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Sample records for weak static magnetic

  1. Superconductor in a weak static gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ummarino, Giovanni Alberto [Dipartimento DISAT, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI-Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gallerati, Antonio [Dipartimento DISAT, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    We provide the detailed calculation of a general form for Maxwell and London equations that takes into account gravitational corrections in linear approximation. We determine the possible alteration of a static gravitational field in a superconductor making use of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations, providing also an analytic solution in the weak field condition. Finally, we compare the behavior of a high-T{sub c} superconductor with a classical low-T{sub c} superconductor, analyzing the values of the parameters that can enhance the reduction of the gravitational field. (orig.)

  2. Effect of a weak static magnetic field on nitrogen-14 quadrupole resonance in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendouz, Laouès; Aissani, Sarra; Marêché, Jean-François; Retournard, Alain; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 1 mT) may produce a well-defined splitting of the (14)N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. It is theoretically shown and experimentally confirmed that the actual splitting (when it exists) as well as the line-shape and the signal intensity depends on three factors: (i) the amplitude of B0, (ii) the amplitude and pulse duration of the radio-frequency field, B1, used for detecting the NQR signal, and (iii) the relative orientation of B0 and B1. For instance, when B0 is parallel to B1 and regardless of the B0 value, the signal intensity is three times larger than when B0 is perpendicular to B1. This point is of some importance in practice since NQR measurements are almost always performed in the earth field. Moreover, in the course of this study, it has been recognized that important pieces of information regarding line-shape are contained in data points at the beginning of the free induction decay (fid) which, in practice, are eliminated for avoiding spurious signals due to probe ringing. It has been found that these data points can generally be retrieved by linear prediction (LP) procedures. As a further LP benefit, the signal intensity loss (by about a factor of three) is regained. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Static and Dynamic Magnetic Response in Ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-30

    REPORT Final Report: Static and Dynamic Magnetic Response in Ferrofluids 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Ferrofluids are technologically...physics of relaxation phenomena in magnetic nanoparticles. We have done systematic DC and AC magnetization studies of ferrofluids composed of Fe3O4...15. SUBJECT TERMS Magnetic nanoparticles, ferrofluids , susceptibility Hariharan Srikanth University of South Florida - Tampa 4202 East Fowler Ave

  4. The Quasi-Static Electromagnetic Approximation for Weakly Conducting Media

    CERN Document Server

    Heubrandtner, T

    2002-01-01

    In a conducting dielectric charge and electric field decay with a time constant tau_R = \\varepsilon/\\sigma. In a weakly conducting medium, as e.g. glass or melamine-phenolic laminate in use in RPC's, this time is about 10^{-3} s; so it is long as compared to the time the charge cloud needs to move through the gap and to the time the signal needs to propagate through a dielectric to the electrode. A quasi-static theory to deal with transient phenomena in weakly conducting media has been developed in Haus and Melcher (1989), Fano, Chu and Adler (1963); it simplifies the analysis considerably since it requires only the solution of a scalar diffusion-type equations in place of the time-dependent Maxwell equations. This little known theory is applied to treat the generation of signals in simple models for chambers with such materials.

  5. Manipulating Cells with Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, J. M.; Guevorkian, K.

    2005-07-01

    We review our investigations of the use of static magnetic fields, B, for manipulating cells and cellular processes. We describe how B fields modify the cell division pattern of frog embryos and consequently can be used to probe the pattern determinants. We also observe that magnetic fields modify the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. We describe these modifications and their potential application to investigations of their swimming behavior.

  6. Orienting Paramecium with intense static magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, James M., Jr.; Guevorkian, Karine; Quindel, Carl

    2004-03-01

    Recent experiments on cell division suggest the application of intense static magnetic fields as a novel tool for the manipulation of biological systems [1]. The magnetic field appears to couple to the intrinsic anisotropies in the diamagnetic components of the cells. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic average diamagnetic anisotropy of the whole single celled ciliate, Paramecium Caudatum. Magnetic fields, 2.5 T Paramecium Caudatum that were suspended in a density matched medium. The organisms align with their long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field. Their intrinsic diamagnetic anisotropy is 3x10-11 in cgs units. We will discuss the implications of these results for employing magnetic fields to probe the behavior of swimming Paramecium. [1] J. M. Valles, Jr. et al., Expt. Cell Res.274, 112-118 (2002).

  7. What is the magnetic Weak Gravity Conjecture for axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebecker, Arthur; Henkenjohann, Philipp [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Witkowski, Lukas T. [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France)

    2017-03-15

    The electric Weak Gravity Conjecture demands that axions with large decay constant f couple to light instantons. The resulting large instantonic corrections pose problems for natural inflation. We explore an alternative argument based on the magnetic Weak Gravity Conjecture for axions, which we try to make more precise. Roughly speaking, it demands that the minimally charged string coupled to the dual 2-form-field exists in the effective theory. Most naively, such large-f strings curve space too much to exist as static solutions, thus ruling out large-f axions. More conservatively, one might allow non-static string solutions to play the role of the required charged objects. In this case, topological inflation would save the superplanckian axion. Furthermore, a large-f axion may appear in the low-energy effective theory based on two subplanckian axions in the UV. The resulting effective string is a composite object built from several elementary strings and domain walls. It may or may not satisfy the magnetic Weak Gravity Conjecture depending on how strictly the latter is interpreted and on the cosmological dynamics of this composite object, which remain to be fully understood. Finally, we recall that large-field brane inflation is naively possible in the codimension-one case. We show how string-theoretic back-reaction closes this apparent loophole of large-f (non-periodic) pseudo-axions. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Static Magnetic Response of Non-Fermi-Liquid Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    We consider the response of the density of a fermion ensemble to an applied weak static magnetic field. It is known that, for a noninteracting Fermi gas, this response is fully characterized by the Fermi volume and the Berry curvature on the Fermi surface. Here we show the same result holds for interacting fermions, including a Fermi liquid and a non-Fermi liquid, to all orders in perturbation theory. Our result relies only on the assumption of a well-defined Fermi surface and the general analytic properties of quantum field theory, and is completely model independent.

  9. The effects of static magnetic fields on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Ding, Chong; Ren, Li; Zhou, Yimin; Shang, Peng

    2014-05-01

    All the living beings live and evolve under geomagnetic field (25-65 μT). Besides, opportunities for human exposed to different intensities of static magnetic fields (SMF) in the workplace have increased progressively, such SMF range from weak magnetic field (1 T). Given this, numerous scientific studies focus on the health effects and have demonstrated that certain magnetic fields have positive influence on our skeleton systems. Therefore, SMF is considered as a potential physical therapy to improve bone healing and keep bones healthy nowadays. Here, we review the mechanisms of effects of SMF on bone tissue, ranging from physical interactions, animal studies to cellular studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Resonances of an Oscillating Conductive Pipe Driven by an Alternating Magnetic Field in the Presence of a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladera, Celso L.; Donoso, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    A short conducting pipe that hangs from a weak spring is forced to oscillate by the magnetic field of a surrounding coaxial coil that has been excited by a low-frequency current source in the presence of an additional static magnetic field. Induced oscillating currents appear in the pipe. The pipe motion becomes damped by the dragging forces…

  11. Static magnets: what are they and what do they do?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Laakso

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Therapeutic static magnets have gained wide community acceptance for neuromusculoskeletal pain relief in many countries yet, apart from strong anecdotal reports of benefit, there is a paucity of scientific evidence for their use. OBJECTIVES: In this review we describe the physical characteristics of traditional and commonplace unipolar and bipolar static magnets as well as newer quadripolar magnetic arrays; discuss what is known of the physiological effects of static magnets and the strength of the literature; and make suggestions for targeted future research for static magnets in the management of neuromusculoskeletal pain conditions.

  12. Magnetic vortex nucleation modes in static magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Vaňatka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic vortex nucleation process in nanometer- and micrometer-sized magnetic disks undergoes several phases with distinct spin configurations called the nucleation states. Before formation of the final vortex state, small submicron disks typically proceed through the so-called C-state while the larger micron-sized disks proceed through the more complicated vortex-pair state or the buckling state. This work classifies the nucleation states using micromagnetic simulations and provides evidence for the stability of vortex-pair and buckling states in static magnetic fields using magnetic imaging techniques and electrical transport measurements. Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy and Magnetic Transmission X-ray Microscopy are employed to reveal the details of spin configuration in each of the nucleation states. We further show that it is possible to unambiguously identify these states by electrical measurements via the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. Combination of the electrical transport and magnetic imaging techniques confirms stability of a vortex-antivortex-vortex spin configuration which emerges from the buckling state in static magnetic fields.

  13. Transformation magneto-statics and illusions for magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2014-10-01

    Based on the form-invariant of Maxwell's equations under coordinate transformations, we extend the theory of transformation optics to transformation magneto-statics, which can design magnets through coordinate transformations. Some novel DC magnetic field illusions created by magnets (e.g. rescaling magnets, cancelling magnets and overlapping magnets) are designed and verified by numerical simulations. Our research will open a new door to designing magnets and controlling DC magnetic fields.

  14. The review of cellular effects of a static magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Miyakoshi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of static magnetic fields at the cellular level are reviewed. Past studies have shown that a static magnetic field alone does not have a lethal effect on the basic properties of cell growth and survival under normal culture conditions, regardless of its magnetic density. It has also been shown that cell cycle distribution is not influenced by extremely strong static magnetic fields (up to a maximum of 10 tesla (T. A further area of interest is whether static magnetic fields cause DNA damage, which can be evaluated by determination of the frequency of micronucleus formation. The presence or absence of such micronuclei can confirm whether a particular treatment damages cellular DNA. This method has been used to confirm that a static magnetic field alone has no such effect. However, the frequency of micronucleus formation changes significantly when certain treatments (for example, X-irradiation and mitomycin C are given during exposure to a strong static magnetic field. It has also been reported that treatment with trace amounts of ferrous ions in the cell culture medium and exposure to a static magnetic field increases DNA damage, which is detected using the comet assay. Several reports suggest that a strong static magnetic field may affect the ion transport and the gene expression. In addition, many studies have found a strong magnetic field can induce orientation phenomena in cell culture.

  15. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  16. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Philip E.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  17. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  18. Enhancement of sedimentation and coagulation with static magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Marcin; Dębowski, Marcin; Hajduk, Anna; Rusanowska, Paulina

    2017-11-01

    The static magnetic field can be an alternative method for wastewater treatment. It has been proved that this physical factor, accelerates the biochemical processes, catalyzes advanced oxidation, intensifies anaerobic and aerobic processes or reduces swelling of activated sludge. There are also reports proving the positive impact of the static magnetic field on the coagulation and sedimentation, as well as the conditioning and dewatering of sludge. In order to be applied in larger scale the published results should be verified and confirmed. In the studies, the enhancement of sedimentation by the static magnetic field was observed. The best sedimentation was noted in the experiment, where magnetizers were placed on activated sludge bioreactor and secondary settling tank. No effect of the static magnetic field on coagulation with the utilization of PIX 113 was observed. However, the static magnetic field enhanced coagulation with the utilization of PAX-XL9. The results suggest that increased sedimentation of colloids and activated sludge, can in practice mean a reduction in the size of the necessary equipment for sedimentation with an unchanged efficiency of the process.

  19. Magnetic relaxation in a three-dimensional ferromagnet with weak ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... determined previously for the same sample from static critical phenomena measurements) for a nearly ordered intermetallic compound Ni3Al, which is an experimental realization of a three-dimensional (= 3) ferromagnet with weak quenched random-exchange disorder. None of the functional forms of r() predicted by ...

  20. Neutrino propagation in a weakly magnetized medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the W and Z bosons allowing us to neglect the momentum dependence in the. W and Z propagators. This is equivalent to lowest-order GF calculations and is justified for low-energy neutrinos and low temperatures and weak fields compared to the Fermi scale. Since, in this work we focus our attention on the possible astro ...

  1. Vitamins and glucose metabolism: The role of static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahbib, Aïda; Ghodbane, Soumaya; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2014-12-01

    This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of static magnetic fields (SMF) bioeffects and vitamins and glucose metabolism. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: Static magnetic field and glucose metabolism, static magnetic field and vitamins and the role of vitamins on glucose metabolism. Considering these articles comprehensively, the conclusions are as follows: The primary cause of changes in cells after incubation in external SMF is disruption of free radical metabolism and elevation of their concentration. Such disruption causes oxidative stress leading to an unsteadiness of glucose level and insulin release. Moreover, based on available data, it was concluded that exposure to SMF alters plasma levels of vitamin A, C, D and E; these parameters can take part in disorder of glucose homeostasis and insulin release.

  2. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Static magnetic field concentration and enhancement using magnetic materials with positive permeability

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a novel compressor for static magnetic fields is proposed based on finite embedded transformation optics. When the DC magnetic field passes through the designed device, the magnetic field can be compressed inside the device. After it passes through the device, one can obtain an enhanced static magnetic field behind the output surface of the device (in a free space region). We can also combine our compressor with some other structures to get a higher static magnetic field enhancement in a free space region. In contrast with other devices based on transformation optics for enhancing static magnetic fields, our device is not a closed structure and thus has some special applications (e.g., for controlling magnetic nano-particles for gene and drag delivery). The designed compressor can be constructed by using currently available materials or DC meta-materials with positive permeability. Numerical simulation verifies good performance of our device.

  4. Ansys Analysis of Weakly Magnetic Materials in MR Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Steinbauer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the impact of weakly magnetic materials on magnetic field in MR tomography. The resultsobtained by finite element method modelling as well as data measured by MR tomography are introduced. Method ofmagnetic susceptibility determination using MRI is discussed.

  5. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity......) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data....

  6. [Modulating effect of weak combined magnetic fields on duration of mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor metamorphosis stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that an exposure of pupae of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor to the combined static (42 μT) and very weak alternating (250 nT) magnetic fields exerts different influence, depending on the frequency of the alternating magnetic field, on duration of metamorphosis processes in these insects. For instance, an exposure of pupae to weak combined magnetic fields, adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for glutaminic acid (4,4 Hz), stimulates metamorphosis process--a transitional stage from pupae to imago lasts shorter. An inhibiting effect was observed when adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for Ca2 (32,2 Hz). At some frequencies this effect is not seen. For instance, an exposure at a frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for K+ (16,5 Hz) exerts no noticeable effect on the duration of the pupal metamorphosis stage.

  7. Resource Letter BSSMF-1: Biological Sensing of Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the effects of static (time-invariant) magnetic fields B on life, concentrating on how selected creatures sense/detect B. Journal articles, books, and previous and future electronically accessible media are cited for the following topics: history, the magnetic sensing/detection of B by creatures from bacteria to bugworms to butterflies to bees to birds to bats to bovines to beings (human), some of the mechanisms of effects at the developmental and cellular levels, experimental pitfalls, claimed healing effects of B, some medical uses of magnets, and cosmetics. The field presents a fascinating, evolving saga.

  8. Weak, Quiet Magnetic Fields Seen in the Venus Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T L; Baumjohann, W; Russell, C T; Luhmann, J G; Xiao, S D

    2016-03-24

    The existence of a strong internal magnetic field allows probing of the interior through both long term changes of and short period fluctuations in that magnetic field. Venus, while Earth's twin in many ways, lacks such a strong intrinsic magnetic field, but perhaps short period fluctuations can still be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the interior. Toward the end of the Venus Express mission, an aerobraking campaign took the spacecraft below the ionosphere into the very weakly electrically conducting atmosphere. As the spacecraft descended from 150 to 140 km altitude, the magnetic field became weaker on average and less noisy. Below 140 km, the median field strength became steady but the short period fluctuations continued to weaken. The weakness of the fluctuations indicates they might not be useful for electromagnetic sounding of the atmosphere from a high altitude platform such as a plane or balloon, but possibly could be attempted on a lander.

  9. Weak-periodic stochastic resonance in a parallel array of static nonlinearities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Ma

    Full Text Available This paper studies the output-input signal-to-noise ratio (SNR gain of an uncoupled parallel array of static, yet arbitrary, nonlinear elements for transmitting a weak periodic signal in additive white noise. In the small-signal limit, an explicit expression for the SNR gain is derived. It serves to prove that the SNR gain is always a monotonically increasing function of the array size for any given nonlinearity and noisy environment. It also determines the SNR gain maximized by the locally optimal nonlinearity as the upper bound of the SNR gain achieved by an array of static nonlinear elements. With locally optimal nonlinearity, it is demonstrated that stochastic resonance cannot occur, i.e. adding internal noise into the array never improves the SNR gain. However, in an array of suboptimal but easily implemented threshold nonlinearities, we show the feasibility of situations where stochastic resonance occurs, and also the possibility of the SNR gain exceeding unity for a wide range of input noise distributions.

  10. Isolated neuron amplitude spike decrease under static magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, María J.; del Moral, A.

    1996-05-01

    Isolated Helix aspersa neurons under strong enough static magnetic fields B (0.07-0.7 T) show a decrease of the spike depolarization voltage of the form ∼exp(αB2), with α dependent on neuron parameters. A tentative model is proposed which explains such behaviour through a deactivation of Na+K+-ATP-ase pumps due to protein superdiamagnetic rotation. Values for the cluster and protein in cluster numbers are estimated.

  11. Graphene-Based Superconducting Weak Links in Low Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Scott; Kumaravadivel, Piranavan; Du, Xu

    The impact of magnetic field on Andreev reflection is studied in graphene-based superconducting weak links. We found, through studying weak links with different adhesion layers and superconducting leads (including Graphene-Ti/Au-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-Nb, Graphene-V-Nb, Graphene-Ti-Nb, Graphene-Ti/Pd-NbN), that in low field (B graphene-superconductor interface. As the effective gap of the weak link approaches the intrinsic gap of the superconducting leads, a remnant of Andreev reflection can survive into the quantum Hall regime, allowing study of the interplay between the quantum Hall effect and Andreev reflection in high quality suspended graphene-superconductor weak links.

  12. Effect of static magnetic field on experimental dermal wound strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Yahya; Aydogan, Cem; Balcik, Cenk; Haberal, Nihan; Kirnap, Mahir; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2012-05-01

    An animal model. We sought to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing. Male Wistar rats were used. Wounds were created on the backs of all rats. Forty of these animals (M group) had NeFeB magnets placed in contact with the incisions, either parallel (Pa) and perpendicular (Pr) to the incision. The other 40 animals (sham [S] group) had nonmagnetized NeFeB bars placed in the same directions as the implanted animals. Half of the animals in each group were killed and assessed for healing on postoperative day 7 and the other half on postoperative day 14. The following assessments were done: gross healing, mechanical strength, and histopathology. Intergroup differences were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U or t test. Values for P less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. There were no differences between the magnetic and sham animals with respect to gross healing parameters. The mechanical strength was different between groups. On postoperative day 14, the MPr14 had significantly higher scores than the other groups. When static, high-power, magnetic fields are placed perpendicular to the wound, increased wound healing occurs in the skin of the experimental model.

  13. Explicit time-reversible orbit integration in Particle In Cell codes with static homogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patacchini, L.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2009-04-01

    A new explicit time-reversible orbit integrator for the equations of motion in a static homogeneous magnetic field - called Cyclotronic integrator - is presented. Like Spreiter and Walter's Taylor expansion algorithm, for sufficiently weak electric field gradients this second order method does not require a fine resolution of the Larmor motion; it has however the essential advantage of being symplectic, hence time-reversible. The Cyclotronic integrator is only subject to a linear stability constraint ( ΩΔ t Democritus can reduce the cost of orbit integration by up to a factor of ten.

  14. Measurements of weak localization of graphene in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvall, N.; Shivayogimath, Abhay; Yurgens, A.

    2015-01-01

    attribute this to the inhomogeneous field caused by vortices in the superconductor. The deviation, which depends on the carrier concentration in graphene, can be tuned by the gate voltage. In addition, collective vortex motion, known as vortex avalanches, is observed through magnetoresistance measurements......Weak localization in graphene is studied in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. To generate the inhomogeneous field, a thin film of type-II superconducting niobium is put in close proximity to graphene. A deviation from the ordinary quadratic weak localization behavior is observed at low fields. We...... of graphene....

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring weak magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    When measuring weak magnetic fields, a container containing a medium, such as a solution containing a stable radical, is placed in a polarising magnetic field, which is essentially at right angles to the field to be measured. The polarising field is interrupted rapidly, the interruption being...... preceded by the impression of a high-frequency electromagnetic signal. The frequency of the signal corresponds to the resonance frequency of the free electron spin. The frequency and amplitude of the precessing nuclei, which are a function of the strength of the measured field, are recorded by a pick...

  16. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem, E-mail: aesmaeili@sci.ui.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-15

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  17. Effects of static magnetic fields on growth of Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahee, Khouaildi B; Poinapen, Danny

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of magnetic fields on growth of primitive eukaryotes such as the ciliate Paramecium. The latter are known to exhibit interesting characteristics such as electrotaxis, gravitaxis, and membrane excitability not commonly encountered in higher organisms. This preliminary study reports the effects of static magnetic fields on growth of Paramecium caudatum. The microorganisms were either permanently or 24 h on-and-off exposed to North and South polarity magnetic fields of average field gradient 4.3 T/m, for a period of 96 h. The growth rate and lag phase of all exposed populations were not significantly different from control ones exposed to normal geomagnetic field (P > .05). However, a significant negative shift in t(max) (time taken for maximum growth) of 10.5%-12.2% and a significant decrease (P Paramecium growth by triggering early senescence of the population. The mechanisms underlying the small changes in population growth are unknown at this level, but various hypotheses have been suggested, including disorganization of swimming patterns resulting from (i) changes in cell membrane electric potential due to high speed movement through a gradient magnetic field and (ii) thermodynamic effect of anisotropic magnetic energies on cell membrane components affecting functioning of calcium channels. Altered swimming movements could in turn affect highly orchestrated processes such as conjugation, essential for survival of the organisms during development of adverse environmental conditions as thought to occur in the closed culture system used in this study.

  18. Theory of ferromagnetic resonance and static magnetization in ultrathin crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, George T.

    1982-07-01

    A theory of the static magnetization orientations θ0 and of the ferromagnetic resonance fields H-->res in ultrathin (res are shown to depend crucially on the magnetocrystalline surface anisotropy, and a generalization of this anisotropy is proposed. The equation of motion of the magnetization is combined with the general exchange boundary condition, and realistic approximations are introduced in order to obtain closed algebraic expressions for θ0 and H-->res. The spatial dependence of the oscillations in the presently calculated resonance modes do not represent spin waves but nondissipative exponential decays perpendicular to the film surfaces. The film thicknesses 2L are so small that the films are "beyond spin-wave cutoff." It is shown that the angular dependence of Hres differs strongly from that predicted by the uniform mode theory and that Hres is a linear function of 1L rather than independent of L. An extension of the theory to somewhat thicker films is also presented.

  19. Pollux: a stable weak dipolar magnetic field but no planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurière, Michel; Konstantinova-Antova, Renada; Espagnet, Olivier; Petit, Pascal; Roudier, Thierry; Charbonnel, Corinne; Donati, Jean-François; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-08-01

    Pollux is considered as an archetype of a giant star hosting a planet: its radial velocity (RV) presents sinusoidal variations with a period of about 590 d, which have been stable for more than 25 years. Using ESPaDOnS and Narval we have detected a weak (sub-gauss) magnetic field at the surface of Pollux and followed up its variations with Narval during 4.25 years, i.e. more than for two periods of the RV variations. The longitudinal magnetic field is found to vary with a sinusoidal behaviour with a period close to that of the RV variations and with a small shift in phase. We then performed a Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) investigation from the Stokes V and Stokes I least-squares deconvolution (LSD) profiles. A rotational period is determined, which is consistent with the period of variations of the RV. The magnetic topology is found to be mainly poloidal and this component almost purely dipolar. The mean strength of the surface magnetic field is about 0.7 G. As an alternative to the scenario in which Pollux hosts a close-in exoplanet, we suggest that the magnetic dipole of Pollux can be associated with two temperature and macroturbulent velocity spots which could be sufficient to produce the RV variations. We finally investigate the scenarii of the origin of the magnetic field which could explain the observed properties of Pollux.

  20. Static Magnetic Field Therapy: A Critical Review of Treatment Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha P. Colbert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Static magnetic field (SMF therapy, applied via a permanent magnet attached to the skin, is used by people worldwide for self-care. Despite a lack of established SMF dosage and treatment regimens, multiple studies are conducted to evaluate SMF therapy effectiveness. Our objectives in conducting this review are to: (i summarize SMF research conducted in humans; (ii critically evaluate reporting quality of SMF dosages and treatment parameters and (iii propose a set of criteria for reporting SMF treatment parameters in future clinical trials. We searched 27 electronic databases and reference lists. Only English language human studies were included. Excluded were studies of electromagnetic fields, transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnets placed on acupuncture points, animal studies, abstracts, posters and editorials. Data were extracted on clinical indication, study design and 10 essential SMF parameters. Three reviewers assessed quality of reporting and calculated a quality assessment score for each of the 10 treatment parameters. Fifty-six studies were reviewed, 42 conducted in patient populations and 14 in healthy volunteers. The SMF treatment parameters most often and most completely described were site of application, magnet support device and frequency and duration of application. Least often and least completely described were characteristics of the SMF: magnet dimensions, measured field strength and estimated distance of the magnet from the target tissue. Thirty-four (61% of studies failed to provide enough detail about SMF dosage to permit protocol replication by other investigators. Our findings highlight the need to optimize SMF dosing parameters for individual clinical conditions before proceeding to a full-scale clinical trial.

  1. Strong static-magnetic field alters operant responding by rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, M.; Matsuda, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Forty male rats of the Wistar ST strain were trained and observed for Sidman avoidance (SA) for 7 weeks or for discriminative avoidance (DA) for 14 weeks to determine the effects of exposure to a strong static-magnetic field. Before avoidance conditioning was completed, rats in the SA group were exposed to the static field at 0.6 T, 16 h/day for 4 days during the fifth week, and those in the DA group were exposed for 6 h/day for 4 days during the seventh week. In the SA conditioning, frequency of lever-pressing by exposed rats gradually decreased during 1 week of exposure and stayed low for at least 2 weeks after exposure. Frequencies of electric shocks received by the rats increased dramatically during the second day of exposure and consistently stayed higher than those of control rats. In the DA condition, exposed rats responded at lower rates than did control rats throughout the observation period. They received more shocks during the 2 weeks following exposure. The data indicate that performance of avoidance responses was inhibited by a comparatively long exposure to a strong magnetic field.

  2. Static Magnetic Properties of AL800 Garnet Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuharik, J. [Fermilab; Madrak, R. [Fermilab; Makarov, A. [Fermilab; Pellico, W. [Fermilab; Sun, S. [Fermilab; Tan, C. Y. [Fermilab; Terechkine, I. [Fermilab

    2017-05-17

    A second harmonic tunable RF cavity is being devel-oped for the Fermilab Booster. This device, which prom-ises reduction of the particle beam loss at the injection, transition, and extraction stages, employs perpendicularly biased garnet material for frequency tuning. The required range of the tuning is significantly wider than in previously built and tested tunable RF devices. As a result, the mag-netic field in the garnet comes fairly close to the gyromag-netic resonance line at the lower end of the frequency range. The chosen design concept of a tuner for the cavity cannot ensure uniform magnetic field in the garnet mate-rial; thus, it is important to know the static magnetic prop-erties of the material to avoid significant increase in the lo-cal RF loss power density. This report summarizes studies performed at Fermilab to understand variations in the mag-netic properties of the AL800 garnet material used to build the tuner of the cavity.

  3. Magnetic fields of weak line T-Tauri stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Colin A.; MaTYSSE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    T-Tauri stars (TTS) are late-type pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars that are gravitationally contracting towards the MS. Those that possess a massive accretion disc are known as classical T-Tauri stars (cTTSs), and those that have exhausted the gas in their inner discs are known as weak-line T-Tauri stars (wTTSs). Magnetic fields largely dictate the angular momentum evolution of TTS and can affect the formation and migration of planets. Thus, characterizing their magnetic fields is critical for testing and developing stellar dynamo models, and trialling scenarios currently invoked to explain low-mass star and planet formation. The MaTYSSE programme (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in Exoplanets) aims to determine the magnetic topologies of ~30 wTTSs and monitor the long-term topology variability of ~5 cTTSs. We present several wTTSs that have been magnetically mapped thus far (using Zeeman Doppler Imaging), where we find a much wider range of field topologies compared to cTTSs and MS dwarfs with similar internal structures.

  4. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Alexandra Paun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20–40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  5. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Dinescu, Maria; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo

    2018-02-07

    We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20-40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase) production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  6. Resonances of an oscillating conductive pipe driven by an alternating magnetic field in the presence of a static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladera, Celso L; Donoso, Guillermo, E-mail: clladera@usb.v [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Apdo. 89000, Caracas 1086 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    A short conducting pipe that hangs from a weak spring is forced to oscillate by the magnetic field of a surrounding coaxial coil that has been excited by a low-frequency current source in the presence of an additional static magnetic field. Induced oscillating currents appear in the pipe. The pipe motion becomes damped by the dragging forces between the induced currents and the static field. This oscillating system presents an interesting set of properties. To start with, it is not a magnet interacting with the oscillating field of a coil. The oscillating pipe is not even a ferromagnet. It is a new and conceptually rich case of a damped forced oscillator whose motion differential equation contains coefficients that depend upon a parameter. Here, we present and analytically explain the case of the small amplitude oscillations of this magneto-mechanical system. The ordinary amplitude and phase resonance curves are theoretically derived and confirmed by the set of experimental results presented. This oscillator is inexpensive and simple to set up, does not require sophisticated instrumentation, and with its interesting analytical model, is recommended either as an undergraduate laboratory experiment, as student project work, or even as a demonstration experiment. In loving memory of our late colleague and friend Professor DarIo Moreno

  7. Growth of etiolated barley plants in weak static and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields tuned to calcium ion cyclotron resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazur, Alexander; Rassadina, Valentina; Dandler, Jörg; Zoller, Jutta

    2006-01-01

    Background The effects of weak magnetic and electromagnetic fields in biology have been intensively studied on animals, microorganisms and humans, but comparably less on plants. Perception mechanisms were attributed originally to ferrimagnetism, but later discoveries required additional explanations like the "radical pair mechanism" and the "Ion cyclotron resonance" (ICR), primarily considered by Liboff. The latter predicts effects by small ions involved in biological processes, that occur in definite frequency- and intensity ranges ("windows") of simultaneously impacting magnetic and electromagnetic fields related by a linear equation, which meanwhile is proven by a number of in vivo and in vitro experiments. Methods Barley seedlings (Hordeum vulgare, L. var. Steffi) were grown in the dark for 5 and 6 days under static magnetic and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields matching the ICR conditions of Ca2+. Control cultures were grown under normal geomagnetic conditions, not matching this ICR. Morphology, pigmentation and long-term development of the adult plants were subsequently investigated. Results The shoots of plants exposed to Ca2+-ICR exposed grew 15–20% shorter compared to the controls, the plant weight was 10–12% lower, and they had longer coleoptiles that were adhering stronger to the primary leaf tissue. The total pigment contents of protochlorophyllide (PChlide) and carotenoids were significantly decreased. The rate of PChlide regeneration after light irradiation was reduced for the Ca2+-ICR exposed plants, also the Shibata shift was slightly delayed. Even a longer subsequent natural growing phase without any additional fields could only partially eliminate these effects: the plants initially exposed to Ca2+-ICR were still significantly shorter and had a lower chlorophyll (a+b) content compared to the controls. A continued cultivation and observation of the adult plants under natural conditions without any artificial electromagnetic fields showed a

  8. Magnetic field strength and reproducibility of neodymium magnets useful for transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadulla, Casto; Foffani, Guglielmo; Oliviero, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in humans reduces the excitability of the motor cortex for a few minutes after the end of stimulation. However, when tSMS is applied in humans, the cortex is at least 2 cm away, so most of the strength of the magnetic field will not reach the target. The main objective of the study was to measure the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by commercial neodymium magnets. We measured the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by four different types of neodymium cylindrical magnets using a magnetic field-to-voltage transducer. Magnetic field strength depended on magnet size. At distances magnetic field strength was affected by the presence of central holes (potentially useful for recording electroencephalograms). At distances >1.5 cm, the measurements made on the cylinder axis and 1.5 cm off the axis were comparable. The reproducibility of the results (i.e., the consistency of the field strength across magnets of the same size) was very high. These measurements offer a quantitative empirical reference for developing devices useful for tSMS protocols in both humans and animals. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  9. Static high-gradient magnetic fields affect the functionality of monocytic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syrovets, T.; Schmidt, Z.; Buechele, B.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Dempsey, N.; Simmet, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-2 ISSN 0892-6638 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : static high-gradient * magnet ic fields * affect the functionality * monocytic cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism

  10. Retrospective assessment of exposure to static magnetic fields during production and development of magnetic resonance imaging systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Suzan; Christopher, Yvette; Engels, Hans; Slottje, Pauline; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    At present, the relationship between chronic exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and health effects is unclear. We developed a task-based deterministic model for estimating historical electromagnetic field exposure from the static B-field (B0) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, for a

  11. Relativistic corrections to the static energy in terms of Wilson loops at weak coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peset, Clara [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department T31, Garching (Germany); Pineda, Antonio [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Grup de Fisica Teorica, Dept. Fisica y IFAE-BIST, Barcelona (Spain); Stahlhofen, Maximilian [Johannes Gutenberg University, PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    We consider the O(1/m) and the spin-independent momentum-dependent O(1/m{sup 2}) quasi-static energies of heavy quarkonium (with unequal masses). They are defined nonperturbatively in terms of Wilson loops. We determine their short-distance behavior through O(α{sup 3}) and O(α{sup 2}), respectively. In particular, we calculate the ultrasoft contributions to the quasi-static energies, which requires the resummation of potential interactions. Our results can be directly compared to lattice simulations. In addition, we also compare the available lattice data with the expectations from effective string models for the long-distance behavior of the quasi-static energies. (orig.)

  12. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains’ electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state.

  13. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners : A comprehensive survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; Vocht, Frank De; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there

  14. Direction-Dependent Effects of Combined Static and ELF Magnetic Fields on Cell Proliferation and Superoxide Radical Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naarala, Jonne; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; McClure, Ian; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Juutilainen, Jukka; Martino, Carlos F

    2017-01-01

    Proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was stimulated by a nearly vertical 60 or 120 μT static magnetic field (MF) in comparison to cells that were shielded against MFs. When the static field was combined with an extremely low frequency (ELF) MF (18 Hz, 30 μT), proliferation was suppressed by a horizontal but not by a vertical ELF field. As these results suggested that the effects of an ELF MF depend on its direction in relation to the static MF, independent experiments were carried out to confirm such dependence using 50 Hz MFs and a different experimental model. Cytosolic superoxide level in rat glioma C6 cells exposed in the presence of a nearly vertical 33 μT static MF was increased by a horizontal 50 Hz, 30 μT MF, but not affected by a vertical 50 Hz MF. The results suggest that a weak ELF MF may interact with the static geomagnetic field in producing biological effects, but the effect depends on the relative directions of the static and ELF MFs.

  15. A Steel Wire Stress Measuring Sensor Based on the Static Magnetization by Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongge Deng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new stress measuring sensor is proposed to evaluate the axial stress in steel wires. Without using excitation and induction coils, the sensor mainly consists of a static magnetization unit made of permanent magnets and a magnetic field measurement unit containing Hall element arrays. Firstly, the principle is illustrated in detail. Under the excitation of the magnetization unit, a spatially varying magnetized region in the steel wire is utilized as the measurement region. Radial and axial magnetic flux densities at different lift-offs in this region are measured by the measurement unit to calculate the differential permeability curve and magnetization curve. Feature parameters extracted from the curves are used to evaluate the axial stress. Secondly, the special stress sensor for Φ5 and Φ7 steel wires is developed accordingly. At last, the performance of the sensor is tested experimentally. Experimental results show that the sensor can measure the magnetization curve accurately with the error in the range of ±6%. Furthermore, the obtained differential permeability at working points 1200 A/m and 10000 A/m change almost linearly with the stress in steel wires, the goodness of linear fits are all higher than 0.987. Thus, the proposed steel wire stress measuring sensor is feasible.

  16. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of densely packed magnetic nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytriiev, O.; Al-Jarah, U. A. S.; Gangmei, P.; Kruglyak, V. V.; Hicken, R. J.; Mahato, B. K.; Rana, B.; Agrawal, M.; Barman, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.

    2013-05-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic properties of magnetic nanowire arrays with high packing density (>0.4) and wire diameter much greater than the exchange length have been studied by static and time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements and micromagnetic simulations. The nanowires were formed by electrodeposition within a nanoporous template such that their symmetry axes lay normal to the plane of the substrate. A quantitative and systematic investigation has been made of the static and dynamic properties of the array, which lie between the limiting cases of a single wire and a continuous ferromagnetic thin film. In particular, the competition between anisotropies associated with the shape of the individual nanowires and that of the array as a whole has been studied. Measured and simulated hysteresis loops are largely anhysteretic with zero remanence, and the micromagnetic configuration is such that the net magnetization vanishes in directions orthogonal to the applied field. Simulations of the remanent state reveal antiferromagnetic alignment of the magnetization in adjacent nanowires and the formation of vortex flux closure structures at the ends of each nanowire. The excitation spectra obtained from experiment and micromagnetic simulations are in qualitative agreement for magnetic fields applied both parallel and perpendicular to the axes of the nanowires. For the field parallel to the nanowire axes, there is also good quantitative agreement between experiment and simulation. The resonant frequencies are initially found to decrease as the applied field is increased from remanence. This is the result of a change of mode profile within the plane of the array from nonuniform to uniform as the ground state evolves with increasing applied field. Quantitative differences between experimental and simulated spectra are observed when the field is applied perpendicular to the nanowire axes. The dependence of the magnetic excitation spectra upon the array packing

  17. No modulatory effects by transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of human motor and somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufner, Marco; Brückner, Sabrina; Kammer, Thomas

    Recently, it was reported that the application of a static magnetic field by placing a strong permanent magnet over the scalp for 10 min led to an inhibition of motor cortex excitability for at least 6 min after removing the magnet. When placing the magnet over the somatosensory cortex, a similar inhibitory after effect could be observed as well. Our aim was to replicate the inhibitory effects of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation in the motor and somatosensory system. The modulatory effect of static magnetic field stimulation was investigated in three experiments. In two experiments motor cortex excitability was measured before and after 10 or 15 min of magnet application, respectively. The second experiment included a sham condition and was designed in a double-blinded manner. In a third experiment, paired-pulse SSEPs were measured pre and four times post positioning the magnet over the somatosensory cortex for 10 min on both hemispheres, respectively. The SSEPs of the non stimulated hemisphere served as control condition. We did not observe any systematic effect of the static magnetic field neither on motor cortex excitability nor on SSEPs. Moreover, no SSEP paired-pulse suppression was found. We provide a detailed analysis of possible confounding factors and differences to previous studies on tSMS. After all, our results could not confirm the static magnetic field effect. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  19. Parametric Resonances of a Conductive Pipe Driven by an Alternating Magnetic Field in the Presence of a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L.

    2012-01-01

    The parametric oscillations of an oscillator driven electromagnetically are presented. The oscillator is a conductive pipe hung from a spring, and driven by the oscillating magnetic field of a surrounding coil in the presence of a static magnetic field. It is an interesting case of parametric oscillations since the pipe is neither a magnet nor a…

  20. Growth of etiolated barley plants in weak static and 50 Hz electromagnetic fields tuned to calcium ion cyclotron resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Pazur, Alexander; Rassadina, Valentina; Dandler, Jörg; Zoller, Jutta

    2006-01-01

    Background The effects of weak magnetic and electromagnetic fields in biology have been intensively studied on animals, microorganisms and humans, but comparably less on plants. Perception mechanisms were attributed originally to ferrimagnetism, but later discoveries required additional explanations like the "radical pair mechanism" and the "Ion cyclotron resonance" (ICR), primarily considered by Liboff. The latter predicts effects by small ions involved in biological processes, that occur in...

  1. TWO DIMENTIONAL STATIC MAGNETIC ANALYSIS OF RADIAL MAGNETIC BEARING SYSTEMS WITH DIFFERENT STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf ÖNER

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The friction loss of electrical machines is an important problem as like in other rotary machines. In addition, the bearings, where the friction losses occur, also require lubrication at periodic intervals and need to be maintained. In this study, to minimize the friction loss of electrical motor, two dimentional static magnetic analysis of radial magnetic bearing systems with different structures are performed and compared with each other; also, magnetic bearing system with four-pole is realized and applied to an induction motor. In simulation, the forces applied to the rotor of induction motor from designed magnetic bearing system are calculated in a computer by using FEMM software package. In application, when comparing designed magnetic bearing system with mechanical bearings up to the revolution of 350 rpm, it was observed that the loss of no-load operating condition of induction motor is decreased about 15 % with magnetic bearing system. In addition to this, mechanical noisy of the motor is also decreased considerably.

  2. Weak antibody-cyclodextrin interactions determined by quartz crystal microbalance and dynamic/static light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, Elisabeth; Dixit, Nitin; Besheer, Ahmed; Kalonia, Devendra; Winter, Gerhard

    2013-11-01

    In a quest to elucidate the mechanism by which hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) stabilizes antibodies against shaking stress, two heavily debated hypotheses exist, namely that stabilization is due to HPβCD's surface activity, or due to specific interactions with proteins. In a previous study by Serno et al. (Pharm. Res. 30 (2013) 117), we could refute the first hypothesis by proving that, although HPβCD is slightly surface active, it does not displace the antibody at the air-water interface, and accordingly, its surface activity is not the underlying stabilizing mechanism. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of interactions between HPβCD and monoclonal antibodies as the potential stabilization mechanism using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and static as well as dynamic light scattering. In the presence of HPβCD, the adsorption of IgG antibodies in the native state (IgG A) and the unfolded state (IgG A and IgG B) on gold-coated quartz crystals was studied by QCM. Results show that HPβCD causes a reduction in protein adsorption in both the folded and the unfolded states, probably due to an interaction between the protein and the cyclodextrin, leading to a reduced hydrophobicity of the protein and consequently a lower extent of adsorption. These results were supported by investigation of the interaction between the native protein and HPβCD using static and dynamic light scattering experiments, which provide the protein-protein interaction parameters, B22 and kD, respectively. Both B22 and kD showed an increase in magnitude with increasing HPβCD-concentrations, indicating a rise in net repulsive forces between the protein molecules. This is further evidence for the presence of interactions between HPβCD and the studied antibodies, since an association of HPβCD on the protein surface leads to a change in the intermolecular forces between the protein molecules. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the previously observed

  3. Static and Dynamic properties of Cubic Chiral Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, F.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on chiral magnets, where skyrmion lattices are stablised by magnetic fields. Neutron scattering, magnetisation and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed on several typical chiral magnets such as the multiferroic insulator Cu2OSeO3 and

  4. Impact of static magnetic fields on human myoblast cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bonaterra, Gabriel Alejandro; Kassner, Stefan S; Faber, Anne; Sauter, Alexander; Schulz, Johannes D; Hörmann, Karl; Kinscherf, Ralf; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of skeletal muscle loss due to trauma or tumor ablation therapy still lacks a suitable clinical approach. Creation of functional muscle tissue in vitro using the differentiation potential of human satellite cells (myoblasts) is a promising new research field called tissue engineering. Strong differentiation stimuli, which can induce formation of myofibers after cell expansion, have to be identified and evaluated in order to create sufficient amounts of neo-tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of static magnetic fields (SMF) on human satellite cell cultures as one of the preferred stem cell sources in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Experiments were performed using human satellite cells with and without SMF stimulation after incubation with a culture medium containing low [differentiation medium (DM)] or high [growth medium (GM)] concentrations of growth factors. Proliferation analysis using the alamarBlue assay revealed no significant influence of SMF on cell division. Real-time RT-PCR of the following marker genes was investigated: myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myogenic differentiation antigen 1 (MYOD1), myogenin (MYOG), skeletal muscle α1 actin (ACTA1), and embryonic (MYH3), perinatal (MYH8) and adult (MYH1) skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain. We detected an influence on marker gene expression by SMF in terms of a down-regulation of the marker genes in cell cultures treated with SMF and DM, but not in cell cultures treated with SMF and GM. Immunocytochemical investigations using antibodies directed against the differentiation markers confirmed the gene expression results and showed an enhancement of maturation after stimulation with GM and SMF. Additional calculation of the fusion index also revealed an increase in myotube formation in cell cultures treated with SMF and GM. Our findings show that the effect of SMF on the process of differentiation depends on the growth factor concentration in the culture medium in human

  5. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stirling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake.

  6. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  7. Static Scaling on an Interacting Magnetic Nanoparticle System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, T.; Svedlindh, P.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    1998-01-01

    The field dependence of the ac susceptibility of a concentrated frozen ferrofluid containing ultrafine Fe-C particles of monodisperse nature has been analyzed using static scaling. For the first time, a divergent behavior of the nonlinear susceptibility of a dipole-dipole interacting system is de...

  8. Investigating the Magnetic Interaction with Geomag and Tracker Video Analysis: Static Equilibrium and Anharmonic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, P.; Mascheretti, P.; DeAmbrosis, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how simple experiments realizable by using easily found and low-cost materials allow students to explore quantitatively the magnetic interaction thanks to the help of an Open Source Physics tool, the Tracker Video Analysis software. The static equilibrium of a "column" of permanents magnets is carefully investigated by…

  9. Work-related factors associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Cambron-Goulet, Évelyne; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to identify work-related and personal factors associated with workers' exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF) from MRI scanners. METHODS: Measurements of personal exposure to SMF and TVMF were performed among MRI staff

  10. Working with MRI: An investigation of occupational exposure to strong static magnetic fields and associated symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) makes use of electromagnetic fields in the non-ionizing radiation frequency ranges. One of them is a continuously present strong static magnetic field (SMF), which extends up to several meters around the scanner. Each time an MRI worker performs tasks near the

  11. Geometrical aspects of cylindric magnetic shields in strong static fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwei, XIA; Wei, LI; Bo, LI; Qingwei, YANG

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), research on a magnetic shield against a strong field has been carried out. In this paper, a cylindric magnetic shield is studied by using the finite element method with a nonlinear magnetization curve. The geometrical aspects of shielding performance are identified and corresponding suggestions for application are provided. Among them, the effects of the edge and cover thickness have not been mentioned elsewhere to our knowledge.

  12. Green function method for calculating properties of static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, S

    2001-10-01

    Given complete information about the normal component of a magnetic field in a plane, it is possible to directly calculate all aspects of the field at any point in a source-free, homogeneous volume above that plane. The magnetic scalar potential, the magnetic field, and its gradient have direct representations as integrals of the boundary data. This paper provides a Green function method for this problem, as well as examples of such calculations. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Linear stability analysis of a levitated nanomagnet in a static magnetic field: Quantum spin stabilized magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, C. C.; Pöchhacker, V.; Cirac, J. I.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically study the levitation of a single magnetic domain nanosphere in an external static magnetic field. We show that, apart from the stability provided by the mechanical rotation of the nanomagnet (as in the classical Levitron), the quantum spin origin of its magnetization provides two additional mechanisms to stably levitate the system. Despite the Earnshaw theorem, such stable phases are present even in the absence of mechanical rotation. For large magnetic fields, the Larmor precession of the quantum magnetic moment stabilizes the system in full analogy with magnetic trapping of a neutral atom. For low magnetic fields, the magnetic anisotropy stabilizes the system via the Einstein-de Haas effect. These results are obtained with a linear stability analysis of a single magnetic domain rigid nanosphere with uniaxial anisotropy in a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic field.

  14. Effect of static magnetic fields and phloretin on antioxidant defense system of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Orchel, Joanna; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław

    2016-08-01

    The available evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies is deemed not sufficient to draw conclusions about the potential health effects of static magnetic field (SMF) exposure. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the influence of static magnetic fields and phloretin on the redox homeostasis of human dermal fibroblasts. Control fibroblasts and fibroblasts treated with phloretin were subjected to the influence of static magnetic fields. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.55, and 0.7 T) were used in the study. Quantification of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1), glutathione reductase (GSR), and catalase (CAT) messenger RNAs (mRNAs) was performed by means of real-time reverse transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) technique. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured using a commercially available kit. No significant differences were found in SOD1, SOD2, GPX1, MGST1, GSR, and CAT mRNA levels among the studied groups in comparison to the control culture without phloretin and without the magnet. There were also no changes in SOD, GPx, and CAT activities. In conclusion, our study indicated that static magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets do not exert a negative influence on the oxidative status of human dermal fibroblasts. Based on these studies, it may also be concluded that phloretin does not increase its antioxidant properties under the influence of static magnetic fields. However, SMF-induced modifications at the cellular and molecular level require further clarification.

  15. Learning about static electricity and magnetism in a fourth-grade classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, David Roy

    Students begin to develop mental models to explain electrostatic and magnetic phenomena throughout childhood, middle childhood and high school, although these mental models are often incoherent and unscientific (Borges, Tenico, & Gilbert, 1998; Maloney, 1985). This is a case study of a classroom of grade four students and the mental models of magnetism and static electricity they used during a six-week science unit. The 22 students studied magnetism and static electricity using inquiry activities structured to create an environment where students would be likely to construct powerful scientific ideas (Goldberg & Bendall, 1995). Multiple data sources, including students' writing, student assessments, teacher interviews, student interviews, teacher journals, and classroom video and audio recordings were used to uncover how fourth grade students made sense of static electricity and magnetism before, during, and after instruction. The data were analyzed using a social constructivist framework to determine if students were able to develop target scientific ideas about static electricity and magnetism. In general, students were found to have three core mental models prior to instruction: (1) Static electricity and magnetism are the same "substance"; (2) This substance exists on the surface of a magnet or a charged object and can be rubbed off, and (3) Opposite substances attract. During the activities, students had many opportunities to observe evidence that contradicted these core mental models. Using evidence from direct observations, the students practiced differentiating between evidence and ideas. Through group and class discussions, they developed evidenced-based (scientific) ideas. Final assessments revealed that students were able to construct target ideas such as: (1) static electricity and magnetism are fundamentally different; (2) there are two kinds of static "charge;" (3) magnet-rubbed wires act like a magnet; and (4) opposite substances move toward each

  16. [Effect of the extremely weak alternating magnetic fields on the regeneration of planarians and the gravitropic response of plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, N A; Ermakov, A M; Znobishcheva, A V; Skrebnitskaia, L K; Lednev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The influence of extremely weak alternating magnetic fields (EW AMF) directed colinearly to the static Earth magnetic field on the rate of regeneration of planarians and the rate of gravitropic response in the stem segments of flax has been studied. The value of bioeffects of EW AMF is determined by the parameter gamma B(AC)/f, where y is the gyromagnetic ratio of the magnetic moments induced by the orbital movements of electrons in atoms, and B(AC) and f correspond to magnetic induction and frequency of the alternating magnetic component. It was shown that the magnitude of bioeffects depends on the amplitude (at fixed 1000 Hz - frequency) and frequency (at fixed 192 nT - amplitude) of the alternating component. Maxima of bioeffects are observed at gamma B(AC)/f = 0.9; 2.75, and minor maxima gamma B(AC)/f = 4.5; 6.1. The bioeffects are absent at gamma B(AC)/f = 1.8, 3.8, 5.3, 6.7. The positions of the maxima and minima of bioeffects correspond to the theoretical prediction (at gamma = 14000 Hz/microT). Primary targets for the EW AMF of this type are the magnetic moments induced by the orbital movements of electrons in atoms.

  17. Dosimetry in clinical static magnetic fields using plastic scintillation detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanowicz, S.; Latzel, H.; Lindvold, Lars René

    2013-01-01

    To further improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the patient, several projects are pursuing the integration of linear accelerators with magnetic resonance imaging systems. Generally, this is conceived as the next generation of image-guided radiotherapy. For technical and physical reason it is......, however, not clear yet how dosimetry will be conducted as standard methods and might not be easily transferred to systems with clinical magnetic fields. For dosimetry in MRI accelerators, we have tested plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) coupled to optical fibers. They are suitable for real-time and in......-vivo dosimetry in radiation treatments and diagnostics and could be, being all-optical, promising candidates for this application. To study the basic feasibility of using PSDs with organic scintillators in magnetic fields, we measured the response of these dosimeters in presence of magnetic fields up to 1 T...

  18. Directional Solidification Microstructure of a Ni-Based Superalloy: Influence of a Weak Transverse Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xu; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jiao; Han, Yanfeng; Li, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A Ni-based superalloy CMSX-6 was directionally solidified at various drawing speeds (5–20 μm·s−1) and diameters (4 mm, 12 mm) under a 0.5 T weak transverse magnetic field. The results show that the application of a weak transverse magnetic field significantly modified the solidification microstructure. It was found that if the drawing speed was lower than 10 μm·s−1, the magnetic field caused extensive macro-segregation in the mushy zone, and a change in the mushy zone length. The magnetic fie...

  19. Effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Shigeki; Naruse, Yujiro; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2010-12-01

    The effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of single yeast cells was investigated using a magnetic circuit that was capable of generating a strong magnetic field (2.93 T) and gradient (6100 T²  m⁻¹). Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells were grown in an aqueous YPD agar in a silica capillary under either a homogeneous or inhomogeneous static magnetic field. Although the size of budding yeast cells was only slightly affected by the magnetic fields after 4 h, the budding angle was clearly affected by the direction of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the homogeneous magnetic field, the budding direction of daughter yeast cells was mainly oriented in the direction of magnetic field B. However, when subjected to the inhomogeneous magnetic field, the daughter yeast cells tended to bud along the axis of capillary flow in regions where the magnetic gradient, estimated by B(dB/dx), were high. Based on the present experimental results, the possible mechanism for the magnetic effect on the budding direction of daughter yeast cells is theoretically discussed. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. [Sensitivity of the diamagnetic condensed matter to weak magnetic fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashov, Iu A; Popov, I V

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that, under the influence of magnetic field, rotational moments of the same direction appear for all charged particles having the same sign of their charge and freely moving in a thermal fluctuational electromagnetic field in a diamagnetic condensed matter. The magnitude of this rotational moment is proportional to the thermal energy kT and can be substantially increased when the conditions for cyclotron resonance are satisfied. The moments of positively charged particles are directed oppositely to the vector of the magnetic field induction. The so-called "kT problem" has been solved. The evidence for magnetosensitivity is the appearance of rotational moments acting on the particles from the thermal field in the presence of an external magnetic field as a small factor.

  1. [Modulation of cardiac rhythms in humans exposed to extremely weak alternating magnetic fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V V; Belova, N A; Ermakov, A M; Akimov, E B; Tonevitskiĭ, A G

    2008-01-01

    The influence of extremely weak alternating magnetic fields (EW AMF) with amplitudes of magnetic fields homogeneous in amplitude. It was shown that the exposure of volunteers to different types of extremely weak alternating magnetic fields can both increase and decrease the magnitude of stress. In particular, the field tuned to the nuclear spins of hydrogen atoms (amplitude 1.6 microT, frequency 76 Hz) induces a decrease in the Baevsky's stress index, while the field tuned to the magnetic moments formed by the orbiting electrons in some atoms (amplitude 0.192 microT, frequency 3000 Hz) increases the stress index. The results obtained provide a possible explanation for the mechanism of adverse effects of some particular types of technogenic and natural extremely weak alternating magnetic fields on the human cardiovascular system.

  2. Magnetic dynamics of weakly and strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian; Mørup, Steen

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of two differently treated samples of hematite nanoparticles from the same batch with a particle size of about 20 nm have been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy. The dynamics of the first sample, in which the particles are coated and dispersed in water, is in accordance...

  3. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Static fluid magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of ureteral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Ectopic ureters are often very difficult to diagnose with conventional imaging modalities especially in children. Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has been recently investigated as a problem-solving tool for the evaluation of various congenital urogenital anomalies with favorable results. Aim of the work: To ...

  5. Static fluid magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of ureteral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T.Y. Gaweesh

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... Abstract Introduction: Ectopic ureters are often very difficult to diagnose with conventional imag- ing modalities especially in children. Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has been recently inves- tigated as a problem-solving tool for the evaluation of various congenital urogenital anomalies with favorable ...

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Magnetically Driven Duffing-Type Spring-Magnet Oscillator in the Static Magnetic Field of a Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L.

    2012-01-01

    We study the nonlinear oscillations of a forced and weakly dissipative spring-magnet system moving in the magnetic fields of two fixed coaxial, hollow induction coils. As the first coil is excited with a dc current, both a linear and a cubic magnet-position dependent force appear on the magnet-spring system. The second coil, located below the…

  7. Influence of static magnetic fields on S. cerevisae biomass growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João B. Muniz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomass growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DAUFPE-1012 was studied in eight batch fermentations exposed to steady magnetic fields (SMF running at 23ºC (± 1ºC, for 24 h in a double cylindrical tube reactor with synchronic agitation. For every batch, one tube was exposed to 220mT flow intensity SMF, produced by NdFeB rod magnets attached diametrically opposed (N to S magnets on one tube. In the other tube, without magnets, the fermentation occurred in the same conditions. The biomass growth in culture (yeast extract + glucose 2% was monitored by spectrometry to obtain the absorbance and later, the corresponding cell dry weight. The culture glucose concentration was monitored every two hours so as the pH, which was maintained between 4 and 5. As a result, the biomass (g/L increment was 2.5 times greater in magnetized cultures (n=8 as compared with SMF non-exposed cultures (n=8. The differential (SMF-control biomass growth rate (135% was slightly higher than the glucose consumption rate (130 % leading to increased biomass production of the magnetized cells.O crescimento da biomassa da Saccharomyces cerevisiae DAUFPE-1012 foi estudado em oito bateladas de fermentação, cada uma exposta aos campos magnéticos contínuos (CMC, à 23ºC (± 1ºC, durante um período de 24 horas em um reator duplo com agitação sincrônica. Em cada batelada,um tubo foi exposto ao CMC, com 220mT de intensidade de fluxo, produzidos por imãs de NdFeB fixados diametralmente opostos (N para S em um tubo do reator de fermentação. Em outro tubo, sem imãs, a fermentação ocorreu nas mesmas condições. O crescimento da biomassa nas culturas (extrato de fermento + glicose 2% foi monitorado através de espectrometria e correlacionado ao peso seco de levedura. A concentração de glicose nas culturas foi monitorada a cada duas horas e o pH foi mantido entre 4 e 5. Como resultado, a biomassa (g/L aumentou 2,5 vezes nas culturas magnetizadas (n=8 quando comparadas com as

  8. Nonlinear Langmuir Wave Modulation in Weakly Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dysthe, K. B.; Pécseli, Hans

    1978-01-01

    It is assumed that the magnetic field is only important for the ion motion. Both a fluid and a kinetic description of the ions are considered. It is found that the presence of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves, in addition to the ion acoustic waves also found in unmagnetized plasmas, has a strong...... varying electron heating in the amplitude modulated Langmuir wave. For modulations travelling almost perpendicular to the magnetic field, this effect has a profound influence on a modulational instability...... influence on the modulation stability of plane Langmuir waves. As in the unmagnetized case, kinetic results were found to deviate considerably from those obtained by using a fluid description for the ion dynamics. With particular attention to ionospheric phenomena, the effect is included of the spatially...

  9. Straintronics-based magnetic tunneling junction: Dynamic and static behavior analysis and material investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study the dynamic and static effects of mechanical stress on a straintronics device that includes a piezoelectric film combined with a magnetic tunneling junction. The inverse magnetostriction effect is studied in detail by realizing the varying magnetic susceptibility of the nanomagnet under stress. A dynamic model is developed based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which provides a platform to simulate the magnetization vector's behavior, critical flipping voltage, and delay properties. Furthermore, by converting the LLG equation into a 2nd order damping differential equation, we develop a proximate approach. This approach predicts the dynamic behavior of the magnetization vector and its dependency on material properties and applied voltage across the device without using sophisticated numerical calculations of the LLG model. Different dynamic and static material properties are observed by simulating five common magnetostrictive materials, including a newly discovered alloy, Galfenol.

  10. Magnetic displacement force and torque on dental keepers in the static magnetic field of an MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omatsu, Mika; Obata, Takayuki; Minowa, Kazuyuki; Yokosawa, Koichi; Inagaki, Eri; Ishizaka, Kinya; Shibayama, Koichi; Yamamoto, Toru

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of the static magnetic field of magnetic resonance (MR) scanners on keepers (ie, ferromagnetic stainless steel plate adhered to the abutment tooth of dental magnetic attachments). Magnetically induced displacement force and torque on keepers were measured using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T MR scanners and a method outlined by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Changes in magnetic flux density before and after exposure to scanner static magnetic field were examined. The maximum magnetically induced displacement forces were calculated to be 10.3 × 10(-2) N at 1.5 T and 13.9 × 10(-2) N at 3.0 T on the cover surface. The maximum torques exerted on the keeper (4 mm in diameter) were 0.83 N × 4 mm at 1.5 T and 0.85 N × 4 mm at 3.0 T. These forces were considerably higher than the gravitational force (7.7 × 10(-4) N) of the keeper but considerably lower than the keeper-root cap proper adhesive force. The keepers' magnetic flux density remained less than that of the Earth. Magnetically induced displacement force and torque on the keeper in the MR scanner do not influence the keeper-root cap proper adhesive force. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Most Typical 12 Resonant Perturbation of the Hydrogen Atom by Weak Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, K.; Lukina, O. V.; Sadovskii, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    We study a perturbation of the hydrogen atom by small homogeneous static electric and magnetic fields in a specific mutual alignment with angle approximately pi/3 which results in the 12 resonance of the linearized Keplerian n-shell approximation. The bifurcation diagram of the classical integrable

  12. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  13. [Magnetic resonance imaging : Recent studies on biological effects of static magnetic and high‑frequency electromagnetic fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pophof, B; Brix, G

    2017-07-01

    During the last few years, new studies on biological effects of strong static magnetic fields and on thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were published. Many of these studies have not yet been included in the current safety recommendations. Scientific publications since 2010 on biological effects of static and electromagnetic fields in MRI were researched and evaluated. New studies confirm older publications that have already described effects of static magnetic fields on sensory organs and the central nervous system, accompanied by sensory perceptions. A new result is the direct effect of Lorentz forces on ionic currents in the semicircular canals of the vestibular system. Recent studies of thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields were focused on the development of anatomically realistic body models and a more precise simulation of exposure scenarios. Strong static magnetic fields can cause unpleasant sensations, in particular, vertigo. In addition, they can influence the performance of the medical staff and thus potentially endanger the patient's safety. As a precaution, medical personnel should move slowly within the field gradient. High-frequency electromagnetic fields lead to an increase in the temperature of patients' tissues and organs. This should be considered especially in patients with restricted thermoregulation and in pregnant women and neonates; in these cases exposure should be kept as low as possible.

  14. From static to rotating to conformal static solutions: rotating imperfect fluid wormholes with(out) electric or magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azreg-Ainou, Mustapha [Baskent University, Department of Mathematics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-05-15

    We derive a shortcut stationary metric formula for generating imperfect fluid rotating solutions, in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates, from spherically symmetric static ones. We explore the properties of the curvature scalar and stress-energy tensor for all types of rotating regular solutions we can generate without restricting ourselves to specific examples of regular solutions (regular black holes or wormholes). We show through examples how it is generally possible to generate an imperfect fluid regular rotating solution via radial coordinate transformations. We derive rotating wormholes that are modeled as imperfect fluids and discuss their physical properties. These are independent on the way the stress-energy tensor is interpreted. A solution modeling an imperfect fluid rotating loop black hole is briefly discussed. We then specialize to the recently discussed stable exotic dust Ellis wormhole as emerged in a source-free radial electric or magnetic field, and we generate its, conjecturally stable, rotating counterpart. This turns out to be an exotic imperfect fluid wormhole, and we determine the stress-energy tensor of both the imperfect fluid and the electric or magnetic field. (orig.)

  15. Strong Gradients in Weak Magnetic Fields Induce DOLLOP Formation in Tap Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Sammer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2012 Coey proposed a theory on the mechanism of magnetic water treatment based on the gradient of the applied field rather than its absolute strength. We tested this theory by measuring the effect of very weak field magnets (≤ 10 G containing strong magnetic inhomogeneities (ΔB = 2 kG·m−1 on tap water samples by the use of electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS and laser scattering. Our results show an increased formation of nm-sized prenucleation clusters (dynamically ordered liquid like oxyanion polymers or “DOLLOPs” due to the exposure to the magnetic field and thus are consistent with Coey’s theory which is therefore also applicable to very weak magnetic fields as long as they contain strong gradients.

  16. Elliptic annular Josephson tunnel junctions in an external magnetic field: the statics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the static properties of one-dimensional planar Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) in the most general case of elliptic annuli. We have analyzed the dependence of the critical current in the presence of an external magnetic field applied either in the junction plane or in the ......We have investigated the static properties of one-dimensional planar Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) in the most general case of elliptic annuli. We have analyzed the dependence of the critical current in the presence of an external magnetic field applied either in the junction plane...... symmetric electrodes a transverse magnetic field is equivalent to an in-plane field applied in the direction of the current flow. Varying the ellipse eccentricity we reproduce all known results for linear and ring-shaped JTJs. Experimental data on high-quality Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb elliptic annular junctions...

  17. Effects of Static Magnetic Fields on the Physical, Mechanical, and Microstructural Properties of Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Soto-Bernal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental study carried out to comprehend the physical, mechanical, and microstructural behavior of cement pastes subjected to static magnetic fields while hydrating and setting. The experimental methodology consisted in exposing fresh cement pastes to static magnetic fields at three different magnetic induction strengths: 19.07, 22.22, and 25.37 Gauss. The microstructural characterization makes evident that there are differences in relation to amount and morphology of CSH gel; the amount of CSH is larger and its morphology becomes denser and less porous with higher magnetostatic induction strengths; it also shows the evidence of changes in the mineralogical composition of the hydrated cement pastes. The temperature increasing has no negative effects over the cement paste compressive strength since the magnetostatic field affects the process of hydration through a molecular restructuring process, which makes cement pastes improve microstructurally, with a reduced porosity and a higher mechanical strength.

  18. Dust Effects on a Free Presheaths in Weakly Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, I. J.; Bae, M. K.; Chp, S. G.; Kim, S. Y.; Hong, S. H.; Choi, H. G.; Oh, Y. S.; Oh, H. T.; Park, I. S.; Lho, T.; Chung, K. S.

    2016-10-01

    Dust effects on a diffusion coefficient and a connection length at a free presheath regions have been investigated as a part of experimental simulation of dust interaction with plasmas and plasma edge transport at Divertor Plasma Simulator - 2 (DiPS-2) with the following conditions: plasma density 1 10 × 1012 cm3, electron temperature 1 10 eV and magnetic field 1 kG, where the characteristics of DiPS-2 is the following: 12 V and 280 A for LaB6 heating, 50 - 100 V and 20 - 40 A for plasma discharge. Pulsed laser beams by a 250 mJ Nd:YAG laser were injected to a tungsten target for production of dust particles. Free presheaths were artificially generated by inserting a tungsten perturbing object with diameter = 1.5 cm at the center of plasmas in DiPS-2. Radial plasma profiles were measured by using a fast scanning probe (FSP) system with triple probe (TP) and Mach probe (MP) and a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system. Dust effects on a diffusion coefficient and a connection length in the presheath region were analysed by comparing the plasma parameter of dusty and pure plasmas.

  19. On the Mathematical Modeling of Line-Start Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors under Static Eccentricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahem Hussein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Line start permanent magnet synchronous motors experience different types of failures, including static eccentricity. The first step in detecting such failures is the mathematical modeling of the motor under healthy and failed conditions. In this paper, an attempt to develop an accurate mathematical model for this motor under static eccentricity is presented. The model is based on the modified winding function method and coupled magnetic circuits approach. The model parameters are calculated directly from the motor winding layout and its geometry. Static eccentricity effects are considered in the motor inductances calculation. The performance of the line start permanent magnet synchronous motor using the developed mathematical model is investigated using MATLAB/SIMULINK® software (2013b, MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA under healthy and static eccentricity condition for different loading values. A finite element method analysis is conducted to verify the mathematical model results, using the commercial JMAG® software (16.0.02n, JSOL Corporation, Tokyo, Japan. The results show a fine agreement between JMAG® and the developed mathematical model simulation results.

  20. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners: a comprehensive survey in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; De Vocht, Frank; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there is insufficient insight into the exposure variability that characterizes routine MRI work practice. However, this is an essential component of risk assessment and epidemiological studies. This paper describes the results of a measurement survey of shift-based personal exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) (B) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (dB/dt) among workers at 15 MRI facilities in the Netherlands. With the use of portable magnetic field dosimeters, >400 full-shift and partial shift exposure measurements were collected among various jobs involved in clinical and research MRI. Various full-shift exposure metrics for B and motion-induced dB/dt exposure were calculated from the measurements, including instantaneous peak exposure and time-weighted average (TWA) exposures. We found strong correlations between levels of static (B) and time-varying (dB/dt) exposure (r = 0.88-0.92) and between different metrics (i.e. peak exposure, TWA exposure) to express full-shift exposure (r = 0.69-0.78). On average, participants were exposed to MRI-related SMFs during only 3.7% of their work shift. Average and peak B and dB/dt exposure levels during the work inside the MRI scanner room were highest among technical staff, research staff, and radiographers. Average and peak B exposure levels were lowest among cleaners, while dB/dt levels were lowest among anaesthesiology staff. Although modest exposure variability between workplaces and occupations was observed, variation between individuals of the same occupation was substantial, especially among research staff. This relatively large variability between workers with the same job suggests that exposure classification

  1. Directional Solidification Microstructure of a Ni-Based Superalloy: Influence of a Weak Transverse Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A Ni-based superalloy CMSX-6 was directionally solidified at various drawing speeds (5–20 μm·s−1 and diameters (4 mm, 12 mm under a 0.5 T weak transverse magnetic field. The results show that the application of a weak transverse magnetic field significantly modified the solidification microstructure. It was found that if the drawing speed was lower than 10 μm·s−1, the magnetic field caused extensive macro-segregation in the mushy zone, and a change in the mushy zone length. The magnetic field significantly decreases the size of γ’ and the content of γ-γ’ eutectic. The formation of macro-segregation under a weak magnetic field was attributed to the interdendritic solute transport driven by the thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC. The γ’ phase refinement could be attributed to a decrease in nucleation activation energy owing to the magnetic field during solid phase transformation. The change of element segregation is responsible for the content decrease of γ-γ’ eutectic.

  2. Development of a new experimental device for long-duration magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Ryoma; Kaminou, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Kento; Inomoto, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a universal phenomenon which determines global structure and energy conversion in magnetized plasmas. Many experimental studies have been carried out to explore the physics of magnetic reconnection in fully ionized condition. However, it is predicted that the behavior of magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasmas such as solar chromosphere plasma will show different behavior such as ambipolar diffusion caused by interaction with neutral particles. In this research, we are developing a new experimental device to uncover the importance of ambipolar diffusion during magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasmas. We employ an inverter-driven rotating magnetic fields technique, which is used for generating steady azimuthal plasma current, to establish long-duration ( 1 ms) anti-parallel reconnection with magnetic field of 5 mT in weakly ionized plasma. We will present development status and initial results from the new experimental setup. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus'', Giant-in Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI) 15H05750, 15K14279, 26287143 and the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS14KNWP004).

  3. Pressure Effect on Magnetic Properties of Weak Itinerant Electron Ferromagnet CrAlGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Soshi; Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Umetsu, Rie Y.; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Koyama, Keiichi

    2018-01-01

    The Pressure effect on the magnetic properties of the weak itinerant electron ferromagnet CrAlGe was investigated at pressures up to 1.0 GPa. The spontaneous magnetic moment ps and Curie temperature TC decreased with increasing applied pressure P. The pressure derivatives of ps and TC were dps/dP = -3.98 × 10-5 μB/MPa and dTC/dP = -6.58 × 10-3 K/MPa, respectively. These obtained results are discussed on the basis of Takahashi's spin fluctuation theory for weak itinerant electron ferromagnets. The characteristic parameters T0 and TA increased with pressure.

  4. Extremely weak magnetic field exposure may inhibit hippocampal neurogenesis of Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Tian, L.; Cai, Y.; Xu, H.; Pan, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis occurs throughout life in mammals brains and can be influenced by animals' age as well as environmental factors. Lines of evidences have shown that the magnetic field is an important physics environmental factor influencing many animals' growth and development, and extremely weak magnetic field exposures have been proved having serious adverse effects on the metabolism and behaviors in some animals, but few studies have examined the response of hippocampal neurogenesis to it. In the present study, we experimentally examined the extremely weak magnetic field effects on neurogenesis of the dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus of adult Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Two types of magnetic fields were used, an extremely weak magnetic field (≤ 0.5μT) and the geomagnetic fields (strength 31-58μT) as controls. Thirty-two SD rats (3-weeks old) were used in this study. New cell survival in hippocampus was assessed at 0, 14, 28, and 42 days after a 7-day intraperitoneal injections of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Meanwhile, the amounts of immature neurons and mature neurons which are both related to hippocampal neurogenesis, as documented by labeling with doublecortin (DCX) and neuron (NeuN), respectively, were also analyzed at 0, 14, 28, and 42 days. Compared with geomagnetic field exposure groups, numbers of BrdU-, DCX-positive cells of DG of hippocampus in tested rats reduces monotonously and more rapidly after 14 days, and NeuN-positive cells significantly decreases after 28days when exposed in the extremely weak magnetic field condition. Our data suggest that the exposure to an extremely weak magnetic field may suppress the neurogenesis in DG of SD rats.

  5. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  6. Suppression of drinking by exposure to a high-strength static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Thomas A; Cassell, Jennifer A; Riccardi, Christina; Kwon, Bumsup; Smith, James C

    2007-01-30

    High-strength static magnetic fields of 7 T and above have been shown to have both immediate and delayed effects on rodents, such as the induction of locomotor circling and the acquisition of conditioned taste aversions. In this study, the acute effects of magnet field exposure on drinking were examined. Exposure to a 14.1-T magnetic field for as little as 5 min significantly decreased the amount of a glucose and saccharin solution (G+S) consumed by water-deprived rats over 10 min. The decreased intake could be accounted for largely, but not entirely, by an increase in the latency of magnet-exposed rats to initiate drinking. When intake was measured for 10-60 min after the initiation of drinking, thus controlling for increased latency, magnet-exposed rats still consumed less G+S than sham-exposed rats. The increased latency was not due simply to an inability of magnet-exposed rats to reach the elevated sipper tube of the G+S bottle, providing rats with long tubes that could be reached without raising their heads normalized intake but latency was still increased. The increased latency and decreased intake appeared to be secondary to somatic effects of magnet exposure, however, because during intraoral infusions magnet-exposed rats consumed the same amount of G+S with the same latency to reject as sham-exposed rats. The suppression of drinking by magnetic field exposure is consistent with the acute effects of other aversive stimuli, such as whole-body rotation, on short-term ingestion. These results add to the evidence that high-static strength magnetic fields can have behavioral effects on rodents.

  7. Enhancement of invertase production by Aspergillus niger OZ-3 using low-intensity static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Mesut; Esim, Nevzat; Genisel, Mucip; Ortucu, Serkan; Hasenekoglu, Ismet; Canli, Ozden; Erdal, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activity and growth on different newly identified molds. The most positive effect of SMFs on invertase activity and growth was observed for Aspergillus niger OZ-3. The submerged production of invertase was performed with the spores obtained at the different exposure times (120, 144, 168, and 196 hr) and magnetic field intensities (0.45, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mT). The normal magnetic field of the laboratory was assayed as 0.45 mT (control). Optimization of magnetic field intensity and exposure time significantly increased biomass production and invertase activity compared to 0.45 mT. The maximum invertase activity (51.14 U/mL) and biomass concentration (4.36 g/L) were achieved with the spores obtained at the 144 hr exposure time and 5 mT magnetic field intensity. The effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activities of molds was investigated for the first time in the present study. As an additional contribution, a new hyper-invertase-producing mold strain was isolated.

  8. ALICE—An advanced reflectometer for static and dynamic experiments in magnetism at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrudan, R; Brüssing, F; Salikhov, R; Meermann, J; Radu, I; Ryll, H; Radu, F; Zabel, H

    2015-06-01

    We report on significant developments of a high vacuum reflectometer (diffractometer) and spectrometer for soft x-ray synchrotron experiments which allows conducting a wide range of static and dynamic experiments. Although the chamber named ALICE was designed for the analysis of magnetic hetero- and nanostructures via resonant magnetic x-ray scattering, the instrument is not limited to this technique. The versatility of the instrument was testified by a series of pilot experiments. Static measurements involve the possibility to use scattering and spectroscopy synchrotron based techniques (photon-in photon-out, photon-in electron-out, and coherent scattering). Dynamic experiments require either laser or magnetic field pulses to excite the spin system followed by x-ray probe in the time domain from nano- to femtosecond delay times. In this temporal range, the demagnetization/remagnetization dynamics and magnetization precession in a number of magnetic materials (metals, alloys, and magnetic multilayers) can be probed in an element specific manner. We demonstrate here the capabilities of the system to host a variety of experiments, featuring ALICE as one of the most versatile and demanded instruments at the Helmholtz Center in Berlin-BESSY II synchrotron center in Berlin, Germany.

  9. ALICE—An advanced reflectometer for static and dynamic experiments in magnetism at synchrotron radiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrudan, R. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin for Materials and Energy, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Brüssing, F.; Salikhov, R.; Meermann, J.; Zabel, H. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Radu, I.; Ryll, H.; Radu, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin for Materials and Energy, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    We report on significant developments of a high vacuum reflectometer (diffractometer) and spectrometer for soft x-ray synchrotron experiments which allows conducting a wide range of static and dynamic experiments. Although the chamber named ALICE was designed for the analysis of magnetic hetero- and nanostructures via resonant magnetic x-ray scattering, the instrument is not limited to this technique. The versatility of the instrument was testified by a series of pilot experiments. Static measurements involve the possibility to use scattering and spectroscopy synchrotron based techniques (photon-in photon-out, photon-in electron-out, and coherent scattering). Dynamic experiments require either laser or magnetic field pulses to excite the spin system followed by x-ray probe in the time domain from nano- to femtosecond delay times. In this temporal range, the demagnetization/remagnetization dynamics and magnetization precession in a number of magnetic materials (metals, alloys, and magnetic multilayers) can be probed in an element specific manner. We demonstrate here the capabilities of the system to host a variety of experiments, featuring ALICE as one of the most versatile and demanded instruments at the Helmholtz Center in Berlin-BESSY II synchrotron center in Berlin, Germany.

  10. Traveling-wave tubes and backward-wave oscillators with weak external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-elfadl, T M; Nusinovich, G S; Shkvarunets, A G; Carmel, Y; Antonsen, T M; Goebel, D

    2001-06-01

    Recent development of plasma-assisted slow-wave oscillators [Goebel et al. IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 22, 547 (1994)], microwave sources that operate without guiding magnetic fields, has stimulated interest in the theoretical analysis of such tubes. In principle, in the absence of guiding magnetic fields, due to the space charge forces and the radial electric field of the wave, the electrons may propagate radially outward which increases electron coupling to the slow wave whose field is localized near the slow-wave structure (SWS). This increases the wave growth rate and efficiency, and hence allows one to shorten the interaction region. So the radial electron motion can be beneficial for operation if it does not lead to interception of electrons by the SWS. To avoid this interception a weak external magnetic field can be applied. The theory developed describes the effect of weak magnetic fields on the operation of traveling-wave tubes and backward-wave oscillators with electrons moving not only axially but also transversely. This theory allows one to estimate the magnetic field required for protecting the SWS from electron bombardment at different power levels. Theoretical predictions of the efficiency enhancement due to the weak magnetic field are confirmed in experiments.

  11. Acute effect of static exercise on the cardiovascular system: assessment by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegret, Josep M; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; La Gerche, Andre; Franco-Bonafonte, Luis; Rubio-Pérez, Francisco; Calvo, Nahum; Montero, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    The acute effect of static exercise on the global dynamics of the cardiovascular system is poorly understood. The use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) may be useful for evaluating this effect. A total of 12 healthy individuals underwent CMR imaging at rest and while performing a maximal sustained static exercise (weight elevation with both legs). We analyzed the effects on left and right ventricular function, ascending aorta dynamics, and venous capacitance using standard cine and phase-contrast sequences. We observed excellent reproducibility in the measurements of the images obtained at rest as well as during static exercise. During exercise, we observed reduced left (-35 ± 8 %, p exercise, we noted a tendency toward decreased aortic distensibility and a reduction of ascending aorta systolic expansion. In healthy individuals, an acute maximal static exercise produced a reduction in the left ventricle, right ventricle, and superior vena cava volumes as well as signs of increased aortic stiffness without increasing left ventricular systolic wall stress. CMR is feasible and useful in evaluating the hemodynamic effects of static exercise.

  12. A magnetoelectric flux gate: new approach for weak DC magnetic field detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhaoqiang; Shi, Huaduo; PourhosseiniAsl, Mohammad Javad; Wu, Jingen; Shi, Weiliang; Gao, Xiangyu; Yuan, Xiaoting; Dong, Shuxiang

    2017-08-17

    The magnetic flux gate sensors based on Faraday's Law of Induction are widely used for DC or extremely low frequency magnetic field detection. Recently, as the fast development of multiferroics and magnetoelectric (ME) composite materials, a new technology based on ME coupling effect is emerging for potential devices application. Here, we report a magnetoelectric flux gate sensor (MEFGS) for weak DC magnetic field detection for the first time, which works on a similar magnetic flux gate principle, but based on ME coupling effect. The proposed MEFGS has a shuttle-shaped configuration made of amorphous FeBSi alloy (Metglas) serving as both magnetic and magnetostrictive cores for producing a closed-loop high-frequency magnetic flux and also a longitudinal vibration, and one pair of embedded piezoelectric PMN-PT fibers ([011]-oriented Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 single crystal) serving as ME flux gate in a differential mode for detecting magnetic anomaly. In this way, the relative change in output signal of the MEFGS under an applied DC magnetic anomaly of 1 nT was greatly enhanced by a factor of 4 to 5 in comparison with the previous reports. The proposed ME flux gate shows a great potential for magnetic anomaly detections, such as magnetic navigation, magnetic based medical diagnosis, etc.

  13. [Effect of weak combined magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A M; Lednev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+ and extremely weak alternating magnetic field on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor have been studied. It was shown that the exposure of pupas of insects to all above-indicated types of fields stimulates the metamorphosis. However, after the exposure to weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+, the number of insects with anomalies increases, which is not observed by the action of the weak alternating magnetic field.

  14. Effect of site disorder on the magnetic properties of weak itinerant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed study of Ni75Al25 samples with varying degree of site disorder reveals that site disorder promotes magnetic excitations such as spin waves and local spin-density fluctuations and thereby reduces both spin-wave stiffness and Curie temperature. Irreversibility lines in the - phase diagram of the weak itinerant ...

  15. The generation of MHD waves by forced turbulence in a weakly magnetized fluid. [in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the fluctuating buoyancy force on wave generation in a weakly magnetized plasma is considered. As expected, the efficiency of MHD wave generation is enhanced by including this force. However, it remains true that the observed variation of coronal emission at fixed spectral type cannot be accounted for by a wave generation process of the type discussed here.

  16. THE EFFECT OF LOW INDUCTIVITY STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD ON SOME PLANT PATHOGEN FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál NAGY

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Growth and sporulation of phytopathogen microscopic fungi were studied under a static magnetic fi eld. The applied flux densities were 0,1, 0,5 and 1 mT. As a result of our experiments, the magnetic fi eld decreased the growth of colonies by 10 % using this fl ux density region. At the same time, the number of the developed conidia of Alternaria alternata and Curvularia inaequalis increased by 68-133 percent, but the number of Fusarium oxysporum conidia decreased by 79-83 percent.

  17. Static properties of small Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution in the barrier of small planar Josephson tunnel junctions is numerically simulated in the case when an external magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the barrier plane. The simulations allow for heuristic analytical solutions for the Josephson static phase...... profile from which the dependence of the maximum Josephson current on the applied field amplitude is derived. The most common geometrical configurations are considered and, when possible, the theoretical findings are compared with the experimental data. ©2008 American Institute of Physics...

  18. [Survey of risks related to static magnetic fields in ultra high field MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, H E; von Cramon, D Y

    2008-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), substantial improvements with respect to sensitivity are expected due to the development of so-called ultra high field scanners, i. e., whole-body scanners with a magnetic field strength of 7 T or above. Users of this technology need to evaluate this benefit for potential risks since commercially available systems are not certified as a medical device for human use. This review provides a detailed survey of static field bioeffects related to the exposure of subjects being scanned, to occupational exposure, and to exposure of the general public under consideration of current standards and directives. According to present knowledge, it is not expected that exposure of human subjects to static magnetic fields of 7 T implies a specific risk of damage or disease provided that known contraindications are observed. The available database does not permit definition of exact thresholds for harmful effects. However, experience from previous application of ultra high field MRI indicates that transient phenomena, such as vertigo, nausea, metallic taste, or magneto-phosphenes, are more frequently observed. In particular, movements in the field or the gradient of the fringe field seem to lead to detectable effects. Besides such observations, there is a strong demand for systematic investigation of potential interaction mechanisms related to static field exposure during MRI examinations.

  19. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Valdés-Bango

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  20. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Bango, F.; Vélez, M.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Alameda, J. M.; Martín, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  1. Strong static magnetic fields elicit swimming behaviors consistent with direct vestibular stimulation in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan K Ward

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for 'high-throughput' investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish.

  2. Design and Demonstration of a Test-Rig for Static Performance-Studies of Permanent Magnet Couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, Stig; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Bendixen, Flemming Buus

    2013-01-01

    The design and construction of an easy-to-use test-rig for permanent magnet couplings is presented. Static torque of permanent magnet couplings as a function of angular displacement is measured of permanent magnet couplings through an semi-automated test system. The test-rig is capable of measuring...

  3. Effect of a weak transverse magnetic field on the microstructure in directionally solidified peritectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Lu, Zhenyuan; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Moreau, Rene; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-11-01

    Effect of a weak transverse magnetic field on the microstructures in directionally solidified Fe-Ni and Pb-Bi peritectic alloys has been investigated experimentally. The results indicate that the magnetic field can induce the formation of banded and island-like structures and refine the primary phase in peritectic alloys. The above results are enhanced with increasing magnetic field. Furthermore, electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) analysis reveals that the magnetic field increases the Ni solute content on one side and enhances the solid solubility in the primary phase in the Fe-Ni alloy. The thermoelectric (TE) power difference at the liquid/solid interface of the Pb-Bi peritectic alloy is measured in situ, and the results show that a TE power difference exists at the liquid/solid interface. 3 D numerical simulations for the TE magnetic convection in the liquid are performed, and the results show that a unidirectional TE magnetic convection forms in the liquid near the liquid/solid interface during directional solidification under a transverse magnetic field and that the amplitude of the TE magnetic convection at different scales is different. The TE magnetic convections on the macroscopic interface and the cell/dendrite scales are responsible for the modification of microstructures during directional solidification under a magnetic field.

  4. Energy partition, scale by scale, in magnetic Archimedes Coriolis weak wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A.; Baklouti, F. S.; Godeferd, F.; Lehner, T.; Cambon, C.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic Archimedes Coriolis (MAC) waves are omnipresent in several geophysical and astrophysical flows such as the solar tachocline. In the present study, we use linear spectral theory (LST) and investigate the energy partition, scale by scale, in MAC weak wave turbulence for a Boussinesq fluid. At the scale k-1, the maximal frequencies of magnetic (Alfvén) waves, gravity (Archimedes) waves, and inertial (Coriolis) waves are, respectively, VAk ,N , and f . By using the induction potential scalar, which is a Lagrangian invariant for a diffusionless Boussinesq fluid [Salhi et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 026301 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.026301], we derive a dispersion relation for the three-dimensional MAC waves, generalizing previous ones including that of f -plane MHD "shallow water" waves [Schecter et al., Astrophys. J. 551, L185 (2001), 10.1086/320027]. A solution for the Fourier amplitude of perturbation fields (velocity, magnetic field, and density) is derived analytically considering a diffusive fluid for which both the magnetic and thermal Prandtl numbers are one. The radial spectrum of kinetic, Sκ(k ,t ) , magnetic, Sm(k ,t ) , and potential, Sp(k ,t ) , energies is determined considering initial isotropic conditions. For magnetic Coriolis (MC) weak wave turbulence, it is shown that, at large scales such that VAk /f ≪1 , the Alfvén ratio Sκ(k ,t ) /Sm(k ,t ) behaves like k-2 if the rotation axis is aligned with the magnetic field, in agreement with previous direct numerical simulations [Favier et al., Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. (2012)] and like k-1 if the rotation axis is perpendicular to the magnetic field. At small scales, such that VAk /f ≫1 , there is an equipartition of energy between magnetic and kinetic components. For magnetic Archimedes weak wave turbulence, it is demonstrated that, at large scales, such that (VAk /N ≪1 ), there is an equipartition of energy between magnetic and potential components, while at small scales (VAk /N ≫1

  5. Occupational exposure in MR facilities due to movements in the static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreuccetti, Daniele; Biagi, Laura; Burriesci, Giancarlo; Cannatà, Vittorio; Contessa, Gian Marco; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Genovese, Elisabetta; Lodato, Rossella; Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Napolitano, Antonio; Pinto, Rosanna; Tiberi, Gianluigi; Tosetti, Michela; Zoppetti, Nicola

    2017-11-01

    The exposure of operators moving in the static field of magnetic resonance (MR) facilities was assessed through measurements of the magnetic flux density, which is experienced as variable in time because of the movement. Collected data were processed to allow the comparison with most recent and authoritative safety standards. Measurements of the experienced magnetic flux density B were performed using a probe worn by volunteers moving in MR environments. A total of 55 datasets were acquired nearby a 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T whole body scanners. Three different metrics were applied: the maximum intensity of B, to be compared with 2013/35/EU Directive exposure limit values for static fields; the maximum variation of the vector B on every 3s-interval, for comparison with the ICNIRP-2014 basic restriction aimed at preventing vertigo effects; two weighted-peak indices (for "sensory" and "health" effects: SENS-WP, HLTH-WP), assessing compliance with ICNIRP-2014 and EU Directive recommendations intended to prevent stimulation effects. Peak values of |B| were greater than 2 T in nine of the 55 datasets. All the datasets at 1.5 T and 3 T were compliant with the limit for vertigo effects, whereas six datasets at 7 T turned out to be noncompliant. At 7 T, all 36 datasets were noncompliant for the SENS-WP index and 26 datasets even for the HLTH-WP one. Results demonstrate that compliance with EU Directive limits for static fields does not guarantee compliance with ICNIRP-2014 reference levels and clearly show that movements in the static field could be the key component of the occupational exposure to EMF in MR facilities. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Characterisation of weak magnetic field effects in an aqueous glutamic acid solution by nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy and voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazur, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate altered metabolism and enzyme kinetics for various organisms, as well as changes of neuronal functions and behaviour of higher animals, when they were exposed to specific combinations of weak static and alternating low frequency electromagnetic fields. Field strengths and frequencies, as well as properties of involved ions were related by a linear equation, known as the formula of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, abbreviation mentioned first by Liboff). Under certain conditions already a aqueous solution of the amino acid and neurotransmitter glutamate shows this effect. Methods An aqueous solution of glutamate was exposed to a combination of a static magnetic field of 40 μT and a sinusoidal electromagnetic magnetic field (EMF) with variable frequency (2–7 Hz) and an amplitude of 50 nT. The electric conductivity and dielectric properties of the solution were investigated by voltammetric techniques in combination with non linear dielectric spectroscopy (NLDS), which allow the examination of the dielectric properties of macromolecules and molecular aggregates in water. The experiments target to elucidate the biological relevance of the observed EMF effect on molecular level. Results An ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) effect of glutamate previously reported by the Fesenko laboratory 1998 could be confirmed. Frequency resolution of the sample currents was possible by NLDS techniques. The spectrum peaks when the conditions for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) of glutamate are matched. Furthermore, the NLDS spectra are different under ICR- and non-ICR conditions: NLDS measurements with rising control voltages from 100–1100 mV show different courses of the intensities of the low order harmonics, which could possibly indicate "intensity windows". Furthermore, the observed magnetic field effects are pH dependent with a narrow optimum around pH 2.85. Conclusions Data will be discussed in the context with recent published models for the

  7. Tessellated permanent magnet circuits for flow-through, open gradient separations of weakly magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Lee R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44195 (United States); Williams, P. Stephen [Cambrian Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Chalmers, Jeffrey J. [William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus 151 W. Woodruff Avenue, OH 43210 (United States); Zborowski, Maciej, E-mail: zborowm@ccf.org [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44195 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Emerging microfluidic-based cell assays favor label-free red blood cell (RBC) depletion. Magnetic separation of RBC is possible because of the paramagnetism of deoxygenated hemoglobin but the process is slow for open-gradient field configurations. In order to increase the throughput, periodic arrangements of the unit magnets were considered, consisting of commercially available Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets and soft steel flux return pieces. The magnet design is uniquely suitable for multiplexing by magnet tessellation, here meaning the tiling of the magnet assembly cross-sectional plane by periodic repetition of the magnet and the flow channel shapes. The periodic pattern of magnet magnetizations allows a reduction of the magnetic material per channel with minimal distortion of the field cylindrical symmetry inside the magnet apertures. A number of such magnet patterns are investigated for separator performance, size and economy with the goal of designing an open-gradient magnetic separator capable of reducing the RBC number concentration a hundred-fold in 1 mL whole blood per hour. - Highlights: • Simple geometry of commercial, off-the-shelf NdFeB magnet blocks is amenable to generate high fields and open gradients. • Periodic pattern of permanent magnet blocks (tessellation) reduces the number of blocks per separation channel and improves the efficiency of separator design. • Split-flow lateral transport thin (SPLITT) fractionation model predicts 100-fold reduction of red blood cells from 1 mL whole blood sample in 1 h, suitable for laboratory medicine applications.

  8. Nonlinear resonance of the rotating circular plate under static loads in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuda; Wang, Tong

    2015-11-01

    The rotating circular plate is widely used in mechanical engineering, meanwhile the plates are often in the electromagnetic field in modern industry with complex loads. In order to study the resonance of a rotating circular plate under static loads in magnetic field, the nonlinear vibration equation about the spinning circular plate is derived according to Hamilton principle. The algebraic expression of the initial deflection and the magneto elastic forced disturbance differential equation are obtained through the application of Galerkin integral method. By mean of modified Multiple scale method, the strongly nonlinear amplitude-frequency response equation in steady state is established. The amplitude frequency characteristic curve and the relationship curve of amplitude changing with the static loads and the excitation force of the plate are obtained according to the numerical calculation. The influence of magnetic induction intensity, the speed of rotation and the static loads on the amplitude and the nonlinear characteristics of the spinning plate are analyzed. The proposed research provides the theory reference for the research of nonlinear resonance of rotating plates in engineering.

  9. Role of Sod Gene in Response to Static Magnetic Fields in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanini, Raouia; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Ghorbel, Selma Ben; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    The protective role of superoxide dismutase (SOD) against non-ionizing radiation such as static electromagnetic field (200 mT) has been studied in wild-type and mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking cytosolic Mn-SOD (sodM), Fe-SOD (sodB), or both SODs (sodMB). Our results showed that inactivation of sodM and/or sodB genes increases the sensitivity of P. aeruginosa toward stress induced by the static magnetic field (200 mT). Furthermore, our results showed an enhancement of SOD, catalase, and peroxidases after exposure to the magnetic field. However, wild-type cells maintained significantly higher activities of antioxidant enzymes than mutant strains. The malondialdehyde produced by the oxidative degradation of unsaturated lipids and fatty acids showed significant increase in mutant strains compared to the wild-type. The overall results showed that the SOD has a protective role against a stress induced by static electromagnetic field in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Magnetic anisotropy study of UGe{sub 2}in a static high magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakon, T [Center for Geo-Enviromental Science, Akita University, Akita City, 010-8502 (Japan); Saito, S [Center for Geo-Enviromental Science, Akita University, Akita City, 010-8502 (Japan); Koyama, K [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Awaji, S [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, I [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Nojima, T [Center for Low Temperature Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, K [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Motokawa, M [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, N K [Department of Physics, Graduated School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    UGe{sub 2} has orthorhombic C{sub mmm} crystalline symmetry and shows ferromagnetic Heavy-Fermion (HF) Superconductor, which provides superconductivity under pressure in the range from 1.0 GPa to 1.5 GPa. Magnetic field dependence of magnetization shows strong magnetic anisotropy. When a magnetic field is applied parallel to easy axis (a-axis), magnetization presents ferromagnetic behavior. At 4.2 K, which is much lower than the Curie temperature T{sub c} = 54 K. Spontaneous magnetization is 1.4 {mu}{sub B}/U, and the magnetization gradually increase with increasing field. On the contrary, when a field is applied parallel to hard axis (b-axis or c-axis), magnetization increases linearly with increasing magnetic field. As for H//b-axis, magnetization is 0.23 {mu} {sub B}/U even at 27 T. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant is obtained as 230 [T {mu}{sub B}] 3.4[kJ/kg] at 4.2 K. This value is comparable with rare-earth magnet Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}, which is typical strongly correlated ferromagnet.

  11. Recovery of Small-Sized Blood Vessels in Ischemic Bone under Static Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenzhi Xu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of static magnetic field (SMF on the vascularization in bone were evaluated using an ischemic bone model, where rat femoral artery was ligated. Magnetized and unmagnetized samarium–cobalt rods were implanted transcortically into the middle diaphysis of the ischemic femurs. Collateral circulation was evaluated by injection of microspheres into the abdominal aorta at the third week after ligation. It was found that the bone implanted with a magnetized rod showed a larger amount of trapped microspheres than that with an unmagnetized rod at the proximal and the distal region (P < 0.05 proximal region. There were no significant differences at the middle and the distal region. This tendency was similar to that of the bone mineral density in the SMF-exposed ischemic bone.

  12. Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2009-08-15

    We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

  13. Field Distribution of Transcranial Static Magnetic Stimulation in Realistic Human Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Joseph J; Goetz, Stefan M; Bernabei, John M; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-10-10

    The objective of this work was to characterize the magnetic field (B-field) that arises in a human brain model from the application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS). The spatial distribution of the B-field magnitude and gradient of a cylindrical, 5.08 cm × 2.54 cm NdFeB magnet were simulated in air and in a human head model using the finite element method and calibrated with measurements in air. The B-field was simulated for magnet placements over prefrontal, motor, sensory, and visual cortex targets. The impact of magnetic susceptibility of head tissues on the B-field was quantified. Peak B-field magnitude and gradient respectively ranged from 179-245 mT and from 13.3-19.0 T/m across the cortical targets. B-field magnitude, focality, and gradient decreased with magnet-cortex distance. The variation in B-field strength and gradient across the anatomical targets largely arose from the magnet-cortex distance. Head magnetic susceptibilities had negligible impact on the B-field characteristics. The half-maximum focality of the tSMS B-field ranged from 7-12 cm3 . This is the first presentation and characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution of the B-field generated in a human brain model by tSMS. These data can provide quantitative dosing guidance for tSMS applications across various cortical targets and subjects. The finding that the B-field gradient is high near the magnet edges should be considered in studies where neural tissue is placed close to the magnet. The observation that susceptibility has negligible effects confirms assumptions in the literature. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  14. Weak interactions in Graphane/BN systems under static electric fields—A periodic ab-initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkasserer, Lukas Eugen Marsoner, E-mail: marsoner@zedat.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustraße 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, 6140 Wellington (New Zealand); Gaston, Nicola [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, 6140 Wellington (New Zealand); Paulus, Beate [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustraße 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-21

    Ab-initio calculations via periodic Hartree-Fock (HF) and local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (LMP2) are used to investigate the adsorption properties of combined Graphane/boron nitride systems and their response to static electric fields. It is shown how the latter can be used to alter both structural as well as electronic properties of these systems.

  15. Transient growth of a Vlasov plasma in a weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Ratushnaya, Valeria

    2016-12-17

    We investigate the stability properties of a collisionless Vlasov plasma in a weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field using non-modal stability analysis. This is an important topic in a physics of tokamak plasma rich in various types of instabilities. We consider a thin tokamak plasma in a Maxwellian equilibrium, subjected to a small arbitrary perturbation. Within the framework of kinetic theory, we demonstrate the emergence of short time scale algebraic instabilities evolving in a stable magnetized plasma. We show that the linearized governing operator (Vlasov operator) is non-normal leading to the transient growth of the perturbations on the time scale of several plasma periods that is subsequently followed by Landau damping. We calculate the first-order distribution function and the electric field and study the dependence of the transient growth characteristics on the magnetic field strength and perturbation parameters of the system. We compare our results with uniformly magnetized plasma and field-free Vlasov plasma.

  16. Effect of static magnetic field on the oxygen production of Scenedesmus obliquus cultivated in municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Renjie; Jin, Wenbiao; Xi, Tingting; Yang, Qian; Han, Song-Fang; Abomohra, Abd El-Fatah

    2015-12-01

    Algal-bacterial symbiotic system, with biological synergism of physiological functions of both algae and bacteria, has been proposed for cultivation of microalgae in municipal wastewater for biomass production and wastewater treatment. The algal-bacterial symbiotic system can enhance dissolved oxygen production which enhances bacterial growth and catabolism of pollutants in wastewater. Therefore, the oxygen production efficiency of microalgae in algal-bacterial systems is considered as the key factor influencing the wastewater treatment efficiency. In the present study, we have proposed a novel approach which uses static magnetic field to enhance algal growth and oxygen production rate with low operational cost and non-toxic secondary pollution. The performance of oxygen production with the magnetic field was evaluated using Scenedesmus obliquus grown in municipal wastewater and was calculated based on the change in dissolved oxygen concentration. Results indicated that magnetic treatment stimulates both algal growth and oxygen production. Application of 1000 GS of magnetic field once at logarithmic growth phase for 0.5 h increased the chlorophyll-a content by 11.5% over the control after 6 days of growth. In addition, magnetization enhanced the oxygen production rate by 24.6% over the control. Results of the study confirmed that application of a proper magnetic field could reduce the energy consumption required for aeration during the degradation of organic matter in municipal wastewater in algal-bacterial symbiotic systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Do weak magnetic fields prevent hydrogen from accreting onto metal-line white dwarf stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, S.; Jordan, S.; Koester, D.

    2004-09-01

    The widely accepted assumption is that metals detected in the spectra of a few cool helium-rich white dwarfs cannot be of primordial origin and therefore must be accreted from the interstellar medium. However, the observed abundances of hydrogen are much too low to be compatible with the high accretion rates inferred from metal accretion. Hydrogen accretion is therefore suppressed compared to metal accretion. The hypothesis most widely discussed as cause for this ``hydrogen screening'' is the propeller mechanism: Metals are accreted in the form of grains onto a slowly rotating, weakly magnetized white dwarf, whereas ionized hydrogen is repelled at the Alfvén radius. We have obtained circular polarization spectra of the helium-rich white dwarfs GD 40 (WD0300-013) and L745-46A (WD0738-172) - which both show strong metal lines as well as hydrogen - in order to search for signatures of a weak magnetic field. The magnetic field strengths necessary for the propeller mechanism to work in these stars are at least 144 000 G and 3000 G, respectively. Whereas L745-46A might have a magnetic field of about -6900 G no magnetic field could be found with an upper limit for the field strength of 4000 G (with 99% confidence) for GD 40. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme 66.D-0541).

  18. Nonlocal weakly relativistic permittivity tensor of magnetized plasma near electron cyclotron resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov, A. S.

    2017-11-01

    Compact expressions are derived for the nonlocal permittivity tensor of weakly relativistic plasma in a 2D nonuniform magnetic field near the resonances at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency for an extraordinary wave and at the first harmonic for an ordinary wave. It is shown that the wave equation with allowance for the obtained thermal correction to the permittivity tensor in the form of a differential operator in transverse (with respect to the external magnetic field) coordinates possesses an integral in the form of the energy conservation law.

  19. Quantum mechanical grad-B drift velocity operator in a weakly non-uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Poh Kam; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Kosaka, Wataru

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the analytical solution for quantum mechanical grad-B drift velocity operator by solving the Heisenberg equation of motion. Using the time dependent operators, it is shown the analytical solution of the position operators in x ̂(t ) and y ̂(t ) of the particle in the presence of a weakly non-uniform magnetic field. It is also shown numerically that the grad-B drift velocity operator agrees with the classical counterpart.

  20. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Mathias M., E-mail: Mathias.Beck@tum.de [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lammel, Christian [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Institute of Medical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 11, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles are aligned using a static three tesla magnetic field. • Inductive heating depends on the particles pre-orientation in a solid matrix. • Alignment increases the heat generation significantly.

  1. Evaluation of occupational exposure to static magnetic field in a chloralkali plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Coobineh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: An observational cross sectional study was conducted to determine iflong term exposure to static magnetic fields could be related to findings of medical examinations.Method: Health data were obtained for 20 workers who spent a major portion of their workdaysin the magnetic fields produced by the direct current through large electrolytic cells. These datawere compared to those of a control group of 21 workers. Intensity of magnetic fields weremeasured in the cell room and the Time weighted Average (TWA exposure to magnetic field wascalculated for each job classification.Results: Maximum and minimum intensities in mTwere found to be 16.99 and 0.46, respectively,which were well below the permissible level. Maximum TWAexposure to magnetic field wasfound to be 47.59 mTWhich were observed. Comparing the ECG, EEG, blood Pressure and pulseratesbetween the two groups showed no statistically significant differences. Clinical findingshowed that fatigue and nervousness complain were be higher in the case group and weresignificantly different between the two groups.Conclusion: We did not see statistical significant differences between case and control groups inECG, EEG, blood pressure and pulse-rates. We have seen statistically differences in the fatigue(P<0.01 and nervousness (P<0.01 complain of these two groups. We suggest that it may benecessary to choose a value of than 60 mT (TLV-TWA, so that the complains of fatigue andnervousness will be reduce.

  2. The effect of static magnetic fields and tat peptides on cellular and nuclear uptake of magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol-Anne M; de la Fuente, Jesus; Pelaz, Beatriz; Furlani, Edward P; Mullin, Margaret; Berry, Catherine C

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely used in bioapplications such as imaging (MRI), targeted delivery (drugs/genes) and cell transfection (magnetofection). Historically, the impermeable nature of both the plasma and nuclear membranes hinder potential. Researchers combat this by developing techniques to enhance cellular and nuclear uptake. Two current popular methods are using external magnetic fields to remotely control particle direction or functionalising the nanoparticles with a cell penetrating peptide (e.g. tat); both of which facilitate cell entry. This paper compares the success of both methods in terms of nanoparticle uptake, analysing the type of magnetic forces the particles experience, and determines gross cell response in terms of morphology and structure and changes at the gene level via microarray analysis. Results indicated that both methods enhanced uptake via a caveolin dependent manner, with tat peptide being the more efficient and achieving nuclear uptake. On comparison to control cells, many groups of gene changes were observed in response to the particles. Importantly, the magnetic field also caused many change in gene expression, regardless of the nanoparticles, and appeared to cause F-actin alignment in the cells. Results suggest that static fields should be modelled and analysed prior to application in culture as cells clearly respond appropriately. Furthermore, the use of cell penetrating peptides may prove more beneficial in terms of enhancing uptake and maintaining cell homeostasis than a magnetic field. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of static magnetic fields up to 700 mT and dihydrochalcones on the antioxidant response in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Kurzeja, Ewa; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław

    2017-03-21

    The effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) and the dihydrochalcones phloretin and phloridzin on the redox homeostasis of fibroblasts were investigated. The aim of the present study was to determine the redox homeostasis of fibroblasts that were simultaneously exposed to a static magnetic field and the dihydrochalcones phloretin and phloridzin. The fibroblasts were cultured for 72 h in special magnetic test chambers at different moderate intensities (0.4, 0.55 and 0.7 T). In this report, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST); the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total antioxidant status were measured using commercially available kits. We did not observe any impairment in the redox balance in cells in fibroblasts that were only exposed to static magnetic fields of different intensities or In fibroblast cultured with dihydrochalcones and exposed to static magnetic field increase the SOD, GPx, GST activities and MDA concentration. Our investigations revealed that the activities of SOD, GPx, GST and the concentration of MDA that were determined for the fibroblasts that were cultured with dihydrochalcones were higher in the presence of a static magnetic field. Our results indicated that exposure to SMF (0.7 T) with dihydrochalcones induces oxidative stress in fibroblasts.

  4. Parallel Simulation of HGMS of Weakly Magnetic Nanoparticles in Irrotational Flow of Inviscid Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanok Hournkumnuard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS using a microferromagnetic wire for capturing weakly magnetic nanoparticles in the irrotational flow of inviscid fluid is simulated by using parallel algorithm developed based on openMP. The two-dimensional problem of particle transport under the influences of magnetic force and fluid flow is considered in an annular domain surrounding the wire with inner radius equal to that of the wire and outer radius equal to various multiples of wire radius. The differential equations governing particle transport are solved numerically as an initial and boundary values problem by using the finite-difference method. Concentration distribution of the particles around the wire is investigated and compared with some previously reported results and shows the good agreement between them. The results show the feasibility of accumulating weakly magnetic nanoparticles in specific regions on the wire surface which is useful for applications in biomedical and environmental works. The speedup of parallel simulation ranges from 1.8 to 21 depending on the number of threads and the domain problem size as well as the number of iterations. With the nature of computing in the application and current multicore technology, it is observed that 4–8 threads are sufficient to obtain the optimized speedup.

  5. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields.

  6. Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.; Kelman, B.J.; Weigel, R.J. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    Although background levels of atmospheric electric and geomagnetic field levels are extremely low, over the past several decades, human beings and other life forms on this planet have been subjected to a dramatically changing electromagnetic milieu. An exponential increase in exposure to electromagnetic fields has occurred, largely because of such technological advances as the growth of electrical power generation and transmission systems, the increased use of wireless communications, and the use of radar. In addition, electromagnetic field generating devices have proliferated in industrial plants, office buildings, homes, public transportation systems, and elsewhere. Although significant increases have occurred in electromagnetic field strenghths spanning all frequency ranges, this symposium addresses only the impact of these fields at static and extremely low frequencies (ELF), primarily 50 and 60 Hz. This volume contains the proceedings of the symposium entitled /open quotes/Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields/close quotes/. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for discussions of all aspects of research on the interaction of static and ELF electromagnetic fields with biological systems. These systems include simple biophysical models, cell and organ preparations, whole animals, and man. Dosimetry, exposure system design, and artifacts in ELF bioeffects research were also addressed, along with current investigations that examine fundamental mechanisms of interactions between the fields and biological processes. Papers are indexed separately.

  7. Design of Static Wireless Charging System for Electric Vehicles with Focus on Magnetic Coupling and Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar

    Static wireless charging using resonant inductive principle offers environmental friendly, comfortable and automatic charging solution for electric vehicles. This technology as of now is nascent with few products on the market and leading companies and universities actively engaged in research....... On similar lines, a pioneer PhD project was undertaken in 2012 at Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University with objectives of improving system design and developing high power density (weight and dimensions), low cost and low magnetic emissions power inductors for this application. This thesis...... of wireless charging systems mostly consist of the coils and passive shielding materials and are different from inductors used in other industrial and consumer applications as majority of magnetic flux passes through air. The first objective in the inductor design is to explain effect of the shielding...

  8. Electrons acceleration in a TE 113 cylindrical cavity affected by a static inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Vergara, V.; González, J. D.; Beltrán, J. R.; Orozco, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The relativistic dynamics of an electron accelerated in a cylindrical cavity mode TE 113 in the presence of a static inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied. This type of acceleration is known as Spatial AutoResonance Acceleration (SARA). The magnetic field profile is such that it keeps the phase difference between the electric microwave field and the electron velocity vector within the acceleration phase band. We study the dynamic of the electron through simulations of the relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation. Numerical experiments with TE 113 cylindrical microwave fields of a frequency of 2.45GHz and an amplitude of the order of 7kV/cm show that it is possible accelerate the electrons up to energies of the order of 300keV. This energy is about of 30% higher than those obtained in previous studies by using the TE 112 mode.

  9. Parametric excitation of optical phonons in weakly polar narrow band gap magnetized semiconductor plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep; Dahiya, Sunita; Singh, Navneet

    2017-11-01

    An analytical treatment based on the hydrodynamic model of plasmas is developed to study parametric amplification and oscillation of optical phonon modes in weakly polar narrow direct-gap magnetized semiconductor plasmas. Second-order optical susceptibility arising due to nonlinear polarization and the basic operational characteristics of the parametric device, viz. threshold nature, power gain mechanisms and conversion efficiency, are obtained. The effects of doping, magnetic field and excitation intensity, on the above operational characteristics have been studied in detail. Numerical estimates are made for an n-InSb crystal at 5 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6 μm CO2 laser. The analysis suggests the possibility of observing super-fluorescent parametric emission and oscillation in moderately doped n-InSb crystal under off-resonant nanosecond pulsed not-too-high power laser irradiation, the crystal being immersed in a large magnetic field.

  10. Orbital diamagnetism of weakly doped bilayer graphene in a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Min; Wan, Shaolong

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the orbital diamagnetism of weakly doped bilayer graphene (BLG) in a spatially smoothly varying magnetic field and obtain the general analytic expression for the orbital susceptibility of BLG, with finite wavenumber and Fermi energy, at zero temperature. We find that the magnetic field screening factor of BLG is dependent on the wavenumber, which results in a more complicated screening behavior compared with that of monolayer graphene (MLG). We also study the induced magnetization and electric current in BLG, under a nonuniform magnetic field, and find that they are qualitatively different from those for MLG and the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). However, as for MLG, a magnetic object placed above BLG is repelled by a diamagnetic force from the BLG, which is approximately equivalent to the force produced by its mirror image on the other side of the BLG with a reduced amplitude dependent on the typical length of the systems. BLG shows crossover behaviors in the responses to the external magnetic field, intermediate between those of MLG and 2DEG.

  11. Magnetically-Driven Quantum Heat Engines: The Quasi-Static Limit of Their Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Muñoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a quantum heat engine (QHEN has been discussed in the literature, not only due to its intrinsic scientific interest, but also as an alternative to efficiently recover, on a nanoscale device, thermal energy in the form of useful work. The quantum character of a QHEN relies, for instance, on the fact that any of its intermediate states is determined by a density matrix operator. In particular, this matrix can represent a mixed state. For a classical heat engine, a theoretical upper bound for its efficiency is obtained by analyzing its quasi-static operation along a cycle drawn by a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states. A similar analysis can be carried out for a quantum engine, where quasi-static processes are driven by the evolution of ensemble-averaged observables, via variation of the corresponding operators or of the density matrix itself on a tunable physical parameter. We recently proposed two new conceptual designs for a magnetically-driven quantum engine, where the tunable parameter is the intensity of an external magnetic field. Along this article, we shall present the general quantum thermodynamics formalism developed in order to analyze this type of QHEN, and moreover, we shall apply it to describe the theoretical efficiency of two different practical implementations of this concept: an array of semiconductor quantum dots and an ensemble of graphene flakes submitted to mechanical tension.

  12. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  13. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-14

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  14. Formation mechanism of axial macrosegregation of primary phases induced by a static magnetic field during directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the macrosegregation formed by applying magnetic fields is of high commercial importance. This work investigates how static magnetic fields control the solute and primary phase distributions in four directionally solidified alloys (i.e., Al-Cu, Al-Si, Al-Ni and Zn-Cu alloys). Experimental results demonstrate that significant axial macrosegregation of the solute and primary phases (i.e., Al2Cu, Si, Al3Ni and Zn5Cu phases) occurs at the initial solidification stage of the samples. This finding is accompanied by two interface transitions in the mushy zone: quasi planar → sloping → quasi planar. The amplitude of the macrosegregation of the primary phases under the magnetic field is related to the magnetic field intensity, temperature gradient and growth speed. The corresponding numerical simulations present a unidirectional thermoelectric (TE) magnetic convection pattern in the mushy zone as a consequence of the interaction between the magnetic field and TE current. Furthermore, a model is proposed to explain the peculiar macrosegregation phenomenon by considering the effect of the forced TE magnetic convection on the solute distribution. The present study not only offers a new approach to control the solute distribution by applying a static magnetic field but also facilitates the understanding of crystal growth in the solute that is controlled by the static magnetic field during directional solidification.

  15. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2018-01-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  16. In situ Weak Magnetic-Assisted Thermal Stress Field Reduction Effect in Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lvjie; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xin

    2017-11-01

    For decades, post-welding magnetic treatment has been used to reduce residual stress of welds by improving the crystal structure of solid-state welds. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic treatment method, which can reduce the time-dependent thermal stress field in situ and reduce the final residual stress of welds by simply exerting an assisted weak magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction and workpiece during laser welding. A new finite-element model is developed to understand the thermal-mechanical physical process of the magnetic-assisted laser welding. For the widely used 304 austenite stainless steel, we theoretically observed that this method can reduce around 10 pct of the time-dependent thermal stress field, and finally reduce approximately 20 MPa of residual stress near the heat-affected zone with a 415-mT magnetic field for typical welding process parameters. A new mechanism based on magneto-fluid dynamics is proposed to explain the theoretical predications by combining high-speed imaging experiments of the transient laser welding process. The developed method is very simple but surprisingly effective, which opens new avenues for thermal stress reduction in laser welding of metals, particularly heat-sensitive metallic materials.

  17. Effect of a static magnetic fields and fluoride ions on the antioxidant defense system of mice fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzeja, Ewa; Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Stec, Małgorzata; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2013-07-18

    The results of studies on the biological influence of magnetic fields are controversial and do not provide clear answers regarding their impact on cell functioning. Fluoride compounds are substances that influence free radical processes, which occur when the reactive forms of oxygen are present. It is not known whether static magnetic fields (SMF) cause any changes in fluoride assimilation or activity. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the potential relationship between magnetic field exposure to, and the antioxidant system of, fibroblasts cultured with fluoride ions. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.6, and 0.7 T) were used in this work. Fluoride ions were added at a concentration of 0.12 mM, which did not cause the precipitation of calcium or magnesium. The results of this study show that static magnetic fields reduce the oxidative stress caused by fluoride ions and normalize the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT). Static magnetic fields modify the energy state of fibroblasts, causing an increase in the ATP concentration and a decrease in the MDA concentration. These results suggest that exposure to fluoride and an SMF improves the tolerance of cells to the oxidative stress induced by fluoride ions.

  18. Effect of a Static Magnetic Fields and Fluoride Ions on the Antioxidant Defense System of Mice Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pawłowska-Góral

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the biological influence of magnetic fields are controversial and do not provide clear answers regarding their impact on cell functioning. Fluoride compounds are substances that influence free radical processes, which occur when the reactive forms of oxygen are present. It is not known whether static magnetic fields (SMF cause any changes in fluoride assimilation or activity. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the potential relationship between magnetic field exposure to, and the antioxidant system of, fibroblasts cultured with fluoride ions. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.6, and 0.7 T were used in this work. Fluoride ions were added at a concentration of 0.12 mM, which did not cause the precipitation of calcium or magnesium. The results of this study show that static magnetic fields reduce the oxidative stress caused by fluoride ions and normalize the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT. Static magnetic fields modify the energy state of fibroblasts, causing an increase in the ATP concentration and a decrease in the MDA concentration. These results suggest that exposure to fluoride and an SMF improves the tolerance of cells to the oxidative stress induced by fluoride ions.

  19. Search for Weak Magnetic Fields in DBZ and DBAZ White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, S.; Jordan, S.; Koester, D.

    It is widely accepted that metals detected in the spectra of a few cool white dwarfs cannot be of primordial origin and therefore must be accreted from the interstellar medium. However the observed abundances of hydrogen in the atmospheres of these stars are much too low to be compatible with the high accretion rates inferred from metal accretion if solar abundances are assumed. It was therefore proposed that metals are accreted in the form of grains onto a slowly rotating, weakly magnetized white dwarf, whereas ionized hydrogen is repelled at the Alfven radius. In order to test this hypothesis we obtained circular polarization spectra of two metal line white dwarfs (GD40 and L745-46A) with the VLT-UT1 and FORS1 to search for such magnetic fields. Within the errors (±0.1% and ±0.3% for L745-46A and GD40, respectively) we could not find signatures of a magnetic field in the spectra of any of the two stars. If we exclude the possibility, that we are looking on the magnetic equator of a pure magnetic dipole, in which case the components of the magnetic field along the line of sight completely cancel and no circular polarization can be detected, we conclude, that the field strength of the magnetic field on both stars must be well below the 105 Gauss required by theory. We could confirm an Hα line in the flux spectrum of GD40, which was found by Greenstein & Liebert (ApJ 360, 662) and determine the hydrogen abundance in the stellar atmosphere which is a factor of 100 to 1000 below the value expected from accretion with solar abundances.

  20. Magnetically Induced Transparency in Cold Magnetized Plasma by Spatially Periodic Magneto-static Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Raanan; Leopold, John G.; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2011-10-01

    Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) is widely investigated. EIT is a resonance absorption line made transparent due to destructive interference between two atomic transitions. A classical analog to quantum EIT is cold magnetized plasma, which resonantly absorbs electromagnetic radiation at the electron cyclotron frequency. Transparency is induced in such plasma by an additional magnetic field, constant in time and varying in space. The proposed physical mechanism is the coupling of longitudinal plasma modulation to the transverse components of the electromagnetic radiation, canceling the forces acting on the plasma electrons. The plasma frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency are the classical analog of the atomic transition frequencies in quantum EIT. Controllable wave propagation parameters such as transmission amplitude and group velocity are some inherent features of MIT. Theoretical study and experimental results will be presented.

  1. Density Measurements in Low Pressure, Weakly Magnetized, RF Plasmas: Experimental Verification of the Sheath Expansion Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunchao Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study shows the validity of Sheridan's method in determining plasma density in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas using ion saturation current data measured by a planar Langmuir probe. The ion density derived from Sheridan's method which takes into account the sheath expansion around the negatively biased probe tip, presents a good consistency with the electron density measured by a cylindrical RF-compensated Langmuir probe using the Druyvesteyn theory. The ion density obtained from the simplified method which neglects the sheath expansion effect, overestimates the true density magnitude, e.g., by a factor of 3 to 12 for the present experiment.

  2. Density measurements in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas: experimental verification of the sheath expansion effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick W.

    2017-07-01

    This experimental study shows the validity of Sheridan's method in determining plasma density in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas using ion saturation current data measured by a planar Langmuir probe. The ion density derived from Sheridan's method which takes into account the sheath expansion around the negatively biased probe tip, presents a good consistency with the electron density measured by a cylindrical RF-compensated Langmuir probe using the Druyvesteyn theory. The ion density obtained from the simplified method which neglects the sheath expansion effect, overestimates the true density magnitude, e.g., by a factor of 3 to 12 for the present experiment.

  3. Angular momentum transport in accretion disk boundary layers around weakly magnetized stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, M.E.; Chan, C.-K.

    2013-01-01

    , in the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the surface of a weakly magnetized star. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI......) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. Motivated by the need of a deeper understanding of the behavior of an MHD fluid in a differentially rotating background that deviates from a Keplerian profile, we study the dynamics of MHD waves...

  4. Static Eccentricity Fault Recognition in Three-Phase Line Start Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Karami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to investigating static eccentricity in a three-phase LSPMSM. The modeling of LSPMSM with static eccentricity between stator and rotor is developed using finite element method (FEM. The analytical expression for the permeance and flux components of nonuniform air-gap due to static eccentricity fault is discussed. Various indexes for static eccentricity detection using stator current signal of IM and permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM are presented. Since LSPMSM is composed of a rotor which is a combination of these two motors, the ability of these features is evaluated for static eccentricity diagnosis in LSPMSM. The simulated stator current signal of LSPMSM in the presence of static eccentricity is analyzed in frequency domain using power spectral density (PSD. It is demonstrated that static eccentricity fault generates a series of low frequency harmonic components in the form of sidebands around the fundamental frequency. Moreover, the amplitudes of these components increase in proportion to the fault severity. According to the mentioned observations, an accurate frequency pattern is specified for static eccentricity detection in three-phase LSPMSM.

  5. Dielectric polarization transients in biological tissue moving in a static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Kari; Laakso, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    Movement of a body in a static magnetic field gives rise to the Lorentz force that induces in the medium both electric currents and dielectric polarization. It is usually assumed that the conductivity of biological tissues is sufficiently high in order to neglect dielectric phenomenon arising from non-equilibrium of polarization charges. However, the permittivity of biological tissues is extremely high and the relaxation time of free charges is relatively low. In this study, we examined the effect of dielectric polarization on the electric field (EF) induced by human movements in a strong magnetic field (MF). Analytic equations for brain and bone equivalent spheres translating and rotating in a uniform MF were derived from Maxwell equations. Several examples were computed by using Fast Fourier Transform to examine transient dielectric effects in a time domain. The results showed that dielectric polarization transients do arise, but in the case of homogeneous medium, they are vanishingly small. In contrast, the local dielectric transients are not vanishingly small in heterogeneous medium. However, due to limited acceleration and deceleration of normal human movements, the transients are relatively small, at maximum a few dozen percent of the EF induced by the change of the magnetic flux. Taking into account the high uncertainty in numerical simulation, the dielectric transients can be neglected in the case of biological materials but not in the case of many non-biological materials of low conductivity. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:409-422, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of static magnetic field on electricity production and wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qinqin; Zhou, Shaoqi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a magnetic field (MF) on electricity production and wastewater treatment in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. Electricity production capacity could be improved by the application of a low-intensity static MF. When a MF of 50 mT was applied to MFCs, the maximum voltage, total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increased from 523 ± 2 to 553 ± 2 mV, ∼93 to ∼96 %, and ∼80 to >90 %, respectively, while the start-up time and coulombic efficiency decreased from 16 to 10 days and ∼50 to ∼43 %, respectively. The MF effects were immediate, reversible, and not long lasting, and negative effects on electricity generation and COD removal seemed to occur after the MF was removed. The start-up and voltage output were less affected by the MF direction. Nitrogen compounds in magnetic MFCs were nitrified more thoroughly; furthermore, a higher proportion of electrochemically inactive microorganisms were found in magnetic systems. TP was effectively removed by the co-effects of microbe absorption and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitates were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope capable of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to be a mixture of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl compounds.

  7. Therapeutic Effects of Static Magnetic Field on Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF on cutaneous wound healing of Streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats. Methods. 20 STZ-induced diabetic rats were randomly divided into two groups (10 in each group: diabetic rats with SMF exposure group which were exposed to SMF by gluing one magnetic disk of 230 mT intensity and diabetic rats with sham SMF exposure group (sham group. 10 normal Wistar rats were used as the control group. One open circular wound with 2 cm diameter in the dorsum was generated on both normal and diabetic rats and then covered with sterile gauzes. Wound healing was evaluated by wound area reduction rate, mean time to wound closure, and wound tensile strength. Results. The wound area reduction rate in diabetic rats in comparison with the control group was significantly decreased (P<0.01. Compared with sham magnet group, diabetic rats under 230 mT SMF exposure demonstrated significantly accelerated wound area reduction rate on postoperative days 7, 14, and 21 and decreased gross time to wound closure (P<0.05, as well as dramatically higher wound tissue strength (P<0.05 on 21st day. Conclusion. 230 mT SMF promoted the healing of skin wound in diabetic rats and may provide a non-invasive therapeutic tool for impaired wound healing of diabetic patients.

  8. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mathias M.; Lammel, Christian; Gleich, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation.

  9. Comments on gravitoelectromagnetism of Ummarino and Gallerati in "Superconductor in a weak static gravitational field" vs other versions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Harihar

    2017-12-01

    Recently reported [Eur. Phys. J. C., 77, 549 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1140/epjc/s10052-017-5116-y] gravitoelectromagnetic equations of Ummarino and Gallerati (UG) in their linearized version of general relativity (GR) are shown to match with (a) our previously reported special relativistic Maxwellian Gravity equations in the non-relativistic limit and with (b) the non-relativistic equations derived here, when the speed of gravity c_g (an undetermined parameter of the theory here) is set equal to c (the speed of light in vacuum). Seen in the light of our new results, the UG equations satisfy the Correspondence Principle (cp), while many other versions of linearized GR equations that are being (or may be) used to interpret the experimental data defy the cp. Such new findings assume significance and relevance in the contexts of recent detection of gravitational waves and the gravitomagnetic field of the spinning earth and their interpretations. Being well-founded and self-consistent, the equations may be of interest and useful to researchers exploring the phenomenology of gravitomagnetism, gravitational waves and the novel interplay of gravity with different states of matter in flat space-time like UG's interesting work on superconductors in weak gravitational fields.

  10. The role of static magnetic resonance urography in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusami, Prakash; Bhuvaneswari, Venkatesan; Elangovan, Sundararajan; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N; Ramesh, Ananthakrishnan

    2013-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of static magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in hydronephrosis and to compare parameters of hydronephrosis in MRU with intravenous urography (IVU). Sixty-nine patients were included in this study of which 55 patients with a total of 63 hydronephrotic units underwent both IVU and MRU. MRU was performed on a 1.5 T scanner using heavily T2-weighted sequences. The level, grade, and cause of obstruction on each modality were interpreted by 2 radiologists. These were compared with the final diagnosis based on other appropriate modalities including imaging, intraoperative and histopathologic diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity MRU in detecting hydronephrosis were 95% and 100%, respectively. In determining the level of obstruction, the strength of agreement between IVU and MRU using kappa statistics was κ = 0.66, which corresponds to a good level of agreement. The Spearman correlation coefficient for the grade of hydronephrosis on MRU and IVU was 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.86-0.95), with a P value of IVU and in 93.8% of the cases by MRU. Along with a high sensitivity and specificity in detecting the presence, level, and grade of hydronephrosis, MRU without contrast also shows a good agreement with IVU. Static MRU can reliably replace IVU when the latter is contraindicated or technically difficult. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Static properties of small Josephson tunnel junctions in an oblique magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed experimental investigation of the static properties of planar Josephson tunnel junctions in presence of a uniform external magnetic field applied in an arbitrary orientation with respect to the barrier plane. We considered annular junctions, as well as rectangular...... junctions (having both overlap and cross-type geometries) with different barrier aspect ratios. It is shown how most of the experimental findings in an oblique field can be reproduced invoking the superposition principle to combine the classical behavior of electrically small junctions in an in-plane field...... together with the small junction behavior in a transverse field that we recently published [R. Monaco , J. Appl. Phys. 104, 023906 (2008)]. We show that the presence of a transverse field may have important consequences, which could be either voluntarily exploited in applications or present an unwanted...

  12. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain); Azanza, María J., E-mail: mjazanza@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B{sub 0}≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f{sub M}=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons.

  13. Anomalous magnetic and weak magnetic dipole moments of the τ lepton in the simplest little Higgs model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo-Urena, M.A.; Tavares-Velasco, G. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Puebla, PUE (Mexico); Hernandez-Tome, G. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Puebla, PUE (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2017-04-15

    We obtain analytical expressions, both in terms of parametric integrals and Passarino-Veltman scalar functions, for the one-loop contributions to the anomalous weak magnetic dipole moment (AWMDM) of a charged lepton in the framework of the simplest little Higgs model (SLHM). Our results are general and can be useful to compute the weak properties of a charged lepton in other extensions of the standard model (SM). As a by-product we obtain generic contributions to the anomalous magnetic dipole moment (AMDM), which agree with previous results. We then study numerically the potential contributions from this model to the τ lepton AMDM and AWMDM for values of the parameter space consistent with current experimental data. It is found that they depend mainly on the energy scale f at which the global symmetry is broken and the t{sub β} parameter, whereas there is little sensitivity to a mild change in the values of other parameters of the model. While the τ AMDM is of the order of 10{sup -9}, the real (imaginary) part of its AWMDM is of the order of 10{sup -9} (10{sup -10}). These values seem to be out of the reach of the expected experimental sensitivity of future experiments. (orig.)

  14. Basic features of a charged particle dynamics in a laser beam with static axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubik, A.; Małachowski, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, the trajectory and kinetic energy of a charged particle, subjected to interaction from a laser beam containing an additionally applied external static axial magnetic field, have been analyzed. We give the rigorous analytical solutions of the dynamic equations. The obtained analytical solutions have been verified by performing calculations using the derived solutions and the well known Runge-Kutta procedure for solving original dynamic equations. Both methods gave the same results. The simulation results have been obtained and presented in graphical form using the derived solutions. Apart from the laser beam, we show the results for a maser beam. The obtained analytical solutions enabled us to perform a quantitative illustration, in a graphical form of the impact of many parameters on the shape, dimensions and the motion direction along a trajectory. The kinetic energy of electrons has also been studied and the energy oscillations in time with a period equal to the one of a particle rotation have been found. We show the appearance of, so-called, stationary trajectories (hypocycloid or epicycloid) which are the projections of the real trajectory onto the (x, y) plane. Increase in laser or maser beam intensity results in the increase in particle's trajectory dimension which was found to be proportional to the amplitude of the electric field of the electromagnetic wave. However, external magnetic field increases the results in shrinking of the trajectories. Performed studies show that not only amplitude of the electric field but also the static axial magnetic field plays a crucial role in the acceleration process of a charged particle. At the authors of this paper best knowledge, the precise analytical solutions and theoretical analysis of the trajectories and energy gains by the charged particles accelerated in the laser beam and magnetic field are lacking in up to date publications. The authors have an intention to clarify partly some important aspects

  15. Phenomenon of the time-reversal violating magnetic field generation by a static electric field in a medium and vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that the T- and P-odd weak interactions yield to the existence of both electric field and magnetic (directed along the electric field) field around an electric charge. Similarly the assotiated magnetic field is directed along the vector of strength of stationary gravitational field.

  16. Phonons and magnetic excitation correlations in weak ferromagnetic YCrO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Sahoo, Satyaprakash, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: guptaraj@iitk.ac.in, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Perez, William; Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: guptaraj@iitk.ac.in, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States); Mukherjee, Somdutta [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Gupta, Rajeev, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: guptaraj@iitk.ac.in, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Department of Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Garg, Ashish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Chatterjee, Ratnamala [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi (India)

    2014-05-14

    Here, we report the temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic studies on orthorhombically distorted perovskite YCrO{sub 3} over a temperature range of 20–300 K. Temperature dependence of DC-magnetization measurements under field cooled and zero field cooled protocols confirmed a Néel transition at T{sub N} ∼ 142 K. Magnetization isotherms recorded at 125 K show a clear loop opening without any magnetization saturation up to 20 kOe, indicating a coexistence of antiferromagnetic (AFM) and weak ferromagnetic (WFM) phases. Estimation of exchange constants using mean-field approximation further confirm the presence of a complex magnetic phase below T{sub N}. Temperature evolution of Raman line-shape parameters of the selected modes (associated with the octahedral rotation and A(Y)-shift in the unit-cell) reveal an anomalous phonon shift near T{sub N}. An additional phonon anomaly was identified at T{sup *} ∼ 60 K, which could possibly be attributed to the change in the spin dynamics. Moreover, the positive and negative shifts in Raman frequencies between T{sub N} and T{sup *} suggest competing WFM and AFM interactions. A close match between the phonon frequency of B{sub 3g} (3)-octahedral rotation mode with the square of sublattice magnetization between T{sub N} and T{sup *} is indicative of the presence of spin-phonon coupling in multiferroic YCrO{sub 3}.

  17. Static and quasi-elastic small angle neutron scattering on biocompatible ionic ferrofluids: magnetic and hydrodynamic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gazeau, F; Dubois, E; Perzynski, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of ionic magnetic fluids (MFs), based on ferrite nanoparticles, dispersed at pH approx 7 either in H sub 2 O or in D sub 2 O. Polarized and non-polarized static small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments in zero magnetic field allow us to study both the magnetic and the nuclear contributions to the neutron scattering. The magnetic interparticle attraction is probed separately from the global thermodynamic repulsion and compares well to direct magnetic susceptibility measurements. The magnetic interparticle correlation is in these fluid samples independent of the probed spatial scale. In contrast, a spatial dependence of the interparticle correlation is evidenced at large PHI by the nuclear structure factor. A model of magnetic interaction quantitatively explains the under-field anisotropy of the SANS nuclear contribution. In a quasi-elastic neutron spin-echo experiment, we probe the Brownian dynamics of translation of the nanoparticles in the range 1.3 sup<=...

  18. Effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field on fetal development in ICR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Uchida, Soshi; Norimura, Toshiyuki [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field (SMF) on fetal development in mice, we evaluated fetal teratogenesis and endochondral ossification following exposure in utero. Pregnant ICR mice were exposed to a 4.7 T SMF from day 7.5 to 9.5 of gestation in a whole-body dose, and sacrificed on day 18.5 of gestation. We examined with incidence of prenatal death, external malformations and fetal skeletal malformations. There were no significant differences observed in the incidence of prenatal death and/or malformations between SMF-exposed mice and control mice. Further, we evaluated the immunoreactivity for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is implicated in angiogenesis and osteogenesis, in the sternum of fetal mice following magnetic exposure. Our studies also indicated that on day 16.5 of gestation following SMF exposure, the immunoreactivity for VEGF was increased compared to unexposed controls. However, it was decreased in the exposed group compared to the control group on day 18.5 of gestation. DNA and proteoglycan (PG) synthesis were also measured in rabbit costal growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. No significant differences were observed in DNA synthesis between the SMF exposed chondrocytes and the control chondrocytes; however, PG synthesis in SMF exposed chondrocytes increased compared to the controls. Based on these results, we suggest that while SMF exposure promoted the endochondral ossification of chondrocytes, it did not induce any harmful effects on fetal development in ICR mice. (author)

  19. Bioeffects of Static Magnetic Fields: Oxidative Stress, Genotoxic Effects, and Cancer Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Ghodbane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of static magnetic fields (SMFs with living organisms is a rapidly growing field of investigation. The magnetic fields (MFs effect observed with radical pair recombination is one of the well-known mechanisms by which MFs interact with biological systems. Exposure to SMF can increase the activity, concentration, and life time of paramagnetic free radicals, which might cause oxidative stress, genetic mutation, and/or apoptosis. Current evidence suggests that cell proliferation can be influenced by a treatment with both SMFs and anticancer drugs. It has been recently found that SMFs can enhance the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic drugs; this may provide a new strategy for cancer therapy. This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of SMFs bioeffects. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: free radical generation and oxidative stress, apoptosis and genotoxicity, and cancer. After an introduction on SMF classification and medical applications, the basic phenomena to understand the bioeffects are described. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts; international safety guidelines are also cited.

  20. Abstract: Theory of ferromagnetic resonance and static magnetization in ultrathin crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, George T.

    1982-03-01

    A theory of the static magnetization orientations ϑ0 and of the ferromagnetic resonance fields Hres in ultrathin (50 Å) monocrystalline films is presented. Both ϑ0 and Hres are shown to depend crucially on the magnetocrystalline surface anisotropy, and a generalization of this anisotropy is proposed. The equation-of-motion of the magnetization is combined with the general exchange boundary condition, and realistic approximations are introduced in order to obtain closed algebraic expressions for ϑ0 and Hres. The spatial dependence of the oscillations in the presently calculated resonance modes do not represent spin waves but nondissipative exponential decays perpendicular to the film surfaces. The film thicknesses 2L are so small that the films are ''beyond spin wave cutoff.'' It is shown that the angular dependence of Hres differs strongly from that predicted by the uniform mode theory and that Hres is a linear function of 1/L rather than independent of L. An extension of the theory to somewhat thicker films is also presented. A full account of this work has been submitted to Physical Review B.

  1. Complete classification of qualitatively different perturbations of the hydrogen atom in weak near-orthogonal electric and magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, K.; Lukina, O. V.; Sadovskii, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider perturbations of the hydrogen atom by sufficiently small homogeneous static electric and magnetic fields in near-orthogonal configurations. Normalization of the Keplerian symmetry reveals that in the parameter space such systems belong in a 'zone' of systems close to the 1: 1 resonance,

  2. Synchronization dynamics induced on pairs of neurons under applied weak alternating magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, María J; del Moral, A; Calvo, A C; Pérez-Bruzón, R N; Junquera, C

    2013-12-01

    Pairs of Helix aspersa neurons show an alternating magnetic field dependent frequency synchronization (AMFS) when exposed to a weak (amplitude B0 between 0.2 and 150 Gauss (G)) alternating magnetic field (AMF) of extremely low frequency (ELF, fM = 50 Hz). We have compared the AMFS patterns of discharge with: i) the synaptic activity promoted by glutamate and acetylcholine; ii) the activity induced by caffeine; iii) the bioelectric activity induced on neurons interconnected by electric synapses. AMFS activity reveals several specific features: i) a tight coincidence in time of the pattern and frequency, f, of discharge; ii) it is induced in the time interval of field application; iii) it is dependent on the intensity of the sinusoidal applied magnetic field; iv) elicited biphasic responses (excitation followed by inhibition) run in parallel for the pair of neurons; and v) some neuron pairs either spontaneously or AMF synchronized can be desynchronized under applied higher AMF. Our electron microscopy studies reveal gap-like junctions confirming our immunocytochemistry results about expression of connexin 26 (Cx26) in 4.7% of Helix neurons. AMF and carbenoxolone did not induce any significant effect on spontaneous synchronization through electric synapses. © 2013.

  3. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Molten Cu-Co Alloy Using an Electromagnetic Levitator Superimposed with a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Takahashi, Ryuji; Shoji, Eita; Kubo, Masaki; Tsukada, Takao; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of molten Cu-Co alloy with different compositions around the liquidus line temperature was measured by the periodic laser-heating method using an electromagnetic levitator superimposed with a static magnetic field to suppress convection in a levitated droplet sample. During the measurement, a static magnetic field of 10 T was applied to the levitated droplet. To confirm that the strength of the static magnetic field was sufficient to suppress convection in the droplet, numerical simulations were performed for the flow and thermal fields in an electromagnetically levitated droplet under a static magnetic field, and moreover, for the periodic laser-heating method to determine the thermal conductivity. It was found that the thermal conductivity of molten Cu-Co alloy increased gradually with increasing Cu composition up to 80 at. pct, beyond which it increased markedly and reached that of pure Cu. In addition, it was found that the composition dependence of the thermal conductivity can be explainable by the Wiedemann-Franz law.

  4. Antiferromagnetism in the organic conductor bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6]: Static magnetic susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kell; Tomkiewicz, Yaffa; Bechgaard, Klaus

    1982-01-01

    The anisotropy in the static magnetic susceptibility of bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6] has been investigated above and below the metal-to-insulator transition for a range of fields between 0.5 and 30 kG. The results are consistent with the expectations of a ...

  5. Theorem: A Static Magnetic N-pole Becomes an Oscillating Electric N-pole in a Cosmic Axion Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Christopher T. [Fermilab

    2016-06-15

    We show for the classical Maxwell equations, including the axion electromagnetic anomaly source term, that a cosmic axion field induces an oscillating electric N-moment for any static magnetic N-moment. This is a straightforward result, accessible to anyone who has taken a first year graduate course in electrodynamics.

  6. The Influence of Static and Rotating Magnetic Fields on Heat and Mass Transfer in Silicon Floating Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, A.; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Szofran, F. R.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone. They are caused by buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, or artificial sources such as rotation and radio-frequency heating. Flows in conducting melts can be controlled by the use of magnetic fields, either by damping fluid motion with static fields or by generating a defined flow with rotating fields. The possibilities of using static and rotating magnetic fields in silicon floating-zone growth have been investigated by experiments in axial static fields up to 5 T and in transverse rotating magnetic fields up to 7.5 mT. Static fields of a few 100 mT already suppress most striations but are detrimental to the radial segregation by introducing a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations caused by time-dependent thermocapillary convection and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile toward a more diffusion-limited case, is possible with static fields greater than or equal to 1 T. However, under certain conditions the use of high axial magnetic fields can lead to the appearance of a new type of pronounced dopant striations, caused by thermoelectromagnetic convection. The use of a transverse rotating magnetic field influences the microscopic segregation at quite low inductions, of the order of a few millitesla. The field shifts time- dependent flows and the resulting striation patterns from a broad range of low frequencies at high amplitudes to a few high frequencies at low amplitudes.

  7. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl-based stripe arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmeguenai, M., E-mail: belmeguenai.mohamed@univ-paris13.fr [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Gabor, M.S. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Zighem, F. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Berling, D. [IS2M, CNRS-LRC 7228, Université de Haute-Alsace, 68057 Mulhouse-Cedex (France); Roussigné, Y. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Petrisor, T. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Chérif, S.M. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Tiusan, C. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS, Université de Nancy, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Brinza, O.; Moch, P. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2016-02-01

    25 nm to 50 nm Co{sub 2}FeAl (CFA) thick wire arrays with varying widths and spacing have been patterned from continuous CFA films deposited on MgO(001) using e-beam lithography and Ar ion milling. Magneto-optical Kerr effect, transverse bias initial inverse susceptibility and torque measurements reveal that the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the wires is dominantly monitored by a uniaxial term, in contrast with the continuous films where it is governed by the superposition of a fourfold term and of a smaller uniaxial term. The microstrip ferromagnetic resonance spectra performed using a magnetic field H, applied in the plane of the studied sample along various directions, or perpendicularly to this plane, gave us access to various quantized modes originating from the patterning. In addition, Brillouin light scattering also exhibits quantized modes. A large part of the experimental observations can be quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the demagnetizing terms induced by the geometrical patterning. However, the presented model, simply built on the effect of the demagnetizing field, is not able to give account of all the quantized modes present in the resonance spectra. When H is parallel to the wires, a more complete description is used: it considers the wave-vector quantization induced by the patterning. For the magnetic modes concerned by both approaches, the correspondence between the 2 models is easily established. When H is not parallel to the wires quantitative descriptions of the behavior of the field dependence of the observed modes still can often be performed. Finally, in all the studied patterned samples, the uniform magnetic mode, termed “film mode”, relative to the parent continuous film is observed by ferromagnetic resonance: such a behavior, which has been reported previously, remains to be completely interpreted. - Highlights: • The static and dynamic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl wire arrays have been studied. • Microstrip

  8. Static and dynamic stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tishin, A.M.; Spichkin, Yu.I.; Bohr, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    can display themselves in static magnetostriction deformations (this effect is not considered here) and in the changing of the magnetic state under mechanical stress. The latter causes variation of the magnetic phase transition temperatures, magnetization and magnetic structures, and leads...

  9. Constituent quark-light vector mesons effective couplings in a weak background magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2018-01-01

    Effective couplings between light SU(2) vector and axial mesons and constituent quarks are calculated in the presence of a background electromagnetic field by considering a one dressed gluon exchange quark-quark interaction. The effective coupling constants, obtained from a large quark mass expansion, are expressed in terms of the Lagrangian parameters of the initial model and of components of the quark and nonperturbative gluon propagators. In spite of many possible couplings, only a few coupling constants emerge. As a second step, constituent quark-vector and axial mesons effective coupling constants are redefined to show explicit dependence on a weak background magnetic field. Ratios between the effective coupling constants are found in the limit of large quark effective mass and numerical estimates are presented.

  10. Characterisation of weak magnetic field effects in an aqueous glutamic acid solution by nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy and voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Pazur, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate altered metabolism and enzyme kinetics for various organisms, as well as changes of neuronal functions and behaviour of higher animals, when they were exposed to specific combinations of weak static and alternating low frequency electromagnetic fields. Field strengths and frequencies, as well as properties of involved ions were related by a linear equation, known as the formula of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, abbreviation mentioned first by Liboff). Under...

  11. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Moral, A.; Azanza, María J.

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate ("frequency"), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca2+ Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD-CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD-CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B0 ≅0.2-15 mT) AC-MF of frequency fM=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation.

  12. Effect of a static magnetic field on silicon transport in liquid phase diffusion growth of SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, N.; Dost, S. [Crystal Growth Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Liquid phase diffusion experiments have been performed without and with the application of a 0.4 T static magnetic field using a three-zone DC furnace system. SiGe crystals were grown from the germanium side for a period of 72 h. Experiments have led to the growth of single crystal sections varying from 0 to 10 mm thicknesses. Examination of the processed samples (single and polycrystalline sections) has shown that the effect of the applied static magnetic field is significant. It alters the temperature distribution in the system, reduces mass transport in the melt, and leads to a much lower growth rate. The initial curved growth interface was slightly flattened under the effect of magnetic field. There were no growth striations in the single crystal sections of the samples. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Acute effect of static exercise in patients with aortic regurgitation assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: role of left ventricular remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegret, Josep M; Martinez-Micaelo, Neus; La Gerche, Andre; Franco-Bonafonte, Luis; Rubio-Pérez, Francisco; Calvo, Nahum; Montero, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    In patients with aortic regurgitation (AR), the effect of static exercise (SE) on global ventricular function and AR severity has not been previously studied. Resting and SE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) were prospectively performed in 23 asymptomatic patients with AR. During SE, we observed a decrease in regurgitant volume in both end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volume in both ventricles, as well as a slight decrease in LV ejection fraction (EF). Interestingly, responses varied depending on the degree of LV remodelling. Among patients with a greater degree of LV remodelling, we observed a decrease in LVEF (56 ± 4 % at rest vs 48 ± 7 % during SE, p = 0.001) as a result of a lower decrease in LVESV (with respect to LVEDV. Among patients with a lower degree of LV remodelling, LVEF remained unchanged. RVEF remained unchanged in both groups. In patients with AR, SE provoked a reduction in preload, LV stroke volume, and regurgitant volume. In those patients with higher LV remodelling, we observed a decrease in LVEF, suggesting a lower LV contractile reserve. • In patients with aortic regurgitation, static exercise reduced preload volume. • In patients with aortic regurgitation, static exercise reduced stroke volume. • In patients with aortic regurgitation, static exercise reduced regurgitant volume. • In patients with greater remodelling, static exercise unmasked a lower contractile reserve. • Effect of static exercise on aortic regurgitation was assessed by cardiac MR.

  14. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers Around Weakly Magnetized Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessah Martin E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity in accretion disks is based on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. This implies that the turbulent stress must be negative and thus transport angular momentum inwards, in the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the surface of a weakly magnetized star. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. Motivated by the need of a deeper understanding of the behavior of an MHD fluid in a differentially rotating background that deviates from a Keplerian profile, we study the dynamics of MHD waves in configurations that are stable to the standard MRI. Employing the shearing-sheet framework, we show that transient amplification of shearing MHD waves can generate magnetic energy without leading to a substantial generation of hydromagnetic stresses. While these results are in agreement with numerical simulations, they emphasize the need to better understand the mechanism for angular momentum transport in the inner disk regions on more solid grounds.

  15. Effect of a weak transverse magnetic field on the morphology and orientation of directionally solidified Al-Ni alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanxiao; Fautrelle, Yves; Hou, Long; Du, Dafan; Zhang, Yikun; Ren, Zhongming; Lu, Xionggang; Moreau, Rene; Li, Xi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of a weak transverse magnetic field on the morphology and orientation of Al3Ni dendrites in directionally solidified Al-12 wt% Ni alloys was investigated. The experimental results indicated that the magnetic field caused segregation. It was also found that the application of a magnetic field decreased the primary dendrite spacing. By means of electronic backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis, the orientation of the Al3Ni dendrite was studied. In the case of no magnetic field, the crystal direction of the Al3Ni crystal was oriented along the solidification direction. When a transverse magnetic field was applied, the crystal direction rotated to the magnetic field direction, whereas the crystal direction remained oriented along the solidification direction. The above experimental results are discussed in the context of thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC) and crystal anisotropy.

  16. The origin of high eccentricity planets: The dispersed planet formation regime for weakly magnetized disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Imaeda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the tandem planet formation regime, planets form at two distinct sites where solid particles are densely accumulated due to the on/off state of the magnetorotational instability (MRI. We found that tandem planet formation can reproduce the solid component distribution of the Solar System and tends to produce a smaller number of large planets through continuous pebble flow into the planet formation sites. In the present paper, we investigate the dependence of tandem planet formation on the vertical magnetic field of the protoplanetary disk. We calculated two cases of Bz=3.4×10−3 G and Bz=3.4×10−5 G at 100 AU as well as the canonical case of Bz=3.4×10−4 G. We found that tandem planet formation holds up well in the case of the strong magnetic field (Bz=3.4×10−3 G. On the other hand, in the case of a weak magnetic field (Bz=3.4×10−5 G at 100 AU, a new regime of planetary growth is realized: the planets grow independently at different places in the dispersed area of the MRI-suppressed region of r=8−30 AU at a lower accretion rate of M˙<10−7.4 M⊙yr−1. We call this the “dispersed planet formation” regime. This may lead to a system with a larger number of smaller planets that gain high eccentricity through mutual collisions.

  17. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011

  18. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  19. Demicellization of Polyethylene Oxide in Water Solution under Static Magnetic Field Exposure Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Calabrò

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available FTIR spectroscopy was used to investigate the alterations of the vibration bands in the mid-infrared region of Polyethylene oxide in aqueous solution at 25 mg/mL concentration under exposure up to 4 h to a static magnetic field at 200 mT. FTIR spectroscopic analysis of PEO solution in the range 3500–1000 cm−1 evidenced the stretching vibrations of ether band, C–H symmetric-antisymmetric and bending vibrations of methylene groups, and the C–O–C stretching band. A significant decrease in intensity of symmetric and asymmetric stretching CH2 vibration bands occurred after 2 h and 4 h of exposure, followed by a significant decrease in intensity of scissoring bending in plane CH2 vibration around 1465 cm−1. Finally, the C–O–C stretching band around 1080 cm−1 increased in intensity after 4 h of exposure. This result can be attributed to the increase of formation of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding that occurred in PEO aqueous solution after SMF exposure, due to the reorientation of PEO chain after exposure to SMF. In this scenario, the observed decrease in intensity of CH2 vibration bands can be understood as well considering that the reorientation of PEO chain under the applied SMF induces PEO demicellization.

  20. Efficacy of Static Magnetic Field for Locomotor Activity of Experimental Osteopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Taniguchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the effectiveness of applying a static magnetic field (SMF for increasing bone mineral density (BMD, we assessed the degree of osteopenia by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, the metabolism measuring system, and histological examination of bone tissue in an ovariectomized (OVX rat model. Thirty-six female Wistar rats (8 weeks old, 160–180 g were divided into three groups. The rats in the OVX-M group were exposed to SMF for 12 weeks after ovariectomy. The ovariectomized rats in the OVX-D group were not exposed to SMF as a control. The rats in the normal group received neither ovariectomy nor exposure to SMF. Twelve-week exposure to SMF in the OVX-M group inhibited the reduction in BMD that was observed in the OVX-D group. Moreover, in the OVX rats, before exposure to SMF, there was no clear difference in the level of locomotor activity between the active and resting phases, and the pattern of locomotor activity was irregular. After exposure of OVX rats to SMF, the pattern of locomotor activity became diphasic with clear active and resting phases, as was observed in the normal group. In the OVX-M group, the continuity of the trabecular bone was maintained more favorably and bone mass was higher than the respective parameters in the OVX-D group. These results demonstrate that exposure to SMF increased the level of locomotor activity in OVX rats, thereby increasing BMD.

  1. Study on Application of Static Magnetic Field for Adjuvant Arthritis Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Taniguchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the effectiveness of the application of static magnetic field (SMF on pain relief, we performed a study on rats with adjuvant arthritis (AA. Sixty female Sprague–Dawley (SD rats (age: 6 weeks, body weight: approximately 160 g were divided into three groups [SMF-treated AA rats (Group I, non-SMF-treated AA rats (Group II and control rats (Group III]. The SD rats were injected in the left hind leg with 0.6 mg/0.05 ml Mycobacterium butyrium to induce AA. The rats were bred for 6 months as chronic pain model. Thereafter, the AA rats were or were not exposed to SMF for 12 weeks. We assessed the changes in the tail surface temperature, locomotor activity, serum inflammatory marker and bone mineral density (BMD using thermography, a metabolism measuring system and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA method, respectively. The tail surface temperature, locomotor activity and femoral BMD of the SMF-exposed AA rats were significantly higher than those of the non-SMF-exposed AA rats, and the serum inflammatory marker was significantly lower. These findings suggest that the pain relief effects are primarily due to the increased blood circulation caused by the rise in the tail surface temperature. Moreover, the pain relief effects increased with activity and BMD of the AA rats.

  2. Prospects of airflow control by a gliding arc in a static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcon, N; Benard, N; Braud, P; Touchard, G; Moreau, E [Laboratoire d' Etudes Aerodynamiques (LEA), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, CNRS Bld Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Mizuno, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan, Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyoashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2008-10-21

    The electrical properties of a gliding arc operating in air at atmospheric pressure are studied to evaluate its possible applications to flow control. The electromechanical behaviour of the discharge travelling at 4 m s{sup -1} along diverging electrodes in a static magnetic field is analysed in detail. Two different methods are proposed to evaluate the velocity of the arc. An initial estimation is based on the arc current evolution during its transit and additional information is gained from fast digital imaging with a CCD camera. The displacement of the arc observed with short exposure time corroborates the electrical measurement and also exhibits the existence of luminous points on the cathode that can slow down the arc motion. In addition, a particle image velocimetry system is used to investigate the interaction between the gliding arc and the surrounding air. The displacement of the low current glidarc creates a low velocity convection (around 0.2 m s{sup -1}) in the gas and also generate faster structures up to 1 m s{sup -1} directly in front of the discharge. These electromechanical effects could be used to manipulate the boundary layer region of various aerodynamic shapes.

  3. AC magnetic characteristics of YBCO superconductor with weak links; Uiku rinku wo motsu YBCO chodendotai no koryu jiki tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuoka, K.; Hashimoto, M.

    2000-05-29

    As magnetic shield using high-temperature superconductors, highly efficient magnetic from static magnetic field to a high frequency range can be realized. However, the high-temperature superconductors are not necessarily uniform materials since they might contain week links such as crystal grain boundary, cracks and the like during a manufacturing process and cracks may be generated due to electromagnetic force or heat shock upon the use of samples. In this research, surface magnetic flux densities at various points of a superconductor are measured with a Hall element, a full-color image is depicted on the basis of these data, and magnetic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors in AC magnetic fields are evaluated. High-temperature super-conductive materials used in the experiment are YBCO superconductors fabricated with MPMG method. Experiment results reveal that invasion of magnetic flux into the superconductors occurs due to flux flow phenomena and is accompanied with time lag, and that the higher the frequency of an applied magnetic field the less the magnetic flux invades the superconductors. (NEDO)

  4. Modeling weakly-ionized plasmas in magnetic field: A new computationally-efficient approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Bernard; Macheret, Sergey O.; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2015-11-01

    Despite its success at simulating accurately both non-neutral and quasi-neutral weakly-ionized plasmas, the drift-diffusion model has been observed to be a particularly stiff set of equations. Recently, it was demonstrated that the stiffness of the system could be relieved by rewriting the equations such that the potential is obtained from Ohm's law rather than Gauss's law while adding some source terms to the ion transport equation to ensure that Gauss's law is satisfied in non-neutral regions. Although the latter was applicable to multicomponent and multidimensional plasmas, it could not be used for plasmas in which the magnetic field was significant. This paper hence proposes a new computationally-efficient set of electron and ion transport equations that can be used not only for a plasma with multiple types of positive and negative ions, but also for a plasma in magnetic field. Because the proposed set of equations is obtained from the same physical model as the conventional drift-diffusion equations without introducing new assumptions or simplifications, it results in the same exact solution when the grid is refined sufficiently while being more computationally efficient: not only is the proposed approach considerably less stiff and hence requires fewer iterations to reach convergence but it yields a converged solution that exhibits a significantly higher resolution. The combined faster convergence and higher resolution is shown to result in a hundredfold increase in computational efficiency for some typical steady and unsteady plasma problems including non-neutral cathode and anode sheaths as well as quasi-neutral regions.

  5. The hot Jupiter of the magnetically active weak-line T Tauri star V830 Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, J.-F.; Yu, L.; Moutou, C.; Cameron, A. C.; Malo, L.; Grankin, K.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Vidotto, A. A.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Haywood, R. D.; Bouvier, J.; Petit, P.; Takami, M.; Herczeg, G. J.; Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M. M.; Morin, J.; MaTYSSE Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We report results of an extended spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri star V830 Tau and its recently detected newborn close-in giant planet. Our observations, carried out within the MaTYSSE (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets) programme, were spread over 91 d, and involved the ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters linked to the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii, the 2-m Bernard Lyot, and the 8-m Gemini-North Telescopes. Using Zeeman-Doppler Imaging, we characterize the surface brightness distributions, magnetic topologies, and surface differential rotation of V830 Tau at the time of our observations, and demonstrate that both distributions evolve with time beyond what is expected from differential rotation. We also report that near the end of our observations, V830 Tau triggered one major flare and two weaker precursors, showing up as enhanced redshifted emission in multiple spectral activity proxies. With three different filtering techniques, we model the radial velocity (RV) activity jitter (of semi-amplitude 1.2 km s-1) that V830 Tau generates, successfully retrieve the 68 ± 11 m s-1 RV planet signal hiding behind the jitter, further confirm the existence of V830 Tau b, and better characterize its orbital parameters. We find that the method based on Gaussian-process regression performs best thanks to its higher ability at modelling not only the activity jitter, but also its temporal evolution over the course of our observations, and succeeds at reproducing our RV data down to an rms precision of 35 m s-1. Our result provides new observational constraints on scenarios of star/planet formation and demonstrates the scientific potential of large-scale searches for close-in giant planets around T Tauri stars.

  6. Static magnetic fields inhibit proliferation and disperse subcellular localization of gamma complex protein3 in cultured C2C12 myoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeungChan; Im, Wooseok

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic fields may delay the rate of cell cycle progression, and there are reports that magnetic fields induce neurite outgrowth in cultured neuronal cells. To demonstrate whether magnetic field also effects on myoblast cells in cell growth, C2C12 cell lines were cultured and 2000G static magnetic field was applied. After 48 h of incubation, both the WST-1 assay (0.01 magnetic fields inhibit the proliferation of cultured C2C12 cells. Immunocytochemistry for alpha and tubulin gamma complex protein (TUBA and GCP3) was made and applying a static magnetic field-dispersed tubulin GCP3 formation, a intracellular apparatus for tubulin structuring in cell division. This protein expression was not altered by western blot. This study indicates that applying a static magnetic field alters the subcellular localizing of GCP3, and may delay the cell growth in cultured C2C12 myoblast cells.

  7. Cavities of Weak Magnetic Field Strength in the Wake of FTEs: Results from Global Magnetospheric MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hesse, M.; Wang, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.

    2009-01-01

    We use the global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code BATS-R-US to model multipoint observations of Flux Transfer Event (FTE) signatures. Simulations with high spatial and temporal resolution predict that cavities of weak magnetic field strength protruding into the magnetosphere trail FTEs. These predictions are consistent with recently reported multi-point Cluster observations of traveling magnetopause erosion regions (TMERs).

  8. Static Metrological Characterization of a Ferrimagnetic Resonance Transducer for Real-Time Magnetic Field Markers in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, P; Caspers, F; Golluccio, G; Petrone, C

    2011-01-01

    The metrological characterization of a magnetic field transducer based on ferrimagnetic resonance for real-time markers in particle accelerators is reported. The transducer is designed to measure the magnetic field with an uncertainty of ± 10-5 T. A case study on the new real-time field monitoring system for the CERN accelerators highlighting the performance improvement achieved through the new ferrimagnetic transducer is described. Preliminary experimental results of the characterization for static and dynamic fields are discussed.

  9. The Role of Moderate Static Magnetic Fields on Biomineralization of Osteoblasts on Sulfonated Polystryene Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X Ba; M Hadjiargyrou; E DiMasi; Y Meng; M Simon; Z Tan; M Rafailovich

    2011-12-31

    We have investigated the effects of moderate static magnetic fields (SMFs) on murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts, and found that they enhance proliferations and promote differentiation. The increase in proliferation rates in response to SMFs was greater in cultures grown on partially sulfonated polytstyrene (SPS, degree of sulfonation: 33%) than in cultures grown on tissue culture plastic. We have previously shown that when the degree of sulfonation exceeded a critical value (12%) [1], spontaneous fibrillogenesis occured which allowed for direct observation of the ECM fibrillar organization under the influence of external fields. We found that the ECM produced in cultures grown on the SPS in the presence of the SMFs assembled into a lattice with larger dimensions than the ECM of the cultures grown in the absence of SMFs. During the early stages of the biomineralization process (day 7), the SMF exposed cultures also templated mineral deposition more rapidly than the control cultures. The rapid response is attributed to orientation of diamagnetic ECM proteins already present in the serum, which could then initiate further cellular signaling. SMFs also influenced late stage osteoblast differentiation as measured by the increased rate of osteocalcin secretion and gene expression beginning 15 days after SFM exposure. This correlated with a large increase in mineral deposition, and in cell modulus. GIXD and EDXS analysis confirmed early deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite. Previous studies on the effects of moderate SMF had focused on cellular gene and protein expression, but did not consider the organization of the ECM fibers. Our ability to form these fibers has allowed us explore this additional effect and highlight its significance in the initiation of the biomineralization process.

  10. An assessment of the conditions for critical velocity ionization at the weakly magnetized planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that critical velocity ionization (CVI) may occur in the magnetosheaths of weakly magnetized planets where the solar wind flows through the planets' upper atmospheres. One can examine this possibility for Venus and Mars by using magnetosheath flow and exosphere models to determine whether the criteria for CVI are met. These criteria include Brenning's empirical condition on the cross-field flow velocity (it must not exceed the local magnetosonic velocity) and the 'Townsend condition' requiring that the integrated probability of impact ionization by a hot electron be greater than 1 along a streamline past the planet. Application of the Spreiter-Stahara gas dynamic flow model and the Nagy and coworkers' models for the exospheres lead to the conclusion that the conditions can be met in a limited region near Venus. However, evidence for CVI has not been identified in in-situ data. Since key details of the planet-solar wind interaction can be explained in terms of photoionization alone, other signatures of the process must be sought in the observations if the presence of CVI is to be positively inferred.

  11. The effect of low static magnetic field on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of human adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marędziak, Monika, E-mail: monika.maredziak@gmail.com [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Śmieszek, Agnieszka, E-mail: smieszek.agnieszka@gmail.com [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A., E-mail: krtomaszewski@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow (Poland); Lewandowski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lewandowski@pwr.wroc.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Mechanics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztofmarycz@interia.pl [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the osteogenic properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). In this study in seven days viability assay we examined the impact of SMF on cells proliferation rate, population doubling time, and ability to form single-cell derived colonies. We have also examined cells' morphology, ultrastructure and osteogenic properties on the protein as well as mRNA level. We established a complex approach, which enabled us to obtain information about SMF and hASCs potential in the context of differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. We demonstrated that SMF enhances both viability and osteogenic properties of hASCs through higher proliferation factor and shorter population doubling time. We have also observed asymmetrically positioned nuclei and organelles after SMF exposition. With regards to osteogenic properties we observed increased levels of osteogenic markers i.e. osteopontin, osteocalcin and increased ability to form osteonodules with positive reaction to Alizarin Red dye. We have also shown that SMF besides enhancing osteogenic properties of hASCs, simultaneously decreases their ability to differentiate into adipogenic lineage. Our results clearly show a direct influence of SMF on the osteogenic potential of hASCs. These results provide key insights into the role of SMF on their cellular fate and properties. - Graphical abstract: Influence of static magnetic field on viability and differentiation properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells. Abbreviations: SMF – static magnetic field; hASCs – human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells; PF – proliferation factor; PDT – population doubling time; CFU-E –> colony forming unit efficiency; OPN – osteopontin; OCL – osteocalcin; Col – collagen type I; BMP-2 – bone morphogenetic protein 2; Ca – calcium; P – phosphorus. - Highlights: • Effects of static

  12. Effects of high-intensity static magnetic fields on a root-based bioreactor system for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Maria Elena; Massa, Silvia; Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2017-11-01

    Static magnetic fields created by superconducting magnets have been proposed as an effective solution to protect spacecrafts and planetary stations from cosmic radiations. This shield can deflect high-energy particles exerting injurious effects on living organisms, including plants. In fact, plant systems are becoming increasingly interesting for space adaptation studies, being useful not only as food source but also as sink of bioactive molecules in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). However, the application of protective magnetic shields would generate inside space habitats residual magnetic fields, of the order of few hundreds milli Tesla, whose effect on plant systems is poorly known. To simulate the exposure conditions of these residual magnetic fields in shielded environment, devices generating high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) were comparatively evaluated in blind exposure experiments (250 mT, 500 mT and sham -no SMF-). The effects of these SMFs were assayed on tomato cultures (hairy roots) previously engineered to produce anthocyanins, known for their anti-oxidant properties and possibly useful in the setting of BLSS. Hairy roots exposed for periods ranging from 24 h to 11 days were morphometrically analyzed to measure their growth and corresponding molecular changes were assessed by a differential proteomic approach. After disclosing blind exposure protocol, a stringent statistical elaboration revealed the absence of significant differences in the soluble proteome, perfectly matching phenotypic results. These experimental evidences demonstrate that the identified plant system well tolerates the exposure to these magnetic fields. Results hereby described reinforce the notion of using this plant organ culture as a tool in ground-based experiments simulating space and planetary environments, in a perspective of using tomato 'hairy root' cultures as bioreactor of ready-to-use bioactive molecules during future long-term space missions.

  13. Effects of high-intensity static magnetic fields on a root-based bioreactor system for space applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Maria Elena; Massa, Silvia; Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2017-11-01

    Static magnetic fields created by superconducting magnets have been proposed as an effective solution to protect spacecrafts and planetary stations from cosmic radiations. This shield can deflect high-energy particles exerting injurious effects on living organisms, including plants. In fact, plant systems are becoming increasingly interesting for space adaptation studies, being useful not only as food source but also as sink of bioactive molecules in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). However, the application of protective magnetic shields would generate inside space habitats residual magnetic fields, of the order of few hundreds milli Tesla, whose effect on plant systems is poorly known. To simulate the exposure conditions of these residual magnetic fields in shielded environment, devices generating high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) were comparatively evaluated in blind exposure experiments (250 mT, 500 mT and sham -no SMF-). The effects of these SMFs were assayed on tomato cultures (hairy roots) previously engineered to produce anthocyanins, known for their anti-oxidant properties and possibly useful in the setting of BLSS. Hairy roots exposed for periods ranging from 24 h to 11 days were morphometrically analyzed to measure their growth and corresponding molecular changes were assessed by a differential proteomic approach. After disclosing blind exposure protocol, a stringent statistical elaboration revealed the absence of significant differences in the soluble proteome, perfectly matching phenotypic results. These experimental evidences demonstrate that the identified plant system well tolerates the exposure to these magnetic fields. Results hereby described reinforce the notion of using this plant organ culture as a tool in ground-based experiments simulating space and planetary environments, in a perspective of using tomato 'hairy root' cultures as bioreactor of ready-to-use bioactive molecules during future long-term space

  14. Influence of 340 mT static magnetic field on germination potential and mid-infrared spectrum of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćirković, Saša; Bačić, Jasmina; Paunović, Novica; Popović, Tamara B; Trbovich, Alexander M; Romčević, Nebojša; Ristić-Djurović, Jasna L

    2017-10-01

    In a number of studies, a static magnetic field was observed to positively influence the growing process of various plants; however, the effect has not yet been related to possible structural changes. We investigate if the static magnetic field that improves germination of wheat also alters wheat's near-infrared spectrum. Two groups of seeds were exposed to 340 mT for 16 h cumulatively. The first group was exposed 8 days for 2 h per day, while the second group was exposed 4 h per day for 4 consecutive days. One half of each of the exposed seed groups as well as of the unexposed control groups was sown, and the other half was used for mid-infrared spectra measurements. The sown seeds were monitored for 3 weeks after sowing. Germination of the groups exposed to the magnetic field was faster compared to corresponding non-exposed groups that were grown under the same conditions. The magnetic field exposure caused the enhancement of one OH peak at 3,369 cm(-1) and two CO peaks at 1,662 cm(-1) and 1,740 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared spectrum. The effect was more pronounced for the 4 day, 4 h/day exposure. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:533-540, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Distinct Nature of Static and Dynamic Magnetic Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, H.; Holm, S. L.; Lǎcǎtuşu, M.-E.; Rømer, A. T.; Bertelsen, M.; Boehm, M.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Grivel, J.-C.; Emery, S. B.; Udby, L.; Wells, B. O.; Lefmann, K.

    2018-01-01

    We present detailed neutron scattering studies of the static and dynamic stripes in an optimally doped high-temperature superconductor, La2 CuO4 +y . We observe that the dynamic stripes do not disperse towards the static stripes in the limit of vanishing energy transfer. Therefore, the dynamic stripes observed in neutron scattering experiments are not the Goldstone modes associated with the broken symmetry of the simultaneously observed static stripes, and the signals originate from different domains in the sample. These observations support real-space electronic phase separation in the crystal, where the static stripes in one phase are pinned versions of the dynamic stripes in the other, having slightly different periods. Our results explain earlier observations of unusual dispersions in underdoped La2 -xSrx CuO4 (x =0.07 ) and La2 -xBax CuO4 (x =0.095 ).

  16. Externally Applied Static Magnetic Field Enhances Cardiac Retention and Functional Benefit of Magnetically Iron-Labeled Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Infarcted Hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Lin, Hung-Yu; Zheng, Dayang; Freed, Darren H.; Arora, Rakesh C.; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    Although adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) hold the promise of effective therapy for myocardial infarction (MI), low cardiac retention of implanted ASCs has hindered their therapeutic efficiency. We investigated whether an externally applied static magnetic field (SMF) enhanced cardiac localization of “magnetic” ASCs preloaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and further improved heart function recovery. In conclusion, the SMF increased the cardiac retention of implanted...

  17. Method for Transformation of Weakly Magnetic Minerals (Hematite, Goethite into Strongly Magnetic Mineral (Magnetite to Improve the Efficiency of Technologies for Oxidized Iron Ores Benefication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarenko, O.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new method for relatively simple transformation of weakly magnetic minerals (goethite (α-FeOOH and hematite (α-Fe2O3 into strongly magnetic mineral (magnetite (Fe3O4 was developed. It was shown, that transformation of structure and magnetic characteristics of go ethite and hematite are realized in the presence of starch at relatively low temperatures (in the range of 300—600 °С. Obtained results open up new possibilities for development of effective technologies for oxidized iron ore beneficiation.

  18. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼ 1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  19. Test-retest repeatability of human speech biomarkers from static and real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töger, Johannes; Sorensen, Tanner; Somandepalli, Krishna; Toutios, Asterios; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Nayak, Krishna

    2017-05-01

    Static anatomical and real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (RT-MRI) of the upper airway is a valuable method for studying speech production in research and clinical settings. The test-retest repeatability of quantitative imaging biomarkers is an important parameter, since it limits the effect sizes and intragroup differences that can be studied. Therefore, this study aims to present a framework for determining the test-retest repeatability of quantitative speech biomarkers from static MRI and RT-MRI, and apply the framework to healthy volunteers. Subjects (n = 8, 4 females, 4 males) are imaged in two scans on the same day, including static images and dynamic RT-MRI of speech tasks. The inter-study agreement is quantified using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and mean within-subject standard deviation (σe). Inter-study agreement is strong to very strong for static measures (ICC: min/median/max 0.71/0.89/0.98, σe: 0.90/2.20/6.72 mm), poor to strong for dynamic RT-MRI measures of articulator motion range (ICC: 0.26/0.75/0.90, σe: 1.6/2.5/3.6 mm), and poor to very strong for velocities (ICC: 0.21/0.56/0.93, σe: 2.2/4.4/16.7 cm/s). In conclusion, this study characterizes repeatability of static and dynamic MRI-derived speech biomarkers using state-of-the-art imaging. The introduced framework can be used to guide future development of speech biomarkers. Test-retest MRI data are provided free for research use.

  20. Exposure to static magnetic field stimulates quorum sensing circuit in luminescent Vibrio strains of the Harveyi clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelfia Talà

    Full Text Available In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule.

  1. First scalar magnetic anomaly map from CHAMP satellite data indicates weak lithospheric field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maus, S.; Rother, M.; Holme, R.

    2002-01-01

    Satellite magnetic anomaly maps derived by different techniques from Magsat/POGO data vary by more than a factor of 2 in the deduced strength of the lithospheric magnetic field. Here, we present a first anomaly map from new CHAMP scalar magnetic field data. After subtracting a recent Ørsted main...

  2. Stabilization of weak ferromagnetism by strong magnetic response to epitaxial strain in multiferroic BiFeO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Hemant; Lee, Jun Hee; Krogel, Jaron T; Okamoto, Satoshi; Cooper, Valentino R

    2015-08-06

    Multiferroic BiFeO3 exhibits excellent magnetoelectric coupling critical for magnetic information processing with minimal power consumption. However, the degenerate nature of the easy spin axis in the (111) plane presents roadblocks for real world applications. Here, we explore the stabilization and switchability of the weak ferromagnetic moments under applied epitaxial strain using a combination of first-principles calculations and group-theoretic analyses. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic moment vector can be stabilized along unique crystallographic directions ([110] and [-110]) under compressive and tensile strains. A direct coupling between the anisotropic antiferrodistortive rotations and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moria interactions drives the stabilization of the weak ferromagnetism. Furthermore, energetically competing C- and G-type magnetic orderings are observed at high compressive strains, suggesting that it may be possible to switch the weak ferromagnetism "on" and "off" under the application of strain. These findings emphasize the importance of strain and antiferrodistortive rotations as routes to enhancing induced weak ferromagnetism in multiferroic oxides.

  3. Orientation of sea urchin sperms in static magnetic fields: Compared to human sperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Lama; Dairi, Maheen

    In this study we report on magnetic orientation of sea urchin and human sperms. The sea urchin and human sperms became oriented parallel to the magnetic field (1 T maximum). The human sperms were totally oriented with magnetic field at about 600 mT. However, the sea urchin sperms show different behavior due to morphological differences between them and the human sperms.

  4. Development of the Facility for Transformation of Magnetic Characteristics of Weakly Magnetic Oxidized Iron Ores Related to Improvement of Technologies for Iron Ore Concentrate Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarenko, O.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New facility for continuous registration of iron ore magnetization depending on temperature by heating of iron ores upon reducing conditions was created. Facility allows to register the processes of transformation of weakly magnetic minerals into strongly magnetic ones under the influence of reducing agents and temperature, as well as to determine the Curie temperature of the minerals. Using created facility it was shown, that heating of goethite and hematite in the presence of 4 % of starch in the temperature range of 300—650 °С leads to significant increase of magnetization of the samples. X-Ray diffraction confirmed that under indicated conditions the structure of hematite and goethite is transformed into magnetite structure. Obtained results open up new possibilities for the development of effective technologies for oxidized iron ore beneficiation.

  5. Normal Spectral Emissivity Measurement of Molten Cu-Co Alloy Using an Electromagnetic Levitator Superimposed with a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shoya; Nakamura, Yuki; Sugioka, Ken-Ichi; Kubo, Masaki; Tsukada, Takao; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy with different compositions was measured in the wavelength range of 780 nm to 920 nm and in the temperature range of 1430 K to 1770 K including the undercooled condition by an electromagnetic levitator superimposed with a static magnetic field. The emissivity was determined as the ratio of the radiance from a levitated molten Cu-Co droplet measured by a spectrometer to the radiance from a blackbody calculated by Planck's law at a given temperature, where a static magnetic field of 2.5 T to 4.5 T was applied to the levitated droplet to suppress the surface oscillation and translational motion of the sample. We found little temperature dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy. Concerning the composition dependence, the emissivity decreased markedly above 80 at%Cu and reached that of pure Cu, although its dependence was low between 20 at%Cu and 80 at%Cu. In addition, this composition dependence of the emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy can be explained well by the Drude free-electron model.

  6. Effect of site disorder on the magnetic properties of weak itinerant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [1] S N Kaul, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 11, 7597 (1999) and references cited therein. S N Kaul and A Semwal, Phys. Lett. A254, 101 (1998). [2] F R de Boer, C J Schinkel, J Biesterbos and S Proost, J. Appl. Phys. 40, 1049 (1969). [3] C G Robbins and H Claus, in Magnetism and magnetic materials edited by C D Graham and.

  7. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  8. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu Iizuka Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ooba, T [Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center, 1465-5 Aikawa-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0861 (Japan); Kiso, K [Fukuoka Regional Taxation Bureau, 2-11-1 Hakataekihigashi, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 812-8547 (Japan); Hayashi, H [Kyushu Power Electric, 2-1-47 Shiobaru Minami-ku Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: otabe@cse.kyutech.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 {+-}0.2 x 10{sup 6}/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, {rho}, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by {rho} = {rho}o exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  9. Behavioral Effects on Rats of Motion within a High Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Thomas A.; Carella, Lee; Gonzalez, Dani; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Anthony; Mueller, Kathleen; Neth, Bryan; Smith, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Some human subjects report vestibular disturbances such as vertigo, apparent motion, and nausea around or within high strength MRI systems operating at 4 T to 9.4 T. These vestibular effects have been ascribed to the consequences of movement through the high magnetic field. We have previously found that exposure to magnetic fields above 7 T suppresses rearing, causes locomotor circling, and induces conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rodents. The present experiments were designed to test the effects on rats of motion through the magnetic field of the 14.1 T superconducting magnet. In experiment 1, we compared the effects of multiple rapid insertions and removals from the center of the magnet to the effects of continuous exposure. Repeated traversal of the magnetic field gradient with only momentary exposure to 14.1 T was sufficient to suppress rearing and induce a significant CTA. Repeated insertion and removal from the magnet, however, did not have a greater effect than a single 30-min exposure on either acute locomotor behavior or CTA acquisition. Prolonged exposure was required to induce locomotor circling. In the second series of experiments, we controlled the rate of insertion and removal by means of an electric motor. Locomotor circling appeared to be dependent on the speed of insertion and removal, but the suppression of rearing and the acquisition of CTA were independent of speed of insertion and removal. In experiment 3, we inserted rats into the center of the magnet and then rotated them about their rostral-caudal axis during a 30-min 14.1 T exposure. Rotation within the magnet did not modulate the behavioral effects of exposure. We conclude that, in rats, movement through the steep gradient of a high magnetic field has some behavioral effects, but sustained exposure to the homogenous center of the field is required for the full behavioral consequences. PMID:21118699

  10. Effect on germination and early growth characteristics in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds exposed to static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisth, Ananta; Nagarajan, Shantha

    2010-01-15

    Seeds of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) were exposed in batches to static magnetic fields of strength from 0 to 250mT in steps of 50mT for 1-4h in steps of 1h. Treatment of sunflower seeds in these magnetic fields increased the speed of germination, seedling length and seedling dry weight under laboratory germination tests. Of the various treatments, 50 and 200mT for 2h yielded the peak performance. Exposure of seeds to magnetic fields improved seed coat membrane integrity and reduced the cellular leakage and electrical conductivity. Treated seeds planted in soil resulted in statistically higher seedling dry weight, root length, root surface area and root volume in 1-month-old seedlings. In germinating seeds, enzyme activities of alpha-amylase, dehydrogenase and protease were significantly higher in treated seeds in contrast to controls. The higher enzyme activity in magnetic-field-treated sunflower seeds could be triggering the fast germination and early vigor of seedlings.

  11. Moderate strength (0.23-0.28 T) static magnetic fields (SMF) modulate signaling and differentiation in human embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyun; Sarje, Anshu; Che, Pao-Lin; Yarema, Kevin J

    2009-08-04

    Compelling evidence exists that magnetic fields modulate living systems. To date, however, rigorous studies have focused on identifying the molecular-level biosensor (e.g., radical ion pairs or membranes) or on the behavior of whole animals leaving a gap in understanding how molecular effects are translated into tissue-wide and organism-level responses. This study begins to bridge this gulf by investigating static magnetic fields (SMF) through global mRNA profiling in human embryonic cells coupled with software analysis to identify the affected signaling pathways. Software analysis of gene expression in cells exposed to 0.23-0.28 T SMF showed that nine signaling networks responded to SMF; of these, detailed biochemical validation was performed for the network linked to the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. We found the short-term (magnetic exposure is transduced from a plausible molecular biosensor (lipid membranes) to cell-level responses that include differentiation toward neural lineages. In addition, SMF provided a stimulus that uncovered new relationships - that exist even in the absence of magnetic fields - between gangliosides, the time-dependent regulation of IL-6 signaling by these glycosphingolipids, and the fate of embryonic cells.

  12. Weighted-peak assessment of occupational exposure due to MRI gradient fields and movements in a nonhomogeneous static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreuccetti, D; Contessa, G M; Falsaperla, R; Lodato, R; Pinto, R; Zoppetti, N; Rossi, P

    2013-01-01

    A procedure for assessing occupational exposure due to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gradient magnetic fields and movement-induced effects in the static magnetic field is proposed and tested. The procedure was based on the application of the weighted-peak method in time domain. It was tested in two 1.5 T total-body and one 3 T head-only scanner MRI facilities in Rome (Italy). Exposure due to switched gradient fields was evaluated in locations inside the magnet room where operators usually stay during particular medical procedures (e.g., cardiac examinations of anesthetized patients); MRI sequences were selected to approach as far as possible a representative worst case exposure scenario. Movement-induced effects were evaluated considering the actual movements of volunteer operators during work activity, by measuring the perceived time-varying magnetic field by a head-worn probe. The analysis of results was based on ICNIRP 1998 and 2010 guidelines, following a weighted-peak approach and including an ad hoc extension to the latter ones, needed to verify compliance in the frequency range 0-1 Hz. Exposures due to switched gradient fields in 1.5 T MRI scanners mostly resulted noncompliant with ICNIRP 1998 occupational reference levels, being, at the same time, always compliant with ICNIRP 2010 ones. Gradient field levels and ICNIRP indexes were significantly lower for the 3 T unit, due to its small dimensions, as that unit was a head-only scanner. Movement-induced effects resulted potentially noncompliant only in the case the operator moved the head inside the bore of a 1.5 T scanner. The procedure had proven to be a sound approach to exposure assessment in MRI. Its testing allowed to draw some general considerations about exposures to gradient magnetic fields and movement-induced effects.

  13. Quantum mechanical expansion of variance of a particle in a weakly non-uniform electric and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Poh Kam; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Kosaka, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    We have solved the Heisenberg equation of motion for the time evolution of the position and momentum operators for a non-relativistic spinless charged particle in the presence of a weakly non-uniform electric and magnetic field. It is shown that the drift velocity operator obtained in this study agrees with the classical counterpart, and that, using the time dependent operators, the variances in position and momentum grow with time. The expansion rate of variance in position and momentum are dependent on the magnetic gradient scale length, however, independent of the electric gradient scale length. In the presence of a weakly non-uniform electric and magnetic field, the theoretical expansion rates of variance expansion are in good agreement with the numerical analysis. It is analytically shown that the variance in position reaches the square of the interparticle separation, which is the characteristic time much shorter than the proton collision time of plasma fusion. After this time, the wavefunctions of the neighboring particles would overlap, as a result, the conventional classical analysis may lose its validity. The broad distribution of individual particle in space means that their Coulomb interactions with other particles become weaker than that expected in classical mechanics.

  14. Quantum mechanical expansion of variance of a particle in a weakly non-uniform electric and magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Poh Kam; Kosaka, Wataru [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Oikawa, Shun-ichi [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    We have solved the Heisenberg equation of motion for the time evolution of the position and momentum operators for a non-relativistic spinless charged particle in the presence of a weakly non-uniform electric and magnetic field. It is shown that the drift velocity operator obtained in this study agrees with the classical counterpart, and that, using the time dependent operators, the variances in position and momentum grow with time. The expansion rate of variance in position and momentum are dependent on the magnetic gradient scale length, however, independent of the electric gradient scale length. In the presence of a weakly non-uniform electric and magnetic field, the theoretical expansion rates of variance expansion are in good agreement with the numerical analysis. It is analytically shown that the variance in position reaches the square of the interparticle separation, which is the characteristic time much shorter than the proton collision time of plasma fusion. After this time, the wavefunctions of the neighboring particles would overlap, as a result, the conventional classical analysis may lose its validity. The broad distribution of individual particle in space means that their Coulomb interactions with other particles become weaker than that expected in classical mechanics.

  15. Magnetization dynamics of weak stripe domains in Fe–N thin films: a multi-technique complementary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, I. S.; Tacchi, S.; Garnier, L.-C.; Eddrief, M.; Fortuna, F.; Carlotti, G.; Marangolo, M.

    2017-11-01

    The resonant eigenmodes of an α‧-FeN thin film characterized by weak stripe domains are investigated by Brillouin light scattering and broadband ferromagnetic resonance experiments, assisted by micromagnetic simulations. The spectrum of the dynamic eigenmodes in the presence of the weak stripes is very rich and two different families of modes can be selectively detected using different techniques or different experimental configurations. Attention is paid to the evolution of the mode frequencies and spatial profiles under the application of an external magnetic field, of variable intensity, in the direction parallel or transverse to the stripes. The different evolution of the modes with the external magnetic field is accompanied by a distinctive spatial localization in specific regions, such as the closure domains at the surface of the stripes and the bulk domains localized in the inner part of the stripes. The complementarity of BLS and FMR techniques, based on different selection rules, is found to be a fruitful tool for the study of the wealth of localized magnetic excitations generally found in nanostructures.

  16. Chronic Exposure to Static Magnetic Fields from Magnetic Resonance Imaging Devices Deserves Screening for Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Levels: A Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun R. Gungor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Technicians often receive chronic magnetic exposures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices, mainly due to static magnetic fields (SMFs. Here, we ascertain the biological effects of chronic exposure to SMFs from MRI devices on the bone quality using rats exposed to SMFs in MRI examining rooms. Eighteen Wistar albino male rats were randomly assigned to SMF exposure (A, sham (B, and control (C groups. Group A rats were positioned within 50 centimeters of the bore of the magnet of 1.5 T MRI machine during the nighttime for 8 weeks. We collected blood samples for biochemical analysis, and bone tissue samples for electron microscopic and histological analysis. The mean vitamin D level in Group A was lower than in the other groups (p = 0.002. The mean cortical thickness, the mean trabecular wall thickness, and number of trabeculae per 1 mm2 were significantly lower in Group A (p = 0.003. TUNEL assay revealed that apoptosis of osteocytes were significantly greater in Group A than the other groups (p = 0.005. The effect of SMFs in chronic exposure is related to movement within the magnetic field that induces low-frequency fields within the tissues. These fields can exceed the exposure limits necessary to deteriorate bone microstructure and vitamin D metabolism.

  17. Particle Dynamics around Weakly Magnetized Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Majeed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the geometry of Reissner-Nordström (RN black hole immersed in magnetic field, we have studied the dynamics of neutral and charged particles. A collision of particles in the inner stable circular orbit is considered and the conditions for the escape of colliding particles from the vicinity of black hole are given. The trajectories of the escaping particle are discussed. Also, the velocity required for this escape is calculated. It is observed that there is more than one stable region if magnetic field is present in the accretion disk of black hole, so the stability of ISCO increases in the presence of magnetic field. Effect of magnetic field on the angular motion of neutral and charged particles is observed graphically.

  18. Effect of extremely weak pulsed magnetic field type Bemer 3000 on ratings of perceived exertion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D Gazurek; K Spodaryk

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether is an influence of the exposition on different inductions of magnetic fields on rating of perceived exertion during 10 min long standardised physical cycloergometer exercise...

  19. Imaging characteristics of "dynamic" versus "static" spondylolisthesis: analysis using magnetic resonance imaging and flexion/extension films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Jesse L; Chen, Antonia F; Lee, Joon Y

    2014-09-01

    Traditionally, the "dynamic" and "static" types of spondylolisthesis have been lumped into a single group in the literature. The goal of this study was to define the radiographic characteristics of "dynamic" and "static" spondylolisthesis with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and flexion/extension radiographs. Describe the characteristic findings present on MRI and flexion/extension radiographs that are associated with dynamic versus static spondylolisthesis. Retrospective radiographic/imaging study. From 2009 to 2011, patients who underwent elective primary posterior spinal fusion for the diagnosis of spondylolisthesis had their plain films assessed for the degree of spondylolisthesis and were designated "dynamic" or "static," as defined by historical measures. Axial and sagittal T2 MRIs were evaluated for associated facet fluid (FF), facet cysts, interspinous fluid (ISF), and facet hypertrophy. These finding were then statistically evaluated for associations between dynamic and static spondylolisthesis on flexion/extension radiographs and characteristic MRI findings. Ninety patients were included in the study with 114 levels examined for spondylolisthesis. Patients with greater than 3 mm of instability on flexion/extension films were more likely to have FF (p=.018) and ISF (pspondylolisthesis on the sagittal MRI reconstruction. If ISF was present on MRI, there was a positive predictive value of 69.0% that there would be greater than 3 mm instability on flexion/extension films. Absence of FF on MRI had a positive predictive value of 75.6% for instability less than 3 mm on flexion/extension films. In the presence of ISF on MRI, the likelihood ratio of finding more than 3 mm of instability on flexion/extension films was 3.68. The presence of FF on MRI had a likelihood ratio of 1.43 for instability. A total of 36.8% of all spondylolisthesis reduced when supine on MRI. The presence of FF and/or ISF is associated with instability greater than 3 mm in flexion

  20. Effect of extremely weak pulsed magnetic field type Bemer 3000 on ratings of perceived exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Gazurek

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether is an influence of the exposition on different inductions of magnetic fields on rating of perceived exertion during 10 min long standardised physical cycloergometer exercise. The investigation was performed in 40 healthy, non-smoking, fit men, mean age 202. The participants were randomly attributed to 4 groups, each including 10 subjects. The first one (group E18 consisted of subjects exposed to the magnetic field with the intensity of 18 μT, the second one (group E64 exposed to the magnetic field with the intensity of 64 μT. Two control groups were formed to accompany these exposed to the magnetic field. In these placebo groups (S-T subjects were not exposed to the magnetic field (so called false therapy, „sham treatment”. The study consisted of 4 steps: pilot study, the first endurance test, exposure to the magnetic field, the second endurance test. The aim of the pilot study was to define subjective feelings of the participant during the effort, his reaction to the effort and also practical familiarization with the character and rules of the endurance test and Borg scale interpretation during 10 min of endurance cycloergometer test. The first endurance test was performed two days after the pilot study with the same rules and its goal was to measure the level of tiredness according to the Borg scale during 10 min long standardised physical effort. The second endurance test was performed according to the same rules as the first one and its goal was to analyse the effect of 20 exposures to the magnetic field with the intensity of 18 and 64 μT repeated daily on the perception of tiredness increase as expressed in the Borg scale when performing 10 min long standardised physical effort. In subjects exposed to 18 μT magnetic field neither changes in the perception of fatigue nor changes in the heart rate at particular levels of the Borg scale have been observed. When compared with both control

  1. Impact of the Static and Radiofrequency Magnetic Fields Produced by a 7T MR Imager on Metallic Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriso, Kenta; Kobayashi, Takuya; Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko; Kihara, Hidemichi; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    We examined safety issues related to the presence of various metallic dental materials in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 7 tesla. A 7T MR imaging scanner was used to examine 18 kinds of materials, including 8 metals used in dental restorations, 6 osseointegrated dental implants, 2 abutments for dental implants, and 2 magnetic attachment keepers. We assessed translational attraction forces between the static magnetic field and materials via deflection angles read on a tailor-made instrument and compared with those at 3T. Heating effects from radiofrequency during image acquisitions using 6 different sequences were examined by measuring associated temperature changes in agarose-gel phantoms with a fiber-optic thermometer. Deflection angles of the metallic dental materials were significantly larger at 7T than 3T. Among full metal crowns (FMCs), deflection angles were 18.0° for cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys, 13.5° for nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys, and 0° for other materials. Deflection angles of the dental implants and abutments were minimal, ranging from 5.0 to 6.5°, whereas the magnetic attachment keepers were strongly attracted to the field, having deflection angles of 90° or more. Increases in temperature of the FMCs were significant but less than 1°C in every sequence. The dental implant of 50-mm length showed significant but mild temperature increases (up to 1.5°C) when compared with other dental implants and abutments, particularly on sequences with high specific absorption rate values. Although most metallic dental materials showed no apparent translational attraction or heating at 7T, substantial attraction forces on the magnetic attachment keepers suggested potential risks to patients and research participants undergoing MR imaging examinations.

  2. Effects of a static inhomogeneous magnetic field acting on a laser-produced carbon plasma plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Favre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present time- and space-resolved observations of the dynamics of a laser-produced carbon plasma, propagating in a sub-Tesla inhomogeneous magnetic field, with both, axial and radial field gradients. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 7 J/cm2, is used to generate the plasma from a solid graphite target, in vacuum. The magnetic field is produced using two coaxial sets of two NeFeB ring magnets, parallel to the laser target surface. The diagnostics include plasma imaging with 50 ns time resolution, spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy and Faraday cup. Based on our observations, evidence of radial and axial plasma confinement due to magnetic field gradients is presented. Formation of C2 molecules, previously observed in the presence of a low pressure neutral gas background, and enhanced on-axis ion flux, are ascribed to finite Larmor radius effects and reduced radial transport due to the presence of the magnetic field.

  3. FTIR investigation of the effects of ultra-strong static magnetic field on the secondary structures of protein in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zichao; Hu, Xing; Zhao, Xusheng; Ren, Zhongming; Ding, Guoji

    2009-07-01

    Secondary structures of protein in Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus) exposed to the ultra-strong static magnetic field (SMF) were investigated by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Difference index D value of amide I (1600-1700 cm -1) showed that the ultra-strong magnetic field had little impact on S. aureus, but had strong impact on E. coli. The results indicated that 3.46-9.92% of the disorder coils in the secondary structures of protein in E. coli were turned into α-helices under SMF while applying deconvolution and curve fitting to amide I. At the same time, intermolecular β-sheets transforming into intramolecular ones suggested that cohesion among protein molecules had been destroyed and intramolecular hydrogen bonds strengthened. All the differences among the compositions of protein's secondary structures in E. coli were mostly due to the varying degrees of various proteins affected by the magnetic field. The results may provide new insights into the structural changes of proteins induced by the SMF.

  4. Measurement of weak magnetic field of corrosion current of isolated corrosion center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Bardin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A very small magnetic field of corrosion current, of the order of 10−4 Oe, generated by isolated zinc inclusion in a copper platelet placed in electrolyte has been measured for the first time with a highly sensitive giant magneto-impedance magnetometer. The total corrosion current of the inclusion is estimated comparing the measured magnetic field distribution with corresponding theoretical calculation. The estimated value of the total corrosion current turns out to be in reasonable agreement with that one obtained in the standard gravimetric measurement.

  5. APPLICATION OF MULTILAYER FILM CONFIGURATION TO PROTECT PHOTOMULTIPLIER AGAINST EXTERNAL STATIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Batische

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the screening constant magnetic field is multi-layered film screens system of NiFe/Cu, formed on the cylindrical housing of photomultiplier tubes, and compared with screen-based steel material – brand 80NHS permalloy. It is shown that the most effective is the screen on the basis of the multilayered film screens, which provide shielding effectiveness value 8–10 in magnetic fields with induction of 0,1–1 mT, and 80–100 – in magnetic fields with induction of 2–4 mT , which is 4–5 times higher than for the screen of the material 80NHS.

  6. Complete classification of qualitatively different perturbations of the hydrogen atom in weak near-orthogonal electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efstathiou, K; Lukina, O V [Department of Mathematics, University of Groningen, Groningen 9700 AK (Netherlands); SadovskiI, D A [Departement de physique, Universite du Littoral, 59140 Dunkerque (France)], E-mail: K.Efstathiou@rug.nl, E-mail: O.Lukina@math.rug.nl, E-mail: sadovski@univ-littoral.fr

    2009-02-06

    We consider perturbations of the hydrogen atom by sufficiently small homogeneous static electric and magnetic fields in near-orthogonal configurations. Normalization of the Keplerian symmetry reveals that in the parameter space such systems belong in a 'zone' of systems close to the 1:1 resonance, the latter corresponding to the exactly orthogonal configuration. Integrable approximations obtained from second normalization of systems in the 1:1 zone are classified into several different qualitative types, many of which possess nontrivial monodromy. We compute monodromy of the complete three-dimensional energy-momentum map, compare the joint quantum spectrum to classical bifurcation diagrams, and show the effect of second normalization to the joint spectrum.

  7. Response of pain to static magnetic fields in postpolio patients: a double-blind pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallbona, C; Hazlewood, C F; Jurida, G

    1997-11-01

    To determine if the chronic pain frequently presented by postpolio patients can be relieved by application of magnetic fields applied directly over an identified pain trigger point. Double-blind randomized clinical trial. The postpolio clinic of a large rehabilitation hospital. Fifty patients with diagnosed postpolio syndrome who reported muscular or arthritic-like pain. Application of active or placebo 300 to 500 Gauss magnetic devices to the affected area for 45 minutes. Score on the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Patients who received the active device experienced an average pain score decrease of 4.4 +/- 3.1 (p postpolio subjects.

  8. Static Magnetic Proximity Effect in Pt/NiFe2O4 and Pt/Fe Bilayers Investigated by X-Ray Resonant Magnetic Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschel, T; Klewe, C; Schmalhorst, J-M; Bertram, F; Kuschel, O; Schemme, T; Wollschläger, J; Francoual, S; Strempfer, J; Gupta, A; Meinert, M; Götz, G; Meier, D; Reiss, G

    2015-08-28

    The spin polarization of Pt in Pt/NiFe2O4 and Pt/Fe bilayers is studied by interface-sensitive x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity to investigate static magnetic proximity effects. The asymmetry ratio of the reflectivity is measured at the Pt L3 absorption edge using circular polarized x-rays for opposite directions of the magnetization at room temperature. The results of the 2% asymmetry ratio for Pt/Fe bilayers are independent of the Pt thickness between 1.8 and 20 nm. By comparison with ab initio calculations, the maximum magnetic moment per spin polarized Pt atom at the interface is determined to be (0.6±0.1)  μB for Pt/Fe. For Pt/NiFe2O4 the asymmetry ratio drops below the sensitivity limit of 0.02  μB per Pt atom. Therefore, we conclude, that the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect recently observed in Pt/NiFe2O4 is not influenced by a proximity induced anomalous Nernst effect.

  9. Enantioselective Crystallization of Sodium Chlorate in the Presence of Racemic Hydrophobic Amino Acids and Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzano, María-Paz; Osuna-Esteban, Susana; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Menor-Salván, Cesar; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2014-06-01

    We study the bias induced by a weak (200 mT) external magnetic field on the preferred handedness of sodium chlorate crystals obtained by slow evaporation at ambient conditions of its saturated saline solution with 20 ppm of added racemic (dl) hydrophobic amino acids. By applying the Fisher test to pairs of experiments with opposing magnetic field orientation we conclude, with a confidence level of 99.7%, that at the water-air interface of this saline solution there is an enantioselective magnetic interaction that acts upon racemic mixtures of hydrophobic chiral amino acids. This interaction has been observed with the three tested racemic hydrophobic amino acids: dl-Phe, dl-Try and dl-Trp, at ambient conditions and in spite of the ubiquitous chiral organic contamination. This enantioselective magnetic dependence is not observed when there is only one handedness of added chiral amino-acid, if the added amino acid is not chiral or if there is no additive. This effect has been confirmed with a double blind test. This novel experimental observation may have implications for our view of plausible initial prebiotic scenarios and of the roles of the geomagnetic field in homochirality in the biosphere.

  10. Enantioselective Crystallization of Sodium Chlorate in the Presence of Racemic Hydrophobic Amino Acids and Static Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Paz Zorzano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the bias induced by a weak (200 mT external magnetic field on the preferred handedness of sodium chlorate crystals obtained by slow evaporation at ambient conditions of its saturated saline solution with 20 ppm of added racemic (dl hydrophobic amino acids. By applying the Fisher test to pairs of experiments with opposing magnetic field orientation we conclude, with a confidence level of 99.7%, that at the water-air interface of this saline solution there is an enantioselective magnetic interaction that acts upon racemic mixtures of hydrophobic chiral amino acids. This interaction has been observed with the three tested racemic hydrophobic amino acids: dl-Phe, dl-Try and dl-Trp, at ambient conditions and in spite of the ubiquitous chiral organic contamination. This enantioselective magnetic dependence is not observed when there is only one handedness of added chiral amino-acid, if the added amino acid is not chiral or if there is no additive. This effect has been confirmed with a double blind test. This novel experimental observation may have implications for our view of plausible initial prebiotic scenarios and of the roles of the geomagnetic field in homochirality in the biosphere.

  11. Precise Localization and Control of Catalytic Janus Micromotors using Weak Magnetic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the precise localization of spherical Pt-Silica Janus micromotors (diameter 5 mu m) under the influence of controlled magnetic fields. First, we control the motion of the Janus micromotors in two-dimensional (2D) space. The control system achieves precise localization

  12. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on the Rate of Proliferation and Viability in HeLa Cancer Cells and Normal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The increasing use of the electromagnetic devices in daily life leads to higher electromagnetic filed effects. The effects on the organic systems are contradictory and controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different intensities and durations of the static magnetic fields on the living cells and their proliferation rate. Materials & Methods: In the applied study, two HeLa cancer cell lines and human fibroblast natural cells were studied. At first, the cells were cultured on DMEN medium. Three magnetic intensities (7, 14, and 21T and two durations (24 and 48h were used, and the cells were treated by static magnetic field. The living cell percentage and cell proliferation rate were assessed by MTT method. Trypan blue was used in staining. And an optical microscope was used in enumeration. Data was analyzed by Graphpad Prism 5 using one-way ANOVA. Findings: The higher the static magnetic field and the more the duration were, the lesser the percentage of living cells and cell proliferation, showing a significant reduction in the HeLa cancer cells, while it was insignificant in the fibroblast natural cells. The highest reduction in the living cell percentage and cell proliferation rate was in 48-hour 21T (p<0.05. Conclusion: The static magnetic field affects the HeLa cancer cells more than the fibroblast cells. The higher the field intensity and the more the duration are, the lesser the alive cell percentage and cell proliferation rate.

  13. QUASI-STATIC MODEL OF MAGNETICALLY COLLIMATED JETS AND RADIO LOBES. II. JET STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fowler, T. Kenneth [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hooper, E. Bickford [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); McClenaghan, Joseph; Lin, Zhihong [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    This is the second in a series of companion papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetically driven, and mediated helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. In the first paper, we showed self-consistently that minimizing viscous dissipation in the disk naturally leads to jets of maximum power with boundary conditions known to yield jets as a low-density, magnetically collimated tower, consistent with observational constraints of wire-like currents at distances far from the black hole. In this paper we show that these magnetic towers remain collimated as they grow in length at nonrelativistic velocities. Differences with relativistic jet models are explained by three-dimensional magnetic structures derived from a detailed examination of stability properties of the tower model, including a broad diffuse pinch with current profiles predicted by a detailed jet solution outside the collimated central column treated as an electric circuit. We justify our model in part by the derived jet dimensions in reasonable agreement with observations. Using these jet properties, we also discuss the implications for relativistic particle acceleration in nonrelativistically moving jets. The appendices justify the low jet densities yielding our results and speculate how to reconcile our nonrelativistic treatment with general relativistic MHD simulations.

  14. Low mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - I. Static migration torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Gressel, Oliver; Lyra, Wladimir

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by models suggesting that the inner planet forming regions of protoplanetary discs are predominantly lacking in viscosity-inducing turbulence, and are possibly threaded by Hall-effect generated large-scale horizontal magnetic fields, we examine the dynamics of the corotation region of a low-mass planet in such an environment. The corotation torque in an inviscid, isothermal, dead zone ought to saturate, with the libration region becoming both symmetrical and of a uniform vortensity, leading to fast inward migration driven by the Lindblad torques alone. However, in such a low viscosity situation, the material on librating streamlines essentially preserves its vortensity. If there is relative radial motion between the disc gas and the planet, the librating streamlines will no longer be symmetrical. Hence, if the gas is torqued by a large-scale magnetic field so that it undergoes a net inflow or outflow past the planet, driving evolution of the vortensity and inducing asymmetry of the corotation region, the corotation torque can grow, leading to a positive torque. In this paper, we treat this effect by applying a symmetry argument to the previously studied case of a migrating planet in an inviscid disc. Our results show that the corotation torque due to a laminar Hall-induced magnetic field in a dead zone behaves quite differently from that studied previously for a viscous disc. Furthermore, the magnetic field induced corotation torque and the dynamical corotation torque in a low viscosity disc can be regarded as one unified effect.

  15. Static Magnetic Field Effects on Impaired Peripheral Vasomotion in Conscious Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenzhi Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the SMF effects on hemodynamics in the caudal artery-ligated rat as an in vivo ischemia model using noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS combined with power spectral analysis by fast Fourier transform. Male Wistar rats in the growth stage (10 weeks old were randomly assigned into four groups: (i intact and nonoperated cage control (n=20; (ii ligated alone (n=20; (iii ligated and implanted with a nonmagnetized rod (sham magnet; n=22; and (vi ligated and implanted with a magnetized rod (n=22. After caudal artery ligation, a magnetized or unmagnetized rod (maximum magnetic flux density of 160 mT was implanted transcortically into the middle diaphysis of the fifth caudal vertebra. During the experimental period of 7 weeks, NIRS measurements were performed in 3- , 5- , and 7-week sessions and the vasomotion amplitude and frequency were analyzed by fast Fourier transform. Exposure for 3–7 weeks to the SMF significantly contracted the increased vasomotion amplitude in the ischemic area. These results suggest that SMF may have a regulatory effect on rhythmic vasomotion in the ischemic area by smoothing the vasomotion amplitude in the early stage of the wound healing process.

  16. Static Magnetic Field Effects on Impaired Peripheral Vasomotion in Conscious Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Hideyuki; Hatano, Naoya; Tomita, Naohide; Ikada, Yoshito

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the SMF effects on hemodynamics in the caudal artery-ligated rat as an in vivo ischemia model using noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with power spectral analysis by fast Fourier transform. Male Wistar rats in the growth stage (10 weeks old) were randomly assigned into four groups: (i) intact and nonoperated cage control (n = 20); (ii) ligated alone (n = 20); (iii) ligated and implanted with a nonmagnetized rod (sham magnet; n = 22); and (vi) ligated and implanted with a magnetized rod (n = 22). After caudal artery ligation, a magnetized or unmagnetized rod (maximum magnetic flux density of 160 mT) was implanted transcortically into the middle diaphysis of the fifth caudal vertebra. During the experimental period of 7 weeks, NIRS measurements were performed in 3- , 5- , and 7-week sessions and the vasomotion amplitude and frequency were analyzed by fast Fourier transform. Exposure for 3–7 weeks to the SMF significantly contracted the increased vasomotion amplitude in the ischemic area. These results suggest that SMF may have a regulatory effect on rhythmic vasomotion in the ischemic area by smoothing the vasomotion amplitude in the early stage of the wound healing process. PMID:24454512

  17. Effect of static magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of frogs; Kaeru no hentai katei ni oyobosu jiba no eikyo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiwaki, O. [Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-01-20

    The effect of static magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of frogs was investigated to examine the effect of static magnetic fields on the internal secretion system and nerve system in a living body. In this experiment, the growth and metamorphosis of a Rana Japonica`s larva are inhibited inside the vessel in which a magnet whose upper surface is the N pole was put at the bottom. However, no remarkable change was recognized when a magnet whose upper surface is the S pole was put at the bottom. For a bullfrog, the same result as described above was obtained. The experiment result shows that the vertical upward fields inhibit the growth and metamorphosis of a frog`s larva, but the vertical downward fields do not remarkably act on them. As a result of this experiment, the growth and metamorphosis of a frog are considered to act on the internal secretion system of a tadpole in static magnetic fields when the control by thyroxin is considered. Since the existence of action varies depending on the polarity of vertical magnetic fields, the magnet in a living body is judged to be associated with the internal secretion system of a tadpole. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Monitoring and modelling of white dwarfs with extremely weak magnetic fields. WD 2047+372 and WD 2359-434

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Valyavin, G.; Valeev, A. F.

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic fields are detected in a few percent of white dwarfs. The number of such magnetic white dwarfs known is now some hundreds. Fields range in strength from a few kG to several hundred MG. Almost all the known magnetic white dwarfs have a mean field modulus ≥1 MG. We are trying to fill a major gap in observational knowledge at the low field limit (≤200 kG) using circular spectro-polarimetry. In this paper we report the discovery and monitoring of strong, periodic magnetic variability in two previously discovered "super-weak field" magnetic white dwarfs, WD 2047+372 and WD 2359-434. WD 2047+372 has a mean longitudinal field that reverses between about -12 and + 15 kG, with a period of 0.243 d, while its mean field modulus appears nearly constant at 60 kG. The observations can be interpreted in terms of a dipolar field tilted with respect to the stellar rotation axis. WD 2359-434 always shows a weak positive longitudinal field with values between about 0 and + 12 kG, varying only weakly with stellar rotation, while the mean field modulus varies between about 50 and 100 kG. The rotation period is found to be 0.112 d using the variable shape of the Hα line core, consistent with available photometry. The field of this star appears to be much more complex than a dipole, and is probably not axisymmetric. Available photometry shows that WD 2359-434 is a light variable with an amplitude of only 0.005 mag; our own photometry shows that if WD 2047+372 is photometrically variable, the amplitude is below about 0.01 mag. These are the first models for magnetic white dwarfs with fields below about 100 kG based on magnetic measurements through the full stellar rotation. They reveal two very different magnetic surface configurations, and that, contrary to simple ohmic decay theory, WD 2359-434 has a much more complex surface field than the much younger WD 2047+372. Based, in part, on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the

  19. Magnetic properties of weak itinerant electron ferromagnet CrAlGe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Soshi; Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Umetsu, Rie Y.; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Koyama, Keiichi

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic properties for CrAlGe with an orthorhombic TiSi2-type structure were investigated under ambient pressure and hydrostatic pressure. CrAlGe is ferromagnetic at the temperature below Curie temperature T C of 80 K and has the spontaneous magnetic moment p s of 0.41 µ B/f.u. at 5 K and the effective moment p eff of 1.89 µ B/f.u. under ambient pressure. For the temperature T below 30 K, the decrease in p s(T) 2/p s(5K)2 was proportional to T 2. However, the decrease in p s(T) 2/p s(5K)2 was proportional to T 4/3 for 30 K high pressure of 1 GPa, T C decreased by approximately 10 K.

  20. d⩾5 magnetized static, balanced black holes with S{sup 2}×S{sup d−4} event horizon topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen, E-mail: eugen.radu@uni-oldenburg.de

    2013-06-10

    We construct static, nonextremal black hole solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell equations in d=6,7 spacetime dimensions, with an event horizon of S{sup 2}×S{sup d−4} topology. These configurations are asymptotically flat, the U(1) field being purely magnetic, with a spherical distribution of monopole charges but no net charge measured at infinity. They can be viewed as generalizations of the d=5 static dipole black ring, sharing its basic properties, in particular the presence of a conical singularity. The magnetized version of these solutions is constructed by applying a Harrison transformation, which puts them into an external magnetic field. For d=5,6,7, balanced configurations approaching asymptotically a Melvin universe background are found for a critical value of the background magnetic field.

  1. Biological effects of static magnetic fields: a selective review with emphasis on risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C. E.

    1982-04-01

    Rather than focusing on literature per se, the current study determines the status of magnetic field information that is applicable to risk assessment. Hence, an attempt is made to identify both the literature that is useful to the goal of risk assessment and a framework within which risk assessment methodologies can be derived. From this selected review, it is concluded that three areas exist for which adequate information can be found to begin modelling: disease induction, reproduction and development, and cardiovascular response. The first two are supported by a combination of positive and negative findings and the last by a calculational technique which utilizes the physically well-known principle of flow retardation for a conducting fluid moving through a magnetic field.

  2. From static to dynamic mapping of chromospheric magnetism - FIRS and SPIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Lin, Haosheng

    2014-06-01

    Advancements in theoretical forward modeling and observational techniques now allow the mapping of the chromospheric magnetic field vector in some regions. We report on full maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbra within NOAA AR 11408. These maps are derived from full Stokes observations of the He I triplet at 1083 nm, which show both Zeeman and atomic-level polarization signatures. Yet, due to the long time to acquire these observations with the slit-based Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), our measurements primarily probe long-lived chromospheric structures, albeit at very high polarization sensitivity. The fast temporal scales remain difficult to probe with conventional slit-based spectropolarimeters. Alternatively, SPIES is an instrument based on a birefringent fiber optic IFU, designed to multiplex a two-dimensional spatial field with high spectral resolution spectropolarimetry, and is an ideal tool for probing small-scale, dynamic magnetic features. We will present movies of the dynamic chromosphere acquired from SPIES across a sunspot and its fine-scaled superpenumbra.

  3. Static magnetic fields aggravate the effects of ionizing radiation on cell cycle progression in bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Amir Sabet; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Ghanati, Faezeh; Heshmati, Emran; Tavasoli, Zeinab; Jahromi, Azadeh Manoochehri

    2010-02-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of static magnetic fields (SMF) on the progression of cell cycle as a monitor of presumptive genotoxicity of these fields, the effects of a 15 mT SMF on cell cycle progression in rat bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) were examined. The cells were divided into two groups. One group encountered SMF alone for 5h continuously but the other group exposed with X ray before treatment with SMF. The population of cells did not show any significant difference in the first group but the second group that was exposed with acute radiation before encountering SMF showed a significant increase in the number of cells in G(2)/M phase. So SMF has intensified the effects of X ray, where SMF alone, did not had any detectable influence on cell cycle. These findings suggest that magnetic fields (MF) play their role by increasing the effects of genotoxic agents and because of the greater concentration of free radicals in the presence of radical pair producers, this effect is better detectable.

  4. Small amplitude ion acoustic solitons in a weakly magnetized plasma with anisotropic ion pressure and kappa distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Mahmood, S.; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-03-01

    The Zakharov-Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for nonlinear electrostatic waves in a weakly magnetized plasma in the presence of anisotropic ion pressure and superthermal electrons. The anisotropic ion pressure is defined using Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) while a generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distribution is assumed for the non-thermal electrons. The standard reductive perturbation method (RPM) is employed to derive the two dimensional ZK equation for the dynamics of obliquely propagating low frequency ion acoustic wave. The influence of spectral index (kappa) of non-thermal electron on the soliton is discussed in the presence of anisotropic ion pressure in plasmas. It is found that ion pressure anisotropy and superthermality of electrons affect both the width and amplitude of the solitary waves. On the other hand the magnetic field is found to alter the dispersive property of the plasma only, and hence the width of the solitons is affected while the amplitude of the solitary waves is independent of external magnetic field. The numerical results are also presented for illustrations.

  5. Process and device for the separation of fragments of liberated ferrous scrap from not liberated ferrous scrap fragments by means of a static magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Fraunholcz, O.N.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a process and device for the separation of fragments of liberated ferrous scrap from not liberated ferrous scrap fragments by means of a static magnet, wherein a mixture of said liberated ferrous and not liberated ferrous fragments is fed onto a continuous conveyor belt

  6. Exposure to static magnetic fields and risk of accidents among a cohort of workers from a medical imaging device manufacturing facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Suzan; Slottje, Pauline; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the association between occupational MRI-related static magnetic fields (SMF) exposure and the occurrence of accidents. METHODS: Recent and career SMF exposure was assessed by linking a retrospective job exposure matrix to payroll based job histories, for a cohort of (former)

  7. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5-7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269224742; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their

  8. Structural, optical and weak magnetic properties of Co and Mn codoped TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Kashyap, Manish K.; Sabharwal, Namita; Kumar, Sarvesh; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Parmod; Asokan, K.

    2017-11-01

    The present investigation focuses on the structural properties and magnetic response of Co, Mn and Co-Mn doped TiO2 nanoparticles (within 3% dilute doping) along with their optical and electrical studies. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns for all these samples show the formation of tetragonal TiO2 anatase phase with no extra impurity phases. Further, Raman bands at 143 cm-1, 396 cm-1, 516 cm-1 and 639 cm-1 also confirm the anatase phase in these samples. Diamagnetic response has been observed in pure TiO2 nanoparticles. However, room temperature (RT) ferromagnetism has been observed with Co and/or Mn doping which gets enhanced further with codoping of Co ions. The observed ferromagnetism has been attributed to the formation of shallow levels with doping/codoping. The Co and/or Mn-doped TiO2 nanoparticles are referred as diluted magnetic semiconductors due to their combined semiconducting and ferromagnetic response. UV-Vis spectra show the band gap of these samples are in the range of 3.03 eV-3.24 eV and a reduction in band gap is observed after codoping. The temperature dependent electrical conductivity measurements also show an enhancement in conductivity after codoping at RT.

  9. Weakly populated multinucleon transfer channels studied with a new time-of-flight magnetic spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A.M.; He, J.H.; Lin, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Via Romea 4, I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Padova, and INFN (Italy); Pollarolo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita' di Torino, and INFN (Italy); Dasso, C.H.; Winther, A. The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17,2100 Copenhagen Oe. (DK))

    1997-10-01

    A new time-of-flight spectrometer with magnetic quadrupoles has been developed. Its high detection efficiency and resolution allows one to identify ions produced with low cross sections in a binary reaction. The study of multinucleon transfer channels in the system {sup 48}Ca+{sup 124}Sn revealed a large drift of the experimental total cross sections with respect to calculations which include independent single nucleon transfer modes. Incorporating pair and {alpha}-cluster channels into theory accounts, at least qualitatively, for the discrepancies. New data coming from the study of {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U show the striking presence of -1{alpha}, -2{alpha} and -3{alpha} channels, supporting once more the idea that cluster degrees of freedom must be considered in a correct description of the reaction mechanism. (author)

  10. The influence of static magnetic fields on canine and equine mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marędziak, Monika; Marycz, Krzysztof; Smieszek, Agnieszka; Lewandowski, Daniel; Toker, Nezir Yaşar

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the proliferation rate and morphological changes of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells of canine and equine origin (Eq- and CaAdMSC). Investigated cells were exposed to a static magnetic field (MF) with the intensity of 0.5 T. Proliferation activity of cells was determined with the Alamar Blue assay. Obtained results, normalized in respect to the control culture, showed that EqAdMSC exposed to MF maintained a high proliferation status, whereas proliferation activity of CaAdMSC cultured in the presence of MF was decreased. Estimations of population doubling time (PDT) also revealed that EqAdMSCs exposed to static MF achieved a twofold increase in the total number of cells in a shorter amount of time than the control culture. The PDT value obtained for investigated CaAdMSCs indicated that MF exposure resulted in the prolongation of population doubling time. Morphology of cells and cellular composition was investigated using a light inverted microscope and a fluorescent microscope. A scanning electron microscope was used for microvesicles (MVs) imaging. Obtained results showed that both cell types maintained fibroblastic morphology and did not reveal signs of apoptosis or necrosis. However, the MF had an influence on the MVs secretion. While EqAdMSCs propagated in the presence of MF were characterized by the abundant MVs presence, CaAdMSCs revealed poor secretory activity. The approach presented provides complex analysis, which enables one to determine changes in equine and canine cytophysiology.

  11. Application of upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads with weak background noise and facile separation in ochratoxin A detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Zhenyu, E-mail: liaozy08@163.com [Tianjin Product Quality Inspection Technology Research Institute, The National Center of Supervision and Inspection for Quality of Food (China); Zhang, Ying [Tianjin University, School of Life Sciences, Tianjin Engineering Center of Micro-Nano Biomaterials and Detection-Treatment Technology (China); Su, Lin [Tianjin Medical University Eye Hospital, Eye Institute and School of Optometry and Ophthalmology (China); Chang, Jin; Wang, Hanjie, E-mail: wanghj@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, School of Life Sciences, Tianjin Engineering Center of Micro-Nano Biomaterials and Detection-Treatment Technology (China)

    2017-02-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), the most harmful and abundant ochratoxin, is chemically stable and commonly existed in foodstuffs. In this work, upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads (UCLMMs) -based cytometric bead array for OTA detection with a less reagent consumption and high sensitivity has been established and optimized. In UCLMMs, upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) for optical code present a weak background noise and no spectral cross talk between the encoding signals and target labels under two excitation conditions to improve detection sensitivity. While the superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs) aim for rapid analysis. The results show that the developed method has a sensitivity of 9.553 ppt below HPLC with a 50-μL sample and can be completed in <2 h with good accuracy and high reproducibility. Therefore, different colors of UCLMMs will become a promising assay platform for multiple mycotoxins after further improvement.

  12. Application of upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads with weak background noise and facile separation in ochratoxin A detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ying; Su, Lin; Chang, Jin; Wang, Hanjie

    2017-02-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), the most harmful and abundant ochratoxin, is chemically stable and commonly existed in foodstuffs. In this work, upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads (UCLMMs) -based cytometric bead array for OTA detection with a less reagent consumption and high sensitivity has been established and optimized. In UCLMMs, upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) for optical code present a weak background noise and no spectral cross talk between the encoding signals and target labels under two excitation conditions to improve detection sensitivity. While the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) aim for rapid analysis. The results show that the developed method has a sensitivity of 9.553 ppt below HPLC with a 50-μL sample and can be completed in colors of UCLMMs will become a promising assay platform for multiple mycotoxins after further improvement.

  13. Precise Localization and Control of Catalytic Janus Micromotors Using Weak Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam S. M. Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally demonstrate the precise localization of spherical Pt-Silica Janus micromotors (diameter 5 μm under the influence of controlled magnetic fields. First, we control the motion of the Janus micromotors in two-dimensional (2D space. The control system achieves precise localization within an average region-of-convergence of 7 μm. Second, we show that these micromotors provide sufficient propulsion force, allowing them to overcome drag and gravitational forces and move both downwards and upwards. This propulsion is studied by moving the micromotors in three-dimensional (3D space. The micromotors move downwards and upwards at average speeds of 19.1 μm/s and 9.8 μm/s, respectively. Moreover, our closed-loop control system achieves localization in 3D space within an average region-of-convergence of 6.3 μm in diameter. The precise motion control and localization of the Janus micromotors in 2D and 3D spaces provides broad possibilities for nanotechnology applications.

  14. Electrostatic and magnetic instabilities in the transition layer of a collisionless weakly relativistic pair shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Bret, A.

    2018-01-01

    Energetic electromagnetic emissions by astrophysical jets like those that are launched during the collapse of a massive star and trigger gamma-ray bursts are partially attributed to relativistic internal shocks. The shocks are mediated in the collisionless plasma of such jets by the filamentation instability of counterstreaming particle beams. The filamentation instability grows fastest only if the beams move at a relativistic relative speed. We model here with a particle-in-cell simulation, the collision of two cold pair clouds at the speed c/2 (c: speed of light). We demonstrate that the two-stream instability outgrows the filamentation instability for this speed and is thus responsible for the shock formation. The incomplete thermalization of the upstream plasma by its quasi-electrostatic waves allows other instabilities to grow. A shock transition layer forms, in which a filamentation instability modulates the plasma far upstream of the shock. The inflowing upstream plasma is progressively heated by a two-stream instability closer to the shock and compressed to the expected downstream density by the Weibel instability. The strong magnetic field due to the latter is confined to a layer 10 electron skin depths wide.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF CO-FE MAGNETIC FILMS FABRICATED BY GALVANO-STATIC ELECTRODEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ghaferi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, nanocrystalline Co-Fe coatings were electrodeposited on copper substrate. The influence of current density on different properties of the films at two pH levels was investigated. All the coatings showed nodular structure with rougher morphology at higher current densities. Due to anomalous deposition at higher current density, the amount of iron content increased and reached its maximum value at about 50 wt.% for the coating obtained from pH 5. X-ray diffraction patterns showed hcp structure as the dominant phase. However, by increasing current density at lower pH value, a double phase structure containing fcc+hcp phases was detected. It was observed that current density has a positive effect on grain refinement. However, coarser grains would obtain at lower pH value. Microhardness measurements showed that, there is a direct relationship between grain size and microhardness. Moreover, microstructure in double phase structure films can influence microhardness more dominantly. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM measurements indicated that the saturation magnetic is proportion to deposited iron content and reached its maximum value at about 1512 emu/cm3. It was cleared that grain size, phase structure and chemical composition can affect coercivity of the films effectively.

  16. Decay of isotropic flow and anisotropic flow with rotation or magnetic field or both in a weakly nonlinear regime

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2016-01-01

    We investigate numerically the decay of isotropic, rotating, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), and rotating MHD flows in a periodic box. The Reynolds number $Re$ defined with the box size and the initial velocity is $100$ at which the flows are in a weakly nonlinear regime, i.e. not laminar but far away from the fully turbulent state. The decay of isotropic flow has two stages, the first stage for the development of small scales and the second stage for the viscous dissipation. In the rapidly rotating flow, fast rotation induces the inertial wave and causes the large-scale structure to inhibit the development of the first stage and retard the flow decay. In the MHD flow, the imposed field also causes the large-scale structure but facilitates the flow decay in the first stage because of the energy conversion from flow to magnetic field. Magnetic Reynolds number $Rm$ is important for the dynamics of the MHD flow, namely a high $Rm$ induces the Alfv\\'en wave but a low $Rm$ cannot. In the rotating MHD flow, slower rotat...

  17. Static magnetic field (SMF) sensing of the P(723)/P(689) photosynthetic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Chakraborty, Madhurima; Raja, Sufi O; Ghosh, Avijit; Dasgupta, Maitrayee; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-12-01

    Moderate intensity SMF have been shown to act as a controller of the protic potential in the coherent milieu of the thylakoid membranes. SMF of the order of 60-500 mT induces memory-like effect in photosystem I (PSI, P723) emission with a correlated oscillation of photosystem II (PSII, P689) fluorescence emission at a temperature of 77 K. The observed magnetic perturbation that affects the thylakoid photon capture circuitry was also found to be associated with the bio-energetic machinery of the thylakoid membranes. At normal pH, SMF causes an enhancement of PSI fluorescence emission intensity (P723/P689 > 1), followed by a slow relaxation on the removal of SMF. The enhancement of the PSI fluorescence intensity also occurs under no-field condition, if either the pH of the medium is lowered, or protonophores, such as carbonyl cyanide chlorophenylhydrazine or nigericin are added (P723/P689≥ 2). If SMF was applied under such a low pH condition or in the presence of protonophore, a reverse effect, particularly, a reduction of the enhanced PSI emission was observed. Because SMF is essentially equivalent to a spin perturbation, the observed effects can be explained in terms of spin re-organization, illustrating a memory effect via membrane re-alignment and assembly. The mimicry of conventional uncouplers by SMF is also notable; the essential difference being the reversibility and manoeuvrability of the latter (SMF). Finally, the effect implies numerous possibilities of externally regulating the photon capture and proton circulation in the thylakoid membranes using controlled SMF.

  18. A flexible automatically adaptive surface nuclear magnetic resonance modelling and inversion framework incorporating complex data and static dephasing dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Trevor P.

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) is the only geophysical technique that can directly and non-invasively detect the presence of subsurface liquid water. The method has established itself as valuable tool for hydrologists and groundwater managers owing to the fact that both porosity and hydraulic conductivity estimates can be made using this technique. Although sNMR has enormous potential, there are many challenges with the technique which hinder it's more widespread adoption. For these reasons sNMR has primarily been used as a 1D groundwater sounding tool, although there exist myriad other applications for a method directly sensitive to liquid water. Simultaneously inverting the entire complex dataset as well as the employment of arrays of separated transmitter and receiver coils and integration with other geophysical methods can help to overcome these limitations. This requires modelling algorithms that can accommodate a widely varying set of survey configurations and scenarios. I present the innovative use of sNMR applied to two geotechnical problems: volcanic landslide hazard characterization on Mt. Baker, Washington and the monitoring of internal erosion in earthen embankments. These applications necessitated the development of a general modelling framework capable of handling arbitrary positioned transmitter and receiver coils as well as 3D water distribution. The advantages of comprehensive (whole dataset) inversion of the entire sNMR record have been established for time-domain inversions. However, these inversions are memory intensive and struggle to fit the phase portion of the dataset-necessitating the regretful dismissal of this valuable information. I instead consider the sNMR inversion problem in the frequency-domain for the first time. There are several benefits: effectively lossless compression, and the ability to easily incorporate and solve for static dephasing dynamics caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities. This has allowed for the

  19. Non-thermal radio frequency and static magnetic fields increase rate of hemoglobin deoxygenation in a cell-free preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Muehsam

    Full Text Available The growing body of clinical and experimental data regarding electromagnetic field (EMF bioeffects and their therapeutic applications has contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action. This study reports that two EMF modalities currently in clinical use, a pulse-modulated radiofrequency (PRF signal, and a static magnetic field (SMF, applied independently, increased the rate of deoxygenation of human hemoglobin (Hb in a cell-free assay. Deoxygenation of Hb was initiated using the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT in an assay that allowed the time for deoxygenation to be controlled (from several min to several hours by adjusting the relative concentrations of DTT and Hb. The time course of Hb deoxygenation was observed using visible light spectroscopy. Exposure for 10-30 min to either PRF or SMF increased the rate of deoxygenation occurring several min to several hours after the end of EMF exposure. The sensitivity and biochemical simplicity of the assay developed here suggest a new research tool that may help to further the understanding of basic biophysical EMF transduction mechanisms. If the results of this study were to be shown to occur at the cellular and tissue level, EMF-enhanced oxygen availability would be one of the mechanisms by which clinically relevant EMF-mediated enhancement of growth and repair processes could occur.

  20. Magnetoresistance of thin films due to weak localization under the variation of the dimensionality induced by the magnetic field and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reukova, O. V.; Kytin, V. G.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Burova, L. I.; Kaul, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    The magnetoresistance due to the weak localization of electrons for films with thickness comparable with the electron diffusion length during the phase relaxation time of the electron wavefunction or with the magnetic length has been analyzed theoretically and studied experimentally. The expression for the magnetoresistance of thin films at the arbitrary relation between the film thickness and the electron diffusion length during the phase relaxation time of the electron wavefunction has been derived. It has been shown that the derived expression describes well the magnetoresistance of gallium-doped zinc oxide films under conditions of the variation of their effective dimension with respect to weak localization induced by the magnetic field and temperature.

  1. Static magnets: what are they and what do they do? Magnetos estáticos: o que são e para que servem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Laakso

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Therapeutic static magnets have gained wide community acceptance for neuromusculoskeletal pain relief in many countries yet, apart from strong anecdotal reports of benefit, there is a paucity of scientific evidence for their use. OBJECTIVES: In this review we describe the physical characteristics of traditional and commonplace unipolar and bipolar static magnets as well as newer quadripolar magnetic arrays; discuss what is known of the physiological effects of static magnets and the strength of the literature; and make suggestions for targeted future research for static magnets in the management of neuromusculoskeletal pain conditions.INTRODUÇÃO: A magnetoterapia estática conquistou ampla aceitação da comunidade para alívio da dor neuromusculoesquelética em diversos países. No entanto, com exceção de relatórios anedóticos de seus benefícios, há uma grande escassez de evidências científicas para seu uso. OBJETIVOS: Nesta revisão, descrevemos as características físicas dos tradicionais magnetos estáticos unipolares e bipolares comuns, assim como os mais recentes conjuntos magnéticos quadripolares; discutimos o que se conhece sobre os efeitos fisiológicos da magnetoterapia estática e o suporte da literatura; e fazemos sugestões para futuras pesquisas direcionadas à magnetoterapia estática no controle de condições de dor neuromusculoesquelética.

  2. Behavior of Particle Depots in Molten Silicon During Float-Zone Growth in Strong Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauss, T.; SorgenFrei, T.; Croell, A.; Azizi, M.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.; Volz, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the photovoltaics industry, the largest market share is represented by solar cells made from multicrystalline silicon, which is grown by directional solidification. During the growth process, the silicon melt is in contact with the silicon nitride coated crucible walls and the furnace atmosphere which contains carbon monoxide. The dissolution of the crucible coating, the carbon bearing gas, and the carbon already present in the feedstock, lead to the precipitation of silicon carbide, and silicon nitride, at later stages of the growth process. The precipitation of Si3N4 and SiC particles of up to several hundred micrometers in diameter leads to severe problems during the wire sawing process for wafering the ingots. Furthermore the growth of the silicon grains can be negatively influenced by the presence of particles, which act as nucleation sources and lead to a grit structure of small grains and are sources for dislocations. If doped with Nitrogen from the dissolved crucible coating, SiC is a semi conductive material, and can act as a shunt, short circuiting parts of the solar cell. For these reasons, the incorporation of such particles needs to be avoided. In this contribution we performed model experiments in which the transport of intentionally added SiC particles and their interaction with the solid-liquid interface during float zone growth of silicon in strong steady magnetic fields was investigated. SiC particles of 7µm and 60µm size are placed in single crystal silicon [100] and [111] rods of 8mm diameter. This is achieved by drilling a hole of 2mm diameter, filling in the particles and closing the hole by melting the surface of the rod until a film of silicon covers the hole. The samples are processed under a vacuum of 1x10(exp -5) mbar or better, to prevent gas inclusions. An oxide layer to suppress Marangoni convection is applied by wet oxidation. Experiments without and with static magnetic field are carried out to investigate the influence of melt

  3. Feedback first: the surprisingly weak effects of magnetic fields, viscosity, conduction and metal diffusion on sub-L* galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kung-Yi; Hopkins, Philip F.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan; Ma, Xiangcheng; Robles, Victor H.

    2017-10-01

    Using high-resolution simulations with explicit treatment of stellar feedback physics based on the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project, we study how galaxy formation and the interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by magnetic fields, anisotropic Spitzer-Braginskii conduction and viscosity, and sub-grid metal diffusion from unresolved turbulence. We consider controlled simulations of isolated (non-cosmological) galaxies but also a limited set of cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. Although simulations have shown significant effects from these physics with weak or absent stellar feedback, the effects are much weaker than those of stellar feedback when the latter is modelled explicitly. The additional physics have no systematic effect on galactic star formation rates (SFRs). In contrast, removing stellar feedback leads to SFRs being overpredicted by factors of ∼10-100. Without feedback, neither galactic winds nor volume-filling hot-phase gas exist, and discs tend to runaway collapse to ultra-thin scaleheights with unphysically dense clumps congregating at the galactic centre. With stellar feedback, a multi-phase, turbulent medium with galactic fountains and winds is established. At currently achievable resolutions and for the investigated halo mass range 1010-1013 M⊙, the additional physics investigated here (magnetohydrodynamic, conduction, viscosity, metal diffusion) have only weak (∼10 per cent-level) effects on regulating SFR and altering the balance of phases, outflows or the energy in ISM turbulence, consistent with simple equipartition arguments. We conclude that galactic star formation and the ISM are primarily governed by a combination of turbulence, gravitational instabilities and feedback. We add the caveat that active galactic nucleus feedback is not included in the present work.

  4. Pain-inhibiting inhomogeneous static magnetic field fails to influence locomotor activity and anxiety behavior in mice: no interference between magnetic field- and morphine-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, János; Tímár, Júlia; Gyarmati, Zsuzsanna; Fürst, Zsuzsanna; Gyires, Klára

    2009-06-30

    We wanted to demonstrate (i) in the writhing test in mice, whether there was a prolonged analgesic effect induced by an inhomogeneous static magnetic field (SMF) exposure; (ii) whether SMF had an effect on the analgesic effect induced by 0.5mg/kgs.c. administered morphine, on the behavioral patterns, and on the hyperlocomotion-inducing effect of morphine. A magnetic exposure system developed by the present authors was used with peak-to-peak flux densities in the 2-754mT range. The writhing test was used for the assessment of pain. An elevated plus maze and a Conducta System was used for studying the anxiogenic or anxyolitic effect in mice, and the locomotor activity, respectively. We looked for the difference in the number of writhings and in the behavioral patterns between treated (s.c. morphine and/or SMF exposure) and control animals, respectively. (i) The antinociceptive effect could be identified 10-30min following SMF exposition in the writhing test in mice. (ii) SMF failed to affect the morphine-induced antinociception, the behavioral patterns in either type of tests, and the hyperlocomotion-inducing effect of morphine. (i) The long-lasting antinociceptive effect of SMF allows experiments under conditions, when in situ application of the SMF-producing device would be technically difficult or impossible; or where it would disturb the experiments. (ii) The results of behavioral tests with freely moving mice in or in the vicinity of inhomogeneous SMFs are not affected by the SMF in the applied flux density range. (iii) Morphine in treated subjects is not interacting with the inhomogeneous SMFs in the applied flux density range.

  5. Possible weakly first-order superconducting transition induced by magnetic excitations in the YBCO system: A fluctuation conductivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hneda, Marlon Luiz; da Silva Berchon, Luciano; Pureur, Paulo; das Neves Vieira, Valdemar; Jaeckel, Sandra Teixeira; Dias, Fábio Teixeira; Menegotto Costa, Rosângela

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuation conductivity is experimentally studied in the genuine critical region near the superconducting transition of YBa2Cu3O7 - δ, YBa2Cu2.985Fe0.015O7 - δ and Y0.95Ca0.05Ba2Cu3O7 - δ single crystal samples. Two fluctuation regimes where the electrical conductivity diverges as a power-law of the reduced temperature were systematically observed. In the first regime, farther from the critical temperature Tc, the transition behaves as predicted by the thermodynamics of the three dimensional-XY (3D-XY) universality class characteristic of a second-order phase transition. In the asymptotic regime closer to Tc a power-law regime characterized by a much smaller exponent is observed. The smallest value ever reported for the fluctuation conductivity exponent in the high-Tc superconductors is obtained for the Fe- and Ca-doped systems. We suggest that the regime beyond 3D-XY is a crossover towards a weakly first-order transition induced by internal magnetic excitations.

  6. The effect of a static magnetic field on the morphometric characteristics of neurosecretory neurons and corpora allata in the pupae of yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor (Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric-Mataruga, Vesna; Prolic, Zlatko; Nenadovic, Vera; Vlahovic, Milena; Mrdakovic, Marija

    2008-02-01

    The morphometric characteristics of A1 and A2 protocerebral neurosecretory neurons (cell and nuclei size, number of nucleoli in the nuclei); corpora allata size, nuclei size, cell number, were investigated in the pupae of yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor (L.), exposed to a strong static magnetic field of 320 mT maximum induction (10,000 times higher than the Earth's). The experimental groups of Tenebrio molitor pupae were: A control group exposed only to natural magnetic field and sacrificed at the eighth day of pupal development (C); and pupae kept in a strong static magnetic field for eight days and then sacrificed (MF). Serial brain cross-sections were stained using the Alcian Blue Floxin technique. All the parameters were analyzed and measurements were performed using an image processing and analysis system (Leica, Cambridge, UK) linked to a Leica DMLB light microscope (program is QWin - Leica's Quantimet Windows-based image analysis tool kit). The values of morphometric parameters of neurosecretory neurons and corpora allata were significantly increased after exposure of the pupae to the strong magnetic field. The strong magnetic field influence characteristics of protocerebral neurosecretory neurons and corpora allata in the late Tenebrio molitor pupae.

  7. Polar-core spin vortex of quasi-2D ferromagnetic spin-1 condensate in a flat-bottomed optical trap with a weak magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gong-Ping; Li, Pin; Li, Ting; Xue, Ya-Jie

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by the recent experiments realized in a flat-bottomed optical trap (Navon et al., 2015; Chomaz et al., 2015), we study the ground state of polar-core spin vortex of quasi-2D ferromagnetic spin-1 condensate in a finite-size homogeneous trap with a weak magnetic field. The exact spatial distribution of local spin is obtained with a variational method. Unlike the fully-magnetized planar spin texture with a zero-spin core, which was schematically demonstrated in previous studies for the ideal polar-core spin vortex in a homogeneous trap with infinitely large boundary, some plateaus and two-cores structure emerge in the distribution curves of spin magnitude in the polar-core spin vortex we obtained for the larger effective spin-dependent interaction. More importantly, the spin values of the plateaus are not 1 as expected in the fully-magnetized spin texture, except for the sufficiently large spin-dependent interaction and the weak-magnetic-field limit. We attribute the decrease of spin value to the effect of finite size of the system. The spin values of the plateaus can be controlled by the quadratic Zeeman energy q of the weak magnetic field, which decreases with the increase of q.

  8. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5–7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their association with static magnetic field exposure. Methods We performed an observational study among 361 employees of 14 clinical and research MRI facilities in The Netherlands. Each participant completed a diary during one or more work shifts inside and/or outside the MRI facility, reporting work activities and symptoms (from a list of potentially MRI-related symptoms, complemented with unrelated symptoms) experienced during a working day. We analysed 633 diaries. Exposure categories were defined by strength and type of MRI scanner, using non-MRI shifts as the reference category for statistical analysis. Non-MRI shifts originated from MRI staff who also participated on MRI days, as well as CT radiographers who never worked with MRI. Results Varying per exposure category, symptoms were reported during 16–39% of the MRI work shifts. We observed a positive association between scanner strength and reported symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with closed-bore MRI scanners of 1.5 Tesla (T) and higher (1.5 T OR=1.88; 3.0 T OR=2.14; 7.0 T OR=4.17). This finding was mainly driven by reporting of vertigo and metallic taste. Conclusions The results suggest an exposure-response association between exposure to strong static magnetic fields (and associated motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields) and reporting of transient symptoms on the same day of exposure. Trial registration number 11-032/C PMID:24714654

  9. Osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells on poly(L-lactide)/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofibers with static magnetic field exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi, Yuzhou; Shan, Dingying; Jia, Wenkai; Duan, Shun [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Deng, Xuliang [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Yang, Xiaoping, E-mail: yangxp@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of bone-related cells are modulated by many factors such as scaffold design, growth factor, dynamic culture system, and physical simulation. Nanofibrous structure and moderate-intensity (1 mT–1 T) static magnetic field (SMF) have been identified as capable of stimulating proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Herein, magnetic nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning mixture solutions of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers demonstrated homogeneous dispersion of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs, and their magnetism depended on the contents of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. SMF of 100 mT was applied in the culture of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts on pure PLLA and PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers for the purpose of studying the effect of SMF on osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells on magnetic nanofibrous scaffolds. On non-magnetic PLLA nanofibers, the application of external SMF could enhance the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. In comparison with pure PLLA nanofibers, the incorporation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs could also promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in the absence or presence of external SMF. The marriage of magnetic nanofibers and external SMF was found most effective in accelerating every aspect of biological behaviors of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The findings demonstrated that the magnetic feature of substrate and microenvironment were applicable ways in regulating osteogenesis in bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanofibers containing well-dispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were produced. • Static magnetic field (SMF) was applied to perform the culture of osteoblasts. • Osteogenic differentiation was enhanced on magnetic substrate with exposure to SMF.

  10. Analytical solution for static and dynamic analysis of magnetically affected viscoelastic orthotropic double-layered graphene sheets resting on viscoelastic foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaei, M. H.; Arani, A. Ghorbanpour

    2018-02-01

    By considering the small scale effect based on the nonlocal Eringen's theory, the static and dynamic analysis of viscoelastic orthotropic double-layered graphene sheets subjected to longitudinal magnetic field and mechanical load is investigated analytically. For this objective, first order shear deformation theory (FSDT) is proposed. The surrounding medium is simulated by visco-Pasternak foundation model in which damping, normal and transverse shear loads are taken into account. The governing equations of motion are obtained via energy method and Hamilton's principle which are then solved analytically by means of Navier's approach and Laplace inversion technique in the space and time domains, respectively. Through various parametric studies, the influences of the nonlocal parameter, structural damping, van der Waals (vdW) interaction, stiffness and damping coefficient of the foundation, magnetic parameter, aspect ratio and length to thickness ratio on the static and dynamic response of the nanoplates are examined. The results depict that when the vdW interaction is considered to be zero, the upper layer deflection reaches a maximum point whereas the lower layer deflection becomes zero. In addition, it is observed that with growing the vdW interaction, the effect of magnetic field on the deflection of the lower layer increases while this effect reduces for the upper layer deflection.

  11. On the texture, phase and tensile properties of commercially pure Ti produced via selective laser melting assisted by static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nan; Yuan, Hao; Coddet, Pierre; Ren, Zhongming; Bernage, Charles; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Tensile strength and ductility of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) processed commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti) were simultaneous enhanced by preforming the melting/solidification processes under Static Magnetic Field (SMF). The effects of SMF on microstructure and tensile properties were examined. The SMF-SLMed CP-Ti sample presents a microstructure of fine acicular martensitic α'-Ti and lath-shaped α-Ti. Meanwhile, the texture structure of SLMed CP-Ti was eliminated after adding a SMF. The SMF-SLM process offers new avenues to ameliorate the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of SLMed sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic field structure in single late-type giants: The weak G-band giant 37 Comae from 2008 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, S.; Petit, P.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Aurière, M.; Wade, G. A.; Palacios, A.; Charbonnel, C.; Drake, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: This work studies the magnetic activity of the late-type giant 37 Com. This star belongs to the group of weak G-band stars that present very strong carbon deficiency in their photospheres. The paper is a part of a global investigation into the properties and origin of magnetic fields in cool giants. Methods: We use spectropolarimetric data, which allows the simultaneous measurement of the longitudinal magnetic field Bl, line activity indicators (Hα, Ca II IRT, S-index) and radial velocity of the star, and consequently perform a direct comparison of their time variability. Mean Stokes V profiles are extracted using the least squares deconvolution (LSD) method. One map of the surface magnetic field of the star is reconstructed via the Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) inversion technique. Results: A periodogram analysis is performed on our dataset and it reveals a rotation period of 111 days. We interpret this period to be the rotation period of 37 Com. The reconstructed magnetic map reveals that the structure of the surface magnetic field is complex and features a significant toroidal component. The time variability of the line activity indicators, radial velocity and magnetic field Bl indicates a possible evolution of the surface magnetic structures in the period from 2008 to 2011. For completeness of our study, we use customized stellar evolutionary models suited to a weak G-band star. Synthetic spectra are also calculated to confirm the peculiar abundance of 37 Com. Conclusions: We deduce that 37 Com is a 6.5 M⊙ weak G-band star located in the Hertzsprung gap, whose magnetic activity is probably due to dynamo action. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL, Pic du Midi, France) of the Midi-Pyrénées Observatory which is operated by the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and Université de Toulouse, and at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is

  13. Synovitis assessed on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and its association with pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Robert Gabriel Coumine; Gudbergsen, Henrik; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury and osteoarthr...

  14. Exposure to a MRI-type high-strength static magnetic field stimulates megakaryocytic/erythroid hematopoiesis in CD34+ cells from human placental and umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzen, Satoru; Takahashi, Kenji; Toki, Tsutomu; Ito, Etsuro; Sakurai, Tomonori; Miyakoshi, Junji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-05-01

    The biological response after exposure to a high-strength static magnetic field (SMF) has recently been widely discussed from the perspective of possible health benefits as well as potential adverse effects. To clarify this issue, CD34+ cells from human placental and umbilical cord blood were exposed under conditions of high-strength SMF in vitro. The high-strength SMF exposure system was comprised of a magnetic field generator with a helium-free superconducting magnet with built-in CO2 incubator. Freshly prepared CD34 cells were exposed to a 5 tesla (T) SMF with the strongest magnetic field gradient (41.7 T/m) or a 10 T SMF without magnetic field gradient for 4 or 16 h. In the harvested cells after exposure to 10 T SMF for 16 h, a significant increase of hematopoietic progenitors in the total burst-forming unit erythroid- and megakaryocytic progenitor cells-derived colony formation was observed, thus producing 1.72- and 1.77-fold higher than the control, respectively. Furthermore, early hematopoiesis-related and cell cycle-related genes were found to be significantly up-regulated by exposure to SMF. These results suggest that the 10 T SMF exposure may change gene expressions and result in the specific enhancement of megakaryocytic/erythroid progenitor (MEP) differentiation from pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells and/or the proliferation of bipotent MEP. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Effect of external static magnetic field on the emittance and total charge of electron beams generated by laser-Wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Zhidkov, Alexei; Maekawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2006-08-18

    Significant enhancement of emittance and an increase of the total charge of femtosecond electron beams produced by a 12 TW, 40 fs laser pulse, tightly focused in a He gas jet, are observed after applying a static magnetic field, B> or =0.2 T, directed along the axis of laser pulse propagation. The effect appears when plasma produced by a laser prepulse becomes magnetized in the vicinity of the focus point: the electron Larmor frequency exceeds the collisional frequency, while periphery of the plasma remains unmagnetized. The entailed change in the shape of the plasma suppresses the diffraction of the main laser pulse that results in a much higher charge of electrons self-injected during the longitudinal wave breaking of the laser wake as well as the excellent stability of the beams.

  16. Static Analysis Using Abstract Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthaud, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    Short presentation about static analysis and most particularly abstract interpretation. It starts with a brief explanation on why static analysis is used at NASA. Then, it describes the IKOS (Inference Kernel for Open Static Analyzers) tool chain. Results on NASA projects are shown. Several well known algorithms from the static analysis literature are then explained (such as pointer analyses, memory analyses, weak relational abstract domains, function summarization, etc.). It ends with interesting problems we encountered (such as C++ analysis with exception handling, or the detection of integer overflow).

  17. Strong static magnetic fields of NMR: Do they affect tissue perfusion. Beeinflussen starke statische Magnetfelder in der NMR-Tomographie die Gewebedurchblutung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stick, C.; Hinkelmann, K. (Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physiologie und Medizinische Klimatologie); Eggert, P. (Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Allgemeine Paediatrie); Wendhausen, H. (Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Radiologie)

    1991-03-01

    Findings obtained in humans and test animals raised the question whether strong static magnetic fields as used in NMR-tomography may affect tissue perfusion. In two test series including 20 subjects, each skin blood flow at the thumb was determined by heat clearance, and forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. For comparative purposes, measurements were carried out bilaterally at both extremities. The experiments consisted of three sections that lasted 10 min each. During the second section the thumb or the forearm were unilaterally exposed to magnetic fields of 0,9 to 1 T and 0.4 to 0.5 T, respectively. The results of this section were compared with the values obtained during the experimental sections prior to and after the exposure to the magnetic field. The results were also compared with the blood flow measured at the contralateral extremity. Neither at the skin of the thumb nor at the forearm were there changes in local blood flow attributable to the magnetic fields applied. (orig.).

  18. Recovery Effects of a 180 mT Static Magnetic Field on Bone Mineral Density of Osteoporotic Lumbar Vertebrae in Ovariectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenzhi Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a moderate-intensity static magnetic field (SMF on osteoporosis of the lumbar vertebrae were studied in ovariectomized rats. A small disc magnet (maximum magnetic flux density 180 mT was implanted to the right side of spinous process of the third lumbar vertebra. Female rats in the growth stage (10 weeks old were randomly divided into 4 groups: (i ovariectomized and implanted with a disc magnet (SMF; (ii ovariectomized and implanted with a nonmagnetized disc (sham; (iii ovariectomized alone (OVX and (vi intact, nonoperated cage control (CTL. The blood serum 17--estradiol (E2 concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay, and the bone mineral density (BMD values of the femurs and the lumbar vertebrae were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The E2 concentrations were statistically significantly lower for all three operated groups than those of the CTL group at the 6th week. Although there was no statistical significant difference in the E2 concentrations between the SMF-exposed and sham-exposed groups, the BMD values of the lumbar vertebrae proximal to the SMF-exposed area statistically significantly increased in the SMF-exposed group than in the sham-exposed group. These results suggest that the SMF increased the BMD values of osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae in the ovariectomized rats.

  19. Moderate strength (0.23–0.28 T static magnetic fields (SMF modulate signaling and differentiation in human embryonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Pao-Lin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compelling evidence exists that magnetic fields modulate living systems. To date, however, rigorous studies have focused on identifying the molecular-level biosensor (e.g., radical ion pairs or membranes or on the behavior of whole animals leaving a gap in understanding how molecular effects are translated into tissue-wide and organism-level responses. This study begins to bridge this gulf by investigating static magnetic fields (SMF through global mRNA profiling in human embryonic cells coupled with software analysis to identify the affected signaling pathways. Results Software analysis of gene expression in cells exposed to 0.23–0.28 T SMF showed that nine signaling networks responded to SMF; of these, detailed biochemical validation was performed for the network linked to the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. We found the short-term ( Conclusion This study provides a framework describing how magnetic exposure is transduced from a plausible molecular biosensor (lipid membranes to cell-level responses that include differentiation toward neural lineages. In addition, SMF provided a stimulus that uncovered new relationships – that exist even in the absence of magnetic fields – between gangliosides, the time-dependent regulation of IL-6 signaling by these glycosphingolipids, and the fate of embryonic cells.

  20. Thin yttrium iron garnet films grown by pulsed laser deposition: Crystal structure, static, and dynamic magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, N. S., E-mail: nsokolov@fl.ioffe.ru; Fedorov, V. V.; Korovin, A. M.; Suturin, S. M.; Baranov, D. A.; Gastev, S. V.; Krichevtsov, B. B.; Bursian, V. E.; Lutsev, L. V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Maksimova, K. Yu.; Grunin, A. I. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad 236041 (Russian Federation); Tabuchi, M. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2016-01-14

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to grow thin (10–84 nm) epitaxial layers of Yttrium Iron Garnet Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) on (111)–oriented Gadolinium Gallium Garnet substrates at different growth conditions. Atomic force microscopy showed flat surface morphology both on micrometer and nanometer scales. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the films are coherent with the substrate in the interface plane. The interplane distance in the [111] direction was found to be by 1.2% larger than expected for YIG stoichiometric pseudomorphic film indicating presence of rhombohedral distortion in this direction. Polar Kerr effect and ferromagnetic resonance measurements showed existence of additional magnetic anisotropy, which adds to the demagnetizing field to keep magnetization vector in the film plane. The origin of the magnetic anisotropy is related to the strain in YIG films observed by XRD. Magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements revealed important role of magnetization rotation during magnetization reversal. An unusual fine structure of microwave magnetic resonance spectra has been observed in the film grown at reduced (0.5 mTorr) oxygen pressure. Surface spin wave propagation has been demonstrated in the in-plane magnetized films.

  1. Labyrinthectomy abolishes the behavioral and neural response of rats to a high-strength static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Angie M; Kwon, Bumsup; Smith, James C; Houpt, Thomas A

    2009-04-20

    Vertigo is a commonly-reported side effect of exposure to the high magnetic fields found in magnetic resonance imaging machines. Although it has been hypothesized that high magnetic fields interact with the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear, there has been no direct evidence establishing its role in magnet-induced vertigo. Our laboratory has shown that following exposure to high magnetic fields, rats walk in circles, acquire a conditioned taste aversion (CTA), and express c-Fos in vestibular and visceral relays of the brainstem, consistent with vestibular stimulation and vertigo or motion sickness. To determine if the inner ear is required for these effects, rats were chemically labyrinthectomized with sodium arsanilate and tested for locomotor circling, CTA acquisition, and c-Fos induction after exposure within a 14.1 T magnet. Intact rats circled counterclockwise after 30-min exposure to 14.1 T, but labyrinthectomized rats showed no increase in circling after magnetic field exposure. After 3 pairings of 0.125% saccharin with 30-min exposure at 14.1 T, intact rats acquired a profound CTA that persisted for 14 days of extinction testing; labyrinthectomized rats, however, did not acquire a CTA and showed a high preference for saccharin similar to sham-exposed rats. Finally, significant c-Fos was induced in the brainstem of intact rats by 30-min exposure to 14.1 T, but magnetic field exposure did not elevate c-Fos in labyrinthectomized rats above sham-exposed levels. These results demonstrate that an intact inner ear is necessary for all the observed effects of exposure to high magnetic fields in rats.

  2. Spontaneous Magnetization of the square 2D Ising lattice with nearest- and weak next-nearest neighbour interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Hoede, C.

    2009-01-01

    We show that the square two-dimensional (2D) Ising lattice with nearest- (J) and weak next-nearest-neighbour interactions (Jd) can be mapped on a square 2D Ising lattice that has only nearest neighbour interactions (J*). For Jd/J << 1 the transformation equation has the simple form

  3. A combined HST and XMM-Newton campaign for the magnetic O9.7 V star HD 54879. Constraining the weak-wind problem of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenar, T.; Oskinova, L. M.; Järvinen, S. P.; Luckas, P.; Hainich, R.; Todt, H.; Hubrig, S.; Sander, A. A. C.; Ilyin, I.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2017-10-01

    Context. HD 54879 (O9.7 V) is one of a dozen O-stars for which an organized atmospheric magnetic field has been detected. Despite their importance, little is known about the winds and evolution of magnetized massive stars. Aims: To gain insights into the interplay between atmospheres, winds, and magnetic fields of massive stars, we acquired UV and X-ray data of HD 54879 using the Hubble Space Telescope and the XMM-Newton satellite. In addition, 35 optical amateur spectra were secured to study the variability of HD 54879. Methods: A multiwavelength (X-ray to optical) spectral analysis is performed using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code and the xspec software. Results: The photospheric parameters (T∗ = 30.5 kK, log g = 4.0 [cm s-2], log L = 4.45 [L⊙]) are typical for an O9.7 V star. The microturbulent, macroturbulent, and projected rotational velocities are lower than previously suggested (ξph,vmac,vsini ≤ 4 km s-1). An initial mass of 16 M⊙ and an age of 5 Myr are inferred from evolutionary tracks. We derive a mean X-ray emitting temperature of log TX = 6.7 [K] and an X-ray luminosity of LX = 1 × 1032 erg s-1. Short- and long-scale variability is seen in the Hα line, but only a very long period of P ≈ 5 yr could be estimated. Assessing the circumstellar density of HD 54879 using UV spectra, we can roughly estimate the mass-loss rate HD 54879 would have in the absence of a magnetic field as log ṀB = 0 ≈ -9.0 [M⊙ yr-1]. The magnetic field traps the stellar wind up to the Alfvén radius rA ≳ 12 R∗, implying that its true mass-loss rate is log Ṁ ≲ -10.2 [M⊙ yr-1]. Hence, density enhancements around magnetic stars can be exploited to estimate mass-loss rates of non-magnetic stars of similar spectral types, essential for resolving the weak wind problem. Conclusions: Our study confirms that strongly magnetized stars lose little or no mass, and supplies important constraints on the weak-wind problem of massive main sequence

  4. Multiple degree-of-freedom force and moment measurement for static propulsion testing using magnetic suspension technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Keith; Bartosh, Blake

    1993-01-01

    Innovative Information Systems (IIS), Inc. is in the process of designing and fabricating a high bandwidth force and moment measuring device (i.e. the Magnetic Thruster Test Stand). This device will use active magnetic suspension to allow direct measurements of the forces and torques generated by the rocket engines of the missile under test. The principle of operation of the Magnetic Thruster Test Stand (MTTS) is based on the ability to perform very precise, high bandwidth force and position measurements on an object suspended in a magnetic field. This ability exists due to the fact that the digital servo control mechanism that performs the magnetic suspension uses high bandwidth (10 kHz) position data (via an eddy-current proximity sensor) to determine the amount of force required to maintain stable suspension at a particular point. This force is converted into required electromagnet coil current, which is then output to a current amplifier driving the coils. A discussion of how the coil current and magnetic gap distance (the distance between the electromagnet and the object being suspended) is used to determine the forces being applied from the suspended assembly is presented.

  5. Polarization dependence of the magnetic fluctuations in the weak itinerant ferromagnet MnSi below T{sub c}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeni, P.; Tixier, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Endoh, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Roessli, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 75 - Paris (France); Shirane, G. [Brookhaven (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The dispersion of the spin-flip and non-spin-flip excitations in the weak itinerant ferromagnet MnSi have been measured in the ferromagnetic phase using inelastic polarized neutron scattering. Spin wave excitations are well defined at energy transfers as large as 7 meV. The cross section of the non-spin-flip excitations is compatible with a quasielastic response function. (author) 2 figs., 3 refs.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging. Recent studies on biological effects of static magnetic and high-frequency electromagnetic fields; Magnetresonanztomographie. Neuere Studien zur biologischen Wirkung statischer Magnetfelder und hochfrequenter elektromagnetischer Felder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pophof, B. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Abteilung fuer Wirkungen und Risiken ionisierender und nichtionisierender Strahlung, Oberschleissheim/Neuherberg (Germany); Brix, G. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Abteilung fuer medizinischen und beruflichen Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim/Neuherberg (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    During the last few years, new studies on biological effects of strong static magnetic fields and on thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were published. Many of these studies have not yet been included in the current safety recommendations. Scientific publications since 2010 on biological effects of static and electromagnetic fields in MRI were researched and evaluated. New studies confirm older publications that have already described effects of static magnetic fields on sensory organs and the central nervous system, accompanied by sensory perceptions. A new result is the direct effect of Lorentz forces on ionic currents in the semicircular canals of the vestibular system. Recent studies of thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields were focused on the development of anatomically realistic body models and a more precise simulation of exposure scenarios. Strong static magnetic fields can cause unpleasant sensations, in particular, vertigo. In addition, they can influence the performance of the medical staff and thus potentially endanger the patient's safety. As a precaution, medical personnel should move slowly within the field gradient. High-frequency electromagnetic fields lead to an increase in the temperature of patients' tissues and organs. This should be considered especially in patients with restricted thermoregulation and in pregnant women and neonates; in these cases exposure should be kept as low as possible. (orig.) [German] In den letzten Jahren wurden neue Studien zu biologischen Wirkungen starker statischer Magnetfelder und zu thermischen Effekten hochfrequenter elektromagnetischer Feldern, wie sie bei der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) verwendet werden, publiziert. Viele dieser Studien sind noch nicht in aktuelle Sicherheitsempfehlungen eingeflossen. Wissenschaftliche Publikationen ab dem Jahr 2010 zur biologischen Wirkung statischer und elektromagnetischer Felder

  7. Scattering Polarization of Hydrogen Lines in Weakly Magnetized Stellar Atmospheres. I. Formulation and Application to Isothermal Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 732, č. 2 (2011), 80/1-80/20 ISSN 0004-637X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : magnetic fields * polarization * radiative transfer Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 6.024, year: 2011

  8. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  9. Wireless charing pillow for a fully implantable hearing aid: Design of a circular array coil based on finite element analysis for reducing magnetic weak zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Gyu; Kim, Jong Hoon; Shin, Dong Ho; Woo, Seong Tak; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Kim, Myoung Nam; Wei, Qun; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Many types of fully implantable hearing aids have been developed. Most of these devices are implanted behind the ear. To maintain the implanted device for a long period of time, a rechargeable battery and wireless power transmission are used. Because inductive coupling is the most renowned method for wireless power transmission, many types of fully implantable hearing aids are transcutaneously powered using inductively coupled coils. Some patients with an implantable hearing aid require a method for conveniently charging their hearing aid while they are resting or sleeping. To address this need, a wireless charging pillow has been developed that employs a circular array coil as one of its primary parts. In this device, all primary coils are simultaneously driven to maintain an effective charging area regardless of head motion. In this case, however, there may be a magnetic weak zone that cannot be charged at the specific secondary coil's location on the array coil. In this study, assuming that a maximum charging distance is 4 cm, a circular array coil-serving as a primary part of the charging pillow-was designed using finite element analysis. Based on experimental results, the proposed device can charge an implantable hearing aid without a magnetic weak zone within 4 cm of the perpendicular distance between the primary and secondary coils.

  10. Strong 3D and 1D magnetism in hexagonal Fe-chalcogenides FeS and FeSe vs. weak magnetism in hexagonal FeTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David S

    2017-06-13

    We present a comparative theoretical study of the hexagonal forms of the Fe-chalcogenides FeS, FeSe and FeTe with their better known tetragonal forms. While the tetragonal forms exhibit only an incipient antiferromagnetism and experimentally show superconductivity when doped, the hexagonal forms of FeS and FeSe display a robust magnetism. We show that this strong magnetism arises from a van Hove singularity associated with the direct Fe-Fe c-axis chains in the generally more three-dimensional NiAs structure. We also find that hexagonal FeTe is much less magnetic than the other two hexagonal materials, so that unconventional magnetically-mediated superconductivity is possible, although a large T c value is unlikely.

  11. Performance of a static-anode/flat-panel x-ray fluoroscopy system in a diagnostic strength magnetic field: a truly hybrid x-ray/MR imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrig, R; Wen, Z; Ganguly, A; DeCrescenzo, G; Rowlands, J A; Stevens, G M; Saunders, R F; Pelc, N J

    2005-06-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are increasing in variety and frequency, facilitated by advances in imaging technology. Our hybrid imaging system (GE Apollo flat panel, custom Brand x-ray static anode x-ray tube, GE Lunar high-frequency power supply and 0.5 T Signa SP) provides both x-ray and MR imaging capability to guide complex procedures without requiring motion of the patient between two distant gantries. The performance of the x-ray tube in this closely integrated system was evaluated by modeling and measuring both the response of the filament to an externally applied field and the behavior of the electron beam for field strengths and geometries of interest. The performance of the detector was assessed by measuring the slanted-edge modulation transfer function (MTF) and when placed at zero field and at 0.5 T. Measured resonant frequencies of filaments can be approximated using a modified vibrating beam model, and were at frequencies well below the 25 kHz frequency of our generator for our filament geometry. The amplitude of vibration was not sufficient to cause shorting of the filament during operation within the magnetic field. A simple model of electrons in uniform electric and magnetic fields can be used to estimate the deflection of the electron beam on the anode for the fields of interest between 0.2 and 0.5 T. The MTF measured at the detector and the DQE showed no significant difference inside and outside of the magnetic field. With the proper modifications, an x-ray system can be fully integrated with a MR system, with minimal loss of image quality. Any x-ray tube can be assessed for compatibility when placed at a particular location within the field using the models. We have also concluded that a-Si electronics are robust against magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the x-ray system installation is required to provide estimates of system operation.

  12. Near-horizon Structure of Escape Zones of Electrically Charged Particles around Weakly Magnetized Rotating Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopáček, Ondřej; Karas, Vladimír

    2018-01-01

    An interplay of magnetic fields and gravitation drives accretion and outflows near black holes. However, a specific mechanism is still a matter of debate; it is very likely that different processes dominate under various conditions. In particular, for the acceleration of particles and their collimation in jets, an ordered component of the magnetic field seems to be essential. Here we discuss the role of large-scale magnetic fields in transporting the charged particles and dust grains from the bound orbits in the equatorial plane of a rotating (Kerr) black hole and the resulting acceleration along trajectories escaping the system in a direction parallel to the symmetry axis (perpendicular to the accretion disk). We consider a specific scenario of destabilization of circular geodesics of initially neutral matter by charging (e.g., due to photoionization). Some particles may be set on escaping trajectories and attain relativistic velocity. The case of charged particles differs from charged dust grains by their charge-to-mass ratio, but the acceleration mechanism operates in a similar manner. It appears that the chaotic dynamics controls the outflow and supports the formation of near-horizon escape zones. We employ the technique of recurrence plots to characterize the onset of chaos in the outflowing medium. We investigate the system numerically and construct the basin-boundary plots, which show the location and the extent of the escape zones. The effects of black hole spin and magnetic field strength on the formation and location of escape zones are discussed, and the maximal escape velocity is computed.

  13. A mathematical description for the scattering phenomena of plane wave from elliptical plasma antenna located in oblique static magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Samaneh; Jazi, Bahram

    2017-06-01

    The problem of electromagnetic wave scattering from an elliptical plasma cylinder in the presence of an external oblique magnetic field is investigated. The electromagnetic waves are landed obliquely on the plasma column. Knowing the dielectric permittivity tensor of the plasma column, the electric potential and the electric field inside and outside the plasma column are obtained for the long-wavelength waves. The graphs of the electric field profile and pattern scattering are presented. Also, the dependence of those graphs on the incident angle, the geometrical dimensions of the plasma column and the magnetic field angle are analyzed. The physical justifications based on the theory of Fresnel's transmission coefficients for describing the graphs, have been presented. Moreover, the effective factors on the shift of the resonance frequency are investigated. Finally, to verify the accuracy of the obtained results, some limiting cases are discussed.

  14. Recent progress on contactless inductive flow tomography for continuous casting in the presence of strong static magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Wondrak, T; Ratajczak, M.; Timmel, K; Stefani, F.; Eckert, S.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The flow structure of liquid steel in the mold of a continuous caster has huge impact on the quality of the produced steel. In order to influence the flow during the casting process electromagnetic brakes (EMBr) are used. Even a rough knowledge of the flow field would be highly desirable. The contactless inductive flow tomography is a technique for reconstructing the velocity field in electrically conducting melts from externally measured induced magnetic fields. For a...

  15. Influence of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-exposure on patients with erosive gastritis: a randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, single centre, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Márk; Nagy, Viktor L; Székely, Hajnal; Kocsis, Dorottya; Tulassay, Zsolt; László, János F

    2014-09-06

    This pilot study was devoted to the effect of static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure on erosive gastritis. The randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot study included 16 patients of the 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Semmelweis University diagnosed with erosive gastritis. The instrumental analysis followed a qualitative (pre-intervention) assessment of the symptoms by the patient: lower heartburn (in the ventricle), upper heartburn (in the oesophagus), epigastric pain, regurgitation, bloating and dry cough. Medical diagnosis included a double-line upper panendoscopy followed by 30 min local inhomogeneous SMF-exposure intervention at the lower sternal region over the stomach with peak-to-peak magnetic induction of 3 mT and 30 mT m(-1) gradient at the target site. A qualitative (post-intervention) assessment of the same symptoms closed the examination. Sham- or SMF-exposure was used in a double-blind manner. The authors succeeded in justifying the clinically and statistically significant beneficial effect of the SMF- over sham-exposure on the symptoms of erosive gastritis, the average effect of inhibition was 56% by p = 0.001, n = 42 + 96. This pilot study was aimed to encourage gastroenterologists to test local, inhomogeneous SMF-exposure on erosive gastritis patients, so this intervention may become an evidence-based alternative or complementary method in the clinical use especially in cases when conventional therapy options are contraindicated. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. The influence of particle size and static magnetic fields on the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into three dimensional cell-seeded collagen gel cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily E L; Child, Hannah W; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; McCully, Mark; Paterson, David; Mullin, Margaret; Berry, Catherine C

    2015-08-01

    Over recent decades there has been and continues to be major advances in the imaging, diagnosis and potential treatment of medical conditions, by the use of magnetic nanoparticles. However, to date the majority of cell delivery studies employ a traditional 2D monolayer culture. This article aims to determine the ability of various sized magnetic nanoparticles to penetrate and travel through a cell seeded collagen gel model, in the presence or absence of a magnetic field. Three different sized (100, 200, and 500 nm) nanoparticles were employed in the study. The results showed cell viability was unaffected by the presence of nanoparticles over a 24-h test period. The initial uptake of the 100 nm nanoparticle into the collagen gel structure was superior compared to the larger sized nanoparticles under the influence of a magnetic field and incubated for 24 h. Interestingly, it was the 200 nm nanoparticles, which proved to penetrate the gel furthest, under the influence of a magnetic field, during the initial culture stage after 1-h incubation. © The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Large magnetic entropy change associated with the weakly first-order paramagnetic to ferrimagnetic transition in antiperovskite manganese nitride CuNMn3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Tong, P.; Lin, J. C.; Lin, S.; Cui, D. P.; Wang, B. S.; Song, W. H.; Lu, W. J.; Sun, Y. P.

    2014-07-01

    We report a systematic study of the specific heat and dc magnetic susceptibility on the paramagnetic to ferrimagnetic transition (TC ˜ 141 K) in CuNMn3. A large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) at TC is observed with the entropy change of 3.49 J/kg K (6.38 J/kg K) for the field change of ΔH = 20 kOe (45 kOe). The analysis of the isothermal magnetizations, including the derived Arrott plots and magnetic entropy change, shows a second-order like transition at TC. However, the existence of latent heat around TC is unambiguously manifested by the reduced slope of the temperature-time relaxations recorded during the specific heat measurement, indicating the transition is in fact weakly first-order in nature. The large MCE comparable with those observed the antiperovskite manganese carbides suggests it is equivalently interesting to explore the MCE in the antiperovskite manganese nitrides as in the carbides.

  18. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of B2 ordered Co{sub 2}MnAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jihong; Qiao, Shuang, E-mail: sqiao@hbu.edu.cn

    2015-11-05

    Co{sub 2}MnAl, considering its potential 100% spin polarization and high Curie temperature, is expected to be one of the most promising materials for realizing half metallicity. However, on the premise of high polarization, the optimization of the magnetic damping constant is directly determined the critical current density for spin torque transfer switching and also the stability of spin polarization for spin injection transfer, thus research on damping constant is also very important. In this paper, we have systematically investigated the magnetic damping constant in Co{sub 2}MnAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(100) substrate by FMR and TR-MOKE measurements, and found that the damping constant of 0.023 extracted by FMR is comparable with that of TR-MOKE at low field. While, considering field-dependent spin orientation, we think that the field-dependent damping constant deduced by TR-MOKE may provide important information for Co{sub 2}MnAl/GaAs heterostructure and its potential application in spintronics. - Graphical abstract: Co{sub 2}MnAl, considering its potential 100% spin polarization and high Curie temperature, is expected to be one of the most promising materials for realizing half metallicity. In this paper, we have successfully grown the B2-ordered Co{sub 2}MnAl film on GaAs (100) substrate and systematically investigated the magnetic damping constant in Co{sub 2}MnAl film epitaxially grown on GaAs(100) substrate by employing both FMR and TR-MOKE measurements. Our results show that the damping constant of 0.023 extracted by FMR is comparable with that of TR-MOKE at low field. However, considering field-dependent spin orientation, we think that the field-dependent damping constant deduced by TR-MOKE may be more useful for Co{sub 2}MnAl/GaAs heterostructure and its possible application in spintronics. - Highlights: • B2 ordered Co{sub 2}MnAl was successfully prepared and studied by LMOKE and ROT-MOKE. • Static magnetic measurements show clear cubic

  19. A simple but reliable method for measuring 3D Achilles tendon moment arm geometry from a single, static magnetic resonance scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C F; Lum, I; Reid, S; Clarke, E; Stannage, K; El-Sallam Abd, A; Herbert, R D; Donnelly, C J

    2017-04-11

    Current methods for measuring in vivo 3D muscle-tendon moment arms generally rely on the acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at multiple joint angles. However, for patients with musculoskeletal pathologies such as fixed contractures, moving a joint through its full range of motion is not always feasible. The purpose of this research was to develop a simple, but reliable in vivo 3D Achilles tendon moment arm (ATMA) technique from a single static MRI scan. To accomplish this, for nine healthy adults (5 males, 4 females), the geometry of a cylinder was fit to the 3D form of the talus dome, which was used to estimate the talocrural flexion/extension axis, and a fifth-order polynomial fit to the line of action of the Achilles tendon. The single static scan in vivo 3D ATMA estimates were compared to estimates obtained from the same subjects at the same ankle joint angles using a previously validated 3D dynamic MRI based in vivo ATMA measurement technique. The ATMA estimates from the single scan in vivo 3D method (52.5mm±5.6) were in excellent agreement (ICC=0.912) to the validated in vivo 3D method (51.5mm±5.1). These data show reliable in vivo 3D ATMA can be obtained from a single MRI scan for healthy adult populations. The single scan, in vivo 3D ATMA technique provides researchers with a simple, but reliable method for obtaining subject-specific ATMAs for musculoskeletal modelling purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure and magnetism in Fe-Gd based dinuclear and chain systems. The interplay of weak exchange coupling and zero field splitting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Gîrţu, Mihai A; Enachescu, Cristian; Tanase, Stefania

    2012-01-02

    The synthesis and characterization of two Fe-Gd systems based on bpca(-) (Hbpca = bis(2-pyridilcarbonyl)amine) as bridging ligand is presented, taking the systems as a case study for structure-property correlations. Compound 1, [Fe(LS)(II)(μ-bpca)(2)Gd(NO(3))(2)(H(2)O)]NO(3)·2CH(3)NO(2), is a zigzag polymer, incorporating the diamagnetic low spin Fe(LS)(II) ion. The magnetism of 1 is entirely determined by the weak zero field splitting (ZFS) effect on the Gd(III) ion. Compound 2 is a Fe(III)-Gd(III) dinuclear compound, [Fe(LS)(III)(bpca)(μ-bpca)Gd(NO(3))(4)]·4CH(3)NO(2)·CH(3)OH, its magnetism being interpreted as due to the antiferromagnetic coupling between the S(Fe) = ½ and S(Gd) = 7/2 spins, interplayed with the local ZFS on the lanthanide center. In both systems, the d-f assembly is determined by the bridging capabilities of the ambidentate bpca(-) ligand, which binds the d ion by a tridentate moiety with nitrogen donors and the f center by the diketonate side. We propose a spin delocalization and polarization mechanism that rationalizes the factors leading to the antiferromagnetic d-f coupling. Although conceived for compound 2, the scheme can be proposed as a general mechanism. The rationalization of the weak ZFS effects on Gd(III) by multiconfiguration and spin-orbit ab initio calculations allowed us to determine the details of the small but still significant anisotropy of Gd(III) ion in the coordination sites of compounds 1 and 2. The outlined methodologies and generalized conclusions shed new light on the field of gadolinium coordination magnetochemistry.

  1. New magnetic-field-based weighted-residual quasi-static finite element scheme for modeling bulk magnetostriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kidambi S.; Dasgupta, Abhijit

    1998-04-01

    Deformation control of smart structures and damage detection in smart composites by magneto-mechanical tagging are just a few of the increasing number of applications of polydomain, polycrystalline magnetostrictive materials that are currently being researched. Robust computational models of bulk magnetostriction will be of great assistance to designers of smart structures for optimization of performance and development of control strategies. This paper discusses the limitations of existing tools, and reports on the work of the authors in developing a 3D nonlinear continuum finite element scheme for magnetostrictive structures, based on an appropriate Galerkin variational principle and incremental constitutive relations. The unique problems posed by the form of the equations governing magneto-mechanical interactions as well as their impact on the proper choice of variational and finite element discretization schemes are discussed. An adaptation of vectorial edge functions for interpolation of magnetic field in hexahedral elements is outlined. The differences between the proposed finite element scheme and available formations are also discussed in this paper. Computational results obtained from the newly proposed scheme will be presented in a future paper.

  2. Entropic uncertainty for spin-1/2 XXX chains in the presence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields and its steering via weak measurement reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Ming, Fei; Huang, Ai-Jun; Sun, Wen-Yang; Ye, Liu

    2017-09-01

    The uncertainty principle configures a low bound to the measuring precision for a pair of non-commuting observables, and hence is considerably nontrivial to quantum precision measurement in the field of quantum information theory. In this letter, we consider the entropic uncertainty relation (EUR) in the context of quantum memory in a two-qubit isotropic Heisenberg spin chain. Specifically, we explore the dynamics of EUR in a practical scenario, where two associated nodes of a one-dimensional XXX-spin chain, under an inhomogeneous magnetic field, are connected to a thermal entanglement. We show that the temperature and magnetic field effect can lead to the inflation of the measuring uncertainty, stemming from the reduction of systematic quantum correlation. Notably, we reveal that, firstly, the uncertainty is not fully dependent on the observed quantum correlation of the system; secondly, the dynamical behaviors of the measuring uncertainty are relatively distinct with respect to ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism chains. Meanwhile, we deduce that the measuring uncertainty is dramatically correlated with the mixedness of the system, implying that smaller mixedness tends to reduce the uncertainty. Furthermore, we propose an effective strategy to control the uncertainty of interest by means of quantum weak measurement reversal. Therefore, our work may shed light on the dynamics of the measuring uncertainty in the Heisenberg spin chain, and thus be important to quantum precision measurement in various solid-state systems.

  3. Experimental production of illusory (false) memories in reconstructions of narratives: effect size and potential mediation by right hemispheric stimulation from complex, weak magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, F; Persinger, M A

    2001-01-01

    This experiment was designed to discern the proportion of false, inferential and verbatim memories that would be included in the reconstruction, one week later, of a 5 min narrative containing ambiguous but emotional content about a little boy. After 48 subjects were administered Spiegel's Hypnosis Induction Profile, they listened to the narrative, were exposed to one of four applications of transcerebral weak, complex magnetic fields for 30 min and then given either an accurate or inaccurate short summary of the story. One week later the group who received the erroneous summary reported more false memories about the original story than did the reference group; this treatment accommodated about 40% of the variance in numbers of false memories. Only an indicator of electrical lability within the temporal lobes (but not hypnotizability) was strongly associated with the numbers of inferential memories but not the numbers of false memories. The group that received transcerebral stimulation over the right hemisphere by a complex magnetic field and the erroneous summary reported three times the numbers of false memories compared to the other groups. Whereas verbatim memories showed a strong primacy effect inferential memories exhibited a strong recency effect (eta(2) =.66).

  4. Pre-sowing static magnetic field treatment for improving water and radiation use efficiency in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under soil moisture stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridha, Nilimesh; Chattaraj, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Debashis; Anand, Anjali; Aggarwal, Pramila; Nagarajan, Shantha

    2016-09-01

    Soil moisture stress during pod filling is a major constraint in production of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), a fundamentally dry land crop. We investigated effect of pre-sowing seed priming with static magnetic field (SMF) on alleviation of stress through improvement in radiation and water use efficiencies. Experiments were conducted under greenhouse and open field conditions with desi and kabuli genotypes. Seeds exposed to SMF (strength: 100 mT, exposure: 1 h) led to increase in root volume and surface area by 70% and 65%, respectively. This enabled the crop to utilize 60% higher moisture during the active growth period (78-118 days after sowing), when soil moisture became limiting. Both genotypes from treated seeds had better water utilization, biomass, and radiation use efficiencies (17%, 40%, and 26% over control). Seed pre-treatment with SMF could, therefore, be a viable option for chickpea to alleviate soil moisture stress in arid and semi-arid regions, helping in augmenting its production. It could be a viable option to improve growth and yield of chickpea under deficit soil moisture condition, as the selection and breeding program takes a decade before a tolerant variety is released. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:400-408, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  6. Magnetic activity and radial velocity filtering of young Suns: the weak-line T-Tauri stars Par 1379 and Par 2244

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C. A.; Carmona, A.; Donati, J.-F.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Gregory, S. G.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Bouvier, J.; The Matysse Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report the results of our spectropolarimetric monitoring of the weak-line T-Tauri stars (wTTSs) Par 1379 and Par 2244, within the MaTYSSE (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets) programme. Both stars are of a similar mass (1.6 and 1.8 M⊙) and age (1.8 and 1.1 Myr), with Par 1379 hosting an evolved low-mass dusty circumstellar disc, and with Par 2244 showing evidence of a young debris disc. We detect profile distortions and Zeeman signatures in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines for each star, and have modelled their rotational modulation using tomographic imaging, yielding brightness and magnetic maps. We find that Par 1379 harbours a weak (250 G), mostly poloidal field tilted 65° from the rotation axis. In contrast, Par 2244 hosts a stronger field (860 G) split 3:2 between poloidal and toroidal components, with most of the energy in higher order modes, and with the poloidal component tilted 45° from the rotation axis. Compared to the lower mass wTTSs, V819 Tau and V830 Tau, Par 2244 has a similar field strength, but is much more complex, whereas the much less complex field of Par 1379 is also much weaker than any other mapped wTTS. We find moderate surface differential rotation of 1.4× and 1.8× smaller than Solar, for Par 1379 and Par 2244, respectively. Using our tomographic maps to predict the activity-related radial velocity (RV) jitter, and filter it from the RV curves, we find RV residuals with dispersions of 0.017 and 0.086 km s-1 for Par 1379 and Par 2244, respectively. We find no evidence for close-in giant planets around either star, with 3σ upper limits of 0.56 and 3.54 MJup (at an orbital distance of 0.1 au).

  7. Weak relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Selleri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Weak Relativity is an equivalent theory to Special Relativity according to Reichenbach’s definition, where the parameter epsilon equals to 0. It formulates a Neo-Lorentzian approach by replacing the Lorentz transformations with a new set named “Inertial Transformations”, thus explaining the Sagnac effect, the twin paradox and the trip from the future to the past in an easy and elegant way. The cosmic microwave background is suggested as a possible privileged reference system. Most importantly, being a theory based on experimental proofs, rather than mutual consensus, it offers a physical description of reality independent of the human observation.

  8. Muscle Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi MD, MSc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome. And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations.

  9. Quantification of synovistis by MRI: correlation between dynamic and static gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic and macroscopic signs of synovial inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1998-01-01

    characteristics were graded at four preselected biopsy sites. Preoperative T1-weighted dynamic fast low angle shot and static spin-echo Gd-enhanced MRI were performed. The dynamic enhancement rate and the static enhancement were measured in the entire synovial membrane of a preselected slice as well...... as at the four biopsy sites, and compared to synovial pathology. The rate of early enhancement of the total synovial membrane of the preselected slice, determined by dynamic MRI, was highly correlated with microscopic evidence of active inflammation (Spearman p = 0.73; p ... infiltration. Dynamic evaluation of small synovial sections at the biopsy sites and static spin-echo MRI resulted in considerably weaker correlations to histologic inflammation than dynamic evaluation of the total synovium. The optimal time for enhancement measurements was one-half to one minute after Gd...

  10. A novel and sensitive method for measuring very weak magnetic fields of DA white dwarfs. A search for a magnetic field at the 250 G level in 40 Eridani B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Valyavin, G. G.; Gadelshin, D.; Martin, A. J.; Galazutdinov, G.; Semenko, E.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Searches for magnetic fields in white dwarfs have clarified both the frequency of occurrence and the global structure of the fields found down to field strengths of the order of 500 kG. Below this level, the situation is still very unclear. Aims: We are engaged in a project to find and study the weakest magnetic fields that are detectable in white dwarfs, in order to empirically determine how the frequency of occurrence and the structure of fields present changes with field strength. In this paper we report the successful testing of a very sensitive method of longitudinal field detection in DA white dwarfs. We use this method to carry out an extremely sensitive search for magnetism in the bright white dwarf 40 Eri B. Methods: The method of field measurement we use is to measure, at high spectral resolution, the polarisation signal V/I of the narrow non-LTE line core in Hα in DA stars. This small feature provides a much higher amplitude polarisation signal than the broad Balmer line wings. We test the usefulness of this technique by searching for a weak magnetic field in 40 Eri B. Results: One hour of observation of I and V Stokes components of the white dwarf 40 Eri B using ESPaDOnS at the CFHT is found to provide a standard error of measurement of the mean longitudinal magnetic field ⟨ Bz ⟩ of about 85 G. This is the smallest standard error of field measurement ever obtained for a white dwarf. The non-detections obtained are generally consistent with slightly less accurate measurements of 40 Eri B obtained with ISIS at the WHT and the Main Stellar Spectrograph at SAO, in order to provide comparison standards for the new method. These further measurements allow us to make a quantitative comparison of the relative efficiencies of low-resolution spectropolarimetery (using most or all of the Balmer lines) with the new method (using only the core of Hα). Conclusions: The new method of field detection reaches the level of sensitivity that was expected. It

  11. Quantification of liquid products from the electroreduction of CO2 and CO using static headspace-gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Abghoui, Younes; Jovanov, Zarko P.

    2017-01-01

    Static headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) useful for ex-situ liquid product analysis. Could complement high-performance liquid chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. Particularly high sensitivity towards compounds with high vapor pressure. Detection limits below 0.5μM were shown for acetaldehyde ...

  12. The Relationship of Static Tibial Tubercle-Trochlear Groove Measurement and Dynamic Patellar Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Victor R; Sheehan, Frances T; Shen, Aricia; Yao, Lawrence; Jackson, Jennifer N; Boden, Barry P

    2017-07-01

    The tibial tubercle to trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance is used for screening patients with a variety of patellofemoral joint disorders to determine who may benefit from patellar medialization using a tibial tubercle osteotomy. Clinically, the TT-TG distance is predominately based on static imaging with the knee in full extension; however, the predictive ability of this measure for dynamic patellar tracking patterns is unknown. To determine whether the static TT-TG distance can predict dynamic lateral displacement of the patella. Cohort study (Diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. The static TT-TG distance was measured at full extension for 70 skeletally mature subjects with (n = 32) and without (n = 38) patellofemoral pain. The dynamic patellar tracking patterns were assessed from approximately 45° to 0° of knee flexion by use of dynamic cine-phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, the value of dynamic lateral tracking corresponding to the exact knee angle measured in the static images for that subject was identified. Linear regression analysis determined the predictive ability of static TT-TG distance for dynamic patellar lateral displacement for each cohort. The static TT-TG distance measured with the knee in full extension cannot accurately predict dynamic lateral displacement of the patella. There was weak predictive ability among subjects with patellofemoral pain ( r2 = 0.18, P = .02) and no predictive capability among controls. Among subjects with patellofemoral pain and static TT-TG distances 15 mm or more, 8 of 13 subjects (62%) demonstrated neutral or medial patellar tracking patterns. The static TT-TG distance cannot accurately predict dynamic lateral displacement of the patella. A large percentage of patients with patellofemoral pain and pathologically large TT-TG distances may have neutral to medial maltracking patterns.

  13. The mechanisms of the effects of magnetic fields on cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, A.

    presented in the cells. 5) Electronic interactions. Static magnetic fields can alter energy levels and spin orientation of electrons. Similar interactions can also occur with nuclear spins, but these are very weak compared to electron interactions. 6) Free radicals. Magnetic fields alter the spin states of the radicals, which, in turn, changes the relative probabilities of recombination and other interactions, possibly with biological consequences. 7) Non-linear effects. A number of non-linear mechanisms of magnetic effects on cells were recently proposed to explain how the cell could extract a weak magnetic signal from noise (e.g. stochastic non-linear resonance, self-tuned Hopf bifurcations). These new models need further experimental testing.

  14. Magnetic memory effects in triglycine sulfate ferroelectric crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainutdinov, R. V.; Ivanova, E. S.; Petrzhik, E. A.; Lashkova, A. K.; Volk, T. R.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on the processes of relaxation of the defect structure relaxation in a triglycine sulfate (TGS) ferroelectric (nonmagnetic) crystal has been observed for the first time. The atomic-force microscopy study has shown that the application of a static weak magnetic field (2 T, 20 min) significantly changes the size distribution of defect nanoclusters characteristic of TGS. Previously known macroscopic aftereffects of the magnetic field in TGS (slow relaxation of the dielectric susceptibility, symmetrization of P-E dielectric hysteresis loops, etc.) can be explained by the redistribution of pinning centers of domain walls caused by the magnetically induced reconfiguration of the defect structure.

  15. Noise and coupling in magnetic super-resolution media for magneto-optical readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chubing; Mansuripur, M.

    1999-05-01

    Interfacial magnetic coupling, transient thermal response, and carrier and noise levels are investigated for two central aperture detection magnetic super-resolution disks. In one of the disks, the two magnetic layers are exchange-coupled, while in the other the coupling is of magneto-static nature. For the exchange-coupled disk, the coupling between the two magnetic layers is fairly strong, and the Kerr loop of the readout layer does not have a square shape. For the magneto-statically coupled disk, the strength of coupling depends on the nonuniformity of the magnetization of the storage layer. The readout layer has a square Kerr loop, but its perpendicular magnetization in the hot region under the focused spot has random orientation if the stray field from the storage layer is weak. This random orientation of magnetization within the readout layer gives rise to a high level of noise during readout.

  16. Statics of deformable solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bisplinghoff, Raymond L; Pian, Theodore HH

    2014-01-01

    Profusely illustrated exposition of fundamentals of solid mechanics and principles of mechanics, statics, and simple statically indeterminate systems. Covers strain and stress in three-dimensional solids, elementary elasticity, energy principles in solid continuum, and more. 1965 edition.

  17. Magneto-thermopower in the Weak Ferromagnetic Oxide CaRu0.8Sc0.2O3: An Experimental Test for the Kelvin Formula in a Magnetic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takafumi D.; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Yasui, Yukio; Iguchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Takahiko; Terasaki, Ichiro

    2017-10-01

    We have measured the resistivity, the thermopower, and the specific heat of the weak ferromagnetic oxide CaRu0.8Sc0.2O3 in external magnetic fields up to 140 kOe below 80 K. We have observed that the thermopower Q is significantly suppressed by magnetic fields at around the ferromagnetic transition temperature of 30 K, and have further found that the magneto-thermopower Δ Q(H,T) = Q(H,T) - Q(0,T) is roughly proportional to the magneto-entropy Δ S(H,T) = S(H,T) - S(0,T). We discuss this relationship between the two quantities in terms of the Kelvin formula, and find that the observed ΔQ is quantitatively consistent with the values expected from the Kelvin formula, a possible physical meaning of which is discussed.

  18. Wireless steering mechanism with magnetic actuation for an endoscopic capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menciassi, A; Valdastri, P; Quaglia, C; Buselli, E; Dario, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper illustrates the design, development and testing of a miniature mechanism to be integrated in endoscopic capsules for precise steering capabilities (Magnetic Internal Mechanism, MIM). The mechanism consists of an electromagnetic motor connected to a couple of small permanent magnets and immersed in a static magnetic field produced by an external permanent magnet or a by an electromagnetic coil. The overall steering capsule, integrating the magnetic steering mechanism and the vision system is 15.6 mm in diameter, 48 mm in length, 14.4 g in weight and can be oriented with an accuracy of 0.01 degrees . As regards system scalability, the capsule size could be reduced down to 11 mm in diameter by optimizing some mechanical components. On the other hand, the magnets size cannot be reduced because the magnetic link between internal and external magnets at typical operation distances (about 15 mm) would be weak.

  19. Low-field switchable dynamic anisotropy in FeCoN thin film with weak stripe domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the static and dynamic magnetic properties of FeCoN films with various thickness have been studied. By controlling the deposition conditions, two-fold static anisotropies, namely a perpendicular anisotropy and an in-plane anisotropy, are introduced into the films, forming weak stripe domain. It is found that, for the films with the thickness between 130 nm and 240 nm, the anisotropy of FMR response is switchable. More importantly, the switching field of the dynamic anisotropy is only about 40-50 Oe, which is far below the value required to switch traditional rotatable anisotropy. Combined with high magnetic permeability and low-field switchable anisotropy, these films are promising for practical applications in the microwave devices.

  20. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Thermal analytic model of current gain for bipolar junction transistor-bipolar static induction transistor compound device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, You-Run; Zhang, Bo; Li, Ze-Hong; Lai, Chang-Jin; Li, Zhao-Ji

    2009-02-01

    This paper proposes a thermal analytical model of current gain for bipolar junction transistor-bipolar static induction transistor (BJT-BSIT) compound device in the low current operation. It also proposes a best thermal compensating factor to the compound device that indicates the relationship between the thermal variation rate of current gain and device structure. This is important for the design of compound device to be optimized. Finally, the analytical model is found to be in good agreement with numerical simulation and experimental results. The test results demonstrate that thermal variation rate of current gain is below 10% in 25 °C-85°C and 20% in -55°C-25°C.

  1. Effect of a weak magnetic field on the Mizoroki–Heck coupling reaction in the presence of wicker-like palladium-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-iron nanocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiee, Ezzat, E-mail: ezzat_rafiee@yahoo.com [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, Razi University, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Joshaghani, Mohammad [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, Razi University, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abadi, Parvaneh Ghaderi-Shekhi [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, Razi University, Kermanshah 67149 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The wicker-like Pd-PVP-Fe (palladium-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-iron) was synthesized by the external magnetic field (EMF). The Pd-based catalyst with nano and the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure was obtained at room temperature without using any additive. The resulting composite was characterized. The results show that EMF has a great influence on morphology, particle size, and crystalline structure of the Pd-PVP-Fe composite. The resulting composite (Pd-PVP-Fe), was found to be an effective catalyst for the Mizoroki–Heck reaction while is exposed to EMF with the intensity at 486 µT. The reused catalyst for at least five repeating cycles, shows excellent activity. - Highlights: • The wicker-like Pd-PVP-Fe nanocatalyst was synthesized via external magnetic field. • The resulting catalyst composite was characterized. • The C–C coupling reaction was carried out at magnetic field and room temperature. • Magnetic field affects on the morphology and size of the catalyst. • The catalyst could be reused without significant degradation in activity.

  2. Spin Seebeck effect in a weak ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arboleda, Juan David, E-mail: juan.arboledaj@udea.edu.co; Arnache Olmos, Oscar [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Aguirre, Myriam Haydee; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Ramos, Rafael [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Spin Quantum Rectification Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Anadon, Alberto [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-06-06

    We report the observation of room temperature spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in a weak ferromagnetic normal spinel Zinc Ferrite (ZFO). Despite the weak ferromagnetic behavior, the measurements of the SSE in ZFO show a thermoelectric voltage response comparable with the reported values for other ferromagnetic materials. Our results suggest that SSE might possibly originate from the surface magnetization of the ZFO.

  3. Competing weak localization and weak antilocalization in ultrathin topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Murong; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Chu, Hao; Jiang, Ying; Bardarson, Jens H; Jiang, Wanjun; Choi, Eun Sang; Wang, Yong; Yeh, Nai-Chang; Moore, Joel; Wang, Kang L

    2013-01-09

    We demonstrate evidence of a surface gap opening in topological insulator (TI) thin films of (Bi(0.57)Sb(0.43))(2)Te(3) below six quintuple layers through transport and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements. By effective tuning the Fermi level via gate-voltage control, we unveil a striking competition between weak localization and weak antilocalization at low magnetic fields in nonmagnetic ultrathin films, possibly owing to the change of the net Berry phase. Furthermore, when the Fermi level is swept into the surface gap of ultrathin samples, the overall unitary behaviors are revealed at higher magnetic fields, which are in contrast to the pure WAL signals obtained in thicker films. Our findings show an exotic phenomenon characterizing the gapped TI surface states and point to the future realization of quantum spin Hall effect and dissipationless TI-based applications.

  4. Experimental induction of intermale aggressive behavior in limbic epileptic rats by weak, complex magnetic fields: implications for geomagnetic activity and the modern habitat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, L S; Persinger, M A; Koren, S A

    1998-12-01

    In three separate experiments, groups (4/group) of male rats with limbic epilepsy were exposed for 80 min every 24 hr during the midscotophase for 24 successive days to sham-field conditions or to one of four complex patterns of magnetic fields whose average intensities ranged between 20 nT to 500 nT. The numbers of episodes of boxing, biting, mounting, eating, drinking and grooming were then recorded each night during the latter 20 min. Moderately strong statistically significant interactions occurred between the presence or absence of the field and the pattern of the field explained 25% and 50% of the variance in the numbers of biting and boxing responses, respectively. Other behaviors were not affected. The results suggest that group aggression can be increased or decreased as a function of the temporal characteristics and morphology (shape) of the applied magnetic field.

  5. Statics with MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Marghitu, Dan B; Madsen, Nels H

    2013-01-01

    Engineering mechanics involves the development of mathematical models of the physical world. Statics addresses the forces acting on and in mechanical objects and systems. Statics with MATLAB®  develops an understanding of the mechanical behavior of complex engineering structures and components using MATLAB®  to execute numerical calculations and to facilitate analytical calculations.   MATLAB® is presented and introduced as a highly convenient tool to solve problems for theory and applications in statics. Included are example problems to demonstrate the MATLAB® syntax and to also introduce specific functions dealing with statics. These explanations are reinforced through figures generated with MATLAB® and the extra material available online which includes the special functions described. This detailed introduction and application of MATLAB® to the field of statics makes Statics with MATLAB® a useful tool for instruction as well as self study,  highlighting the use of symbolic MATLAB® for both theo...

  6. Static electromagnetic frequency changers

    CERN Document Server

    Rozhanskii, L L

    1963-01-01

    Static Electromagnetic Frequency Changers is about the theory, design, construction, and applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers, devices that used for multiplication or division of alternating current frequency. It is originally published in the Russian language. This book is organized into five chapters. The first three chapters introduce the readers to the principles of operation, the construction, and the potential applications of static electromagnetic frequency changers and to the principles of their design. The two concluding chapters use some hitherto unpublished work

  7. Monodisperse Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} nanospheres: Metal-ion-steered size/composition control mechanism, static magnetic and enhanced microwave absorbing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Kedan, E-mail: 17858961652@163.com [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Liu, Yun, E-mail: liuyun650403@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Pan, Yefei, E-mail: 3083780256@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Wang, Ru, E-mail: 631081137@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Hu, Panbing, E-mail: 1036855954@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); He, Rujia, E-mail: 634185782@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Zhang, Lingli, E-mail: 786510121@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Tong, Guoxiu, E-mail: tonggx@zjnu.cn [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A metal-ion-steered solvothermal method for synthesizing Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} nanospheres. • Proposing an in situ-reduction, coordination-precipitation transformation mechanism. • Investigating size- and composition-dependent static magnetic properties. • Investigating size- and composition-dependent microwave absorbing properties. - Abstract: An easy metal-ion-steered solvothermal method was developed for the one-step synthesis of monodisperse, uniform Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} polycrystalline nanospheres with tunable sphere diameter (40–400 nm) and composition (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.245) via changing just Ni{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} molar ratio (γ). With g increased from 0:1 to 2:1, sphere diameter gradually decreased and crystal size exhibited an inversed U-shaped change tendency, followed by increased Ni/Fe atom ratio from 0% to 0.0888%. An in situ-reduction, coordination-precipitation transformation mechanism was proposed to interpret the metal-ion-steered growth. Size- and composition-dependent static magnetic and microwave absorbing properties were systematically investigated. Saturation magnetization declines with g in a Boltzmann model due to the changes of crystal size, sphere diameter, and Ni content. The coercivity reaches a maximum at γ = 0.75:1 because of the critical size of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} single domain (25 nm). Studies on microwave absorption reveal that 150–400 nm Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanospheres mainly obey the quarter-wavelength cancellation model with the single-band absorption; 40–135 nm Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} nanospheres (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.245) obey the one and three quarter-wavelength cancellation model with the multi-band absorption. 150 nm Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanospheres exhibit the optimal EM wave-absorbing property with an absorbing band of 8.94 GHz and the maximum R{sub L} of −50.11 dB.

  8. Contagion processes on the static and activity driven coupling networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Yanjun; Guo, Quantong; Ma, Yifang; Li, Meng; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of network structure and the spreading of epidemic are common coexistent dynamical processes. In most cases, network structure is treated either static or time-varying, supposing the whole network is observed in a same time window. In this paper, we consider the epidemic spreading on a network consisting of both static and time-varying structures. At meanwhile, the time-varying part and the epidemic spreading are supposed to be of the same time scale. We introduce a static and activity driven coupling (SADC) network model to characterize the coupling between static (strong) structure and dynamic (weak) structure. Epidemic thresholds of SIS and SIR model are studied on SADC both analytically and numerically with various coupling strategies, where the strong structure is of homogeneous or heterogeneous degree distribution. Theoretical thresholds obtained from SADC model can both recover and generalize the classical results in static and time-varying networks. It is demonstrated that weak structure...

  9. Low strength static magnetic field inhibits the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human vascular smooth muscle cells in a restenosis model through mediating integrins β1-FAK, Ca2+ signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Song, Li-Qiang; Chen, Michael Q; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Li, Jingxia; Feng, Xu-Yang; Li, Weijie; Guo, Wenyi; Jia, Guoliang; Wang, Haichang; Yu, Jin

    2012-12-01

    The proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their interactions with extracellular matrix are key features of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recently, there has been evidence that magnetic fields exert multiple effects on the biological performance of cells and may aid in the treatment of vascular disease. However, the effect of a static magnetic field (SMF) on human VSMCs still remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of low strength SMF on human VSMCs in an in vitro restenosis model. A SMF was established using neodymium-yttrium-iron permanent magnet. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (hUASMCs) were isolated and seeded to a fibronectin-coated plate to form an in vitro restenosis model and then exposed to a vertically oriented field of 5 militesla (mT). MTT, transwell, and adhesion assays were used to demonstrate that the proliferation, migration, and adhesion potential of hUASMCs were significantly decreased after exposure to 5 mT SMF for 48 h compared with a non-treated group. Meanwhile, confocal microscopy analysis was used to demonstrate that integrin β(1) clustering was inhibited by exposure to 5 mT SMF. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was markedly inhibited, and the upregulated cytosolic free calcium had been reversed (p strength SMF on hUASMCs could be blocked by the administration of GRGDSP-the blockade of integrins. In conclusion, a low strength SMF can influence the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of VSMCs by inhibiting the clustering of integrin β1, decreasing cytosolic free calcium concentration, and inactivating FAK. With further validation, SMFs may aid in attenuating abnormal VSMCs biological performance and has potential to block atherogenesis and prevent restenosis.

  10. Fluid Statics and Archimedes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluid Statics and Archimedes. Jaywant H Arakeri C Dharuman. General Article Volume 11 Issue 10 October 2006 pp 28- ... Keywords. Fluid statics; buoyancy; stratification; instability. Author Affiliations. Jaywant H Arakeri1 C Dharuman1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 ...

  11. Exposure to static magnetic fields increases insulin secretion in rat INS-1 cells by activating the transcription of the insulin gene and up-regulating the expression of vesicle-secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Libin; Wang, Huiqin; Ma, Fenghui; Guo, Zhixia; He, Hongpeng; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nan

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on insulin secretion and explore the mechanisms underlying exposure to SMF-induced insulin secretion in rat insulinoma INS-1 cells. INS-1 cells were exposed to a 400 mT SMF for 72 h, and the proliferation of INS-1 cells was detected by (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The secretion of insulin was measured with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), the expression of genes was detected by real-time PCR, and the expression of proteins was measured by Western blotting. Exposure to an SMF increased the expression and secretion of insulin by INS-1 cells but did not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, SMF exposure up-regulated the expression of several pancreas-specific transcriptional factors. Specifically, the activity of the rat insulin promoter was enhanced in INS-1 cells exposed to an SMF, and the expression levels of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and syntaxin-1A were up-regulated after exposure to an SMF. SMF exposure can promote insulin secretion in rat INS-1 cells by activating the transcription of the insulin gene and up-regulating the expression of vesicle-secreted proteins.

  12. Inhibition of Viability, Proliferation, Cytokines Secretion, Surface Antigen Expression, and Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Seven-Day Exposure to 0.5 T Static Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After seven-day exposure to 0.5-Tesla Static Magnetic Field (SMF, Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ASCs and those labeled by superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles were examined for viability by methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT assay, proliferation by cell counting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation, DNA integrity by single cell gel electrophoresis, surface antigen by flow cytometry analysis, and the expression of cytokines and genetic markers by reverse transcription-PCR and underwent adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assessed by quantifying related specific genes expression. The SMF slightly reduced cell viability and proliferation and inhibited the expression of CD49d, CD54, and CD73 but did not damage DNA integrity. The SMF slightly downregulated the expression of cytokines including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1, Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 (TGF-β1, genetic markers comprising Stem Cell Antigen-1 (Sca1, Octamer-4 (Oct-4, ATP-binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1 (ABCB1, adipogenic marker genes containing Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR-γ, and osteogenic marker genes including Secreted Phosphor-protein 1 (SPP1 and Osterix (OSX. Exposure to 0.5 T SMF for seven days inhibited viability, proliferation, surface antigen expression, cytokine secretion, stem cell genetic marker expression, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation but did not affect the DNA integrity in ASCs with or without SPIO labeling.

  13. Static potential in baryon

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzmenko, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    The baryon static potential is calculated in the framework of field correlator method and is shown to match the recent lattice results. The effects of the nonzero value of the gluon correlation length are emphasized.

  14. Static vs Dynamic SAGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Lanese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available SAGAs calculi (or simply SAGAs have been proposed by Bruni et al. as a model for long-running transactions. The approach therein can be considered static, while a dynamic approach has been proposed by Lanese and Zavattaro. In this paper we first extend both static SAGAs (in the centralized interruption policy and dynamic SAGAs to deal with nesting, then we compare the two approaches.

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  16. Investigation of the curvature induction and membrane localization of the influenza virus M2 protein using static and off-magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of oriented bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2015-04-07

    A wide variety of membrane proteins induce membrane curvature for function; thus, it is important to develop new methods to simultaneously determine membrane curvature and protein binding sites in membranes with multiple curvatures. We introduce solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods based on magnetically oriented bicelles and off-magic-angle spinning (OMAS) to measure membrane curvature and the binding site of proteins in mixed-curvature membranes. We demonstrate these methods on the influenza virus M2 protein, which not only acts as a proton channel but also mediates virus assembly and membrane scission. An M2 peptide encompassing the transmembrane (TM) domain and an amphipathic helix, M2(21-61), was studied and compared with the TM peptide (M2TM). Static (31)P NMR spectra of magnetically oriented 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) bicelles exhibit a temperature-independent isotropic chemical shift in the presence of M2(21-61) but not M2TM, indicating that the amphipathic helix confers the ability to generate a high-curvature phase. Two-dimensional (2D) (31)P spectra indicate that this high-curvature phase is associated with the DHPC bicelle edges, suggestive of the structure of budding viruses from the host cell. (31)P- and (13)C-detected (1)H relaxation times of the lipids indicate that the majority of M2(21-61) is bound to the high-curvature phase. Using OMAS experiments, we resolved the (31)P signals of lipids with identical headgroups based on their distinct chemical shift anisotropies. On the basis of this resolution, 2D (1)H-(31)P correlation spectra show that the amide protons in M2(21-61) correlate with the DMPC but not DHPC (31)P signal of the bicelle, indicating that a small percentage of M2(21-61) partitions into the planar region of the bicelles. These results show that the amphipathic helix induces high membrane curvature and localizes the protein to this phase, in good

  17. Kramers systems with weak spin-dependent interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwanski, R.J. [Inst. of Physics and Informatics, Pedagogical University, 30-084, Krakow (Poland)]|[Center for Solid State Physics, Sw. Filip 5, 31-150, Krakow (Poland)

    1995-02-09

    Magnetic properties of a paramagnetic Kramers f{sup 3} subsystem under charge interactions of the hexagonal symmetry have been examined in the combination with weak spin-dependent (S-D) interactions for the case of the weakly-magnetic charge-formed ground state. The Kramers systems with weak S-D interactions exhibit particular phenomena like large specific heat at low temperatures. ((orig.)).

  18. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  19. Explaining the Virtual Universal Occurrence of Static Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Sokoloff, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    Perturbation theory, simulations and scaling arguments predict that there should be no static friction for two weakly interacting flat atomically smooth clean solid surfaces. The absence of static friction results from the fact that the atomic level interfacial potential energy is much weaker than the elastic potential energy, which prevents the atoms from sinking to their interfacial potential minima. Consequently, we have essentially two rigid solids, for which the forces at randomly distri...

  20. Magnetic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Essam Aboud; Nabil El-Masry; Atef Qaddah; Faisal Alqahtani; Mohammed R.H. Moufti

    2015-01-01

    .... A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  4. Static Transition Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damian, Daniel; Danvy, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    Starting from an operational specification of a translation from a structured to an unstructured imperative language, we point out how a compositional and context-insensitive translation gives rise to static chains of jumps. Taking an inspiration from the notion of continuation, we state a new...... compositional and context-sensitive specification that provably gives rise to no static chains of jumps, no redundant labels, and no unused labels. It is defined with one inference rule per syntactic construct and operates in linear time and space on the size of the source program (indeed it operates in one...

  5. Energy conversion statics

    CERN Document Server

    Messerle, H K; Declaris, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Energy Conversion Statics deals with equilibrium situations and processes linking equilibrium states. A development of the basic theory of energy conversion statics and its applications is presented. In the applications the emphasis is on processes involving electrical energy. The text commences by introducing the general concept of energy with a survey of primary and secondary energy forms, their availability, and use. The second chapter presents the basic laws of energy conversion. Four postulates defining the overall range of applicability of the general theory are set out, demonstrating th

  6. WEAK GORENSTEIN GLOBAL DIMENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Bennis, Driss

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the weak Gorenstein global dimensions. We are mainly interested in studying the problem when the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions coincide. We first show, for GF-closed rings, that the left and right weak Gorenstein global dimensions are equal when they are finite. Then, we prove that the same equality holds for any two-sided coherent ring. We conclude the paper with some examples and a brief discussion of the scope and limits of our results.

  7. Aligning Paramecium caudatum with Static Magnetic Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M

    2006-01-01

    ... by a Paramecium in a DC electric field. It orients with the field and swims toward the cathode due to a change in its membrane potential. This phenomenon is not observed in nonswimming Paramecium (11) . On the other hand, there also exist passive responses for which a physical field such as gravity may directly orient an organism without eliciting a physiolo...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  12. EKC: Static or Dynamic?

    OpenAIRE

    Dinda, Soumyananda

    2006-01-01

    This paper tests the robustness of the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis, using dynamic model specification for the long panel data set rather than static model. The monotonic income - CO2 emission relationship exists in most of the under developed or developing economies but EKC exists mostly in developed economies.

  13. Fluid Statics and Archimedes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we derive equations for variation of pressure in a static fluid or in one that is moving as a rigid body. Also, we show that surfaces of constant pressure and constant density should coincide. Various types of instabilities related to submerged bodies and multi layerd fluids are briefly discussed. Pressure in Fluids.

  14. Why Static Clings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  15. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  16. Static Transition Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Damian, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Starting from an operational specification of a translation from a structured to an unstructured imperative language, we point out how a compositional and context-insensitive translation gives rise to static chains of jumps. Taking an inspiration from the notion of continuation, we state a new co...

  17. History of Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  19. Weak bond screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  20. Axial static mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  5. Do naturally occurring magnetic nanoparticles in the human body mediate increased risk of childhood leukaemia with EMF exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binhi, Vladimir

    2008-07-01

    To develop the hypothesis that magnetic nanoparticles, found in many organisms and often involved in biological reactions to weak electromagnetic fields (EMF), mediate EMF-induced DNA damage which could result in increased risk of childhood leukaemia and other cancers. An analysis of current research into magnetic nanoparticles. Physics estimates and the development of the hypothesis that intracellular magnetic nanoparticles chronically change the free radical concentration and can mediate the enhanced rate of DNA damage in hematopoietic stem cells. The properties of magnetic nanoparticles are considered and the naturally occurring magnetic field generated by a magnetic nanoparticle within a cell is calculated to be in the range of about 1-200 millitesla, which exceeds the level of the natural geomagnetic field by orders of magnitude. Experiments are summarized on the biological effects of static magnetic field in this range. It is shown that magnetic nanoparticles can increase the rate of free radical formation by a few percent, in the course of an idealized radical-pair reaction in a cell. A mechanism is discussed that explains how weak alternating magnetic fields, of the order of 0.4 muT, could cause an increase in the rate of leukaemia via millitesla fields produced around superparamagnetic nanoparticles in hematopoietic stem cells. The postulated presence of magnetic nanoparticles located in hematopoietic stem cells could constitute a cancer risk factor. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles can possibly mediate increased level of leukaemia caused by background exposure to low-frequency weak EMF.

  6. Hybrid static-runtime information flow and declassification enforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocha, Bruno P.S.; Conti, Mauro; Etalle, Sandro; Crispo, Bruno

    There are different paradigms for enforcing information flow and declassification policies. These approaches can be divided into static analyzers and runtime enforcers. Each class has its own strengths and weaknesses, each being able to enforce a different set of policies. In this paper, we

  7. MAGNETO-STATIC MODELING OF THE MIXED PLASMA BETA SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BASED ON SUNRISE/IMaX DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Neukirch, T. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Nickeler, D. H. [Astronomical Institute, AV CR, Fricova 298, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Borrero, J. M., E-mail: wiegelmann@mps.mpg.de [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstrasse 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    Our aim is to model the three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the upper solar atmosphere, including regions of non-negligible plasma beta. We use high-resolution photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX as the boundary condition for a magneto-static magnetic field model. The high resolution of IMaX allows us to resolve the interface region between the photosphere and corona, but modeling this region is challenging for the following reasons. While the coronal magnetic field is thought to be force-free (the Lorentz force vanishes), this is not the case in the mixed plasma β environment in the photosphere and lower chromosphere. In our model, pressure gradients and gravity forces are self-consistently taken into account and compensate for the non-vanishing Lorentz force. Above a certain height (about 2 Mm) the non-magnetic forces become very weak and consequently the magnetic field becomes almost force-free. Here, we apply a linear approach where the electric current density consists of a superposition of a field-line parallel current and a current perpendicular to the Sun's gravity field. We illustrate the prospects and limitations of this approach and give an outlook for an extension toward a nonlinear model.

  8. Magneto-static Modeling of the Mixed Plasma Beta Solar Atmosphere Based on Sunrise/IMaX Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Neukirch, T.; Nickeler, D. H.; Solanki, S. K.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Borrero, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Our aim is to model the three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the upper solar atmosphere, including regions of non-negligible plasma beta. We use high-resolution photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX as the boundary condition for a magneto-static magnetic field model. The high resolution of IMaX allows us to resolve the interface region between the photosphere and corona, but modeling this region is challenging for the following reasons. While the coronal magnetic field is thought to be force-free (the Lorentz force vanishes), this is not the case in the mixed plasma β environment in the photosphere and lower chromosphere. In our model, pressure gradients and gravity forces are self-consistently taken into account and compensate for the non-vanishing Lorentz force. Above a certain height (about 2 Mm) the non-magnetic forces become very weak and consequently the magnetic field becomes almost force-free. Here, we apply a linear approach where the electric current density consists of a superposition of a field-line parallel current and a current perpendicular to the Sun's gravity field. We illustrate the prospects and limitations of this approach and give an outlook for an extension toward a nonlinear model.

  9. Bagging Weak Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Manuel; Hillebrand, Eric

    Relations between economic variables can often not be exploited for forecasting, suggesting that predictors are weak in the sense that estimation uncertainty is larger than bias from ignoring the relation. In this paper, we propose a novel bagging predictor designed for such weak predictor...... variables. The predictor is based on a test for finitesample predictive ability. Our predictor shrinks the OLS estimate not to zero, but towards the null of the test which equates squared bias with estimation variance. We derive the asymptotic distribution and show that the predictor can substantially lower...

  10. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, V

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the cosmic microwave background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l approximately=1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended t...

  11. Studies on magnetism and bioelectromagnetics for 45 years: from magnetic analog memory to human brain stimulation and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-01-01

    Forty-five years of studies on magnetism and bioelectromagnetics, in our laboratory, are presented. This article is prepared for the d'Arsonval Award Lecture. After a short introduction of our early work on magnetic analog memory, we review and discuss the following topics: (1) Magnetic nerve stimulation and localized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the human brain by figure-eight coils; (2) Measurements of weak magnetic fields generated from the brain by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems, called magnetoencephalography (MEG), and its application in functional brain studies; (3) New methods of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the imaging of impedance of the brain, called impedance MRI, and the imaging of neuronal current activities in the brain, called current MRI; (4) Cancer therapy and other medical treatments by pulsed magnetic fields; (5) Effects of static magnetic fields and magnetic control of cell orientation and cell growth; and (6) Effects of radio frequency magnetic fields and control of iron ion release and uptake from and into ferritins, iron cage proteins. These bioelectromagnetic studies have opened new horizons in magnetism and medicine, in particular for brain research and treatment of ailments such as depression, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's diseases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Modelling of magnetic fluid support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashtovoi, V.G. E-mail: bashv@reol1.itmo.by; Bossis, G.; Kabachnikov, D.N.; Krakov, M.S.; Volkova, O

    2002-11-01

    One kind of elastic magnetic fluid support representing the magnetic fluid drop with permanent magnet inside is investigated experimentally and numerically. The dependencies between the magneto static force in support and the geometrical parameters and properties of the magnet and the magnetic fluid are established.

  13. Charged weak currents

    CERN Document Server

    Turlay, René

    1979-01-01

    In this review of charged weak currents the author concentrates on inclusive high energy neutrino physics. The authors discusses the general structure of charged currents, new results on total cross- sections, the Callan-Gross relation, antiquark distributions, scaling violations and tests of QCD. A very short summary on multilepton physics is given. (44 refs).

  14. On Weak Markov's Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    We show that the so-called weak Markov's principle (WMP) which states that every pseudo-positive real number is positive is underivable in E-HA + AC. Since allows one to formalize (atl eastl arge parts of) Bishop's constructive mathematics, this makes it unlikely that WMP can be proved within...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  17. The Static Baryon Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Tsapalis, A; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2002-01-01

    Using state of the art lattice techniques we investigate the static baryon potential. We employ the multi-hit procedure for the time links and a variational approach to determine the ground state with sufficient accuracy that, for distances up to $\\sim 1.2$ fm, we can distinguish the $Y$- and $\\Delta$- Ans\\"atze for the baryonic Wilson area law. Our analysis shows that the $\\Delta$-Ansatz is favoured. This result is also supported by the gauge-invariant nucleon wave function which we measure for the first time.

  18. Static analysis for blinding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer Rosenkilde; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2006-01-01

    operation blinding. In this paper we study the theoretical foundations for one of the successful approaches to validating cryptographic protocols and we extend it to handle the blinding primitive. Our static analysis approach is based on Flow Logic; this gives us a clean separation between the specification...... of the analysis and its realisation in an automatic tool. We concentrate on the former in the present paper and provide the semantic foundation for our analysis of protocols using blinding - also in the presence of malicious attackers....

  19. Weak lensing with GEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Kaiser, N.

    2001-12-01

    Weak lensing by large-scale structure (cosmic shear) provides an opportunity to directly observe the dark matter in the universe. Current ground-based and space-based surveys have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in determining the mass distribution and thus placing constraints on cosmological parameters such as Ω m, σ 8, and the bias parameter b. Current surveys have been hampered by the comparatively low resolution of ground-based telescopes and the small field of view of HST. To make significant progress in this field, wide field space-based surveys are needed. The Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope (GEST) will be able to provide 500- 1000 sqare degrees with a resolution of better than 0.2 arcseconds in multiple filters. This will make it an ideal instrument for a weak lensing survey.

  20. Composite weak bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamical mechanism of composite W and Z is studied in a 1/N field theory model with four-fermion interactions in which global weak SU(2) symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. Issues involved in such a model are discussed in detail. Deviation from gauge coupling due to compositeness and higher order loop corrections are examined to show that this class of models are consistent not only theoretically but also experimentally.

  1. Avaliação quantitativa das forças laterais da patela: ressonância magnética estática e cinemática Quantitative evaluation of lateral forces on the patella: static and kinematic magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Hoon Yang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a validade da ressonância magnética cinemática combinada com a ressonância magnética estática no estudo da articulação femoropatelar. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas ressonância magnética estática e ressonância magnética cinemática em 20 voluntários assintomáticos (40 joelhos e em 23 pacientes (43 joelhos, em aparelho de configuração fechada de 1,5 tesla de campo. Os indivíduos foram posicionados na extremidade da mesa, em 30° de flexão. A translação patelar foi avaliada medindo-se o desvio da bissetriz, o deslocamento lateral da patela e o ângulo de inclinação da patela. Para a comparação entre os estudos estático e cinemático, foi utilizado o teste não-paramétrico de Wilcoxon. Para a comparação entre os voluntários e os pacientes, foi utilizado o teste de Mann-Whitney. RESULTADOS: Houve diferenças significantes entre a ressonância magnética estática e a ressonância magnética cinemática (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of combining static and kinematic magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the femoropatellar joint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (40 knees and 23 patients (43 knees were submitted to both static and kinematic magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5 tesla whole-body magnetic resonance scanner. The knees were positioned at 30º flexion with the quadrature knee coil at the inner end of the examination table. The patellar translation was evaluated by measurements of bisect offset, lateral patellar displacement and patellar tilt angle. The nonparametric Wilcoxon test was utilized for statistical analysis of data resulting from the static and kinematic studies in both groups. Nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was utilized in the comparison between healthy volunteers and patients. RESULTS: Statistical analysis demonstrated significant differences (p < 0.05 between static and kinematic magnetic resonance imaging for the three parameters

  2. The Weak Haagerup Property II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Uffe; Knudby, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The weak Haagerup property for locally compact groups and the weak Haagerup constant were recently introduced by the second author [27]. The weak Haagerup property is weaker than both weak amenability introduced by Cowling and the first author [9] and the Haagerup property introduced by Connes [6......] and Choda [5]. In this paper, it is shown that a connected simple Lie group G has the weak Haagerup property if and only if the real rank of G is zero or one. Hence for connected simple Lie groups the weak Haagerup property coincides with weak amenability. Moreover, it turns out that for connected simple...... Lie groups the weak Haagerup constant coincides with the weak amenability constant, although this is not true for locally compact groups in general. It is also shown that the semidirect product R2 × SL(2,R) does not have the weak Haagerup property....

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  6. Magnetic nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Silke; Appel, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanocomposites are multi-component materials, typically containing nanosized magnetic materials to trigger the response to an external stimulus (i.e., an external static or alternating magnetic field). Up to now, the search for novel nanocomposites has lead to the combination of a plethora of different materials (e.g., gels, liquid crystals, renewable polymers, silica, carbon or metal organic frameworks) with various types of magnetic particles, offering exciting perspectives not only for fundamental investigations but also for application in various fields, including medical therapy and diagnosis, separations, actuation, or catalysis. In this review, we have selected a few of the most recent examples to highlight general concepts and advances in the preparation of magnetic nanocomposites and recent advances in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  8. Modeling of Static Characteristics of Switched Reluctance Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Memon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the running characteristics of a switched reluctance motor, the static characteristics and related input data tables are required. The static characteristics comprise of flux linkage, co-energy and static torque characteristics. The co-energy and static torque are calculated once data of magnetization characteristics is available. The data of co-energy is required for the calculation of static torque characteristics. The simulation model includes the data of static characteristics for prediction of the instantaneous and steady state performance of the motor. In this research a computer based procedure of experiments is carried out for measurement of the magnetization characteristics. For every set of measurements, the removal of eddy current is carefully addressed. The experiments are carried out on an existing 8/6 pole rotary switched reluctance motor. Additionally, the instantaneous phase current, instantaneous torque and flux waveforms are produced by using linear, which is by default and spline data interpolation separately. The information obtained from theses simulation results will help in an improved simulation model for predicting the performance of the machine.

  9. Magnets for Pain Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat diseases. Web site: www.nih.gov/health/clinicaltrials/ Key References Colbert AP, Markov MS, Souder JS. Static magnetic field therapy: dosimetry considerations. Journal of Alternative ...

  10. Exploring the magnetization dynamics of NiFe/Pt multilayers in flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrêa, M.A., E-mail: marciocorrea@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-900 Natal, RN (Brazil); Dutra, R.; Marcondes, T.L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mori, T.J.A. [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, Rua Giuseppe Máximo Scolfaro, 1000, Guará, 13083-100 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Bohn, F. [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-900 Natal, RN (Brazil); Sommer, R.L. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Magnetic properties of multilayers grown onto flexible substrates were investigated. • Experimental and theoretical magnetization dynamics results are presented. • The flexible substrates become promising candidate for rf-frequency devices. - Abstract: We investigate the structural and magnetic properties, and the magnetization dynamics in Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}/Pt multilayer systems grown onto rigid and flexible substrates. The structural characterization shows evidence of a superlattice behavior, while the quasi-static magnetization characterization reveal a weak magnetic anisotropy induced in the multilayers. The magnetization dynamics is investigated through the magnetoimpedance effect. We employ a theoretical approach to describe the experimental magnetoimpedance effect and verify the influence of the effective damping parameter on the magnetization dynamics. Experimental data and theoretical results are in agreement and suggest that the multilayers present high effective damping parameter. Moreover, our experiments raise an interesting issue on the possibility of achieving considerable MI% values, even for systems with weak magnetic anisotropy and high damping parameter grown onto flexible substrates.

  11. ICU-Acquired Weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Sarah E; Bunnell, Aaron E; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-11-01

    Survivorship after critical illness is an increasingly important health-care concern as ICU use continues to increase while ICU mortality is decreasing. Survivors of critical illness experience marked disability and impairments in physical and cognitive function that persist for years after their initial ICU stay. Newfound impairment is associated with increased health-care costs and use, reductions in health-related quality of life, and prolonged unemployment. Weakness, critical illness neuropathy and/or myopathy, and muscle atrophy are common in patients who are critically ill, with up to 80% of patients admitted to the ICU developing some form of neuromuscular dysfunction. ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is associated with longer durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, along with greater functional impairment for survivors. Although there is increasing recognition of ICUAW as a clinical entity, significant knowledge gaps exist concerning identifying patients at high risk for its development and understanding its role in long-term outcomes after critical illness. This review addresses the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of ICUAW; highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with its diagnosis in patients who are critically ill; and proposes, to our knowledge, a novel strategy for identifying ICUAW. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of magnetized dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben; Wilms, Jochen

    2012-10-01

    The combination of the electric field that confines a dust cloud with a static magnetic field generally leads to a rotation of the dust cloud. In weak magnetic fields, the Hall component of the ion flow exerts a drag force that sets the dust in rotation. We have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamics of torus-shaped dust clouds in anodic plasmas. The stationary flow [1] is characterized by a shell structure in the laminar dust flow and by the spontaneous formation of a shear-flow around a stationary vortex. Here we present new results on dynamic phenomena, among them fluctuations due to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear-flow. The simulations are compared with experimental results. [4pt] [1] T. Reichstein, A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 18, 083705 (2011)

  13. Magnetic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA); Baldwin, M.J. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (USA)

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Detection of Static Eccentricity Fault in Saturated Induction Motors by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unfortunately, motor current signature analysis (MCSA) cannot detect the small degrees of the purely static eccentricity (SE) defects, while the air-gap magnetic flux signature analysis (FSA) is applied successfully. The simulation results are obtained by using time stepping finite elements (TSFE) method. In order to show the ...

  15. Cytological effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields and static ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytological effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields and static magnetic fields induced by a therapeutic device on in vivo exposed rats. ... were distributed into three groups: (a) 5 males and 5 females (independently) exposed to PEMFs combined with SMFs, (b) animals treated with SMFs only, and (c) non-exposed animals.

  16. Gluon chain formation in presence of static charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, A.; Santopinto, E.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Vassallo, A.

    2012-12-01

    We consider the origins of the gluon chain model. The model serves as a realization of the dynamics of the chromoelectric flux between static quark-antiquark sources. The derivation is based on the large-NC limit of the Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian in the presence of a background field introduced to model magnetic charge condensation inducing electric confinement.

  17. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically...

  18. Single crystal EPR study of the dinuclear Cu(II) complex [Cu(tda)(phen)](2)·H(2)tda (tda = thiodiacetate, phen = phenanthroline): influence of weak interdimeric magnetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Nicolás I; Perec, Mireille; González, Pablo J; Passeggi, Mario C G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2010-12-23

    We report powder and single crystal EPR measurements of [Cu(tda)(phen)](2)·H(2)tda (tda = thiodiacetate, phen = phenanthroline) at 9.7 GHz. This compound consists of centrosymmetric copper(II) ion dimers, weakly ferromagnetically exchange-coupled (J = +3.2 cm(-1)), in which the dimeric units are linked by hydrophobic chemical paths involving the phen molecules. EPR revealed that the triplet spectra are collapsed by interdimeric exchange interactions mediated by that chemical path. Analysis and simulation of the single crystal EPR spectra were performed using Anderson's exchange narrowing model, together with statistical arguments. This approach allowed us to interpret the spectra modulated by the interdimeric interactions in situations of weak, intermediate, and strong exchange. We evaluated an interdimeric exchange constant J' = 0.0070(3) cm(-1), indicating that hydrophobic paths can transmit weak exchange interactions between centers at relatively long distances of the order of ∼10 Å.

  19. Weak Quantum Ergodicity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1998-01-01

    We examine the consequences of classical ergodicity for the localization properties of individual quantum eigenstates in the classical limit. We note that the well known Schnirelman result is a weaker form of quantum ergodicity than the one implied by random matrix theory. This suggests the possibility of systems with non-gaussian random eigenstates which are nonetheless ergodic in the sense of Schnirelman and lead to ergodic transport in the classical limit. These we call "weakly quantum ergodic.'' Indeed for a class of "slow ergodic" classical systems, it is found that each eigenstate becomes localized to an ever decreasing fraction of the available state space, in the semiclassical limit. Nevertheless, each eigenstate in this limit covers phase space evenly on any classical scale, and long-time transport properties betwen individual quantum states remain ergodic due to the diffractive effects which dominate quantum phase space exploration.

  20. Model Checking as Static Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fuyuan

    to a multi-valued setting, and we therefore obtain a multivalued analysis for temporal properties specied by CTL formulas. In particular, we have shown that the three-valued CTL model checking problem over Kripke modal transition systems can be exactly encoded in three-valued ALFP. Last, we come back to two-valued......Both model checking and static analysis are prominent approaches to detecting software errors. Model Checking is a successful formal method for verifying properties specified in temporal logics with respect to transition systems. Static analysis is also a powerful method for validating program...... properties which can predict safe approximations to program behaviors. In this thesis, we have developed several static analysis based techniques to solve model checking problems, aiming at showing the link between static analysis and model checking. We focus on logical approaches to static analysis...

  1. Discrete dissipative localized modes in nonlinear magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanov, Nikolay N; Vysotina, Nina V; Shatsev, Anatoly N; Shadrivov, Ilya V; Powell, David A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2011-12-19

    We analyze the existence, stability, and propagation of dissipative discrete localized modes in one- and two-dimensional nonlinear lattices composed of weakly coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) excited by an external electromagnetic field. We employ the near-field interaction approach for describing quasi-static electric and magnetic interaction between the resonators, and demonstrate the crucial importance of the electric coupling, which can completely reverse the sign of the overall interaction between the resonators. We derive the effective nonlinear model and analyze the properties of nonlinear localized modes excited in one-and two-dimensional lattices. In particular, we study nonlinear magnetic domain walls (the so-called switching waves) separating two different states of nonlinear magnetization, and reveal the bistable dependence of the domain wall velocity on the external field. Then, we study two-dimensional localized modes in nonlinear lattices of SRRs and demonstrate that larger domains may experience modulational instability and splitting.

  2. Distortion-free magnetic resonance imaging in the zero-field limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Nathan; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bouchard, Louis-S.; Demas, Vasiliki; Muck, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2009-07-09

    MRI is a powerful technique for clinical diagnosis and materials characterization. Images are acquired in a homogeneous static magnetic field much higher than the fields generated across the field of view by the spatially encoding field gradients. Without such a high field, the concomitant components of the field gradient dictated by Maxwell's equations lead to severe distortions that make imaging impossible with conventional MRI encoding. In this paper, we present a distortion-free image of a phantom acquired with a fundamentally different methodology in which the applied static field approaches zero. Our technique involves encoding with pulses of uniform and gradient field, and acquiring the magnetic field signals with a SQUID. The method can be extended to weak ambient fields, potentially enabling imaging in the Earth's field without cancellation coils or shielding. Other potential applications include quantum information processing and fundamental studies of long-range ferromagnetic interactions.

  3. Elasticity of a magnetic fluid in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.; Sheldeshova, E. V.; Karpova, G. V.; Aref'ev, I. M.

    2017-07-01

    Complex measurements of the following elastic-magnetic parameters of a magnetic fluid suspended by magnetic levitation within a horizontal tube in a strong magnetic field were performed: the oscillation frequency and decay coefficient; the static, ponderomotive, and dynamic elasticity coefficients; the fluid displacement under hydrostatic pressure; magnetization curve; and the magnetic field strength and gradient. Calculations based on a model of ponderomotive elasticity with correction for the resistance of a viscous fluid in motion and on the fluid column displacement for two magnetic fluid samples agree well with the experimental magnetization curve. The discussed technique holds promise for research into magnetophoresis and nanoparticle aggregation in magnetic colloids.

  4. Statics and mechanics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically determinate structures in the form of trusses, beams and frames. Instability is discussed in the form of the column problem - both the ideal column and the imperfect column used in actual column design. The theory of statically indeterminate structures is then introduced, and the force and deformation methods are explained and illustrated. An important aspect of the book’s approach is the systematic development of the theory in a form suitable for computer implementation using finite elements. This development is supported by two small computer programs, MiniTruss and MiniFrame, which permit static analysis of trusses and frames, as well as linearized stability analysis. The book’s final section presents related ...

  5. Static Decoupling in fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index...

  6. Statics of Historic Masonry Constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of much of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. This book aims to help fill this demand presenting a comprehensive new statics of masonry constructions. The book, result of thirty years of research and professional experience, gives the fundamentals of statics of the masonry solid, then applied to the study of statics of arches, piers and vaults. Further, combining engineering and architecture and through an interdisciplinary approach, the book investigates the statical behaviour of many historic monuments, as the Pantheon, the Colosseum,  the domes of S. Maria del Fiore in Florence and of St. Peter in Rome, the Tower of Pisa, the Gothic Cathedrals and the Masonry Buildings under seismic actions.

  7. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically...... are explained and illustrated. An important aspect of the book’s approach is the systematic development of the theory in a form suitable for computer implementation using finite elements. This development is supported by two small computer programs, MiniTruss and MiniFrame, which permit static analysis...... determinate structures in the form of trusses, beams and frames. Instability is discussed in the form of the column problem - both the ideal column and the imperfect column used in actual column design. The theory of statically indeterminate structures is then introduced, and the force and deformation methods...

  8. Neutrino-heated winds from millisecond protomagnetars as sources of the weak r-process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Andrey D.; Metzger, Brian D.; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2017-06-01

    We explore heavy element nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds from rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized protoneutron stars ('millisecond protomagnetars') for which the magnetic dipole is aligned with the rotation axis, and the field is assumed to be a static force-free configuration. We process the protomagnetar wind trajectories calculated by Vlasov, Metzger & Thompson through the r-process nuclear reaction network SkyNet using contemporary models for the evolution of the wind electron fraction during the protoneutron star cooling phase. Although we do not find a successful second or third-peak r-process for any rotation period P, we show that protomagnetars with P ˜ 1-5 ms produce heavy element abundance distributions that extend to higher nuclear mass number than from otherwise equivalent spherical winds (with the mass fractions of some elements enhanced by factors of ≳100-1000). The heaviest elements are synthesized by outflows emerging along flux tubes that graze the closed zone and pass near the equatorial plane outside the light cylinder. Due to dependence of the nucleosynthesis pattern on the magnetic field strength and rotation rate of the protoneutron star, natural variations in these quantities between core collapse events could contribute to the observed diversity of the abundances of weak r-process nuclei in metal-poor stars. Further diversity, including possibly even a successful third-peak r-process, could be achieved for misaligned rotators with non-zero magnetic inclination with respect to the rotation axis. If protomagnetars are central engines for GRBs, their relativistic jets should contain a high-mass fraction of heavy nuclei of characteristic mass number \\bar{A}≈ 100, providing a possible source for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays comprised of heavy nuclei with an energy spectrum that extends beyond the nominal Grezin-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off for protons or iron nuclei.

  9. Static Analysis of Mobile Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    multiple layers of object-oriented abstractions. Our hypothesis has been that static analysis techniques have reached the point that sound, precise and...important features of STAMP are: • An interface for reading and interpreting DEX bytecode, allowing analysis of libraries in compiled form, both statically...describe a new bottom-up, subset-based, and context-sensitive pointer analysis for Java. The main novelty of our technique is the constraint-based handling

  10. Crossover between weak antilocalization and weak localization of bulk states in ultrathin Bi₂Se₃ films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Chang, Cui-Zu; Zuo, Huakun; Zhao, Yanfei; Sun, Yi; Xia, Zhengcai; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xie, X C; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Jian

    2014-07-24

    We report transport studies on the 5 nm thick Bi₂Se₃ topological insulator films which are grown via molecular beam epitaxy technique. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data show that the Fermi level of the system lies in the bulk conduction band above the Dirac point, suggesting important contribution of bulk states to the transport results. In particular, the crossover from weak antilocalization to weak localization in the bulk states is observed in the parallel magnetic field measurements up to 50 Tesla. The measured magneto-resistance exhibits interesting anisotropy with respect to the orientation of parallel magnetic field B// and the current I, signifying intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in the Bi₂Se₃ films. Our work directly shows the crossover of quantum interference effect in the bulk states from weak antilocalization to weak localization. It presents an important step toward a better understanding of the existing three-dimensional topological insulators and the potential applications of nano-scale topological insulator devices.

  11. Weak Measurement and Quantum Correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Pati

    The concept of the weak measurements, for the first time, was introduced by Aharonov et al.1. Quantum state is preselected in |ψi〉 and allowed to interact weakly with apparatus. Measurement strength can be tuned and for “small g(t)” it is called 'weak measurement'. With postselection in |ψf 〉, apparatus state is shifted by an ...

  12. Origins of Marslike spectral and magnetic properties of a Hawaiian palagonitic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.; Gooding, James L.; Lauer, Howard V., Jr.; Singer, Robert B.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on spectral, Moessbauer, static magnetic, petrographic, and compositional data for a Hawaiian palagonitic soil from Mauna Kea (HWMK1). It was found that reflectivity spectra of size separates smaller than 20 microns resemble spectra for Martian bright regions, while spectra of larger size separates show characteristics in common with spectra for Martian dark regions. Data on the HWMK1 soil are consistent with the partitioning of iron among the following minerals: olivine, titanomagnetite, hematite, and a superparamagnetic colored ferric oxide. These mineralogies are heterogeneously distributed within the soil with respect to both particle type and soil-particle diameter. The strongly magnetic titanomagnetite is associated with black particles and is responsible for the magnetic nature of the soil, while the colored weakly magnetic superparamagnetic ferric oxide and minor hematite are associated with orange particles.

  13. Model of the motion of a charged particle into a plasma during the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating in the direction of a static and homogeneous magnetic field; Modelo del movimiento de una particula cargada en un plasma durante la interaccion de un pulso electromagnetico elipticamente polarizado propagandose en la direccion de un campo magnetico estatico y homogeneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez R, F. [UAEM, A.P. 2-139, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ondarza R, R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    An analytical model for the description of the movement of a charged particle in the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating along of a static and homogeneous external magnetic field in a plasma starting from the force equation is presented. The method allows to express the solution in terms of the invariant phase, obtaining differential equations for the trajectory of the accelerated particle by means of an electromagnetic pulse of arbitrary amplitude and modulated by an encircling Gaussian. The numerical solutions reported in this work can find varied applications, for example in the physics of the interaction laser-plasma, in the acceleration of particles, in hot plasma and in radiative effects. (Author)

  14. Motion model for a charged particle in a plasma during the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating in the direction of a static and homogeneous magnetic field; Modelo del movimiento de una particula cargada en un plasma durante la interaccion de un pulso electromagnetico elipticamente polarizado propagandose en la direccion de un campo magnetico estatico y homogeneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez R, F. [UAEM, Facultad de Ciencias, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ondarza R, R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    An analytic model is presented for the description of the motion of a charged particle in the interaction of an elliptically electromagnetic pulse polarized propagating along a static and homogeneous external magnetic field in a plasma starting from the force equation. The method allows to express the solution in terms of the invariant phase, obtaining differential equations for the trajectory of the accelerated particle by means of an electromagnetic pulse of arbitrary and modulated width by an encircling Gaussian. The numerical solutions reported in this work can find varied applications, for example in the physics of the interaction laser-plasma, in the acceleration of particles, in hot plasma and in radioactive effects. (Author)

  15. Structural aspects of superconducting fusion magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, M.; Lehner, J.; Powell, J.

    1977-01-01

    Some methods for studying various static, dynamic, elastic-plastic, and fracture mechanics problems of superconducting magnets are described. Sample solutions are given for the UWMAK-I magnet. Finite element calculations were used. (MOW)

  16. Tuning static and high frequency magnetic properties of SrFe12-x(Mn0.5Co0.5Ti)x/2O19 nanoparticles and thin films via chemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Ali

    2015-03-01

    This study is intended to evaluate the structural, magnetic, and reflection loss of Mn-Co-Ti susbtituted strontium hexaferrite SrFe12-x(Mn0.5Co0.5Ti)x/2O19 nanoparticles with x=0-2.5 synthesized by a sol-gel combustion method. The thin films of ferrite with the same composition were also prepared. These particles were evaluated to characterize the structural, magnetic, and reflection loss properties of prepared samples by use of X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, vibrating-sample magnetometer, and vector network analyzer. The XRD and SEM results confirmed the presence of strontium ferrite phase with magnetoplumbite structure and narrow size distribution in all synthesized samples. The substituted cations were located in 4f1 and 2b sites. According to hysteresis loops, magnetization increased and coercivity decreased. The reflection loss characteristics of this ferrite were investigated in the12-18 GHz range. SEM and AFM micrographs showed that with an increase in substitution content, the grain size increases. Magnetic susceptibility of thin films was characterized and it was found that the real parts of susceptibility were decreased by an increase in substitution content, while imaginary parts enhanced.

  17. Study of Magnetic Nanocomposites by NMR and Bulk Magnetization Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matveev V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocomposites possess complex and nonuniform magnetic structure. As a result it is necessary to use different physical methods to describe their properties. In this work we have applied a combination of micro and macro approaches to understand more deeply magnetic properties of some cobaltcontaining nanocomposites. Testing of magnetic structure of the samples at molecular level was done with NMR and Mössbauer techniques whereas static (SQUID and dynamic magnetic (M2, see below measurements – at macro level.

  18. Modifying the photodetachment near a metal surface by a weak electric field

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, B. C.; Du, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    We show the photodetachment cross sections of H near a metal surface can be modified using a weak static electric field. The modification is possible because the oscillatory part of the cross section near a metal surface is directly connected with the transit-time and the action of the detached-electron closed-orbit which can be changed systematically by varying the static electric field strength. Photodetachment cross sections for various photon energies and electric field values are calcula...

  19. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    are explained and illustrated. An important aspect of the book’s approach is the systematic development of the theory in a form suitable for computer implementation using finite elements. This development is supported by two small computer programs, MiniTruss and MiniFrame, which permit static analysis......The statics and mechanics of structures form a core aspect of civil engineering. This book provides an introduction to the subject, starting from classic hand-calculation types of analysis and gradually advancing to a systematic form suitable for computer implementation. It starts with statically...... of trusses and frames, as well as linearized stability analysis. The book’s final section presents related strength of materials subjects in greater detail; these include stress and strain, failure criteria, and normal and shear stresses in general beam flexure and in beam torsion....

  20. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments of its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant; still within the broad studies in the subject it is not yet recognised, in particular within the seismic area, a unitary approach to deal with Masonry structures. This successful book contributes to clarify the issues with a rigorous approach offering a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. This third edition has been driven by some recent developments of the research in the field, and it gives the fundamentals of Statics with an original and rigorous mathematical formulation, further in-depth inquired in this new version. With many refinements and improvements, the book investigates the static behaviour of many historic monuments, such as the Gothic Cathedrals, the Mycenaean Tholoi, the Pantheon, the Colosseum, the dome...

  1. Static Correctness of Hierarchical Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    1990-01-01

    basis for a general type hierarchy with static type checking, which enables first-order polymorphism combined with multiple inheritance and specialization in a language with assignments. We extend the results to include opaque types. An opaque version of a type is different from the original but has......A system of hierarchical, fully recursive types in a truly imperative language allows program fragments written for small types to be reused for all larger types. To exploit this property to enable type-safe hierarchical procedures, it is necessary to impose a static requirement on procedure calls....... We introduce an example language and prove the existence of a sound requirement which preserves static correctness while allowing hierarchical procedures. This requirement is further shown to be optimal, in the sense that it imposes as few restrictions as possible. This establishes the theoretical...

  2. Propagation of Cigarette Static Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A propagation model of cigarette static burn at the cigarette periphery is proposed. Propagation of cigarette static burn is characterized by intermittent burn of the cigarette paper. The burning rate depends on the period of flash burn of the paper and is independent of the burning width. By measuring the local temperature near the front line of the burning propagation, the rate-determining step was identified as the time required to ignite the paper. A mathematical analysis was performed by calculating the heat transfer at the periphery during the paper heating period, and it was revealed that the thermal properties of the cigarette are the dominant factors of cigarette static burn. Modeling results showed good agreement with measured data.

  3. Weak gravity conjecture and effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    The weak gravity conjecture (WGC) is a proposed constraint on theories with gauge fields and gravity, requiring the existence of light charged particles and/or imposing an upper bound on the field theory cutoff Λ . If taken as a consistency requirement for effective field theories (EFTs), it rules out possibilities for model building including some models of inflation. I demonstrate simple models which satisfy all forms of the WGC, but which through Higgsing of the original gauge fields produce low-energy EFTs with gauge forces that badly violate the WGC. These models illustrate specific loopholes in arguments that motivate the WGC from a bottom-up perspective; for example the arguments based on magnetic monopoles are evaded when the magnetic confinement that occurs in a Higgs phase is accounted for. This indicates that the WGC should not be taken as a veto on EFTs, even if it turns out to be a robust property of UV quantum gravity theories. However, if the latter is true, then parametric violation of the WGC at low energy comes at the cost of nonminimal field content in the UV. I propose that only a very weak constraint is applicable to EFTs, Λ ≲(log 1/g )-1 /2Mpl , where g is the gauge coupling, motivated by entropy bounds. Remarkably, EFTs produced by Higgsing a theory that satisfies the WGC can saturate but not violate this bound.

  4. Mechanisms Undlerlying Quadriceps Weakness in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    PETTERSON, STEPHANIE C.; BARRANCE, PETER; BUCHANAN, THOMAS; BINDER-MACLEOD, STUART; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify determinants of quadriceps weakness among persons with end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods One-hundred twenty-three individuals (mean age 64.9 ± 8.5 yr) with Kellgren/Lawrence grade IV knee OA participated. Quadriceps strength (MVIC) and volitional muscle activation (CAR) were measured using a burst superimposition test. Muscle composition (lean muscle cross-sectional area (LMCSA) and fat CSA (FCSA)) were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. Specific strength (MVIC/LMCSA) was computed. Interlimb differences were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests. Regression analysis was applied to identify determinants of MVIC. An alpha level of 0.05 was adopted. Results The OA limb was significantly weaker, had lower CAR, and had smaller LMCSA than the contralateral limb. CAR explained 17% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 40% in the OA limb. LMCSA explained 41% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 27% in the OA limb. Conclusion Both reduced CAR and LMCSA contribute to muscle weakness in persons with knee OA. Similar to healthy elders, the best predictor of strength in the contralateral, nondiseased limb was largely determined by LMCSA, whereas CAR was found to be the primary determinant of strength in the OA limb. Deficits in CAR may undermine the effectiveness of volitional strengthening programs in targeting quadriceps weakness in the OA population. PMID:18379202

  5. Mechanisms underlying quadriceps weakness in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Stephanie C; Barrance, Peter; Buchanan, Thomas; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2008-03-01

    To identify determinants of quadriceps weakness among persons with end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). One-hundred twenty-three individuals (mean age 64.9 +/- 8.5 yr) with Kellgren/Lawrence grade IV knee OA participated. Quadriceps strength (MVIC) and volitional muscle activation (CAR) were measured using a burst superimposition test. Muscle composition (lean muscle cross-sectional area (LMCSA) and fat CSA (FCSA)) were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. Specific strength (MVIC/LMCSA) was computed. Interlimb differences were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests. Regression analysis was applied to identify determinants of MVIC. An alpha level of 0.05 was adopted. The OA limb was significantly weaker, had lower CAR, and had smaller LMCSA than the contralateral limb. CAR explained 17% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 40% in the OA limb. LMCSA explained 41% of the variance in the contralateral limb's MVIC compared with 27% in the OA limb. Both reduced CAR and LMCSA contribute to muscle weakness in persons with knee OA. Similar to healthy elders, the best predictor of strength in the contralateral, nondiseased limb was largely determined by LMCSA, whereas CAR was found to be the primary determinant of strength in the OA limb. Deficits in CAR may undermine the effectiveness of volitional strengthening programs in targeting quadriceps weakness in the OA population.

  6. Voltage Sensors Monitor Harmful Static

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A tiny sensor, small enough to be worn on clothing, now monitors voltage changes near sensitive instruments after being created to alert Agency workers to dangerous static buildup near fuel operations and avionics. San Diego s Quasar Federal Systems received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center to develop its remote voltage sensor (RVS), a dime-sized electrometer designed to measure triboelectric changes in the environment. One of the unique qualities of the RVS is that it can detect static at greater distances than previous devices, measuring voltage changes from a few centimeters to a few meters away, due to its much-improved sensitivity.

  7. Resisting Weakness of the Will.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Neil

    2011-01-01

    I develop an account of weakness of the will that is driven by experimental evidence from cognitive and social psychology. I will argue that this account demonstrates that there is no such thing as weakness of the will: no psychological kind corresponds to it. Instead, weakness of the will ought to be understood as depletion of System II resources. Neither the explanatory purposes of psychology nor our practical purposes as agents are well-served by retaining the concept. I therefore suggest that we ought to jettison it, in favour of the vocabulary and concepts of cognitive psychology.

  8. On the approach to electro- and magneto-static equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, Hans C.

    1983-11-01

    Many textbooks claim that the relaxation time for the approach to electrostatic equilibrium is ɛ0/σ. We show that, for a good conductor, this claim is false. For such a conductor, the approach to the electro- and magneto-static equilibrium hinges on the damping of the induced dynamic electric and magnetic fields. The relaxation time depends on the conductivity, the geometry of the conductor, and the details of the initial charge distribution.

  9. Static Analysis for Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Rosa, D. Schuch da

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows how static analysis techniques can help understanding biological systems. Based on a simple example we illustrate the outcome of performing three different analyses extracting information of increasing precision. We conclude by reporting on the potential impact and exploitation o...... of these techniques in systems biology....

  10. Static Analysis for Dynamic XML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Aske Simon; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2002-01-01

    We describe the summary graph lattice for dataflow analysis of programs that dynamically construct XML documents. Summary graphs have successfully been used to provide static guarantees in the JWIG language for programming interactive Web services. In particular, the JWIG compiler is able to check...

  11. Weak Coupling Phases future directions

    CERN Document Server

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results obtained from B decays on the phases of weak couplings described by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are discussed, with particular emphasis on $\\alpha$ and $\\gamma = \\pi - \\beta - \\alpha$.

  12. A young woman with weakness of the legs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On neurological examination she had profound bilateral weakness of the lower limbs, hypertonia, hyperreflexia, a positive Babinski sign and a T6 sensory level. Tests for syphilis and HIV and screening for auto-immune conditions were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spinal cord revealed ...

  13. Fast static field CIPT mapping of unpatterned MRAM film stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Daniel; Hansen, Ole; Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    While investigating uniformity of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) stacks we find experimentally and analytically that variation in the resistance area product (RA) is more important to monitor as compared to the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), which is less sensitive to MTJ variability. The standard...... Current In-Plane Tunneling (CIPT) method measures both RA and TMR, but the usefulness for uniformity mapping, e.g. for tool optimization, is limited by excessive measurement time. Thus, we develop and demonstrate a fast complementary static magnetic field method focused only on measurement of RA. We...

  14. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of CoPt{sub 3}. Nanoparticles in comparison with bulk matter; Statische und dynamische magnetische Eigenschaften von CoPt{sub 3}. Nanopartikel im Vergleich zum Volumenmaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, C.

    2006-09-22

    In this work the structural and magnetic characteristics of CoPt{sub 3}-particles are examined. In particular the determination of the g-factor is of interest as well as the damping behavior of the magnetization vector under influence of a microwave radiation. Moreover the magnetic anisotropy energy density of individual particles is covered by the presented thesis. The particles exist in the chemically disordered phase. They are monocrystalline and monodisperse with a mean diameter of d=4.04 nm and a width of the size distribution of {sigma}=0.15, as determined by transmission electron microscopy. Moreover the particles are embedded into a polymer with high dilution (0.08 vol%). To compare the results for the particles CoPt{sub 3} films and bulk-material are prepared and examined with the same procedure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that all three sample systems are an alloy and do not appear as cobalt clusters embedded in platinum. The lattice constant of the particles is increased by 0.5% in comparison to the bulk material (a{sub NP}=0.388{+-}0.003 nm). The evaluation of the peak widths of the XRD experiments exhibit a crystalline size of 95.5{+-}6.5 nm of the films and 48.5{+-}6.5 nm of the bulk material. The evaluation of the relative intensities of (111)- and (200)-peaks points the fact that both the film and the particles preferentially grow in the (111)-direction. The films are polycrystalline in the film-plane. From magnetic resonance measurements the g-factor and the damping constant {alpha} is extracted. The measurement shows that both the g-factor (about 2%) and the damping-constant {alpha} (about 125%) is increased in comparison to the film, and/or bulk material. For the films M{sub eff} is determined from angle-dependent resonance-field measurements. From the temperature dependence of the resonance field the magnetic anisotropy is determined. Because of the fact that the measurements could be done only to a minimum of 50 K the value of the anisotropy

  15. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  16. Weak interactions of elementary particles

    CERN Document Server

    Okun, Lev Borisovich

    1965-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 5: Weak Interaction of Elementary Particles focuses on the composition, properties, and reactions of elementary particles and high energies. The book first discusses elementary particles. Concerns include isotopic invariance in the Sakata model; conservation of fundamental particles; scheme of isomultiplets in the Sakata model; universal, unitary-symmetric strong interaction; and universal weak interaction. The text also focuses on spinors, amplitudes, and currents. Wave function, calculation of traces, five bilinear covariants,

  17. Acute muscular weakness in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pablo Javier Erazo Torricelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acute muscle weakness in children is a pediatric emergency. During the diagnostic approach, it is crucial to obtain a detailed case history, including: onset of weakness, history of associated febrile states, ingestion of toxic substances/toxins, immunizations, and family history. Neurological examination must be meticulous as well. In this review, we describe the most common diseases related to acute muscle weakness, grouped into the site of origin (from the upper motor neuron to the motor unit. Early detection of hyperCKemia may lead to a myositis diagnosis, and hypokalemia points to the diagnosis of periodic paralysis. Ophthalmoparesis, ptosis and bulbar signs are suggestive of myasthenia gravis or botulism. Distal weakness and hyporeflexia are clinical features of Guillain-Barré syndrome, the most frequent cause of acute muscle weakness. If all studies are normal, a psychogenic cause should be considered. Finding the etiology of acute muscle weakness is essential to execute treatment in a timely manner, improving the prognosis of affected children.

  18. Precision metrology using weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2015-05-29

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  19. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Uttam, E-mail: uttamsingh@hri.res.in; Pati, Arun Kumar, E-mail: akpati@hri.res.in

    2014-04-15

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength.

  20. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply nonlinear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatiotemporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the behaviour of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non- Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope.

  1. Statics and Mechanics of Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    determinate structures in the form of trusses, beams and frames. Instability is discussed in the form of the column problem - both the ideal column and the imperfect column used in actual column design. The theory of statically indeterminate structures is then introduced, and the force and deformation methods...... are explained and illustrated. An important aspect of the book’s approach is the systematic development of the theory in a form suitable for computer implementation using finite elements. This development is supported by two small computer programs, MiniTruss and MiniFrame, which permit static analysis...... of trusses and frames, as well as linearized stability analysis. The book’s final section presents related strength of materials subjects in greater detail; these include stress and strain, failure criteria, and normal and shear stresses in general beam flexure and in beam torsion....

  2. Static Validation of XSL Transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Olesen, Mads Østerby; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2007-01-01

    XSL Transformations (XSLT) is a programming language for defining transformations among XML languages. The structure of these languages is formally described by schemas, for example using DTD or XML Schema, which allows individual documents to be validated. However, existing XSLT tools offer...... and XACT XML transformations. Being able to provide static guarantees, we can detect a large class of errors in an XSLT stylesheet at the time it is written instead of later when it has been deployed, and thereby provide benefits similar to those of static type checkers for modern programming languages....... Our analysis takes a pragmatic approach that focuses its precision on the essential language features but still handles the entire XSLT language. We evaluate the analysis precision on a range of real stylesheets and demonstrate how it may be useful in practice....

  3. Size scaling of static friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, O M; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-22

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as f(m)+Δf/A(γ) for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of f(m), controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  4. Statics of historic masonry constructions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Mario

    2016-01-01

    This successful book, which is now appearing in its second edition, presents a comprehensive new Statics of Masonry Constructions. Masonry constructions are the great majority of the buildings in Europe’s historic centres and the most important monuments in its architectural heritage. Given the age of these constructions, the demand for safety assessments and restoration projects is pressing and constant. The book you hold in hands contributes to fill this demand. The second edition integrates the original text of the first edition with new developments, widening and revisions, due to recent research studies achievements. The result is a book that gives a complete picture of the behaviour of the Masonry Constructions. First of all, it gives the fundamentals of its Statics, based on the no-tension assumption, and then it develops the Limit Analysis for the Masonry Constructions. In this framework, through an interdisciplinary approach combining Engineering and Architecture, the book also investigates the sta...

  5. Static and Dynamic Membrane Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Ivanov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While originally P systems were defined to contain multiset rewriting rules, it turned out that considering different types of rules may produce important results, such as increasing the computational power of the rules. This paper focuses on factoring out the concept of a membrane structure out of various P system models with the goal of providing useful formalisations. Both static and dynamic membrane structures are considered.

  6. Quasi-Static Ultrasound Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Tomy

    2010-01-01

    Elastography is a new imaging modality where elastic tissue parameters related to the structural organization of normal and pathological tissues are imaged. Basic principles underlying the quasi-static elastography concept and principles are addressed. The rationale for elastographic imaging is reinforced using data on elastic properties of normal and abnormal soft tissues. The several orders of magnitude difference between the elastic modulus of normal and abnormal tissues which is the primary contrast mechanism in elastographic imaging underlines the probability of success with this imaging modality. Recent advances enabling the clinical practice of elastographic imaging in real-time on clinical ultrasound systems is also discussed. In quasi-static elastography, radiofrequency echo signals acquired before and after a small (about 1%) of applied deformation are correlated to estimate tissue displacements. Local tissue displacement vector estimates between small segments of the pre- and post-deformation signals are estimated and the corresponding strain distribution imaged. Elastographic imaging techniques are based on the hypothesis that soft tissues deform more than stiffer tissue, and these differences can be quantified in images of the tissue strain tensor or the Young’s modulus. Clinical applications of quasi-static elastography have mushroomed over the last decade, with the most commonly imaged areas being the breast, prostate, thyroid, cardiac, treatment monitoring of ablation procedures and vascular imaging applications. PMID:20798841

  7. First-order correction terms in the weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Vinh H.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    The weak-field asymptotic theory (WFAT) of tunneling ionization in a static electric field is developed to the next order in field. The first-order corrections to the ionization rate and transverse momentum distribution of the ionized electrons are derived. This extends the region of applicability...

  8. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karta Kooner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from a probe D-brane in a warped throat. We show that warped geometries can allow the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved, within the supergravity approximation and consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. Preliminary estimates of the brane backreaction suggest that the probe approximation may be under control. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  9. Determination of Operation Characteristics of a Synchronous Generator by Static Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILINA, I.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the determination of the operation characteristics of a Synchronous Generator (SG using static experimental tests (current and voltage decay tests. Using these tests the magnetization characteristic, the machine parameters (synchronous magnetization inductances and differential magnetization inductances, the no-load characteristic and the external characteristic were determined. The magnetization characteristic, the parameters and the operational characteristics provide important information about the performance of synchronous generator, machine which is currently used in most power plants. Compared to classical experimental methods with moving rotor and numerical methods of field computation that require the knowledge of geometric dimensions and material properties, static experimental methods are distinguished by several advantages: simple implementation for any type of SG, quick results, low power consumption and no effect on the drive system where the machine is integrated. The mathematical model of SG uses dedicated Matlab-Simulink programs and the results obtained by static methods are compared with those obtained by classical methods. Also to better approach the phenomenon of magnetic saturation and a more accurate estimate of the parameters, the magnetization characteristic, synchronous magnetization inductances and differential magnetization inductances are determined versus the total magnetizing current.

  10. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  11. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Nonlinear waves and weak turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, V E

    1997-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers on dynamical and statistical theory of nonlinear wave propagation in dispersive conservative media. Emphasis is on waves on the surface of an ideal fluid and on Rossby waves in the atmosphere. Although the book deals mainly with weakly nonlinear waves, it is more than simply a description of standard perturbation techniques. The goal is to show that the theory of weakly interacting waves is naturally related to such areas of mathematics as Diophantine equations, differential geometry of waves, Poincaré normal forms, and the inverse scattering method.

  13. Weak turbulence theory for beam-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2018-01-01

    The kinetic theory of weak plasma turbulence, of which Ronald C. Davidson was an important early pioneer [R. C. Davidson, Methods in Nonlinear Plasma Theory, (Academic Press, New York, 1972)], is a venerable and valid theory that may be applicable to a large number of problems in both laboratory and space plasmas. This paper applies the weak turbulence theory to the problem of gentle beam-plasma interaction and Langmuir turbulence. It is shown that the beam-plasma interaction undergoes various stages of physical processes starting from linear instability, to quasilinear saturation, to mode coupling that takes place after the quasilinear stage, followed by a state of quasi-static "turbulent equilibrium." The long term quasi-equilibrium stage is eventually perturbed by binary collisional effects in order to bring the plasma to a thermodynamic equilibrium with increased entropy.

  14. Vrancea slab earthquakes triggered by static stress transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ganas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the interaction of the Vrancea seismic activity (Romania in space as result of Coulomb, static stress transfer during M=7+ events. In this area, three large events occurred in 1977, 1986 and 1990 at mid-lower, lithospheric depths and with similar focal mechanisms. Assuming elastic rheology for the deforming rocks it is suggested that frictional sliding on pre-existing fault produced the 1986 M=7.1 event (depth 131 km, that was possibly triggered by the 1977 M=7.4 event (depth 94 km. We calculated a static stress transfer of 0.52–0.78 bar to the hypocentre of the 1986 event. On the contrary, the occurrence of the 1990 event is uncertain: it is located inside the relaxed (shadow zone of the combined 1977 and 1986 static stress field considering an azimuth for maximum compression of N307° E. It follows that, the 1990 earthquake most likely represents an unbroken patch (asperity of the 1977 rupture plane that failed due to loading. However, if a different compression azimuth is assumed (N323° E then the 1990 event was also possibly triggered by static stress transfer of the 1977 and 1986 events (combined. Our modeling is a first-order approximation of the kind of earthquake interaction we might expect at intermediate lithospheric depths (80–90 to 130–140 km. It is also suggested that static stress transfer may explain the clustering of Vrancea earthquakes in space by the rupturing of two (possibly three NW-dipping major zones of weakness (faults which accommodate the extension (vertical elongation of the slab.

  15. Thermal corrections to the Casimir energy in a general weak gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-12-01

    We calculate finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of a two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. After solving the Klein-Gordon equation inside the apparatus, mode frequencies inside the apparatus are obtained in terms of the parameters of the weak background. Using Matsubara’s approach to quantum statistical mechanics gravity-induced thermal corrections of the energy density are obtained. Well-known weak static and stationary gravitational fields are analyzed and it is found that in the low temperature limit the energy of the system increases compared to that in the zero temperature case.

  16. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  17. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 119, No. 3, June 2009, pp. 297–318. © Printed in India. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs. A CARRIAZO, L M FERN ´ANDEZ and A RODRÍGUEZ-HIDALGO. Department of Geometry and Topology, Faculty of Mathematics, University of Sevilla,. Apartado de Correos 1160, 41080-Sevilla, Spain.

  18. Beam splitting on weak illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A W; Buryak, A V; Mitchell, D J

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate, in both two and three dimensions, how a self-guided beam in a non-Kerr medium is split into two beams on weak illumination. We also provide an elegant physical explanation that predicts the universal character of the observed phenomenon. Possible applications of our findings to guiding light with light are also discussed.

  19. On Weak-BCC-Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomys, Janus; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    We describe weak-BCC-algebras (also called BZ-algebras) in which the condition (x∗y)∗z = (x∗z)∗y is satisfied only in the case when elements x, y belong to the same branch. We also characterize ideals, nilradicals, and nilpotent elements of such algebras. PMID:24311983

  20. Voltage Weak DC Distribution Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hailu, T.G.; Mackay, L.J.; Ramirez Elizondo, L.M.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the behavior of voltage weak DC distribution systems. These systems have relatively small system capacitance. The size of system capacitance, which stores energy, has a considerable effect on the value of fault currents, control complexity, and system reliability. A number of

  1. Static Analysis of Dynamic Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic programming languages are highly popular and widely used. Java-Script is often called the lingua franca of the web and it is the de facto standardfor client-side web programming. On the server-side the PHP, Python andRuby languages are prevalent. What these languages have in common isan expressive power which is not easily captured by any static type system.These, and similar dynamic languages, are often praised for their ease-of-useand flexibility. Unfortunately, this dynamism comes ...

  2. Static Validation of Security Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodei, Chiara; Buchholtz, Mikael; Degano, P.

    2005-01-01

    We methodically expand protocol narrations into terms of a process algebra in order to specify some of the checks that need to be made in a protocol. We then apply static analysis technology to develop an automatic validation procedure for protocols. Finally, we demonstrate that these techniques...... suffice to identify several authentication flaws in symmetric and asymmetric key protocols such as Needham-Schroeder symmetric key, Otway-Rees, Yahalom, Andrew secure RPC, Needham-Schroeder asymmetric key, and Beller-Chang-Yacobi MSR...

  3. How a GNSS Receiver Is Held May Affect Static Horizontal Position Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Steven A; Ucar, Zennure; Bettinger, Pete; Merry, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The static horizontal position accuracy of a mapping-grade GNSS receiver was tested in two forest types over two seasons, and subsequently was tested in one forest type against open sky conditions in the winter season. The main objective was to determine whether the holding position during data collection would result in significantly different static horizontal position accuracy. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether the time of year (season), forest type, or environmental variables had an influence on accuracy. In general, the F4Devices Flint GNSS receiver was found to have mean static horizontal position accuracy levels within the ranges typically expected for this general type of receiver (3 to 5 m) when differential correction was not employed. When used under forest cover, in some cases the GNSS receiver provided a higher level of static horizontal position accuracy when held vertically, as opposed to held at an angle or horizontally (the more natural positions), perhaps due to the orientation of the antenna within the receiver, or in part due to multipath or the inability to use certain satellite signals. Therefore, due to the fact that numerous variables may affect static horizontal position accuracy, we only conclude that there is weak to moderate evidence that the results of holding position are significant. Statistical test results also suggest that the season of data collection had no significant effect on static horizontal position accuracy, and results suggest that atmospheric variables had weak correlation with horizontal position accuracy. Forest type was found to have a significant effect on static horizontal position accuracy in one aspect of one test, yet otherwise there was little evidence that forest type affected horizontal position accuracy. Since the holding position was found in some cases to be significant with regard to the static horizontal position accuracy of positions collected in forests, it may be beneficial to have an

  4. Differences in dynamic and static functional connectivity between young and elderly healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Eun; Jung, Seung Chai; Ryu, Kyeoung Hwa; Oh, Joo Young; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong-Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Shim, Woo Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Brain connectivity is highly dynamic, but functional connectivity (FC) studies using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) assume it to be static. This study assessed differences in dynamic FC between young healthy adults (YH) and elderly healthy adults (EH) compared to static FC. Using rs-fMRI data from 12 YH and 31 EH, FC was assessed in six functional regions (subcortical, auditory [AUD], sensorimotor [SM], visuospatial [VS], cognitive control [CC], and default mode network [DMN]). Static FC was calculated as Fisher's z-transformed correlation coefficient. The sliding time window correlation (window size 30 s, step size 3 s) was applied for dynamic FC, and the standard deviation across sliding windows was calculated. Differences in static and dynamic FC between EH and YH were calculated and compared by region. EH showed decreased static FC in the subcortical, CC, and DMN regions (FDR corrected p = 0.0013; 74 regions), with no regions showing static FC higher than that in YH. EH showed increased dynamic FC in the subcortical, CC, and DMN regions, whereas decreased dynamic FC in CC and DMN regions (p static and dynamic FC. Dynamic FC exhibited differences from static FC in EH and YH, mainly in regions involved in cognitive control and the DMN. Altered dynamic FC demonstrated both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct patterns of transient brain activity and needs to be studied as an imaging biomarker in the aging process.

  5. Field theory of bicritical and tetracritical points. I. Statics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, R; Holovatch, Yu; Moser, G

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the static critical behavior of systems of O(n_||)(plus sign in circle)O(n_perpendicular) symmetry by the renormalization group method within the minimal subtraction scheme in two-loop order. Summation methods lead to fixed points describing multicritical behavior. Their stability border lines in the space of the order parameter components n_|| and n_perpendicular and spatial dimension d are calculated. The essential features obtained already in two-loop order for the interesting case of an antiferromagnet in a magnetic field ( n_|| =1, n_perpendicular =2 ) are the stability of the biconical fixed point and the neighborhood of the stability border lines to the other fixed points, leading to very small transient exponents. We are also able to calculate the flow of static couplings, which allows us to consider the attraction region. Depending on the nonuniversal background parameters, the existence of different multicritical behavior (bicritical or tetracritical) is possible, including a triple point.

  6. Electrowetting -- from statics to dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longquan; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2014-08-01

    More than one century ago, Lippmann found that capillary forces can be effectively controlled by external electrostatic forces. As a simple example, by applying a voltage between a conducting liquid droplet and the surface it is sitting on we are able to adjust the wetting angle of the drop. Since Lippmann's findings, electrocapillary phenomena - or electrowetting - have developed into a series of tools for manipulating microdroplets on solid surfaces, or small amounts of liquids in capillaries for microfluidic applications. In this article, we briefly review some recent progress of fundamental understanding of electrowetting and address some still unsolved issues. Specifically, we focus on static and dynamic electrowetting. In static electrowetting, we discuss some basic phenomena found in DC and AC electrowetting, and some theories about the origin of contact angle saturation. In dynamic electrowetting, we introduce some studies about this rather recent area. At last, we address some other capillary phenomena governed by electrostatics and we give an outlook that might stimulate further investigations on electrowetting. © 2013.

  7. Optimal Weak Lensing Skewness Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li; Zhang, Pengjie; Dubinski, John

    2003-01-01

    Weak lensing measurements are entering a precision era to statistically map the distribution of matter in the universe. The most common measurement has been of the variance of the projected surface density of matter, which corresponds to the induced correlation in alignments of background galaxies. This measurement of the fluctuations is insensitive to the total mass content, like using waves on the ocean to measure its depths. But when the depth is shallow as happens near a beach, waves beco...

  8. Weak neutral-current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z/sup 0/ boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references. (JFP)

  9. [Muscle weakness in cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givon, Uri

    2009-01-01

    Over the last two decades, muscle weakness has been shown to be a major component of cerebral palsy (CP) pathology. Caused by multiple etiologies including variations in the muscle fiber type, pathologic motor unit function, co-contraction of agonists and antagonists, and muscle size and rigidity, weakness interferes with function and leads to limited function and participation. Muscle strength was found to be associated with walking ability and with functional scales. Children with CP were found to be weaker than typically developing children, and differences were found with respect to muscle groups in children with CP. Muscle weakness should be evaluated as objectively as possible to improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment. Manual muscle testing is not sufficient for evaluation, and instrumented muscle testing is validated in CP. Muscle strengthening is an important part of treatment of CP. Several methods of strengthening have been described. Muscle lengthening and other spasticity-modifying therapies have been shown to have a positive effect on muscle strength. Children who participated in muscle strengthening programs had a better quality of life and improved function.

  10. Completely continuous and weakly completely continuous abstract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    if the operator ρa of right multiplication by a is compact (weakly compact, respectively). An algebra A is called right completely continuous (right weakly completely continuous) if any element a ∈ A is right completely continuous (right weakly completely con- tinuous, respectively). Left completely continuous (left weakly ...

  11. Quantum weak and modular values in enlarged Hilbert spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Le Bin; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2018-01-01

    We introduce an enlarged state, which combines both pre- and postselection states at a given time t in between the pre- and postselection. Based on this form, quantum weak and modular values can be completely interpreted as expectation values of a linear combination of given operators in the enlarged Hilbert space. This formalism thus enables us to describe and measure the weak and modular values at any time dynamically. A protocol for implementing an enlarged Hamiltonian has also been proposed and applied to a simple example of a single spin under an external magnetic field. In addition, the time-dependent weak and modular values for pre- and postselection density matrices mapping onto an enlarged density matrix are also discussed.

  12. The Predictive Validity of the Static-99, Static-99R, and Static-2002/R: Which One to Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Sophie G; Ogloff, James R P; Simmons, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    The use of Static tools (Static-99, Static-99R, Static-2002, and Static-2002R) in risk decision making involving sexual offenders is widespread internationally. This study compared the predictive accuracy and incremental validity of four Static risk measures in a sample of 621 Australian sexual offenders. Results indicated that approximately 45% of the sample recidivated (with 18.8% committing sexual offenses). All of the Static measures investigated yielded moderate predictive validity for sexual recidivism, which was comparable with other Australian and overseas studies. Area under the curve (AUC) values for the four measures across the 5-, 10-, and 15-year intervals ranged from .67 to .69. All of the Static measures discriminated quite well between low-risk and high-risk sexual offenders but less well for the moderate risk categories. When pitted together, none of the tools accounted for additional variance in sexual recidivism, above and beyond what the other measures accounted for. The overall results provide support for the use of Static measures as a component of risk assessment and decision making with Australian sexual offending populations. The limitations of this study and recommendations for further research are also discussed.

  13. Protecting weak measurements against systematic errors

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Shengshi; Alonso, Jose Raul Gonzalez; Brun, Todd A.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the systematic error of quantum metrology by weak measurements under decoherence. We derive the systematic error of maximum likelihood estimation in general to the first-order approximation of a small deviation in the probability distribution, and study the robustness of standard weak measurement and postselected weak measurements against systematic errors. We show that, with a large weak value, the systematic error of a postselected weak measurement when the probe u...

  14. Gossip and Distributed Kalman Filtering: Weak Consensus Under Weak Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Soummya; Moura, José M. F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the gossip interactive Kalman filter (GIKF) for distributed Kalman filtering for networked systems and sensor networks, where inter-sensor communication and observations occur at the same time-scale. The communication among sensors is random; each sensor occasionally exchanges its filtering state information with a neighbor depending on the availability of the appropriate network link. We show that under a weak distributed detectability condition: 1. the GIKF error process remains stochastically bounded, irrespective of the instability properties of the random process dynamics; and 2. the network achieves \\emph{weak consensus}, i.e., the conditional estimation error covariance at a (uniformly) randomly selected sensor converges in distribution to a unique invariant measure on the space of positive semi-definite matrices (independent of the initial state.) To prove these results, we interpret the filtered states (estimates and error covariances) at each node in the GIKF as stochastic particles with local interactions. We analyze the asymptotic properties of the error process by studying as a random dynamical system the associated switched (random) Riccati equation, the switching being dictated by a non-stationary Markov chain on the network graph.

  15. Static Behaviour of Bucket Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim André

    as well as large-scale tests on bucket foundations subjected to low vertical load are performed during this work. Numerical simulations of the tests performed are carried out using the Mohr Coulomb material model and the commercial finite element code ABAQUS. Based on the present work, the finite element......One new foundation concept in relation to offshore wind turbines is bucket foundations. The concept is known from the oil and gas industry, though the load conditions here are significantly different. The bucket foundation can be used as monopod or e.g. tripod foundations for offshore wind turbines....... The monopod concept is investigated in this thesis, regarding the static behaviour from loads relevant to offshore wind turbines. The main issue in this concept is the rotational stiffness of the foundation and the combined capacity dominated by moments. The vertical bearing capacity of bucket foundations...

  16. Statics learning from engineering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Emri, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This textbook introduces and explains the basic concepts on which statics is based utilizing real engineering examples. The authors emphasize the learning process by showing a real problem, analyzing it, simplifying it, and developing a way to solve it. This feature teaches students intuitive thinking in solving real engineering problems using the fundamentals of Newton’s laws. This book also: · Stresses representation of physical reality in ways that allow students to solve problems and obtain meaningful results · Emphasizes identification of important features of the structure that should be included in a model and which features may be omitted · Facilitates students' understanding and mastery of the "flow of thinking" practiced by professional engineers.

  17. Ares I Static Tests Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, William; Lindemuth, Kathleen; Mich, John; White, K. Preston; Parker, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic engineering design enhances safety and reduces costs by incorporating risk assessment directly into the design process. In this paper, we assess the format of the quantitative metrics for the vehicle which will replace the Space Shuttle, the Ares I rocket. Specifically, we address the metrics for in-flight measurement error in the vector position of the motor nozzle, dictated by limits on guidance, navigation, and control systems. Analyses include the propagation of error from measured to derived parameters, the time-series of dwell points for the duty cycle during static tests, and commanded versus achieved yaw angle during tests. Based on these analyses, we recommend a probabilistic template for specifying the maximum error in angular displacement and radial offset for the nozzle-position vector. Criteria for evaluating individual tests and risky decisions also are developed.

  18. Static Analysis for JavaScript

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Simon Holm

    2013-01-01

    Web applications present unique challenges to designers of static analysis tools.One of these challenges is the language JavaScript used for client side scriptingin the browser. JavaScript is a complex language with many pitfalls and poortool support compared to other languages. This dissertation describes thedesign and implementation of a static analysis for JavaScript that can assistprogrammers in finding bugs in code during development.We describe the design of a static analysis tool for J...

  19. Weak polyelectrolytes in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Rathee, Vikramjit S.; Sikora, Benjamin

    Crucial to the behavior of recently designed charge-rejection and mosaic membranes are the conformations of polyelectrolyte brushes and oligomeric grafts used to control the membranes' surface charge. The use of pH-tunable weak polyelectrolytes with associative interactions enables fine tuning of material transport properties. Here, we apply constant-pH molecular dynamics along with free energy sampling algorithms to understand the subtle tug-of-war between pH, salt concentrations, and solvation forces in confined systems, and determine how each of these effects alters transport within the system. We further discuss the implications of our findings for the design of electrolyte separation membranes.

  20. Assessment of magnetic fluid stability in non-homogeneous magnetic field of a single-tooth magnetic fluid sealer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefyev, I. M.; Demidenko, O. V.; Saikin, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    A special experimental stand has been developed and made to test magnetic fluid. It represents a single-tooth magnetic fluid sealer. The type of dependence of the pressure differential on magnetic fluid sealer operation time is used as a criterion to determine magnetic fluid stability and magnetic fluid sealer service life under such conditions. The siloxane-based magnetic fluid was used as the test sample. The colloidal stability as well as stability of the synthesized magnetic fluid in magnetic fields in static mode were determined. It has been found that the obtained magnetic fluid is stable in static mode and, consequently, can be used to conduct necessary tests on stand. Short-term and life tests on stand have shown that MF remains stable and efficient for at least 360 days of continuous utilization.