararene-based self-sorting system consisting of two wheels and two axles is also described.

  16. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    wave slope was retrieved from the DNS results. Similar to the physical experiment the wave growth rate weakly decreased with the wave steepness. The results of physical and numerical experiments were compared with the calculations within the theoretical model of a turbulent boundary layer based on the system of Reynolds equations with the first-order closing hypothesis. Within the model the wind-wave interaction is considered within the quasi-linear approximation and the mean airflow over waves within the model is treated as a non-separated. The calculations within the model represents well profiles of the mean wind velocity, turbulent stress, amplitude and phase of the main harmonics of the wave-induced velocity components and also wave-induced pressure fluctuations and wind wave growth rate obtained both in the physical experiment and DNS. Applicability of the non-separating quasi-linear theory for description of average fields in the airflow over steep and even breaking waves, when the effect of separation is manifested in the instantaneous flow images, can possibly be explained qualitatively by the strongly non-stationary character of the separation process with the typical time being much less than the wave period, and by the small scale of flow heterogeneity in the area of separation. In such a situation small-scale vortices produced within the separation bubble affect the mean flow and wind-induced disturbances as eddy viscosity. Then, the flow turbulence affects the averaged fields as a very viscous fluid, where the effective Reynolds number for the average fields determined by the eddy viscosity was small even for steep waves. It follows from this assumption that strongly nonlinear effects, such as flow separations should not be expected in the flow averaged over turbulent fluctuations, and the main harmonics of the wave-induced disturbances of the averaged flow, which determine the energy flux to surface waves, can be described in the weakly

  17. Health effects related to wind turbine noise exposure: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Klokker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects thereof have attracted substantial attention. Various symptoms such as sleep-related problems, headache, tinnitus and vertigo have been described by subjects suspected of having been exposed to wind turbine noise. This review was conducted systematically with the purpose of identifying any reported associations between wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects. A search of the scientific literature concerning the health-related effects of wind turbine noise was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and various other Internet sources. All studies investigating suspected health-related outcomes associated with wind turbine noise exposure were included. Wind turbines emit noise, including low-frequency noise, which decreases incrementally with increases in distance from the wind turbines. Likewise, evidence of a dose-response relationship between wind turbine noise linked to noise annoyance, sleep disturbance and possibly even psychological distress was present in the literature. Currently, there is no further existing statistically-significant evidence indicating any association between wind turbine noise exposure and tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo or headache. Selection bias and information bias of differing magnitudes were found to be present in all current studies investigating wind turbine noise exposure and adverse health effects. Only articles published in English, German or Scandinavian languages were reviewed. Exposure to wind turbines does seem to increase the risk of annoyance and self-reported sleep disturbance in a dose-response relationship. There appears, though, to be a tolerable level of around LAeq of 35 dB. Of the many other claimed health effects of wind turbine noise exposure reported in the literature, however, no conclusive evidence could be found. Future studies should focus on investigations aimed at objectively demonstrating whether or not

  18. Health Effects Related to Wind Turbine Noise Exposure: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Klokker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Background Wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects thereof have attracted substantial attention. Various symptoms such as sleep-related problems, headache, tinnitus and vertigo have been described by subjects suspected of having been exposed to wind turbine noise. Objective This review was conducted systematically with the purpose of identifying any reported associations between wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects. Data Sources A search of the scientific literature concerning the health-related effects of wind turbine noise was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and various other Internet sources. Study Eligibility Criteria All studies investigating suspected health-related outcomes associated with wind turbine noise exposure were included. Results Wind turbines emit noise, including low-frequency noise, which decreases incrementally with increases in distance from the wind turbines. Likewise, evidence of a dose-response relationship between wind turbine noise linked to noise annoyance, sleep disturbance and possibly even psychological distress was present in the literature. Currently, there is no further existing statistically-significant evidence indicating any association between wind turbine noise exposure and tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo or headache. Limitations Selection bias and information bias of differing magnitudes were found to be present in all current studies investigating wind turbine noise exposure and adverse health effects. Only articles published in English, German or Scandinavian languages were reviewed. Conclusions Exposure to wind turbines does seem to increase the risk of annoyance and self-reported sleep disturbance in a dose-response relationship. There appears, though, to be a tolerable level of around LAeq of 35 dB. Of the many other claimed health effects of wind turbine noise exposure reported in the literature, however, no conclusive evidence could be found

  19. Effect of site disorder on the magnetic properties of weak itinerant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed study of Ni75Al25 samples with varying degree of site disorder reveals that site disorder promotes magnetic excitations such as spin waves and local spin-density fluctuations and thereby reduces both spin-wave stiffness and Curie temperature. Irreversibility lines in the - phase diagram of the weak itinerant ...

  20. Ship motion effects in CTD-data from weakly stratified waters of the Puerto Rico trench

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.

    2015-01-01

    Shipborne SBE 911plus Conductivity Temperature Depth (CTD)-casts have been made to maximum 7220 m in the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT). In PRT-waters from 5500 m and deeper and specifically below the 6500 m transition to the hadal-zone, the vertical density stratification is found very weak, with

  1. Effects on harbour porpoises from Roedsand 2 Off-shore Wind Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teilmann, J.; Tougaard, J.; Carstensen, J.

    2012-11-15

    E.ON Vind Sverige has been commissioned the construction of Roedsand 2 Offshore Wind Farm comprising 90 wind turbines, south of Lolland-Falster, Denmark. The location of the wind farm is 3 km west of the existing Nysted Offshore Wind Farm with 72 turbines. In combination the two wind farms represents the largest wind farm area in the world. Porpoises were monitored by automatic acoustic dataloggers (T-PODs) according to a statistical BACI design and deployed during baseline (Sep 2008-Feb 2009) and during operation (Sep 2011-Mar 2012). These instruments were deployed at 10 stations covering a coastal stretch of 35 km from Gedser to Roedby, including the wind farm area with reference areas on both sides. In addition, background noise at four of the T-POD stations was recorded by automatic noise loggers. In order to assess the potential cumulative effect of two adjacent wind farms, similar data from the Nysted Offshore Wind Farm were also analysed. We found no overall change in echolocation activity over the entire monitoring area from baseline to operation of Roedsand 2 Offshore Wind Farm. Also, there was no significant change in the echolocation activity in Roedsand 2 Offshore Wind Farm relative to each or a combination of the three reference areas, i.e. changes from baseline to operation were similar in the impact and reference areas. Also no significant change in noise levels audible to porpoises was found. This could be due to a generally high noise level in the area, masking the turbine noise or that the noise loggers in the wind farm were deployed between the wind turbines, i.e. at distances {approx}350-450 m from the turbines. This study also shows that the echolocation activity is still significantly lower in Nysted Offshore Wind Farm since the baseline in 2001-2002, although the difference seem to gradually diminish possibly due to a habituation of the porpoises to the wind farm or better feeding posibilities. We found no cumulative effect of the two wind

  2. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km.

    Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere.

    In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity

  3. The effect of wind direction and building surroundings on a marina bay in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Cosmin; Safta, Carmen Anca

    2017-01-01

    The wind effect has usually a major importance in the marina bay. These environmental sites are an interplay between tourist and commercial activities, requiring a high-detailed and definition studies of the dynamic fluid in the harbor. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used elaborately in urban surroundings research. However, most CFD studies were performed for harbors for only a confined number of wind directions and/or without considering the building surroundings effects. This paper presents the results of different simulations based on various wind flows and the CFD simulation of coupled urban wind flow and general wind directions upon a semi-closed area. Thus the importance of wind effects on the evaluation of the marina bay will be pointed out to achieve a safe and secure mooring at the berth and eventually a good potential of renewable energy for an impending green harbor.

  4. Effects of the wind profile at night on wind turbine sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, GP

    2004-01-01

    Since the start of the operation of a 30 MW, 17 turbine wind park, residents living 500 in and more from the park have reacted strongly to the noise; residents up to 1900 in distance expressed annoyance. To assess actual sound immission, long term measurements (a total of over 400 night hours in 4

  5. Wind effects on collectors. Final report, October 1, 1978--October 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, H.C. Jr.; Griggs, E.I.

    1979-11-01

    Consideration was given to modeling wind speed data and to a scheme for correlating data between two separate stations. A sensor system was developed to measure the effect of wind on collector performance. The specifications for the sensor are presented, and a discussion of the calibration of the sensor is given. Four experiments were performed to determine wind flow patterns around buildings. The velocity profile over an actual collector was also measured as a function of free stream velocity. A mathematical model for a solar collector and three experimental efforts to measure the effect of wind on collector performance are reported. (MHR)

  6. Chiral assembly of weakly curled hard rods: Effect of steric chirality and polarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensink, H. H., E-mail: wensink@lps.u-psud.fr; Morales-Anda, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides–UMR 8502, Université Paris-Sud & CNRS, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-10-14

    We theoretically investigate the pitch of lyotropic cholesteric phases composed of slender rods with steric chirality transmitted via a weak helical deformation of the backbone. In this limit, the model is amenable to analytical treatment within Onsager theory and a closed expression for the pitch versus concentration and helical shape can be derived. Within the same framework, we also briefly review the possibility of alternative types of chiral order, such as twist-bend or screw-like nematic phases, finding that cholesteric order dominates for weakly helical distortions. While long-ranged or “soft” chiral forces usually lead to a pitch decreasing linearly with concentration, steric chirality leads to a much steeper decrease of quadratic nature. This reveals a subtle link between the range of chiral intermolecular interaction and the pitch sensitivity with concentration. A much richer dependence on the thermodynamic state is revealed for polar helices where parallel and anti-parallel pair alignments along the local director are no longer equivalent. It is found that weak temperature variations may lead to dramatic changes in the pitch, despite the lyotropic nature of the assembly.

  7. Transient performances analysis of wind turbine system with induction generator including flux saturation and skin effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H.; Zhao, B.; Han, L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to analyze correctly the effect of different models for induction generators on the transient performances of large wind power generation, Wind turbine driven squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) models taking into account both main and leakage flux saturation and skin effect were pr...

  8. Effect of wind on the chemical uptake kinetics of a passive air sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianming; Brown, Trevor N; Ansari, Amer; Yeun, Beom; Kitaoka, Ken; Kondo, Akira; Lei, Ying D; Wania, Frank

    2013-07-16

    Passive air samplers (PASs) operate in different types of environment under various wind conditions, which may affect sampling rates and thus introduce uncertainty to PAS-derived air concentrations. To quantify the effect of wind speed and angle on the uptake in cylindrical PASs using XAD-resin as the sampling medium, we measured the uptake kinetics of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in XAD and of water in silica-gel, both under quasi wind-still condition and with lab-generated wind blowing toward the PASs at various speeds and angles. Passive sampling rates (PSRs) of PCBs under laboratory generated windy conditions were approximately 3-4 times higher than under wind-still indoor conditions. The rate of water uptake by silica-gel increased with wind speed, following a logarithmic function so that PSRs are more strongly influenced at lower wind speed. PSRs of both PCBs and water varied little with wind angle, which is consistent with computational fluid dynamic simulations showing that different angles of wind incidence cause only minor variations of air velocities within the cylindrical sampler housing. Because modifications of the design of the cylindrical PAS were not successful in eliminating the wind speed dependence of PSRs at low wind levels, indoor and outdoor deployments require different sets of PSRs. The effect of wind speed and angle on the PSRs of the cylindrical PAS are much smaller than what has been reported for the double-bowl polyurethane foam PAS. PSRs of the cylindrical XAD-PAS therefore tend to vary much less between sampling sites exposed to different wind conditions.

  9. Effect of Wind Velocity on Flame Spread in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kuldeep; Olson, Sandra L.; Nakamura, Yuji; Fujita, Osamu; Nishizawa, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kenichi; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent model is developed describing ignition and subsequent transition to flame spread over a thermally thin cellulosic sheet heated by external radiation in a microgravity environment. A low Mach number approximation to the Navier Stokes equations with global reaction rate equations describing combustion in the gas phase and the condensed phase is numerically solved. The effects of a slow external wind (1-20 cm/s) on flame transition are studied in an atmosphere of 35% oxygen concentration. The ignition is initiated at the center part of the sample by generating a line-shape flame along the width of the sample. The calculated results are compared with data obtained in the 10s drop tower. Numerical results exhibit flame quenching at a wind speed of 1.0 cm/s, two localized flames propagating upstream along the sample edges at 1.5 cm/s, a single line-shape flame front at 5.0 cm/s, three flames structure observed at 10.0 cm/s (consisting of a single line-shape flame propagating upstream and two localized flames propagating downstream along sample edges) and followed by two line-shape flames (one propagating upstream and another propagating downstream) at 20.0 cm/s. These observations qualitatively compare with experimental data. Three-dimensional visualization of the observed flame complex, fuel concentration contours, oxygen and reaction rate isosurfaces, convective and diffusive mass flux are used to obtain a detailed understanding of the controlling mechanism, Physical arguments based on lateral diffusive flux of oxygen, fuel depletion, oxygen shadow of the flame and heat release rate are constructed to explain the various observed flame shapes.

  10. Health Effects Related to Wind Turbine Noise Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Klokker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and various other Internet sources. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: All studies investigating suspected health-related outcomes associated with wind turbine noise exposure were included. RESULTS: Wind turbines emit noise, including low-frequency noise, which...

  11. Geo-effectiveness of Solar Wind Extremes Hari Om Vats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solar wind to the magnetosphere. Rastogi (2001 and references therein) gives a histor- ical background of the geomagnetic activity phenomena and its interesting features. Now it is an established fact that the major mechanism of energy transfer from the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere is magnetic reconnection ...

  12. Before?After Field Study of Effects of Wind Turbine Noise on Polysomnographic Sleep Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Jalali, Leila; Bigelow, Philip; Nezhad-Ahmadi, Mohammad-Reza; Gohari, Mahmood; Williams, Diane; McColl, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Wind is considered one of the most advantageous alternatives to fossil energy because of its low operating cost and extensive availability. However, alleged health-related effects of exposure to wind turbine (WT) noise have attracted much public attention and various symptoms, such as sleep disturbance, have been reported by residents living close to wind developments. Prospective cohort study with synchronous measurement of noise and sleep physiologic signals was conducted to explore the pos...

  13. State Criterion of Wind Turbine Generator in Operation with Using Tower Shadow Effect

    OpenAIRE

    内藤, 督; 佐藤, 孝紀; 八木橋, 大介; 徳永, 義孝

    2002-01-01

    Because of low cost and maintenance free, inductron machines are widely used as the wind turbine generators. In order to get wind energy effectively, pole-change-type induction generators are adopted. Otherwise, the pole-change-type induction generator causes the voltage dips at starting and at pole changing time. To keep the power quality, it is important to know the state change of the generator operation. In this paper a new state criterion of wind turbine generator in operation using the ...

  14. Spare Part Logistics and Optimization for Wind Turbines : Methods for Cost-Effective Supply and Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, Mattias; Lundin, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    The wind power industry is maturing and the amount of electricity produced by wind turbines in the world is rapidly increasing every year. Service and maintenance of wind turbines has proven to be difficult and expensive, especially offshore. A well coordinated support organisation and optimized maintenance strategies are required to effectively reduce the costs associated with WT support, where cost-efficient supply and storage of spare parts are important. The aim of this thesis is to model...

  15. Numerical investigation of aerodynamic performance of darrieus wind turbine based on the magnus effect

    OpenAIRE

    L Khadir; H Mrad

    2016-01-01

    The use of several developmental approaches is the researchers’ major preoccupation with the DARRIEUS wind turbine. This paper presents the first approach and results of a wide computational investigation on the aerodynamics of a vertical axis DARRIEUS wind turbine based on the MAGNUS effect. Consequently, wind tunnel tests were carried out to ascertain overall performance of the turbine and two-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were generated to help understand t...

  16. An assessment of the environmental effects of offshore wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This report focuses on the development of an approach to the formal environmental assessment of large-scale offshore wind farms around the UK coast which will be required by EU Directives. The legislative background and policy framework are outlined, and key issues to be addressed in the environmental assessment are highlighted. Available information on the manufacture and transportation of wind farm equipment, turbine and cable installation, operation of an offshore wind farm, and wind farm decommissioning is reviewed and recommendations are given. The role of offshore wind power in meeting the UK's commitment to reducing emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases and its targets for generating 10% of the UK's electricity from renewable energy sources is discussed.

  17. Performance analysis of wind turbine systems under different parameters effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salih, Salih Mohammed; Taha, Mohammed Qasim; Alawsaj, Mohammed K. [College of Engineering, University of Anbar (Iraq)

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, simulation models are used to study the performance of small power systems based on different weather parameters. The results are extracted using Matlab software program for analyzing the performance of two wind turbines: Whisper-500 3.2KW and NY-WSR1204 600W which have the same type of permanent magnetic alternators (three phase and 16 poles). Different parameters can affect on the performance of wind turbines which are: the wind speed air density, air pressure, temperature and the length of blades for wind generators. The mathematical results related the previous mentioned parameters are analyzed in order to determine the sensitivity of input power on the output of wind generators.

  18. Towards weakly constrained double field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanghoon Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that it is possible to construct a well-defined effective field theory incorporating string winding modes without using strong constraint in double field theory. We show that X-ray (Radon transform on a torus is well-suited for describing weakly constrained double fields, and any weakly constrained fields are represented as a sum of strongly constrained fields. Using inverse X-ray transform we define a novel binary operation which is compatible with the level matching constraint. Based on this formalism, we construct a consistent gauge transform and gauge invariant action without using strong constraint. We then discuss the relation of our result to the closed string field theory. Our construction suggests that there exists an effective field theory description for massless sector of closed string field theory on a torus in an associative truncation.

  19. FIP effect for minor heavy solar wind ions as seen with SOHO/CELIAS/MTOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena, E-mail: heidrich@physik.uni-kiel.de; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F. [Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel (Germany); Wurz, Peter [University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Bochsler, Peter [University of New Hampshire, Durham (United States); Ipavich, Fred M. [University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Paquette, John A. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Klecker, Bernd [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    A recent paper [Shearer et al., 2014] reported that during solar maximum Ne showed a surprisingly low abundance. This leads to the question whether other elements show the same behavior. The good mass resolution of Mass-Time-Of-Flight (MTOF) as part of the Charge ELement and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on the Solar Helioshperic Observatory (SOHO) allows to investigate the composition of heavy minor elements in different types of solar wind. We restrict this study to slow solar wind, where the characterisation of slow solar wind is taken from Xu and Borovsky, 2014. This classification scheme requires magnet field information. Since SOHO does not carry a magnetometer, we use the Magnetometer (MAG) of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) instead. The Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (ACE/SWICS) also provides composition data for cross-calibration and charge-state distributions as input for the transmission function of MTOF whenever the two spacecraft can be expected to observe the same type of wind. We illustrate the MTOF’s capability to determine the solar wind abundance compared to the photospheric abundance (called the FIP ratio in the following) for rare elements like Ti or Cr on long-time scales as a proof of concept for our analysis. And in this brief study, measurements with both ACE/SWICS indicate that the observed elements exhibit a (weak) dependence on the solar cycle, whereas the MTOF measurements are inconclusive.

  20. Weak localization effect in topological insulator micro flakes grown on insulating ferrimagnet BaFe12O19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guolin; Wang, Ning; Yang, Jiyong; Wang, Weike; Du, Haifeng; Ning, Wei; Yang, Zhaorong; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Yuheng; Tian, Mingliang

    2016-01-01

    Many exotic physics anticipated in topological insulators require a gap to be opened for their topological surface states by breaking time reversal symmetry. The gap opening has been achieved by doping magnetic impurities, which however inevitably create extra carriers and disorder that undermine the electronic transport. In contrast, the proximity to a ferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic insulator may improve the device quality, thus promises a better way to open the gap while minimizing the side-effects. Here, we grow thin single-crystal Sb1.9Bi0.1Te3 micro flakes on insulating ferrimagnet BaFe12O19 by using the van der Waals epitaxy technique. The micro flakes show a negative magnetoresistance in weak perpendicular fields below 50 K, which can be quenched by increasing temperature. The signature implies the weak localization effect as its origin, which is absent in intrinsic topological insulators, unless a surface state gap is opened. The surface state gap is estimated to be 10 meV by using the theory of the gap-induced weak localization effect. These results indicate that the magnetic proximity effect may open the gap for the topological surface attached to BaM insulating ferrimagnet. This heterostructure may pave the way for the realization of new physical effects as well as the potential applications of spintronics devices. PMID:26891682

  1. Analysis of the reduced wake effect for available wind power calculation during curtailment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontekoning, M. P. C.; Sanchez Perez-Moreno, S.; Ummels, B. C.; Zaaijer, M. B.

    2017-05-01

    With the increase of installed wind power capacity, the contribution of wind power curtailment to power balancing becomes more relevant. Determining the available power during curtailment at the wind farm level is not trivial, as curtailment changes the wake effects in a wind farm. Current best practice to estimate the available power is to sum the available power calculated by every wind turbine. However, during curtailment the changed local wind conditions at the wind turbines lead to inaccurate results at the wind farm level. This paper presents an algorithm to determine the available power of a wind farm during curtailment. Moreover, results of curtailment experiments are discussed that were performed on nearshore wind farm Westermeerwind to validate the algorithm. For the case where a single turbine is being curtailed, it is shown that the algorithm reduces the estimation error for the first downstream turbine significantly. Further development of the algorithm is required for accurate estimation of the second turbine. All further downstream turbines did not experience a change in wake conditions.

  2. Contesting facts about wind farms in Australia and the legitimacy of adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shannon; Botterill, Linda Courtenay

    2017-02-01

    The development of wind energy in Australia has been subject to ongoing public debate and has been characterised by concerns over the health impacts of wind turbines. Using discursive psychology, we examine 'wind turbine syndrome' as a contested illness and analyse how people build and undermine divergent arguments about wind-farm health effects. This article explores two facets of the dispute. First, we consider how participants construct 'facts' about the health effects of wind farms. We examine rhetorical resources used to construct wind farms as harmful or benign. Second, we examine the local negotiation of the legitimacy of health complaints. In the research interviews examined, even though interviewees treat those who report experiencing symptoms from wind farms as having primary rights to narrate their own experience, this epistemic primacy does not extend to the ability to 'correctly' identify symptoms' cause. As a result, the legitimacy of health complaints is undermined. Wind turbine syndrome is an example of a contested illness that is politically controversial. We show how stake, interest and legitimacy are particularly relevant for participants' competing descriptions about the 'facts' of wind turbine health effects.

  3. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A,; Chokani, N.

    2013-07-01

    Offshore winds are generally stronger and more consistent than winds on land, making the offshore environment attractive for wind energy development. A large part of the offshore wind resource is however located in deep water, where floating turbines are the only economical way of harvesting the energy. The design of offshore floating wind turbines relies on the use of modeling tools that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At present, most of these tools include only first-order hydrodynamic theory. However, observations of supposed second-order hydrodynamic responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium suggest that second-order effects might be critical. In this paper, the methodology used by the oil and gas industry has been modified to apply to the analysis of floating wind turbines, and is used to assess the effect of second-order hydrodynamics on floating offshore wind turbines. The method relies on combined use of the frequency-domain tool WAMIT and the time-domain tool FAST. The proposed assessment method has been applied to two different floating wind concepts, a spar and a tension-leg-platform (TLP), both supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. Results showing the hydrodynamic forces and motion response for these systems are presented and analysed, and compared to aerodynamic effects.

  4. Weak interaction effects in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation with polarised beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simard, R.

    1977-11-02

    Although the standard gauge model of weak and electromagnetic interactions based on the work of Salam and Weinberg has met with great success, there are experimental facts that will require its extension or its modification to a new gauge model; the discovery of a heavy lepton at SLAC and the absence of parity violation in atoms that is expected from the neutral weak current coupling to electrons are discussed. Three tests are proposed that bear on these questions. First, heavy lepton production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation when one of the incident beams is longitudinally polarized is considered and the purely leptonic decay of this heavy lepton is examined. An asymmetry in the inclusive angular distribution of one charged lepton (electron or muon) is important in determining the structure of weak interactions of the heavy lepton. In fact, this angular asymmetry easily distinguishes between the cases V - A and V + A for the heavy lepton current. Then, the decay channel L ..-->.. ..nu../sub L/ + one hadron is considered (L = heavy lepton) under the same experimental set-up and the inclusive one-hadron angular distribution examined. Parity nonconservation in the decay of the heavy lepton causes a conspicuous forward-backward asymmetry in the cos theta distribution of the inclusive hadron spectrum near the high energy end that can be distinguished easily from other sources of asymmetry. It is easy then to discover the chirality (V - A or V + A) of the heavy lepton current. Finally a test is proposed which provides unambigous and clear evidence for parity violation in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. It consists in measuring a possible left-right asymmetry of inclusive hadron production with highly transversely polarized e/sup +/e/sup -/ incident beams. If observed, this asymmetry provides evidence of a parity violating neutral current coupling to electrons.

  5. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2010-04-01

    With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering nearby wind power developments, there is a need to empirically investigate community concerns about wind project development. One such concern is that property values may be adversely affected by wind energy facilities, and relatively little existing research exists on the subject. The present research is based on almost 7,500 sales of single-family homes situated within ten miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from four different hedonic pricing models. The model results are consistent in that neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have a statistically significant effect on home sales prices.

  6. Explicit-ion Effects in the Coil-Globule Transition of Weak Polyelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Benjamin J.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    The first-order coil-globule transition in weak (annealed) polyelectrolytes involves a subtle balance of pH, charge strength, and solvation forces. In this work, we utilize a coarse-grain hybrid grand-canonical Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics approach to explore the free energetic topography of a model hydrophobic polybase [representing poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP)] and explore the role of salt concentration/valency in influencing polyelectrolyte conformations using both an implicit Debye-Hückel and explicit salt approach. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally measured behavior for dilute annealed polyelectrolytes, and present a solid foundation for understanding pH responsive polyelectrolyte materials.

  7. Development of Wind Farm AEP Prediction Program Considering Directional Wake Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kyoungboo; Cho, Kyungho; Huh, Jongchul [Jeju Nat’l Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    For accurate AEP prediction in a wind farm, it is necessary to effectively calculate the wind speed reduction and the power loss due to the wake effect in each wind direction. In this study, a computer program for AEP prediction considering directional wake effect was developed. The results of the developed program were compared with the actual AEP of the wind farm and the calculation result of existing commercial software to confirm the accuracy of prediction. The applied equations are identical with those of commercial software based on existing theories, but there is a difference in the calculation process of the detection of the wake effect area in each wind direction. As a result, the developed program predicted to be less than 1% of difference to the actual capacity factor and showed more than 2% of better results compared with the existing commercial software.

  8. Effect of wind on Svalbard reindeer fur insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cuyler

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer through Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus fur samples was studied with respect to wind velocity, season and animal age. A total of 33 dorsal fur sections were investigated using a wind tunnel. Insulation varied with season (calving, summer, autumn and winter. At zero wind velocity, fur insulation was significantly different between seasons for both calf and adult fur samples. At the same time, there was no significant difference between calf and adult insulation for the summer, autumn and winter seasons. Calf fur insulated as well as adult fur. Winter insulation of Svalbard reindeer was approximately 3 times that of summer. Increasing wind veloci¬ty increased heat loss, however, the increase was not dramatic. When wind coefficients (slope of the heat transfer regression lines were compared, between season and between calf and adult, no significant differences were reported. All fur samples showed similar increases in heat transfer for wind velocities between 0 and 10 m.s-1. The conductance of winter fur of Svalbard reindeer was almost half that of caribou fur. Also, conductance was not as greatly influenced by wind as caribou fur

  9. Effects of Offshore Wind Turbines on Ocean Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimer, Nicholas; Churchfield, Matthew; Hamlington, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Wakes from horizontal axis wind turbines create large downstream velocity deficits, thus reducing the available energy for downstream turbines while simultaneously increasing turbulent loading. Along with this deficit, however, comes a local increase in the velocity around the turbine rotor, resulting in increased surface wind speeds. For offshore turbines, these increased speeds can result in changes to the properties of wind-induced waves at the ocean surface. In this study, the characteristics and implications of such waves are explored by coupling a wave simulation code to the Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The wave simulator and SOWFA are bi-directionally coupled using the surface wind field produced by an offshore wind farm to drive an ocean wave field, which is used to calculate a wave-dependent surface roughness that is fed back into SOWFA. The details of this combined framework are outlined. The potential for using the wave field created at offshore wind farms as an additional energy resource through the installation of on-site wave converters is discussed. Potential negative impacts of the turbine-induced wave field are also discussed, including increased oscillation of floating turbines.

  10. Combined Effects of Wind and Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, S.; Harrison, E.; Ho, D. T.; Veron, F.

    2010-12-01

    In constraining local and global carbon cycle budgets, it is important to know the air-water gas transfer velocity (k). Historically, k has been parameterized by wind speed or rain rate separately, and pilot experiments in the laboratory with wind and rain suggested that these parameterizations may be linearly additive (Ho et al., 2007). Here we present results from a series of experiments completed at the University of Delaware’s Air-Sea Interaction Laboratory (ASIL) that aim to study the combined effect of wind and rain on air-water gas exchange. Experimental conditions included 11 wind speeds and 6 rain rates, where gas transfer velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, and bubble size and density were measured. Our results indicate that these effects are not linearly additive, particularly at higher wind speeds (approximately 19 m/s). At these higher wind speeds wind contributes significantly more to the total kinetic energy flux than the rain. These results corroborate findings at the ASIL from 2008 (Harrison et al., in prep). Here, we further examine changes in turbulence due to wind and rain and bubble production due to rain at the air-water interface to elucidate the nonlinear effects of wind and rain on air-water gas exchange. References Harrison, E., et al. (in prep), The combined effect of rain and wind on air-water gas exchange. Ho, D. T., et al. (2007), The combined effect of rain and wind on air-water gas exchange: A feasibility study, Journal of Marine Systems, 66(1-4), 150-160.

  11. Observed and modeled effects of pH on bioconcentration of diphenhydramine, a weakly basic pharmaceutical, in fathead minnows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathead minnows were exposed to diphenhydramine (DPH), a weakly basic pharmaceutical (pKa = 9.1), to examine pH effects on uptake and accumulation. Fish were exposed to 10 ìg/L DPH in water for up to 96 h at three nominal pH levels: 6.7, 7.7, and 8.7. In each case, an appa...

  12. Effect of stellar wind induced magnetic fields on planetary obstacles of non-magnetized hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkaev, N. V.; Odert, P.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Mezentsev, A. V.; Johnstone, C. P.; Kubyshkina, D. I.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the interaction between the magnetized stellar wind plasma and the partially ionized hydrodynamic hydrogen outflow from the escaping upper atmosphere of non-magnetized or weakly magnetized hot Jupiters. We use the well-studied hot Jupiter HD 209458b as an example for similar exoplanets, assuming a negligible intrinsic magnetic moment. For this planet, the stellar wind plasma interaction forms an obstacle in the planet's upper atmosphere, in which the position of the magnetopause is determined by the condition of pressure balance between the stellar wind and the expanded atmosphere, heated by the stellar extreme ultraviolet radiation. We show that the neutral atmospheric atoms penetrate into the region dominated by the stellar wind, where they are ionized by photoionization and charge exchange, and then mixed with the stellar wind flow. Using a 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, we show that an induced magnetic field forms in front of the planetary obstacle, which appears to be much stronger compared to those produced by the solar wind interaction with Venus and Mars. Depending on the stellar wind parameters, because of the induced magnetic field, the planetary obstacle can move up to ≈0.5-1 planetary radii closer to the planet. Finally, we discuss how estimations of the intrinsic magnetic moment of hot Jupiters can be inferred by coupling hydrodynamic upper planetary atmosphere and MHD stellar wind interaction models together with UV observations. In particular, we find that HD 209458b should likely have an intrinsic magnetic moment of 10-20 per cent that of Jupiter.

  13. Armature reaction effects on HTS field winding in HTS machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results from the Superwind laboratory setup. Particular focus in the paper has been placed on describing and quantifying the in influence of armature reaction on performance of the HTS fled winding. Presented experimental results have confrmed the HTS feld winding...... sensitivity to both armature reaction intensity and angular position with respect to the HTS coils. Furthermore, the characterization of the HTS feld winding has been correlated to the electromagnetic torque of the machine where the maximal Ic reduction of 21% has been observed for the maximum torque....

  14. WindVOiCe, a Self-Reporting Survey: Adverse Health Effects, Industrial Wind Turbines, and the Need for Vigilance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Carmen M. E.; Gillis, Lorrie; Kouwen, Nicholas; Aramini, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines have been operating in many parts of the globe. Anecdotal reports of perceived adverse health effects relating to industrial wind turbines have been published in the media and on the Internet. Based on these reports, indications were that some residents perceived they were experiencing adverse health effects. The purpose…

  15. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, M C

    2012-01-31

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development.

  16. Three essays on the effect of wind generation on power system planning and operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Clay Duane

    While the benefits of wind generation are well known, some drawbacks are still being understood as wind power is integrated into the power grid at increasing levels. The primary difference between wind generation and other forms of generation is the intermittent, and somewhat unpredictable, aspect of this resource. The somewhat uncontrollable aspect of wind generation makes it important to consider the relationship between this resource and load, and also how the operation of other non-wind generation resources may be affected. The three essays that comprise this dissertation focus on these and other important issues related to wind generation; leading to an improved understanding of how to better plan for and utilize this resource. The first essay addresses the cost of increased levels of installed wind capacity from both a capacity planning and economic dispatch perspective to arrive at the total system cost of installing a unit of wind capacity. This total includes not only the cost of the wind turbine and associated infrastructure, but also the cost impact an additional unit of wind capacity has on the optimal mix and operation of other generating units in the electricity supply portfolio. The results of the model showed that for all wind expansion scenarios, wind capacity is not cost-effective regardless of the level of the wind production tax credit and carbon prices that were considered. Larger levels of installed wind capacity result in reduced variable cost, but this reduction is not able to offset increases in capital cost, as a unit of installed wind capacity does not result in an equal reduction in other non-wind capacity needs. The second essay develops a methodology to better handle unexpected short term fluctuations in wind generation within the existing power system. The methodology developed in this essay leads to lower expected costs by anticipating and planning for fluctuations in wind generation by focusing on key constraints in the system. The

  17. Muscle Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi MD, MSc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome. And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations.

  18. Renewable Energy and Negative Externalities: The Effects of Wind Turbines on House Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droes, M.I.; Koster, H.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    In many countries, wind turbines are constructed as part of a strategy to reduce dependence on fossil fuels. In this paper, we measure the external effect of wind turbines on the transaction prices of nearby houses. A unique Dutch house price dataset covering the period 1985–2011 is used, as well as

  19. Renewable energy and negative externalities: the effect of wind turbines on house prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dröes, M.I.; Koster, H.R.A.

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, wind turbines are constructed as part of a strategy to reduce dependence on fossil fuels. In this paper, we measure the external effect of wind turbines on the transaction prices of nearby houses. A unique house price dataset covering the period 1985-2011 is used, including the

  20. Effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on small wind turbine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on the noise level of two different size wind turbines was investigated at the Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) near Bushland, TX. Noise and performance data were collected on two blade designs tested on a wind turbine rated a...

  1. Effect of wind turbine on TLP flating platform response

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chodnekar, Y.P.; Mandal, S.; Rao, K.B.

    ). The metacentric height improves drastically after adding weight to concrete ballast. Higher reserve buoyancy helps reduce surge, sway, roll and yaw. The direction of the incident wave and wind does not affect heave response and remains same when incident wave...

  2. Statistical study of the effect of wind characteristics on the main shaft loadings of an active-stall controlled wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sho

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic loadings of the wind turbine main shafts are important for drivetrain components as external excitation force, and the evaluation of their dependence on wind characteristics is necessary for both the understanding of the drivetrain bahavior and the extrapolation of the loadings at different sites. In this study, the load measurements of the wind turbine main shafts were performed along with the wind field measurement. Next the multivariate regression analysis was utilized to identify the influential wind parameters that affect the statistics of the dynamic loadings of the shaft. Finally, the dependence of the load statistics on the identified wind parameters was evaluated qualitatively using the observed data. Obtained regression results showed that there were more effects of wind field parameters on shaft loadings at low and middle wind speed regions than at the high wind speed region. Among the identified parameters, the incline angle and the vertical turbulence were found to be dominant for most of the shaft loadings, though the turbulence intensity is the parameter that is generally used for characterization of a wind field. For the mean tilt bending moment and the standard deviation of the torque, which are recognized as the influential factors for the loadings of drivetrain component, the differences the identified parameters caused were about 15% and 100% respectively.

  3. The effect of statistical wind corrections on global wave forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Tom H.; Greenslade, Diana J. M.; Simmonds, Ian

    2013-10-01

    The skill of modern wave models is such that the quality of their forecasts is, to a large degree, determined by errors in the forcing wind field. This work explores the extent to which large-scale systematic biases in modelled waves from a third generation wave model can be attributed to the forcing winds. Three different sets of winds with known global bias characteristics are used to force the WAVEWATCH III model. These winds are based on the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's ACCESS model output, with different statistical corrections applied. Wave forecasts are verified using satellite altimeter data. It is found that a negative bias in modelled Significant Wave Height (Hs) has its origins primarily in the forcing, however, the reduction of systematic wind biases does not result in universal improvement in modelled Hs. A positive bias is present in the Southern Hemisphere due primarily to an overestimation of high Hs values in the Southern Ocean storm tracks. A positive bias is also present in the east Pacific and East Indian Ocean. This is due both to the over-prediction of waves in the Southern Ocean and lack of swell attenuation in the wave model source terms used. Smaller scale features are apparent, such as a positive bias off the Cape of Good Hope, and a negative bias off Cape Horn. In some situations, internal wave model error has been compensated for by error in the forcing winds.

  4. DAC to Mitigate the Effect of Periodic Disturbances on Drive Train using Collective Pitch for Variable Speed Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imran, Raja Muhammad; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Soltani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    scheme to mitigate the effect of 3p flicker on drive train. 5MW wind turbine of the National Renewable Laboratories (NREL) is used as research object and results are simulated in MATLAB/Simulink. We designed the controller based on linearized model of the wind turbine generated for above rated wind speed......DAC is a linear control technique used to mitigate the effect of disturbance on the plant. It is a superposition of full state feedback and disturbance feedback. This paper presents a control technique based on Disturbance Accommodation Control (DAC) to reduce fatigue on drive train generated...... by wind which is combination of step and periodic disturbances (generated by wind shear and tower shadow ) of the turbine for above rated wind speed (Region III). We have presented a wind modeling for wind shear and tower shadow effect for the wind turbine control simulation and also developed a control...

  5. Muscle weakness, fatigue, and torque variability: effects of age and mobility status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent-Braun, Jane A; Callahan, Damien M; Fay, Jessica L; Foulis, Stephen A; Buonaccorsi, John P

    2014-02-01

    Whereas deficits in muscle function, particularly power production, develop in old age and are risk factors for mobility impairment, a complete understanding of muscle fatigue during dynamic contractions is lacking. We tested hypotheses related to torque-producing capacity, fatigue resistance, and variability of torque production during repeated maximal contractions in healthy older, mobility-impaired older, and young women. Knee extensor fatigue (decline in torque) was measured during 4 min of dynamic contractions. Torque variability was characterized using a novel 4-component logistic regression model. Young women produced more torque at baseline and during the protocol than older women (P torque variability differed by group (P = 0.022) and was greater in older impaired compared with young women (P = 0.010). These results suggest that increased torque variability may combine with baseline muscle weakness to limit function, particularly in older adults with mobility impairments. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Structure Effects in Collisions Induced by Halo and Weakly Bound Nuclei Around the Coulomb Barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Scuderi, V; Torresi, D; Fisichella, M; Borge, M J G; Randisi, G; Milin, M; Figuera, P; Raabe, R; Di Pietro, A; Amorini, F; Fraile, L M; Vidal, A M; Rizzo, F; Zadro, M; Gomez-Camacho, J; Pellegriti, M G; Papa, M; Jeppesen, H; Santonocito, D; Sanchez, E M R; Acosta, L; Tengblad, O; Lattuada, M; Musumarra, A; Scalia, G

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, results concerning different reaction channels for the collisions induced by the three Be isotopes, Be-9,Be-10,Be-11, on a Zn-64 target at energies around the Coulomb barrier will be presented. The experiments with the radioactive Be-10,Be-11 beams were performed at REX-ISOLDE (CERN) whereas the experiment with the stable weakly bound Be-9 beam was performed at LNS Catania. Elastic scattering angular distributions have been measured for the three systems Be-9,Be-10,Be-11 + Zn-64 at the same center of mass energy. The angular distributions were analyzed with optical potentials and reaction cross sections were obtained from optical model calculations, performed with the code PTOLEMY. For the Be-11 + Zn-64 reaction, the break-up angular distribution was also measured.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of wind waves: multifractal phase/time effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Mellen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the bispectral coherence method, phase/time analysis of analytic signals is another promising avenue for the investigation of phase effects in wind waves. Frequency spectra of phase fluctuations obtained from both sea and laboratory experiments follow an F-β power law over several decades, suggesting that a fractal description is appropriate. However, many similar natural phenomena have been shown to be multifractal. Universal multifractals are quantified by two additional parameters: the Lévy index 0 α 2 for the type of multifractal and the co-dimension 0 C1 1 for intermittence. The three parameters are a full statistical measure the nonlinear dynamics. Analysis of laboratory flume data is reported here and the results indicate that the phase fluctuations are 'hard multifractal' (α > 1. The actual estimate is close to the limiting value α = 2,  which is consistent with Kolmogorov's lognormal model for turbulent fluctuations. Implications for radar and sonar backscattering from the sea surface are briefly considered.

  8. Effects of industrial wind turbine noise on sleep and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, Michael A; Aramini, Jeffery J; Hanning, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are a new source of noise in previously quiet rural environments. Environmental noise is a public health concern, of which sleep disruption is a major factor. To compare sleep and general health outcomes between participants living close to IWTs and those living further away from them, participants living between 375 and 1400 m (n = 38) and 3.3 and 6.6 km (n = 41) from IWTs were enrolled in a stratified cross-sectional study involving two rural sites. Validated questionnaires were used to collect information on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index - PSQI), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score - ESS), and general health (SF36v2), together with psychiatric disorders, attitude, and demographics. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate the effect of the main exposure variable of interest (distance to the nearest IWT) on various health outcome measures. Participants living within 1.4 km of an IWT had worse sleep, were sleepier during the day, and had worse SF36 Mental Component Scores compared to those living further than 1.4 km away. Significant dose-response relationships between PSQI, ESS, SF36 Mental Component Score, and log-distance to the nearest IWT were identified after controlling for gender, age, and household clustering. The adverse event reports of sleep disturbance and ill health by those living close to IWTs are supported.

  9. Effects of industrial wind turbine noise on sleep and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Nissenbaum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial wind turbines (IWTs are a new source of noise in previously quiet rural environments. Environmental noise is a public health concern, of which sleep disruption is a major factor. To compare sleep and general health outcomes between participants living close to IWTs and those living further away from them, participants living between 375 and 1400 m (n = 38 and 3.3 and 6.6 km (n = 41 from IWTs were enrolled in a stratified cross-sectional study involving two rural sites. Validated questionnaires were used to collect information on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index - PSQI, daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score - ESS, and general health (SF36v2, together with psychiatric disorders, attitude, and demographics. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate the effect of the main exposure variable of interest (distance to the nearest IWT on various health outcome measures. Participants living within 1.4 km of an IWT had worse sleep, were sleepier during the day, and had worse SF36 Mental Component Scores compared to those living further than 1.4 km away. Significant dose-response relationships between PSQI, ESS, SF36 Mental Component Score, and log-distance to the nearest IWT were identified after controlling for gender, age, and household clustering. The adverse event reports of sleep disturbance and ill health by those living close to IWTs are supported.

  10. Understanding and representing the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transfer in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronda, R.J.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Pino, D.

    2012-01-01

    Goal of this study is to quantify the effect of wind shear on the turbulent transport in the dry Convective Boundary Layer (CBL). Questions addressed include the effect of wind shear on the depth of the mixed layer, the effect of wind shear on the depth and structure of the capping inversion, and

  11. Analysis of environmental dispersion in a wetland flow under the effect of wind: Extended solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huilin; Huai, Wenxin

    2018-02-01

    The accurate analysis of the contaminant transport process in wetland flows is essential for environmental assessment. However, dispersivity assessment becomes complicated when the wind strength and direction are taken into consideration. Prior studies illustrating the wind effect on environmental dispersion in wetland flows simply focused on the mean longitudinal concentration distribution. Moreover, the results obtained by these analyses are not accurate when done on a smaller scale, namely, the initial stage of the contaminant transport process. By combining the concentration moments method (the Aris' method) and Gill's expansion theory, the previous researches on environmental dispersion in wetland flows with effect of wind have been extended. By adopting up to 4th-order moments, the wind effect-as illustrated by dimensionless parameters Er (wind force) and ω (wind direction)-on kurtosis and skewness is discussed, the up to 4th-order vertical concentration distribution is obtained, and the two-dimensional concentration distribution is illustrated. This work demonstrates that wind intensity and direction can significantly affect the contaminant dispersion. Moreover, the study presents a more accurate analytical solution of environmental dispersion in wetland flows under various wind conditions.

  12. Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD With and Without Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso-Vanelli, Renata P; Di Lorenzo, Valéria A Pires; Labadessa, Ivana G; Regueiro, Eloisa M G; Jamami, Mauricio; Gomes, Evelim L F D; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD may experience respiratory muscle weakness. Two therapeutic approaches to the respiratory muscles are inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises. The aims of the study are to compare the effects of inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises associated with physical training in subjects with COPD as an additional benefit of strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, thoracoabdominal mobility, physical exercise capacity, and reduction in dyspnea on exertion. In addition, these gains were compared between subjects with and without respiratory muscle weakness. 25 subjects completed the study: 13 composed the inspiratory muscle training group, and 12 composed the calisthenics-and-breathing exercises group. Subjects were assessed before and after training by spirometry, measurements of respiratory muscle strength and test of inspiratory muscle endurance, thoracoabdominal excursion measurements, and the 6-min walk test. Moreover, scores for the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale were reported. After intervention, there was a significant improvement in both groups of respiratory muscle strength and endurance, thoracoabdominal mobility, and walking distance in the 6-min walk test. Additionally, there was a decrease of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak. A difference was found between groups, with higher values of respiratory muscle strength and thoracoabdominal mobility and lower values of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak and the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale in the inspiratory muscle training group. In the inspiratory muscle training group, subjects with respiratory muscle weakness had greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. Both interventions increased exercise capacity and decreased dyspnea during physical effort. However, inspiratory muscle training was more effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, which could

  13. Recipes for correcting the impact of effective mesoscale resolution on the estimation of extreme winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Ott, Søren; Badger, Jake

    2012-01-01

    Extreme winds derived from simulations using mesoscale models are underestimated due to the effective spatial and temporal resolutions. This is reflected in the spectral domain as an energy deficit in the mesoscale range. The energy deficit implies smaller spectral moments and thus underestimation...... in the extreme winds. We have developed two approaches for correcting the smoothing effect resulting from the mesoscale model resolution on the extreme wind estimation by taking into account the difference between the modeled and measured spectra in the high frequency range. Both approaches give estimates...... of the smoothing effect in good agreement with measurements from several sites in Denmark and Germany....

  14. The macro-economic effects of wind energy. De macro-economische effecten van windenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Burg, T. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    First the characteristics of wind energy pertaining to business economics are discussed. Then attention is paid to the calculation of macro-economic effects. Special attention is paid to the efficiency of projects from a business economical point of view correlated to macro-economic effects, and subsidies for wind energy for the Dutch situation. From the economic analysis it appears that investments in wind energy have positive macro-economic effects, even if they are inefficient with regard to business economical aspects. 2 figs., 9 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Effect of muscle weakness and joint inflammation on the onset and progression of osteoarthritis in the rabbit knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, C; Sawatsky, A; Leonard, T; Hart, D A; Valderrabano, V; Herzog, W

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between mechanical and non-mechanical independent risk factors for the onset and progression of Osteoarthritis (OA) are poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of muscle weakness, joint inflammation and the combination on the onset and progression of OA in a rabbit knee joint model. Thirty 1-year-old female New Zealand White rabbits (average 5.7 kg, range 4.8-6.6 kg) were divided into four groups with one limb randomly assigned to be the experimental side: (1) surgical denervation of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle; (2) muscle weakness induced by intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A); (3) intraarticular injection with Carrageenan to induce a transient inflammatory reaction; (4) combination of Carrageenan and BTX-A injection. After 90 days, cartilage histology of the articular surfaces were microscopically analyzed using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histology scoring system. VL denervation resulted in significantly higher OARSI scores in the patellofemoral joint (group 1). BTX-A administration resulted in significant cartilage damage in all four compartments of the knee (group 2). Carrageenan did not cause significant cartilage damage. BTX-A combined with Carrageenan lead to severe cartilage damage in all four compartments. Muscle weakness lead to significant OA in the rabbit knee. A transient local inflammatory stimulus did not promote cartilage degradation nor did it enhance OA progression when combined with muscle weakness. These results are surprising and add to the literature the conclusion that acute inflammation is probably not an independent risk factor for OA in this rabbit model. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of deformation of isovector electromagnetic and weak transition strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamick, L.; Auerbach, N.

    1999-10-01

    The summed strength for transitions from the ground state of 12C via the operators st, ℓ t, rY1t, r[ Y1s] λt and r[ Y1ℓ] λt are calculated using the ΔN = 0 rotational model. If we choose the z-component of the isospin operator tz, the above operators are relevant to electromagnetic transitions; if we choose t+, they are relevant to weak transitions such as neutrino capture. In going from the spherical limit to the asymptotic (oblate) limit the strength for the operator st decreases steadily to zero; the strength for the operator ℓ t (scissors mode) increases by a factor of three. For the last three operators, isovector dipole, spin dipole and orbital dipole (including the twist mode), it is shown that the summed strength is independent of deformation. The main difference in the behavior is that for the first two operators we have in-shell transitions whereas for the last three operators the transitions are out of shell.

  17. The Effects of Deformation on Isovector Electromagnetic and Weak Transition Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamick, Larry; Auerbach, Naftali

    1999-10-01

    The summed strength for transitions from the ground state of ^12C via the operators st, lt, rY^1t, r[Y^1s]^λt are calculated using the ΔN=0 rotational model. If we choose the z component of the isospin operator t_z, the above operators are relevant to electromagnetic transitions; if we choose t+ they are relevant to weak transitions such as neutrino capture. In going from the spherical limit to the asymptotic (oblate) limit the strength for the operator s τ decreases steaddily to zero; the strength for the operator l τ (scissors mode) increases by a factor of three. For the last three operators - isovector dipole, spin dipole and orbital dipole (including the twist mode) it is shown that the summed strength is independent of deformation . The main difference in the behaviour is that for the first two operators we have in-shell transitions whereas for the last three operators the transitions are out of shell. For the last three operators the results are more general - summed strength is independent of whatever configuration is chosen with the constraint that the valence particles are in the 0p shell and the mean square radii for p_3/2 and p_1/2 are the same.

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of agricultural mulches for reducing post-wildfire wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, P. R.; Jennewein, J.; Sharratt, B. S.; Lewis, S. A.; Brown, R. E.

    2017-08-01

    Post-wildfire soil erosion can be caused by water or aeolian processes, yet most erosion research has focused on predominantly water-driven erosion. This study investigates the effectiveness of three agricultural mulches, with and without a tackifier, on aeolian sediment transport processes. A wind tunnel was used to simulate post-wildfire wind erosion at three wind speeds (6, 11 and 18 m s-1). Shallow trays containing soil collected after a wildfire were treated with chopped rice, wheat or chopped wheat mulch; mulch treatments were also compounded with liquid treatments, tackifier to water ratios of 1:6, 1:3 and water. The mulch treatments were generally easily moved at all wind speeds with cover reductions greater than 90% at the highest wind speed. As expected, sediment loss was greatest for the bare soil treatment, ranging from 6.5 g m-2 at the lowest wind speed which increases to 6258 g m-2 at the highest wind speed. Adding wheat or chopped wheat mulch significantly reduced sediment loss by an order or magnitude (698 and 298 g m-2, respectively) at the highest wind speed. Adding chopped rice straw reduced sediment loss by a half to 3573 g m-2 at the highest wind speed, but the effect was not significant due to mobilization of the mulch. The most effective sediment loss mitigation was achieved with liquid tackifier treatments when applied to bare soil and when compounded with various mulch treatments, particularly at the highest wind speed. These results may aid management decisions when mitigating aeolian sediment transport after wildfires.

  19. Effects of Center Offset and Noise on Weak-Lensing Derived Concentration-Mass Relation of Dark Matter Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Fan, Zuhui

    2014-04-01

    With the halo catalog from the Millennium Simulation, we analyze the weak-lensing measured density profiles for clusters of galaxies, paying attention to the determination of the concentration-mass (c-M) relation, which can be biased by the center offset, selection effect, and shape noise from intrinsic ellipticities of background galaxies. Several different methods of locating the center of a cluster from weak-lensing effects alone are explored. We find that, for intermediate redshift clusters, the highest peak from our newly proposed two-scale smoothing method applied to the reconstructed convergence field, first with a smoothing scale of 2' and then 0.'5, corresponds best to the true center. Assuming the parameterized Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we fit the reduced tangential shear signals around different centers identified by different methods. It is shown that, for the ensemble median values, a center offset larger than one scale radius rs can bias the derived mass and concentration significantly lower than the true values, especially for low-mass halos. However, the existence of noise can compensate for the offset effect and reduce the systematic bias, although the scatter of mass and concentration becomes considerably larger. Statistically, the bias effect of center offset on the c-M relation is insignificant if an appropriate center finding method is adopted. On the other hand, noise from intrinsic ellipticities can bias the c-M relation derived from a sample of weak-lensing analyzed clusters if a simple χ2 fitting method is used. To properly account for the scatter and covariance between c and M, we apply a Bayesian method to improve the statistical analysis of the c-M relation. It is shown that this new method allows us to derive the c-M relation with significantly reduced biases.

  20. The effects of different regulation strategies on Jiangsu's wind integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Lixuan; Lund, Henrik; Möller, Bernd

    This paper presents the influence of different regulation strategies on wind energy integration into existing Jiangsu’s energy system. The ability of wind integration is defined in terms of the ability to avoid excess electricity production, to conserve primary energy consumptions and to reduce CO2...... are compared and analyzed in the range of a wind input from 0% to 47% of the electricity demand. It is concluded that operating power plants of existing Jiangsu’s energy system in a flexible way is...... emissions in the system. Firstly, a reference model of Jiangsu’s energy system is built by using EnergyPLAN based on the year 2009. The model results then are compared to actual values from 2009 to validate its accuracy. Based on the reference model, different regulations of Jiangsu’s energy system...

  1. Effects of amplitude modulation on perception of wind turbine noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ki Seop; Lee, Soo Gab; Gwak, Doo Young [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Yeol Wan [Ammunition Engineering Team, Defense Agency for Technology and Quality, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Hoon [Aerodynamics Research Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji Young [Transportation Environmental Research Team, Green Transport and Logistics Institute, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Wind turbine noise is considered to be easily detectable and highly annoying at relatively lower sound levels than other noise sources. Many previous studies attributed this characteristic to amplitude modulation. However, it is unclear whether amplitude modulation is the main cause of these properties of wind turbine noise. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to identify the relationship between amplitude modulation and these two properties of wind turbine noise. For this investigation, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, 12 participants determined the detection thresholds of six target sounds in the presence of background noise. In the second experiment, 12 participants matched the loudness of modified sounds without amplitude modulation to that of target sounds with amplitude modulation. The results showed that the detection threshold was lowered as the modulation depth increased; additionally, sounds with amplitude modulation had higher subjective loudness than those without amplitude modulation.

  2. Effects of wake-turbine blade interactions on power production of wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Maki; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Iida, Akiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    In offshore wind farms, deterioration in power generation performance due to the mutual interference of flow around the wind turbines is a serious issue. To clarify the effects of wake-turbine blade interactions on the performance of wind farms, we conducted large-scale simulations of the flow around two full-scale wind turbines in a tandem-arrangement with two different spacings. The spacing between the two turbines was L/D = 1.0 and L/D = 2.0, with D being the rotor diameter. The predicted results show that vortices generated in the wake of the first turbine interfere with the blades of the second turbine and the interference becomes more intense for the case of L/D = 1.0. Thus, the power coefficient of the downstream turbine becomes lower by 80% for the case of L/D = 1.0 compared with the case of a single wind turbine.

  3. Wind Effects on Retention Time in Highway Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Larsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents results from an experimental and numerical study of wind-induced flows and transportation patterns in highway wet detention ponds. The study presented here is part of a general investigation on road runoff and pollution in respect to wet detention ponds. The objective...... with the situation of a "real" spatial non-uniform shear stress distribution on the surface of the pond. The result of this paper shows that wind plays a dominant role for the retention time and flow pattern. Furthermore, the results shows that the differences in retention time between the use of uniform and non...

  4. Wind Effects on Retention Time in Highway Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Larsen, Torben; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents results from an experimental and numerical study of wind-induced flows and transportation patterns in highway wet detention ponds. The study presented here is part of a general investigation on road runoff and pollution in respect to wet detention ponds. The objective...... with the situation of a "real" spatial non-uniform shear stress distribution on the surface of the pond. The result of this paper shows that wind plays a dominant role for the retention time and flow pattern. Furthermore, the results shows that the differences in retention time between the use of uniform and non...

  5. Modeling of wind turbine vortex generators in considering the inter-effects between arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhenzhou; Shen, Wenzhong; Wang, Ruixin

    2017-01-01

    Vortex generators (VGs) are commonly placed on wind turbine blades to delay flow separation in the boundary layer. VGs can be parametrically modeled in computational fluid dynamics for effective and efficient simulations of wind blade flow fields. Many researchers have studied the vortex....... Compared to the solid VG model, the array type model has similar streamlines and surface pressure coefficients on the suction surface. The array type VG model can effectively reduce the number of grid points and yield highly accurate predictions of wind turbine blade aerodynamic characteristics....

  6. A weak-base fibrous anion exchanger effective for rapid phosphate removal from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awual, Md Rabiul; Jyo, Akinori; El-Safty, Sherif A; Tamada, Masao; Seko, Noriaki

    2011-04-15

    This work investigated that weak-base anion exchange fibers named FVA-c and FVA-f were selectively and rapidly taken up phosphate from water. The chemical structure of both FVA-c and FVA-f was the same; i.e., poly(vinylamine) chains grafted onto polyethylene coated polypropylene fibers. Batch study using FVA-c clarified that this preferred phosphate to chloride, nitrate and sulfate in neutral pH region and an equilibrium capacity of FVA-c for phosphate was from 2.45 to 6.87 mmol/g. Column study using FVA-f made it clear that breakthrough capacities of FVA-f were not strongly affected by flow rates from 150 to 2000 h(-1) as well as phosphate feed concentration from 0.072 to 1.6mM. Under these conditions, breakthrough capacities were from 0.84 to 1.43 mmol/g indicating high kinetic performances. Trace concentration of phosphate was also removed from feeds containing 0.021 and 0.035 mM of phosphate at high feed flow rate of 2500 h(-1), breakthrough capacities were 0.676 and 0.741 mmol/g, respectively. The column study also clarified that chloride and sulfate did not strongly interfere with phosphate uptake even in their presence of equimolar and fivefold molar levels. Adsorbed phosphate on FVA-f was quantitatively eluted with 1M HCl acid and regenerated into hydrochloride form simultaneously for next phosphate adsorption operation. Therefore, FVA-f is able to use long time even under rigorous chemical treatment of multiple regeneration/reuse cycles without any noticeable deterioration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. On the interpretation of likelihood ratios in forensic science evidence: Presentation formats and the weak evidence effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, K A; Kemp, R I; Sayle, M; Newell, B R

    2014-07-01

    Likelihood ratios are increasingly being adopted to convey expert evaluative opinions to courts. In the absence of appropriate databases, many of these likelihood ratios will include verbal rather than numerical estimates of the support offered by the analysis. However evidence suggests that verbal formulations of uncertainty are a less effective form of communication than equivalent numerical formulations. Moreover, when evidence strength is low a misinterpretation of the valence of the evidence - a "weak evidence effect" - has been found. We report the results of an experiment involving N=404 (student and online) participants who read a brief summary of a burglary trial containing expert testimony. The expert evidence was varied across conditions in terms of evidence strength (low or high) and presentation method (numerical, verbal, table or visual scale). Results suggest that of these presentation methods, numerical expressions produce belief-change and implicit likelihood ratios which were most commensurate with those intended by the expert and most resistant to the weak evidence effect. These findings raise questions about the extent to which low strength verbal evaluative opinions can be effectively communicated to decision makers at trial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial effects of weak acids on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huiying J; Breidt, Frederick; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Osborne, Jason A

    2011-06-01

    Outbreaks of disease due to vegetative bacterial pathogens associated with acid foods (such as apple cider) have raised concerns about acidified vegetables and related products that have a similar pH (3.2 to 4.0). Escherichia coli O157:H7 and related strains of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) have been identified as the most acid resistant vegetative pathogens in these products. Previous research has shown that the lack of dissolved oxygen in many hermetically sealed acid or acidified food products can enhance survival of EHEC compared with their survival under aerobic conditions. We compared the antimicrobial effects of several food acids (acetic, malic, lactic, fumaric, benzoic, and sorbic acids and sulfite) on a cocktail of EHEC strains under conditions representative of non-heat-processed acidified vegetables in hermetically sealed jars, holding the pH (3.2) and ionic strength (0.342) constant under anaerobic conditions. The overall antimicrobial effectiveness of weak acids used in this study was ranked, from most effective to least effective: sulfite > benzoic acid > sorbic acid > fumaric acid > L- and D-lactic acid > acetic acid > malic acid. These rankings were based on the estimated protonated concentrations required to achieve a 5-log reduction in EHEC after 24 h of incubation at 30°C. This study provides information that can be used to formulate safer acid and acidified food products and provides insights about the mode of action of weak acids against EHEC.

  9. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  10. Life in wind turbines vicinity, effects on health – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Pawlas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a short review of scientific papers , and other sources concerning health effects of exposure to noise, infrasounds, electromagnetic radiation and mechanical hazards induced in dwellers living in vicinity of wind farm.

  11. The effect of E. coli STa enterotoxin on the absorption of weakly dissociable drugs from rat proximal jejunum in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    McEwan, G. T.; Lucas, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of E. coli heat stable (STa) enterotoxin on the absorption of radio-labelled weak electrolytes and their appearance in peripheral blood was assessed in vivo by use of an intestinal recirculation procedure. 2. STa reduced the luminal disappearance (P less than 0.02) and peripheral blood appearance (P less than 0.02) of label from salicylic acid as well as the luminal disappearance (P less than 0.02) of diphenylhydantoin. 3. In contrast, STa increased the appearance in peripheral ...

  12. The State of Surgical Hand-Washing in our Hospital and the Effects of Weakly Acidic Disinfectant on Skin Damages

    OpenAIRE

    比嘉, 洋子; 久田, 友治; 比嘉, 博美; 識名, 通子; 津波, 浩子; 大湾, 知子; 具志堅, 興冶; Higa, Yoko; Kuda, Tomoharu; Higa, Hiromi; Shikina, Kayoko; Tsuha, Hiroko; Owan, Tomoko; Gushiken, Koji; 琉球大学医学部附属病院看護部

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the present state of surgical hand-washing in our hospital, we asked doctors and nurses to fill out a questionnaire on the subject. We also investigated whether the new weakly-acidic chlorohexidine-based disinfectant (the new disinfectant) was effective in preventing skin damage caused by hand-washing. According to the survey, all the nurses used 2 brushes and 72% of them had skin damage, while the doctors used 1 to 3 brushes and 37% of them had skin damage. There was a significan...

  13. Effects of finite aspect ratio on wind turbine airfoil measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark A.; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines partly operate in stalled conditions within their operational cycle. To simulate these conditions, it is also necessary to obtain 2-D airfoil data in terms of lift and drag coefficients at high angles of attack. Such data has been obtained previously, but often at low aspect ratios...

  14. EFFECTS OF WIND SHEAR ON POLLUTION DISPERSION. (R827929)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using an accurate numerical method for simulating the advection and diffusion of pollution puffs, it is demonstrated that point releases of pollution grow into a shape reflecting the vertical wind shear profile experienced by the puff within a time scale less than 4 h. Fo...

  15. Effects of Turbine Spacings in Very Large Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    wind farms, although certain aspects of the complex wake interaction are not captured, see Churchfield et al.(2014). Recent studies have shown how turbines introduce low frequencies in the wake, which could describe some of the shortcomings. Chamorro et al.(2015) identified three regions of different...

  16. Effect of placing a diffuser around a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.O.L.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Flay, R.G.J.

    2000-01-01

    An actuator disc CFD model of the flow through a wind turbine in a diffuser is developed and validated. Further, it is shown theoretically from a 1D analysis that the Betz limit can be exceeded by a factor proportional to the relative increase in mass flow through the rotor induced by the diffuser...

  17. The effects of inhomogeneous proton-α drifts on the heating of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Viñas, A. F.; Roberts, D. A.

    2017-06-01

    Previous modeling studies have demonstrated that waves and super-Alfvénic drift can lead to perpendicular preferential heating of the α particles with respect to protons. Using 2.5-D hybrid model of the solar wind α-proton plasma, we study the effects of inhomogeneous (across the magnetic field) background streaming focusing on the fast solar wind. We explore the effects of an initial relative, inhomogeneous ion drift on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling and consider the effects of solar wind expansion. We study the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background solar wind and demonstrate the generation of oblique waves and their effects on enhanced resonant anisotropic ion heating. The model reproduces the typical ion temperature anisotropy values seen in observations. Using our model, we find that inhomogeneous super-Alfvénic ion drift in the plasma generates significant power of oblique waves in the solar wind plasma, in addition to enhanced heating compared to the nondrifting populations. We demonstrate the effects of various inhomogeneity profiles and regions of the drift on the ion anisotropic heating in super-Alfvénic and near-Alfvénic drifts. We find that the cooling effect due to the solar wind expansion is not significant when super-Alfvénic drifts are considered.

  18. A Model for Determining the Effect of the Wind Velocity on 100 M Sprinting Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janjic Natasa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an equation for determining instantaneous and final velocity of a sprinter in a 100 m run completed with a wind resistance ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 m/s. The validity of the equation was verified using the data of three world class sprinters: Carl Lewis, Maurice Green, and Usain Bolt. For the given constant wind velocity with the values + 0.9 and + 1.1 m/s, the wind contribution to the change of sprinter velocity was the same for the maximum as well as for the final velocity. This study assessed how the effect of the wind velocity influenced the change of sprinting velocity. The analysis led to the conclusion that the official limit of safely neglecting the wind influence could be chosen as 1 m/s instead of 2 m/s, if the velocity were presented using three, instead of two decimal digits. This implies that wind velocity should be rounded off to two decimal places instead of the present practice of one decimal place. In particular, the results indicated that the influence of wind on the change of sprinting velocity in the range of up to 2 m/s and was of order of magnitude of 10-3 m/s. This proves that the IAAF Competition Rules correctly neglect the influence of the wind with regard to such velocities. However, for the wind velocity over 2 m/s, the wind influence is of order 10-2 m/s and cannot be neglected.

  19. A Model for Determining the Effect of the Wind Velocity on 100 m Sprinting Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Natasa; Kapor, Darko; Doder, Dragan; Petrovic, Aleksandar; Doder, Radoslava

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces an equation for determining instantaneous and final velocity of a sprinter in a 100 m run completed with a wind resistance ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 m/s. The validity of the equation was verified using the data of three world class sprinters: Carl Lewis, Maurice Green, and Usain Bolt. For the given constant wind velocity with the values + 0.9 and + 1.1 m/s, the wind contribution to the change of sprinter velocity was the same for the maximum as well as for the final velocity. This study assessed how the effect of the wind velocity influenced the change of sprinting velocity. The analysis led to the conclusion that the official limit of safely neglecting the wind influence could be chosen as 1 m/s instead of 2 m/s, if the velocity were presented using three, instead of two decimal digits. This implies that wind velocity should be rounded off to two decimal places instead of the present practice of one decimal place. In particular, the results indicated that the influence of wind on the change of sprinting velocity in the range of up to 2 m/s and was of order of magnitude of 10(-3) m/s. This proves that the IAAF Competition Rules correctly neglect the influence of the wind with regard to such velocities. However, for the wind velocity over 2 m/s, the wind influence is of order 10(-2) m/s and cannot be neglected.

  20. Effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli–Euler beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with analytically predicting the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli–Euler beam performing bending oscillations. Two cases are considered: (i) large transverse deflections, where nonlinear (true) curvature, nonlinear material and nonlinear inertia owing to longitudinal motions of the beam are taken into account, and (ii) mid-plane stretching nonlinearity. A novel approach is employed, the method of varying amplitudes. As a result, the isolated as well as combined effects of the considered sources of nonlinearities are revealed. It is shown that nonlinear inertia has the most substantial impact on the dispersion relation of a non-uniform beam by removing all frequency band-gaps. Explanations of the revealed effects are suggested, and validated by experiments and numerical simulation. PMID:27118899

  1. Effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli–Euler beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with analytically predicting the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli– Euler beam performing bending oscillations. Two cases are considered: (i) large transverse deflections, where nonlinear (true) curvature......, nonlinear material and nonlinear inertia owing to longitudinal motions of the beam are taken into account, and (ii) midplane stretching nonlinearity. A novel approach is employed, the method of varying amplitudes. As a result, the isolated as well as combined effects of the considered sources...... of nonlinearities are revealed. It is shown that nonlinear inertia has the most substantial impact on the dispersion relation of a nonuniform beam by removing all frequency band-gaps. Explanations of the revealed effects are suggested, and validated by experiments and numerical simulation....

  2. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Diego State University; Bard Center for Environmental Policy at Bard College; Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2011-06-23

    With increasing numbers of communities considering wind power developments, empirical investigations regarding related community concerns are needed. One such concern is that proximate property values may be adversely affected, yet relatively little research exists on the subject. The present research investigates roughly 7,500 sales of single-family homes surrounding 24 existing U.S. wind facilities. Across four different hedonic models, and a variety of robustness tests, the results are consistent: neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have a statistically significant effect on sales prices, yet further research is warranted.

  3. Experiment and Simulation Effects of Cyclic Pitch Control on Performance of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Quang Sang

    2017-06-01

      Keywords: Floating Offshore Wind Turbine, Aerodynamic Forces, Cyclic Pitch Control, FAST Code, Wind Tunnel Experiment Article History: Received February 11th 2017; Received in revised form April 29th 2017; Accepted June 2nd 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Sang, L.Q., Maeda, T., Kamada, Y., and Li, Q. (2017 Experiment and simulation effect of cyclic pitch control on performance of horizontal axis wind turbine to International Journal of Renewable Energy Develeopment, 6(2, 119-125. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.6.2.119-125

  4. Wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeoman, J.C. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    This evaluation of wind turbines is part of a series of Technology Evaluations of possible components and subsystems of community energy systems. Wind turbines, ranging in size from 200 W to 10 MW, are discussed as candidates for prime movers in community systems. Estimates of performance characteristics and cost as a function of rated capacity and rated wind speed are presented. Data concerning material requirements, environmental effects, and operating procedures also are given and are represented empirically to aid computer simulation.

  5. Reactive Power Dispatch Method in Wind Farms to Improve the Lifetime of Power Converter Considering Wake Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Dao; Su, Chi

    2017-01-01

    In Wind Farms (WF), the most popular and commonly implemented active power control method is the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT). Due to the wake effect, the upstream Wind Turbine (WT) in WFs has more active power generation than the downstream WT at the wind directions and wind speeds...... DFIG WTs. It can be concluded that, compared with the traditional reactive power dispatch method, the proposed method can increase the lifetime of the upstream WT’s power converter....

  6. 78 FR 6316 - Big Blue Wind Farm, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Big Blue Wind Farm, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status Docket Nos. Big Blue Wind Farm, LLC EG13-1-000 Calpine Bosque Energy Center, LLC EG13-2-000 Homer City Generation, L.P EG13-3-000 Texas Dispatchable Wind 1, LLC EG13-4-000 Blue Creek Wind Farm LLC...

  7. Seasonal effects of wind conditions on migration patterns of soaring American white pelican.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez Illan, Javier; Wang, Guiming; Cunningham, Fred L; King, D Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Energy and time expenditures are determinants of bird migration strategies. Soaring birds have developed migration strategies to minimize these costs, optimizing the use of all the available resources to facilitate their displacement. We analysed the effects of different wind factors (tailwind, turbulence, vertical updrafts) on the migratory flying strategies adopted by 24 satellite-tracked American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) throughout spring and autumn in North America. We hypothesize that different wind conditions encountered along migration routes between spring and autumn induce pelicans to adopt different flying strategies and use of these wind resources. Using quantile regression and fine-scale atmospheric data, we found that the pelicans optimized the use of available wind resources, flying faster and more direct routes in spring than in autumn. They actively selected tailwinds in both spring and autumn displacements but relied on available updrafts predominantly in their spring migration, when they needed to arrive at the breeding regions. These effects varied depending on the flying speed of the pelicans. We found significant directional correlations between the pelican migration flights and wind direction. In light of our results, we suggest plasticity of migratory flight strategies by pelicans is likely to enhance their ability to cope with the effects of ongoing climate change and the alteration of wind regimes. Here, we also demonstrate the usefulness and applicability of quantile regression techniques to investigate complex ecological processes such as variable effects of atmospheric conditions on soaring migration.

  8. Seasonal effects of wind conditions on migration patterns of soaring American white pelican.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Gutierrez Illan

    Full Text Available Energy and time expenditures are determinants of bird migration strategies. Soaring birds have developed migration strategies to minimize these costs, optimizing the use of all the available resources to facilitate their displacement. We analysed the effects of different wind factors (tailwind, turbulence, vertical updrafts on the migratory flying strategies adopted by 24 satellite-tracked American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos throughout spring and autumn in North America. We hypothesize that different wind conditions encountered along migration routes between spring and autumn induce pelicans to adopt different flying strategies and use of these wind resources. Using quantile regression and fine-scale atmospheric data, we found that the pelicans optimized the use of available wind resources, flying faster and more direct routes in spring than in autumn. They actively selected tailwinds in both spring and autumn displacements but relied on available updrafts predominantly in their spring migration, when they needed to arrive at the breeding regions. These effects varied depending on the flying speed of the pelicans. We found significant directional correlations between the pelican migration flights and wind direction. In light of our results, we suggest plasticity of migratory flight strategies by pelicans is likely to enhance their ability to cope with the effects of ongoing climate change and the alteration of wind regimes. Here, we also demonstrate the usefulness and applicability of quantile regression techniques to investigate complex ecological processes such as variable effects of atmospheric conditions on soaring migration.

  9. Experimental modeling of the effect of hurricane wind forces on driving behavior and vehicle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose M; Codjoe, Julius; Osman, Osama; Ishak, Sherif; Wolshon, Brian

    2015-01-01

    While traffic planning is important for developing a hurricane evacuation plan, vehicle performance on the roads during extreme weather conditions is critical to the success of the planning process. This novel study investigates the effect of gusty hurricane wind forces on the driving behavior and vehicle performance. The study explores how the parameters of a driving simulator could be modified to reproduce wind loadings experienced by three vehicle types (passenger car, ambulance, and bus) during gusty hurricane winds, through manipulation of appropriate software. Thirty participants were then tested on the modified driving simulator under five wind conditions (ranging from normal to hurricane category 4). The driving performance measures used were heading error and lateral displacement. The results showed that higher wind forces resulted in more varied and greater heading error and lateral displacement. The ambulance had the greatest heading errors and lateral displacements, which were attributed to its large lateral surface area and light weight. Two mathematical models were developed to estimate the heading error and lateral displacements for each of the vehicle types for a given change in lateral wind force. Through a questionnaire, participants felt the different characteristics while driving each vehicle type. The findings of this study demonstrate the valuable use of a driving simulator to model the behavior of different vehicle types and to develop mathematical models to estimate and quantify driving behavior and vehicle performance under hurricane wind conditions.

  10. Harbour porpoises on Horns Reef - Effects of the Horns Reef wind farm. Annual status report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tougaard, J.; Carstensen, J.; Henriksen, Oluf. D.; Teilmann, J. [National Environmental Research Inst., Roskilde (Denmark); Rye Hansen, J. [DDH Consulting A/S, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2004-06-15

    Occurrence and distribution of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) in and around the off-shore wind farm on Horns Reef, Denmark, was investigated. This report describes data collected in 2003 as part of an ongoing monitoring program, covering a period before construction of the wind farm (baseline), the construction period in 2002 and one year following construction of the wind farm. Data from acoustic dataloggers (T-PODs) and visual surveys conducted from ships confirmed the presence of harbour porpoises inside the wind farm area during all periods investigated. Comparison with baseline data from 1999-2001 and with control areas outside the wind farm did not show a statistical significant change in sighting rates inside the wind farm area in the first year following construction relative to baseline. T-POD data showed a pronounced effect of the construction of the wind farm on the indicators 'encounter duration' (measure of how long porpoises remain close to the POD) and 'waiting time' (measure of time interval between porpoise encounters). Both parameters seem to indicate higher levels of porpoise activity during construction (encounter duration went up, waiting time went down) compared to baseline. A partial return to baseline levels was seen for these two indicators in 2003. (au)

  11. Effects of high modes on the wind-induced response of super high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruoqiang; Yan, Guirong; Ge, Jinming

    2012-09-01

    For super high-rise buildings, the vibration period of the basic mode is several seconds, and it is very close to the period of the fluctuating wind. The damping of super high-rise buildings is low, so super high-rise buildings are very sensitive to fluctuating wind. The wind load is one of the key loads in the design of super high-rise buildings. It is known that only the basic mode is needed in the wind-response analysis of tall buildings. However, for super high-rise buildings, especially for the acceleration response, because of the frequency amplification of the high modes, the high modes and the mode coupling may need to be considered. Three typical super high-rise projects with the SMPSS in wind tunnel tests and the random vibration theory method were used to analyze the effect of high modes on the wind-induced response. The conclusions can be drawn as follows. First, for the displacement response, the basic mode is dominant, and the high modes can be neglected. Second, for the acceleration response, the high modes and the mode coupling should be considered. Lastly, the strain energy of modes can only give the vibration energy distribution of the high-rise building, and it cannot describe the local wind-induced vibration of high-rise buildings, especially for the top acceleration response.

  12. R-Modafinil exerts weak effects on spatial memory acquisition and dentate gyrus synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharanidharan Shanmugasundaram

    Full Text Available Modafinil is a wake promoting drug approved for clinical use and also has cognitive enhancing properties. Its enantiomer R-Modafinil (R-MO is not well studied in regard to cognitive enhancing properties. Hence we studied its effect in a spatial memory paradigm and its possible effects on dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (DG-LTP. Clinically relevant doses of R-MO, vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO or saline were administered for three days during the hole-board test and in in vivo DG-LTP. Synaptic levels of dopamine receptors D1R, D2R, dopamine transporter (DAT, and its phosphorylated form (ph-DAT in DG tissue 4 h after LTP induction were quantified by western blot analysis. Monoamine reuptake and release assays were performed by using transfected HEK-293 cells. Possible neurotoxic side effects on general behaviour were also studied. R-MO at both doses significantly enhanced spatial reference memory during the last training session and during memory retrieval compared to DMSO vehicle but not when compared to saline treated rats. Similarly, R-MO rescues DG-LTP from impairing effects of DMSO. DMSO reduced memory performance and LTP magnitude when compared to saline treated groups. The synaptic DR1 levels in R-MO groups were significantly decreased compared to DMSO group but were comparable with saline treated animals. We found no effect of R-MO in neurotoxicity tests. Thus, our results support the notion that LTP-like synaptic plasticity processes could be one of the factors contributing to the cognitive enhancing effects of spatial memory traces. D1R may play an important regulatory role in these processes.

  13. Aerofoil profile modification effects for improved performance of a vertical axis wind turbine blade

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Md. Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Due to the growing need of sustainable energy technologies, wind energy is gaining more popularity day by day. For micro power generation vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is preferred due to its simplicity and easy to install characteristics. This study investigates the effects of profile-modification on a NACA0015 aerofoil used in VAWTs. The profile-modifications being investigated consist of a combination of inward semi-circular dimple and Gurney flap at the lower surface of the aerofoil. ...

  14. Do general relativistic effects limit experiments to test the universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle?

    CERN Document Server

    Nobili, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    The Universality of Free Fall and the Weak Equivalence Principle, which are at the basis of General Relativity, have been confirmed to 1 part in 10^13. Space experiments with macroscopic test masses of different composition orbiting the Earth inside a low altitude satellite aim at improving this precision by two orders of magnitude (with the Microscope satellite, launched on 25 April 2016) and up to four orders of magnitude (with the 'Galileo Galilei' - GG satellite). At such a high precision many tiny effects must be taken into account in order to be ruled out as the source of a spurious violation signal. In this work we investigate the general relativistic effects, including those which involve the rotation of both the source body and the test masses, and show that they are by far too small to be considered even in the most challenging experiment.

  15. Weak evidence of bright light effects on human LH and FSH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kripke Daniel F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most mammals are seasonal breeders whose gonads grow to anticipate reproduction in the spring and summer. As day length increases, secretion increases for two gonadotropins, luteinizing hormone (LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH. This response is largely controlled by light. Light effects on gonadotropins are mediated through effects on the suprachiasmatic nucleus and responses of the circadian system. There is some evidence that seasonal breeding in humans is regulated by similar mechanisms, and that light stimulates LH secretion, but primate responses seem complex. Methods To gain further information on effects of bright light on LH and FSH secretion in humans, we analyzed urine samples collected in three experiments conducted for other goals. First, volunteers ages 18-30 years and 60-75 commenced an ultra-short 90-min sleep-wake cycle, during which they were exposed to 3000 lux light for 3 hours at balanced times of day, repeated for 3 days. Urine samples were assayed to explore any LH phase response curve. Second, depressed participants 60-79 years of age were treated with bright light or dim placebo light for 28 days, with measurements of urinary LH and FSH before and after treatment. Third, women of ages 20-45 years with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD were treated to one 3-hour exposure of morning light, measuring LH and FSH in urine before and after the treatments. Results Two of the three studies showed significant increases in LH after light treatment, and FSH also tended to increase, but there were no significant contrasts with parallel placebo treatments and no significant time-of-day treatment effects. Conclusions These results gave some support for the hypothesis that bright light may augment LH secretion. Longer-duration studies may be needed to clarify the effects of light on human LH and FSH.

  16. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  17. Effects of offshore wind power on the pelagic fish; Effekter av havsbaserad vindkraft paa pelagisk fisk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axenrot, Thomas (SLU, Institutionen foer Akvatiska Resurser, Soetvattenlaboratoriet (Sweden)); Didrikas, Tomas (AquaBiota Water Research AB (Sweden); Stockholms universitet (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Marine wind parks are being planned for and built in coastal and shallow offshore areas in response to an increasing demand for renewable energy. Today's knowledge is limited about possible effects on fish from habitat change and generated underwater sound when wind parks are running. There may also be consequences for the fishery. Studies on fish hearing have shown that many fishes hear low frequency sound like that produced by wind turbines. This study consists of two parts. The first part of the study investigated pelagic fish abundance and spatial distribution at one wind park and two reference areas (200 m to 10 km distance from fundaments) at five different occasions from 2005 through 2007 in the Kalmar Sound of the Baltic Sea. The highest fish densities was found in the most remote reference area. The difference between areas was statistically significant for fish of the size groups 30-80 mm (stickleback), 80-140 mm (sprat, small herring) and 140-250 mm (adult herring). For fish >250 mm, representing cod and salmon, no statistically significant difference between areas was observed. For one group (sticklebacks) Area was significantly pointed out as the most important factor for the observed differences in fish density. No data on fish densities in the investigated areas were collected before the wind park (Utgrunden 1) was built which is a drawback to this part of the study. The second part of the study focused on possible effects of underwater sound generated by wind turbines on fish behaviour in the close vicinity of the fundaments (2-35 m distance). Stationary horizontal acoustics was used to estimate fish abundance and swimming speed in relation to turbine rotor speed and electricity production. The changes of abundance were not consistent and difficult to interpret. Fish swimming speed decreased with increasing turbine rotor speed and electricity production. However, it cannot be distinguished if this was an effect of sound emitted by wind turbines

  18. Security and Stability Analysis of Wind Farms Integration into Distribution Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan-yang, Li; Hongzhao, Wang; Guanglei, Li; Yamei, Cheng; Hong-zheng, Liu; Yi, Sun

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing share of the wind power in the power system, wind power fluctuations will cause obvious negative impacts on weak local grid. This paper firstly establish electromechanical transient simulation model for doubly fed induction wind turbine, then use Matlab/Simulink to achieve power flow calculation and transient simulation of power system including wind farms, the local synchronous generator, load, etc, finally analyze wind power on the impact of the local power grid under typical circumstances. The actual calculated results indicate that wind mutation causes little effect on the power grid, but when the three-phase short circuit fault happens, active power of wind power decreases sharply and the voltage of location of wind power into the grid also drop sharply, finally wind farm split from power system. This situation is not conducive to security and stability of the local power grid. It is necessary to develop security and stability measures in the future.

  19. Effects of an Offshore Wind Farm (OWF) on the Common Shore Crab Carcinus maenas: Tagging Pilot Experiments in the Lillgrund Offshore Wind Farm (Sweden).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhamer, Olivia; Holand, Håkon; Rosenqvist, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide growth of offshore renewable energy production will provide marine organisms with new hard substrate for colonization in terms of artificial reefs. The artificial reef effect is important when planning offshore installations since it can create habitat enhancement. Wind power is the most advanced technology within offshore renewable energy sources and there is an urgent need to study its impacts on the marine environment. To test the hypothesis that offshore wind power increases the abundance of reef species relative to a reference area, we conduct an experiment on the model species common shore crab (Carcinus maenas).Overall, 3962 crabs were captured, observed, marked and released in 2011 and 1995 crabs in 2012. Additionally, carapace size, sex distribution, color morphs and body condition was recorded from captured crabs. We observed very low recapture rates at all sites during both years which made evaluating differences in population sizes very difficult. However, we were able to estimate population densities from the capture record for all three sites. There was no obvious artificial reef effect in the Lillgrund wind farm, but a spill-over effect to nearby habitats cannot be excluded. We could not find any effect of the wind farm on either, morphs, sex distribution or condition of the common shore crab. Our study found no evidence that Lillgrund wind farm has a negative effect on populations of the common shore crab. This study provides the first quantitative and experimental data on the common shore crab in relation to offshore wind farms.

  20. Effects of an Offshore Wind Farm (OWF on the Common Shore Crab Carcinus maenas: Tagging Pilot Experiments in the Lillgrund Offshore Wind Farm (Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Langhamer

    Full Text Available Worldwide growth of offshore renewable energy production will provide marine organisms with new hard substrate for colonization in terms of artificial reefs. The artificial reef effect is important when planning offshore installations since it can create habitat enhancement. Wind power is the most advanced technology within offshore renewable energy sources and there is an urgent need to study its impacts on the marine environment. To test the hypothesis that offshore wind power increases the abundance of reef species relative to a reference area, we conduct an experiment on the model species common shore crab (Carcinus maenas.Overall, 3962 crabs were captured, observed, marked and released in 2011 and 1995 crabs in 2012. Additionally, carapace size, sex distribution, color morphs and body condition was recorded from captured crabs. We observed very low recapture rates at all sites during both years which made evaluating differences in population sizes very difficult. However, we were able to estimate population densities from the capture record for all three sites. There was no obvious artificial reef effect in the Lillgrund wind farm, but a spill-over effect to nearby habitats cannot be excluded. We could not find any effect of the wind farm on either, morphs, sex distribution or condition of the common shore crab. Our study found no evidence that Lillgrund wind farm has a negative effect on populations of the common shore crab. This study provides the first quantitative and experimental data on the common shore crab in relation to offshore wind farms.

  1. Effects of an Offshore Wind Farm (OWF) on the Common Shore Crab Carcinus maenas: Tagging Pilot Experiments in the Lillgrund Offshore Wind Farm (Sweden)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhamer, Olivia; Holand, Håkon; Rosenqvist, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide growth of offshore renewable energy production will provide marine organisms with new hard substrate for colonization in terms of artificial reefs. The artificial reef effect is important when planning offshore installations since it can create habitat enhancement. Wind power is the most advanced technology within offshore renewable energy sources and there is an urgent need to study its impacts on the marine environment. To test the hypothesis that offshore wind power increases the abundance of reef species relative to a reference area, we conduct an experiment on the model species common shore crab (Carcinus maenas).Overall, 3962 crabs were captured, observed, marked and released in 2011 and 1995 crabs in 2012. Additionally, carapace size, sex distribution, color morphs and body condition was recorded from captured crabs. We observed very low recapture rates at all sites during both years which made evaluating differences in population sizes very difficult. However, we were able to estimate population densities from the capture record for all three sites. There was no obvious artificial reef effect in the Lillgrund wind farm, but a spill-over effect to nearby habitats cannot be excluded. We could not find any effect of the wind farm on either, morphs, sex distribution or condition of the common shore crab. Our study found no evidence that Lillgrund wind farm has a negative effect on populations of the common shore crab. This study provides the first quantitative and experimental data on the common shore crab in relation to offshore wind farms. PMID:27780212

  2. Modelling of Anti-Tumour Immune Response: Immunocorrective Effect of Weak Centimetre Electromagnetic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Isaeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We formulate the dynamical model for the anti-tumour immune response based on intercellular cytokine-mediated interactions with the interleukin-2 (IL-2 taken into account. The analysis shows that the expression level of tumour antigens on antigen presenting cells has a distinct influence on the tumour dynamics. At low antigen presentation, a progressive tumour growth takes place to the highest possible value. At high antigen presentation, there is a decrease in tumour size to some value when the dynamical equilibrium between the tumour and the immune system is reached. In the case of the medium antigen presentation, both these regimes can be realized depending on the initial tumour size and the condition of the immune system. A pronounced immunomodulating effect (the suppression of tumour growth and the normalization of IL-2 concentration is established by considering the influence of low-intensity electromagnetic microwaves as a parametric perturbation of the dynamical system. This finding is in qualitative agreement with the recent experimental results on immunocorrective effects of centimetre electromagnetic waves in tumour-bearing mice.

  3. Effects of weak mobile phone - electromagnetic fields (GSM, UMTS) on well-being and resting EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinlogel, H; Dierks, T; Koenig, T; Lehmann, H; Minder, A; Berz, R

    2008-09-01

    Modern mobile phones emit electromagnetic fields (EMFs) ranging from 900 to 2000 MHz which are suggested to have an influence on well-being, attention and neurological parameters in mobile phone users. To date most studies have investigated Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)-EMF and only very few studies were concerned with Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS)-EMF. Consequently, we tested the effects of both types of EMF, 1950 MHz UMTS (SAR 0.1 and 1 W/kg) and pulsed 900 MHz GSM (1 W/kg), on well-being and vigilance-controlled resting electroencephalogram (eyes closed) in 15 healthy, right-handed subjects. A double-blind, randomised, crossover application of the test procedure was used. Neither the UMTS- nor the GSM-EMF produced any significant changes in the measured parameters compared to sham exposure. The results do not give any evidence for a deleterious effect of the EMF on normal healthy mobile phone users. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Effects of weak mobile phone - electromagnetic fields (GSM, UMTS) on event related potentials and cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinlogel, H; Dierks, T; Koenig, T; Lehmann, H; Minder, A; Berz, R

    2008-09-01

    Modern mobile phones emit electromagnetic fields (EMF) ranging from 900 to 2000 MHz which are suggested to have an influence on well-being, attention and neurological parameters in mobile phone users. Until now most studies have investigated Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)-EMF and only very few studies have focused on Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS)-EMF. Therefore, we tested the effects of both types of unilaterally presented EMF, 1950 UMTS (0.1 and 1 W/kg) and pulsed 900 MHz GSM (1 W/kg), on visually evoked occipital P100, the P300 of a continuous performance test, auditory evoked central N100 and the P300 during an oddball task as well as on the respective behavioral parameters, reaction time and false reactions, in 15 healthy, right handed subjects. A double-blind, randomized, crossover application of the test procedure was used. Neither the UMTS- nor the GSM-EMF produced any significant changes in the measured parameters compared to sham exposure. The results do not give any evidence for a deleterious effect of the EMF on normal healthy mobile phone users. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Effects of interruptible load program on equilibrium outcomes of electricity markets with wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Xuena; Zhang, Shaohua; Li, Xue [Shanghai Univ. (China). Key Lab. of Power Station Automation Technology

    2013-07-01

    High wind power penetration presents a lot of challenges to the flexibility and reliability of power system operation. In this environment, various demand response (DR) programs have got much attention. As an effective measure of demand response programs, interruptible load (IL) programs have been widely used in electricity markets. This paper addresses the problem of impacts of the IL programs on the equilibrium outcomes of electricity wholesale markets with wind power. A Cournot equilibrium model of wholesale markets with wind power is presented, in which IL programs is included by a market demand model. The introduction of the IL programs leads to a non-smooth equilibrium problem. To solve this equilibrium problem, a novel solution method is proposed. Numerical examples show that IL programs can lower market price and its volatility significantly, facilitate the integration of wind power.

  6. Numerical modelling of wind effects on breaking waves in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua

    2017-10-01

    Wind effects on periodic breaking waves in the surf zone have been investigated in this study using a two-phase flow model. The model solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k - 𝜖 turbulence model simultaneously for the flows both in the air and water. Both spilling and plunging breakers over a 1:35 sloping beach have been studied under the influence of wind, with a focus during wave breaking. Detailed information of the distribution of wave amplitudes and mean water level, wave-height-to-water-depth ratio, the water surface profiles, velocity, vorticity, and turbulence fields have been presented and discussed. The inclusion of wind alters the air flow structure above water waves, increases the generation of vorticity, and affects the wave shoaling, breaking, overturning, and splash-up processes. Wind increases the water particle velocities and causes water waves to break earlier and seaward, which agrees with the previous experiment.

  7. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, Cameron [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Capps, Scott [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  8. EFFECT OF THE FLOW FIELD DEFORMATION IN THE WIND TUNNEL ON THE AERODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Maturkanič

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow field quality has a principal signification at wind tunnel measurement. The creation of the flow field of air by fan leads to the rotation of entire flow field which is, moreover, deformed at the bends of the wind tunnel with close circulation. Despite the wind tunnels are equipped with the devices which eliminate these non-uniformities, in the most of cases, the air flow field has not ideal parameters in the test section. For the evaluation of the measured results of the model in the wind tunnel, the character of flow field deformation is necessary. The following text describes the possible general forms of the flow field nonuniformity and their effect on the aerodynamic coefficients calculation.

  9. Effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a Savonius wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Mao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Savonius wind turbine is a common vertical axis wind turbine which simply comprises two or three arc-type blades and can generate power under poor wind conditions. With the aim of increasing the turbine’s power efficiency, the effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a typical two-bladed Savonius wind turbine is investigated with a transient computational fluid dynamics method. Simulations were based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes equations, and the renormalization group k − ε turbulent model was utilized. The numerical method was validated with existing experimental data. The results indicate that the turbine with a blade arc angle of 160 ∘ generates the maximum power coefficient, 0.2836, which is 8.37% higher than that from a conventional Savonius turbine.

  10. Temperature effects on the magnetoplasmon spectrum of a weakly modulated graphene monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, M [Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, Sargodha (Pakistan); Sabeeh, K [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); MacKinnon, A, E-mail: m.tahir@uos.edu.pk, E-mail: ksabeeh@qau.edu.pk, E-mail: kashifsabeeh@hotmail.com, E-mail: a.mackinnon@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-26

    In this work, we determine the effects of temperature on the magnetoplasmon spectrum of an electrically modulated graphene monolayer as well as a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The intra-Landau band magnetoplasmon spectrum within the self-consistent field approach is investigated for both the aforementioned systems. Results obtained not only exhibit Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations but also commensurability oscillations (Weiss oscillations). These oscillations are periodic as a function of inverse magnetic field. We find that both the magnetic oscillations, SdH and Weiss, have a greater amplitude and are more robust against temperature in graphene compared to a conventional 2DEG. Furthermore, there is a {pi} phase shift between the magnetoplasmon oscillations in the two systems which can be attributed to Dirac electrons in graphene acquiring a Berry's phase as they traverse a closed path in a magnetic field. (paper)

  11. 2p2h effects on the weak pion production cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano, A.; Barbero, C. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina. Instituto de Física La Plata, CONICET (Argentina)

    2015-05-15

    The ν{sub l}n → l{sup −}p QE reaction on the A-target is used as a signal event or/and to reconstruct the neutrino energy, using two-body kinematics. Competition of another processes could lead to misidentification of the arriving neutrinos, being important the fake events coming from the CC1π background. A precise knowledge of cross sections is a prerequisite in order to make simulations in event generators to substract the fake ones from the QE countings, and in this contribution we analyze the different nuclear effects on the CC1π channel. Our calculations also can be extended for the NC case.

  12. Individual common variants exert weak effects on the risk for autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Baird, Gillian; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Casey, Jillian; Conroy, Judith; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Green, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Jacob, Suma; Kenny, Graham P.; Kim, Cecilia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Law-Smith, Miriam; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lombard, Frances; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Mantoulan, Carine; McDougle, Christopher J.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Noakes, Carolyn; Nygren, Gudrun; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Posey, David J.; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Regan, Regina; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Schlitt, Sabine; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Sykes, Nuala; Tancredi, Raffaella; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, JAS; Wallace, Simon; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bailey, Anthony J.; Battaglia, Agatino; Cantor, Rita M.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Dawson, Geraldine; Ennis, Sean; Freitag, Christine M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Klauck, Sabine M.; McMahon, William M.; Maestrini, Elena; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar; Parr, Jeremy R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Piven, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vicente, Astrid M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; Hallmayer, Joachim; Paterson, Andrew D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-01-01

    While it is apparent that rare variation can play an important role in the genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the contribution of common variation to the risk of developing ASD is less clear. To produce a more comprehensive picture, we report Stage 2 of the Autism Genome Project genome-wide association study, adding 1301 ASD families and bringing the total to 2705 families analysed (Stages 1 and 2). In addition to evaluating the association of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we also sought evidence that common variants, en masse, might affect the risk. Despite genotyping over a million SNPs covering the genome, no single SNP shows significant association with ASD or selected phenotypes at a genome-wide level. The SNP that achieves the smallest P-value from secondary analyses is rs1718101. It falls in CNTNAP2, a gene previously implicated in susceptibility for ASD. This SNP also shows modest association with age of word/phrase acquisition in ASD subjects, of interest because features of language development are also associated with other variation in CNTNAP2. In contrast, allele scores derived from the transmission of common alleles to Stage 1 cases significantly predict case status in the independent Stage 2 sample. Despite being significant, the variance explained by these allele scores was small (Vm< 1%). Based on results from individual SNPs and their en masse effect on risk, as inferred from the allele score results, it is reasonable to conclude that common variants affect the risk for ASD but their individual effects are modest. PMID:22843504

  13. Analysis of Oscillations in a Cableway: Wind Load Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gustincic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop and investigate a non-linear model for analysing the reaction of a self-detachable cabin monocable ropeway exposed to a sudden deceleration and wind forces. The First and Second Newton's Law and Differential Equations are the basic tools for building the model. Furthermore a few basic considerations have been made about the air “dragging and lifting" forces that induce oscillations and vibrations in mechanical systems alike. All the numerical data used for the simulation was taken from a ropeway in the skiing site of Ravascletto-Zoncolan in the North- East of Italy.

  14. Biological Effects of Weak Electromagnetic Field on Healthy and Infected Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Trees with Phytoplasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Abdollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF has become an issue of concern for a great many people and is an active area of research. Phytoplasmas, also known as mycoplasma-like organisms, are wall-less prokaryotes that are pathogens of many plant species throughout the world. Effects of electromagnetic fields on the changes of lipid peroxidation, content of H2O2, proline, protein, and carbohydrates were investigated in leaves of two-year-old trees of lime (Citrus aurantifolia infected by the Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifoliae. The healthy and infected plants were discontinuously exposed to a 10 KHz quadratic EMF with maximum power of 9 W for 5 days, each 5 h, at 25°C. Fresh and dry weight of leaves, content of MDA, proline, and protein increased in both healthy and infected plants under electromagnetic fields, compared with those of the control plants. Electromagnetic fields decreased hydrogen peroxide and carbohydrates content in both healthy and infected plants compared to those of the controls.

  15. Biological effects of weak electromagnetic field on healthy and infected lime (Citrus aurantifolia) trees with phytoplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Fatemeh; Niknam, Vahid; Ghanati, Faezeh; Masroor, Faribors; Noorbakhsh, Seyyed Nasr

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) has become an issue of concern for a great many people and is an active area of research. Phytoplasmas, also known as mycoplasma-like organisms, are wall-less prokaryotes that are pathogens of many plant species throughout the world. Effects of electromagnetic fields on the changes of lipid peroxidation, content of H(2)O(2), proline, protein, and carbohydrates were investigated in leaves of two-year-old trees of lime (Citrus aurantifolia) infected by the Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifoliae. The healthy and infected plants were discontinuously exposed to a 10 KHz quadratic EMF with maximum power of 9 W for 5 days, each 5 h, at 25 °C. Fresh and dry weight of leaves, content of MDA, proline, and protein increased in both healthy and infected plants under electromagnetic fields, compared with those of the control plants. Electromagnetic fields decreased hydrogen peroxide and carbohydrates content in both healthy and infected plants compared to those of the controls.

  16. Noise-induced effects on multicellular biopacemaker spontaneous activity: Differences between weak and strong pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghighi, Alireza; Comtois, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Self-organization of spontaneous activity of a network of active elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for pacemaking activity to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, consisting of resting and pacemaker cells, exhibit spontaneous activation of their electrical activity. Similarly, one proposed approach to the development of biopacemakers as an alternative to electronic pacemakers for cardiac therapy is based on heterogeneous cardiac cells with resting and spontaneously beating phenotypes. However, the combined effect of pacemaker characteristics, density, and spatial distribution of the pacemaker cells on spontaneous activity is unknown. Using a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm, we previously showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of pacemaker cells. In this study, we show that this behavior is dependent on the pacemaker cell characteristics, with weaker pacemaker cells requiring higher density and larger clusters to sustain multicellular activity. These multicellular structures also demonstrated an increased sensitivity to voltage noise that favored spontaneous activity at lower density while increasing temporal variation in the period of activity. This information will help researchers overcome the current limitations of biopacemakers.

  17. Rheological Characteristics of Weak Rock Mass and Effects on the Long-Term Stability of Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianhong; Xu, Tao; Liu, Hongyuan; Zhang, Chunming; Wang, Shanyong; Rui, Yongqin; Shen, Li

    2014-11-01

    The creep deformation behavior of the northern slope of an open-pit mine is introduced. Direct shear creep tests are then conducted for the samples taken from the northern slope to study the rheological characteristics of the rock mass. The experimental results are analyzed afterwards using an empirical method to develop a rheological model for the rock mass. The proposed rheological model is finally applied to understand the creep behavior of the northern slope, predict the long-term stability, and guide appropriate measures to be taken at suitable times to increase the factor of safety to ensure stability. Through this study, a failure criterion is proposed to predict the long-term stability of the slope based on the rheological characteristics of the rock mass and a critical deformation rate is adopted to determine when appropriate measures should be taken to ensure slope stability. The method has been successfully applied for stability analysis and engineering management of the toppling and slippage of the northern slope of the open-pit mine. This success in application indicates that it is theoretically accurate, practically feasible, and highly cost-effective.

  18. Analysis of large effective electric fields of weakly polar molecules for electron electric dipole moment searches

    CERN Document Server

    Sunaga, A; Hada, M; Das, B P

    2016-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of an electron (eEDM) is one of the sensitive probes of physics beyond the standard model. The possible existence of the eEDM gives rise to an experimentally observed energy shift, which is proportional to the effective electric field (Eeff) of a target molecule. Hence, an analysis of the quantities that enhance Eeff is necessary to identify suitable molecules for eEDM searches. In the context of such searches, it is generally believed that a molecule with larger electric polarization also has a larger value of Eeff. However, our Dirac-Fock and relativistic coupled-cluster singles and doubles calculations show that the hydrides of Yb and Hg have larger Eeff than those of fluorides, even though their polarizations are smaller. This is due to significant mixing of valence s and p orbitals of the heavy atom in the molecules. This mixing has been attributed to the energy differences of the valence atomic orbitals and the overlap of the two atomic orbitals based on the orbital interactio...

  19. Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

    2012-02-28

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when

  20. Effects of Weak Surface Modification on Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Wensheng; Shen, Hehong; Jin, Yangfu; Yang, Xiazhen

    2015-01-01

    A weak surface modification is applied to Co/SiO2 catalyst by hydrothermal treatment at 180°C for 5 h. Aluminum is introduced to Co/SiO2 catalysts during the surface modification. The effects of surface modification on Co/SiO2 catalyst are studied by changing the operating sequences of surface modification and cobalt impregnation in the catalyst preparation. Surface modification before cobalt impregnation makes Co3O4 particle small and dispersed into the deep part of enlarged pore in SiO2, while surface modification after cobalt impregnation does not obviously change the particle size of Co3O4. The improved amplitude of catalytic activity is similar for the two kinds of catalysts, but they are benefited from different factors. The content of iso-hydrocarbons in the products is increased by the surface modifications.

  1. Effects of Weak Surface Modification on Co/SiO2 Catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch Reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Ning

    Full Text Available A weak surface modification is applied to Co/SiO2 catalyst by hydrothermal treatment at 180°C for 5 h. Aluminum is introduced to Co/SiO2 catalysts during the surface modification. The effects of surface modification on Co/SiO2 catalyst are studied by changing the operating sequences of surface modification and cobalt impregnation in the catalyst preparation. Surface modification before cobalt impregnation makes Co3O4 particle small and dispersed into the deep part of enlarged pore in SiO2, while surface modification after cobalt impregnation does not obviously change the particle size of Co3O4. The improved amplitude of catalytic activity is similar for the two kinds of catalysts, but they are benefited from different factors. The content of iso-hydrocarbons in the products is increased by the surface modifications.

  2. [Mechanism of the biological impact of weak electromagnetic fields and in vitro effects of degassing of blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatalov, V M

    2012-01-01

    The physical validity of the mechanism proposed by the author is discussed. According to the theory a prolonged exposure to weak electromagnetic fields leads to an enlargement of the micro-bubbles and degassing of bioliquid. Degassing alters the physical and chemical properties of bioliquid that affect some medical and biological indicators. The following changes in some blood parameters during degassing in vitro were analyzed: a decrease in the glucose concentration, an abnormal activation of blood clotting, an increase in the rate of blood cell aggregation, a decrease in the effectiveness of aspirin as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and the slowing of indirect anticoagulants. All of this evidences a possible correlation between the increasing electromagnetic pollution and the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  3. Effect of extremely weak pulsed magnetic field type Bemer 3000 on ratings of perceived exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Gazurek

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether is an influence of the exposition on different inductions of magnetic fields on rating of perceived exertion during 10 min long standardised physical cycloergometer exercise. The investigation was performed in 40 healthy, non-smoking, fit men, mean age 202. The participants were randomly attributed to 4 groups, each including 10 subjects. The first one (group E18 consisted of subjects exposed to the magnetic field with the intensity of 18 μT, the second one (group E64 exposed to the magnetic field with the intensity of 64 μT. Two control groups were formed to accompany these exposed to the magnetic field. In these placebo groups (S-T subjects were not exposed to the magnetic field (so called false therapy, „sham treatment”. The study consisted of 4 steps: pilot study, the first endurance test, exposure to the magnetic field, the second endurance test. The aim of the pilot study was to define subjective feelings of the participant during the effort, his reaction to the effort and also practical familiarization with the character and rules of the endurance test and Borg scale interpretation during 10 min of endurance cycloergometer test. The first endurance test was performed two days after the pilot study with the same rules and its goal was to measure the level of tiredness according to the Borg scale during 10 min long standardised physical effort. The second endurance test was performed according to the same rules as the first one and its goal was to analyse the effect of 20 exposures to the magnetic field with the intensity of 18 and 64 μT repeated daily on the perception of tiredness increase as expressed in the Borg scale when performing 10 min long standardised physical effort. In subjects exposed to 18 μT magnetic field neither changes in the perception of fatigue nor changes in the heart rate at particular levels of the Borg scale have been observed. When compared with both control

  4. Lunar precursor effects in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Plaschke, F.; Roux, A.; Ergun, R. E.

    2012-05-01

    The two ARTEMIS probes observe significant precursor activity upstream from the Moon, when magnetically connected to the dayside lunar surface. The most common signature consists of high levels of whistler wave activity near half of the electron cyclotron frequency. This precursor activity extends to distances of many thousands of km, in both the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere. In the magnetosphere, electrons reflect from a combination of magnetic and electrostatic fields above the lunar surface, forming loss cone distributions. In the solar wind they generally form conics, as a result of reflection from an obstacle moving with respect to the plasma frame (just as at a shock). The anisotropy associated with these reflected electrons provides the free energy source for the whistlers, with cyclotron resonance conditions met between the reflected source population and Moonward-propagating waves. These waves can in turn affect incoming plasma, and we observe significant perpendicular electron heating and plasma density depletions in some cases. In the magnetosphere, we also observe broadband electrostatic modes driven by beams of secondary electrons and/or photoelectrons accelerated outward from the surface. We also occasionally see waves near the ion cyclotron frequency in the magnetosphere. These lower frequency waves, which may result from the presence of ions of lunar origin, modulate the whistlers described above, as well as the electrons. Taken together, our observations suggest that the presence of the Moon leads to the formation of an upstream region analogous in many ways to the terrestrial electron foreshock.

  5. Evaluation of Dynamical Downscaling Resolution Effect on Wind Energy Forecast Value for a Wind Farm in Central Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosgaard, Martin Haubjerg; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Nielsen, Torben Skov

    For any energy system relying on wind power, accurate forecasts of wind fluctuations are essential for efficient utilisation in the power grid. Statistical wind power prediction tools [1] use numerical weather prediction (NWP) model data along with measurements and can correct magnitude errors...... the two time series. Results on limited-area NWP model performance, with focus on the 12th to 48th forecast hour horizon relevant for Elspot auction bidding on the Nord Pool Spot market [2], are presented....

  6. An Experimental Study on the Effects of Base Motion on the Aeromechanic Performance of Floating Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Morteza; Sarkar, Partha; Hu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of the wave-induced base motions experienced by floating wind turbines sited in offshore wind farms on their aeromechanic performance and wake characteristics, in comparison with those of a bottom- fixed wind turbine. The experimental study was performed in a large-scale atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel with a scaled wind turbine model placed in a turbulent boundary layer flow with similar mean and turbulence characteristics as those over a typical offshore wind farm. During the experiments, a scaled wind turbine model was mounted on a translational and rotational stage, which can generate translation and/or rotation motions to simulate the dynamic wave-induced motions (i.e., surge, pitch and heave motions) experienced by floating wind turbines in offshore wind farms. In addition to measuring dynamic wind loadings (both forces and moments)acting on the model turbine, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocity (PIV) system was also used to conduct detailed flow field measurements to characterize the turbine wakes with the turbine base in motion. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the dynamic wind load data to elucidate underlying physics for higher total power yield and better durability of floating offshore wind turbines.

  7. Evaluation of Dynamical Downscaling Resolution Effect on Wind Energy Forecast Value for a Wind Farm in Central Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosgaard, Martin Haubjerg; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Nielsen, Torben Skov

    2014-01-01

    energy. The present study aims to quantify value added to wind energy forecasts in the 12-48 hour leadtime by downscaling global numerical weather prediction (NWP) data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System (GFS) using the limited-area NWP model described......For any energy system relying on wind power, accurate forecasts of wind fluctuations are essential for efficient integration into the power grid. Increased forecast precision allows end-users to plan day-ahead operation with reduced risk of penalties which in turn supports the feasibility of wind...

  8. Effects of gain-scheduling methods in a classical wind turbine controller on wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaldi, Carlo; Henriksen, Lars Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    The eects of dierent gain-scheduling methods for a classical wind turbine controller, operating in full load region, on the wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads are investigated in this work. The dierent techniques are derived looking at the physical problem to take into account...... the changes in the aerodynamic characteristics as a function of the wind speed. The modal analysis is performed with a high-order linear aeroservoelastic model computed with the frequency based stability tool HAWCStab2. The time series of the wind turbines loads are computed with the non-linear time domain...

  9. Some techniques for reducing the tower shadow of the DOE/NASA mod-0 wind turbine tower. [wind tunnel tests to measure effects of tower structure on wind velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, R. R.; Savino, J. M.; Wagner, L. H.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Wind speed profile measurements to measure the effect of a wind turbine tower on the wind velocity are presented. Measurements were made in the wake of scale models of the tower and in the wake of certain full scale components to determine the magnitude of the speed reduction (tower shadow). Shadow abatement techniques tested on the towers included the removal of diagonals, replacement of diagonals and horizontals with round cross section members, installation of elliptical shapes on horizontal members, installation of airfoils on vertical members, and application of surface roughness to vertical members.

  10. Gust Wind Effects on Stability and Ride Quality of Actively Controlled Maglev Guideway Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ju Min

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a framework to analyze the interaction between an actively controlled magnetic levitation vehicle and a guideway structure under gusty wind. The equation of motion is presented for a 30-dof maglev vehicle model consisting of one cabin and four bogies. In addition, a lateral electromagnetic suspension (EMS system is introduced to improve the running safety and ride quality of the maglev vehicle subjected to turbulent crosswind. By using the developed simulation tools, the effects of various parameters on the dynamic response of the vehicle and guideway are investigated in the case of the UTM maglev vehicle running on a simply supported guideway and cable-stayed guideway. The simulation results show that the independent lateral EMS and associated control scheme are definitely helpful in improving the running safety and ride quality of the vehicle under gusty wind. In the case of the cable-stayed guideway, at low wind speed, vehicle speed is the dominant factor influencing the dynamic responses of the maglev vehicle and the guideway, but at wind speed over 10 m/s, wind becomes the dominant factor. For the ride quality of the maglev vehicle, wind is also the most influential factor.

  11. Effects of wave induced motion on power generation of offshore floating wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoele, Kourosh

    2014-11-01

    Wind power has been the world's fastest growing energy source for more than a decade. There is a continuous effort to study the potentials of offshore floating wind farms in producing electricity. One of the major technical challenges in studying the performance of offshore floating wind farms is the hydrodynamic and aerodynamic interactions between individual turbines. In this study, a novel approach is presented to study the hydrodynamic interaction between group of floating wind turbines and determine how wave induced motion of the platforms modifies the power generation of the farm. In particular, exact analytical models are presented to solve the hydrodynamic diffraction and radiation problem of a group of floating wind turbine platforms, to model the aerodynamic interaction between turbines, and to quantify the nonlinear dynamic of the mooring lines used to stabilize the floating platforms through connecting them to the seabed. The overall performance of the farm with different configuration and at different wind and wave conditions are investigated and the effects of the sea state condition as well as the distance between the turbines in the farm on the low frequency temporal variation of the power output are discussed.

  12. Effects of Second-Order Hydrodynamic Forces on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A. J. N. A.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-04-01

    Relative to first-order, second-order wave-excitation loads are known to cause significant motions and additional loads in offshore oil and gas platforms. The design of floating offshore wind turbines was partially inherited from the offshore oil and gas industry. Floating offshore wind concepts have been studied with powerful aero-hydro-servo-elastic tools; however, most of the existing work on floating offshore wind turbines has neglected the contribution of second-order wave-excitation loads. As a result, this paper presents a computationally efficient methodology to consider these loads within FAST, a wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The method implemented was verified against the commercial OrcaFlex tool, with good agreement, and low computational time. A reference floating offshore wind turbine was studied under several wind and wave load conditions, including the effects of second-order slow-drift and sum-frequency loads. Preliminary results revealed that these loads excite the turbine's natural frequencies, namely the surge and pitch natural frequencies.

  13. Probabilistic Approach to Optimizing Active and Reactive Power Flow in Wind Farms Considering Wake Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Cheol Kang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel probabilistic optimization algorithm for simultaneous active and reactive power dispatch in power systems with significant wind power integration. Two types of load and wind-speed uncertainties have been assumed that follow normal and Weibull distributions, respectively. A PV bus model for wind turbines and the wake effect for correlated wind speed are used to achieve accurate AC power flow analysis. The power dispatch algorithm for a wind-power integrated system is modeled as a probabilistic optimal power flow (P-OPF problem, which is operated through fixed power factor control to supply reactive power. The proposed P-OPF framework also considers emission information, which clearly reflects the impact of the energy source on the environment. The P-OPF was tested on a modified IEEE 118-bus system with two wind farms. The results show that the proposed technique provides better system operation performance evaluation, which is helpful in making decisions about power system optimal dispatch under conditions of uncertainty.

  14. The effects of wind and rainfall on suspended sediment concentration related to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XinFeng; Tang, DanLing; Li, ZiZhen; Zhang, FengPan

    2009-09-01

    The effects of rainfall and wind speed on the dynamics of suspended sediment concentration (SSC), during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, were analyzed using spatial statistical models. The results showed a positive effect of wind speed on SSC, and inconsistent effects (positive and negative) of rainfall on SSC. The effects of wind speed and rainfall on SSC weakened immediately around the tsunami, indicating tsunami-caused floods and earthquake-induced shaking may have suddenly disturbed the ocean-atmosphere interaction processes, and thus weakened the effects of wind speed and rainfall on SSC. Wind speed and rainfall increased markedly, and reached their maximum values immediately after the tsunami week. Rainfall at this particular week exceeded twice the average for the same period over the previous 4years. The tsunami-affected air-sea interactions may have increased both wind speed and rainfall immediately after the tsunami week, which directly lead to the variations in SSC.

  15. Characterisation of weak magnetic field effects in an aqueous glutamic acid solution by nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy and voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazur, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate altered metabolism and enzyme kinetics for various organisms, as well as changes of neuronal functions and behaviour of higher animals, when they were exposed to specific combinations of weak static and alternating low frequency electromagnetic fields. Field strengths and frequencies, as well as properties of involved ions were related by a linear equation, known as the formula of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, abbreviation mentioned first by Liboff). Under certain conditions already a aqueous solution of the amino acid and neurotransmitter glutamate shows this effect. Methods An aqueous solution of glutamate was exposed to a combination of a static magnetic field of 40 μT and a sinusoidal electromagnetic magnetic field (EMF) with variable frequency (2–7 Hz) and an amplitude of 50 nT. The electric conductivity and dielectric properties of the solution were investigated by voltammetric techniques in combination with non linear dielectric spectroscopy (NLDS), which allow the examination of the dielectric properties of macromolecules and molecular aggregates in water. The experiments target to elucidate the biological relevance of the observed EMF effect on molecular level. Results An ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) effect of glutamate previously reported by the Fesenko laboratory 1998 could be confirmed. Frequency resolution of the sample currents was possible by NLDS techniques. The spectrum peaks when the conditions for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) of glutamate are matched. Furthermore, the NLDS spectra are different under ICR- and non-ICR conditions: NLDS measurements with rising control voltages from 100–1100 mV show different courses of the intensities of the low order harmonics, which could possibly indicate "intensity windows". Furthermore, the observed magnetic field effects are pH dependent with a narrow optimum around pH 2.85. Conclusions Data will be discussed in the context with recent published models for the

  16. CALCLENS: weak lensing simulations for large-area sky surveys and second-order effects in cosmic shear power spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthew R.

    2013-10-01

    I present a new algorithm, Curved-sky grAvitational Lensing for Cosmological Light conE simulatioNS (CALCLENS), for efficiently computing weak gravitational lensing shear signals from large N-body light cone simulations over a curved sky. This new algorithm properly accounts for the sky curvature and boundary conditions, is able to produce redshift-dependent shear signals including corrections to the Born approximation by using multiple-plane ray tracing and properly computes the lensed images of source galaxies in the light cone. The key feature of this algorithm is a new, computationally efficient Poisson solver for the sphere that combines spherical harmonic transform and multigrid methods. As a result, large areas of sky (˜10 000 square degrees) can be ray traced efficiently at high resolution using only a few hundred cores. Using this new algorithm and curved-sky calculations that only use a slower but more accurate spherical harmonic transform Poisson solver, I study the convergence, shear E-mode, shear B-mode and rotation mode power spectra. Employing full-sky E/B-mode decompositions, I confirm that the numerically computed shear B-mode and rotation mode power spectra are equal at high accuracy (≲1 per cent) as expected from perturbation theory up to second order. Coupled with realistic galaxy populations placed in large N-body light cone simulations, this new algorithm is ideally suited for the construction of synthetic weak lensing shear catalogues to be used to test for systematic effects in data analysis procedures for upcoming large-area sky surveys. The implementation presented in this work, written in C and employing widely available software libraries to maintain portability, is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/calclens.

  17. The effect of yaw on horizontal axis wind turbine loading and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Corrigan, R. D.; Miller, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Mod-0 100 kW experimental wind turbine was tested to determine the effects of yaw on rotor power, blade loads and teeter response. The wind turbine was operated for extended periods at yaw angles up to 49 deg to define average or mean response to yaw. It was determined that the effect of yaw on rotor power can be approximated by the cube of the velocity normal to the rotor disc as long as the yaw angle is less than 30 deg. Blade bending loads were relatively unaffected by yaw, but teeter angle increased with wind speed as the magnitude of the yaw angle exceeded 30 deg indicating a potential for teeter stop impacts at large yaw angles. No other adverse effects due to yaw were noted during the tests.

  18. Effect of oscillation frequency on wind turbine airfoil dynamic stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Li, C.; Nie, J. B.; Chen, Y.

    2013-12-01

    At the same oscillation amplitude, Reynolds Number, mean angle of attack, the dynamic stall characteristics of the NREL S809 airfoil undergoing sinusoidal pitch oscillations of different oscillation frequencies were investigated with modified k-ω SST turbulence model of CFD solution for two-dimensional numerical simulation. The predicted lift, drag coefficients and moment coefficients were compared with the Ohio State University wind tunnel test results, which showed a good agreement. The birth, development and breaking off of eddies were analyzed through streamline distribution around airfoil and the influence of oscillation frequencies on dynamic stall characteristics was also described and analyzed in detail, which enrich the database of dynamic stall characteristics needed by the quantization of oscillation frequencies on dynamic characteristics and prove that sliding mesh method is reliable when dealing with dynamic stall problems.

  19. Directionality Effects of Aligned Wind and Wave Loads on a Y-Shape Semi-Submersible Floating Wind Turbine under Rated Operational Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtao Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Y-shape (triangular semi-submersible foundation has been adopted by most of the built full-scale floating wind turbines, such as Windfloat, Fukushima Mirai and Shimpuu. Considering the non-fully-symmetrical shape and met-ocean condition, the foundation laying angle relative to wind/wave directions will not only influence the downtime and power efficiency of the floating turbine, but also the strength and fatigue safety of the whole structure. However, the dynamic responses induced by various aligned wind and wave load directions have scarcely been investigated comparatively before. In our study, the directionality effects are investigated by means of combined wind and wave tests and coupled multi-body simulations. By comparing the measured data in three load directions, it is found that the differences of platform motions are mainly derived from the wave loads and larger pitch motion can always be observed in one of the directions. To make certain the mechanism underlying the observed phenomena, a coupled multi-body dynamic model of the floating wind turbine is established and validated. The numerical results demonstrate that the second-order hydrodynamic forces contribute greatly to the directionality distinctions for surge and pitch, and the first-order hydrodynamic forces determine the variations of tower base bending moments and nacelle accelerations. These findings indicate the directionality effects should be predetermined comprehensively before installation at sea, which is important for the operation and maintenance of the Y-shape floating wind turbines.

  20. Full-scale tests of wind effects on a long span roof structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiyang; Zheng, Qingxing; Wu, Jiurong; Xu, An

    2015-06-01

    Full-scale measurements are regarded as the most reliable method to evaluate wind effects on large buildings and structures. Some selected results are presented in this paper from the full-scale measurement of wind effects on a long-span steel roof structure during the passage of Typhoon Fanapi. Some field data, including wind speed and direction, acceleration responses, etc., were continuously and simultaneously recorded during the passage of the typhoon. Comprehensive analysis of the measured data is conducted to evaluate the typhoon-generated wind characteristics and its effects on a long-span steel roof. The first four natural frequencies and their vibration mode shapes of the Guangzhou International Sports Arena (GISA) roof are evaluated by the stochastic subspace identification (SSI) method and comparisons with those from finite element (FE) analysis are made. Meanwhile, damping ratios of the roof are also identified by the SSI method and compared with those identified by the random decrement method; the amplitude-dependent damping behaviors are also discussed. The fullscale measurement results are further compared with the corresponding wind tunnel test results to evaluate its reliability. The results obtained from this study are valuable for academic and professional engineers involved in the design of large-span roof structures.

  1. Vegetation in Drylands: Effects on Wind Flow and Aeolian Sediment Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome R. Mayaud

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Drylands are characterised by patchy vegetation, erodible surfaces and erosive aeolian processes. Empirical and modelling studies have shown that vegetation elements provide drag on the overlying airflow, thus affecting wind velocity profiles and altering erosive dynamics on desert surfaces. However, these dynamics are significantly complicated by a variety of factors, including turbulence, and vegetation porosity and pliability effects. This has resulted in some uncertainty about the effect of vegetation on sediment transport in drylands. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of the effects of dryland vegetation on wind flow and aeolian sediment transport processes. In particular, wind transport models have played a key role in simplifying aeolian processes in partly vegetated landscapes, but a number of key uncertainties and challenges remain. We identify potential future avenues for research that would help to elucidate the roles of vegetation distribution, geometry and scale in shaping the entrainment, transport and redistribution of wind-blown material at multiple scales. Gaps in our collective knowledge must be addressed through a combination of rigorous field, wind tunnel and modelling experiments.

  2. Weak antilocalization effect due to topological surface states in Bi2Se2.1Te0.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, K.; Graf, D.; Marinova, V.; Lorenz, B.; Chu, C. W.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the weak antilocalization (WAL) effect in the p-type Bi2Se2.1Te0.9 topological system. The magnetoconductance shows a cusp-like feature at low magnetic fields, indicating the presence of the WAL effect. The WAL curves measured at different tilt angles merge together when they are plotted as a function of the normal field components, showing that surface states dominate the magnetoconductance in the Bi2Se2.1Te0.9 crystal. We have calculated magnetoconductance per conduction channel and applied the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka formula to determine the physical parameters that characterize the WAL effect. The number of conduction channels and the phase coherence length do not change with temperature up to T = 5 K. In addition, the sample shows a large positive magnetoresistance that reaches 1900% under a magnetic field of 35 T at T = 0.33 K with no sign of saturation. The magnetoresistance value decreases with both increasing temperature and tilt angle of the sample surface with respect to the magnetic field. The large magnetoresistance of topological insulators can be utilized in future technology such as sensors and memory devices.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of the Effectiveness of Tuned Mass Dampers to Reduce the Wind-Induced Torsional Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pozos-Estrada

    Full Text Available Abstract Use of Tuned Mass Dampers (TMDs to reduce the wind-induced torsional response of structures has been investigated in the literature by assuming that the wind excitations can be approximated by harmonic forces or white noise random processes; however, such an assumption is not realistic. Further, wind load effects are correlated. This study is focused on the effectiveness of different linear/nonlinear TMDs configurations to reduce the wind induced response. For the analyses, the structure is modeled as a multi-degree of freedom system under correlated wind load effects. The results show that the selection of optimum dampers is affected by the consideration of the correlated wind load effects.

  4. Implementation of the Generalized Brazier Effect in Analysis of Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Peter Riddersholm; Nikolajsen, Jan Ánike; Damkilde, Lars

    2016-01-01

    As wind turbine blades are getting longer and more slender, new failure modes occur and these may be related to the non-linear geometric Brazier effect1,2,3, where the bending moments ovalize the thin-walled cross-sections. For general cross-sections the torsional moments have a similar effect. T...

  5. Effects of Armature Winding Segmentation with Multiple Converters on the Short Circuit Torque of 10-MW Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Polinder, Henk; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting synchronous generators (SCSGs) are drawing more attention in large direct-drive wind turbine applications. Despite low weight and compactness, the short circuit torque of an SCSG may be too high for wind turbine constructions due to a large magnetic air gap of an SCSG. This paper...

  6. Model improvements for evaluating the effect of tower tilting on the aerodynamics of a vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, K.; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, T.

    2015-01-01

    be investigated to more accurately predict the aerodynamic loads. This paper proposes certain modifications to the double multiple-streamtube (DMS) model to include the component of wind speed parallel to the rotating shaft. The model is validated against experimental data collected on an H-Darrieus wind turbine......If a vertical axis wind turbine is mounted offshore on a semi-submersible, the pitch motion of the platform will dominate the static pitch and dynamic motion of the platform and wind turbine such that the effect of tower tilting on the aerodynamics of the vertical axis wind turbine should...... in skewed flow conditions. Three different dynamic stall models are also integrated into the DMS model: Gormont's model with the adaptation of Strickland, Gormont's model with the modification of Berg and the Beddoes-Leishman dynamic stall model. Both the small Sandia 17m wind turbine and the large DeepWind...

  7. The Effect of Wind on Coxiella burnetii Transmission Between Cattle Herds: a Mechanistic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovici, S; Hoch, T; Brahim, M L; Joly, A; Beaudeau, F

    2017-04-01

    There is a consensus that wind plays a key role in the transmission of Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, between ruminants and from ruminants to humans. However, no observational study so far has focused on the mechanisms associated with this airborne transmission. This study applied a mechanistic epidemiological approach to investigate the processes underlying the wind effect and to assess its influence on the risk for a dairy herd to become C. burnetii infected. Ninety-five dairy cattle herds located in the Finistère department (western France) were subjected to samplings of bulk tank milk and indoor dust every 4 months over a 1-year period to determine their C. burnetii status using PCR tests. A total of 27 incident herd-periods (negative-tested on both PCR tests and becoming positive-tested at least once at the subsequent sampling time) and 71 negative herd-periods were retained for analysis. Using logistic regression, we assessed the effect of (i) the cumulated number of bacteria in herds located under the main wind direction and (ii) the mean wind speed in this area, on a given herd's risk of becoming incident. Compared to herds in areas with low wind speed (≤5.5 m/s), the risk was significantly higher (OR = 3.7) in herds in areas with high wind speed (>5.5 m/s) and high bacterial load (>10), whereas it was not significantly different from unity in other situations. In agreement with our assumptions, C. burnetii transmission to a previously infection-free herd occurs only when (i) the wind transporting from infected sources and (ii) the load in the contaminated particles/aerosols generated are high enough to act jointly. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. SAR Observation and Modeling of Gap Winds in the Prince William Sound of Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Volz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Alaska’s Prince William Sound (PWS is a unique locale tending to have strong gap winds, especially in the winter season. To characterize and understand these strong surface winds, which have great impacts on the local marine and aviation activities, the surface wind retrieval from the Synthetic Aperture Radar data (SAR-wind is combined with a numerical mesoscale model. Helped with the SAR-wind observations, the mesoscale model is used to study cases of strong winds and relatively weak winds to depict the nature of these winds, including the area of extent and possible causes of the wind regimes. The gap winds from the Wells Passage and the Valdez Arm are the most dominant gap winds in PWS. Though the Valdez Arm is north-south trending and Wells Passage is east-west oriented, gap winds often develop simultaneously in these two places when a low pressure system is present in the Northern Gulf of Alaska. These two gap winds often converge at the center of PWS and extend further out of the Sound through the Hinchinbrook Entrance. The pressure gradients imposed over these areas are the main driving forces for these gap winds. Additionally, the drainage from the upper stream glaciers and the blocking effect of the banks of the Valdez Arm probably play an important role in enhancing the gap wind.

  9. Predicting extreme loads effects on wind turbines considering uncertainty in airfoil data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Imad; Natarajan, Anand; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    The sources contributing to uncertainty in a wind turbine blade static airfoil data include wind tunnel testing, CFD calculations, 3D rotational corrections based on CFD or empirical models, surface roughness corrections, Reynolds number corrections, expansion to the full 360-degree angle of attack...... that the uncertainty in airfoil data can have a significant impact on the prediction of extreme loads effects depending on the component, and the correlation along the span of the blade....... range, validation by full scale measurements, and geometric distortions of the blade during manufacturing and under loading. In this paper a stochastic model of the static airfoil data is proposed to supplement the prediction of extreme loads effects for large wind turbines. It is shown...

  10. Effectiveness of a Wedge Probe to Measure Sonic Boom Signatures in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the effectiveness of a wedge probe to measure sonic boom pressure signatures compared to a slender conical probe. A generic business jet model at a constant angle of attack and at a single model to probe separation distance was used to generate a sonic boom signature. Pressure signature data were acquired with both the wedge probe and a slender conical probe for comparison. The test was conducted at a Mach number of 2.0 and a free-stream unit Reynolds number of 2 million per foot. The results showed that the wedge probe was not effective in measuring the sonic boom pressure signature of the aircraft model in the supersonic wind tunnel. Data plots and a discussion of the results are presented. No tabulated data or flow visualization photographs are included.

  11. Dynamic Effects of Anchor Positional Tolerance on Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher; Pakrashi, Vikram; Murphy, Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    For water depths greater than 60m floating wind turbines will become the most economical option for generating offshore wind energy. Tension mooring stabilised units are one type of platform being considered by the offshore wind energy industry. The complex mooring arrangement used by this type of platform means that the dynamics are greatly effected by offsets in the positioning of the anchors. This paper examines the issue of tendon anchor position tolerances. The dynamic effects of three positional tolerances are analysed in survival state using the time domain FASTLink. The severe impact of worst case anchor positional offsets on platform and turbine survivability is shown. The worst anchor misposition combinations are highlighted and should be strongly avoided. Novel methods to mitigate this issue are presented.

  12. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  13. Noise Model Analysis and Estimation of Effect due to Wind Driven Ambient Noise in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sakthivel Murugan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transmission in ocean using water as a channel is a challenging process due to attenuation, spreading, reverberation, absorption, and so forth, apart from the contribution of acoustic signals due to ambient noises. Ambient noises in sea are of two types: manmade (shipping, aircraft over the sea, motor on boat, etc. and natural (rain, wind, seismic, etc., apart from marine mammals and phytoplanktons. Since wind exists in all places and at all time: its effect plays a major role. Hence, in this paper, we concentrate on estimating the effects of wind. Seven sets of data with various wind speeds ranging from 2.11 m/s to 6.57 m/s were used. The analysis is performed for frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 8 kHz. It is found that a linear relationship between noise spectrum and wind speed exists for the entire frequency range. Further, we developed a noise model for analyzing the noise level. The results of the empirical data are found to fit with results obtained with the aid of noise model.

  14. Theoretical and experimental insights into effects of wind on leaf heat and gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    Transpiration and heat exchange by plant leaves are coupled physiological processes of significant importance for surface-climate interactions and ecohydrology. The common practice of modelling transpiration as an isothermal process (assuming equal leaf and air temperatures) may introduce significant bias into estimates of transpiration rates and water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of carbon gained by photosynthesis per unit of water lost by transpiration). In contrast, explicit consideration of stomatal and leaf boundary layer resistances in series and the leaf energy balance in a physically-based model led to some surprising results, such as suppressed transpiration rates for increasing wind speed at constant stomatal conductance. The model predicts that for high wind velocities, the same leaf conductance (for water vapour and carbon dioxide) can be maintained with less evaporative losses. If this leaf-scale effect is consistent across most leaves, it may have profound implications for canopy-scale water use efficiency under globally decreasing wind speeds. This presentation reports the results of a systematic study of the effect of wind speed on leaf heat and gas exchange rates and introduces a novel experimental design to verify the modelling results using an insulated wind tunnel and artificial leaves with defined pore geometries, allowing to measure leaf-scale latent and sensible heat fluxes independently. First experimental results and new insights will be highlighted.

  15. The effect of cocoa fermentation and weak organic acids on growth and ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copetti, Marina V; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Mororó, Raimundo C; Pereira, José L; Frisvad, Jens C; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2012-04-16

    The acidic characteristics of cocoa beans have influence on flavor development in chocolate. Cocoa cotyledons are not naturally acidic, the acidity comes from organic acids produced by the fermentative microorganisms which grow during the processing of cocoa. Different concentrations of these metabolites can be produced according to the fermentation practices adopted in the farms, which could affect the growth and ochratoxin A production by fungi. This work presents two independent experiments carried out to investigate the effect of some fermentation practices on ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus carbonarius in cocoa, and the effect of weak organic acids such as acetic, lactic and citric at different pH values on growth and ochratoxin A production by A. carbonarius and Aspergillus niger in culture media. A statistical difference (ρorganic acids on fungal growth and ochratoxin A production, with differences according to the media pH and the organic acid present. Acetic acid was the most inhibitory acid against A. carbonarius and A. niger. From the point of view of food safety, considering the amount of ochratoxin A produced, fermentation practices should be conducted towards the enhancement of acetic acid, although lactic and citric acids also have an important role in lowering the pH to improve the toxicity of acetic acid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mind the wind: microclimate effects on incubation effort of an arctic seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyvik Hilde, Christoffer; Pélabon, Christophe; Guéry, Loreleï; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Descamps, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The energetic costs of reproduction in birds strongly depend on the climate experienced during incubation. Climate change and increasing frequency of extreme weather events may severely affect these costs, especially for species incubating in extreme environments. In this 3-year study, we used an experimental approach to investigate the effects of microclimate and nest shelter on the incubation effort of female common eiders (Somateria mollissima) in a wild Arctic population. We added artificial shelters to a random selection of nesting females, and compared incubation effort, measured as body mass loss during incubation, between females with and without shelter. Nonsheltered females had a higher incubation effort than females with artificial shelters. In nonsheltered females, higher wind speeds increased the incubation effort, while artificially sheltered females experienced no effect of wind. Although increasing ambient temperatures tended to decrease incubation effort, this effect was negligible in the absence of wind. Humidity had no marked effect on incubation effort. This study clearly displays the direct effect of a climatic variable on an important aspect of avian life-history. By showing that increasing wind speed counteracts the energetic benefits of a rising ambient temperature, we were able to demonstrate that a climatic variable other than temperature may also affect wild populations and need to be taken into account when predicting the effects of climate change.

  17. Effects of wind-energy facilities on breeding grassland bird distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Jill A; Buhl, Deborah A

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of renewable energy to meet worldwide demand continues to grow. Wind energy is one of the fastest growing renewable sectors, but new wind facilities are often placed in prime wildlife habitat. Long-term studies that incorporate a rigorous statistical design to evaluate the effects of wind facilities on wildlife are rare. We conducted a before-after-control-impact (BACI) assessment to determine if wind facilities placed in native mixed-grass prairies displaced breeding grassland birds. During 2003-2012, we monitored changes in bird density in 3 study areas in North Dakota and South Dakota (U.S.A.). We examined whether displacement or attraction occurred 1 year after construction (immediate effect) and the average displacement or attraction 2-5 years after construction (delayed effect). We tested for these effects overall and within distance bands of 100, 200, 300, and >300 m from turbines. We observed displacement for 7 of 9 species. One species was unaffected by wind facilities and one species exhibited attraction. Displacement and attraction generally occurred within 100 m and often extended up to 300 m. In a few instances, displacement extended beyond 300 m. Displacement and attraction occurred 1 year after construction and persisted at least 5 years. Our research provides a framework for applying a BACI design to displacement studies and highlights the erroneous conclusions that can be made without the benefit of adopting such a design. More broadly, species-specific behaviors can be used to inform management decisions about turbine placement and the potential impact to individual species. Additionally, the avoidance distance metrics we estimated can facilitate future development of models evaluating impacts of wind facilities under differing land-use scenarios. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Environmental external effects for wind power and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleisner, L.; Meyer, H.J.; Morthorst, P.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Systems Analysis Dept.

    1995-12-31

    This article summarises some of the results achieved in a project carried out in Denmark with the purpose to assess the environmental damages and the external costs in the production of energy. The project has especially handled renewable energy versus energy based on fossil fuels. The project has been a collaboration between the Technical University of Denmark and Riso National Laboratory. The research institutions have considered different energy production technologies in the project. The energy production technologies that have been considered by Risoe National Laboratory and will be reported and compared in this article are the following: (1) Wind power, (2) A coal-fired condensing plant. In the project the environmental damages are thus compared, and externalities in the production of energy using renewable energy and fossil fuels are identified, estimated and monetized. The following result applies in general to the applied technologies. Only the environmental externalities have been assessed in the project. Social and economical externalities, e.g. related to changes in employment or depletion of resources, are not included in the project. The cost concept is based on marginal damage cost, in principle taking as starting point the level of pollution that exists today. The methodology, which has been used in order to find and monetize the environmental externalities, consists of the different processes like Identification, quantification, Dose-response and Valuation

  19. Wind and load variability in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Rissanen, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Larsen, X. [Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, Lyngby (Denmark); Loevholm, A. L. [Kjeller Vindteknikk (Norway)

    2013-04-15

    This publication analysed the variability of wind production and load in Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and the Nordic region as a whole, based on real data measured from large-scale wind power during 2009-2011. The Nordic-wide wind power time series was scaled up such that Sweden had same amount of wind power production than Denmark, and Finland and Norway only 50% of the wind power production in Denmark. Wind power production in Denmark and Sweden is somewhat correlated (coefficient 0.7) but less correlation is found between the other countries. The variations from one hour to the next are only weakly correlated between all countries, even between Denmark and Sweden. Largest variations occur when the production is approximately 30-70% of installed capacity and variability is low during periods of light winds. The variability in shorter time scales was less than the hourly variations. During the three years analysed in this publication there were few storm incidents and they did not produce dramatic wind power ramps in the Nordic region. Wind and load variations are not correlated between the countries, which is beneficial from the viewpoint of wind integration. The smoothing effect is shown as reduction of variability from a single country to Nordic-wide wind power. The impact of wind power on the variability that the system experiences is evaluated by analysing the variability of net load with different wind power penetration levels. The Nordic-wide wind power production increases the highest hourly ramps by 2.4% (up) and -3.6% (down) of installed wind power capacity when there is 20% wind power penetration and by 2.7% (up) and -4.7% (down) for 30% wind penetration. These results assess the impacts of variability only. The next step will be assessing the uncertainty from forecast errors. The timing of ramp events, and occurrence of high-wind and low-load are studied. With current wind penetration, low production levels (2-5% of installed wind power) can occur in a

  20. A Simple and Effective Approach for the Prediction of Turbine Power Production From Wind Speed Forecast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Marrocu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An accurate forecast of the power generated by a wind turbine is of paramount importance for its optimal exploitation. Several forecasting methods have been proposed either based on a physical modeling or using a statistical approach. All of them rely on the availability of high quality measures of local wind speed, corresponding generated power and on numerical weather forecasts. In this paper, a simple and effective wind power forecast technique, based on the probability distribution mapping of wind speed forecast and observed power data, is presented and it is applied to two turbines located on the island of Borkum (Germany in the North Sea. The wind speed forecast of the ECMWF model at 100 m from the ground is used as the prognostic meteorological parameter. Training procedures are based entirely on relatively short time series of power measurements. Results show that our approach has skills that are similar or better than those obtained using more standard methods when measured with mean absolute error.

  1. Optimal Coordinated Control of Power Extraction in LES of a Wind Farm with Entrance Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P. Goit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the use of optimal coordinated control techniques in large eddy simulations of wind farm boundary layer interaction with the aim of increasing the total energy extraction in wind farms. The individual wind turbines are considered as flow actuators, and their energy extraction is dynamically regulated in time, so as to optimally influence the flow field. We extend earlier work on wind farm optimal control in the fully-developed regime (Goit and Meyers 2015, J. Fluid Mech. 768, 5–50 to a ‘finite’ wind farm case, in which entrance effects play an important role. For the optimal control, a receding horizon framework is employed in which turbine thrust coefficients are optimized in time and per turbine. Optimization is performed with a conjugate gradient method, where gradients of the cost functional are obtained using adjoint large eddy simulations. Overall, the energy extraction is increased 7% by the optimal control. This increase in energy extraction is related to faster wake recovery throughout the farm. For the first row of turbines, the optimal control increases turbulence levels and Reynolds stresses in the wake, leading to better wake mixing and an inflow velocity for the second row that is significantly higher than in the uncontrolled case. For downstream rows, the optimal control mainly enhances the sideways mean transport of momentum. This is different from earlier observations by Goit and Meyers (2015 in the fully-developed regime, where mainly vertical transport was enhanced.

  2. CFD investigation of effects of wind tunnel walls on flow properties over S809 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshfeghi, Mohammad; Xie, Yonghui

    2013-07-01

    This article researches CFD simulations of the subsonic wind tunnel at Xi'an Jiaotong University's Laboratory of Thermal Turbo-machines. The wind tunnel cross section measures 800×600 mm2, and the simulations are conducted on a wind tunnel with a 375 mm chord S809 airfoil at the Reynolds number of one million. The angles of attack for the 2D airfoil range from 0 to 22 degrees. In another set of 2D simulations, a 750 mm chord airfoil is calculated in open-air with no walls restricting airflow. The pressure fields, flow patterns and lift and drag coefficients are compared with each other to show the blockage effects in the wind tunnel. As the results show, the wind tunnel walls directly cause the flow to stream faster and increase the lift and drag values. Another consequence of this channeled flow is that the separated area expands. Moreover, the commencement of the separation also occurs at a smaller angle of attack.

  3. Structural Testing of the Blade Reliability Collaborative Effect of Defect Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hughes, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Paquette, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Two 8.3-meter (m) wind turbine blades intentionally constructed with manufacturing flaws were tested to failure at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) south of Boulder, Colorado. Two blades were tested; one blade was manufactured with a fiberglass spar cap and the second blade was manufactured with a carbon fiber spar cap. Test loading primarily consisted of flap fatigue loading of the blades, with one quasi-static ultimate load case applied to the carbon fiber spar cap blade. Results of the test program were intended to provide the full-scale test data needed for validation of model and coupon test results of the effect of defects in wind turbine blade composite materials. Testing was part of the Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) led by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The BRC seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the causes of unexpected blade failures (Paquette 2012), and to develop methods to enable blades to survive to their expected operational lifetime. Recent work in the BRC includes examining and characterizing flaws and defects known to exist in wind turbine blades from manufacturing processes (Riddle et al. 2011). Recent results from reliability databases show that wind turbine rotor blades continue to be a leading contributor to turbine downtime (Paquette 2012).

  4. Description of Weak Halogen Bonding Using Various Levels of Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory Combined with Effective Core Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Matczak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work starts with providing a description of the halogen bonding (XB interaction between the halogen atom of MH3X (where M = C–Pb and X = I, At and the N atom of HCN. This interaction leads to the formation of stable yet very weakly bound MH3X⋯NCH complexes for which the interaction energy (Eint between MH3X and HCN is calculated using various symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT methods combined with the def2-QZVPP basis set and midbond functions. This basis set assigns effective core potentials (ECPs not only to the I or At atom directly participating in the XB interaction with HCN but also to the M atom when substituted with Sn or Pb. Twelve SAPT methods (or levels are taken into consideration. According to the SAPT analysis of Eint, the XB interaction in the complexes shows mixed electrostatic-dispersion nature. Next, the accuracy of SAPT Eint is evaluated by comparing with CCSD(T reference data. This comparison reveals that high-order SAPT2+(3 method and the much less computationally demanding SAPT(DFT method perform very well in describing Eint of the complexes. However, the accuracy of these methods decreases dramatically if they are combined with the so-called Hartree-Fock correction.

  5. Monolayer Single-Crystal 1T'-MoTe2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition Exhibits Weak Antilocalization Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Carl H; Parkin, William M; Ping, Jinglei; Gao, Zhaoli; Zhou, Yu Ren; Kim, Youngkuk; Streller, Frank; Carpick, Robert W; Rappe, Andrew M; Drndić, Marija; Kikkawa, James M; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2016-07-13

    Growth of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers is of interest due to their unique electrical and optical properties. Films in the 2H and 1T phases have been widely studied but monolayers of some 1T'-TMDs are predicted to be large-gap quantum spin Hall insulators, suitable for innovative transistor structures that can be switched via a topological phase transition rather than conventional carrier depletion [ Qian et al. Science 2014 , 346 , 1344 - 1347 ]. Here we detail a reproducible method for chemical vapor deposition of monolayer, single-crystal flakes of 1T'-MoTe2. Atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy confirm the composition and structure of MoTe2 flakes. Variable temperature magnetotransport shows weak antilocalization at low temperatures, an effect seen in topological insulators and evidence of strong spin-orbit coupling. Our approach provides a pathway to systematic investigation of monolayer, single-crystal 1T'-MoTe2 and implementation in next-generation nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-05-01

    The design of offshore floating wind turbines uses design codes that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At the present, most codes include only first-order hydrodynamics, which induce forces and motions varying with the same frequency as the incident waves. Effects due to second- and higher-order hydrodynamics are often ignored in the offshore industry, because the forces induced typically are smaller than the first-order forces. In this report, first- and second-order hydrodynamic analysis used in the offshore oil and gas industry is applied to two different wind turbine concepts--a spar and a tension leg platform.

  7. Effect of wind turbine micro-Doppler on SAR and GMTI signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Ling, Hao

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a modeling study to examine the interference effect of microDopplers caused by offshore wind farms on airborne sensors operating in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) modes. The modeling is carried out by generating CAD instantiations of the dynamic wind turbine and using the high-frequency electromagnetic code Xpatch to perform the scattering calculations. Artifacts in the resulting SAR and GMTI signatures are evaluated for interference with tracking of boats in coastal waters. Results of signal filtering algorithms to reduce the dynamic turbine clutter in both SAR images and GMTI displays are presented.

  8. Effect of wind turbine surge motion on rotor thrust and induced velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaal, J.B., de; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, T.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind turbines on floating platforms will experience larger motions than comparable bottom fixed wind turbines—for which the majority of industry standard design codes have been developed and validated. In this paper, the effect of a periodic surge motion on the integrated loads and induced...... will be inherently included in the solution of the associated fluid dynamic problem. Through analysis of integrated rotor loads, induced velocities and aerodynamic damping, it is concluded that typical surge motions are sufficiently slow to not affect the wake dynamics predicted by engineering models significantly...

  9. The Brazier effect in wind turbine blades and its influence on design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Find Mølholt; Weaver, P.M.; Cecchini, L.S.

    2012-01-01

    Critical failure was observed in the shear web of a wind turbine blade during a full-scale testing. This failure occurred immediately before the ultimate failure and was partly caused by buckling and non-linear cross-sectional strain. Experimental values had been used to compare and validate both...... numerical and semi-analytical results in the analysis of the shear webs in the reinforced wind turbine blade. Only elastic material behaviour was analysed, and attention was primarily focused on the Brazier effect. The complex, geometrically non-linear and elastic stress–strain behaviour of the shear webs...

  10. Emergency wind erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  11. The effect of wind on the rate of heat loss from avian cup-shaped nests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caragh B Heenan

    Full Text Available Forced convection can significantly influence the heat loss from birds and their offspring but effects may be reduced by using sheltered micro-sites such as cavities or constructing nests. The structural and thermal properties of the nests of two species, the spiny-cheeked honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis and yellow-throated miner (Manorina flavigula, were measured in relation to three wind speeds. Nest dimensions differ between the two species, despite the similar body mass of the incubating adults, however nest conductance is comparable. As wind speed increases, so does the rate of heat loss from the nests of both species, and further still during incubation recesses. The significance of forced convection through the nest is a near-doubling in heat production required by the parent, even when incubating at relatively low wind speeds. This provides confirmation that selecting a sheltered nest site is important for avian reproductive success.

  12. Design of a simple, effective and low cost micro wind energy conversion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Massimiliano; Pucci, Marcello; Vitale, Gianpaolo

    2011-07-01

    The installation of micro-wind energy conversion systems (MWECS) depends on the system's performance and cost. The aim of this study is to present a MWECS developed for low power applications connected to the grid. The system containing a micro-wind turbine, a PMSM machine, a diode bridge, a boost DC/DC converter and a grid connected single phase inverter was developed and then tested. The results showed a good performance of the system, it can deliver up to twice as much energy as a conventional system in the same conditions. This technology is also cheaper and simpler than its concurrents. This study developed a simple effective and low cost micro wind energy conversion system.

  13. Preliminary analysis of dynamic stall effects on a 91-meter wind turbine rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical investigation of dynamic stall on HAWT (horizontal-axis wind turbines) rotor loads was conducted. Dynamic stall was modeled using the Gormont approach on the MOD-2 rotor, treating the blade as a rigid body teetering about a fixed axis. Blade flapwise bending moments at station 370 were determined with and without dynamic stall for spatial variations in local wind speed due to wind shear and yaw. The predicted mean flapwise bending moments were found to be in good agreement with test results. Results obtained with and without dynamic stall showed no significant difference for the mean flapwise bending moment. The cyclic bending moments calculated with and without dynamic stall effects were substantially the same. None of the calculated cyclic loads reached the level of the cyclic loads measured on the MOD-2 using the Boeing five-minute-average technique.

  14. Effect of soil-foundation-structure interaction on the seismic response of wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Austin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil-foundation-structure interaction can affect the seismic response of wind turbines. This paper studies the effects of soil-foundation-structure interaction on the seismic response of 65 kW, 1 MW, and 2 MW horizontal-axis wind turbines with truncated cone steel towers. Four types of foundations with frequency-based design were analyzed, including spread foundation, mono pile, pile group with cap, and anchored spread foundation. Soil is modeled both implicitly (subgrade reaction modulus and explicitly. The finite element model developed using the ANSYS program was first validated using experimental data. Numerical models are then analyzed in both frequency and time domains using the Block Lanczos and generalized HHT-α formulations. Recommendations were given to simplify the soil-foundation-structure interaction analysis of wind turbines subjected to seismic loading.

  15. The effect of the weak androgen oxandrolone on psychological and behavioral characteristics in growth hormone-treated girls with Turner syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, L.A.; Sas, T.C.J.; Visser, M. de; Kreukels, B.P.; Stijnen, T.; Zandwijken, G.R.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Otten, B.J.; Wit, J.M.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    The weak androgen oxandrolone (Ox) increases height gain in growth-hormone (GH) treated girls with Turner syndrome (TS), but may also give rise to virilizing side effects. To assess the effect of Ox, at a conventional and low dosage, on behavior, aggression, romantic and sexual interest, mood, and

  16. The sound of high winds : The effect of atmospheric stability on wind turbine sound and microphone noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is the story of the discovery of a new phenomenon: why wind turbines sound different at night time. This discovery was related to a problem in society, namely that of perceived noise by residents living close to such turbines.

  17. Wind turbine inverter robust loop-shaping control subject to grid interaction effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Mikkel Peter Sidoroff; Wu, Qiuwei; Blanke, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    with integral effect while bounding the induced change. The design was tested in an aggregated model of the London Array offshore wind power plant and compared with traditional PI controller designs. Robust stability and performance and a reduction of control effort by 25% are obtained over the full envelope...

  18. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Wind Turbine Systems in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiangsheng; Ma, Kuichao; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses a cost based Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) approch for the Wind Turbine (WT) with condition monitoring system in China. Normally, the traditional FMEA uses the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to rank failure modes. But the RPN can be changed with the Condition Monitoring...

  19. 75 FR 19959 - Uilk Wind Farm, LLC; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Uilk Wind Farm, LLC; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status April 9, 2010. Take notice that during the month March, 2010, the status of the above-captioned...

  20. Effect of natural inbreeding on variance structure in tests of wind pollination Douglas-fir progenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank C. Sorensen; T.L. White

    1988-01-01

    Studies of the mating habits of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) have shown that wind-pollination families contain a small proportion of very slow-growing natural inbreds.The effect of these very small trees on means, variances, and variance ratios was evaluated for height and diameter in a 16-year-old plantation by...

  1. Structural effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces on horizontal-axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). BioServe Space Technologies

    1994-08-01

    Due to its renewable nature and abundant resources, wind energy has the potential to fulfill a large portion of this nation`s energy needs. The simplest means of utilizing wind energy is through the use of downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) with fixed-pitch rotors. This configuration regulates the peak power by allowing the rotor blade to aerodynamically stall. The stall point, the point of maximum coefficient of lift, is currently predicted using data obtained from wind tunnel tests. Unfortunately, these tests do not accurately simulate conditions encountered in the field. Flow around the tower and nacelle coupled with inflow turbulence and rotation of the turbine blades create unpredicted aerodynamic forces. Dynamic stall is hypothesized to occur. Such aerodynamic loads are transmitted into the rotor and tower causing structural resonance that drastically reduces the design lifetime of the wind turbine. The current method of alleviating this problem is to structurally reinforce the tower and blades. However, this adds unneeded mass and, therefore, cost to the turbines. A better understanding of the aerodynamic forces and the manner in which they affect the structure would allow for the design of more cost effective and durable wind turbines. Data compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for a downwind HAWT with constant chord, untwisted, fixed-pitch rotors is analyzed. From these data, the actual aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor are being portrayed and the potential effects upon the structure can for the first time be fully analyzed. Based upon their understanding, solutions to the problem of structural resonance are emerging.

  2. The unexpected effects of wind speeds on plant water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2013-12-01

    Transpiration and heat exchange by plant leaves are coupled physiological processes of significant ecohydrological importance. The common practice of modelling transpiration as an isothermal process (assuming equal leaf and air temperatures) may introduce significant bias into estimates of transpiration rates and water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of carbon gained by photosynthesis per unit of water lost by transpiration). In a recent study (Schymanski et al., 2013), we investigated effects of fluctuating irradiance (sunflecks) on leaf thermal regime and transpiration rates using a physically-based leaf model. Results suggest that leaf temperatures may deviate substantially from air temperature, leading to greatly modified transpiration rates compared to isothermal conditions. This presentation reports a systematic study of the effects of wind speed on leaf heat and gas exchange rates. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, an increase in wind speed can suppress transpiration rates. This is due to feedbacks between sensible heat flux, leaf temperature, leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit and latent heat flux. The model predicts that for high wind velocities, the same leaf conductance (for water vapour and carbon dioxide) can be maintained with less evaporative losses. If this leaf-scale effect is consistent across most leaves, it may have profound implications for canopy-scale water use efficiency under globally decreasing wind speeds. Experimental verification of the modelling study is under way and first results will be presented.

  3. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  4. Decision support for the definition of wind turbine systems adequacy to site specificities and weak electrical networks; Aide a la decision pour la definition d'un systeme eolien, adequation au site et a un reseau faible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbaoui, A

    2006-10-15

    A decision support system for the definition of wind turbine systems is developed by taking into account the wind and site characteristics, the wind turbine components and the electrical network properties close to the site. The approach is based on functional analysis, on the investigation of the functional fluxes and on the definition of a model suitable for supporting decision at the preliminary stages of wind turbine design. The complete set of solutions derived from the model is determined using a Constraint Satisfaction Problem solver. The intrinsic capability of the model to support decision is derived from the investigation of the model parsimony, precision, exactness and specialization. The model takes into account performance criteria resulting from knowledge of manufacturers, distributors and investors. These criteria are used to discriminate design alternatives. Design alternatives correspond to choices of site (wind, electric network) and wind turbine architectures (related to 7 design variables). Performance criteria are the cost of electric kWh, the amount of energy being produced and the discounted total cost of the project. Electric network connection to wind turbines is taken into account through slow variations of the voltage and Flickers phenomenon. First, the maximal rate of penetration of the wind turbine energy production is determined. Next, two design alternatives have been investigated to improve wind turbine system integration in electric distribution networks. These alternatives are a reactive power control system and an inertial energy storage system. Inertial storage systems seem to be more expensive than reactive power control systems for this type of application. The influence of site specificities on decision making process has been established through three different sites (a Mediterranean site and two sites located in northern Europe). Profits relative to the cost of kWh appear to be high for Mediterranean sites. Most of the

  5. Effects from fully nonlinear irregular wave forcing on the fatigue life of an offshore wind turbine and its monopile foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schløer, Signe; Bredmose, Henrik; Bingham, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    The effect from fully nonlinear irregular wave forcing on the fatigue life of the foundation and tower of an offshore wind turbine is investigated through aeroelastic calculations. Five representative sea states with increasing significant wave height are considered in a water depth of 40 m....... The waves are both linear and fully nonlinear irregular 2D waves. The wind turbine is the NREL 5-MW reference wind turbine. Fatigue analysis is performed in relation to analysis of the sectional forces in the tower and monopile. Impulsive excitation of the sectional force at the bottom of the tower is seen...... when the waves are large and nonlinear and most notably for small wind speeds. In case of strong velocities and turbulent wind, the excitation is damped out. In the monopile no excitation of the force is seen, but even for turbulent strong wind the wave affects the forces in the pile significantly...

  6. Effect of TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis and its receptor on migration of hepatic stellate cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SU Min

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWAEK and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14 on the migration of hepatic stellate cells and the possible mechanism. Methods The human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2 cells were treated with TWEAK or Fn14 specific small interfering RNA (Fn14 siRNA+TWEAK. Transwell chamber was used to observe the migration of hepatic stellate cells, and real-time PCR and Western blot were used to measure the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups; a one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between multiple groups, and the least significant difference t-test was used for further comparison between two groups. Results Compared with normal LX-2 cells, the TWEAK group had a significant increase in the migration of LX-2 cells (105±8 vs 164±17, t=5.287,P<0.01, and compared with the negative control group, the Fn14 siRNA+TWEAK group had a significant reduction in the number of migrated cells (122±9 vs 58±7, t=9.836, P<0.01. When LX-2 cells were treated with TWEAK, the mRNA and protein expression of MMP9 increased in a time-dependent manner (both P<0.05, while the Fn14 siRNA+TWEAK group had significant reductions in the mRNA and protein expression of MMP9 compared with the TWEAK group (t=5.358, P<0.01. Conclusion TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 can promote the migration of hepatic stellate cells by upregulating MMP9, and blockade of this pathway may become a potential target for the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  7. Risk formulation for the sonic effects of offshore wind farms on fish in the EU region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ryunosuke

    2010-02-01

    In 2007, European leaders agreed to source 20% of their energy needs from renewable energy; since that time, offshore wind farms have been receiving attention in the European Union (EU). In 2008, the European Community submitted a proposal to the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) in order to combat marine noise pollution. In consideration of these facts, the present paper aims to deduce a preliminary hypothesis and its formulation for the effect of offshore wind farm noise on fish. The following general picture is drawn: the short-term potential impact during pre-construction; the short-term intensive impact during construction; and the physiological and/or masking effects that may occur over a long period while the wind farm is in operation. The EU's proposal to UNEP includes noise databases that list the origins of man-made sounds; it is advisable that offshore wind farms should be listed in the noise databases in order to promote rational environment management. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of nacelle on wake meandering in a laboratory scale wind turbine using LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniel; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    Wake meandering, large scale motion in the wind turbine wakes, has considerable effects on the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity in the turbine wake from the laboratory scale to utility scale wind turbines. In the dynamic wake meandering model, the wake meandering is assumed to be caused by large-scale atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, Kang et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014) demonstrated that the nacelle geometry has a significant effect on the wake meandering of a hydrokinetic turbine, through the interaction of the inner wake of the nacelle vortex with the outer wake of the tip vortices. In this work, the significance of the nacelle on the wake meandering of a miniature wind turbine previously used in experiments (Howard et al., Phys. Fluid, 2015) is demonstrated with large eddy simulations (LES) using immersed boundary method with fine enough grids to resolve the turbine geometric characteristics. The three dimensionality of the wake meandering is analyzed in detail through turbulent spectra and meander reconstruction. The computed flow fields exhibit wake dynamics similar to those observed in the wind tunnel experiments and are analyzed to shed new light into the role of the energetic nacelle vortex on wake meandering. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), and Sandia National Laboratories. Computational resources were provided by Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Minnesota Supercomputing.

  9. Fish benefits from offshore wind farm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonhard, Simon B.; Stenberg, Claus; Støttrup, Josianne

    2013-01-01

    moderately attractive to fish. Also investigations into the effects on fish and fish behaviour from electromagnetic fields were made at Nysted. Data documented some effects from the cable route on fish behaviour, with some species avoiding the cable, while other species were attracted. However, only flounder......The studies up until 2006 showed few effects on the fish fauna that could be attributed to the establishment and operation of the wind farms. Fish abundance and diversity were not higher inside the wind farms than in the areas outside the wind farms. One obvious reason for this could...... be that the studies and investigations were made during the early stages of colonisation of the turbine foundations at Horns Rev that constitute artificial reefs. At Nysted, the effect was weak, presumably because the benthic community consisted of a monoculture of large common mussels (Mytilus edulis) that are only...

  10. Effects of offshore wind farms on marine wildlife-a generalized impact assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrom, L.; Kautsky, L.; Malm, T.

    2014-01-01

    study synthesizes the current state of understanding on the effects of offshore wind farms on marine wildlife, in order to identify general versus local conclusions in published studies. The results were translated into a generalized impact assessment for coastal waters in Sweden, which covers a range......, and level of certainty. Research on the environmental effects of offshore wind farms has gone through a rapid maturation and learning process, with the bulk of knowledge being developed within the past ten years. The studies showed a high level of consensus with respect to the construction phase, indicating...... in studies on cumulative impacts and long-term effects on the food web, as well as on combined effects with other human activities, such as the fisheries. These aspects remain key open issues for a sustainable marine spatial planning....

  11. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25

    recovers to its inflow velocity is dependent on the amount ambient turbulence, the amount of wind shear, and topographical and structural effects. The maximum velocity deficit is estimated to occur at 1-2 D but can be longer under low levels of ambient turbulence. Our understanding of turbine wakes comes from wind tunnel experiments, field experiments, numerical simulations, and from studies utilizing both experimental and modeling methods. It is well documented that downwind turbines in multi-Megawatt wind farms often produce less power than upwind turbine rows. These wake-induced power losses have been estimated from 5% to up to 40% depending on the turbine operating settings (e.g., thrust coefficient), number of turbine rows, turbine size (e.g., rotor diameter and hub-height), wind farm terrain, and atmospheric flow conditions (e.g., ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability). Early work by Elliott and Cadogan suggested that power data for different turbulent conditions be segregated to distinguish the effects of turbulence on wind farm power production. This may be especially important for downwind turbines within wind farms, as chaotic and turbulent wake flows increase stress on downstream turbines. Impacts of stability on turbine wakes and power production have been examined for a flat terrain, moderate size (43 turbines) wind farm in Minnesota and for an offshore, 80 turbine wind farm off the coast of Denmark. Conzemius found it difficult to distinguish wakes (i.e., downwind velocity deficits) when the atmosphere was convective as large amounts of scatter were present in the turbine nacelle wind speed data. This suggested that high levels of turbulence broke-up the wake via large buoyancy effects, which are generally on the order of 1 km in size. On the other hand, they found pronounced wake effects when the atmosphere was very stable and turbulence was either suppressed or the length scale was reduced as turbulence in this case was mechanically

  12. BOUNDARY LAYER AND AMPLIFIED GRID EFFECTS ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF S809 AIRFOIL FOR HORIZONTAL AXIS WIND TURBINE (HAWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOUNES EL KHCHINE

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of rotor blades has a great effect on the aerodynamics performances of horizontal axis wind turbine and its efficiency. This work presents the effects of mesh refinement and boundary layer on aerodynamic performances of wind turbine S809 rotor. Furthermore, the simulation of fluid flow is taken for S809 airfoil wind turbine blade using ANSYS/FLUENT software. The problem is solved by the conservation of mass and momentum equations for unsteady and incompressible flow using advanced SST k-ω turbulence model, in order to predict the effects of mesh refinement and boundary layer on aerodynamics performances. Lift and drag coefficients are the most important parameters in studying the wind turbine performance, these coefficients are calculated for four meshes refinement and different angles of attacks with Reynolds number is 106. The study is applied to S809 airfoil which has 21% thickness, specially designed by NREL for horizontal axis wind turbines.

  13. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Erickson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis, which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS. White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  14. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Diffendorfer, Jay E; Russell, Robin E; Szymanski, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat ( Myotis sodalis ), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans , disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  15. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Russell, Robin E.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  16. Van der Waals effect in weak adsorption affecting trends in adsorption, reactivity, and the view of substrate nobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelkkanen, Kari André; Lundqvist, Bengt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) force, particularly discernible in weak adsorption, is studied on noble and transition metals. In calculations with the vdW density functional (DF) [ M. Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)], the atomic structure near the adsorption site...

  17. Observed and modeled effects of pH on bioconcentration of diphenhydramine, a weakly basic pharmaceutical, by fathead minnows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the influence of pH on uptake and accumulation of ionizable pharmaceuticals by fish was recently identified as a major research need. In the present study, fathead minnows were exposed to diphenhydramine (DPH), a weakly basic pharmaceutical (pKa = 9.1). Fish were ...

  18. THE EFFECT OF ACIDIC EXCIPIENTS ON THE RELEASE OF WEAKLY BASIC DRUGS FROM THE PROGRAMMED RELEASE MEGALOPOROUS SYSTEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEEN, C; BUITENDIJK, H; LERK, CF

    1991-01-01

    Weakly basic drugs such as ketanserin and mianserin exhibit strongly pH-dependent solubilities. Incorporated in the programmed release megaloporous system, these drugs showed pH-dependent release profiles. The strongly inhibited release rates in neutral media compared to acidic media, could be

  19. Wind power development in the United States: Effects of policies and electricity transmission congestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitaj, Claudia

    In this dissertation, I analyze the drivers of wind power development in the United States as well as the relationship between renewable power plant location and transmission congestion and emissions levels. I first examine the role of government renewable energy incentives and access to the electricity grid on investment in wind power plants across counties from 1998-2007. The results indicate that the federal production tax credit, state-level sales tax credit and production incentives play an important role in promoting wind power. In addition, higher wind power penetration levels can be achieved by bringing more parts of the electricity transmission grid under independent system operator regulation. I conclude that state and federal government policies play a significant role in wind power development both by providing financial support and by improving physical and procedural access to the electricity grid. Second, I examine the effect of renewable power plant location on electricity transmission congestion levels and system-wide emissions levels in a theoretical model and a simulation study. A new renewable plant takes the effect of congestion on its own output into account, but ignores the effect of its marginal contribution to congestion on output from existing plants, which results in curtailment of renewable power. Though pricing congestion removes the externality and reduces curtailment, I find that in the absence of a price on emissions, pricing congestion may in some cases actually increase system-wide emissions. The final part of my dissertation deals with an econometric issue that emerged from the empirical analysis of the drivers of wind power. I study the effect of the degree of censoring on random-effects Tobit estimates in finite sample with a particular focus on severe censoring, when the percentage of uncensored observations reaches 1 to 5 percent. The results show that the Tobit model performs well even at 5 percent uncensored observations

  20. Inversion effects on wind and surface pressure in atmospheric front propagation simulation with a hyperbolic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper the effects of an inversion layer in a stratified atmosphere on the surface wind speed and pressure are investigated with models based on the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions. Artificial compressibility is introduced into the models in order to make the governing equations hyperbolic. For comparison with available simulation data, the physical processes under study are assumed to be adiabatic. Plain orography is considered in surface pressure simulations with a finite-difference version of the model, while surface wind speed effects are estimated in artificial cold front propagation over a hill with a finite-element version of the model. The front surface is described in both models by an equation for advection of a scalar substance, which is solved with a third-order semi-Lagrangian procedure. The results of simulations show various meteorological effects in agreement with observations and in accordance with a theory proposed by Charba [3].

  1. Effect of changes in some climatic factors on wind erosion risks – the case study of South Moravia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podhrázská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of wind erosion is determined by climatic factors (wind direction and wind speed, precipitation, temperature, humidity, presence of negative temperatures, soil and geological factors (geological composition of the area, the size and shape of soil particles, soil moisture, soil structure, mechanical stability of soil, vegetation factors (vegetation cover, crop residues, geomorphological factors (shape and distribution of the slopes, the incidence planes and leeward sites and anthropogenic factors (length and orientation of land, farming, irrigation. Potential exposure of the wind erosion can be expressed through indexes of soil susceptibility to wind erosion in conjunction with the effects of climatic factors. In connection with the fluctuating values of climatic factors induced by climate changes, differences can be expected to occur also in the size of areas threatened by wind erosion. One of the areas, most endangered by wind erosion in the Czech Republic, is South Moravia. In this region there was performed the regionalization of localities, endangered by wind erosion. This paper presents results of analysis the erosion risks according to climatic and soil characteristics statistically processed for the period from 1901–1950. These are then compared with areas endangered by wind erosion that were established based on the updated set of climatic data and its statistical processing from the period of years 1961–2000. The results are processed into map outputs by using GIS.

  2. Exposure to wind turbine noise: Perceptual responses and reported health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, David S; Feder, Katya; Keith, Stephen E; Voicescu, Sonia A; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; McGuire, D'Arcy; Bower, Tara; Lavigne, Eric; Murray, Brian J; Weiss, Shelly K; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    Health Canada, in collaboration with Statistics Canada, and other external experts, conducted the Community Noise and Health Study to better understand the impacts of wind turbine noise (WTN) on health and well-being. A cross-sectional epidemiological study was carried out between May and September 2013 in southwestern Ontario and Prince Edward Island on 1238 randomly selected participants (606 males, 632 females) aged 18-79 years, living between 0.25 and 11.22 km from operational wind turbines. Calculated outdoor WTN levels at the dwelling reached 46 dBA. Response rate was 78.9% and did not significantly differ across sample strata. Self-reported health effects (e.g., migraines, tinnitus, dizziness, etc.), sleep disturbance, sleep disorders, quality of life, and perceived stress were not related to WTN levels. Visual and auditory perception of wind turbines as reported by respondents increased significantly with increasing WTN levels as did high annoyance toward several wind turbine features, including the following: noise, blinking lights, shadow flicker, visual impacts, and vibrations. Concern for physical safety and closing bedroom windows to reduce WTN during sleep also increased with increasing WTN levels. Other sample characteristics are discussed in relation to WTN levels. Beyond annoyance, results do not support an association between exposure to WTN up to 46 dBA and the evaluated health-related endpoints.

  3. Measured effects of wind turbine generation at the Block Island Power Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Smith, R. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scot, G. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    Data measurements made on the NASA MOD-OA 200-kw wind-turbine generator (WTG) installed on a utility grid form the basis for an overall performance analysis. Fuel displacement/-savings, dynamic interactions, and WTG excitation (reactive-power) control effects are studied. Continuous recording of a large number of electrical and mechanical variables on FM magnetic tape permit evaluation and correlation of phenomena over a bandwidth of at least 20 Hz. Because the wind-power penetration reached peaks of 60 percent, the impact of wind fluctuation and wind-turbine/diesel-utility interaction is evaluated in a worst-case scenario. The speed-governor dynamics of the diesel units exhibited an underdamped response, and the utility operation procedures were not altered to optimize overall WTG/utility performance. Primary findings over the data collection period are: a calculated 6.7-percent reduction in fuel consumption while generating 11 percent of the total electrical energy; acceptable system voltage and frequency fluctuations with WTG connected; and applicability of WTG excitation schemes using voltage, power, or VARS as the controlled variable.

  4. Shelter effect efficacy of sand fences: A comparison of systems in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Qu, Jianjun; Ling, Yuquan; Liu, Benli; Xiao, Jianhua

    2018-02-01

    The Lanzhou-Xinjiang High-speed Railway runs through an expansive wind area in the Gobi Desert and blown-sand disasters are a critical issue affecting its operation. To strengthen the blown-sand disaster shelter systems along the railway, the shelter effects of punching plate and wire mesh fences with approximately equal porosity (48%) were simulated in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the wind velocity was reduced to a higher extent by the punching plate fence than by the wire mesh fence. When a single row of sand fencing was used, the wind velocity reduction coefficient (Rcz) values downwind of the punching plate fence and wire mesh fence reached 71.77% and 39.37%, respectively. When double rows of sand fencing were used, the Rcz values downwind of the punching plate and wire mesh fences were approximately 87.48% and 60.81%, respectively. For the flow field structure on the leeward side of the fencing, the deceleration zone behind the punching plate fence was more pronounced than that behind the wire mesh fence. The vortex zone was not obvious and the reverse flow disappeared for both types of fences, which indicates that the turbulent intensity was small. The sand-trapping efficiency of the wire mesh fence was close to that of punching plate fence. When a single row of sand fencing was set up, the total mass flux density decreased, on average, by 65.85% downwind of the wire mesh fence, and 75.06% downwind of the punching plate fence; when double rows of sand fencing were present, the total mass flux density decreased, on average, by 84.53% downwind of the wire mesh fence and 84.51% downwind of the punching plate fence. In addition, the wind-proof efficiency and the sand-proof efficiency of the punching plate fence and the wire mesh fence decreased with increasing wind velocities. Consequently, punching plate and wire mesh fences may effectively control the sand hazard in the expansive wind area of the Gobi Desert.

  5. Effects of wind turbines on area use and behaviour of semi-domestic reindeer in enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Flydal

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, industrial developments have expanded into reindeer ranges in the arctic and adjacent higher latitudes in search for energy, minerals, timber and other resources. Several wind turbine parks are under planning in reindeer ranges in Norway, and there is concern about possible negative effects on behaviour and area use of wild and semi-domestic reindeer. We tested whether a wind turbine and its rotor movement had any effect on area use, activity changes, vigilance bouts, and restless behaviour like running, walking, and standing for enclosed semi-domestic reindeer. Five different groups of reindeer in a 450 m long, 8 hectare, enclosure close to a wind turbine were manipulated by turning the wind turbine rotor on and off, and compared with reindeer in a control enclosure without wind turbine exposure. When exposed to rotor movement, two groups used locations farther from the wind turbine, two groups showed no shift, while one group moved closer to the wind turbine. The reindeer showed no systematic differences in the measured behaviour patterns between the two enclosures that could indicate fright or stress as a consequence of the wind turbine or rotor movement. We conclude that semi-domestic reindeer in an enclosure showed no negative behavioural response and little or no aversion towards a wind turbine. The possibility of rapid habituation in a small enclosure with continuous wind turbine exposure suggests that effects on area use should be studied at a larger scale or with free-ranging reindeer.Abstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag:I løpet av de senere tiår har industriell utbygging til utnytting av energi, mineraler, tømmer og andre ressurser ekspandert inn i reinens beiteområder i nordområdene. Flere vindmølleparker er under planlegging i norske reinbeiteområder, og det spekuleres i mulige konsekvenser av disse på atferd og arealbruk hos villrein og tamrein. Vi testet om en vindmølle og dens rotorbevegelse hadde noen

  6. Consolidating the State of Knowledge: A Synoptical Review of Wind Energy's Wildlife Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Eva; Bulling, Lea; Köppel, Johann

    2015-08-01

    Wind energy development contributes substantially to achieve climate protection goals. Unintended side effects, especially on wildlife, have long been discussed and substantial research has evolved over the last decade. At this stage, it is important to identify what we have learnt so far, as well as which predominant uncertainties and gaps remain. This review article aims to consolidate the state of knowledge, providing a qualitative analysis of the main effects of wind energy development on- and offshore, focusing on frequently studied species groups (bats, breeding and resting birds, raptors, migratory birds, marine mammals). We reviewed over 220 publications from which we identified predominant hypotheses that were summarized and displayed in tables. Journal publications, conference contributions, and further studies have been considered. We found that research focusing on offshore wind energy within the last couple of years has increased significantly as well, catching up with the vast amount of onshore studies. Some hypotheses have been verified by numerous publications and a consensus has been reached (e.g., correlation between bat activity and weather factors), while others are still being debated more (e.g., determination of migratory corridors) or remain unknown (e.g., effect on population level). Factors influencing potential effects were mainly related to species characteristics (morphology, phenology, abundance, behavior, and response to turbines) or site characteristics (landscape features, weather, and habitat quality). Consolidating the state of research provides the groundwork for the identification of mitigation measures and advanced planning approaches. However, the quantification of effects remains challenging and uncertainties will always persist.

  7. Consolidating the State of Knowledge: A Synoptical Review of Wind Energy's Wildlife Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Eva; Bulling, Lea; Köppel, Johann

    2015-08-01

    Wind energy development contributes substantially to achieve climate protection goals. Unintended side effects, especially on wildlife, have long been discussed and substantial research has evolved over the last decade. At this stage, it is important to identify what we have learnt so far, as well as which predominant uncertainties and gaps remain. This review article aims to consolidate the state of knowledge, providing a qualitative analysis of the main effects of wind energy development on- and offshore, focusing on frequently studied species groups (bats, breeding and resting birds, raptors, migratory birds, marine mammals). We reviewed over 220 publications from which we identified predominant hypotheses that were summarized and displayed in tables. Journal publications, conference contributions, and further studies have been considered. We found that research focusing on offshore wind energy within the last couple of years has increased significantly as well, catching up with the vast amount of onshore studies. Some hypotheses have been verified by numerous publications and a consensus has been reached (e.g., correlation between bat activity and weather factors), while others are still being debated more (e.g., determination of migratory corridors) or remain unknown (e.g., effect on population level). Factors influencing potential effects were mainly related to species characteristics (morphology, phenology, abundance, behavior, and response to turbines) or site characteristics (landscape features, weather, and habitat quality). Consolidating the state of research provides the groundwork for the identification of mitigation measures and advanced planning approaches. However, the quantification of effects remains challenging and uncertainties will always persist.

  8. Investigation of nozzle contours in the CSIR supersonic wind tunnel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vallabh, Bhavya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing nozzle contour profiles of the CSIR’s supersonic or High Speed Wind Tunnel (HSWT) produce weak waves in the test section region, which effectively degrades the air flow quality in the test section. This paper describes a calculation...

  9. Mod 1 wind turbine generator failure modes and effects analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was directed primarily at identifying those critical failure modes that would be hazardous to life or would result in major damage to the system. Each subsystem was approached from the top down, and broken down to successive lower levels where it appeared that the criticality of the failure mode warranted more detail analysis. The results were reviewed by specialists from outside the Mod 1 program, and corrective action taken wherever recommended.

  10. Analysis of extreme wind events at Høvsøre and the effect on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannesdóttir, Ásta; Kelly, Mark C.; Mann, Jakob

    of this analysis is to answer the questions: 1. How are the wind-turbine loads affected by these events? 2. What atmospheric parameters give rise to the highest loads? The data used for the analysis is from a 160 m tall lighting tower in Høvsøre, which is a measurement site approximately 2 km from the west coast...

  11. Calm winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of calm winds is of societal importance in connection with distribution pollution from natural sources (dust, volcanic gases and ash) as well as antropogenic sources. Time series from a multitude of automatic weather stations in Iceland have been explored and the climatology of calmness is established. This climatology underlines the importancec of not only abscence of large scale winds, but more importantly, the presence of surface inversions. Calmness is most frequent in summer, with secondary maxima in autumn and winter. The autumn calmness coincides with a period when frequency of synoptic scale cyclones does not increase, while the frequency of surface inversions increases rapidly. There is a very strong diurnal cycle in frequency of calm winds in the summer. The data indiates strongly that the nocturnal calmness is a result of a surface inversion, not the abscence of sea breeze. The frequency of calm winds is not only low at the coast, but also in the mountains, in spite of higher surface roughness away from the sea. The frequency of calm winds is much greater inside valleys and fjords than anywhere else. There are indications that open water in fjords has limited effect on the frequecy of calm winds along the fjord.

  12. Relativistic effects in superluminal jets and neutron star winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Ellis, G.F.R.; Lanza, A. (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy) Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy) Cape Town Univ., Rondebosch (South Africa) International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy))

    1990-10-01

    A complete solution is given for the problem of radial motion of a test particle through the combined gravitational and radiation field of a spherical star. The star is assumed to radiate isotropically from each point of its surface. The radiative force acting on the particle is assumed not to depend on the frequency of radiation. There is no feedback from the particle motion to the background radiation field. All the effects of special and general relativity are included with no approximation. 29 refs.

  13. Effect of Wind Noise on Undersea Acoustic Network Performance and Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hurt, Christopher S

    2005-01-01

    .... Previous reported correlations of acoustic communication performance and wind speed led to multiple hypotheses explaining degradation, including noise variability as well as wind-driven sea-surface...

  14. Characterisation of weak magnetic field effects in an aqueous glutamic acid solution by nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy and voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Pazur, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate altered metabolism and enzyme kinetics for various organisms, as well as changes of neuronal functions and behaviour of higher animals, when they were exposed to specific combinations of weak static and alternating low frequency electromagnetic fields. Field strengths and frequencies, as well as properties of involved ions were related by a linear equation, known as the formula of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, abbreviation mentioned first by Liboff). Under...

  15. Wind-tunnel Investigation of Effects of Rear Upper Surface Modification on a NASA Supercritical Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C. D.; Blackwell, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.81 to examine the effects on supercritical airfoil of modifying the rear upper surface to reduce the magnitude of an intermediate off design second velocity peak. The modification was accomplished by increasing the upper surface curvature around the 50 percent chord station and reducing the curvature over approximately the rearmost 30 percent of the airfoil while maintaining the same trailing edge thickness.

  16. Seasonal effects of wind conditions on migration patterns of soaring American white pelican

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez Illan, Javier; Wang, Guiming; Cunningham, Fred L.; King, D. Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Energy and time expenditures are determinants of bird migration strategies. Soaring birds have developed migration strategies to minimize these costs, optimizing the use of all the available resources to facilitate their displacement. We analysed the effects of different wind factors (tailwind, turbulence, vertical updrafts) on the migratory flying strategies adopted by 24 satellite-tracked American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) throughout spring and autumn in North America. We h...

  17. Effect of Two-Way Air-Sea Coupling in High and Low Wind Speed Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    development of Hur- ricane Opal and found the model-simulated hurricane intensity was sensitive to inclusion of sea-spray evap- oration and less...its impact on two different weather scenarios. The first case examines the impact of a hurricane -induced cold ocean wake on simulated changes in the...structure of Hurricane Katrina. The second case investigates the effect of wind- and current-induced island wakes and their impact on the local

  18. Self-starting aerodynamics analysis of vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyang Zhu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vertical axis wind turbine is a special type of wind-force electric generator which is capable of working in the complicated wind environment. The self-starting aerodynamics is one of the most important considerations for this kind of turbine. This article aims at providing a systematic synthesis on the self-starting aerodynamic characteristics of vertical axis wind turbine based on the numerical analysis approach. First, the physical model of vertical axis wind turbine and its parameter definitions are presented. Secondary, the interaction model between the vertical axis wind turbine and fluid is developed by using the weak coupling approach; the numerical data of this model are then compared with the wind tunnel experimental data to show its feasibility. Third, the effects of solidity and fixed pitch angle on the self-starting aerodynamic characteristics of the vertical axis wind turbine are analyzed systematically. Finally, the quantification effects of the solidity and fixed pitch angle on the self-starting performance of the turbine can be obtained. The analysis in this study will provide straightforward physical insight into the self-starting aerodynamic characteristics of vertical axis wind turbine.

  19. Methods development for cost-effective marine environmental monitoring at offshore wind farms in Norwegian waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlgren, Thomas; Schlaeppy, Marie-Lise; Olenin, Sergej; Shashkov, Alexej; Heggoey, Erling; Troedsson, Christofer

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Current understanding of the environmental impact from offshore wind farms and experiences in monitoring practices, are restricted to soft-bottom habitats. Due to the large expansion of this source of energy, and the national and international drive to place large parks offshore, there is at present a strong need to further increase our knowledge of the impact on the marine environment in a wider range of habitats. At a national level, it is of importance to develop monitoring methods that are suitable for Norwegian sites and that are adjusted to impact levels expected from wind parks. Biological data on the impact of offshore wind farms in marine ecosystems are predominantly focused on the southern Baltic and southern North Sea. It is shown that large wind farms do have an impact on the marine ecosystem. The most studied effects relate to the introduction of hard substrate (the turbine foundation and scour protection) in an area made exclusively of soft sediments. This leads to an introduction of a new category of fauna, a higher productivity and a shift in community structure and species composition. In addition, the construction of an offshore wind farm excludes other activities with potentially high negative impacts on the marine ecosystem such as bottom trawling. These findings are not necessary applicable to rocky shorelines such as those bordering the Norwegian coast and the first full-scale offshore wind farm, Havsul 1. The Havsul site borders an open ocean with high average yearly wind-speeds of more than 20 knots. A relatively narrow shelf and steep underwater topography creates waves of substantial heights and a benthic marine ecosystem that is fundamentally different from the shallow water, soft sediment substrates in the southern Baltic and North Seas. Instead, areas in Norway with water depths suitable for today.s design of offshore wind farms (down to a depth of about 30-50 m) have a complex topography and a mosaic of substrate types are

  20. Wind power: Addressing wildlife impacts, assessing effects on tourism, and examining the link between climate change perceptions and support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Meredith Blaydes

    As the world's most rapidly growing source of energy, wind power has vast potential for mitigating climate change and advancing global environmental sustainability. Yet, the challenges facing wind energy remain both complex and substantial. Two such challenges are: 1) wildlife impacts; and 2) perceived negative effects on tourism. This dissertation examines these challenges in a multi-paper format, and also investigates the role that climate change perceptions play in garnering public support for wind power. The first paper assesses optimal approaches for addressing wind power's wildlife impacts. Comparative analysis reveals that avian mortality from turbines ranks far behind avian mortality from a number of other anthropogenic sources. Additionally, although bats have recently emerged as more vulnerable to wind turbines than birds, they are generally less federally protected. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects over 800 bird species, regardless of their threatened or endangered status. Moreover, it criminalizes the incidental take of birds without a permit and simultaneously grants no permits for such incidental take, thereby creating a legal conundrum for the wind industry. An examination of the legislative and case history of the MBTA, however, reveals that wind operators are not likely to be prosecuted for incidental take if they cooperate with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) and take reasonable steps to reduce siting and operational impacts. Furthermore, this study's analysis reveals modest wildlife impacts from wind power, in comparison with numerous other energy sources. Scientific-research, legal, and policy recommendations are provided to update the present legal and regulatory regime under the MBTA and to minimize avian and bat impacts. For instance, FWS should: establish comprehensive federal guidelines for wind facility siting, permitting, monitoring, and mitigation; and promulgate regulations under the MBTA for the issuance of

  1. Effect on Torque and Thrust of the Pointed Tip Shape of a Wind Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoungsoo Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of the tip shape of a wind turbine blade on aerodynamic forces, including the effects of separation, transition and stall. A National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL Phase-VI wind turbine blade was used, in which the shape of the tip was modified to a pointed tip. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations were employed for the analysis and the results were compared with the original NREL blade CFD and experimental data using ANSYS CFX (Ansys Inc., Delaware, PA, USA. To predict the separation and separation-induced transition on both near wall and far away, the shear-stress-transport (SST Gamma-Theta turbulent model was used. The stall onset of a 20° angle of attack and its effects were also analyzed and presented. The value of torque with the pointed tip blade was found to be 3%–8% higher than the original NREL blade showing the benefit of the pointed tip. Normal force coefficient is lower at the tip for the pointed tip blade, which results in lower deformation of the blade. It was found that the pointed-tip blade is more efficient in terms of generating torque than the original NREL Phase-VI blade in the dynamic stall region of 10–15 m/s wind speeds.

  2. Effect of wind and altitude on record performance in foot races, pole vault, and long jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1985-08-01

    Using only elementary physics, one can estimate the effect of wind and altitude on performance in several track and field events. Experiments have shown that the power lost to aerodynamic drag forces is about a tenth of the total power expended in running at sprint speeds. From this observation one can calculate the effect of wind or of air density changes on sprinting speed. In pole vaulting, the sprinter converts his kinetic energy into potential energy to clear the bar. In long jumping, he is a projectile, but he is prevented from reaching his optimum distance expected for his initial velocity by the height which he can attain during his jump. For each of these events, performance in moderate winds of 2.0 m/s or at altitudes comparable to Mexico City differ by several percent from performances at sea level or in still air. In longer running races and in bicycle races, aerodynamic forces play an important role in racing strategy. However, since the athletes perform in groups it is difficult to calculate the effect on individual performances.

  3. Weak Quantum Ergodicity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    We examine the consequences of classical ergodicity for the localization properties of individual quantum eigenstates in the classical limit. We note that the well known Schnirelman result is a weaker form of quantum ergodicity than the one implied by random matrix theory. This suggests the possibility of systems with non-gaussian random eigenstates which are nonetheless ergodic in the sense of Schnirelman and lead to ergodic transport in the classical limit. These we call "weakly quantum ergodic.'' Indeed for a class of "slow ergodic" classical systems, it is found that each eigenstate becomes localized to an ever decreasing fraction of the available state space, in the semiclassical limit. Nevertheless, each eigenstate in this limit covers phase space evenly on any classical scale, and long-time transport properties betwen individual quantum states remain ergodic due to the diffractive effects which dominate quantum phase space exploration.

  4. Wind Tunnel Interference Effects on Tilt Rotor Testing Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Witold J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental techniques to measure rotorcraft aerodynamic performance are widely used. However, most of them are either unable to capture interference effects from bodies, or require an extremely large computational budget. The objective of the present research is to develop an XV-15 Tiltrotor Research Aircraft rotor model for investigation of wind tunnel wall interference using a novel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver for rotorcraft, RotCFD. In RotCFD, a mid-fidelity Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver is used with an incompressible flow model and a realizable k-e turbulence model. The rotor is, however, not modeled using a computationally expensive, unsteady viscous body-fitted grid, but is instead modeled using a blade-element model (BEM) with a momentum source approach. Various flight modes of the XV-15 isolated rotor, including hover, tilt, and airplane mode, have been simulated and correlated to existing experimental and theoretical data. The rotor model is subsequently used for wind tunnel wall interference simulations in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) at Ames Research Center in California. The results from the validation of the isolated rotor performance showed good correlation with experimental and theoretical data. The results were on par with known theoretical analyses. In RotCFD the setup, grid generation, and running of cases is faster than many CFD codes, which makes it a useful engineering tool. Performance predictions need not be as accurate as high-fidelity CFD codes, as long as wall effects can be properly simulated. For both test sections of the NFAC wall, interference was examined by simulating the XV-15 rotor in the test section of the wind tunnel and with an identical grid but extended boundaries in free field. Both cases were also examined with an isolated rotor or with the rotor mounted on the modeled geometry of the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR). A "quasi linear trim" was used to trim the thrust

  5. Effect of Wind Turbine Wakes on the Performance of a Real Case WRF-LES Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubrawa, P.; Montornès, A.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.; Giroux, G.; Casso, P.

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this work is to estimate how much of the discrepancy between measured and modeled flow parameters can be attributed to wake effects. The real case simulations were performed for a period of 15 days with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and nested down to a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) scale of ∼ 100 m. Beyond the coastal escarpment, the site is flat and homogeneous and the study focuses on a meteorological mast and a northern turbine subjected to the wake of a southern turbine. The observational data set collected during the Prince Edward Island Wind Energy Experiment (PEIWEE) includes a sonic anemometer at 60 m mounted onto the mast, and measurements from the two turbines. Wake versus free stream conditions are distinguished based on measured wind direction while assuming constant expansion for the wake of the southern turbine. During the period considered the mast and northern turbine were under the southern turbine wake ∼ 16% and ∼ 11% of the time, respectively. Under these conditions, the model overestimates the wind speed and underestimates the turbulence intensity at the mast but not at the northern turbine, where the effect of wakes on the model error is unclear and other model limitations are likely more important. The wind direction difference between the southern and northern turbines is slightly underestimated by the model regardless of whether free stream or wake conditions are observed, indicating that it may be due to factors unrelated to the wake development such as surface forcings. Finally, coupling an inexpensive wake model to the high-fidelity simulation as a post-processing tool drives the simulated wind speeds at the mast significantly closer to the observed values, but the opposite is true at the coastal turbine which is in the far wake. This indicates that the application of a post-processing wake correction should be performed with caution and may increase the wind speed errors when other important

  6. Alfvénic turbulence in solar wind originating near coronal hole boundaries: heavy-ion effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The mid-latitude phases of the Ulysses mission offer an excellent opportunity to investigate the solar wind originating near the coronal hole boundaries. Here we report on Alfvénic turbulence features, revealing a relevant presence of in-situ generated fluctuations, observed during the wind rarefaction phase that charaterizes the transition from fast to slow wind. Heavy-ion composition and magnetic field measurements indicate a strict time correspondence of the locally generated fluctuations with 1 the crossing of the interface between fast and slow wind and 2 the presence of strongly underwound magnetic field lines (with respect to the Parker spiral. Recent studies suggest that such underwound magnetic configurations correspond to fast wind magnetic lines that, due to footpoint motions at the Sun, have their inner leg transferred to slow wind and are stretched out by the velocity gradient. If this is a valid scenario, the existence of a magnetic connection across the fast-slow wind interface is a condition that, given the different state of the two kinds of wind, may favour the development of processes acting as local sources of turbulence. We suggest that heavy-ion effects could be responsible of the observed turbulence features.

  7. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed.......The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  8. Methodology for the Assessment of 3D Conduction Effects in an Aerothermal Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Anthony Brandon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for the assessment of three-dimensional conduction effects during test in a Aerothermal Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to duplicate and extend tests that were performed during the 1960's on thermal conduction on proturberance on a flat plate. Slides review the 1D versus 3D conduction data reduction error, the analysis process, CFD-based analysis, loose coupling method that simulates a wind tunnel test run, verification of the CFD solution, Grid convergence, Mach number trend, size trends, and a Sumary of the CFD conduction analysis. Other slides show comparisons to pretest CFD at Mach 1.5 and 2.16 and the geometries of the models and grids.

  9. Effect of Side Wind on the Directional Stability and Aerodynamics of a Hybrid Buoyant Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional stability characteristics explain the capabilities of a hybrid buoyant aircraft’s performance against the side wind, which induces flow separation that is chaotic in nature and may lead to oscillations of the aerodynamic surfaces. A numerical study is carried out to estimate the effect of side wind. The boundary conditions for the computational domain are set to velocity inlet and pressure outlet. Due to the incompressible flow at the cruise velocity, the density is taken to be constant. For these steady state simulations, the time is discretized in first order implicit and the SIMPLE scheme is employed for pressure velocity coupling alongwith k-ω SST model. Based on the results obtained so far, it is concluded that voluminous hybrid lifting fuselage is the major cause of directional.

  10. Proton Kinetic Effects and Turbulent Energy Cascade Rate in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Kiyani, K. H.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the (β‖,T⊥/T‖)-plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rates and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  11. Wind Tunnel Analysis of the Aerodynamic Loads on Rolling Stock over Railway Embankments: The Effect of Shelter Windbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Sanchez, Sergio; Lopez-Garcia, Oscar; Sanz-Andres, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Wind-flow pattern over embankments involves an overexposure of the rolling stock travelling on them to wind loads. Windbreaks are a common solution for changing the flow characteristic in order to decrease unwanted effects induced by the presence of cross-wind. The shelter effectiveness of a set of windbreaks placed over a railway twin-track embankment is experimentally analysed. A set of two-dimensional wind tunnel tests are undertaken and results corresponding to pressure tap measurements over a section of a typical high-speed train are herein presented. The results indicate that even small-height windbreaks provide sheltering effects to the vehicles. Also, eaves located at the windbreak tips seem to improve their sheltering effect. PMID:25544954

  12. Unstructed Navier-Stokes Analysis of Wind-Tunnel Aeroelastic Effects on TCA Model 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Neal T.; Allison, Dennis O.; Parikh, Paresh C.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate a simple technique which accounts for aeroelastic deformations experienced by HSR wind-tunnel models within CFD computations. With improved correlations, CFD can become a more effective tool for augmenting the post-test understanding of experimental data. The present technique involves the loose coupling of a low-level structural representation within the ELAPS code, to an unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3Dns. The ELAPS model is initially calibrated against bending characteristics of the wind-tunnel model. The strength of this method is that, with a single point calibration of a simple structural representation, the static aeroelastic effects can be accounted for in CFD calculations across a range of test conditions. No prior knowledge of the model deformation during the wind-on test is required. This approach has been successfully applied to the high aspect-ratio planforms of subsonic transports. The current challenge is to adapt the procedure to low aspect-ratio planforms typical of HSR configurations.

  13. Atmospheric Turbulence Effects on Wind-Turbine Wakes: An LES Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Wu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of atmospheric turbulence effects on wind-turbine wakes is presented. Large-eddy simulations of neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layer flows through stand-alone wind turbines were performed over homogeneous flat surfaces with four different aerodynamic roughness lengths. Emphasis is placed on the structure and characteristics of turbine wakes in the cases where the incident flows to the turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different mean wind shears and turbulence intensity levels. The simulation results show that the different turbulence intensity levels of the incoming flow lead to considerable influence on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit, turbulence intensity, and turbulent shear stress in the wake region. In particular, when the turbulence intensity level of the incoming flow is higher, the turbine-induced wake (velocity deficit recovers faster, and the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stress are closer to the turbine. A detailed analysis of the turbulence kinetic energy budget in the wakes reveals also an important effect of the incoming flow turbulence level on the magnitude and spatial distribution of the shear production and transport terms.

  14. Investigating Effects of Monsoon Winds on Hydrodynamics in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    The South China Sea is a large marginal sea surrounded by land masses and island chains, and characterized by complex bathymetry and irregular coastlines. The circulation in South China Sea is subjected to seasonal and inter-annual variations of tidal and meteorological conditions. The effects of monsoon winds on hydrodynamics is investigated by applying spectral and harmonic analysis on surface elevation and wind data at stations located in the South China Sea. The analysis indicates varying responses to the seasonal monsoon depending on the location of the station. At Kaohsiung (located in northern South China Sea off Taiwan coast), tides from the Pacific Ocean and the southwest monsoon winds are found to be dominant mechanisms. The Kota Kinabalu and Bintulu stations, located to the east of South China Sea off Borneo coast, are influenced by low energy complex winds, and the shallow bottom bathymetry at these locations leads to tidal energy damping compared to other stations. The tidal dynamics at Tioman, located in southern South China Sea off Malaysia coast, are most responsive to the effects of the northeast monsoon. The complexity of our problem together with the limited amount of available data in the region presents a challenging research topic. An unstructured-grid SUNTANS model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of the circulation in South China Sea. Skill assessment of the model is performed by comparing model predictions of the surface elevations and currents with observations. The results suggest that the quality of the model prediction is highly dependent on horizontal grid resolution and coastline accuracy. The model may be used in future applications to investigate seasonal and inter-annual variations in hydrodynamics.

  15. Atmospheric infrasound propagation modelling using the reflectivity method with a direct formulation of the wind effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Valerie; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Schweitzer, Johannes; Gibbons, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    We recently advocated using the reflectivity method, also known as the wavenumber integration method or fast-field program, to model atmospheric infrasound propagation at regional distances. The advantage of the reflectivity method is its ability to model the full wavefield, including diffractive effects with head waves and shadow zone arrivals, in a broad frequency range but still at a relatively low computational cost. Attenuation can easily be included, giving the possibility to analyse relative amplitudes and frequency content of the different arrivals. It has clear advantages compared with ray theory in terms of predicting phases considering the particular frequent occurrence of shadow zone arrivals in infrasound observations. Its main limitation, at least in the traditional form of the method, lies in the fact that it can only handle range-independent models. We presented earlier some reflectivity method simulations of an observed accidental explosion in Norway. Wind intensity and direction are non-negligible parameters for infrasound propagation and these are appropriately taken into account in most infrasound ray-tracing codes. On the other hand, in the previous reflectivity simulations wind was taken into account only through the effective sound speed approximation where the horizontal projection of the wind field is added to the adiabatic sound speed profiles. This approximation is appropriate for dominantly horizontal propagation but can give incorrect arrival times and shadow zone locations for waves which have a significant portion of their propagation path at more vertical incidence, like thermospheric arrivals. We present here how we have modified the original reflectivity algorithm in order to take the wind into account in a more correct fashion, and how this improvement influences the synthetics.

  16. Detection of nocturnal coherent turbulence in the US Great Plains and effects on wind turbine fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, M. J.; Wiersema, D. J.; Zhou, B.; Chow, F. K.

    2012-12-01

    Strong low-level jet winds that develop in the nocturnal stable boundary layer (SBL) create some of the most energetic wind energy resources in Great Plains of North America. These stratified flows, however, can cause strong wind shear and veer across wind turbine rotors. Additionally, turbulent bursting events triggered by strong vertical wind shear can lead to fatigue and damage of wind turbine blades and components, increasing maintenance costs and reducing wind turbine power production. Coherent structures which are the signature of turbulent bursting events can be observed in heavily instrumented wind farms and in high-resolution simulations. Large-scale adoption of wind energy will benefit from the ability to predict these turbulence events with limited in-situ data. By identifying signatures of these bursting events, new turbine control technologies could be used to reduce wind turbine damage and increase overall wind farm energy yield (for example using algorithms with the ability to proactively and independently pitch blades). This research analyzes SBL turbulence in the Great Plains to develop methods to identify these structures at wind farms. Nested large-eddy simulations down to about 20m horizontal resolution are performed and compared to high-resolution Doppler wind LIDAR data (1 Hz) to determine if the model is able to create similar wind and turbulence conditions. Wavelet analysis of the LIDAR and model wind fields is used to detect coherent turbulent structures at frequencies that could be potentially damaging for wind turbines and provide guidance for design of turbine control technologies.

  17. A Spatial Hedonic Analysis of the Effects of Wind Energy Facilities on Surrounding Property Values in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoen, Ben [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cappers, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Jason P. [Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, MO (United States); Jackson, Thomas [Real Analytics Inc. and Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Thayer, Mark A. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-08-21

    This report summarizes a new analysis, building on previously published research, about wind energy’s effects on residential property values. This study helps fill research gaps by collecting and analyzing data from 27 counties across nine U.S. states, related to 67 different wind facilities, and constructs a pooled model that investigates average effects near the turbines across the sample while controlling for local variables, such as sale prices of nearby homes.

  18. Effects of internal loading on phosphorus distribution in the Taihu Lake driven by wind waves and lake currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Fang, Hongwei; He, Guojian; Jiang, Helong; Wang, Changhui

    2016-12-01

    Wind-driven sediment resuspension exerts significant effects on the P behavior in shallow lake ecosystems. In this study, a comprehensive dynamic phosphorus (P) model that integrates hydrodynamic, wind wave and sediment transport is proposed to assess the importance of internal P cycling due to sediment resuspension on water column P levels. The primary contribution of the model is detailed modeling and rigorous coupling of sediment and P dynamics. The proposed model is applied to predict the P behavior in the shallow Taihu Lake, which is the third largest lake in China, and quantitatively estimate the effects of wind waves and lake currents on P release and distribution. Both the prevailing southeast winds in summer and northwest winds in winter are applied for the simulation, and different wind speeds of 5 m/s and 10 m/s are also considered. Results show that sediment resuspension and the resulting P release have a dominant effect on P levels in Taihu Lake, and likely similar shallow lakes. Wind-driven waves at higher wind speeds significantly enhance sediment resuspension and suspended sediment concentration (SSC). Total P concentration in the water column is also increased but not in proportion to the SSC. The different lake circulations resulting from the different prevailing wind directions also affect the distribution of suspended sediment and P around the lake ultimately influencing where eutrophication is likely to occur. The proposed model demonstrates that internal cycling in the lake is a dominant factor in the lake P and must be considered when trying to manage water quality in this and similar lakes. The model is used to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of remediation of an area where historical releases have led to P accumulation on overall lake quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulations of Wind Field Effect on Two-Stream Waves in the Equatorial Electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Lon Fern

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wind field effect on the phase veloc i ties of 3- to 10-me ter Farley-Buneman two-stream waves in the equato rial E region ion o sphere at al titudes in the range of 95 - 110 km is stud ied by nu mer i cal simu la tion. The behav ior of this two-stream wave in the uni form wind field Un in a plane per pen dic u lar to the Earth’s mag netic field is simu lated with a two-di men sional two-fluid code in which elec tron in er tia is ne glected while ion in er tia is re tained. It is con firmed that, the thresh old con di tion for the ap pear ance of two-stream waves is VD C U th » + s + n (1 / cos Y0 q ; and the phase ve loc ity of the two-stream wave at the thresh old con di tion is Vp » Cs + Un cos q, where q is the ele va tion an gle of the wave prop a ga tion in a limited range and Y0 = ninnen / WiWe. The first formula in di cates that the wind field paral lel (anti-par al lel to the elec tron drift ve loc ity will raise (lower the thresh old drift ve loc ity by the amount of the wind speed. This means that par al lel wind is a sta ble fac tor, while anti-paral lel wind is an un sta ble fac tor of two-stream waves. This may ex plain why high speed (larger than acous tic speed two-stream waves were rarely ob served, since larger thresh old drift veloc ity de mands larger po larization elec tric field. The result of the simu la tions at the sat u ra tion stage show that when VD was only slightly larger than VD th , the hor i zon tal phase ve loc ity of the two-stream wave would grad u ally down-shift to the thresh old phase ve loc ity Cs + Un. The physical implications of which are discussed

  20. The 4-dimensional plant: effects of wind- induced canopy movement on light fluctuations and photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Jacquelyn Burgess

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical perturbation of a plant canopy brought about by wind is a ubiquitous phenomenon and yet its biological importance has often been overlooked. This is partly due to the complexity of the issue at hand: wind-induced movement (or mechanical excitation is a stochastic process which is difficult to measure and quantify; plant motion is dependent upon canopy architectural features which, until recently, were difficult to accurately represent and model in 3-dimensions; light patterning throughout a canopy is difficult to compute at high-resolutions, especially when confounded by other environmental variables. Recent studies have reinforced the expectation that canopy architecture is a strong determinant of productivity and yield; however, links between the architectural properties of the plant and its mechanical properties, particularly its response to wind, are relatively unknown. As a result, biologically relevant data relating canopy architecture, light dynamics and short-scale photosynthetic responses in the canopy setting are scarce. Here, we hypothesise that wind-induced movement will have large consequences for the photosynthetic productivity of our crops due to its influence on light patterning. To address this issue, in this study we combined high resolution 3D reconstructions of a plant canopy with a simple representation of canopy perturbation as a result of wind using solid body rotation in order to explore the potential effects on light patterning, interception and photosynthetic productivity. We looked at two different scenarios: firstly a constant distortion where a rice canopy was subject to a permanent distortion throughout the whole day; and secondly, a dynamic distortion, where the canopy was distorted in incremental steps between two extremes at set time points in the day. We find that mechanical canopy excitation substantially alters light dynamics; light distribution and modelled canopy carbon gain. We then discuss methods

  1. High Humidity Aerodynamic Effects Study on Offshore Wind Turbine Airfoil/Blade Performance through CFD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damp air with high humidity combined with foggy, rainy weather, and icing in winter weather often is found to cause turbine performance degradation, and it is more concerned with offshore wind farm development. To address and understand the high humidity effects on wind turbine performance, our study has been conducted with spread sheet analysis on damp air properties investigation for air density and viscosity; then CFD modeling study using Fluent was carried out on airfoil and blade aerodynamic performance effects due to water vapor partial pressure of mixing flow and water condensation around leading edge and trailing edge of airfoil. It is found that the high humidity effects with water vapor mixing flow and water condensation thin film around airfoil may have insignificant effect directly on airfoil/blade performance; however, the indirect effects such as blade contamination and icing due to the water condensation may have significant effects on turbine performance degradation. Also it is that found the foggy weather with microwater droplet (including rainy weather may cause higher drag that lead to turbine performance degradation. It is found that, at high temperature, the high humidity effect on air density cannot be ignored for annual energy production calculation. The blade contamination and icing phenomenon need to be further investigated in the next study.

  2. A comparison of three approaches for simulating fine-scale surface winds in support of wildland fire management. Part II. An exploratory study of the effect of simulated winds on fire growth simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason M. Forthofer; Bret W. Butler; Charles W. McHugh; Mark A. Finney; Larry S. Bradshaw; Richard D. Stratton; Kyle S. Shannon; Natalie S. Wagenbrenner

    2014-01-01

    The effect of fine-resolution wind simulations on fire growth simulations is explored. The wind models are (1) a wind field consisting of constant speed and direction applied everywhere over the area of interest; (2) a tool based on the solution of the conservation of mass only (termed mass-conserving model) and (3) a tool based on a solution of conservation of mass...

  3. The Effect of Blade Aeroelasticity and Turbine Parameters on Wind Turbine Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the demand for wind energy has dramatically increased as well as the number and size of commercial wind turbines. These large turbines are loud and can cause annoyance to nearby communities. Therefore, the prediction of large wind turbine noise over long distances is critical. The wind turbine noise prediction is a very complex problem since it has to account for atmospheric conditions (wind and temperature), ground absorption, un-even terrain, turbine wake, and blade deforma...

  4. The effects of meshed offshore grids on offshore wind investment – a real options analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Kitzing, Lena

    farm’s IRR can increase by up to 33% in the analysed (fictive) cases when connected to four neighbouring countries. Contrarily, in case of nodal pricing, the wind farm will have to cope with IRRs that are up to 15% lower when connected to more than one country. These effects can either hamper adequate...... investment or lead to windfall profits, if the level of support were not adjusted according to the choice of regulatory regime. This should therefore be considered when designing the regulatory regime and level of support in the offshore grid in order to maintain an effective and efficient development...

  5. The effects of meshed offshore grids on offshore wind investment – a real options analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Kitzing, Lena

    2012-01-01

    farm’s IRR can increase by up to 33% in the analysed (fictive) cases when connected to four neighbouring countries. Contrarily, in case of nodal pricing, the wind farm will have to cope with IRRs that are up to 15% lower when connected to more than one country. These effects can either hamper adequate...... investment or lead to windfall profits, if the level of support were not adjusted according to the choice of regulatory regime. This should therefore be considered when designing the regulatory regime and level of support in the offshore grid in order to maintain an effective and efficient development...

  6. Effects of rotor location, coning, and tilt on critical loads in large wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, D. A.; Janetzke, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Several large (1500 kW) horizontal rotor configurations were analyzed to determine the effects on dynamic loads of upwind downwind rotor locations, coned and radial blade positions, and tilted and horizontal rotor axis positions. Loads were calculated for a range of wind velocities at three locations in the structure: (1) the blade shank; (2) the hub shaft; and (3) the yaw drive. Blade axis coning and rotor axis tilt were found to have minor effects on loads. However, locating the rotor upwind of the tower significantly reduced loads at all locations analyzed.

  7. Numerical investigation of aerodynamic performance of darrieus wind turbine based on the magnus effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Khadir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of several developmental approaches is the researchers’ major preoccupation with the DARRIEUS wind turbine. This paper presents the first approach and results of a wide computational investigation on the aerodynamics of a vertical axis DARRIEUS wind turbine based on the MAGNUS effect. Consequently, wind tunnel tests were carried out to ascertain overall performance of the turbine and two-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD models were generated to help understand the aerodynamics of this new performance. Accordingly, a moving mesh technique was used where the geometry of the turbine blade was cylinders. The turbine model was created in Gambit modeling software and then read into fluent software for fluid flow analysis. Flow field characteristics are investigated for several values of tip speed ratio (TSR, in this case we generated a new rotational speed ratio between the turbine and cylinder (δ = ωC/ωT. This new concept based on the MAGNUS approach provides the best configuration for better power coefficient values. The positive results of Cp obtained in this study are used to generate energy; on the other hand, the negative values of Cp could be used in order to supply the engines with energy.

  8. Effect of land uses and wind direction on the contribution of local sources to airborne pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Jesús; Rapp, Ana; Lara, Beatriz; Fernández-González, Federico; Pérez-Badia, Rosa

    2015-12-15

    The interpretation of airborne pollen levels in cities based on the contribution of the surrounding flora and vegetation is a useful tool to estimate airborne allergen concentrations and, consequently, to determine the allergy risk for local residents. This study examined the pollen spectrum in a city in central Spain (Guadalajara) and analysed the vegetation landscape and land uses within a radius of 20km in an attempt to identify and locate the origin of airborne pollen and to determine the effect of meteorological variables on pollen emission and dispersal. The results showed that local wind direction was largely responsible for changes in the concentrations of different airborne pollen types. The land uses contributing most to airborne pollen counts were urban green spaces, though only 0.1% of the total surface area studied, and broadleaved forest which covered 5% of the study area. These two types of land use together accounted for 70% of the airborne pollen. Crops, scrubland and pastureland, though covering 80% of the total surface area, contributed only 18.6% to the total pollen count, and this contribution mainly consisted of pollen from Olea and herbaceous plants, including Poaceae, Urticaceae and Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae. Pollen from ornamental species were mainly associated with easterly (Platanus), southerly (Cupressaceae) and westerly (Cupressaceae and Platanus) winds from the areas where the city's largest parks and gardens are located. Quercus pollen was mostly transported by winds blowing in from holm-oak stands on the eastern edge of the city. The highest Populus pollen counts were associated with easterly and westerly winds blowing in from areas containing rivers and streams. The airborne pollen counts generally rose with increasing temperature, solar radiation and hours of sunlight, all of which favour pollen release. In contrast, pollen counts declined with increased relative humidity and rainfall, which hinder airborne pollen transport

  9. The flow upstream of a row of aligned wind turbine rotors and its effect on power production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer Forsting, Alexander Raul; Troldborg, Niels; Gaunaa, Mac

    2017-01-01

    The blockage developing in front of a laterally aligned row of wind turbines and its impact on power production over a single turbine was analysed using two different numerical methods. The inflow direction was varied from orthogonal to the row until 45◦, with the turbines turning into the wind...... turbine or set as constant. For all methods significant changes were found in the developing flow-field with corresponding effects on the individual power output of the wind turbines. These became more pronounced with increasing inflow angle and predicted a rise in power of up to 2% for the downstream...

  10. Effects of trade-wind strength and direction on the leeside circulations and rainfall of the island of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yang; Yi-Leng Chen; Francis M. Fujioka

    2009-01-01

    The leeside circulations and weather of the island of Hawaii were studied from the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) land surface model simulations for eight strong (∼7.9 m s−1) and eight weak (∼5.2 m s−1) trade-wind days and for five days with southeasterly trades (∼7.1 m s

  11. Extreme winds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Rathmann, O.; Hansen, S.O.

    2000-01-01

    ), Kegnaes (7 yr), Sprogo (20 yr), and Tystofte (16 yr). The measured data are wind speed, wind direction, temperature and pressure. The wind records are cleaned for terrain effects by means of WASP (Mortensew ct al., Technical Report I-666 (EN), Riso National Laboratory, 1993. Vol. 2. User's Guide...

  12. Wind Loads on Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbye, Claes; Hansen, Svend Ole

    induced by wind turbulence, vortex shedding, flutter and galloping. The book gives a comprehensive treatment of wind effects on structures and it will be useful for consulting engineers designing wind-sensitive structures. It will also be valuable for students of civil engineering as textbook...

  13. Effect of a weak transverse magnetic field on the morphology and orientation of directionally solidified Al-Ni alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanxiao; Fautrelle, Yves; Hou, Long; Du, Dafan; Zhang, Yikun; Ren, Zhongming; Lu, Xionggang; Moreau, Rene; Li, Xi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of a weak transverse magnetic field on the morphology and orientation of Al3Ni dendrites in directionally solidified Al-12 wt% Ni alloys was investigated. The experimental results indicated that the magnetic field caused segregation. It was also found that the application of a magnetic field decreased the primary dendrite spacing. By means of electronic backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis, the orientation of the Al3Ni dendrite was studied. In the case of no magnetic field, the crystal direction of the Al3Ni crystal was oriented along the solidification direction. When a transverse magnetic field was applied, the crystal direction rotated to the magnetic field direction, whereas the crystal direction remained oriented along the solidification direction. The above experimental results are discussed in the context of thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC) and crystal anisotropy.

  14. Measurement of the effective weak mixing angle in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle, in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of $\\sin^2\\theta_{\\text{eff}}^{\\text{$\\ell$}}=0.23146 \\pm 0.00047$ is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  15. Wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms: The confounding effect of concurrent environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not wind turbines pose a risk to human health is a matter of heated debate. Personal reactions to other environmental exposures occurring in the same settings as wind turbines may be responsible of the reported symptoms. However, these have not been accounted for in previous studies. We investigated whether there is an association between residential proximity to wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms, after controlling for personal reactions to other environmental co-exposures. We assessed wind turbine exposures in 454 residences as the distance to the closest wind turbine (Dw) and number of wind turbines wind turbines and agricultural odor exposure, we did not observe a significant relationship between residential proximity to wind turbines and symptoms and the parameter estimates were attenuated toward zero. Wind turbines-health associations can be confounded by personal reactions to other environmental co-exposures. Isolated associations reported in the literature may be due to confounding bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating wind power`s effective capacity: A case study in the Caribbean Island of La Martinique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, R.; Germa, J.M.; Bailey, B. [AWS Scientific, Inc., Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we report on the experimental determination of the effective capacity of wind and photovoltaic (PV) power generation with respect to the utility load requirements of the Island of La Martinique. La Martinique is a French Overseas Department in the Caribbean Sea. The case study spans two years, 1990 and 1991. We consider wind generation at three locations in different wind regimes, and PV generation for fixed and tracking flat plate systems. The results presented include: (1) An overview of typical solar and wind power output at each considered site, presented in contrast to the Island`s electric load requirements; and (2) Effective capacities quantified for each resource as a function of penetration in the utility generation mix. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-ray Scaling Relations from Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of 32 SPT Selected Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, J.P.; et al.

    2017-11-14

    Uncertainty in the mass-observable scaling relations is currently the limiting factor for galaxy cluster based cosmology. Weak gravitational lensing can provide a direct mass calibration and reduce the mass uncertainty. We present new ground-based weak lensing observations of 19 South Pole Telescope (SPT) selected clusters and combine them with previously reported space-based observations of 13 galaxy clusters to constrain the cluster mass scaling relations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE), the cluster gas mass $M_\\mathrm{gas}$, and $Y_\\mathrm{X}$, the product of $M_\\mathrm{gas}$ and X-ray temperature. We extend a previously used framework for the analysis of scaling relations and cosmological constraints obtained from SPT-selected clusters to make use of weak lensing information. We introduce a new approach to estimate the effective average redshift distribution of background galaxies and quantify a number of systematic errors affecting the weak lensing modelling. These errors include a calibration of the bias incurred by fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the reduced shear using $N$-body simulations. We blind the analysis to avoid confirmation bias. We are able to limit the systematic uncertainties to 6.4% in cluster mass (68% confidence). Our constraints on the mass-X-ray observable scaling relations parameters are consistent with those obtained by earlier studies, and our constraints for the mass-SZE scaling relation are consistent with the the simulation-based prior used in the most recent SPT-SZ cosmology analysis. We can now replace the external mass calibration priors used in previous SPT-SZ cosmology studies with a direct, internal calibration obtained on the same clusters.

  18. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  19. Effects of the Tunoe Knob offshore wind farm on birdlife; Effekt af Tunoe knob vindmoellepark paa fuglelivet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, M.; Kyed Larsen, J.; Clausager, I.

    1997-10-01

    As part of the plans of the Danish government to expand offshore wind energy production, The Ministry of Environment and Energy, in collaboration with the Danish power companies, initiated a three-year study of the effects of the Tunoe Knob offshore wind farm on bird life. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential conflict between offshore wind farms and water birds. Danish coastal waters support very large, internationally important concentrations of moulting, migrating and wintering water birds which depend on shallow water areas as major feeding habitats. The wind farm was established at Tunoe Knob, a shoal in Aarhus Bugt, and consisted of ten 500 kW turbines erected in 3-5 m of water during the late summer of 1995. All studies were carried out during the winter period, and results are reported for eider Somateria mollissima and common scoter Melanitta nigra, which composed the great majority of the bird population. In the part of Tunoe knob where the wind farm was build, eider numbers decreased markedly over the study period. However, this decline was comparable to that observed on other parts of Tunoe Knob. Furthermore, detailed mapping showed a high degree of annual and within season variation in spatial distribution over the area, including occurrence in the immediate vicinity of the wind farm. These results suggest that the observed changes in eider numbers in the wind farm area were due to natural variation. (EG) 21 refs.

  20. An analysis of offshore wind farm SCADA measurements to identify key parameters influencing the magnitude of wake effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmeier, N.; Blodau, T.; Steinfeld, G.; Rott, A.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric conditions have a clear influence on wake effects. Stability classification is usually based on wind speed, turbulence intensity, shear and temperature gradients measured partly at met masts, buoys or LiDARs. The objective of this paper is to find a classification for stability based on wind turbine Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) measurements in order to fit engineering wake models better to the current ambient conditions. Two offshore wind farms with met masts have been used to establish a correlation between met mast stability classification and new aggregated statistical signals based on multiple measurement devices. The significance of these new signals on power production is demonstrated for two wind farms with met masts and validated against data from one further wind farm without a met mast. We found a good correlation between the standard deviation of active power divided by the average power of wind turbines in free flow with the ambient turbulence intensity when the wind turbines were operating in partial load.

  1. WEAK GORENSTEIN GLOBAL DIMENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, Driss

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the weak Gorenstein global dimensions. We are mainly interested in studying the problem when the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions coincide. We first show, for GF-closed rings, that the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions are equal when they are finite. Then, we prove that the same equality holds for any two-sided coherent ring. We conclude the paper with some examples and a brief discussion of the scope and limits of our results.

  2. Voltage Weak DC Distribution Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hailu, T.G.; Mackay, L.J.; Ramirez Elizondo, L.M.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the behavior of voltage weak DC distribution systems. These systems have relatively small system capacitance. The size of system capacitance, which stores energy, has a considerable effect on the value of fault currents, control complexity, and system reliability. A number of

  3. The effect of baroclinicity on the wind in the planetary boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier Ralph; Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2015-01-01

    . The surface geostrophic wind, the surface gradient wind and the gradient wind were estimated using the pressure and geopotential fields from a mesoscale model. At both sites the atmospheric flow was typically baroclinic. The distribution of the geostrophic wind shear was approximately Gaussian with a mean...... close to zero and a standard deviation of approximately 3ms−1km−1. The geostrophic wind shear had a strong seasonal dependence because of temperature differences between land and sea. The mean wind profile in Hamburg, observed during an intensive campaign using radio sounding and during the whole year...

  4. Effect of land uses and wind direction on the contribution of local sources to airborne pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojo, Jesús; Rapp, Ana; Lara, Beatriz; Fernández-González, Federico; Pérez-Badia, Rosa

    2015-12-15

    The interpretation of airborne pollen levels in cities based on the contribution of the surrounding flora and vegetation is a useful tool to estimate airborne allergen concentrations and, consequently, to determine the allergy risk for local residents. This study examined the pollen spectrum in a city in central Spain (Guadalajara) and analysed the vegetation landscape and land uses within a radius of 20 km in an attempt to identify and locate the origin of airborne pollen and to determine the effect of meteorological variables on pollen emission and dispersal. The results showed that local wind direction was largely responsible for changes in the concentrations of different airborne pollen types. The land uses contributing most to airborne pollen counts were urban green spaces, though only 0.1% of the total surface area studied, and broadleaved forest which covered 5% of the study area. These two types of land use together accounted for 70% of the airborne pollen. Crops, scrubland and pastureland, though covering 80% of the total surface area, contributed only 18.6% to the total pollen count, and this contribution mainly consisted of pollen from Olea and herbaceous plants, including Poaceae, Urticaceae and Chenopodiaceae–Amaranthaceae. Pollen from ornamental species were mainly associated with easterly (Platanus), southerly (Cupressaceae) and westerly (Cupressaceae and Platanus) winds from the areas where the city's largest parks and gardens are located. Quercus pollen was mostly transported by winds blowing in from holm-oak stands on the eastern edge of the city. The highest Populus pollen counts were associated with easterly and westerly winds blowing in from areas containing rivers and streams. The airborne pollen counts generally rose with increasing temperature, solar radiation and hours of sunlight, all of which favour pollen release. In contrast, pollen counts declined with increased relative humidity and rainfall, which hinder airborne pollen

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of an ultrasonic acoustic deterrent for reducing bat fatalities at wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Edward B.; Hein, Cris D.; Schirmacher, Michael R.; Huso, Manuela M.P.; Szewczak, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of bats are killed by wind turbines worldwide and minimizing fatalities is critically important to bat conservation and acceptance of wind energy development. We implemented a 2-year study testing the effectiveness of an ultrasonic acoustic deterrent for reducing bat fatalities at a wind energy facility in Pennsylvania. We randomly selected control and treatment turbines that were searched daily in summer and fall 2009 and 2010. Estimates of fatality, corrected for field biases, were compared between treatment and control turbines. In 2009, we estimated 21–51% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine than per control turbine. In 2010, we determined an approximate 9% inherent difference between treatment and control turbines and when factored into our analysis, variation increased and between 2% more and 64% fewer bats were killed per treatment turbine relative to control turbines. We estimated twice as many hoary bats were killed per control turbine than treatment turbine, and nearly twice as many silver-haired bats in 2009. In 2010, although we estimated nearly twice as many hoary bats and nearly 4 times as many silver-haired bats killed per control turbine than at treatment turbines during the treatment period, these only represented an approximate 20% increase in fatality relative to the pre-treatment period for these species when accounting for inherent differences between turbine sets. Our findings suggest broadband ultrasound broadcasts may reduce bat fatalities by discouraging bats from approaching sound sources. However, effectiveness of ultrasonic deterrents is limited by distance and area ultrasound can be broadcast, in part due to rapid attenuation in humid conditions. We caution that an operational deterrent device is not yet available and further modifications and experimentation are needed. Future efforts must also evaluate cost-effectiveness of deterrents in relation to curtailment strategies to allow a cost-benefit analysis for

  6. The Effect of Solar Wind Variations on the Escape of Oxygen Ions From Mars Through Different Channels: MAVEN Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Pätzold, M.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J. S.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Eparvier, F.; Brain, D.; Jakosky, B. M.; Vaisberg, O.; Zelenyi, L.

    2017-11-01

    We present multi-instrument observations of the effects of solar wind on ion escape fluxes on Mars based on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) data from 1 November 2014 to 15 May 2016. Losses of oxygen ions through different channels (plasma sheet, magnetic lobes, boundary layer, and ion plume) as a function of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field variations were studied. We have utilized the modified Mars Solar Electric (MSE) coordinate system for separation of the different escape routes. Fluxes of the low-energy (≤30 eV) and high-energy (≥30 eV) ions reveal different trends with changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure, the solar wind flux, and the motional electric field. Major oxygen fluxes occur through the tail of the induced magnetosphere. The solar wind motional electric field produces an asymmetry in the ion fluxes and leads to different relations between ion fluxes supplying the tail from the different hemispheres and the solar wind dynamic pressure (or flux) and the motional electric field. The main driver for escape of the high-energy oxygen ions is the solar wind flux (or dynamic pressure). On the other hand, the low-energy ion component shows the opposite trend: ion flux decreases with increasing solar wind flux. As a result, the averaged total oxygen ion fluxes reveal a low variability with the solar wind strength. The large standard deviations from the averages values of the escape fluxes indicate the existence of mechanisms which can enhance or suppress the efficiency of the ion escape. It is shown that the Martian magnetosphere possesses the properties of a combined magnetosphere which contains different classes of field lines. The existence of the closed magnetic field lines in the near-Mars tail might be responsible for suppression of the ion escape fluxes.

  7. A qualitative analytical investigation of geometrically nonlinear effects in wind turbine blade cross sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eder, Martin Alexander; Bitsche, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper analytically investigates the Brazier effect on asymmetric thin-walled sections subject to biaxial bending. In the latter case a torsional moment – in this paper referred to as Brazier torsion – is induced, which proved to be a vital part of the solution. By means of a generic cross...... crack growth at loads well below the load-carrying capacity of the beam. The findings in this paper are twofold: Firstly, the investigated analysis procedure can be integrated into the design process of wind turbine blade cross sections. Secondly, the proposed approach serves as a basis...

  8. Mean load effects on the fatigue life of offshore wind turbine monopile foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral; Natarajan, Anand

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of mean load effects on the estimation of the fatigue damage in offshore wind turbine monopile foundations. The mud line bending moment time series are generated using a fully coupled aero-hydro-elastic model accounting for non-linear water waves and sea current...... sensitivity factor) and 33% (Goodman) is observed when mean load corrections are considered. The lifetime damage equivalent bending moment is further increased by approximately 7% when considering sea current forces. The results indicate that mean load correction techniques should be employed in the analysis...

  9. Effect of modulation depth, frequency, and intermittence on wind turbine noise annoyance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidou, Christina; Santurette, Sébastien; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) may be an important factor for the perceived annoyance of wind turbine noise (WTN). Two AM types, typically referred to as “normal AM” (NAM) and “other AM” (OAM), characterize WTN AM, OAM corresponding to having intermittent periods with larger AM depth in lower frequency......-field stimuli and the temporal AM variations were taken into account, the effect of AM frequency remained limited and the presence of intermittent OAM periods did not affect annoyance. These findings suggest that, at a given overall level, the AM depth of NAM periods is the most crucial AM parameter for WTN...

  10. Model-OA wind turbine generator - Failure modes and effects analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, William E.; Lali, Vincent R.

    1990-01-01

    The results failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) conducted for wind-turbine generators are presented. The FMEA was performed for the functional modes of each system, subsystem, or component. The single-point failures were eliminated for most of the systems. The blade system was the only exception. The qualitative probability of a blade separating was estimated at level D-remote. Many changes were made to the hardware as a result of this analysis. The most significant change was the addition of the safety system. Operational experience and need to improve machine availability have resulted in subsequent changes to the various systems, which are also reflected in this FMEA.

  11. Effects of torsional degree of freedom, geometric nonlinearity, and gravity on aeroelastic behavior of large-scale horizontal axis wind turbine blades under varying wind speed conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Min-Soo; Cha, Myung-Chan; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, a numerical analysis considering blade torsional degree of freedom, geometric nonlinearity, and gravity was utilized to examine the effects of these factors on the aeroelastic blade behavior of a large-scale horizontal axis wind turbine. The results predicted that flapwise deflection is mainly...... affected by the torsional degree of freedom, which causes the blade bending deflections to couple to torsional deformation, thereby varying the aerodynamic loads through changes in the effective angle of attack. Edgewise deflection and torsional deformation are mostly influenced by the periodic...

  12. Development and testing of a unique carousel wind tunnel to experimentally determine the effect of gravity and the interparticle force on the physics of wind-blown particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, R. N.; Greeley, Ronald; White, Bruce R.; Iversen, James D.

    1987-01-01

    In the study of planetary aeolian processes the effect of gravity is not readily modeled. Gravity appears in the equations of particle motion along with the interparticle forces but the two are not separable. A wind tunnel that perimits multiphase flow experiments with wind blown particles at variable gravity was built and experiments were conducted at reduced gravity. The equations of particle motion initiation (saltation threshold) with variable gravity were experimentally verified and the interparticle force was separated. A uniquely design Carousel Wind Tunnel (CWT) allows for the long flow distance in a small sized tunnel since the test section if a continuous loop and develops the required turbulent boundary layer. A prototype model of the tunnel where only the inner drum rotates was built and tested in the KC-135 Weightless Wonder 4 zero-g aircraft. Future work includes further experiments with walnut shell in the KC-135 which sharply graded particles of widely varying median sizes including very small particles to see how interparticle force varies with particle size, and also experiments with other aeolian material.

  13. History of Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  14. Large-scale surface dielectric barrier discharge type reactor : effect of the electric wind on the conversion effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolibois, J. [Univ. de Poitiers, Poitiers (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique; Poitiers Univ., Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Inst. Pprime; Zouzou, N.; Moreau, E. [Poitiers Univ., Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Inst. Pprime; Tatibouet, J.M. [Univ. de Poitiers, Poitiers (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique

    2010-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) techniques offer an innovative approach for air pollution reduction. Most studies in NTP techniques use volumetric discharge reactors with small dimensions and low flow rates at laboratory scale. The objective of this study was to develop an air pollution control plasma reactor at industrial scale with surface discharge. Propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) was oxidized at high flow rates in a large-scale plasma reactor based on surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Three different configurations of surface discharges were tested with 15 ppm of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} in air at ambient temperature for a flow rate of 50 m{sup 3} per hour. The properties of these different surface discharges were analyzed using chemical measurements and 3 component particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. PIV measurements were used characterize the effect of the electric wind on the polluted gas airflow inside the reactor and to explain the differences of effectiveness of the three tested plasma generators. For the three plasma generators, a propene oxidation of up to 45 percent was obtained at one J per liter. The electric wind produced by the surface discharge resulted in the formation of vortices inside the plasma reactor. This electric wind can increase gas mixing inside the plasma reactor and therefore plays a key role in conversion efficiency. It was concluded that the electric wind produced by surface discharges enables the use of this type of discharge for VOC elimination at high flow rate, with the same effectiveness of volumetric discharges. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Effect of nacelle on the wake meandering in Horns Rev wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Foti, Daniel; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    Turbine wake meandering has considerable effects on the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity in the wake. However, the mechanism for wake meandering is still not well understood and low-order models cannot take into account the wake meandering effects accurately. A recent work by Kang, Yang and Sotiropoulos showed that the nacelle has a significant effect on the wake meandering of a hydrokinetic turbine. To examine the nacelle contributions to wake meandering and wake interactions in utility-scale wind farms, we simulate the atmospheric turbulent flow over the Horns Rev wind farm using large-eddy simulation with actuator type models. In a preliminary simulation on a coarse grid using actuator line model for turbine blades without a nacelle model, the computed power shows overall good agreement with field measurements. Fine grid simulations using an actuator surface model for turbine blades with and without a nacelle model are being carried out. The corresponding results will be presented with analysis on wake meandering dynamics using the technique proposed by Horward et al. and Foti et al.. This work was supported by DOE (DE-AC04-94AL85000), Xcel Energy (Grant RD4-13) and Sandia National Laboratories. Computational resources were provided by National Renewable Energy Laboratory and University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  16. Summary Report: The Shadow effect of large wind farms: measurements, data analysis and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Rathmann, Ole

    : • Measurements were carried out at the Nysted and Horns Rev demonstration wind farms for several years. Doing so included design, installation and operation of the measurement system • A data base was built from the incoming data. The data have been organized to facilitate verification of the models developed......It was the goal of the project – by means of data from the demonstration wind farms Horns Rev and Nysted, analyses of these data and modelling – to facilitate prediction of the power losses from a wind farm should a new wind farm be built upwind relative to the prevailing wind direction....... Or conversely, predict with adequate accuracy the production of a new wind farm built downwind of an existing wind farm. The project should be seen in the perspective of the two existing demonstration wind farms that extend 5-10 km in each direction. In order to e.g. use the existing electrical infrastructure...

  17. Weather and the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: The Effect of Wind

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P. M. Macey; P. J. Schluter; R. P. K. Ford

    2000-01-01

    ...) and wind, particularly the föhn wind, in Christchurch, New Zealand. Design-A retrospective epidemiological study combining details of regional hourly meteorological variables and reported SIDS cases...

  18. The effect of achievement test selection on identification of learning disabilities within a patterns of strengths and weaknesses framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, W Pat; Denton, Carolyn A; Fletcher, Jack M

    2015-09-01

    Few empirical investigations have evaluated learning disabilities (LD) identification methods based on a pattern of cognitive strengths and weaknesses (PSW). This study investigated the reliability of LD classification decisions of the concordance/discordance method (C/DM) across different psychoeducational assessment batteries. C/DM criteria were applied to assessment data from 177 second-grade students based on 2 psychoeducational assessment batteries. The achievement tests were different, but were highly correlated and measured the same latent construct. Resulting LD identifications were then evaluated for agreement across batteries on LD status and the academic domain of eligibility. The 2 batteries identified a similar number of participants as having LD (80 and 74). However, indices of agreement for classification decisions were low (κ = .29), especially for percent positive agreement (62%). The 2 batteries demonstrated agreement on the academic domain of eligibility for only 25 participants. Cognitive discrepancy frameworks for LD identification are inherently unstable because of imperfect reliability and validity at the observed level. Methods premised on identifying a PSW profile may never achieve high reliability because of these underlying psychometric factors. An alternative is to directly assess academic skills to identify students in need of intervention. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. [Effect of the extremely weak alternating magnetic fields on the regeneration of planarians and the gravitropic response of plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, N A; Ermakov, A M; Znobishcheva, A V; Skrebnitskaia, L K; Lednev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The influence of extremely weak alternating magnetic fields (EW AMF) directed colinearly to the static Earth magnetic field on the rate of regeneration of planarians and the rate of gravitropic response in the stem segments of flax has been studied. The value of bioeffects of EW AMF is determined by the parameter gamma B(AC)/f, where y is the gyromagnetic ratio of the magnetic moments induced by the orbital movements of electrons in atoms, and B(AC) and f correspond to magnetic induction and frequency of the alternating magnetic component. It was shown that the magnitude of bioeffects depends on the amplitude (at fixed 1000 Hz - frequency) and frequency (at fixed 192 nT - amplitude) of the alternating component. Maxima of bioeffects are observed at gamma B(AC)/f = 0.9; 2.75, and minor maxima gamma B(AC)/f = 4.5; 6.1. The bioeffects are absent at gamma B(AC)/f = 1.8, 3.8, 5.3, 6.7. The positions of the maxima and minima of bioeffects correspond to the theoretical prediction (at gamma = 14000 Hz/microT). Primary targets for the EW AMF of this type are the magnetic moments induced by the orbital movements of electrons in atoms.

  20. Study on Reduction in Vibrations of Concentrated Winding Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor by Skew Effects of Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Ryoichi; Wakui, Shinichi; Miyata, Kenji; Noma, Keiji; Senoo, Masaharu

    Recently, global warming and the problem with successfully incorporating environmental safeguards have promoted the need for a more power-efficient motor. Therefore, as a driving source, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with concentrated winding is widely used as the important device for a variety of fields. However, a PMSM with concentrated winding generates more vibrations than that with distributed winding because of a radial electromagnetic force. This paper describes the influence of a new skewed rotor on the characteristics of a concentrated winding PMSM. We investigated the influence by using a three-dimensional finite element analysis (3-D FEM) and several measurements. In addition, we presented that the proposed rotor is effective in reducing the radial electromagnetic force without decreasing the motor efficiency.