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Sample records for wdl1 modulate helical

  1. Mutation in Wilted Dwarf and Lethal 1 (WDL1) causes abnormal cuticle formation and rapid water loss in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Jin; Jin, Ping; Yoon, Jinmi; Yang, Jung-Il; Jeong, Hee Joong; Ranathunge, Kosala; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus; Lee, In-Jung; An, Gynheung

    2010-09-01

    Epidermal cell layers play important roles in plant defenses against various environmental stresses. Here we report the identification of a cuticle membrane mutant, wilted dwarf and lethal 1 (wdl1), from a rice T-DNA insertional population. The mutant is dwarf and die at seedling stage due to increased rates of water loss. Stomatal cells and pavement cells are smaller in the mutant, suggesting that WDL1 affects epidermal cell differentiation. T-DNA was inserted into a gene that encodes a protein belonging to the SGNH subfamily, within the GDSL lipase superfamily. The WDL1-sGFP signal coincided with the RFP signal driven by AtBIP-mRFP, indicating that WDL1 is an ER protein. SEM analyses showed that their leaves have a disorganized crystal wax layer. Cross-sectioning reveals loose packing of the cuticle and irregular thickness of cell wall. Detailed analyses of the epicuticular wax showed no significant changes either in the total amount and amounts of each monomer or in the levels of lipid polymers, including cutin and other covalently bound lipids, attached to the cell wall. We propose that WDL1 is involved in cutin organization, affecting depolymerizable components.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy for Lung Cancer and Lung Metastasis

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    Aiko Nagai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT proved to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity for lung tumors. However, the use of helical intensity-modulated (IM SBRT is controversial. We investigated the outcome of lung tumor patients treated by IMSBRT using helical tomotherapy with a Japanese standard fractionation schedule of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (n=37 or modified protocols of 50–60 Gy in 5–8 fractions (n=35. Median patient’s age was 76 years and median follow-up period for living patients was 20 months (range, 6–46. The median PTV was 6.9 cc in the 4-fraction group and 14 cc in the 5- to 8-fraction group (P=0.001. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis was seen in 2 of 37 patients in the 4-fraction group and in 2 of 35 patients in the 5- to 8-fraction group (log-rank P=0.92. Other major complications were not observed. The LC rates at 2 years were 87% in the 4-fraction group and 83% in the 5- to 8-fraction group. Helical IMSBRT for lung tumors is safe and effective. Patients with a high risk of developing severe complications may also be safely treated using 5–8 fractions. The results of the current study warrant further studies of helical IMSBRT.

  3. Recognition of the Helical Structure of β-1,4-Galactan by a New Family of Carbohydrate-binding Modules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Melissa; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Kaneko, Satoshi; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Willats, William G. T.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial enzymes that depolymerize plant cell wall polysaccharides, ultimately promoting energy liberation and carbon recycling, are typically complex in their modularity and often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Here, through analysis of an unknown module from a Thermotoga maritima endo-β-1,4-galactanase, we identify a new family of CBMs that are most frequently found appended to proteins with β-1,4-galactanase activity. Polysaccharide microarray screening, immunofluorescence microscopy, and biochemical analysis of the isolated module demonstrate the specificity of the module, here called TmCBM61, for β-1,4-linked galactose-containing ligands, making it the founding member of family CBM61. The ultra-high resolution x-ray crystal structures of TmCBM61 (0.95 and 1.4 Å resolution) in complex with β-1,4-galactotriose reveal the molecular basis of the specificity of the CBM for β-1,4-galactan. Analysis of these structures provides insight into the recognition of an unexpected helical galactan conformation through a mode of binding that resembles the recognition of starch. PMID:20826814

  4. Helicity scalings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunian, F [ISTerre, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lessinnes, T; Carati, D [Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Stepanov, R, E-mail: Franck.Plunian@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Science, Perm (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-22

    Using a helical shell model of turbulence, Chen et al. (2003) showed that both helicity and energy dissipate at the Kolmogorov scale, independently from any helicity input. This is in contradiction with a previous paper by Ditlevsen and Giuliani (2001) in which, using a GOY shell model of turbulence, they found that helicity dissipates at a scale larger than the Kolmogorov scale, and does depend on the helicity input. In a recent paper by Lessinnes et al. (2011), we showed that this discrepancy is due to the fact that in the GOY shell model only one helical mode (+ or -) is present at each scale instead of both modes in the helical shell model. Then, using the GOY model, the near cancellation of the helicity flux between the + and - modes cannot occur at small scales, as it should be in true turbulence. We review the main results with a focus on the numerical procedure needed to obtain accurate statistics.

  5. N-terminal segments modulate the α-helical propensities of the intrinsically disordered basic regions of bZIP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rahul K; Crick, Scott L; Pappu, Rohit V

    2012-02-17

    Basic region leucine zippers (bZIPs) are modular transcription factors that play key roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. The basic regions of bZIPs (bZIP-bRs) are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding and specificity. Bioinformatic predictions and spectroscopic studies suggest that unbound monomeric bZIP-bRs are uniformly disordered as isolated domains. Here, we test this assumption through a comparative characterization of conformational ensembles for 15 different bZIP-bRs using a combination of atomistic simulations and circular dichroism measurements. We find that bZIP-bRs have quantifiable preferences for α-helical conformations in their unbound monomeric forms. This helicity varies from one bZIP-bR to another despite a significant sequence similarity of the DNA binding motifs (DBMs). Our analysis reveals that intramolecular interactions between DBMs and eight-residue segments directly N-terminal to DBMs are the primary modulators of bZIP-bR helicities. We test the accuracy of this inference by designing chimeras of bZIP-bRs to have either increased or decreased overall helicities. Our results yield quantitative insights regarding the relationship between sequence and the degree of intrinsic disorder within bZIP-bRs, and might have general implications for other intrinsically disordered proteins. Understanding how natural sequence variations lead to modulation of disorder is likely to be important for understanding the evolution of specificity in molecular recognition through intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. First examples of a modulated bridging mu(2)-1:2kappan-triazine in double helical silver compounds. experimental and theoretical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, M Pilar; Manzano, Blanca R; Jalón, Félix A; Rodríguez, Ana M; Santos, Lucía; Moreno, Miquel

    2010-04-19

    The synthesis of several silver double helices containing bis(3,5dimethylpyrazolyl)-6-(R)-s-triazine ligands is described. The structure of two of them has been determined by X-ray difraction. Both derivatives represent the first reported examples of a new interaction mode for a triazine ring that involves a triazine N atom bridging two metal centers. Argentophilic contacts are also present. The Ag-N and Ag-Ag interactions have been demonstrated by theoretical studies, which also showed the clear influence of weak interactions with the counteranion and the effect of the symmetry of the triazine substituent. The different donor characters of these substituents allows a modulation of the strength of the bridging Ag-N(triazine) interaction. Double pi-pi stacking, anion-pi interactions, hydrogen bonds, and hydrophobic effects are observed in an unusual highly symmetrical interpenetrated three-dimensional superstructure.

  7. Fast, simple, and informative patient-specific dose verification method for intensity modulated total marrow irradiation with helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K

    2014-01-25

    Patient-specific dose verification for treatment planning in helical tomotherapy is routinely performed using a homogeneous virtual water cylindrical phantom of 30 cm diameter and 18 cm length (Cheese phantom). Because of this small length, treatment with total marrow irradiation (TMI) requires multiple deliveries of the dose verification procedures to cover a wide range of the target volumes, which significantly prolongs the dose verification process. We propose a fast, simple, and informative patient-specific dose verification method which reduce dose verification time for TMI with helical tomotherapy. We constructed a two-step solid water slab phantom (length 110 cm, height 8 cm, and two-step width of 30 cm and 15 cm), termed the Whole Body Phantom (WB phantom). Three ionization chambers and three EDR-2 films can be inserted to cover extended field TMI treatment delivery. Three TMI treatment plans were conducted with a TomoTherapy HiArt Planning Station and verified using the WB phantom with ion chambers and films. Three regions simulating the head and neck, thorax, and pelvis were covered in a single treatment delivery. The results were compared to those with the cheese phantom supplied by Accuray, Inc. following three treatment deliveries to cover the body from head to pelvis. Use of the WB phantom provided point doses or dose distributions from head and neck to femur in a single treatment delivery of TMI. Patient-specific dose verification with the WB phantom was 62% faster than with the cheese phantom. The average pass rate in gamma analysis with the criteria of a 3-mm distance-to-agreement and 3% dose differences was 94% ± 2% for the three TMI treatment plans. The differences in pass rates between the WB and cheese phantoms at the upper thorax to abdomen regions were within 2%. The calculated dose agreed with the measured dose within 3% for all points in all five cases in both the WB and cheese phantoms. Our dose verification method with the WB phantom

  8. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

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    Chen Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. Methods From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84% or without (16% chemotherapy. Results The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  9. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

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    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities.

  10. Estimating the excess lifetime risk of radiation induced secondary malignancy (SMN) in pediatric patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI): Conventional radiation therapy versus helical intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jordan A; Chera, Bhishamjit S; Brenner, David J; Shuryak, Igor; Wilson, Adam K; Lehman-Davis, Misty; Fried, David V; Somasundaram, Vivek; Lian, Jun; Cullip, Tim; Marks, Lawrence B

    To quantify the risk of radiation-induced second malignancies (SMN) in pediatric patients receiving craniospinal irradiation (CSI) either with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (Conv CSI) or tomotherapy helical intensity modulated radiation therapy (Tomo CSI). A novel predictive model that accounts for short- and long-term carcinogenesis was incorporated into our institutional treatment planning system to quantify the lifetime risk of SMN in incidentally irradiated organs. Five pediatric patients previously treated with CSI were studied. For each case, Conv CSI and Tomo CSI plans were computed. The excess absolute number of SMN was computed for each plan for each patient. For female patients, age was varied to assess its impact. Tomo CSI has a much higher risk than Conv CSI for breast cancer. Tomo has a slightly increased risk for the lung, and conventional has a slightly higher risk for the thyroid. Both techniques have intermediate risks to the pancreas and stomach, and lesser risks to the bladder and rectum. For the breast, the magnitude of the absolute risks varied with age: 14.2% versus 7.4% (Tomo vs Conv) age 5; 16.9% versus 7.6% age 10, and 18.6% versus 8.0% age 15. Tomo has a higher risk for inducing breast and lung second cancers, and when using Tomo-based intensity modulated radiation therapy, care should be taken to avoid incidental radiation to the breast. When planning CSI, one needs to balance these cancer risks against other normal tissue effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaccio, G., E-mail: giovanni.ciaccio@igi.cnr.it; Spizzo, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Schmitz, O., E-mail: oschmitz@wisc.edu; Frerichs, H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Abdullaev, S. S. [Institut für Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Evans, T. E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); White, R. B. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  12. Evaluation of the optimal combinations of modulation factor and pitch for Helical TomoTherapy plans made with TomoEdge using Pareto optimal fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kerf, Geert; Van Gestel, Dirk; Mommaerts, Lobke; Van den Weyngaert, Danielle; Verellen, Dirk

    2015-09-17

    Modulation factor (MF) and pitch have an impact on Helical TomoTherapy (HT) plan quality and HT users mostly use vendor-recommended settings. This study analyses the effect of these two parameters on both plan quality and treatment time for plans made with TomoEdge planning software by using the concept of Pareto optimal fronts. More than 450 plans with different combinations of pitch [0.10-0.50] and MF [1.2-3.0] were produced. These HT plans, with a field width (FW) of 5 cm, were created for five head and neck patients and homogeneity index, conformity index, dose-near-maximum (D2), and dose-near-minimum (D98) were analysed for the planning target volumes, as well as the mean dose and D2 for most critical organs at risk. For every dose metric the median value will be plotted against treatment time. A Pareto-like method is used in the analysis which will show how pitch and MF influence both treatment time and plan quality. For small pitches (≤0.20), MF does not influence treatment time. The contrary is true for larger pitches (≥0.25) as lowering MF will both decrease treatment time and plan quality until maximum gantry speed is reached. At this moment, treatment time is saturated and only plan quality will further decrease. The Pareto front analysis showed optimal combinations of pitch [0.23-0.45] and MF > 2.0 for a FW of 5 cm. Outside this range, plans will become less optimal. As the vendor-recommended settings fall within this range, the use of these settings is validated.

  13. Determination of W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF Run II and production of endcap modules for the ATLAS Silicon Tracker

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    Moed, Shulamit [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presented here includes two parts. The first part discusses the production of endcap modules for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker at the University of Geneva. The ATLAS experiment is one of the two multi-purpose experiments being built at the LHC at CERN. The University of Geneva invested extensive efforts to create an excellent and efficient module production site, in which 655 endcap outer modules were constructed. The complexity and extreme requirements for 10 years of LHC operation with a high resolution, high efficiency, low noise tracking system resulted in an extremely careful, time consuming production and quality assurance of every single module. At design luminosity about 1000 particles will pass through the tracking system each 25 ns. In addition to requiring fast tracking techniques, the high particle flux causes significant radiation damage. Therefore, modules have to be constructed within tight and accurate mechanical and electrical specification. A description of the ATLAS experiment and the ATLAS Semiconductor tracker is presented, followed by a detailed overview of the module production at the University of Geneva. My personal contribution to the endcap module production at the University of Geneva was taking part, together with other physicists, in selecting components to be assembled to a module, including hybrid reception tests, measuring the I-V curve of the sensors and the modules at different stages of the production, thermal cycling the modules and performing electrical readout tests as an initial quality assurance of the modules before they were shipped to CERN. An elaborated description of all of these activities is given in this thesis. At the beginning of the production period the author developed a statistics package which enabled us to monitor the rate and quality of the module production. This package was then used widely by the ATLAS SCT institutes that built endcap modules of any type, and kept being improved and updated

  14. Rapid Arc, helical tomotherapy, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy and three dimensional conformal radiation for localized prostate cancer: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A Kinhikar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of RapidArc (RA compared with helical tomotherapy (HT, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SW IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Prescription doses ranged from 60 Gy to planning target volume (PTV and 66.25 Gy for clinical target volume prostate (CTV-P over 25-30 fractions. PTV and CTV-P coverage were evaluated by conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI. Organ sparing comparison was done with mean doses to rectum and bladder. Results: CI 95 were 1.0 ± 0.01 (RA, 0.99 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.97 ± 0.02 (IMRT, 0.98 ± 0.02 (3D CRT for PTV and 1.0 ± 0.00 (RA, HT, SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. HI was 0.11 ± 0.03 (RA, 0.16 ± 0.08 (HT, 0.12 ± 0.03 (IMRT, 0.06 ± 0.01 (3D CRT for PTV and 0.03 ± 0.00 (RA, 0.05 ± 0.01 (HT, 0.03 ± 0.01 (SW IMRT and 3D CRT for CTV-P. Mean dose to bladder were 23.68 ± 13.23 Gy (RA, 24.55 ± 12.51 Gy (HT, 19.82 ± 11.61 Gy (IMRT and 23.56 ± 12.81 Gy (3D CRT, whereas mean dose to rectum was 36.85 ± 12.92 Gy (RA, 33.18 ± 11.12 Gy (HT, IMRT and 38.67 ± 12.84 Gy (3D CRT. Conclusion: All studied intensity-modulated techniques yield treatment plans of significantly improved quality when compared with 3D CRT, with HT providing best organs at risk sparing and RA being the most efficient treatment option, reducing treatment time to 1.45-3.7 min and monitor unit to <400 for a 2 Gy fraction.

  15. Cascades in helical turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ditlevsen, P D

    2001-01-01

    The existence of a second quadratic inviscid invariant, the helicity, in a turbulent flow leads to coexisting cascades of energy and helicity. An equivalent of the four-fifth law for the longitudinal third order structure function, which is derived from energy conservation, is easily derived from helicity conservation cite{Procaccia,russian}. The ratio of dissipation of helicity to dissipation of energy is proportional to the wave-number leading to a different Kolmogorov scale for helicity than for energy. The Kolmogorov scale for helicity is always larger than the Kolmogorov scale for energy so in the high Reynolds number limit the flow will always be helicity free in the small scales, much in the same way as the flow will be isotropic and homogeneous in the small scales. A consequence is that a pure helicity cascade is not possible. The idea is illustrated in a shell model of turbulence.

  16. Role of helicity on the anticancer mechanism of action of cationic-helical peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Bing; He, Li-Yan; Jiang, Hong-Yu; Chen, Yu-Xin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the 26-residue amphipathic α-helical peptide A12L/A20L (Ac-KWKSFLKTFKSLKKTVLHTLLKAISS-amide) with strong anticancer activity and specificity was used as the framework to study the effects of helicity of α-helical anticancer peptides on biological activities. Helicity was systematically modulated by introducing d-amino acids to replace the original l-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix. Peptide helicity was measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy and was demonstrated to correlate with peptide hydrophobicity and the number of d-amino acid substitutions. Biological studies showed that strong hemolytic activity of peptides generally correlated with high hydrophobicity and helicity. Lower helicity caused the decrease of anti-HeLa activity of peptides. By introducing d-amino acids to replace the original l-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix, we improved the therapeutic index of A12L/A20L against HeLa cells by 9-fold and 22-fold, respectively. These results show that the helicity of anticancer peptides plays a crucial role for biological activities. This specific rational approach of peptide design could be a powerful method to improve the specificity of anticancer peptides as promising therapeutics in clinical practices.

  17. Role of Helicity on the Anticancer Mechanism of Action of Cationic-Helical Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xin Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the 26-residue amphipathic α-helical peptide A12L/A20L (Ac-KWKSFLKTFKSLKKTVLHTLLKAISS-amide with strong anticancer activity and specificity was used as the framework to study the effects of helicity of α-helical anticancer peptides on biological activities. Helicity was systematically modulated by introducing D-amino acids to replace the original L-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix. Peptide helicity was measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy and was demonstrated to correlate with peptide hydrophobicity and the number of D-amino acid substitutions. Biological studies showed that strong hemolytic activity of peptides generally correlated with high hydrophobicity and helicity. Lower helicity caused the decrease of anti-HeLa activity of peptides. By introducing D-amino acids to replace the original L-amino acids on the non-polar face or the polar face of the helix, we improved the therapeutic index of A12L/A20L against HeLa cells by 9-fold and 22-fold, respectively. These results show that the helicity of anticancer peptides plays a crucial role for biological activities. This specific rational approach of peptide design could be a powerful method to improve the specificity of anticancer peptides as promising therapeutics in clinical practices.

  18. Helicity of the Neutrino

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Helicity for a particle is defined as the projection of the particle's spin along its direction of motion. For a massive particle, the sign of its helicity depends on the frame of reference ... A team of three scientists at Brookhaven National Lab- oratory, M Goldhaber, L Grodzins and A W Sunyar set about to rectify the situation.

  19. Magnetic helical micromachines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyer, Kathrin E; Tottori, Soichiro; Qiu, Famin; Zhang, Li; Nelson, Bradley J

    2013-01-02

    Helical microrobots have the potential to be used in a variety of application areas, such as in medical procedures, cell biology, or lab-on-a-chip. They are powered and steered wirelessly using low-strength rotating magnetic fields. The helical shape of the device allows propulsion through numerous types of materials and fluids, from tissue to different types of bodily fluids. Helical propulsion is suitable for pipe flow conditions or for 3D swimming in open fluidic environments. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Large Helical Device project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    In this book, the results of the scientific research on the design, trial manufacture and manufacturing processes of the Large Helical Device which was constructed in National Institute for Fusion Science are summarized. The LHD is the largest helical device in the world, and the largest superconducting system in the world. It possesses the following features: the optimization of heliotron magnetic field coordination, the adoption of superconducting magnets for 2 helical magnetic field coils and 6 poloidal coils, the adoption of helical diverter which enables steady plasma experiment, the flexible specification as the experimental facility and so on. The construction has been carried out smoothly, and in March, 1998, first plasma was generated. The outline of the Large Helical Device project, the physical design, the equipment design, the research and development of superconductivity and low temperature system, the design and manufacture of the superconducting and low temperature systems, the design and manufacture of the power source and superconducting bus-line, vacuum vessel and others, electron cyclotron heating, neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron RF heating, measurement system, control and data processing, safety management, the theory and analysis of LHD plasma, the visualization of the result of theoretical analysis, the analysis of the experimental data, and the experiment plan are described. (K.I.)

  1. Helical plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beklemishev, A. D., E-mail: bekl@bk.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  2. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  3. Helices and vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, A N

    1990-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the use of helices as a method for studying exceptional vector bundles, an important and natural concept in algebraic geometry. The work arises out of a series of seminars organised in Moscow by A. N. Rudakov. The first article sets up the general machinery, and later ones explore its use in various contexts. As to be expected, the approach is concrete; the theory is considered for quadrics, ruled surfaces, K3 surfaces and P3(C).

  4. Analysis of dose distribution and risk of pneumonitis in stereotactic body radiation therapy for centrally located lung tumors: a comparison of robotic radiosurgery, helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannarunimit, Danita; Descovich, Martina; Garcia, Aaron; Chen, Josephine; Weinberg, Vivian; Mcguinness, Christopher; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Murnane, John; Gottschalk, Alexander R; Yom, Sue S

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to central lung tumors is associated with normal -tissue toxicity. Highly conformal technologies may reduce the risk of complications. This study compares physical dose characteristics and anticipated risks of radiation pneumonitis (RP) among three SBRT modalities: robotic radiosurgery (RR), helical tomotherapy (HT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Nine patients with central lung tumors ≤5 cm were compared. RR, HT and VMAT plans were developed per RTOG 0831. Dosimetric comparisons included target coverage, conformity index, heterogeneity index, gradient index, maximal dose at 2 cm from target (D2 cm), and dose-volume parameters for organs at risk (OARs). Efficiency endpoints included total beam-on time and monitor units. RP risk was derived from Lyman-Kutcher-Burman modeling on in-house software. The average GTV and PTV were 11.6 ± 7.86 cm(3) and 36.8 ± 18.1 cm(3). All techniques resulted in similar target coverage (p = 0.64) and dose conformity (p = 0.88). While RR had sharper fall-off gradient (p = 0.002) and lower D2 cm (p = 0.02), HT and VMAT produced greater homogeneity (p OAR overlap and small PTV. VMAT and HT produced greater homogeneity, potentially desirable for a large PTV-OAR overlap. VMAT probably yields the lowest RP risk for a large PTV. Understanding subtle differences among these technologies may assist in situations where multiple choices of modality are available. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, ACTREC/TMH, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India); Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Master, Zubin; Phurailatpam, Reena; Pai-Shetty, Rajershi; Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, ACTREC/TMH, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  6. Helical CT for lumbosacral spinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of helical CT for lumbosacral pathology. We performed helical CT with multiplanar reconstruction, including the formation of oblique transaxial and coronal images, in 62 patients with various lumboscral disorders, including 32 non-enhanced CT and 36 CT after myelography. We correlated the appearance of the stenotic spinal canal and neoplastic disease with the findings on MRI obtained at nearly the same time. We obtained helical CT images in all cases in about 30 seconds. The diagnostic ability of helical CT was roughly equal to that of MRI in patients with spondylosis deformans, spondylolisthesis and herniated nucleus pulposus. There was no significant difference in diagnostic value for degenerative lumbosacral disease with canal and foraminal stenosis between non-enhanced and post-myelography helical CT. However, non-enhanced helical CT could not clearly demonstrate neoplastic disease because of the poor contrast resolution. Helical CT was useful in evaluating degenerative disorder and its diagnostic value was nearly equal to that of MRI. We considered that helical CT may be suitable for the assessment of patients with severe lumbago owing to the markedly shortened examination time. However, if helical CT is used as a screening method for lumbosacral disease, one must be careful of its limitations, for example, poor detectability of neoplastic disease, vascular anomalies and so on. (author)

  7. Magnetic helicity and higher helicity invariants as constraints for dynamo action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, Dmitry; Akhmetyev, Peter; Illarionov, Egor

    2018-01-01

    We consider classical magnetic helicity (a Gauss invariant of magnetic lines) and higher helicity invariants as nonlinear constraints for dynamo action. We argue that the Gauss invariant has several properties absent from higher helicity invariants which prevents use of the latter to constrain dynamo action. We consider other helicities (hydrodynamic helicity and cross helicity) in the context of the dynamo problem.

  8. Topology of helical fluid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Considering a coordinate-free formulation of helical symmetry rather than more traditional definitions based on coordinates, we discuss basic properties of helical vector fields and compare results from the literature obtained with other approaches. In particular, we discuss the role of the stream...

  9. Helicity in dynamic atmospheric processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    An overview on the helicity of the velocity field and the role played by this concept in modern research in the field of geophysical fluid dynamics and dynamic meteorology is given. Different (both previously known in the literature and first presented) formulations of the equation of helicity balance in atmospheric motions (including those with allowance for effects of air compressibility and Earth's rotation) are brought together. Equations and relationships are given which are valid in different approximations accepted in dynamic meteorology: Boussinesq approximation, quasi-static approximation, and quasi-geostrophic approximation. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of helicity budget in large-scale quasi-geostrophic systems of motion; a formula for the helicity flux across the upper boundary of the nonlinear Ekman boundary layer is given, and this flux is shown to be exactly compensated for by the helicity destruction inside the Ekman boundary layer.

  10. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  11. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  12. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Yue Bun Pun, Edwin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices.

  13. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-09-10

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices.

  14. Assessment of three-dimensional set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Upasani, Maheshkumar; Master, Zubin; Patil, Anita; Phurailatpam, Reena; Nojin, Siji; Kannan, Sadhana; Godasastri, Jayant; Jalali, Rakesh

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess three-dimensional (3D) set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for supine craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients were immobilized in a customized 4-clamp thermoplastic head mask with or without whole-body vacuum cradle. Set-up was based primarily on a set of cranial fiducial markers. MVCT scans were acquired and co-registered with planning scan separately at three different levels (brain, upper, and lower spine) at every fraction. Only translational displacements were analysed, wherein positive sign denotes deviation in anterior, left, and superior direction; while negative sign denotes deviation in posterior, right, and inferior direction. Mean displacements, systematic, and random errors of the study population were calculated at all three levels separately. Local residual uncertainty of the upper and lower spine was also derived assuming perfect co-registration of the skull. Set-up margins for clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) were derived at these three levels separately using published margin recipes. Data from 1868 co-registrations in 674 fractions on 33 patients was included. The mean displacements in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions were -1.21, -1.36, and 1.38 mm; -1.25, -0.34, and 0.65 mm; and -1.47, -2.78, and 0.22 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lumbar spine respectively. The corresponding 3D vector of displacement was 2.28; 1.45; and 3.15 mm respectively. There was a distinct systematic trend towards increasing inaccuracy from the brain towards the lower spine. Using Stroom's formula, the minimum recommended CTV to PTV margins in absence of daily image-guidance were 6.5; 7.0; and 9.5 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lower spine respectively. This increased to 7.5; 8.5; and 11.5 mm using van Herk's formula. Subset and sensitivity analyses

  15. Optical helices and spiral interference fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M.; Hill, C. A.; Vaughan, J. M.

    1994-03-01

    Very pure optical helices have been generated in an argon ion laser of low Fresnel number. The beam character, with continuous cophasal surface of helical form, is clearly demonstrated by spiral interference fringes produced in a novel interferometric arrangement. In addition to single-start helices the multistart fringe patterns establish both two-start and three-start helices (of pitch two and three wavelengths, respectively), and also the state of helicity (i.e. rotational hand) of the beams.

  16. Comparison of Helical tomotherapy and Cyberknife in Spine Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Nam; Yoon, Se Chul; Chi, Byung Ok; Jng, Hong Suk; Sohn, Suk Hyun [Seoul ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gee Young; Shin, Heon Ju; Choi, Ilbong; Gea, Cheol Seong [Incheon ST.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study is planning comparison of helicaltomotherapy and Cyber knife in spine radiosurgery. Spine radiosurgery is an alternative to invasive spine surgery. The tomotherapy is megavoltage CT(MVCT) based image guided helical IMRT delivery system. The cyberknife using robotic arm and image guided based fiducial marker killo voltage X-ray image. The helical tomotherapy is modulated by a 64-multileaf collimator that has paired, pneumatically driven, 6.25-mm-wide leaves calculated to open or close at approximately every 7 .deg. of LINAC rotation, or 51 times per gantry rotation. But cyber knife use 100 or more than bean path. Although, cord maximum dose in CKP is lower than HTP, target homogeneity in HTP is better than CKP. Target coverage is 85% in CKP, 92% in HTP. It was benefit of helical radiation therapy. Tomotheapy and cyberknife are useful equipment to spine radiosurgery.

  17. Design principles for Bernal spirals and helices with tunable pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, Szilard N.; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J.

    2014-07-01

    Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment.Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00324a

  18. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  19. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buniy, Roman V., E-mail: roman.buniy@gmail.com [Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); Kephart, Thomas W., E-mail: tom.kephart@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  20. Stability of helical Janus clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Connor L.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent experimental and computational work has elucidated the importance of kinetic pathways in the formation of helical structures by hydrophobic-charged Janus particles.ootnotetextQ. Chen, J.K. Whitmer, et al., Science 331, 199 (2011). Motivated by these findings, we perform free-energy calculations to investigate the equilibrium structure and relative stability of helical aggregates as a function of cluster size and Janus balance. These results simultaneously aid in the interpretation of experimental observations and in the design of building blocks for specific structures.

  1. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Yuanhui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We develop a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along non-convex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implement the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of non-convex trajectories, thereby opening up a new route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical ap...

  2. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We developed a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along nonconvex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implemented the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of nonconvex trajectories, thereby opening up a route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical applications.

  3. Applications of 2D helical vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we show how the assumption of helical symmetry in the context of 2D helical vortices can be exploited to analyse and to model various cases of rotating flows. From theory, examples of three basic applications of 2D dynamics of helical vortices embedded in flows with helical symmetry...... of the vorticity field are addressed. These included some of the problems related to vortex breakdown, instability of far wakes behind rotors and vortex theory of ideal rotors....

  4. ICRF heating on helical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

  5. ICRF heating on helical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

  6. Topological helical edge states in water waves over a topographical bottom

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shi qiao

    2017-11-27

    We present the discovery of topologically protected helical edge states in water wave systems, which are realized in water wave propagating over a topographical bottom whose height is modulated periodically in a two-dimensional triangular pattern. We develop an effective Hamiltonian to characterize the dispersion relation and use spin Chern numbers to classify the topology. Through full wave simulations we unambiguously demonstrate the robustness of the helical edge states which are immune to defects and disorders so that the backscattering loss is significantly reduced. A spin splitter is designed for water wave systems, where helical edge states with different spin orientations are spatially separated with each other, and potential applications are discussed.

  7. Numerical investigations of turbulent flow characteristics in helically finned pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygârd, F.; Andersson, H. I.

    2011-12-01

    A helical fin in a circular pipe is a means to generate swirling flow and the swirling motion will in turn modulate the turbulence field. This paper reports on a direct numerical simulation aimed to explore such flow phenomena. The full Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a cylindrical coordinate system are integrated numerically in time and the helical fin is embedded in the structured grid by means of an immersed boundary method. The statistically steady three-dimensional flow field exhibits a helical symmetry with an azimuthal mean velocity which amounts to about 50% of the axial mean velocity component. The variation of the mean flow over the cross-sections can be explained by the variations of the nine non-zero components of the Reynolds stress tensor. Particular attention is paid to the contribution of the Reynolds stresses to the skin-friction coefficient. Appreciable levels of fluctuating helicity are observed in the vicinity of the pipe wall and reflect that the swirling motion breaks the structural symmetry in conventional pipe flow.

  8. Baryon helicity in B decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko [Department of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The unexpectedly large transverse polarization measured in the decay B {yields} {phi}K* poses the question whether it is accounted for as a strong interaction effect or possibly points to a hidden nonstandard weak interaction. We extend here the perturbative argument to the helicity structure of the two-body baryonic decay and discuss qualitatively on how the baryonic B decay modes might help us in understanding the issue raised by B {yields} {phi}K*. We find among others that the helicity +1/2 amplitude dominates the leading order in the B(b-barq) decay and that unlike the B {yields} VV decay the dominant amplitude is sensitive to the right-handed b {yields} s current, if any, in the penguin interaction.

  9. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  10. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Buesser, K.; Colberg, T.; Demiroers, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H.P.; Eversheim, P.D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Gross, A.; Gross-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Naehle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjess, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Rossen, P. von; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H.J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R

    1999-07-21

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}72 deg. and 0 deg. {<=}phi (cursive,open) Greek{<=}360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  11. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  12. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeier, M.; Bauer, F.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bissel, T.; Bollmann, R.; Busch, M.; Büßer, K.; Colberg, T.; Demirörs, L.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Eversheim, P. D.; Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Glende, M.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Jonas, E.; Krause, H.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindemann, T.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuck, T.; Meinerzhagen, A.; Nähle, O.; Pfuff, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sanz, B.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Thomas, S.; Trelle, H. J.; Weise, E.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.; EDDA Collaboration

    1999-07-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9°⩽ Θ⩽72° and 0°⩽ ϕ⩽360° in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes.

  13. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  14. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  16. Four Novel Zn (II Coordination Polymers Based on 4′-Ferrocenyl-3,2′:6′,3′′-Terpyridine: Engineering a Switch from 1D Helical Polymer Chain to 2D Network by Coordination Anion Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufei Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Four novel ZnII coordination polymers, [(ZnCl22(L2]n (1, [(ZnBr22(L2]n (2, and [(ZnI22(L2]n (3 and {[Zn(SCN2]1.5(L3}n (4, have been synthesized based on 4′-ferrocenyl-3,2′:6′,3′′-terpyridine with ZnII ions and different coordination anions under similar ambient conditions. Their structures have been confirmed using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, showing that complexes 1–3 are one-dimensional (1D double-stranded metal ion helical polymer chains and complex 4 is of a two-dimensional (2D network. The structural transformations of them from a 1D polymer chain to a 2D network under the influence of the coordination anions has been systematic investigated. Furthermore, the optical band gaps have been measured by optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, revealing that the ligand and the complexes should have semiconductor properties.

  17. Formation of functional super-helical assemblies by constrained single heptad repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudipta; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Lipstman, Sophia; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the key role of super-helical motifs in molecular self-organization, several tandem heptad repeat peptides were used as building blocks to form well-ordered supramolecular nano-assemblies. However, the need for stable helical structures limits the length of the smallest described units to three heptad repeats. Here we describe the first-ever self-assembling single heptad repeat module, based on the ability of the non-coded α-aminoisobutyric acid to stabilize very short peptides in helical conformation. A conformationally constrained peptide comprised of aromatic, but not aliphatic, residues, at the first and fourth positions formed helical fibrillar assemblies. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the peptide demonstrates super-helical packing in which phenylalanine residues formed an `aromatic zipper' arrangement at the molecular interface. The modification of the minimal building block with positively charged residues results in tight DNA binding ascribed to the combined factors of helicity, hydrophobicity and charge. The design of these peptides defines a new direction for assembly of super-helical nanostructures by minimal molecular elements.

  18. Importance of the tryptophans of gramicidin for its lipid structure modulating activity in lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine model membranes. A comparative study employing gramicidin analogs and a synthetic α-helical hydrophobic polypeptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aranda, F.J.; Killian, J.A.; Kruijff, B. de

    1987-01-01

    The importance of the tryptophan residues of gramicidin for the lipid structure modulating activity of this pentadecapeptide was investigated by studying the interaction of gramicidin analogs A, B, C (which have a tryptophan, phenylalanine and tyrosine in position 11, respectively) and

  19. Investigation of dose homogeneity for loose helical tomotherapy delivery in the context of breath-hold radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-05-01

    Loose helical delivery is a potential solution to account for respiration-driven tumour motion in helical tomotherapy (HT). In this approach, a treatment is divided into a set of interlaced 'loose' helices commencing at different gantry angles. Each loose helix covers the entire target length in one gantry rotation during a single breath-hold. The dosimetric characteristics of loose helical delivery were investigated by delivering a 6 MV photon beam in a HT-like manner. Multiple scenarios of conventional 'tight' HT and loose helical deliveries were modelled in treatment planning software, and carried out experimentally with Kodak EDR2 film. The advantage of loose helical delivery lies in its ability to produce a more homogeneous dose distribution by eliminating the 'thread' effect—an inherent characteristic of HT, which results in dose modulations away from the axis of gantry rotation. However, loose helical delivery was also subjected to undesirable dose modulations in the direction of couch motion (termed 'beating' effect), when the ratio between the number of beam projections per gantry rotation (n) and pitch factor (p) was a non-integer. The magnitude of dose modulations decreased with an increasing n/p ratio. The results suggest that for the current HT unit (n = 51), dose modulations could be kept under 5% by selecting a pitch factor smaller than 7. A pitch factor of this magnitude should be able to treat a target up to 30 cm in length. Loose helical delivery should increase the total session time only by a factor of 2, while the planning time should stay the same since the total number of beam projections remains unchanged. Considering its dosimetric advantage and clinical practicality, loose helical delivery is a promising solution for the future HT treatments of respiration-driven targets.

  20. On the helical arrangements of protein molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauter, Zbigniew; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    Helical structures are prevalent in biology. In the PDB, there are many examples where protein molecules are helically arranged, not only according to strict crystallographic screw axes but also according to approximate noncrystallographic screws. The preponderance of such screws is rather striking as helical arrangements in crystals must preserve an integer number of subunits per turn, while intuition and simple packing arguments would seem to favor fractional helices. The article provides insights into such questions, based on stereochemistry, trigonometry, and topology, and illustrates the findings with concrete PDB structures. Updated statistics of Sohncke space groups in the PDB are also presented. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  1. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  2. Segregation of helicity in inertial wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Inertial waves are known to exist in the Earth's rapidly rotating outer core and could be important for the dynamo generation. It is well known that a monochromatic inertial plane wave traveling parallel to the rotation axis (along positive z ) has negative helicity while the wave traveling antiparallel (negative z ) has positive helicity. Such a helicity segregation, north and south of the equator, is necessary for the α2-dynamo model based on inertial waves [Davidson, Geophys. J. Int. 198, 1832 (2014), 10.1093/gji/ggu220] to work. The core is likely to contain a myriad of inertial waves of different wave numbers and frequencies. In this study, we investigate whether this characteristic of helicity segregation also holds for an inertial wave packet comprising waves with the same sign of Cg ,z, the z component of group velocity. We first derive the polarization relations for inertial waves and subsequently derive the resultant helicity in wave packets forming as a result of superposition of two or more waves. We find that the helicity segregation does hold for an inertial wave packet unless the wave numbers of the constituent waves are widely separated. In the latter case, regions of opposite color helicity do appear, but the mean helicity retains the expected sign. An illustration of this observation is provided by (a) calculating the resultant helicity for a wave packet formed by superposition of four upward-propagating inertial waves with different wave vectors and (b) conducting the direct numerical simulation of a Gaussian eddy under rapid rotation. Last, the possible effects of other forces such as the viscous dissipation, the Lorentz force, buoyancy stratification, and nonlinearity on helicity are investigated and discussed. The helical structure of the wave packet is likely to remain unaffected by dissipation or the magnetic field, but can be modified by the presence of linearly stable stratification and nonlinearity.

  3. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  4. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We establish a simple model to describe the helical magnetic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observation of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources.

  5. Helicity Evolution at Small x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Michael; Kovchegov, Yuri; Pitonyak, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We construct small- x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of ln2(1 / x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of ln(1 / x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation effects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-Nc and large-Nc &Nf limits. After solving the large-Nc equations numerically we obtain the following small- x asymptotics for the flavor-singlet g1 structure function along with quarks hPDFs and helicity TMDs (in absence of saturation effects): g1S(x ,Q2) ΔqS(x ,Q2) g1L S(x ,kT2) (1/x) > αh (1/x) 2.31√{αsNc/2 π. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin may be at small x and what impact this has on the so-called ``spin crisis.'' Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-SC0004286 (YK), the RIKEN BNL Research Center, and TMD Collaboration (DP), and DOE Contract No. DE-SC0012704 (MS).

  6. Thermally activated helicity reversals of skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X. Z.; Shibata, K.; Koshibae, W.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kimoto, K.; Taguchi, Y.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic bubbles with winding number S =1 are topologically equivalent to skyrmions. Here we report the discovery of helicity (in-plane magnetization-swirling direction) reversal of skyrmions, while keeping their hexagonal lattice form, at above room temperature in a thin hexaferrite magnet. We have observed that the frequency of helicity reversals dramatically increases with temperature in a thermally activated manner, revealing that the generation energy of a kink-soliton pair for switching helicity on a skyrmion rapidly decreases towards the magnetic transition temperature.

  7. Polymorphic transformation of helical flagella of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sookkyung; Howard Berg Collaboration; William Ko Collaboration; Yongsam Kim Collaboration; Wanho Lee Collaboration; Charles Peskin Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as E. coli swim in an aqueous environment by utilizing the rotation of flagellar motors and alternate two modes of motility, runs and tumbles. Runs are steady forward swimming driven by bundles of flagellar filaments whose motors are turning CCW; tumbles involve a reorientation of the direction of swimming triggered by motor reversals. During tumbling, the helical flagellum undergoes polymorphic transformations, which is a local change in helical pitch, helical radius, and handedness. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of structural conformation and how this polymorphic transition plays a role in bacterial swimming. National Science Foundation.

  8. Investigation of backfire monofilar helical antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Thomas Gunst; Larsen, Niels Vesterdal; Gothelf, Ulrich Vesterager

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the electromagnetic properties of the backfire monofilar helical antenna. The current distribution along the helical conductor, the input impedance, and the front-to-back ratio are calculated and analyzed for the backfire operation of the antenna. ....... A parametric study of the helical geometry and the resulting antenna characteristics will be described and discussed. The currents and fields are calculated using the simulation software AWAS based on the Method of Moments with a wire representation of the ground plane....

  9. Spin versus helicity in processes involving transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We construct the spin formalism in order to deal in a direct and natural way with processes involving transversity which are now of increasing popularity. The helicity formalism which is more appropriate for collision processes of definite helicity has been so far used also to manage processes with transversity, but at the price of computing numerous helicity amplitudes generally involving unnecessary kinematical variables.In a second step we work out the correspondence between both formalisms and retrieve in another way all results of the helicity formalism but in simpler forms.We then compute certain processes for comparison.A special process:the quark dipole magnetic moment is shown to be exclusively treated within the spin formalism as it is directly related to the transverse spin of the quark inside the baryon.

  10. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  11. Exact solutions for helical magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villata, M. (Istituto di Fisica Generale, Universita di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)); Tsinganos, K. (Department of Physics, University of Crete and Research Center of Crete, GR-71409, Heraklion, Crete (Greece))

    1993-07-01

    Three novel classes of exact solutions of the generalized Grad--Shafranov equation for helically symmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria are presented. The first two classes may be applied to helical MHD equilibria for plasma confined between two coaxial cylinders, while the third one to the modeling of helicoidal magnetic fields and flows in several recently observed astrophysical jets. The same solutions can be also used for the testing of sophisticated numerical codes. It is also shown that all helically symmetric MHD equilibria can be treated by the same general method which is employed to generate exact MHD solutions for systems possessing an ignorable coordinate in a system of three orthogonal basis vectors, although in the case of helical symmetry an [ital orthogonal] ignorable coordinate does not exist, contrary to what happens in the well-known cases of axial and translational symmetries.

  12. Planetary dynamos driven by helical waves - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, A.

    2015-09-01

    In most numerical simulations of the Earth's core the dynamo resides outside the tangent cylinder and may be crudely classified as being of the α2 type. In this region the flow comprises a sea of thin columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, taking the form of alternating cyclones and anticyclones. The dynamo is thought to be driven by these columnar vortices within which the flow is observed to be highly helical, helicity being a crucial ingredient of planetary dynamos. As noted in Davidson, one of the mysteries of this dynamo cartoon is the origin of the helicity, which is observed to be positive in the south and negative in the north. While Ekman pumping at the mantle can induce helicity in some of the overly viscous numerical simulations, it is extremely unlikely to be a significant source within planets. In this paper we return to the suggestion of Davidson that the helicity observed in the less viscous simulations owes its existence to helical wave packets, launched in and around the equatorial plane where the buoyancy flux is observed to be strong. Here we show that such wave packets act as a potent source of planetary helicity, constituting a simple, robust mechanism that yields the correct sign for h north and south of the equator. Since such a mechanism does not rely on the presence of a mantle, it can operate within both the Earth and the gas giants. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that helical wave packets dispersing from the equator produce a random sea of thin, columnar cyclone/anticyclone pairs, very like those observed in the more strongly forced dynamo simulations. We examine the local dynamics of helical wave packets dispersing from the equatorial regions, as well as the overall nature of an α2-dynamo driven by such wave packets. Our local analysis predicts the mean emf induced by helical waves, an analysis that rests on a number of simple approximations which are consistent with our numerical experiments, while our global

  13. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  14. Multiple helical modes of vortex breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery

    2011-01-01

    Experimental observations of vortex breakdown in a rotating lid-driven cavity are presented. The results show that vortex breakdown for cavities with high aspect ratios is associated with the appearance of stable helical vortex multiplets. By using results from stability theory generalizing Kelvin......’s problem on vortex polygon stability, and systematically exploring the cavity flow, we succeeded in identifying two new stable vortex breakdown states consisting of triple and quadruple helical multiplets....

  15. MHD Gauge Fields: Helicities and Casimirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Webb, G. M.; Zank, G. P.; Anco, S.

    2016-12-01

    Clebsch potential gauge field theory for magnetohydrodynamics is developed based in part on the theory of Calkin (1963). It is shown how the polarization vector P in Calkin's approach, naturally arises from the Lagrange multiplier constraint equation for Faraday's equation for the magnetic induction B, or alternatively from the magnetic vector potential form of Faraday's equation. Gauss's equation, (divergence of Bis zero), is incorporated in the variational principle by means of a Lagrange multiplier constraint. Noether's theorem, and gauge symmetries are used to derive the conservation laws for (a) magnetic helicity (b) cross helicity, (c) fluid helicity for non-magnetized fluids, and (d) a class of conservation laws associated with curl and divergence equations, which applies to Faraday's equation and Gauss's equation. The magnetic helicity conservation law is due to a gauge symmetry in MHD and not due to a fluid relabelling symmetry. The analysis is carried out for a non-barotropic gas. The cross helicity and fluid helicity conservation are nonlocal conservation laws, that reduce to local conservation laws for the case of a barotropic gas. The connections between gauge symmetries, Clebsch potentials and Casimirs are developed. It is shown that the gauge symmetry functionals in the work of Henyey (1982) satisfy the Casimir equations.

  16. A REVIEW ON HEAT TRANSFER THROUGH HELICAL COIL HEAT EXCHANGERS

    OpenAIRE

    Surendra Vishvakarma*, Sanjay Kumbhare, K. K. Thakur

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a brief review of heat transfer through helical coil heat exchangers. Helical coils of circular cross section have been used in wide variety of applications due to simplicity in manufacturing. Enhancement in heat transfer due to helical coils has been reported by many researchers. While the heat transfer characteristics of double pipe helical heat exchangers are available in the literature, there exists no published experimental or theoretical analysis of a helically coile...

  17. A Conserved Cross Helicity for Non-Barotropic MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Yahalom, A

    2016-01-01

    Cross helicity is not conserved in non-barotropic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) (as opposed to barotropic or incompressible MHD). Here we show that variational analysis suggests a new kind of cross helicity which is conserved in the non barotropic case. The non barotropic cross helicity reduces to the standard cross helicity under barotropic assumptions. The new cross helicity is conserved even for topologies for which the variational principle does not apply.

  18. Helicity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgansky, Michael; Koprov, Boris; Koprov, Victor; Chkhetiani, Otto

    2017-04-01

    An overview is presented of recent direct field measurements at the Tsimlyansk Scientific Station of A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Moscow of turbulent helicity (and potential vorticity) using four acoustic anemometers positioned, within the atmospheric surface-adjacent boundary layer, in the vertices of a rectangular tetrahedron, with an approximate 5 m distance between the anemometers and a 5.5 m elevation of the tetrahedron base above the ground surface (Koprov, Koprov, Kurgansky and Chkhetiani. Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2015, Vol.51, 565-575). The same ideology was applied in a later field experiment in Tsimlyansk with the tetrahedron's size of 0.7 m and variable elevation over the ground from 3.5 to 25 m. It is illustrated with examples of the statistical distribution of instantaneous (both positive and negative) turbulent helicity values. A theory is proposed that explains the measured mean turbulent helicity sign, including the sign of contribution to helicity from the horizontal and vertical velocity & vorticity components, respectively, and the sign of helicity buoyant production term. By considering a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and a jet-like wind profile that mimics a shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated Earth surface, a possible explanation is provided, why the measured mean turbulent helicity sign is negative. The pronounced breeze circulation over the Tsimlyansk polygon which is located nearby the Tsimlyansk Reservoir was, indeed, observed during the measurements period. Whereas, essentially positive helicity is injected into the boundary layer from the free atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Fundamental efficiency of new-style limited-cone-beam CT (3DX). Comparison with helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Kazuya; Arai, Yoshinori; Iwai, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Koji; Shinoda, Koji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry; Saitou, Tsutomu

    2000-12-01

    Limited-cone-beam CT named 'Ortho-CT' has been used clinically for more than 2 years. On the basis of this experience we developed the new-style limited-cone-beam CT for practical use named '3DX Multi image micro CT' (3DX). Purpose of this study was to evaluate the fundamental efficiency of this new-style limited-cone-beam CT in comparison with helical-CT. The resolutions of 3DX was evaluated with MTF (Modulation transfer function). 3DX were compared with helical CT about the fundamental efficiency. The subjective image quality was evaluated with the anatomical landmarks which included inner ear, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and the maxillary first molar and mandibular first molar. Five dental radiologists and two otolaryngologists evaluated the quality of 3DX image in comparison with that of helical CT images on the same observation point. The five-point scale used ranged from point one (inferior) to five (superior). The skin doses of 3DX and helical CT were measured using TLD on the Rando phantom. The resolution of 3DX was 3.1 line pair/mm (horizontal) and 4.2 line pair/mm (vertical). The subjective image quality of 3DX was better than that of helical CT at every observational point. The minimum score was 3.46 and maximum score was 4.03. There was a significant difference in every observation point (p<0.05). The skin doses were 1.19 mSv with 3DX and 160.0 mSv with helical CT. The skin dose of 3DX was very low compared with that of helical CT. The image showed very high resolution in comparison with that of helical CT. The skin dose was under the one-percent as against helical CT. This system is very useful for diagnosis of tooth and bone in dental and otological field. (author)

  20. Metallofoldamers supramolecular architectures from helicates to biomimetics

    CERN Document Server

    Maayan, Galia

    2013-01-01

    Metallofoldamers are oligomers that fold into three-dimensional structures in a controlled manner upon coordination with metal ions. Molecules in this class have shown an impressive ability to form single-handed helical structures and other three-dimensional architectures. Several metallofoldamers have been applied as sensors due to their selective folding when binding to a specific metal ion, while others show promise for applications as responsive materials on the basis of their ability to fold and unfold upon changes in the oxidation state of the coordinated metal ion, and as novel catalysts. Metallofoldamers: From Helicates to Biomimetic Architectures describes the variety of interactions between oligomers and metal species, with a focus on non-natural synthetic molecules. Topics covered include: the major classes of foldamers and their folding driving force metalloproteins and metalloenzymes helicates: self-assembly, structure and applications abiotic metallo-DNA metallo-PNA and iDNA metallopeptides inte...

  1. Trefoil knot timescales for reconnection and helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Robert M.

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional images of evolving numerical trefoil vortex knots are used to study the growth and decay of the enstrophy and helicity. Negative helicity density (hpreserved through the first reconnection, as suggested theoretically (Laing et al 2015 Sci. Rep. 5 9224) and observed experimentally (Scheeler et al 2014a Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 111 15350–5). Next, to maintain the growth of the enstrophy and positive helicity within the trefoil while { H } is preserved, hgood correspondence between the evolution of the simulated vortices and the reconnecting experimental trefoil of Kleckner and Irvine (2017 Nat. Phys. 9 253–8) when time is scaled by their respective nonlinear timescales t f . The timescales t f are based upon by the radii r f of the trefoils and their circulations Γ, so long as the strong camber of the experimental hydrofoil models is used to correct the published experimental circulations Γ that use only the flat-plate approximation.

  2. Integral dose delivered to normal brain with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy IMRT during partial brain radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas with and without selective sparing of the hippocampus, limbic circuit and neural stem cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, James C; Ziel, G Ellis; Diaz, Aidnag Z; Wendt, Julie A; Gobole, Rohit; Turian, Julius V

    2013-06-01

    We compared integral dose with uninvolved brain (IDbrain ) during partial brain radiotherapy (PBRT) for high-grade glioma patients using helical tomotherapy (HT) and seven field traditional inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with and without selective sparing (SPA) of contralateral hippocampus, neural stem cell compartment (NSC) and limbic circuit. We prepared four PBRT treatment plans for four patients with high-grade gliomas (60 Gy in 30 fractions delivered to planning treatment volume (PTV60Gy)). For all plans, a structure denoted 'uninvolved brain' was created, which included all brain tissue not part of PTV or standard (STD) organs at risk (OAR). No dosimetric constraints were included for uninvolved brain. Selective SPA plans were prepared with IMRT and HT; contralateral hippocampus, NSC and limbic circuit were contoured; and dosimetric constraints were entered for these structures without compromising dose to PTV or STD OAR. We compared V100 and D95 for PTV46Gy and PTV60Gy, and IDbrain for all plans. There were no significant differences in V100 and D95 for PTV46Gy and PTV60Gy. IDbrain was lower in traditional IMRT versus HT plans for STD and SPA plans (mean IDbrain 23.64 Gy vs. 28 Gy and 18.7 Gy vs. 24.5 Gy, respectively) and in SPA versus STD plans both with IMRT and HT (18.7 Gy vs. 23.64 Gy and 24.5 Gy vs. 28 Gy, respectively). In the setting of PBRT for high-grade gliomas, IMRT reduces IDbrain compared with HT with or without selective SPA of contralateral hippocampus, limbic circuit and NSC, and the use of selective SPA reduces IDbrain compared with STD PBRT delivered with either traditional IMRT or HT. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  3. The Source of Helicity in Perfluorinated N-Alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Seung Soon; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William A.; Caldwell, Gregg; Ross, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    The well-known helical conformations of double stranded DNA and poly(alanine) are stabilized by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, respectively. Perfluorinated n-alkanes also exhibit stable helical conformations, with ordered chiralities at low temperatures. In the absence of hydrogen bonds, one may ask what forces stabilize perfluorinated n-alkane helices. We combine ab initio and empirical data to study the likely classical source of this helical behavior. Past studies point to bad s...

  4. Review of the helicity formalism; Revision del formalismo de helicidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, F.; Cerrada, M.; Fernandez, E.

    1972-07-01

    Our purpose in these notes has been to present a brief and general review of the helicity formalism. We begin by discussing Lorentz invariance, spin and helicity ideas, in section 1 . In section 2 we deal with the construction of relativistic states and scattering amplitudes in the helicity basis and we study their transformation properties under discrete symmetries. Finally we present some more sophisticated topics like kinematical singularities of helicity amplitudes, kinematical constraints and crossing relations 3, 4, 5 respectively. (Author) 8 refs.

  5. Artificial, parallel, left-handed DNA helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan; Li, Xiang; Li, Yingmei; Wang, Guansong; Mao, Chengde

    2012-12-19

    This communication reports an engineered DNA architecture. It contains multiple domains of half-turn-long, standard B-DNA duplexes. While each helical domain is right-handed and its two component strands are antiparallel, the global architecture is left-handed and the two component DNA strands are oriented parallel to each other.

  6. Helical chirality induction of expanded porphyrin analogues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Helical porphyrin analogues. 1163. References. 1. (a) Jasat A and Dolphin A 1997 Chem. Rev. 97 2267;. (b) Sessler J L, Gebauer A and Weghorn S J 2000 in The porphyrin handbook, vol. 2, K M Kadish, K M Smith,. R Guilard (eds) (San Diego: Academic Press) pp55;. (c) Sessler J L and Seidel D 2003 Angew. Chem. Int.

  7. Fermion Helicity Flip Induced by Torsion Field

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; Iovane, G.; Lambiase, G.; Stornaiolo, C.

    1999-01-01

    We show that in theories of gravitation with torsion the helicity of fermion particles is not conserved and we calculate the probability of spin flip, which is related to the anti-symmetric part of affine connection. Some cosmological consequences are discussed.

  8. The prediction of amphiphilic alpha-helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, D A; Harris, F; Daman, O A; Wallace, J

    2002-04-01

    A number of sequence-based analyses have been developed to identify protein segments, which are able to form membrane interactive amphiphilic alpha-helices. Earlier techniques attempted to detect the characteristic periodicity in hydrophobic amino acid residues shown by these structure and included the Molecular Hydrophobic Potential (MHP), which represents the hydrophobicity of amino acid residues as lines of isopotential around the alpha-helix and analyses based on Fourier transforms. These latter analyses compare the periodicity of hydrophobic residues in a putative alpha-helical sequence with that of a test mathematical function to provide a measure of amphiphilicity using either the Amphipathic Index or the Hydrophobic Moment. More recently, the introduction of computational procedures based on techniques such as hydropathy analysis, homology modelling, multiple sequence alignments and neural networks has led to the prediction of transmembrane alpha-helices with accuracies of the order of 95% and transmembrane protein topology with accuracies greater than 75%. Statistical approaches to transmembrane protein modeling such as hidden Markov models have increased these prediction levels to an even higher level. Here, we review a number of these predictive techniques and consider problems associated with their use in the prediction of structure / function relationships, using alpha-helices from G-coupled protein receptors, penicillin binding proteins, apolipoproteins, peptide hormones, lytic peptides and tilted peptides as examples.

  9. Topological characteristics of helical repeat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Barford, D

    The recent elucidation of protein structures based upon repeating amino acid motifs, including the armadillo motif, the HEAT motif and tetratricopeptide repeats, reveals that they belong to the class of helical repeat proteins. These proteins share the common property of being assembled from tandem

  10. Numerical modelling of pullout of helical soil nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Rawat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the pullout response of helical soil nail using finite element subroutine Plaxis 2D is presented. The numerical modelling of actual pullout response is achieved by axisymmetric and horizontal loading condition. The effect of varying number of helical plates, helical plate spacing and helical plate diameter is studied to understand the pullout capacity behaviour. The failure surfaces for various helical soil nail configurations and their pullout mechanisms are also analysed and discussed. The pullout capacity is found to increase with increase in number of helical plates. The helical plate spacing ratio (s/Dh and diameter ratio (Dh/Ds are found to increase the pullout only up to a critical value. The response of helical soil nail using axisymmetric finite element simulation is found similar to the uplift behaviour of helical piles and helical soil anchors. In the absence of literature regarding numerical modelling of helical soil nail, simulation results are validated with uplift responses of helical piles and soil anchors. A good agreement in their comparative study for pullout response is also observed.

  11. Modeling of high gain helical antenna for improved performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modeling of High Gain Helical Antenna structure is subdivided into three sections : introduction of helical structures ,Numerical analysis, modeling and simulation based on the parameters of helical antenna. The basic foundation software for the research paper is Matlab technical computing software, the modeling were ...

  12. Hydrophobicity and Helicity Regulate the Antifungal Activity of 14-Helical β-Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most prevalent fungal pathogens, causing both mucosal candidiasis and invasive candidemia. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), part of the human innate immune system, have been shown to exhibit antifungal activity but have not been effective as pharmaceuticals because of low activity and selectivity in physiologically relevant environments. Nevertheless, studies on α-peptide AMPs have revealed key features that can be designed into more stable structures, such as the 14-helix of β-peptide-based oligomers. Here, we report on the ways in which two of those features, hydrophobicity and helicity, govern the activity and selectivity of 14-helical β-peptides against C. albicans and human red blood cells. Our results reveal both antifungal activity and hemolysis to correlate to hydrophobicity, with intermediate levels of hydrophobicity leading to high antifungal activity and high selectivity toward C. albicans. Helical structure-forming propensity further influenced this window of selective antifungal activity, with more stable helical structures eliciting specificity for C. albicans over a broader range of hydrophobicity. Our findings also reveal cooperativity between hydrophobicity and helicity in regulating antifungal activity and specificity. The results of this study provide critical insight into the ways in which hydrophobicity and helicity govern the activity and specificity of AMPs and identify criteria that may be useful for the design of potent and selective antifungal agents. PMID:24837702

  13. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of {nabla}B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  14. Time-Mean Helicity Distribution in Turbulent Swirling Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tesař

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicity offers an alternative approach to investigations of the structure of turbulent flows. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of the time-mean component of helicity is the starting point. Yet very little is known even about basic cases in which Helicity plays important role, such as the case of a swirling jet. This is the subject of the present investigations, based mainly on numerical flowfield computations. The region of significantly large time-mean helicity density is found only in a rather small region reaching to several nozzle diameters downstream from the exit. The most important result is the similarity of the helicity density profiles. 

  15. Single Domain Magnetic Helicity and Triangular Chirality in Structurally Enantiopure Ba3NbFe3Si2O14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, K.; Simonet, V.; Ressouche, E.; Ballou, R.; Lejay, P.; Bordet, P.

    2008-12-01

    A novel doubly chiral magnetic order is found in the structurally chiral langasite compound Ba3NbFe3Si2O14. The magnetic moments are distributed over planar frustrated triangular lattices of triangle units. On each of these they form the same triangular configuration. This ferrochiral arrangement is helically modulated from plane to plane. Unpolarized neutron scattering on a single crystal associated with spherical neutron polarimetry proved that a single triangular chirality together with a single helicity is stabilized in an enantiopure crystal. A mean-field analysis allows us to discern the relevance on this selection of a twist in the plane to plane super-superexchange paths.

  16. Weyl spinors and the helicity formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Cruz, J Lorenzo; Meza-Aldama, O; Perez, Jonathan Reyes

    2015-01-01

    In this work we give a review of the original formulation of the relativistic wave equation for particles with spin one-half. Traditionally \\`a la Dirac, it's proposed that the ``square root'' of the Klein-Gordon (K-G) equation involves a 4 component (Dirac) spinor and in the non-relativistic limit it can be written as 2 equations for two 2 component spinors. On the other hand, there exists Weyl's formalism, in which one works from the beginning with 2 component Weyl spinors, which are the fundamental objects of the helicity formalism. In this work we rederive Weyl's equations directly, starting from K-G equation. We also obtain the electromagnetic interaction through minimal coupling and we get the interaction with the magnetic moment. As an example of the use of that formalism, we calculate Compton scattering using the helicity methods.

  17. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  18. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, O B; Clarke, J A; Bailey, I R; Dainton, J B; Malysheva, L I; Barber, D P; Cooke, P; Baynham, E; Bradshaw, T; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Ivanyushenkov, Y; Rochford, J; Moortgat-Pick, G A

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of ∼10MeV∼10MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of ∼100nTorr∼100nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4–6mm4–6mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100–200m100–200m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  19. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  20. Laser modes with helical wave fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M.; Hill, C. A.; Tapster, P. R.; Vaughan, J. M.

    1994-04-01

    We report the operation of an argon-ion laser in pure (single-frequency) ``doughnut'' modes of order m=1, 2, and 3. The phase discontinuity at the center of these modes leads to striking two-beam interference patterns that clearly demonstrate the existence of a helical cophasal surface (wave front). The doughnut mode with m=1 (usually called TEM*01) displays a forking interference fringe pattern characteristic of a pure single helix. The m=2 mode shows a pattern with four extra prongs, establishing that the cophasal surface is a two-start or double helix; the m=3 mode is a triple helix with a six-extra-pronged pattern. Each pure doughnut mode is shown to have two possible states corresponding to output wave fronts of opposite helicity.

  1. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-12-30

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  2. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We develop a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along non-convex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implement the...

  3. Anion Recognition by Aliphatic Helical Oligoureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Vincent; Fischer, Lucile; Kauffmann, Brice; Guichard, Gilles

    2016-10-24

    Anion binding properties of neutral helical foldamers consisting of urea type units in their backbone have been investigated. (1) H NMR titration studies in various organic solvents including DMSO suggest that the interaction between aliphatic oligoureas and anions (CH3 COO(-) , H2 PO4(-) , Cl(-) ) is site-specific, as it largely involves the urea NHs located at the terminal end of the helix (positive pole of the helix), which do not participate to the helical intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network. This mode of binding parallels that found in proteins in which anion-binding sites are frequently found at the N-terminus of an α-helix. (1) H NMR studies suggest that the helix of oligoureas remains largely folded upon anion binding, even in the presence of a large excess of the anion. This study points to potentially useful applications of oligourea helices for the selective recognition of small guest molecules. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Propulsion of microorganisms by a helical flagellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenborn, Bruce; Chen, Chih-Hung; Swinney, Harry L; Liu, Bin; Zhang, H P

    2013-01-29

    The swimming of a bacterium or a biomimetic nanobot driven by a rotating helical flagellum is often interpreted using the resistive force theory developed by Gray and Hancock and by Lighthill, but this theory has not been tested for a range of physically relevant parameters. We test resistive force theory in experiments on macroscopic swimmers in a fluid that is highly viscous so the Reynolds number is small compared to unity, just as for swimming microorganisms. The measurements are made for the range of helical wavelengths λ, radii R, and lengths L relevant to bacterial flagella. The experiments determine thrust, torque, and drag, thus providing a complete description of swimming driven by a rotating helix at low Reynolds number. Complementary numerical simulations are conducted using the resistive force theories, the slender body theories of Lighthill and Johnson, and the regularized Stokeslet method. The experimental results differ qualitatively and quantitatively from the predictions of resistive force theory. The difference is especially large for and/or , parameter ranges common for bacteria. In contrast, the predictions of Stokeslet and slender body analyses agree with the laboratory measurements within the experimental uncertainty (a few percent) for all λ, R, and L. We present code implementing the slender body, regularized Stokeslet, and resistive force theories; thus readers can readily compute force, torque, and drag for any bacterium or nanobot driven by a rotating helical flagellum.

  5. Superconducting Helical Snake Magnet for the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Willen, Erich; Escallier, John; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Jain, Animesh K; Luccio, Alfredo U; MacKay, William W; Marone, Andrew; Muratore, Joseph F; Okamura, Masahiro; Plate, Stephen R; Roser, Thomas; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wanderer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting helical magnet has been built for polarized proton acceleration in the Brookhaven AGS. This "partial Snake" magnet will help to reduce the loss of polarization of the beam due to machine resonances. It is a 3 T magnet some 1940 mm in magnetic length in which the dipole field rotates with a pitch of 0.2053 degrees/mm for 1154 mm in the center and a pitch of 0.3920 degrees/mm for 393 mm in each end. The coil cross-section is made of two slotted cylinders containing superconductor. In order to minimize residual offsets and deflections of the beam on its orbit through the Snake, a careful balancing of the coil parameters was necessary. In addition to the main helical coils, a solenoid winding was built on the cold bore tube inside the main coils to compensate for the axial component of the field that is experienced by the beam when it is off-axis in this helical magnet. Also, two dipole corrector magnets were placed on the same tube with the solenoid. A low heat leak cryostat was built so that t...

  6. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION FOR THE HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT IN HELICAL CONE COILS OVER ORDINARY HELICAL COILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. ABO ELAZM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This numerical research is introducing the concept of helical cone coils and their enhanced heat transfer characteristics compared to the ordinary helical coils. Helical and spiral coils are known to have better heat and mass transfer than straight tubes, which is attributed to the generation of a vortex at the helical coil known as Dean Vortex. The Dean number which is a dimensionless number used to describe the Dean vortex is a function of Reynolds number and the square root of the curvature ratio, so varying the curvature ratio for the same coil would vary the Dean number. Two scenarios were adopted to study the effect of changing the taper angle (curvature ratio on the heat transfer characteristics of the coil; the commercial software FLUENT was used in the investigation. It was found that Nusselt number increased with increasing the taper angle. A MATLAB code was built based on empirical correlation of Manlapaz and Churchill for ordinary helical coils to calculate the Nusselt number at each coil turn, and then calculate the average Nusselt number for the entire coil turns, the CFD simulation results were found acceptable when compared with the MATLAB results.

  7. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity Parameters and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    The hemispheric preference for negative/positive helicity to occur in the northern/southern solar hemisphere provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. Previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulence. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning 2006-2013, we studied the effects of two spatial smoothing tests that imitate atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We studied in detail the effects of atmospheric seeing on the helicity distributions across various field strengths for active regions (ARs) NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, in addition to studying the average helicities of 179 ARs with and without smoothing. We found that, rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, spatial smoothing modified existing trends by reducing random noise and by regressing outliers toward the mean, or removing them altogether. Furthermore, the average helicity parameter values of the 179 ARs did not conform to the hemisphere rule: independent of smoothing, the weak-vertical-field values tended to be negative in both hemispheres, and the strong-vertical-field values tended to be positive, especially in the south. We conclude that spatial smoothing does not significantly affect the overall statistics for space-based data, and thus seeing from atmospheric turbulence seems not to have significantly affected previous studies’ ground-based results on the hemisphere rule.

  8. HMM_RA: An Improved Method for Alpha-Helical Transmembrane Protein Topology Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhui Yan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available α-helical transmembrane (TM proteins play important and diverse functional roles in cells. The ability to predict the topology of these proteins is important for identifying functional sites and inferring function of membrane proteins. This paper presents a Hidden Markov Model (referred to as HMM_RA that can predict the topology of α-helical transmembrane proteins with improved performance. HMM_RA adopts the same structure as the HMMTOP method, which has five modules: inside loop, inside helix tail, membrane helix, outside helix tail and outside loop. Each module consists of one or multiple states. HMM_RA allows using reduced alphabets to encode protein sequences. Thus, each state of HMM_RA is associated with n emission probabilities, where n is the size of the reduced alphabet set. Direct comparisons using two standard data sets show that HMM_RA consistently outperforms HMMTOP and TMHMM in topology prediction. Specifically, on a high-quality data set of 83 proteins, HMM_RA outperforms HMMTOP by up to 7.6% in topology accuracy and 6.4% in α-helices location accuracy. On the same data set, HMM_RA outperforms TMHMM by up to 6.4% in topology accuracy and 2.9% in location accuracy. Comparison also shows that HMM_RA achieves comparable performance as Phobius, a recently published method.

  9. Molecular modeling of biomembranes and their complexes with protein transmembrane α-helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Smirnov, Kirill V.; Antonov, Mikhail Yu.; Nikolaev, Ivan N.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2017-11-01

    Helical segments are common structural elements of membrane proteins. Dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane (TM) α-helices provides the framework for spatial structure formation and protein-protein interactions. The membrane itself also takes part in the protein functioning. There are some examples of the mutual influence of the lipid bilayer properties and embedded membrane proteins. This work aims at the detail investigation of protein-lipid interactions using model systems: TM peptides corresponding to native protein segments. Three peptides were considered corresponding to TM domains of human glycophorin A (GpA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and proposed TM-segment of human neuraminidase-1 (Neu1). A computational analysis of structural and dynamical properties was performed using molecular dynamics method. Monomers of peptides were considered incorporated into hydrated lipid bilayers. It was confirmed, that all these TM peptides have stable helical conformation in lipid environment, and the mutual adaptation of peptides and membrane was observed. It was shown that incorporation of the peptide into membrane results in the modulation of local and mean structural properties of the bilayer. Each peptide interacts with lipid acyl chains having special binding sites on the surface of central part of α-helix that exist for at least 200 ns. However, lipid acyl chains substitute each other faster occupying the same site. The formation of a special pattern of protein-lipid interactions may modulate the association of TM domains of membrane proteins, so membrane environment should be considered when proposing new substances targeting cell receptors.

  10. Hydrodynamic studies of CNT nanofluids in helical coil heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babita; Sharma, S. K.; Mital Gupta, Shipra; Kumar, Arinjay

    2017-12-01

    Helical coils are extensively used in several industrial processes such as refrigeration systems, chemical reactors, recovery processes etc to accommodate a large heat transfer area within a smaller space. Nanofluids are getting great attention due to their enhanced heat transfer capability. In heat transfer equipments, pressure drop is one of the major factors of consideration for pumping power calculations. So, the present work is aimed to study hydrodynamics of CNT nanofluids in helical coils. In this study, pressure drop characteristics of CNT nanofluid flowing inside horizontal helical coils are investigated experimentally. The helical coil to tube diameter was varied from 11.71 to 27.34 keeping pitch of the helical coil constant. Double distilled water was used as basefluid. SDBS and GA surfactants were added to stablilize CNT nanofluids. The volumetric fraction of CNT nanofluid was varied from 0.003 vol% to 0.051 vol%. From the experimental data, it was analyzed that the friction factor in helical coils is greater than that of straight tubes. Concentration of CNT in nanofluids also has a significant influence on the pressure drop/friction factor of helical coils. At a constant concentration of CNT, decreasing helical coil to tube diameter from 27.24 to 11.71, fanning friction factor of helical coil; f c increases for a constant value of p/d t. This increase in the value of fanning friction factor can be attributed to the secondary flow of CNT nanofluid in helical coils.

  11. Magnetic helicity balance at Taylor relaxed states sustained by AC helicity injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Makoto; Morrison, Philip J.; Horton, Wendell; Hattori, Yuji

    2017-10-01

    Magnitudes of Taylor relaxed states that are sustained by AC magnetic helicity injection (also known as oscillating field current drive, OFCD) are investigated numerically in a cylindrical geometry. Compared with the amplitude of the oscillating magnetic field at the skin layer (which is normalized to 1), the strength of the axial guide field Bz 0 is shown to be an important parameter. The relaxation process seems to be active only when Bz 0 Neill et al., where the helicity injection rate is directly equated with the dissipation rate at the Taylor states. Then, the bifurcation to the helical Taylor state is predicted theoretically and the estimated magnitudes of the relaxed states reasonably agree with numerical results as far as Bz 0 < 1 . This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K05627.

  12. Nonequilibrium transport between helical Luttinger liquids leads or helical Majorana modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Sung Po; Silotri, Salman; Chung, Chung Hou

    2014-03-01

    We study a steady state non-equilibrium transport between (i) two interacting helical edge states of a two dimensional topological insulator, described by helical Luttinger liquids, through a quantum dot or tunneling junction. (ii) one Luttinger liquids lead and a helical Majorana modes lead connected by tunneling junction(s). We find the metal-to-insulator quantum phase transition for attractive or repulsive interactions in the leads when the magnitude of the interaction strength characterized by a charge sector Luttinger parameter goes beyond a critical value. The authors acknowledge NSC grant No.101-2628-M-009-001-MY3, the MOE-ATU program, the CTS of NCTU, the NCTS and NTHU of Taiwan, R.O.C.

  13. Analysis of higher harmonics on bidirectional heat pulse propagation experiment in helical and tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Tamura, N.; Choe, G. H.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Ko, W. H.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Shafer, M. W.; Ono, M.; López-bruna, D.; Ochando, M. A.; Estrada, T.; Hidalgo, C.; Moon, C.; Igami, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Tsujimura, T. Ii.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2017-07-01

    In this contribution we analyze modulation electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) experiment and discuss higher harmonic frequency dependence of transport coefficients. We use the bidirectional heat pulse propagation method, in which both inward propagating heat pulse and outward propagating heat pulse are analyzed at a radial range, in order to distinguish frequency dependence of transport coefficients due to hysteresis from that due to other reasons, such as radially dependent transport coefficients, a finite damping term, or boundary effects. The method is applied to MECH experiments performed in various helical and tokamak devices, i.e. Large Helical Device (LHD), TJ-II, Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR), and Doublet III-D (DIII-D) with different plasma conditions. The frequency dependence of transport coefficients are clearly observed, showing a possibility of existence of transport hysteresis in flux-gradient relation.

  14. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-07

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  15. Interferometric measurement of the helical mode of a single photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, E J; Coyle, L E; Johnson, E; Reschovsky, B J, E-mail: egalvez@colgate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colgate University, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    We present measurements of the helical mode of single photons and do so by sending heralded photons through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that prepares the light in a helical mode with topological charge one, and interferes it with itself in the fundamental non-helical mode. Masks placed after the interferometer were used to diagnose the amplitude and phase of the mode of the light. Auxiliary measurements verified that the light was in a non-classical state. The results are in good agreement with theory. The experiments demonstrate in a direct way that single photons carry the entire spatial helical-mode information.

  16. Transmembrane helices can induce domain formation in crowded model membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Domański, Jan; Marrink, Siewert J; Schäfer, Lars V

    2012-01-01

    We studied compositionally heterogeneous multi-component model membranes comprised of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, cholesterol, and a-helical TM protein models using coarse-grained molecular...

  17. Inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar angular-momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2017-04-01

    Coupled with mean absolute vorticity Ω∗ (rotation and mean relative vorticity), inhomogeneous turbulent helicity is expected to contribute to the generation of global flow structure against the linear and angular momentum mixing due to turbulent or eddy viscosity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect was originally derived in Yokoi & Yoshizawa (1993) [1], and recently has been validated by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of rotating helical turbulence [2]. Turbulence effect enters the mean-vorticity equation through the turbulent vortexmotive force ⟨u'×ω'⟩ [u': velocity fluctuation, ω'(= ∇× u'): vorticity fluctuation], which is the vorticity counterpart of the electromotive force ⟨u'× b'⟩ (b': magnetic fluctuation) in the mean magnetic-field induction. The mean velocity induction δU is proportional to the vortexmotive force. According to the theoretical result [1,2], it is expressed as δU = -νT∇×Ω∗-ηT(∇2H)Ω∗, where ηT is the transport coefficient, H = ⟨u'ṡω'⟩ the turbulent helicity, and Ω∗ the mean absolute vorticity. The first term corresponds to the enhanced diffusion due to turbulent viscosity νT. The second term expresses the large-scale flow generation due to inhomogeneous helicity. Since helicity is self-generated in rotating stratified turbulence [3], an inhomogeneous helicity distribution is expected to exist in the solar convection zone. A rising flow with expansion near the surface of the Sun generates a strongly negative helicity there [4]. This spatial distribution of helicity would lead to a positive Laplacian of turbulent helicity (∇2H > 0) in the subsurface layer of the Sun. In the combination with the large-scale vorticity associated with the meridional circulation, the inhomogeneous helicity effect works for accelerating the mean velocity in the azimuthal direction. The relevance of this inhomogeneous helicity effect in the solar convection zone is discussed further. References [1] Yokoi, N. and

  18. The formation of helical mesoporous silica nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Xiaobing; Pei Xianfeng; Zhao Huanyu; Chen Yuanli; Guo Yongmin; Li Baozong; Yang Yonggang [Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Suzhou (Soochow) University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hanabusa, Kenji [Department of Functional Polymer Science, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan)], E-mail: ygyang@suda.edu.cn

    2008-08-06

    Three chiral cationic gelators were synthesized. They can form translucent hydrogels in pure water. These hydrogels become highly viscous liquids under strong stirring. Mesoporous silica nanotubes with coiled pore channels in the walls were prepared using the self-assemblies of these gelators as templates. The mechanism of the formation of this hierarchical nanostructure was studied using transmission electron microscopy at different reaction times. The results indicated that there are some interactions between the silica source and the gelator. The morphologies of the self-assemblies of gelators changed gradually during the sol-gel transcription process. It seems that the silica source directed the organic self-assemblies into helical nanostructures.

  19. Helical CT findings in mesenteric ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Won Jae; Choi, Sang Hee; Lee, Soon Jin; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Kyung Ah; Lee, Yon Ok [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine. Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    Ischemic bowel disease is one of the common causes of acute abdomen, which results from insufficient blood flow to the small bowel and colon caused by arterial or venous occlusion or mesenteric vasoconstriction. Early diagnosis by clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings is often difficult and delay in adequate therapy results in substantial morbidity and mortality. CT is known to be useful for the evaluation of patients with suspected bowel ischemia or infarction. This study describes the spectrum of helical CT findings in acute and chronic mesenteric ischemia due to various causes, and explains the value of CT findings for specific diagnosis.

  20. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  1. Numerical analysis of helical dielectric elastomer actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang Ho; Nair, Saurabh; Kim, Daewon

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are known for its capability of experiencing extreme strains, as it can expand and contract based on specific actuation voltage applied. On contrary, helical DEA (HDEA) with its unique configuration does not only provide the contractile and extendable capabilities, but also can aid in attaining results for bending and torsion. The concept of HDEA embraces many new techniques and can be applied in multiple disciplines. Thus, this paper focuses on the simulation of HDEA with helical compliant electrodes that is a major factor prior to its application. The attributes of the material used to build the structure plays a vital role in the behavior of the system. For numerical analysis of HDEA, the material characteristics are input into a commercial grade software, and then the appropriate analysis is performed to retrieve its outcome. Applying the material characteristics into numerical analysis modeling, the functionality of HDEA for various activations can be achieved, which is used to test and comply with the fabricated final product.

  2. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Helicity Condensation in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-01-01

    The helicity condensation model has been proposed by Antiochos (2013) to explain the observed smoothness of coronal loops and the observed buildup of magnetic shear at filament channels. The basic hypothesis of the model is that magnetic reconnection in the corona causes the magnetic stress injected by photospheric motions to collect only at those special locations where prominences form. In this work we present the first detailed quantitative MHD simulations of the reconnection evolution proposed by the helicity condensation model. We use the well-known ansatz of modeling the closed corona as an initially uniform field between two horizontal photospheric plates. The system is driven by applying photospheric rotational flows that inject magnetic helicity into the system. The flows are confined to a finite region on the photosphere so as to mimic the finite flux system of, for example, a bipolar active region. The calculations demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, coronal loops having opposite helicity do not reconnect, whereas loops having the same sense of helicity do reconnect. Furthermore, we find that for a given amount of helicity injected into the corona, the evolution of the magnetic shear is insensitive to whether the pattern of driving photospheric motions is fixed or quasi-random. In all cases, the shear propagates via reconnection to the boundary of the flow region while the total magnetic helicity is conserved, as predicted by the model. We discuss the implications of our results for solar observations and for future, more realistic simulations of the helicity condensation process.

  4. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renormalized viscosity, renormalized resistivity, and various energy fluxes are calculated for helical magnetohydrodynamics using perturbative field theory. The calculation is of first-order in perturbation. Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, but they induce an inverse cascade of ...

  5. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    categories (Segrest et al. 1990; Phoenix et al. 1998; Phoenix and Harris 2002). Helices that cause membrane lysis belong to class L and those that bind to lipids but are not lytic, such as those occurring in apolipoproteins, are classified as class. A. Interest in amphipathic helices has further stemmed from the observation that ...

  6. Relative magnetic helicity as a diagnostic of solar eruptivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, E.; Leake, J. E.; Valori, G.; Linton, M. G.; Zuccarello, F. P.; Dalmasse, K.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The discovery of clear criteria that can deterministically describe the eruptive state of a solar active region would lead to major improvements on space weather predictions. Aims: Using series of numerical simulations of the emergence of a magnetic flux rope in a magnetized coronal, leading either to eruptions or to stable configurations, we test several global scalar quantities for the ability to discriminate between the eruptive and the non-eruptive simulations. Methods: From the magnetic field generated by the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations, we compute and analyze the evolution of the magnetic flux, of the magnetic energy and its decomposition into potential and free energies, and of the relative magnetic helicity and its decomposition. Results: Unlike the magnetic flux and magnetic energies, magnetic helicities are able to markedly distinguish the eruptive from the non-eruptive simulations. We find that the ratio of the magnetic helicity of the current-carrying magnetic field to the total relative helicity presents the highest values for the eruptive simulations, in the pre-eruptive phase only. We observe that the eruptive simulations do not possess the highest value of total magnetic helicity. Conclusions: In the framework of our numerical study, the magnetic energies and the total relative helicity do not correspond to good eruptivity proxies. Our study highlights that the ratio of magnetic helicities diagnoses very clearly the eruptive potential of our parametric simulations. Our study shows that magnetic-helicity-based quantities may be very efficient for the prediction of solar eruptions.

  7. Experimental investigation of solar powered diaphragm and helical pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    For several years, many types of solar powered water pumping systems were evaluated, and in this paper, diaphragm and helical solar photovoltaic (PV) powered water pumping systems are discussed. Data were collected on diaphragm and helical pumps which were powered by different solar PV arrays at mul...

  8. Two new twisted helical nickel (II) and cobalt (III) octahedral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 6. Two new twisted helical nickel(II) and cobalt(III) octahedral monomer complexes: Synthesis and structural characterization. Malay Dolai ... Keywords. Coordination chemistry; nickel(II); cobalt(III); Schiff base; twisted helicity; supramolecular interactions.

  9. Space vehicle electromechanical system and helical antenna winding fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Guenther, David; Enemark, Donald; Seitz, Daniel; Martinez, John; Storms, Steven

    2017-12-26

    A space vehicle electromechanical system may employ an architecture that enables convenient and practical testing, reset, and retesting of solar panel and antenna deployment on the ground. A helical antenna winding fixture may facilitate winding and binding of the helical antenna.

  10. Micro helical polymeric structures produced by variable voltage direct electrospinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shariatpanahi, S.P.; Iraji zad, A.; Abdollahzadeh, I.; Shirsavar, R.; Bonn, D.; Ejtehadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct near field electrospinning is used to produce very long helical polystyrene microfibers in water. The pitch length of helices can be controlled by changing the applied voltage, allowing the production of both microsprings and microchannels. Using a novel high frequency variable voltage

  11. Coronary artery angioplasty with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurbel, PA; Anderson, RD; vanBoven, AJ; denHeijer, P

    The initial in-hospital and long-term clinical experience with a helical autoperfusion balloon catheter in the treatment of coronary artery disease is reported, This new catheter design allows blood to flow passively around the inflated balloon through a protected helical channel molded into the

  12. Orbital angular momentum of helical necklace beams in colloid-based nonlinear optical metamaterials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walasik, Wiktor T.; Silahli, Salih Z.; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal metamaterials are a robust and flexible platform for engineering of optical nonlinearities and studies of light filamentation. To date, nonlinear propagation and modulation instability of Gaussian beams and optical vortices carrying orbital angular momentum were studied in such media. Here, we investigate the propagation of necklace beams and the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in colloidal media with saturable nonlinearity. We study various scenarios leading to generation of helical necklace beams or twisted beams, depending on the radius, power, and charge of the input vortex beam. Helical beams are build of two separate solitary beams with circular cross-sections that spiral around their center of mass as a result of the equilibrium between the attraction force of in-phase solitons and the centrifugal force associated with the rotational movement. A twisted beam is a single beam with an elliptical cross-section that rotates around it's own axis. We show that the orbital angular momentum is converted into the rotational motion at different rates for helical and twisted beams. While earlier studies reported that solitary beams are expelled form the initial vortex ring along straight trajectories tangent to the vortex ring, we show that depending on the charge and the power of the initial beam, these trajectories can diverge from the tangential direction and may be curvilinear. These results provide a detailed description of necklace beam dynamics in saturable nonlinear media and may be useful in studies of light filamentation in liquids and light propagation in highly scattering colloids and biological samples.

  13. Malignant pleural mesothelioma - Pleural cavity irradiation after decortication with helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrabi, Semi B; Koerber, Stefan A; Adeberg, Sebastian; Katayama, Sonja; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Sterzing, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive disease that poses a treatment challenge in spite of recent technical developments. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to assess the feasibility of administering intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the pleural cavity using helical tomotherapy in patients who had undergone pleurectomy/decortication (P/D) and also the resulting toxicity levels. Ten patients who had MPM and had undergone P/D were treated with pleural cavity irradiation that included a median dose of 52.2 Gy using helical tomotherapy. The median age of the patients was 53 years (31-74). In addition to clinical and diagnostic findings from regular follow-up examinations, we evaluated the dose distribution for other organs at risk to assess treatment in relation to toxicity, with special regard for the underlying intact lung. The mean lung dose on the treatment site was 32.8 Gy (±6.8). The V20 Gy was 71.7% (±17.2). No treatment-related toxicity that exceeded grade III according to common toxicity criteria (CTC) was observed. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 13 months with a median overall survival (OAS) of 19 months. The findings of this analysis provide data indicating that sparing the underlying lung in patients with MPM after P/D is not only feasible with helical tomotherapy, but that this treatment also causes reasonably few side effects.

  14. Helicity transport and creation in the solar convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcope, D.; Pevtsov, A.

    Magnetic helicity provides a theoretical tool for characterizing the solar dynamo and the evolution of the coronal field. The magnetic helicity may be inferred from several types of observation including vector magnetograms of the photospehric magnetic fields. The helicty of an active region reflects, to some degree, that produced by the solar cycle dyanmo which is believed to be operating at the base of the convection zone, where the Rossby number is small. The helicty of the active region is affected by the turbulence through which it rises, and this process must be taken into account when interpreting helicity observations. The subsequent dispersal of the active region magnetic field will further affect the observed helicty of the photospheric field. This transport process suggests an observational method of identifying, through helicty measurements, the source of quiet Sun field from either a surface (non-helical) dynamo or the fragmentation of helical active region fields.

  15. Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Supratik

    2016-01-01

    Besides total energy, three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses two inviscid invariants which are the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. New exact relations are derived for homogeneous (non-isotropic) stationary Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) with non-zero helicities and in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments. It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding invariant flux. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations.

  16. Broadband circularly polarizing dichroism with high efficient plasmonic helical surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingpei; Zhao, Xiaonan; Li, Ruibin; Zhu, Aijiao; Chen, Linghua; Lin, Yu; Cao, Bing; Zhu, Xiaojun; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-05-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a broadband and high efficient circularly polarizing dichroism using a simple single-cycle and single-helical plasmonic surface array arranged in square lattice. Two types of helical surface structures (partially or completely covered with a gold film) are investigated. It is shown that the circular polarization dichroism in the mid-IR range (3µm - 5µm) can reach 80% (when the surface is partially covered with gold) or 65% (when the surface is completely covered with gold) with a single-cycle and single-helical surface. Experimental fabrications of the proposed helical plasmonic surface are implemented with direct 3D laser writing followed by electron beam evaporation deposition of gold. The experimental evaluations of the circular polarization dichroism are in excellent agreement with the simulation. The proposed helical surface structure is of advantages of easy-fabrication, high-dichroism and scalable to other frequencies as a high efficient broadband circular polarizer.

  17. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  18. A molecular leverage for helicity control and helix inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akine, Shigehisa; Hotate, Sayaka; Nabeshima, Tatsuya

    2011-09-07

    The helical tetranuclear complex [LZn(3)La(OAc)(3)] having two benzocrown moieties was designed and synthesized as a novel molecular leverage for helicity control and helix inversion. Short alkanediammonium guests H(3)N(+)(CH(2))(n)NH(3)(+) (n = 4, 6, 8) preferentially stabilized the P-helical isomer of [LZn(3)La(OAc)(3)], while the longer guest H(3)N(+)(CH(2))(12)NH(3)(+) caused a helix inversion to give the M-helical isomer as the major isomer. The differences in the molecular lengths were efficiently translated into helical handedness via the novel molecular leverage mechanism using the gauche/anti conversion of the trans-1,2-disubstituted ethylenediamine unit.

  19. Helicity conservation and twisted Seifert surfaces for superfluid vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Hayder

    2017-04-01

    Starting from the continuum definition of helicity, we derive from first principles its different contributions for superfluid vortices. Our analysis shows that an internal twist contribution emerges naturally from the mathematical derivation. This reveals that the spanwise vector that is used to characterize the twist contribution must point in the direction of a surface of constant velocity potential. An immediate consequence of the Seifert framing is that the continuum definition of helicity for a superfluid is trivially zero at all times. It follows that the Gauss-linking number is a more appropriate definition of helicity for superfluids. Despite this, we explain how a quasi-classical limit can arise in a superfluid in which the continuum definition for helicity can be used. This provides a clear connection between a microscopic and a macroscopic description of a superfluid as provided by the Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations. This leads to consistency with the definition of helicity used for classical vortices.

  20. Actin-based motility of Listeria: Right-handed helical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes recruit cellular machinery to move in and between cells. Understanding the mechanism of motility, including force and torque generation and the resultant displacements, holds keys to numerous applications in medicine and biosensing. In this work, a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation is presented to illustrate that a biomechanical model of actin-based motility of a rigid surface through persistently attached filaments propelled by affinity-modulated molecular motors can produce a right-handed helical trajectory consistent with experimental observations. The implications of the mechanism to bacterial motility are discussed.

  1. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  2. Construction of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, P. E.; Gu, P.; Hamp, W. T.; Izzo, V. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Rogers, J. A.

    2001-10-01

    HIT-SI is a ``bow tie'' spheromak designed to implement Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI). The engineering requirements of SIHI lead to several unique design features, including a multiply connected electrically insulating o-ring seal and a close-fitting passive flux conserver that is electrically insulated from the plasma. Prototype tests have been performed to verify the performance of the o-ring seal and the plasma sprayed zirconia insulation. An engineering test of the new HIT-SI front end will be done before it replaces the present HIT-II front end on HIT. Startup and one millisecond of sustainment will be done to test breakdown and verify power supply requirements. The power supplies and external coils are designed to provide 20 MW at 5 kHz to 50 kHz for 1 ms to the helicity injection circuits for this test. Progress in the construction and assembly of HIT-SI will be presented.

  3. Helical Locomotion in a Granular Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Ibarra, Alejandro; Melo, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    The physical mechanisms that bring about the propulsion of a rotating helix in a granular medium are considered. A propulsive motion along the axis of the rotating helix is induced by both symmetry breaking due to the helical shape, and the anisotropic frictional forces undergone by all segments of the helix in the medium. Helix dynamics is studied as a function of helix rotation speed and its geometrical parameters. The effect of the granular pressure and the applied external load were also investigated. A theoretical model is developed based on the anisotropic frictional force experienced by a slender body moving in a granular material, to account for the translation speed of the helix. A good agreement with experimental data is obtained, which allows for predicting the helix design to propel optimally within granular media. These results pave the way for the development of an efficient sand robot operating according to this mode of locomotion.

  4. Equilibrium Reconstruction on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel A. Lazerson, D. Gates, D. Monticello, H. Neilson, N. Pomphrey, A. Reiman S. Sakakibara, and Y. Suzuki

    2012-07-27

    Equilibrium reconstruction is commonly applied to axisymmetric toroidal devices. Recent advances in computational power and equilibrium codes have allowed for reconstructions of three-dimensional fields in stellarators and heliotrons. We present the first reconstructions of finite beta discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The plasma boundary and magnetic axis are constrained by the pressure profile from Thomson scattering. This results in a calculation of plasma beta without a-priori assumptions of the equipartition of energy between species. Saddle loop arrays place additional constraints on the equilibrium. These reconstruction utilize STELLOPT, which calls VMEC. The VMEC equilibrium code assumes good nested flux surfaces. Reconstructed magnetic fields are fed into the PIES code which relaxes this constraint allowing for the examination of the effect of islands and stochastic regions on the magnetic measurements.

  5. Chiral Spin Pairing in Helical Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Shigeki; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2007-07-01

    A concept of chiral spin pairing is introduced to describe a vector-chiral liquid-crystal order in frustrated spin systems. It is found that the chiral spin pairing is induced by the coupling to phonons through the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and the four-spin exchange interaction of the Coulomb origin under the edge-sharing network of magnetic and ligand ions. This produces two successive second-order phase transitions upon cooling: an O(2) chiral spin nematic, i.e., spin cholesteric, order appears with an either parity, and then the O(2) symmetry is broken to yield a helical magnetic order. Possible candidate materials are also discussed as new multiferroic systems.

  6. Determination comparative study of esophageal cancer treatments with helical tomotherapy; Determinacion estudio comparativo de tratamientos de cancer de esofago con tomoterapia helicoidal, IMRT dinamica y 3DCRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto Monedero, M.; Sanchez Rubio, P.; Rodriguez Romero, R.

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of treatments dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy in cases of esophageal cancer, in terms of PTV coverage and dose reduction in OARs compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy treatments. (Author)

  7. Helical bottleneck effect in 3D homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of modelling the development of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a large-scale source of energy and a source of helicity distributed over scales. We use the shell model for numerical simulation of the turbulence at high Reynolds number. The results show that the helicity injection leads to a significant change in the behavior of the energy and helicity spectra in scales larger and smaller than the energy injection scale. We suggest the phenomenology for direct turbulent cascades with the helicity effect, which reduces the efficiency of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that non-linear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. It can be interpreted as the ‘helical bottleneck effect’ which, depending on the parameters of the injection helicity, reminds one of the well-known bottleneck effect at the end of inertial range. Simulations which included the infrared part of the spectrum show that the inverse cascade hardly develops under distributed helicity forcing.

  8. Theoretical model of chirality-induced helical self-propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takaki; Sano, Masaki

    2018-01-01

    We recently reported the experimental realization of a chiral artificial microswimmer exhibiting helical self-propulsion [T. Yamamoto and M. Sano, Soft Matter 13, 3328 (2017), 10.1039/C7SM00337D]. In the experiment, cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) droplets dispersed in surfactant solutions swam spontaneously, driven by the Marangoni flow, in helical paths whose handedness is determined by the chirality of the component molecules of CLC. To study the mechanism of the emergence of the helical self-propelled motion, we propose a phenomenological model of the self-propelled helical motion of the CLC droplets. Our model is constructed by symmetry argument in chiral systems, and it describes the dynamics of CLC droplets with coupled time-evolution equations in terms of a velocity, an angular velocity, and a tensor variable representing the symmetry of the helical director field of the droplet. We found that helical motions as well as other chiral motions appear in our model. By investigating bifurcation behaviors between each chiral motion, we found that the chiral coupling terms between the velocity and the angular velocity, the structural anisotropy of the CLC droplet, and the nonlinearity of model equations play a crucial role in the emergence of the helical motion of the CLC droplet.

  9. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  10. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation. The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static mixers, but in porous media.

  11. Inducing achiral aliphatic oligoureas to fold into helical conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsel, Romina; Maury, Julien; Fremaux, Juliette; France, Scott P; Guichard, Gilles; Clayden, Jonathan

    2014-12-11

    The ability of urea-linked oligomers of achiral diamines (achiral analogues of the well-established chiral oligourea foldamers) to adopt helical conformations was explored spectroscopically. Up to four achiral units were ligated either to a well-formed helical trimer or to a single chiral diamine, and the extent to which they adopted a screw-sense preference was determined by NMR and CD. In the best performing cases, a trimeric chiral oligourea and even a single cis-cyclohexanediamine monomer induced folding into a helical conformation.

  12. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    . The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static......Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation...

  13. Helicity-Dependent Showers and Matching with VINCIA

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We present an antenna-shower formalism that includes helicity dependence for massless partons. The formalism applies to both traditional (global) showers and to sector-based variants. We combine the shower with VINCIA's multiplicative approach to matrix-element matching, generalized to operate on each helicity configuration separately. The result is a substantial gain in computational speed for high parton multiplicities. We present an implementation of both sector and global showers, with min and max variations, and helicity-dependent tree-level matching applied for vector bosons or Higgs decay to q qbar plus up to 4 gluons and for Higgs decay to up to 5 gluons.

  14. Investigations of peripheral dose for helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissner, Steffen; Schubert, Kai; Sterzing, Florian; Herfarth, Klaus; Sroka-Perez, Gabriele; Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Wiezorek, Tilo [University Hospital Jena (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Whenever treating a patient with percutaneous radiotherapy, a certain amount of dose is inevitably delivered to healthy tissue. This is mainly due to beam's entry and exit in the region of the target volume. In regions distant from the target volume, dose is delivered by leakage from the MLC and head scatter from the accelerator head and phantom scatter from the target volume (peripheral dose). Helical tomotherapy is a form of radiation therapy with a uniquely designed machine and delivery pattern which influence the peripheral dose. The goal of this work was to investigate peripheral dose in helical tomotherapy. The experiments were used to establish a complex characterization of the peripheral dose. Materials and methods: A 30*30*60cm{sup 3} slab phantom and TLD-100 (Lithium fluoride) were used for the experiments. Treatment procedures were generated with the tomotherapy planning system (TPS). Additionally, procedures were created on the Operator Station of the tomotherapy system without a calculation of the dose distribution. The peripheral dose which was produced by a typical tomotherapy treatment plan was measured. Furthermore, these procedures were used to differentiate the parts of the peripheral dose in phantom scatter dose and head scatter and leakage dose. Additionally, the relation between peripheral dose and treatment time and between peripheral dose and delivered dose was investigated. Additionally, the peripheral dose was measured in an Alderson phantom. Results: Distances of 30cm or more resulted in a decrease of the peripheral dose to less than 0.1% of the target dose. The measured doses have an offset of approximately 1cGy in comparison to the calculated doses from the TPS. The separated head scatter and leakage dose was measured in the range of 1cGy for typical treatments. Furthermore, the investigations show a linear correlation between head scatter leakage dose and treatment time and between scatter dose parts and delivered dose. A

  15. Helical CT of the urinary organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, H.H.; Uggowitzer, M.M.; Ruppert-Kohlmayr, A. [Graz Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-03-01

    Despite of the diagnostic potential of conventional CT (CCT), limitations being inherent in this technology reduce its diagnostic confidence and limit clinical CT applications as 3D imaging. Helical CT (HCT) has far overcome the limitations of CCT and has become the standard CT technology. After a short overview on the technique of HCT and its advantages over CCT, the impact of HCT on the detection of disorders of the urinary organs is discussed. Due to the high quality of 3D reconstructions, vessels are visualized free of artefacts resulting in a dramatic improvement and acceptance of CT angiography, which has become a clinically important examination in the evaluation of obstructive renal artery disease. Fast HCT provides a precise assessment of the three phases of the nephrogram and it is a prerequisite for an improved depiction of abnormal vascular perfusion and impaired tubule transit of contrast material. Helical CT enables an improved characterization of cystic mass lesions reducing the diagnosis of indeterminate masses and thus facilitating a better therapeutic management. The diagnosis of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) has improved due to an increased sensitivity in detecting small RCCs, and an increased specificity in the diagnosis of neoplastic lesions. Improved staging of RCCs is the result of accurate assessment of venous tumour extension. When planning nephron-sparing surgery 3D display of the renal tumour helps to determine the resectability of the mass depicting its relation to major renal vessels and the renal collecting system. In the evaluation of renal trauma HCT provides shorter scanning time and thus fewer artefacts in the examination of traumatized patients who cannot cooperate adequately. Three-dimensional postprocessing modalities allow the assessment of the renal vascular pedicel by CT angiography and improve the demonstration of complex lacerations of the renal parenchyma. In the evaluation of the upper urinary tract unenhanced HCT has

  16. The generic geometry of helices and their close-packed structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper; Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    with values from the literature for helical polypeptide backbone structures, the alpha-, pi-. 3-10-, and gamma-helices. The alpha-helices are close to being optimally packed in the sense of efficient use of space, i.e. close-packed. They are more densely packed than the other three types of helices...

  17. Analysis on sliding helices and strands in protein structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-06-16

    Holm ... enable identification of conserved core of a protein fold it is not clear if the quality of .... Percentage of pairs of secondary structural elements for various SCOP classes (a) alpha helices (b) beta strands. Number of pairs.

  18. 3D printing of a multifunctional nanocomposite helical liquid sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuang-Zhuang; Yang, Xuelu; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Therriault, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    A multifunctional 3D liquid sensor made of a PLA/MWCNT nanocomposite and shaped as a freeform helical structure was fabricated by solvent-cast 3D printing. The 3D liquid sensor featured a relatively high electrical conductivity, the functionality of liquid trapping due to its helical configuration, and an excellent sensitivity and selectivity even for a short immersion into solvents.A multifunctional 3D liquid sensor made of a PLA/MWCNT nanocomposite and shaped as a freeform helical structure was fabricated by solvent-cast 3D printing. The 3D liquid sensor featured a relatively high electrical conductivity, the functionality of liquid trapping due to its helical configuration, and an excellent sensitivity and selectivity even for a short immersion into solvents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00278h

  19. Microfabricated, 94 GHz, 25 W, Helical Traveling Wave Tube Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Teraphysics Corporation completed the Phase I objectives for the electrical design of a 94 GHz, 26 W TWT with 53% overall efficiency, including the helical circuit...

  20. On the viscosity influence on a helical vortex flament evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agafontseva M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical vortices whose parameters have a strong influence on the efficiency of the apparatus is often occur in technical devices using swirling flow (cyclones, separators, etc.. To date the internal structure of such vortices is poorly understood. In [1] a model of helical vortex with uniform vorticity distribution in the core is proposed. Vortices arising in real flow always have a smooth vorticity distribution due to the viscosity action. The problem on steady moving helical vortices with the vortex core of small size in an inviscid fluid was solved in [2]. The non-orthogonal ‘helical’ coordinate system was introduced that allowed author to reduce the problem to two dimensional one. However, the velocity of the vortex motion was written only in the form of a quadratures computation of which is difficult. This paper presents first attempt for research on the diffusion and dynamics of a viscous helical vortex.

  1. Design study of a normal conducting helical snake for AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Junpei; Okamura, Masahiro; Roser, Thomas; MacKay, William W; Luccio, Alfredo U; Takano, Koji

    2004-01-01

    A new normal conducting snake magnet is being fabricated for the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) project, a superconducting type helical dipole magnets had been developed and it performed successfully in high-energy polarized proton acceleration. The new AGS helical snake has the same basic magnetic structure but is more complicated. To achieve no beam shift and no beam deflection in one magnetic device, helical pitches and rotating angles were carefully calculated. Compared to a superconducting magnet, a normal warm magnet must have a large cross- sectional area of conductors which make it difficult to design a magnet with large helical pitch. We developed a modified window frame structure to accommodate the large number of conductors. Its three dimensional magnetic field was simulated by using OPERA3D/TOSCA. 3 Refs.

  2. Perfect spin filtering effect in ultrasmall helical zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Yue, E-mail: zzy8423@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2017-02-05

    The spin-polarized transport properties of helical zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are investigated by first-principles calculations. It is found that although all helical ZGNRs have similar density of states and edge states, they show obviously different transport characteristics depending on the curling manners. ZGNRs curled along zigzag orientation exhibit perfect spin filtering effect with a large spin-split gap near the Fermi level, while ZGNRs curled along armchair orientation behave as conventional conductors for both two spin channels. The spin filtering effect will be weakened with the increase of either ribbon width or curling diameter. The results suggest that ultrasmall helical ZGNRs have important potential applications in spintronics and flexible electronics. - Highlights: • Perfect spin filtering effect has been found in helical ZGNRs. • The effect strongly depends on the curling manners of ZGNRs. • Different transport properties do not induced by distinct electronic properties. • The effect may be weakened with increasing either ribbon width or curling diameter.

  3. Topological states and quantized current in helical organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ai-Min; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2017-04-01

    We report a theoretical study of electron transport along helical organic molecules subject to an external electric field which is perpendicular to molecular helix axis. Our results reveal that topological states can appear in single-helical molecules as well as double-stranded DNA under the perpendicular electric field. In particular, a topological charge pumping can be realized by rotating the electric field in the transverse plane, where during each pumping cycle, an integer number of electrons can transport across the helical molecules at zero bias voltage, with pumped current being quantized. The quantized current constitutes multiple plateaus by scanning the Fermi energy as well as the bias voltage, and holds for various model parameters, since the edge states are topologically protected. These results could pave the way to explore topological states and quantized current in the biological systems and the helical molecules, and help in designing stable molecular devices.

  4. Helical vortices: linear stability analysis and nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selçuk, C.; Delbende, I.; Rossi, M.

    2018-02-01

    We numerically investigate, within the context of helical symmetry, the dynamics of a regular array of two or three helical vortices with or without a straight central hub vortex. The Navier–Stokes equations are linearised to study the instabilities of such basic states. For vortices with low pitches, an unstable mode is extracted which corresponds to a displacement mode and growth rates are found to compare well with results valid for an infinite row of point vortices or an infinite alley of vortex rings. For larger pitches, the system is stable with respect to helically symmetric perturbations. In the nonlinear regime, we follow the time-evolution of the above basic states when initially perturbed by the dominant instability mode. For two vortices, sequences of overtaking events, leapfrogging and eventually merging are observed. The transition between such behaviours occurs at a critical ratio involving the core size and the vortex-separation distance. Cases with three helical vortices are also presented.

  5. Packing of Helices: Is Chirality the Highest Crystallographic Symmetry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Gautier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chiral structures resulting from the packing of helices are common in biological and synthetic materials. Herein, we analyze the noncentrosymmetry (NCS in such systems using crystallographic considerations. A comparison of the chiral structures built from helices shows that the chirality can be expected for specific building units such as 31/32 or 61/65 helices which, in hexagonal arrangement, will more likely lead to a chiral resolution. In these two systems, we show that the highest crystallographic symmetry (i.e., the symmetry which can describe the crystal structure from the smallest assymetric unit is chiral. As an illustration, we present the synthesis of two materials ([Zn(2,2’-bpy3](NbF62 and [Zn(2,2’-bpy3](TaF62 in which the 3n helices pack into a chiral structure.

  6. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  7. Contribution of iron yoke on helical coils for RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tominaka, T; Katayama, T

    2002-01-01

    In order to estimate the field contribution due to an axially symmetric iron yoke for a helical magnet, a three-dimensional magnetic scalar potential problem with helical symmetry is solved. It is confirmed that the asymptotic forms for potential and field coincide with those for the two-dimensional magnet, in the limit of large twist pitch length. Then, it is also confirmed that the obtained analytical expression for the magnetic field is consistent with the numerical field calculation. (8 refs).

  8. Comparison between helical computed tomography angiography and intraoperative findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abijit Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Helical CT is important in delineating the arterial, venous, and ureteral anatomy and can show the important incidental findings. Left renal donors and males have more variations in their renal anatomy. Technically challenging laparoscopic nephrectomy on the multiple-vessel-side donor is possible with the aid of helical CT. The importance of the CT in evaluating donor renal anatomy for a technically challenging laparoscopic donor nephrectomy is commendable.

  9. Supramolecular helical porphyrin arrays using DNA as a scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Bouamaied, Imenne; Nguyen, ThaoNguyen; Ruhl, Thomas; Stulz, Eugen

    2008-01-01

    A diphenyl porphyrin substituted nucleotide was incorporated site specifically into DNA, leading to helical stacked porphyrin arrays in the major groove of the duplexes. The porphyrins show an electronic interaction which is significantly enhanced compared to the analogous tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) as shown in the large exciton coupling of the porphyrin B-band absorbance. Analogous to the TPP-DNA, an induced helical secondary structure is observed in the single strand porphyrin-DNA. The mod...

  10. Tokamak startup using point-source dc helicity injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, D J; Bongard, M W; Fonck, R J; Redd, A J; Sontag, A C

    2009-06-05

    Startup of a 0.1 MA tokamak plasma is demonstrated on the ultralow aspect ratio Pegasus Toroidal Experiment using three localized, high-current density sources mounted near the outboard midplane. The injected open field current relaxes via helicity-conserving magnetic turbulence into a tokamaklike magnetic topology where the maximum sustained plasma current is determined by helicity balance and the requirements for magnetic relaxation.

  11. Helical containers with classical and quantum fluids in rotating frame

    OpenAIRE

    Okulov, A. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    The examples of the classical liquids confined by rotating helical boundaries are considered and these examples are compared with rotating helical reservoir filled by ultracold bosonic ensemble. From the point of view of observer who co-rotates with classical liquid trapped by reservoir the quantum fluid will move translationally alongside rotation axis while in laboratory frame the quantum fluid will stay in rest. This behavior of quantum ensemble which is exactly opposite to the classical c...

  12. Helicity decomposition of ghost-free massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-11-01

    We perform a helicity decomposition in the full Lagrangian of the class of Massive Gravity theories previously proven to be free of the sixth (ghost) degree of freedom via a Hamiltonian analysis. We demonstrate, both with and without the use of nonlinear field redefinitions, that the scale at which the first interactions of the helicity-zero mode come in is {Λ_{{3}}} = {left( {{M_{text{Pl}}}{m^{{2}}}} right)^{{{1}/{3}}}} , and that this is the same scale at which helicity-zero perturbation theory breaks down. We show that the number of propagating helicity modes remains five in the full nonlinear theory with sources. We clarify recent misconceptions in the literature advocating the existence of either a ghost or a breakdown of perturbation theory at the significantly lower energy scales, {Λ_{{5}}} = {left( {{M_{text{Pl}}}{m^{{4}}}} right)^{{{1}/{5}}}} or {Λ_{{4}}} = {left( {{M_{text{Pl}}}{m^{{3}}}} right)^{{{1}/{4}}}} , which arose because relevant terms in those calculations were overlooked. As an interesting byproduct of our analysis, we show that it is possible to derive the Stückelberg formalism from the helicity decomposition, without ever invoking diffeomorphism invariance, just from a simple requirement that the kinetic terms of the helicity-two, -one and -zero modes are diagonalized.

  13. Helical Birods: An Elastic Model of Helically Wound Double-Stranded Rods

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Christopher

    2014-03-11

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. We consider a geometrically accurate model for a helically wound rope constructed from two intertwined elastic rods. The line of contact has an arbitrary smooth shape which is obtained under the action of an arbitrary set of applied forces and moments. We discuss the general form the theory should take along with an insight into the necessary geometric or constitutive laws which must be detailed in order for the system to be complete. This includes a number of contact laws for the interaction of the two rods, in order to fit various relevant physical scenarios. This discussion also extends to the boundary and how this composite system can be acted upon by a single moment and force pair. A second strand of inquiry concerns the linear response of an initially helical rope to an arbitrary set of forces and moments. In particular we show that if the rope has the dimensions assumed of a rod in the Kirchhoff rod theory then it can be accurately treated as an isotropic inextensible elastic rod. An important consideration in this demonstration is the possible effect of varying the geometric boundary constraints; it is shown the effect of this choice becomes negligible in this limit in which the rope has dimensions similar to those of a Kirchhoff rod. Finally we derive the bending and twisting coefficients of this effective rod.

  14. α-Peptide-Oligourea Chimeras: Stabilization of Short α-Helices by Non-Peptide Helical Foldamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremaux, Juliette; Mauran, Laura; Pulka-Ziach, Karolina; Kauffmann, Brice; Odaert, Benoit; Guichard, Gilles

    2015-08-17

    Short α-peptides with less than 10 residues generally display a low propensity to nucleate stable helical conformations. While various strategies to stabilize peptide helices have been previously reported, the ability of non-peptide helical foldamers to stabilize α-helices when fused to short α-peptide segments has not been investigated. Towards this end, structural investigations into a series of chimeric oligomers obtained by joining aliphatic oligoureas to the C- or N-termini of α-peptides are described. All chimeras were found to be fully helical, with as few as 2 (or 3) urea units sufficient to propagate an α-helical conformation in the fused peptide segment. The remarkable compatibility of α-peptides with oligoureas described here, along with the simplicity of the approach, highlights the potential of interfacing natural and non-peptide backbones as a means to further control the behavior of α-peptides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya driven helical-butterfly structure in Ba3NbFe3Si2O14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagnoli, V.; Huang, S. W.; Garganourakis, M.; de Souza, R. A.; Staub, U.; Simonet, V.; Lejay, P.; Ballou, R.

    2013-09-01

    We have used soft x-ray magnetic diffraction at the Fe3+ L2,3 edges to examine to what extent the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in Ba3NbFe3Si2O14 influences its low-temperature magnetic structure. A modulated component of the moments along the c axis is present, adding to the previously proposed helical magnetic configuration of coplanar moments in the a,b plane. This leads to a “helical-butterfly” structure and suggests that both the multiaxial in-plane and the uniform out-of-plane Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya vectors are relevant. A nonzero orbital magnetic signal is also observed at the oxygen K edge, which reflects the surprisingly strong hybridization between iron 3d and oxygen 2p states, given the nominal spherical symmetry of the Fe3+ half-filled shell.

  16. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomographic angiography between conventional helical scanning and a strategy incorporating sequential scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J; Wolff, Steven D; Manheimer, Eric D; Thompson, James; Terry, Sylvia; Uretsky, Seth; Pilip, Adalbert; Peters, M Robert

    2009-11-15

    Radiation dose from coronary computed tomographic angiography may be decreased using a sequential scanning protocol rather than a conventional helical scanning protocol. We compared radiation dose and image quality from coronary computed tomographic angiography in a single center between an initial period during which helical scanning with electrocardiographically controlled tube current modulation was used for all patients (n = 138) and after adoption of a strategy incorporating sequential scanning whenever appropriate (n = 261). Using the sequential-if-appropriate strategy, sequential scanning was employed in 86.2% of patients. Compared to the helical-only strategy, this strategy was associated with a 65.1% dose decrease (mean dose-length product [DLP] 305.2 vs 875.1 and mean effective dose 14.9 vs 5.2 mSv, respectively), with no significant change in overall image quality, step artifacts, motion artifacts, or perceived image noise. For the 225 patients undergoing sequential scanning, the DLP was 201.9 +/- 90.0 mGy x cm; for patients undergoing helical scanning under either strategy, the DLP was 890.9 +/- 293.3 mGy x cm (p strategy. In conclusion, a sequential-if-appropriate diagnostic strategy decreases dose markedly compared to a helical-only strategy, with no significant difference in image quality.

  17. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  18. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and striking features of the Suns magnetic field are coronal loops, which are smooth and laminar, and prominences or filaments, which are strongly sheared. Loops are puzzling because they show little evidence of tangling or braiding, at least on the quiet Sun, despite the chaotic nature of the solar surface convection. Prominences are mysterious because the origin of their underlying magnetic structure filament channels is poorly understood at best. These two types of features would seem to be quite unrelated and wholly distinct. We argue that, on the contrary, they are inextricably linked and result from a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a Parker (1972) corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: (1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of Antiochos (2013), the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection in the corona results in the formation of filament channels localized about polarity inversion lines; (2) this same process removes most complex fine structure from the rest of the corona, resulting in smooth and laminar coronal loops; (3) the amount of remnant tangling in coronal loops is inversely dependent on the net helicity injected by the driving motions; and (4) the structure of the solar corona depends only on the helicity preference of the driving motions and not on their detailed time dependence. We discuss the implications of our results for high-resolution observations of the corona.

  19. Helical tomotherapy as a new treatment technique for whole abdominal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochet, N.; Sterzing, F.; Jensen, A.; Herfarth, K.; Schubert, K.; Debus, J.; Harms, W. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Dinkel, J. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Eichbaum, M.; Schneeweiss, A.; Sohn, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To describe a new intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique using helical tomotherapy for whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Material and Methods: A patient with radically operated ovarian cancer FIGO stage IIIc was treated in a prospective clinical trial with WAI to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as an additional therapy after adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) included the entire peritoneal cavity. PTV was adapted according to breathing motion as detected in a four-dimensional respiratory-triggered computed tomography (4D-CT). Inverse treatment planning was done with the Hi-Art tomotherapy planning station. Organs at risk (OARs) were kidneys, liver, bone marrow, spinal cord, thoracic and lumbosacral vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Daily control of positioning accuracy was performed with megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT). Results: Helical tomotherapy enabled a very homogeneous dose distribution with excellent sparing of OARs and coverage of the PTV (V90 of 93.1%, V95 of 86.9%, V105 of 1.9%, and V110 of 0.01%). Mean liver dose was 21.57 Gy and mean kidney doses were 9.75 Gy and 9.14 Gy, respectively. Treatment could be performed in 18.1 min daily and no severe side effects occurred. Conclusion: Helical tomotherapy is feasible and fast for WAI. Tomotherapy enabled excellent coverage of the PTV and effective sparing of liver, kidneys and bone marrow. (orig.)

  20. Stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Zhen [College of Science, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121001 (China); Liu, Chun-Jian [College of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Lv, Hang [Institute of New Energy, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Liu, Bing-Bing, E-mail: liubb@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2016-08-12

    The helicity of stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic interaction energy. Our results present clear images of stable double helical structures inside SWCNTs. The optimum helical radius and helical angle increase and decrease with increasing diameter, respectively. The tube's diameter plays a leading role in the helicity of encapsulated structures, while the tube's chirality may induce different metastable structures. This study indicates that the observed double helical iodine chains in experiments are not necessarily the optimum structures, but may also be metastable structures. - Highlights: • The stable double helical iodine chain inside single-walled carbon nanotubes is proposed. • The influence of tube's diameter and chirality on the stability of encapsulated iodine chains is studied. • The metastable double helical structures may be co-existence with the stable structure but not in the same tubes.

  1. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  2. Emergence of helicity +/- 2 modes (gravitons) from qbit models

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Zheng-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    It was shown that photons (i.e. helicity $\\pm 1$ gapless excitations) can emerge from a qbit model (i.e. a quantum spin model) on a 3D lattice. In this paper, we study the possibility of the emergence of helicity $\\pm 2$ gapless excitations (i.e. the gravitons) from two quantum spin models. In the first quantum spin model (called the L-type model), the helicity $\\pm 2$ gapless excitations are shown to appear as the only type of low energy excitations. Within a perturbative calculation, the dispersion of the gapless helicity $\\pm 2$ is found to be $\\eps_{\\v{k}} \\propto |\\v{k}|^3$. The appearance of the gapless helicity $\\pm2$ modes suggests that the ground state of the quantum spin model is a new state of matter. In the second model (called the N-type model) the collective modes are strongly interacting and there is no reliable approach to understand its low energy dynamics. Using a spin-wave/quantum-freeze approach (which is shown to reproduce the correct emergent U(1) gauge theory in a quantum rotor model), ...

  3. Cross-Linked Collagen Triple Helices by Oxime Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentzen, Nina B; Smeenk, Linde E J; Witek, Jagna; Riniker, Sereina; Wennemers, Helma

    2017-09-13

    Covalent cross-links are crucial for the folding and stability of triple-helical collagen, the most abundant protein in nature. Cross-linking is also an attractive strategy for the development of synthetic collagen-based biocompatible materials. Nature uses interchain disulfide bridges to stabilize collagen trimers. However, their implementation into synthetic collagen is difficult and requires the replacement of the canonical amino acids (4R)-hydroxyproline and proline by cysteine or homocysteine, which reduces the preorganization and thereby stability of collagen triple helices. We therefore explored alternative covalent cross-links that allow for connecting triple-helical collagen via proline residues. Here, we present collagen model peptides that are cross-linked by oxime bonds between 4-aminooxyproline (Aop) and 4-oxoacetamidoproline placed in coplanar Xaa and Yaa positions of neighboring strands. The covalently connected strands folded into hyperstable collagen triple helices (Tm ≈ 80 °C). The design of the cross-links was guided by an analysis of the conformational properties of Aop, studies on the stability and functionalization of Aop-containing collagen triple helices, and molecular dynamics simulations. The studies also show that the aminooxy group exerts a stereoelectronic effect comparable to fluorine and introduce oxime ligation as a tool for the functionalization of synthetic collagen.

  4. Peptide tessellation yields micrometre-scale collagen triple helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, I. Caglar; Forticaux, Audrey; Jin, Song; Raines, Ronald T.

    2016-11-01

    Sticky-ended DNA duplexes can associate spontaneously into long double helices; however, such self-assembly is much less developed with proteins. Collagen is the most prevalent component of the extracellular matrix and a common clinical biomaterial. As for natural DNA, the ~103-residue triple helices (~300 nm) of natural collagen are recalcitrant to chemical synthesis. Here we show how the self-assembly of short collagen-mimetic peptides (CMPs) can enable the fabrication of synthetic collagen triple helices that are nearly a micrometre in length. Inspired by the mathematics of tessellations, we derive rules for the design of single CMPs that self-assemble into long triple helices with perfect symmetry. Sticky ends thus created are uniform across the assembly and drive its growth. Enacting this design yields individual triple helices that, in length, match or exceed those in natural collagen and are remarkably thermostable, despite the absence of higher-order association. The symmetric assembly of CMPs provides an enabling platform for the development of advanced materials for medicine and nanotechnology.

  5. Controlling skyrmion helicity via engineered Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián A; Troncoso, Roberto E

    2016-10-26

    Single magnetic skyrmion dynamics in chiral magnets with a spatially inhomogeneous Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) is considered. Based on the relation between DMI coupling and skyrmion helicity, it is argued that the latter must be included as an extra degree of freedom in the dynamics of skyrmions. An effective description of the skyrmion dynamics for an arbitrary inhomogeneous DMI coupling is obtained through the collective coordinates method. The resulting generalized Thiele equation is a dynamical system for the center of mass position and helicity of the skyrmion. It is found that the dissipative tensor and hence the Hall angle become helicity dependent. The skyrmion position and helicity dynamics are fully characterized by our model in two particular examples of engineered DMI coupling: half-planes with opposite-sign DMI and linearly varying DMI. In light of the experiment of Shibata et al (2013 Nat. Nanotechnol. 8 723) on the magnitude and sign of the DMI, our results constitute the first step toward a more complete understanding of the skyrmion helicity as a new degree of freedom that could be harnessed in future high-density magnetic storage and logic devices.

  6. Generation of Subwavelength Plasmonic Nanovortices via Helically Corrugated Metallic Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changming; Chen, Xianfeng; Oladipo, Abiola O; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Ye, Fangwei

    2015-08-17

    We demonstrate that plasmonic helical gratings consisting of metallic nanowires imprinted with helical grooves or ridges can be used efficiently to generate plasmonic vortices with radius much smaller than the operating wavelength. In our proposed approach, these helical surface gratings are designed so that plasmon modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers (topological charge) are phase-matched, thus allowing one to generate optical plasmonic vortices with arbitrary topological charge. The general principles for designing plasmonic helical gratings that facilitate efficient generation of such plasmonic vortices are derived and their applicability to the conversion of plasmonic vortices with zero angular momentum into plasmonic vortices with arbitrary angular momentum is illustrated in several particular cases. Our analysis, based both on the exact solutions for the electromagnetic field propagating in the helical plasmonic grating and a coupled-mode theory, suggests that even in the presence of metal losses the fundamental mode with topological charge m = 0 can be converted to plasmon vortex modes with topological charge m = 1 and m = 2 with a conversion efficiency as large as 60%. The plasmonic nanovortices introduced in this study open new avenues for exciting applications of orbital angular momentum in the nanoworld.

  7. Microscopic Processes in Global Relativistic Jets Containing Helical Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Nishikawa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the study of relativistic jets one of the key open questions is their interaction with the environment on the microscopic level. Here, we study the initial evolution of both electron–proton ( e − – p + and electron–positron ( e ± relativistic jets containing helical magnetic fields, focusing on their interaction with an ambient plasma. We have performed simulations of “global” jets containing helical magnetic fields in order to examine how helical magnetic fields affect kinetic instabilities such as the Weibel instability, the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI and the Mushroom instability (MI. In our initial simulation study these kinetic instabilities are suppressed and new types of instabilities can grow. In the e − – p + jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs and jet electrons are strongly perturbed. In the e ± jet simulation a recollimation-like instability occurs at early times followed by a kinetic instability and the general structure is similar to a simulation without helical magnetic field. Simulations using much larger systems are required in order to thoroughly follow the evolution of global jets containing helical magnetic fields.

  8. Crenactin forms actin-like double helical filaments regulated by arcadin-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izoré, Thierry; Kureisaite-Ciziene, Danguole; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Löwe, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The similarity of eukaryotic actin to crenactin, a filament-forming protein from the crenarchaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis supports the theory of a common origin of Crenarchaea and Eukaryotes. Monomeric structures of crenactin and actin are similar, although their filament architectures were suggested to be different. Here we report that crenactin forms bona fide double helical filaments that show exceptional similarity to eukaryotic F-actin. With cryo-electron microscopy and helical reconstruction we solved the structure of the crenactin filament to 3.8 Å resolution. When forming double filaments, the 'hydrophobic plug' loop in crenactin rearranges. Arcadin-2, also encoded by the arcade gene cluster, binds tightly with its C-terminus to the hydrophobic groove of crenactin. Binding is reminiscent of eukaryotic actin modulators such as cofilin and thymosin β4 and arcadin-2 is a depolymeriser of crenactin filaments. Our work further supports the theory of shared ancestry of Eukaryotes and Crenarchaea. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21600.001 PMID:27852434

  9. Discrete molecular dynamics can predict helical prestructured motifs in disordered proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Szöllősi

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs lack a stable tertiary structure, but their short binding regions termed Pre-Structured Motifs (PreSMo can form transient secondary structure elements in solution. Although disordered proteins are crucial in many biological processes and designing strategies to modulate their function is highly important, both experimental and computational tools to describe their conformational ensembles and the initial steps of folding are sparse. Here we report that discrete molecular dynamics (DMD simulations combined with replica exchange (RX method efficiently samples the conformational space and detects regions populating α-helical conformational states in disordered protein regions. While the available computational methods predict secondary structural propensities in IDPs based on the observation of protein-protein interactions, our ab initio method rests on physical principles of protein folding and dynamics. We show that RX-DMD predicts α-PreSMos with high confidence confirmed by comparison to experimental NMR data. Moreover, the method also can dissect α-PreSMos in close vicinity to each other and indicate helix stability. Importantly, simulations with disordered regions forming helices in X-ray structures of complexes indicate that a preformed helix is frequently the binding element itself, while in other cases it may have a role in initiating the binding process. Our results indicate that RX-DMD provides a breakthrough in the structural and dynamical characterization of disordered proteins by generating the structural ensembles of IDPs even when experimental data are not available.

  10. Probing spin helical surface states in topological HgTe nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, J.; Kozlovsky, R.; Gorini, C.; Liu, M.-H.; Weishäupl, S.; Maier, H.; Fischer, R.; Kozlov, D. A.; Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Richter, K.; Weiss, D.

    2018-01-01

    Nanowires with helical surface states represent key prerequisites for observing and exploiting phase-coherent topological conductance phenomena, such as spin-momentum locked quantum transport or topological superconductivity. We demonstrate in a joint experimental and theoretical study that gated nanowires fabricated from high-mobility strained HgTe, known as a bulk topological insulator, indeed preserve the topological nature of the surface states, that moreover extend phase-coherently across the entire wire geometry. The phase-coherence lengths are enhanced up to 5 μ m when tuning the wires into the bulk gap, so as to single out topological transport. The nanowires exhibit distinct conductance oscillations, both as a function of the flux due to an axial magnetic field and of a gate voltage. The observed h /e -periodic Aharonov-Bohm-type modulations indicate surface-mediated quasiballistic transport. Furthermore, an in-depth analysis of the scaling of the observed gate-dependent conductance oscillations reveals the topological nature of these surface states. To this end we combined numerical tight-binding calculations of the quantum magnetoconductance with simulations of the electrostatics, accounting for the gate-induced inhomogeneous charge carrier densities around the wires. We find that helical transport prevails even for strongly inhomogeneous gating and is governed by flux-sensitive high-angular momentum surface states that extend around the entire wire circumference.

  11. Development of the helical reaction hydraulic turbine. Final technical report, July 1, 1996--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorlov, A.

    1998-08-01

    The present report contains the final results obtained during July 1996--July 1998. This report should be considered in association with the Annual Progress Report submitted in July 1997 due to the fact that not all of the intermediate results reflected in the Progress Report have been included in the Final Report. The aim of the project was to build a helical hydraulic turbine prototype and demonstrate its suitability and advantages as a novel apparatus to harness hydropower from ultra low-head rivers and other free water streams such as ocean currents or rivers without dams. The research objectives of the project are: Design, optimization and selection of the hydro foil section for the helical turbine; Design of the turbine for demonstration project; Construction and testing of the turbine module; Assessing test results and determining scale-up feasibility. The research conducted under this project has substantially exceeded the original goals including designing, constructing and testing of a scaled-up triple-helix turbine, as well as developing recommendations for application of the turbine for direct water pumping in irrigation systems and for future use in wind farms. Measurements collected during two years of turbine testing are kept in the PI files.

  12. Effects of multiple-helicity fields on ion temperature gradient modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H. [Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gigu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    Effects of multiple-helicity magnetic fields on ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD) are studied by means of the linear gyrokinetic theory. Especially, dependence of the real frequency, growth rate, and the eigenfunction of the ITG mode on sideband-helicity fields added to the main helical component is investigated. Comparison between multiple-helicity effects on the ITG mode with those on the neoclassical ripple transport is presented, and optimization of the magnetic configuration for better plasma confinement is discussed. (author)

  13. Method for Sampling Alpha-Helical Protein Backbones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael

    2000-02-22

    We present a novel technique of sampling the configurations of helical proteins. Assuming knowledge of native secondary structure, we employ assembly rules gathered from a database of existing structures to enumerate the geometrically possible 3-D arrangements of the constituent helices. We produce a library of possible folds for 25 helical protein cores. In each case the method finds significant numbers of conformations close to the native structure. In addition we assign coordinates to all atoms for 4 of the 25 proteins. In the context of database driven exhaustive enumeration our method performs extremely well, yielding significant percentages of structures (0.02%--82%) within 6A of the native structure. The method's speed and efficiency make it a valuable contribution towards the goal of predicting protein structure.

  14. Electrostatic braiding and homologous pairing of DNA double helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortini, Ruggero; Kornyshev, Alexei A; Lee, Dominic J; Leikin, Sergey

    2011-08-17

    Homologous pairing and braiding (supercoiling) have crucial effects on genome organization, maintenance, and evolution. Generally, the pairing and braiding processes are discussed in different contexts, independently of each other. However, analysis of electrostatic interactions between DNA double helices suggests that in some situations these processes may be related. Here we present a theory of DNA braiding that accounts for the elastic energy of DNA double helices as well as for the chiral nature of the discrete helical patterns of DNA charges. This theory shows that DNA braiding may be affected, stabilized, or even driven by chiral electrostatic interactions. For example, electrostatically driven braiding may explain the surprising recent observation of stable pairing of homologous double-stranded DNA in solutions containing only monovalent salt. Electrostatic stabilization of left-handed braids may stand behind the chiral selectivity of type II topoisomerases and positive plasmid supercoiling in hyperthermophilic bacteria and archea. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Geometric scalings for the electrostatically driven helical plasma state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Cihan; Finn, John M.; Nebel, Richard A.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2017-12-01

    A new plasma state has been investigated [Akcay et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 052503 (2017)], with a uniform applied axial magnetic field in a periodic cylinder of length L = 2 π R , driven by helical electrodes. The drive is single helicity, depending on m θ + k z = m θ - n ζ , where ζ = z / R and k = - n / R . For strong ( m , n ) = ( 1 , 1 ) drive, the state was found to have a strong axial mean current density, with a mean-field safety factor q 0 ( r ) just above the pitch of the electrodes m / n = 1 in the interior. This state has possible applications to DC electrical transformers and tailoring of the current profile in tokamaks. We study two geometric issues of interest for these applications: (i) scaling of properties with the plasma length or aspect ratio and (ii) behavior for different helicities, specifically ( m , n ) = ( 1 , n ) for n > 1 and ( m , n ) = ( 2 , 1 ) .

  16. Helical Nanomachines for Fast Mechanical Mapping of Heterogeneous Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Artificial micro and nano machines have been envisioned and demonstrated as potential candidates for variety of applications, ranging from targeted drug or gene delivery, cell manipulation, environmental sensing and many more. Here, we demonstrate the application of helical nanomachines that can measure and map the local rheological properties of a complex heterogeneous environment. The position of the helical nanomachine was controlled precisely using magnetic fields, while the instantaneous orientation provided an estimation of the viscosity of the surrounding medium with high spatial and temporal accuracy. Apart from providing viscosity estimates in purely viscous and viscoelastic media with shear rate independent viscosity (Boger fluids), their motion was also found to be extremely sensitive to fluid elasticity. Taken together we report a promising new technique of mapping the rheological properties of a complex fluidic environment by helical nanomachines with high spatial and temporal resolutions, a func...

  17. MAGNETIC HELICITY REVERSALS IN A CYCLIC CONVECTIVE DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miesch, Mark S. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Zhang, Mei [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Augustson, Kyle C., E-mail: miesch@ucar.edu [CEA/DRF/IRFU Service d’Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, Batiment 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2016-06-10

    We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in promoting cyclic magnetic activity in a global, 3D, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a convective dynamo. This simulation is characterized by coherent bands of toroidal field that exist within the convection zone, with opposite polarities in the northern hemisphere (NH) and southern hemisphere (SH). Throughout most of the cycle, the magnetic helicity in these bands is negative in the NH and positive in the SH. However, during the declining phase of each cycle, this hemispheric rule reverses. We attribute this to a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that is induced by the interaction of the bands across the equator. This band interaction appears to be ultimately responsible for, or at least associated with, the decay and subsequent reversal of both the toroidal bands and the polar fields. We briefly discuss the implications of these results within the context of solar observations, which also show some potential evidence for toroidal band interactions and helicity reversals.

  18. The large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a non-local inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic fields. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero-flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  19. Fabrication of a magnetic helical mesostructured silica rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang Qiao, Shi; Cheng, Lina; Yan, Zifeng; Qing Lu, Gao Max

    2008-10-01

    We report a one-step synthesis of magnetic helical mesostructured silica (MHMS) by self-assembly of an achiral surfactant, magnetic nanocrystals with stearic acid ligands and silicate. This core-shell structured material consists of an Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanocrystal core and a highly ordered periodic helical mesoporous silica shell. We propose that the formation of the helical structure is induced by the interaction between the surfactant and dissociated stearic acid ligands. The MHMS obtained possesses superparamagnetism, uniform mesostructure, narrow pore size distribution, high surface area, and large pore volume. Furthermore, the drug release process is demonstrated using aspirin as a drug model and MHMS as a drug carrier in a sodium phosphate buffer solution.

  20. Stability of helical tip vortices in a rotor far wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    , corresponding to Rankine, Gaussian and Scully vortices, at radial extents ranging from the core radius of a tip vortex to several rotor radii. The analysis shows that the stability of tip vortices largely depends on the radial extent of the hub vorticity as well as on the type of vorticity distribution. As part......As a means of analysing the stability of the wake behind a multi-bladed rotor the stability of a multiplicity of helical vortices embedded in an assigned flow field is addressed. In the model the tip vortices in the far wake are approximated by infinitely long helical vortices with constant pitch...... and radius. The work is a further development of a model developed in Okulov (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 521, p. 319) in which the linear stability of N equally azimuthally spaced helical vortices was considered. In the present work the analysis is extended to include an assigned vorticity field due to root...

  1. Swimming of helically-undulating rings in a Stokes fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauci, Lisa; Nguyen, Hoa; Ortiz, Ricardo; Cortez, Ricardo

    2009-11-01

    Dinoflagellates swim due to the action of two eucaryotic flagella - a trailing, longitundinal flagellum that propagates planar waves, and a transverse flagellum that propagates helical waves. The transverse flagellum wraps around the cell in a plane perpendicular to the trailing flagellum, and is thought to provide both forward thrust along with rotational torque. Motivated by the intriguing function of this transverse flagellum, we study the fundamental fluid dynamics of a helically-undulating ring in a Stokes fluid. We use slender-body theory to compute the steady-state transverse and rotational swimming velocities of the ring in free- space, due to an imposed helical traveling wave. In addition, we study the dynamics of an undulating, elastic ring moving in both free-space and near a plane wall using the method of regularized Stokeslets.

  2. Helical liquid and the edge of quantum spin Hall systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Congjun; Bernevig, B Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2006-03-17

    The edge states of the recently proposed quantum spin Hall systems constitute a new symmetry class of one-dimensional liquids dubbed the "helical liquid," where the spin orientation is determined by the direction of electron motion. We prove a no-go theorem which states that a helical liquid with an odd number of components cannot be constructed in a purely 1D lattice system. In a helical liquid with an odd number of components, a uniform gap in the ground state can appear when the time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken by interactions. On the other hand, a correlated two-particle backscattering term by an impurity can become relevant while keeping the time-reversal invariance.

  3. Cooperative polymerization of α-helices induced by macromolecular architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Ryan; Fu, Hailin; Song, Ziyuan; Lin, Yao; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-07-01

    Catalysis observed in enzymatic processes and protein polymerizations often relies on the use of supramolecular interactions and the organization of functional elements in order to gain control over the spatial and temporal elements of fundamental cellular processes. Harnessing these cooperative interactions to catalyse reactions in synthetic systems, however, remains challenging due to the difficulty in creating structurally controlled macromolecules. Here, we report a polypeptide-based macromolecule with spatially organized α-helices that can catalyse its own formation. The system consists of a linear polymeric scaffold containing a high density of initiating groups from which polypeptides are grown, forming a brush polymer. The folding of polypeptide side chains into α-helices dramatically enhances the polymerization rate due to cooperative interactions of macrodipoles between neighbouring α-helices. The parameters that affect the rate are elucidated by a two-stage kinetic model using principles from nucleation-controlled protein polymerizations; the key difference being the irreversible nature of this polymerization.

  4. Variation in the helical structure of native collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available The structure of collagen has been a matter of curiosity, investigation, and debate for the better part of a century. There has been a particularly productive period recently, during which much progress has been made in better describing all aspects of collagen structure. However, there remain some questions regarding its helical symmetry and its persistence within the triple-helix. Previous considerations of this symmetry have sometimes confused the picture by not fully recognizing that collagen structure is a highly complex and large hierarchical entity, and this affects and is effected by the super-coiled molecules that make it. Nevertheless, the symmetry question is not trite, but of some significance as it relates to extracellular matrix organization and cellular integration. The correlation between helical structure in the context of the molecular packing arrangement determines which parts of the amino acid sequence of the collagen fibril are buried or accessible to the extracellular matrix or the cell. In this study, we concentrate primarily on the triple-helical structure of fibrillar collagens I and II, the two most predominant types. By comparing X-ray diffraction data collected from type I and type II containing tissues, we point to evidence for a range of triple-helical symmetries being extant in the molecules native environment. The possible significance of helical instability, local helix dissociation and molecular packing of the triple-helices is discussed in the context of collagen's supramolecular organization, all of which must affect the symmetry of the collagen triple-helix.

  5. Helicity Selection Rules and Non-Interference for BSM Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Machado, Camila S.; Riva, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Precision studies of scattering processes at colliders provide powerful indirect constraints on new physics. We study the helicity structure of scattering amplitudes in the SM and in the context of an effective Lagrangian description of BSM dynamics. Our analysis reveals a novel set of helicity selection rules according to which, in the majority of 2 to 2 scattering processes at high energy, the SM and the leading BSM effects do not interfere. In such situations, the naive expectation that dimension-6 operators represent the leading BSM contribution is compromised, as corrections from dimension-8 operators can become equally (if not more) important well within the validity of the effective field theory approach.

  6. Radiation Field of a Square, Helical Beam Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Lottrup

    1952-01-01

    Rigorous formulas have been derived for the field from a square, helical antenna with a uniformly progressing current wave of constant amplitude. These formulas that have the advantage of great simplicity are of direct use for helical antennas in the meter band, where for practical reasons only...... with the results obtained from the rigorous formulas. A statement to the contrary made recently in the literature is shown to rest on a trivial error. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  7. Helical CT of calcaneal fractures: technique and imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, R.J.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Karasick, D.; Deely, D.M.; Morrison, W. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 111 South 11th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Since the degree of comminution, fracture alignment, and articular congruity of intra-articular calcaneal fractures are important determinants in surgical treatment and patient prognosis, we review helical computed tomographic (CT) technique and features for detecting and assessing the extent of acute calcaneal fractures. Helical CT can be used to classify these fractures and facilitate the surgeon`s understanding of the anatomy and position of the fracture components in all orthogonal planes independently of the patient`s condition, foot placement in the CT gantry, or other injuries. (orig.) With 13 figs., 13 refs.

  8. Fiber-guided modes conversion using superposed helical gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yancheng; Fang, Liang; Wu, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Optical fibers can support various modal forms, including vector modes, linear polarization (LP) modes, and orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes, etc. The modal correlation among these modes is investigated via Jones matrix, associated with polarization and helical phase corresponding to spin angular momentum (SAM) and OAM of light, respectively. We can generate different modal forms by adopting superposed helical gratings (SHGs) with opposite helix orientations. Detailed analysis and discussion on mode conversion is given as for mode coupling in optical fibers with both low and high contrast index, respectively. Our study may deepen the understanding for various fiber-guided modes and mode conversion among them via fiber gratings.

  9. Synthesis, model and stability of helically coiled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejes, Dora; Raffai, Manuella; Hernadi, Klara

    2013-01-01

    . Our experiments focused on the production and development of catalysts for the synthesis of helically coiled CNTs (carbon nanotubes). The catalysts were tested in the decomposition of acetylene by CCVD (Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition) method. The carbon deposit was imaged by TEM (Transmission......Structural model of helically coiled carbon nanotubes is proposed. It is constructed by means of topological coordinate method. Relaxation and cohesive energy calculation are performed by molecular mechanics, using second-generation bond order potential for hydrocarbons introduced by D. W. Brenner...

  10. Handedness preference and switching of peptide helices. Part II: Helices based on noncoded α-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisma, Marco; De Zotti, Marta; Formaggio, Fernando; Peggion, Cristina; Moretto, Alessandro; Toniolo, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    In this second part of our review article on the preferred screw sense and interconversion of peptide helices, we discuss the most significant computational and experimental data published on helices formed by the most extensively investigated categories of noncoded α-amino acids. They are as follows: (i) N-alkylated Gly residues (peptoids), (ii) C(α) -alkylated α-amino acids, (iii) C(α,β) -sp(2) configurated α-amino acids, and (iv) combinations of residues of types (ii) and (iii). With confidence, the large body of interesting papers examined and classified in this editorial effort will stimulate the development of helical peptides in many diverse areas of biosciences and nanosciences. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Roles of effective helical ripple rates in nonlinear stability of externally induced magnetic islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic islands are externally produced by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in toroidal plasmas. Spontaneous annihilation of RMP-induced magnetic islands called self-healing has been observed in helical systems. A possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by helical ripple-induced neoclassical flows, which give rise to neoclassical viscous torques. In this study, effective helical ripple rates in multi-helicity helical systems are revisited, and a multi-helicity effect on the self-healing is investigated, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands. It is confirmed that effective helical ripple rates are sensitive to magnetic axis positions. It is newly found that self-healing thresholds also strongly depend on magnetic axis positions, which is due to dependence of neoclassical viscous torques on effective helical ripple rates.

  12. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  13. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  14. What Helicity Can Tell Us about Solar Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Later, the concept was successfully applied in studies of different solar processes from solar dynamo to flare and CME phenomena. Although no silver bullet, helicity has proven to be a very useful “tool” in answering many still-puzzling questions about origin and evolution of solar magnetic fields. I present an overview of ...

  15. Mechanics of tunable helices and geometric frustration in biomimetic seashells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaohang; Chen, Zi; Li, Wei; Dai, Pinqiang; Ren, Kun; Lin, Junjie; Taber, Larry A.; Chen, Wenzhe

    2014-03-01

    Helical structures are ubiquitous in nature and engineering, ranging from DNA molecules to plant tendrils, from sea snail shells to nanoribbons. While the helical shapes in natural and engineered systems often exhibit nearly uniform radius and pitch, helical shell structures with changing radius and pitch, such as seashells and some plant tendrils, add to the variety of this family of aesthetic beauty. Here we develop a comprehensive theoretical framework for tunable helical morphologies, and report the first biomimetic seashell-like structure resulting from mechanics of geometric frustration. In previous studies, the total potential energy is everywhere minimized when the system achieves equilibrium. In this work, however, the local energy minimization cannot be realized because of the geometric incompatibility, and hence the whole system deforms into a shape with a global energy minimum whereby the energy in each segment may not necessarily be locally optimized. This novel approach can be applied to develop materials and devices of tunable geometries with a range of applications in nano/biotechnology.

  16. Alpha-Effect, Current and Kinetic Helicities for Magnetically Driven ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam, Germany. *e-mail: gbelvedere @alpha4. ct. astro. it. Key words. Sun—dynamo, helicity, turbulent convection. Extended abstract. Recent numerical simulations lead to the result that turbulence is much more mag- netically driven than believed.

  17. Helicity of Solar Active Regions from a Dynamo Model Piyali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    above need not be mutually exclusive: both may be simultaneously operative. A careful comparison between observational data and detailed theoretical models will be needed to ascertain the relative importance of these two effects. We present here calculations of helicity based on our two-dimensional kinematic.

  18. Field-theoretic calculation of kinetic helicity flux

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bulence and compute the fluxes of energy and kinetic helicity. The renormalized viscosity computed using RG procedure is used in the calculation. Contrast this with the arbitrary constant used in EDQNM calculation. In addition, the EDQNM calculations require numerical integration of energy equation, which is not required.

  19. Performance of Upgraded Cooling System for Lhd Helical Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Obana, T.; Yanagi, N.; Moriuchi, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Oba, K.; Mito, T.; Motojima, O.; Okamura, T.; Semba, T.; Yoshinaga, S.; Wakisaka, H.

    2008-03-01

    Helical coils of the Large Helical Device (LHD) are large scale superconducting magnets for heliotron plasma experiments. The helical coils had been cooled by saturated helium at 4.4 K, 120 kPa until 2005. An upgrade of the cooling system was carried out in 2006 in order to improve the cryogenic stability of the helical coils and then it has been possible to supply the coils with subcooled helium at 3.2 K, 120 kPa. A designed mass flow of the supplied subcooled helium is 50 g/s. The subcooled helium is generated at a heat exchanger in a saturated helium bath. A series of two centrifugal cold compressors with gas foil bearing is utilized to lower the helium pressure in the bath. The supplied helium temperature is regulated by rotational speed of the cold compressors and power of a heater in the bath. The mass flow of the supplied helium is also controlled manually by a supply valve and its surplus is evaporated by ten heaters at the outlet above the coils. In the present study, the performance of the cooling system has been investigated and a stable operating method has also developed. As the result, it was confirmed that the performance of the upgraded cooling system satisfies the requirements.

  20. The Hemispheric Sign Rule of Current Helicity during the Rising ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We compute the signs of two different current helicity parameters (i.e., best and ) for 87 active regions during the rise of cycle 23. The results indicate that 59% of the active regions in the northern hemisphere have negative best and 65% in the southern hemisphere have positive. This is consistent with that of the cycle ...

  1. Helical Phase Inflation and Monodromy in Supergravity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study helical phase inflation which realizes “monodromy inflation” in supergravity theory. In the model, inflation is driven by the phase component of a complex field whose potential possesses helicoid structure. We construct phase monodromy based on explicitly breaking global U(1 symmetry in the superpotential. By integrating out heavy fields, the phase monodromy from single complex scalar field is realized and the model fulfills natural inflation. The phase-axion alignment is achieved from explicitly symmetry breaking and gives super-Planckian phase decay constant. The F-term scalar potential provides strong field stabilization for all the scalars except inflaton, which is protected by the approximate global U(1 symmetry. Besides, we show that helical phase inflation can be naturally realized in no-scale supergravity with SU(2,1/SU(2×U(1 symmetry since the supergravity setup needed for phase monodromy is automatically provided in the no-scale Kähler potential. We also demonstrate that helical phase inflation can be reduced to another well-known supergravity inflation model with shift symmetry. Helical phase inflation is free from the UV-sensitivity problem although there is super-Planckian field excursion, and it suggests that inflation can be effectively studied based on supersymmetric field theory while a UV-completed framework is not prerequisite.

  2. Instability of helical tip vortices in rotor wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    The conditions for the appearance of instabilities in systems of helical vortices constitute an intriguing problem that still remains partly unsolved. The experimental study of Felli, Camussi & Di Felice (J. Fluid Mech., this issue, vol. 682, 2011, pp. 5-53) has shed new light on some of the basi...

  3. Generation of hypermagnetic helicity and leptogenesis in the early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semikoz, V. B.; Smirnov, A. Yu.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2016-05-01

    We study hypermagnetic helicity and lepton asymmetry evolution in the plasma of the early Universe before the electroweak phase transition accounting for chirality flip processes via inverse Higgs decays and sphaleron transitions which violate the left lepton number and wash out the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (BAU). In the scenario where the right electron asymmetry supports the BAU alone through the conservation law B /3 -Le R=const at temperatures T >TRL≃10 TeV , the following Universe cooling leads to the production of a nonzero left lepton (electrons and neutrinos) asymmetry. This is due to the Higgs decays becoming faster when entering the equilibrium at T =TRL, with the Universe expansion, ΓRL˜T >H ˜T2 , resulting in the parallel evolution of the right and left electron asymmetries at T helicity evolution proceeds in a self-consistent way with the lepton asymmetry growth. The role of sphaleron transitions in decreasing the left lepton number turns out to be negligible in a given scenario. The hypermagnetic helicity plays a key role in lepto-/baryogenesis in our scenario, and the more hypermagnetic field gets closer to the maximum helical one the faster the BAU grows to the observable value, Bobs˜1 0-10 .

  4. One-dimensional helical transport in topological insulator nanowire interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Sae; Zhang, Yi; Cha, Judy J; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-14

    The discovery of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators opens a gateway to generate unusual phases and particles made of the helical surface electrons, proposing new applications using unusual spin nature. Demonstration of the helical electron transport is a crucial step to both physics and device applications of topological insulators. Topological insulator nanowires, of which spin-textured surface electrons form 1D band manipulated by enclosed magnetic flux, offer a unique nanoscale platform to realize quantum transport of spin-momentum locking nature. Here, we report an observation of a topologically protected 1D mode of surface electrons in topological insulator nanowires existing at only two values of half magnetic quantum flux (±h/2e) due to a spin Berry's phase (π). The helical 1D mode is robust against disorder but fragile against a perpendicular magnetic field breaking-time-reversal symmetry. This result demonstrates a device with robust and easily accessible 1D helical electronic states from 3D topological insulators, a unique nanoscale electronic system to study topological phenomena.

  5. Helical rays in two-dimensional resonant wave conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Allan N.; Tracy, Eugene R.; Brizard, Alain J.

    2004-09-14

    The process of resonant wave conversion (often called linear mode conversion) has traditionally been analyzed with a spatially one-dimensional slab model, for which the rays propagate in a two-dimensional phase space. However, it has recently been shown [E.R. Tracy and A.N. Kaufman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 130402 (2003)] that multidimensional rays have a helical structure for conversion in two or more spatial dimensions (if their dispersion matrix is generic). In that case, a one-dimensional model is inadequate; a correct analysis requires two spatial dimensions and, thus, four-dimensional phase space. In this paper we show that a cold plasma model will exhibit ray helicity in conversion regions where the density and magnetic field gradients are significantly non-parallel. For illustration, we examine a model of the poloidal plane of a deuterium-tritium tokamak plasma, and identify such a region. In this region, characterized by a six-sector topology, rays in the sector for incident and reflected magnetosonic waves exhibit significant helicity. We introduce a ''symmetric-wedge'' model, to develop a detailed analytic and numerical study of helical rays in this sector.

  6. Helical rays in two-dimensional resonant wave conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Allan N.; Tracy, Eugene R.; Brizard, Alain J.

    2004-12-08

    The process of resonant wave conversion (often called linear mode conversion) has traditionally been analyzed with a spatially one-dimensional slab model, for which the rays propagate in a two-dimensional phase space. However, it has recently been shown [E.R. Tracy and A.N. Kaufman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 130402 (2003)] that multidimensional rays have a helical structure for conversion in two or more spatial dimensions (if their dispersion matrix is generic). In that case, a one-dimensional model is inadequate; a correct analysis requires two spatial dimensions and, thus, four-dimensional phase space. In this paper we show that a cold plasma model will exhibit ray helicity in conversion regions where the density and magnetic field gradients are significantly non-parallel. For illustration, we examine a model of the poloidal plane of a deuterium-tritium tokamak plasma, and identify such a region. In this region, characterized by a six-sector topology, rays in the sector for incident and reflected magnetosonic waves exhibit significant helicity. We introduce a ''symmetric-wedge'' model, to develop a detailed analytic and numerical study of helical rays in this sector.

  7. Shape selection and multi-stability in helical ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q.; Mehta, A. K.; Grover, M. A.; Chen, W.; Lynn, D. G.; Chen, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Helical structures, almost ubiquitous in biological systems, have inspired the design and manufacturing of helical devices with applications in nanoelecromechanical systems, morphing structures, optoelectronics, micro-robotics, and drug delivery devices. Meanwhile, multi-stable structures, represented by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelet, have attracted increasing attention due to their applications in making artificial muscles, bio-inspired robots, deployable aerospace components, and energy harvesting devices. Here we show that the mechanical anisotropy pertinent to helical deformation, together with geometric nonlinearity associated with multi-stability, can lead to a selection principle of the geometric shape and multi-stability in spontaneous helical ribbons. Simple table-top experiments were also performed to illustrate the working principle. Our work will promote understanding of spontaneous curling, twisting, wrinkling of thin objects, and their instabilities. The proposed theoretical framework can also serve as a tool for developing functional structures and devices featuring tunable, morphing geometries and smart actuation mechanisms that can be applied in a spectrum of areas.

  8. Numerical investigation of elastic modes of propagation in helical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treyssède, Fabien

    2007-06-01

    Steel multi-wire cables are widely employed in civil engineering. They are usually made of a straight core and one layer of helical wires. In order to detect material degradation, nondestructive evaluation methods based on ultrasonics are one of the most promising techniques. However, their use is complicated by the lack of accurate cable models. As a first step, the goal of this paper is to propose a numerical method for the study of elastic guided waves inside a single helical wire. A finite element (FE) technique is used based on the theory of wave propagation inside periodic structures. This method avoids the tedious writing of equilibrium equations in a curvilinear coordinate system yielding translational invariance along the helix centerline. Besides, no specific programming is needed inside a conventional FE code because it can be implemented as a postprocessing step of stiffness, mass and damping matrices. The convergence and accuracy of the proposed method are assessed by comparing FE results with Pochhammer-Chree solutions for the infinite isotropic cylinder. Dispersion curves for a typical helical waveguide are then obtained. In the low-frequency range, results are validated with a helical Timoshenko beam model. Some significant differences with the cylinder are observed.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies on a novel helical architecture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A novel two-dimensional (2D), layered, helical supramolecular architecture constructed via cooperative hydrogen bond and halogen bonds was synthesized and characterized: [(BMBA)₂(TPB)]n (1) [BMBA= 3-bromo-2-methylbenzoic acid, TPB = 1,2,3,4-tetra-(4-pyridyl)-butane]. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations ...

  10. Experimental and theoretical studies on a novel helical architecture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Helical supramolecular architecture; crystal structure; hydrogen bond; halogen bond; photoluminescence. 1. Introduction. As is well-known, crystal engineering comprises of an understanding of specific intermolecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonding (HB), halogen bonding (XB), electrostatic interaction and van der ...

  11. Position and Trajectrories of helical microswimmers inside circular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldag, Hakan; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2015-11-01

    This work reports the position and orientation of helical mm-sized microswimmers in circular channels obtained by image processing of recorded images. Microswimmers are biologically inspired structures with huge potential for medical practices such as delivery of potent drugs into tissues. In order to understand the hydrodynamic effects of confinement on the velocity and stability of trajectories of swimmers, we developed helical microswimmers with a magnetic head and a rigid helical tail, similar to those of E. coli bacteria. The experiments are recorded using a digital camera, which is placed above the experimental setup that consists of three Helmholtz pairs, generating a rotating magnetic field. A channel containing the microswimmer is placed along the axis of the innermost coil. Image processing tools based on contrast-enhancement are used to obtain the centroid of the head of the swimmer and orientation of the whole swimmer in the channel. Swimmers that move in the direction of the head, i.e. pushed kinematically by the tail, has helical trajectories, which are more unstable in the presence of Poiesuille flow inside the channel; and the swimmers that are pulled by the tail, have trajectories that stabilize at the centerline of the channel.

  12. Experimental observation of discrete helical modes in imploding cylindrical liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Zhang, P.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Campbell, P. C.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    The 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver at the University of Michigan was used to implode ultrathin (400 nm thick) cylindrical aluminum liners1 that were pre-embedded with externally applied, axial magnetic fields of Bz = 0.2 - 2.0 T. Using 12-frame laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission, helical striations were found that increased in pitch angle during the implosion and decreased in angle during the later time explosion, despite the relatively large, peak azimuthal magnetic field exceeding 40 T. The results are interpreted as a discrete, non-axisymmetric eigenmode of a helical instability that persists from implosion to explosion. The helical pitch angle φ was found to obey the simple relation φ = m / kR , where m, k, and R are the azimuthal mode number, axial wavenumber, and radius of the helical instability. Analytic growth rates2 for experimental parameters are presented, and show that early in the current pulse, axisymmetric modes (m = 0) are completely stabilized while non-axisymmetric modes (m > 1) are found to be unstable. This research was supported by DOE Award DE-SC0012328, Sandia National Laboratories, and the NSF. The fast framing camera was supported by AFOSR Grant #FA9550-15-1-0419.

  13. Locally Enhanced and Tunable Optical Chirality in Helical Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Philipp; Burger, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of optical chirality. Intertwined gold helices illuminated with plane waves concentrate right and left circularly polarized electromagnetic field energy to sub-wavelength regions. These spots of enhanced chirality can be smoothly shifted in position and magnitude by varying illumination parameters, allowing for the control of light-matter interactions on a nanometer scale.

  14. Experimental evaluation of helically coiled tube flocculators for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The constant need to improve water treatment techniques allows for the emergence of new technologies for obtaining adequate water, both in terms of quality and quantity. In order to obtain an efficient, rapid and low-cost clarification system, this study proposes the use of helically coiled tubes (HCTs) as a ...

  15. Geometrical influence on mixing in helical porous membrane microcontactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jani, J.M.; Jani, Jigar M.; Wessling, Matthias; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of gas–liquid micromixing has led to develop various kinds of passive micromixer configurations, which can be used for many microfluidics applications. This work details gas–liquid contacting using porous helical microchannels. An experimental and numerical design methodology for different

  16. The Hemispheric Sign Rule of Current Helicity during the Rising ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    S. D. Bao*, G. X. Ai & H. Q. Zhang, Beijing Astronomical Observatory/National. Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100 012, China. *e mail: bshd@sunl0.bao.ac.cn. Abstract. We compute the signs of two different current helicity para meters (i.e., α best and H c) for 87 active regions during the ...

  17. In situ control of polymer helicity with a non-covalently bound photoresponsive molecular motor dopant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Heideman, G Henrieke; Zhao, Depeng; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-06-13

    The transfer of chirality from a molecular motor to a dynamic helical polymer via ionic interactions was investigated. A dopant with photoswitchable chirality was able to induce a preferred helicity in a poly(phenylacetylene) polymer and the helicity is inverted upon irradiation. The findings described herein will advance the development of functional and responsive polymeric systems.

  18. Numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helical channels are widely applied in different application areas. In a converging diverging nozzle, helical channels are mainly used for cooling of its wall. The characteristics of fluid flow and heat transfer inside helical duct for a converging diverging nozzle is not commonly dealt in present literatures. In this paper CFD ...

  19. A Lennard-Jones-like perspective on first order transitions in biological helices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskolkov, Nikolay N.; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Helical structures with Lennard-Jones self-interactions are studied for optimal conformations. For this purpose, their self-energy is analyzed for extrema with respect to the geometric parameters of the helices. It is found that Lennard-Jones helices exhibit a first order phase transition from a ...

  20. Fluid-magnetic helicity in axisymmetric stationary relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-10-01

    The present work is intended to gain a fruitful insight into the understanding of the formations of magneto-vortex configurations and their role in the physical processes of mutual exchange of energies associated with fluid's motion and the magnetic fields in an axisymmetric stationary hydromagnetic system subject to strong gravitational field (e.g., neutron star/magnetar). It is found that the vorticity flux vector field associated with vorticity 2-form is a linear combination of fluid's vorticity vector and of magnetic vorticity vector. The vorticity flux vector obeys Helmholtz's flux conservation. The energy equation associated with the vorticity flux vector field is deduced. It is shown that the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces contributes to the formation of vorticity flux vector field. The dynamo action for the generation of toroidal components of vorticity flux vector field is described in the presence of meridional circulations. It is shown that the stretching of twisting magnetic lines due to differential rotation leads to the breakdown of gravitational isorotation in the absence of meridional circulations. An explicit expression consists of rotation of vorticity flux surface, energy and angular momentum per baryon for the fluid-magnetic helicity current vector is obtained. The conservation of fluid-magnetic helicity is demonstrated. It is found that the fluid-magnetic helicity displays the energy spectrum arising due to the interaction between the mechanical rotation of vorticity flux surfaces and the fluid's motion obeying Euler's equations. The dissipation of a linear combination of modified fluid helicity and magnetic twist is shown to occur due to coupled effect of frame dragging and meridional circulation. It is found that the growing twist of magnetic lines causes the dissipation of modified fluid helicity in the absence of meridional circulations.

  1. Effects of magnetic and kinetic helicities on the growth of magnetic fields in laminar and turbulent flows by helical-Fourier decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz; McKay, Mairi; Berera, Arjun; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical and analytical study of incompressible homogeneous conducting fluids using a Fourier-helical representation. We analytically study both small- and large-scale dynamo properties, as well as the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, in the most general minimal subset of interacting velocity and magnetic fields on a closed Fourier triad. We mainly focus on the dependency of magnetic field growth as a function of the distribution of kinetic and magnetic helicities among the three interacting wavenumbers. By combining direct numerical simulations of the full magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations with the Fourier-helical decomposition we numerically confirm that in the kinematic dynamo regime the system develops a large-scale magnetic helicity with opposite sign compared to the small-scale kinetic helicity, a sort of triad-by-triad $\\alpha$-effect in Fourier space. Concerning the small-scale perturbations, we predict theoretically and confirm numerically that the largest instability is achived...

  2. Fluid-dynamic optimal design of helical vascular graft for stenotic disturbed flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Ha

    Full Text Available Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn* of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft.

  3. Fluid-dynamic optimal design of helical vascular graft for stenotic disturbed flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Choi, Woo-Rak; Baek, Jehyun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn*) of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft.

  4. The conservation of helicity in hurricane Andrew (1992) and the formation of the spiral rainband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yamei; Wu, Rongsheng

    2003-11-01

    The characteristics of helicity in a hurricane are presented by calculating the MM5 model output in addition to theoretical analysis. It is found that helicity in a hurricane mainly depends on its horizontal component, whose magnitude is about 100 to 1000 times larger than its vertical component. It is also found that helicity is approximately conserved in the hurricane. Since the fluid has the intention to adjust the wind shear to satisfy the conservation of helicity, the horizontal vorticity is even larger than the vertical vorticity, and the three-dimensional vortices slant to the horizontal plane except in the inner eye. There are significant horizontal vortices and inhomogeneous helical flows in the hurricane. The formation of the spiral rainband is discussed by using the law of horizontal helical flows. It is closely related to the horizontal strong vortices and inhomogeneous helical flows.

  5. A numerical study on helical vortices induced by a short twisted tape in a circular pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Helical vortices, as one kind of secondary flows, are recently observed downstream of the short twisted tape. The behaviors of vortices, which have significant effects on the efficiency of twisted tape, are not well understood. As such, the formation and development of helical vortices induced by the short twisted tape are studied numerically. The results show that two symmetrical stable helical vortices are present downstream of the twisted tape. The values of radial velocities cannot be neglected due to the presence of the vortices. The vortices form in the twisted tape and remain the structure downstream of the twisted tape. Torsion promotes the formation of helical vortices. The intensities of helical vortices decay along the streamwise direction. With the increasing Reynolds numbers, the intensities of helical vortices increase, and the trend is in agreement with the swirl intensities. The intensities of helical vortices decay slowly compared with the intensities of swirling flow.

  6. Analysis of Eyring-Powell Fluid in Helical Screw Rheometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Siddiqui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the flow of an incompressible, isothermal Eyring-Powell fluid in a helical screw rheometer. The complicated geometry of the helical screw rheometer is simplified by “unwrapping or flattening” the channel, lands, and the outside rotating barrel, assuming the width of the channel is larger as compared to the depth. The developed second order nonlinear differential equations are solved by using Adomian decomposition method. Analytical expressions are obtained for the velocity profiles, shear stresses, shear at wall, force exerted on fluid, volume flow rates, and average velocity. The effect of non-Newtonian parameters, pressure gradients, and flight angle on the velocity profiles is noticed with the help of graphical representation. The observation confirmed the vital role of involved parameters during the extrusion process.

  7. Analysis of Eyring-Powell fluid in helical screw rheometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, A M; Haroon, T; Zeb, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to study the flow of an incompressible, isothermal Eyring-Powell fluid in a helical screw rheometer. The complicated geometry of the helical screw rheometer is simplified by "unwrapping or flattening" the channel, lands, and the outside rotating barrel, assuming the width of the channel is larger as compared to the depth. The developed second order nonlinear differential equations are solved by using Adomian decomposition method. Analytical expressions are obtained for the velocity profiles, shear stresses, shear at wall, force exerted on fluid, volume flow rates, and average velocity. The effect of non-Newtonian parameters, pressure gradients, and flight angle on the velocity profiles is noticed with the help of graphical representation. The observation confirmed the vital role of involved parameters during the extrusion process.

  8. Fluid motion and mixing in helical static mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. Casey; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2001-11-01

    Helical static mixers are used for mixing in a variety of industrial settings under a wide range of flow conditions. To obtain a more fundamental understanding of how these mixers operate, a detailed computational fluid dynamics model study of the helical static mixer was performed using a second-order accurate method for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on fine computational grids. We investigate the fluid structure in the mixers as a function the Reynolds number and the number of mixer elements. The Reynolds number was varied from 100 to 500, and the number of elements was varied from two to six. Mixing was investigated by applying dynamical systems techniques to the trajectories of a large number of particles released from the inlet of the mixer. We also consider closely two numerical issues: the length of the inlet and outlet sections attached to the mixer and the periodicity of the flow field within the mixer sections.

  9. Equilibrium reconstruction for Single Helical Axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Martines, Emilio; Momo, Barbara; Terranova, David; Zanca, Paolo; Alfier, Alberto; Bonomo, Federica; Canton, Alessandra; Fassina, Alessandro; Franz, Paolo; Innocente, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Single Helical Axis (SHAx) configurations are emerging as the natural state for high current reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft X-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  10. Helicity operators for mesons in flight on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Christopher E; Dudek, Jozef J

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the desire to construct meson-meson operators of definite relative momentum in order to study resonances in lattice QCD, we present a set of single-meson interpolating fields at non-zero momentum that respect the reduced symmetry of a cubic lattice in a finite cubic volume. These operators follow from the subduction of operators of definite helicity into irreducible representations of the appropriate little groups. We show their effectiveness in explicit computations where we find that the spectrum of states interpolated by these operators is close to diagonal in helicity, admitting a description in terms of single-meson states of identified J^{PC}. The variationally determined optimal superpositions of the operators for each state give rapid relaxation in Euclidean time to that state, ideal for the construction of meson-meson operators and for the evaluation of matrix elements at finite momentum.

  11. Equilibrium reconstruction for single helical axis reversed field pinch plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, E; Lorenzini, R; Momo, B; Terranova, D; Zanca, P; Alfier, A; Bonomo, F; Canton, A; Fassina, A; Franz, P; Innocente, P, E-mail: emilio.martines@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Single helical axis configurations are emerging as the natural state for high-current reversed field pinch plasmas. These states feature the presence of transport barriers in the core plasma. Here we present a method for computing the equilibrium magnetic surfaces for these states in the force-free approximation, which has been implemented in the SHEq code. The method is based on the superposition of a zeroth-order axisymmetric equilibrium and of a first-order helical perturbation computed according to Newcomb's equation supplemented with edge magnetic field measurements. The mapping of the measured electron temperature profiles, soft x-ray emission and interferometric density measurements on the computed magnetic surfaces demonstrates the quality of the equilibrium reconstruction. The procedure for computing flux surface averages is illustrated, and applied to the evaluation of the thermal conductivity profile. The consistency of the evaluated equilibria with Ohm's law is also discussed.

  12. Compensating Faraday Depolarization by Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Ashurova, Mohira B. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Jabbari, Sarah, E-mail: brandenb@nordita.org [School of Mathematical Sciences and Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2017-08-20

    A turbulent dynamo in spherical geometry with an outer corona is simulated to study the sign of magnetic helicity in the outer parts. In agreement with earlier studies, the sign in the outer corona is found to be opposite to that inside the dynamo. Line-of-sight observations of polarized emission are synthesized to explore the feasibility of using the local reduction of Faraday depolarization to infer the sign of helicity of magnetic fields in the solar corona. This approach was previously identified as an observational diagnostic in the context of galactic magnetic fields. Based on our simulations, we show that this method can be successful in the solar context if sufficient statistics are gathered by using averages over ring segments in the corona separately for the regions north and south of the solar equator.

  13. The velocity field induced by a helical vortex tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Y.; Okulov, Valery

    2005-01-01

    The influence of finite-core thickness on the velocity field around a vortex tube is addressed. An asymptotic expansion of the Biot-Savart law is made to a higher order in a small parameter, the ratio of core radius to curvature radius, which consists of the velocity field due to lines of monopoles...... and dipoles arranged on the centerline of the tube. The former is associated with an infinitely thin core and is featured by the circulation alone. The distribution of vorticity in the core reflects on the strength of dipole. This result is applied to a helical vortex tube, and the induced velocity due...... to a helical filament of the dipoles is obtained in the form of the Kapteyn series, which augments Hardin's [Phys. Fluids 25, 1949 (1982)] solution for the monopoles. Using a singularity-separation technique, a substantial part of the series is represented in a closed form for both the mono- and the dipoles...

  14. Small-x Asymptotics of the Quark Helicity Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D

    2017-02-03

    We construct a numerical solution of the small-x evolution equations derived in our recent work [J. High Energy Phys. 01 (2016) 072.JHEPFG1029-847910.1007/JHEP01(2016)072] for the (anti)quark transverse momentum dependent helicity TMDs and parton distribution functions (PDFs) as well as the g_{1} structure function. We focus on the case of large N_{c}, where one finds a closed set of equations. Employing the extracted intercept, we are able to predict directly from theory the behavior of the quark helicity PDFs at small x, which should have important phenomenological consequences. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin carried by the quarks may be at small x and what impact this has on the spin puzzle.

  15. Helical liquids and Majorana bound states in quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreg, Yuval; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2010-10-22

    We show that the combination of spin-orbit coupling with a Zeeman field or strong interactions may lead to the formation of a helical electron liquid in single-channel quantum wires, with spin and velocity perfectly correlated. We argue that zero-energy Majorana bound states are formed in various situations when such wires are situated in proximity to a conventional s-wave superconductor. This occurs when the external magnetic field, the superconducting gap, or, most simply, the chemical potential vary along the wire. These Majorana states do not require the presence of a vortex in the system. Experimental consequences of the helical liquid and the Majorana states are also discussed.

  16. A 3D printed helical antenna with integrated lens

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2015-10-26

    A novel antenna configuration comprising a helical antenna with an integrated lens is demonstrated in this work. The antenna is manufactured by a unique combination of 3D printing of plastic material (ABS) and inkjet printing of silver nano-particle based metallic ink. The integration of lens enhances the gain by around 7 dB giving a peak gain of about 16.4 dBi at 9.4 GHz. The helical antenna operates in the end-fire mode and radiates a left-hand circularly polarized (LHCP) pattern. The 3-dB axial ratio (AR) bandwidth of the antenna with lens is 3.2 %. Due to integration of lens and fully printed processing, this antenna configuration offers high gain performance and requires low cost for manufacturing.

  17. Symmetry analysis of transport properties in helical superconductor junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Yinhan; Zhang, Kunhua; Jin, Biao; Zhang, Changlian

    2017-03-01

    We study the discrete symmetries satisfied by helical p-wave superconductors with the d-vectors [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] and the transformations brought by symmetry operations to ferromagnet and spin-singlet superconductors, which show intimate associations with the transport properties in heterojunctions, including helical superconductors. In particular, the partial symmetries of the Hamiltonian under spin-rotation and gauge-rotation operations are responsible for the novel invariances of the conductance in tunnel junctions and the new selection rules for the lowest current and peculiar phase diagrams in Josephson junctions, which were reported recently. The symmetries of constructed free energies for Josephson junctions are also analyzed, and are consistent with the results from the Hamiltonian.

  18. Compensating Faraday Depolarization by Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Ashurova, Mohira B.; Jabbari, Sarah

    2017-08-01

    A turbulent dynamo in spherical geometry with an outer corona is simulated to study the sign of magnetic helicity in the outer parts. In agreement with earlier studies, the sign in the outer corona is found to be opposite to that inside the dynamo. Line-of-sight observations of polarized emission are synthesized to explore the feasibility of using the local reduction of Faraday depolarization to infer the sign of helicity of magnetic fields in the solar corona. This approach was previously identified as an observational diagnostic in the context of galactic magnetic fields. Based on our simulations, we show that this method can be successful in the solar context if sufficient statistics are gathered by using averages over ring segments in the corona separately for the regions north and south of the solar equator.

  19. Propulsion by a Helical Flagellum in a Capillary Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    We study the microscale propulsion of a rotating helical filament confined by a cylindrical tube, using a boundary-element method for Stokes flow that accounts for helical symmetry. We determine the effect of confinement on swimming speed and power consumption. Except for a small range of tube radii at the tightest confinements, the swimming speed at fixed rotation rate increases monotonically as the confinement becomes tighter. At fixed torque, the swimming speed and power consumption depend only on the geometry of the filament centerline, except at the smallest pitch angles for which the filament thickness plays a role. We find that the `normal' geometry of \\textit{Escherichia coli} flagella is optimized for swimming efficiency, independent of the degree of confinement. The efficiency peaks when the arc length of the helix within a pitch matches the circumference of the cylindrical wall. We also show that a swimming helix in a tube induces a net flow of fluid along the tube.

  20. Dynamo transition in a five-mode helical model

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rohit; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition ($\\mathrm{Rm}_c$) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers ($\\mathrm{Pm}$). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo stat...

  1. Optimal bundling of transmembrane helices using sparse distance constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Sale, Ken; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Genetha A. Gray; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-step approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only sparse distance constraints, such as those derived from chemical cross-linking, dipolar EPR and FRET experiments. In Step 1, using an algorithm, we developed, the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching a set of distance constraints is explored to provide initial structures for local conformational searches. In Step 2, these structures refined against ...

  2. New Classes of Quasi-helically Symmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.P. Ku and A.H. Boozer

    2010-08-09

    New classes of quasi-helically symmetric stellarators with aspect ratios ≤ 10 have been found which are stable to the perturbation of magnetohydrodynamic modes at plasma pressures of practical interest. These configurations have large rotational transform and good quality of flux surfaces. Characteristics of some selected examples are discussed in detail. The feasibility of using modular coils for these stellarators has been investigated. It is shown that practical designs for modular coils can be achieved.

  3. Cylindrical Taylor states conserving total absolute magnetic helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, B. C.; Fang, F.

    2014-09-01

    The Taylor state of a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field in an upright cylindrical domain V is derived from first principles as an extremum of the total magnetic energy subject to a conserved, total absolute helicity Habs. This new helicity [Low, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052901 (2011)] is distinct from the well known classical total helicity and relative total helicity in common use to describe wholly-contained and anchored fields, respectively. A given field B, tangential along the cylindrical side of V, may be represented as a unique linear superposition of two flux systems, an axially extended system along V and a strictly transverse system carrying information on field-circulation. This specialized Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation defines Habs and permits a neat formulation of the boundary-value problem (BVP) for the Taylor state as a constant-α force-free field, treating 3D wholly-contained and anchored fields on the same conceptual basis. In this formulation, the governing equation is a scalar integro-partial differential equation (PDE). A family of series solutions for an anchored field is presented as an illustration of this class of BVPs. Past treatments of the constant-α field in 3D cylindrical geometry are based on a scalar Helmholtz PDE as the governing equation, with issues of inconsistency in the published field solutions discussed over time in the journal literature. The constant-α force-free equation reduces to a scalar Helmholtz PDE only as special cases of the 3D integro-PDE derived here. In contrast, the constant-α force-free equation and the scalar Helmholtz PDE are absolutely equivalent in the spherical domain as discussed in Appendix. This theoretical study is motivated by the investigation of the Sun's corona but the results are also relevant to laboratory plasmas.

  4. Centering devices for drilling wells by helical face motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, I.K.; Bogomazov, L.D.; Dudkin, M.P.; Kaplun, V.A.; Remizov, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    Substantiation is provided for developing centering devices in drilling wells by helical face motors. Designs and operating principals are presented for the centering devices with changing diameter, pin centering device, centering device with spherical lock and spring loaded centering device, with recommendations for their assembly and disassembly. The described designs of centering devices can be used with other types of face motors in inclined directional drilling.

  5. Flexibility of LHD configuration with multi-layer helical coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Motojima, Osamu; Yamazaki, Kozo; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto, Masao

    1995-11-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) is a heliotron device with two helical coils, each of which has a structure of three current layers. It is designed so that the current in each layer should be controlled independently. By changing the combination of the coil current in the layers, it is possible to vary the effective minor radius of the helical coils, which enlarges the flexibility of the configuration. The properties of the plasmas for several combinations of the layers are investigated numerically. In the vacuum configuration, it is obtained that the combination of the layers corresponding to a large effective coil radius has a large outermost surface. In this case, the rotational transform decreases and the magnetic hill is reduced compared with the configuration with all three layers. The large Shafranov shift which is due to the small rotational transform enhances the magnetic well and the magnetic shear to stabilize the Mercier mode, however, it degrades the equilibrium beta limit. In the case of the combination for a small effective coil radius, the Mercier mode is destabilized, because the magnetic hill is enhanced. The effect on the bootstrap current is also studied. (author).

  6. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  7. Silica biomineralization via the self-assembly of helical biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Cao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zhehao; Duan, Yingying; Che, Shunai

    2015-01-21

    The biomimetic synthesis of relevant silica materials using biological macromolecules as templates via silica biomineralization processes attract rapidly rising attention toward natural and artificial materials. Biomimetic synthesis studies are useful for improving the understanding of the formation mechanism of the hierarchical structures found in living organisms (such as diatoms and sponges) and for promoting significant developments in the biotechnology, nanotechnology and materials chemistry fields. Chirality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and is an inherent feature of biomolecular components in organisms. Helical biomolecules, one of the most important types of chiral macromolecules, can self-assemble into multiple liquid-crystal structures and be used as biotemplates for silica biomineralization, which renders them particularly useful for fabricating complex silica materials under ambient conditions. Over the past two decades, many new silica materials with hierarchical structures and complex morphologies have been created using helical biomolecules. In this review, the developments in this field are described and the recent progress in silica biomineralization templating using several classes of helical biomolecules, including DNA, polypeptides, cellulose and rod-like viruses is summarized. Particular focus is placed on the formation mechanism of biomolecule-silica materials (BSMs) with hierarchical structures. Finally, current research challenges and future developments are discussed in the conclusion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. MemBrain: improving the accuracy of predicting transmembrane helices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Shen

    Full Text Available Prediction of transmembrane helices (TMH in alpha helical membrane proteins provides valuable information about the protein topology when the high resolution structures are not available. Many predictors have been developed based on either amino acid hydrophobicity scale or pure statistical approaches. While these predictors perform reasonably well in identifying the number of TMHs in a protein, they are generally inaccurate in predicting the ends of TMHs, or TMHs of unusual length. To improve the accuracy of TMH detection, we developed a machine-learning based predictor, MemBrain, which integrates a number of modern bioinformatics approaches including sequence representation by multiple sequence alignment matrix, the optimized evidence-theoretic K-nearest neighbor prediction algorithm, fusion of multiple prediction window sizes, and classification by dynamic threshold. MemBrain demonstrates an overall improvement of about 20% in prediction accuracy, particularly, in predicting the ends of TMHs and TMHs that are shorter than 15 residues. It also has the capability to detect N-terminal signal peptides. The MemBrain predictor is a useful sequence-based analysis tool for functional and structural characterization of helical membrane proteins; it is freely available at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/MemBrain/.

  9. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  10. Modeling and Navigation of Artificial Helical Swimmers in Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Acemoglu, Alperen; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments in micro/nanotechnology and manufacturing techniques make use of micro robots for biomedical applications realizable. Controlled in-channel navigation of swimming micro robots is necessary for medical applications performed in conduits and vessels in living bodies. Successful design and control of micro swimmers can be achieved with full understanding of hydrodynamic behavior inside channels and their interaction with channel walls and resultant flows. We performed experimental and modeling studies on untethered mm-sized magnetic helical swimmers inside glycerol-filled rectangular channels. In experiments it is observed that rotation of swimmers in the direction of helical axis leads to forward motion due to fluidic propulsion and lateral motion due to traction forces near the wall. Effects of surface roughness, swimming direction and rotation frequency on the swimmers' speed are analyzed. The flow induced by the tail motion is visualized using micro-particle image velocimetry and analyzed at different radial positions using Computational Fluid Dynamics models. Results indicate that at low frequencies traction forces are effective, however as frequency increases fluid forces become dominant and fluid flow is affecting the swimming motion of helical swimmers. We acknowledge the support from TUBITAK (Techonological & Research Council of Turkey) under the grant no: 111M376.

  11. Theory of helical structures of tilted chiral lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang Zhong-Can; Liu Jixing

    1991-06-01

    Analogous to the theory of cholesteric liquid crystal, a theory for tilted chiral lipid bilayers (TCLB) [briefly reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1679 (1990)] is developed. The tilt equation and the surface-shape-equilibrium equation have been derived. Application of the theory shows that on a cylindrical surface, the field of tilt directions of TCLB molecules forms a right-handed helix with a 45° gradient angle for k2>0 or a left-handed helix with -45° gradient angle for k2cholesteric liquid crystal. In addition, there exists another type of helical structure that looks like twisted strips or helicoids. It is also shown that on a spherical surface, the tilt field has at least two singular points. Based on these results, the succession of transitions from a vesicular dispersion to a phase involving helical structures and then to tubes observed in several laboratories can be reasonably explained. The general formula that explains the aggregation of narrow and prolate ribbon structures is derived. By including more terms of elasticity free energy into the theory, the size of the helical structure is obtained and is shown to agree with experimental observations.

  12. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Amand A; Lambin, Philippe [Physics Department, FUNDP, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein {alpha}-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  13. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Amand A.; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  14. Helical instability in film blowing process: Analogy to buckling instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Sung; Kwon, Ilyoung; Jung, Hyun Wook; Hyun, Jae Chun

    2017-12-01

    The film blowing process is one of the most important polymer processing operations, widely used for producing bi-axially oriented film products in a single-step process. Among the instabilities observed in this film blowing process, i.e., draw resonance and helical motion occurring on the inflated film bubble, the helical instability is a unique phenomenon portraying the snake-like undulation motion of the bubble, having the period on the order of few seconds. This helical instability in the film blowing process is commonly found at the process conditions of a high blow-up ratio with too low a freezeline position and/or too high extrusion temperature. In this study, employing an analogy to the buckling instability for falling viscous threads, the compressive force caused by the pressure difference between inside and outside of the film bubble is introduced into the simulation model along with the scaling law derived from the force balance between viscous force and centripetal force of the film bubble. The simulation using this model reveals a close agreement with the experimental results of the film blowing process of polyethylene polymers such as low density polyethylene and linear low density polyethylene.

  15. Enhanced Control for Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierren, C.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Perry, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Local helicity injection (LHI) experiments on Pegasus rely upon programmable control of a 250 MVA modular power supply system that drives the electromagnets and helicity injection systems. Precise control of the central solenoid is critical to experimental campaigns that test the LHI Taylor relaxation limit and the coupling efficiency of LHI-produced plasmas to Ohmic current drive. Enhancement and expansion of the present control system is underway using field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology for digital logic and control, coupled to new 10 MHz optical-to-digital transceivers for semiconductor level device communication. The system accepts optical command signals from existing analog feedback controllers, transmits them to multiple devices in parallel H-bridges, and aggregates their status signals for fault detection. Present device-level multiplexing/de-multiplexing and protection logic is extended to include bridge-level protections with the FPGA. An input command filter protects against erroneous and/or spurious noise generated commands that could otherwise cause device failures. Fault registration and response times with the FPGA system are 25 ns. Initial system testing indicates an increased immunity to power supply induced noise, enabling plasma operations at higher working capacitor bank voltage. This can increase the applied helicity injection drive voltage, enable longer pulse lengths and improve Ohmic loop voltage control. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  16. Multi-dimensional charge transport in supramolecular helical foldamer assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Ardoy, Alejandro; Markandeya, Nagula; Li, Xuesong; Tsai, Yu-Tang; Pecastaings, Gilles; Buffeteau, Thierry; Maurizot, Victor; Muccioli, Luca; Castet, Frédéric; Huc, Ivan; Bassani, Dario M

    2017-10-01

    Aromatic foldamers are bioinspired architectures whose potential use in materials remains largely unexplored. Here we report our investigation of vertical and horizontal charge transport over long distances in helical oligo-quinolinecarboxamide foldamers organized as single monolayers on Au or SiO2. Conductive atomic force microscopy showed that vertical conductivity is efficient and that it displays a low attenuation with foldamer length (0.06 Å-1). In contrast, horizontal charge transport is found to be negligible, demonstrating the strong anisotropy of foldamer monolayers. Kinetic Monte Carlo calculations were used to probe the mechanism of charge transport in these helical molecules and revealed the presence of intramolecular through-space charge transfer integrals approaching those found in pentacene and rubrene crystals, in line with experimental results. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of charge hopping along the foldamer chain evidence the strong contribution of multiple 1D and 3D pathways in these architectures and their dependence on conformational order. These findings show that helical foldamer architectures may provide a route for achieving charge transport over long distance by combining multiple charge transport pathways.

  17. Tunable symmetry breaking and helical edge transport in a graphene quantum spin Hall state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A F; Sanchez-Yamagishi, J D; Hunt, B; Choi, S H; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Ashoori, R C; Jarillo-Herrero, P

    2014-01-23

    Low-dimensional electronic systems have traditionally been obtained by electrostatically confining electrons, either in heterostructures or in intrinsically nanoscale materials such as single molecules, nanowires and graphene. Recently, a new method has emerged with the recognition that symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases, which occur in systems with an energy gap to quasiparticle excitations (such as insulators or superconductors), can host robust surface states that remain gapless as long as the relevant global symmetry remains unbroken. The nature of the charge carriers in SPT surface states is intimately tied to the symmetry of the bulk, resulting in one- and two-dimensional electronic systems with novel properties. For example, time reversal symmetry endows the massless charge carriers on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator with helicity, fixing the orientation of their spin relative to their momentum. Weakly breaking this symmetry generates a gap on the surface, resulting in charge carriers with finite effective mass and exotic spin textures. Analogous manipulations have yet to be demonstrated in two-dimensional topological insulators, where the primary example of a SPT phase is the quantum spin Hall state. Here we demonstrate experimentally that charge-neutral monolayer graphene has a quantum spin Hall state when it is subjected to a very large magnetic field angled with respect to the graphene plane. In contrast to time-reversal-symmetric systems, this state is protected by a symmetry of planar spin rotations that emerges as electron spins in a half-filled Landau level are polarized by the large magnetic field. The properties of the resulting helical edge states can be modulated by balancing the applied field against an intrinsic antiferromagnetic instability, which tends to spontaneously break the spin-rotation symmetry. In the resulting canted antiferromagnetic state, we observe transport signatures of gapped edge states

  18. Dose-escalated simultaneous integrated-boost treatment of prostate cancer patients via helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, M.; Astner, S.T.; Duma, M.N.; Putzhammer, J.; Winkler, C.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Jacob, V. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Care; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the feasibility of moderately hypofractionated simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer regarding acute side effects and dose-volume histogram data (DVH data). Acute side effects and DVH data were evaluated of the first 40 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients treated with a definitive daily image-guided SIB-IMRT protocol via helical tomotherapy in our department. The planning target volume including the prostate and the base of the seminal vesicles with safety margins was treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The boost volume containing the prostate and 3 mm safety margins (5 mm craniocaudal) was treated as SIB to a total dose of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction). Planning constraints for the anterior rectal wall were set in order not to exceed the dose of 76 Gy prescribed to the boost volume. Acute toxicity was evaluated prospectively using a modified CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) score. SIB-IMRT allowed good rectal sparing, although the full boost dose was permitted to the anterior rectal wall. Median rectum dose was 38 Gy in all patients and the median volumes receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), 70 Gy (V70), and 75 Gy (V75) were 13.5%, 9%, and 3%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 3 toxicity was observed in 20% of patients involving nocturia only. Grade 2 acute intestinal and urological side effects occurred in 25% and 57.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between acute toxicity and the DVH data. This institutional SIB-IMRT protocol using daily image guidance as a precondition for smaller safety margins allows dose escalation to the prostate without increasing acute toxicity. (orig.)

  19. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Everaert, Hendrik [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Hoorens, Anne [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Gastroenterology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  20. Performance characteristics of an independent dose verification program for helical tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac C. F. Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical tomotherapy with its advanced method of intensity-modulated radiation therapy delivery has been used clinically for over 20 years. The standard delivery quality assurance procedure to measure the accuracy of delivered radiation dose from each treatment plan to a phantom is time-consuming. RadCalc®, a radiotherapy dose verification software, has released specifically for beta testing a module for tomotherapy plan dose calculations. RadCalc®'s accuracy for tomotherapy dose calculations was evaluated through examination of point doses in ten lung and ten prostate clinical plans. Doses calculated by the TomoHDA™ tomotherapy treatment planning system were used as the baseline. For lung cases, RadCalc® overestimated point doses in the lung by an average of 13%. Doses within the spinal cord and esophagus were overestimated by 10%. Prostate plans showed better agreement, with overestimations of 6% in the prostate, bladder, and rectum. The systematic overestimation likely resulted from limitations of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm implemented by RadCalc®. Limitations were more severe in areas of greater inhomogeneity and less prominent in regions of homogeneity with densities closer to 1 g/cm3. Recommendations for RadCalc® dose calculation algorithms and anatomical representation were provided based on the results of the study.

  1. α-Helical to β-Helical Conformation Change in the C-Terminal of the Mammalian Prion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jesse; Whitford, Paul; Hayre, Natha; Cox, Daniel; Onuchic, José.

    2011-03-01

    We employ all-atom structure-based models with mixed basis contact maps to explore whether there are any significant geometric or energetic constraints limiting conjectured conformational transitions between the alpha-helical (α H) and the left handed beta helical (LHBH) conformations for the C-terminal (residues 166-226) of the mammalian prion protein. The LHBH structure has been proposed to describe infectious oligomers and one class of in vitro grown fibrils, as well as possibly self- templating the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to the infectious form. Our results confirm that the kinetics of the conformation change are not strongely limited by large scale geometry modification and there exists an overall preference for the LHBH conformation.

  2. Experiments on helical modes in magnetized thin foil-plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, David

    2017-10-01

    This paper gives an in-depth experimental study of helical features on magnetized, ultrathin foil-plasmas driven by the 1-MA linear transformer driver at University of Michigan. Three types of cylindrical liner loads were designed to produce: (a) pure magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes (defined as being void of the acceleration-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability, MRT) using a non-imploding geometry, (b) pure kink modes using a non-imploding, kink-seeded geometry, and (c) MRT-MHD coupled modes in an unseeded, imploding geometry. For each configuration, we applied relatively small axial magnetic fields of Bz = 0.2-2.0 T (compared to peak azimuthal fields of 30-40 T). The resulting liner-plasmas and instabilities were imaged using 12-frame laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission on a fast framing camera. The azimuthal mode number was carefully identified with a tracking algorithm of self-emission minima. Our experiments show that the helical structures are a manifestation of discrete eigenmodes. The pitch angle of the helix is simply m / kR , from implosion to explosion, where m, k, and R are the azimuthal mode number, axial wavenumber, and radius of the helical instability. Thus, the pitch angle increases (decreases) during implosion (explosion) as R becomes smaller (larger). We found that there are one, or at most two, discrete helical modes that arise for magnetized liners, with no apparent threshold on the applied Bz for the appearance of helical modes; increasing the axial magnetic field from zero to 0.5 T changes the relative weight between the m = 0 and m = 1 modes. Further increasing the applied axial magnetic fields yield higher m modes. Finally, the seeded kink instability overwhelms the intrinsic instability modes of the plasma. These results are corroborated with our analytic theory on the effects of radial acceleration on the classical sausage, kink, and higher m modes. Work supported by US DOE award DE-SC0012328, Sandia National Laboratories

  3. How to improve the maps of magnetic helicity injection in active regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, Etienne; Démoulin, Pascal; Nindos, Alexander

    Magnetic helicity, a topological quantity which measures the twist, the writhe and the shear of a magnetic field, has recently appeared as a key quantity to understand some mechanisms of the solar activity such as Coronal Mass Ejections and flare onset. It is thus becoming of major importance to be able to compute magnetic helicity in active regions. Computing photospheric maps of the injection of magnetic helicity provides new spatial information that helps us to understand basic properties of solar activity, such as where and how magnetic helicity is injected. Several helicity flux density maps have been published for different active regions. Unfortunately, the classical helicity flux density is not a correct physical quantity and it does induce spurious signals (fake polarities) which mask the real injection of helicity. To map the real helicity injection, the knowledge of the complete connectivity of the field lines is fundamental. Even without the connectivity, improved helicity flux density maps can be derived. They have fake polarities which are lower by more than a factor 10 than the previous incorrect maps. Rather than a mixture of negative and positive injection patterns, they show almost unipolar injection on the active region scale. This leads to a completely new way of understanding the dynamics of active regions, in the frame of magnetic helicity studies.

  4. Hydrogen recycling and transport in the helical divertor of TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clever, Meike

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the hydrogen recycling at the target plates of the helical divertor in TEXTOR and by this the capability of this divertor configuration to access such favourable operational regimes. In order to study the different divertor density regimes in TEXTOR, discharges were performed in which the total plasma density was increased continuously up to the density limit. The recycling was investigated in a fixed helical divertor structure where four helical strike points with a poloidal width of about 8-10 cm are created at the divertor target plates. The experimental investigation of the hydrogen recycling was carried out using mainly spectroscopic methods supplemented by Langmuir probe, interferometric and atomic beam measurements. In the framework of this thesis a spectroscopic multi camera system has been built that facilitates the simultaneous observation of four different spectral lines, recording images of the divertor target plates and the plasma volume close to the target. The system facilitates the simultaneous measurement of the poloidal and toroidal pattern of the recycling flux at the divertor target without the need for sweeping the plasma structure. The simultaneous observation of different spectral lines reduces the uncertainty in the analysis based on several lines, as the contribution from uncertainties in the reproducibility of plasma parameters in different discharges are eliminated and only the uncertainty of the measurement method limits the accuracy. The spatial resolution of the system in poloidal and toroidal direction (0.8 mm{+-}0.01 mm) is small compared to the separation of the helical strike points, the capability of the measurement method to resolve these structures is therefore limited by the line-of-sight integration and the penetration depth of the light emitting species. The measurements showed that the recycling flux increases linearly with increasing plasma density, a high recycling regime is not

  5. Synthesis of Helical Phenolic Resin Bundles through a Sol-Gel Transcription Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhen Shao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chiral and helical polymers possess special helical structures and optical property, and may find applications in chiral catalysis and optical devices. This work presents the preparation and formation process of helical phenolic resins through a sol-gel transcription method. A pair of bola-type chiral low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs derived from valine are used as templates, while 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and formaldehyde are used as precursors. The electron microscopy images show that the phenolic resins are single-handed helical bundles comprised of helical ultrafine nanofibers. The diffused reflection circular dichroism spectra indicate that the helical phenolic resins exhibit optical activity. A possible formation mechanism is proposed, which shows the co-assembly of the LMWGs and the precursors.

  6. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Wahab, Sasa [Cobb Center for Radiation Oncology Center, Austell, GA (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  7. alpha-Helix dipole model and electrostatic stabilization of 4-alpha-helical proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheridan, R.P.; Levy, R.M.; Salemme, F. R.

    1982-01-01

    A simple dipole model is developed for estimation of the electrostatic interaction energy between alpha-helices in proteins. This model is used to estimate the electrostatic stabilization in a recurrent protein tertiary structural motif, an array of four closely packed alpha-helices. It is found that, for the proteins examined (cytochrome c', hemerythrin, myohemerythrin, cytochrome b562, and a T4 phage lysozyme domain), their common antiparallel arrangement of adjacent helices confers a stabi...

  8. Triple-Stranded Cluster Helicates for the Selective Catalytic Oxidation of C-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Gong, Wei; Liu, Lujia; Liu, Yan; Cui, Yong

    2016-10-17

    Triple-stranded cluster helicates with heptametallic dicubane cores are synthesized by entrapping metals in the cavities of linear triple helicates based on a C2-symmetrical hexadentate Schiff-base ligand of ortho-substitued biphenol. The helicates are stable in both the solution and solid states, and the copper species could selectively catalyze the oxidation of C-H bonds of alkanes to ketones.

  9. Analytic, High-beta Solutions of the Helical Grad-Shafranov Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Smith; A.H. Reiman

    2004-05-19

    We present analytic, high-beta ({beta} {approx} O(1)), helical equilibrium solutions for a class of helical axis configurations having large helical aspect ratio, with the helix assumed to be tightly wound. The solutions develop a narrow boundary layer of strongly compressed flux, similar to that previously found in high beta tokamak equilibrium solutions. The boundary layer is associated with a strong localized current which prevents the equilibrium from having zero net current.

  10. Exact solutions for helical magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. II. Nonstatic and nonbarotropic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villata, M. (Istituto di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)); Ferrari, A. (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy))

    1994-07-01

    In the framework of the analytical study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria with flow and nonuniform density, a general family of well-behaved exact solutions of the generalized Grad--Shafranov equation and of the whole set of time-independent MHD equations completed by the nonbarotropic ideal gas equation of state is obtained, both in helical and axial symmetry. The helical equilibrium solutions are suggested to be relevant to describe the helical morphology of some astrophysical jets.

  11. Pelvic migration of the helical blade after treatment of transtrochanteric fracture using a proximal femoral nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luciano Teixeira Gomes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Proximal femoral nails with a helical blade are a new generation of implants used for treating transtrochanteric fractures. The blade design provides rotational and angular stability for the fracture. Despite greater biomechanical resistance, they sometimes present complications. In the literature, there are some reports of cases of perforation of the femoral head caused by helical blades. Here, a clinical case of medial migration of the helical blade through the femoral head and acetabulum into the pelvic cavity is presented.

  12. Helical CT defecography; La defecografia con Tomografia Computerizzata spirale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrando, R.; Fiorini, G.; Beghello, A.; Cicio, G.R.; Derchi, L.E.; Consigliere, M.; Resasco, M. [Genua Univ., Genua (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia, Cattedra R; Tornago, S. [Genua Univ. Genua (Italy). 2 Clinica Ortopedica

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the possible role of Helical CT defecography in pelvic floor disorders by comparing the results of the investigations with those of conventional defecography. The series analyzed consisted of 90 patients, namely 62 women and 28 men, ranging in age 24-82 years. They were all submitted to conventional defecography, and 18 questionable cases were also studied with Helical CT defecography. The conventional examination was performed during the 4 standard phases of resting, squeezing, Valsalva and straining; it is used a remote-control unit. The parameters for Helical CT defecography were: 5 mm beam collimation, pitch 2, 120 KV, 250 m As and 18-20 degrees gantry inclination to acquire coronal images of the pelvic floor. The rectal ampulla was distended with a bolus of 300 mL nonionic iodinated contrast agent (dilution: 3g/cc). The patient wore a napkin and was seated on the table, except for those who could not hold the position and were thus examined supine. Twenty-second helical scans were performed at rest and during evacuation; multiplanar reconstructions were obtained especially on the sagittal plane for comparison with conventional defecographic images. Coronal Helical CT defecography images permitted to map the perineal floor muscles, while sagittal reconstructions provided information on the ampulla and the levator ani. To conclude, Helical CT defecography performed well in study of pelvic floor disorders and can follow conventional defecography especially in questionable cases. [Italian] Scopo di questo lavoro e' ricercare un ruolo per la defeco-TC con apparecchiatura elicoidale nello studio delle malattie del pavimento pelvico confrontandola con i risultati consolidati della defecografia tradizionale. Si sono visionati 90 pazienti, 62 femmine e 28 maschi, con eta' compresa tra 24 e 82 anni, con defecografia tradizionale; di questi, 18 casi con diagnosi dubbia sono stati studiati anche con defeco-TC spirale

  13. Design and analysis of a field modulated magnetic screw for artificial heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zhijian; Ji, Jinghua; Wang, Fangqun; Bian, Fangfang

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a new electromechanical energy conversion system, called Field Modulated Magnetic Screw (FMMS) as a high force density linear actuator for artificial heart. This device is based on the concept of magnetic screw and linear magnetic gear. The proposed FMMS consists of three parts with the outer and inner carrying the radially magnetized helically permanent-magnet (PM), and the intermediate having a set of helically ferromagnetic pole pieces, which modulate the magnetic fields produced by the PMs. The configuration of the newly designed FMMS is presented and its electromagnetic performances are analyzed by using the finite-element analysis, verifying the advantages of the proposed structure.

  14. Silver baits for the "miraculous draught" of amphiphilic lanthanide helicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terazzi, Emmanuel; Guénée, Laure; Varin, Johan; Bocquet, Bernard; Lemonnier, Jean-François; Emery, Daniel; Mareda, Jiri; Piguet, Claude

    2011-01-03

    The axial connection of flexible thioalkyls chains of variable length (n=1-12) within the segmental bis-tridentate 2-benzimidazole-8-hydroxyquinoline ligands [L12(Cn) -2 H](2-) provides amphiphilic receptors designed for the synthesis of neutral dinuclear lanthanides helicates. However, the stoichiometric mixing of metals and ligands in basic media only yields intricate mixtures of poorly soluble aggregates. The addition of Ag(I) in solution restores classical helicate architectures for n=3, with the quantitative formation of the discrete D(3) -symmetrical [Ln(2) Ag2(L12(C3) -2 H)(3) ](2+) complexes at millimolar concentration (Ln=La, Eu, Lu). The X-ray crystal structure supports the formation of [La(2) Ag(2) (L12(C3) -2 H)(3) ][OTf](2) , which exists in the solid state as infinite linear polymers bridged by S-Ag-S bonds. In contrast, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the gas phase and in solution confirm the experimental diffusion measurements, which imply the formation of discrete molecular entities in these media, in which the sulfur atoms of each lipophilic ligand are rapidly exchanged within the Ag(I) coordination sphere. Turned as a predictive tool, MD suggests that this Ag(I) templating effect is efficient only for n=1-3, while for n>3 very loose interactions occur between Ag(I) and the thioalkyl residues. The subsequent experimental demonstration that only 25 % of the total ligand speciation contributes to the formation of [Ln(2) Ag(2) (L12(C12) -2 H)(3) ](2+) in solution puts the bases for a rational approach for the design of amphiphilic helical complexes with predetermined molecular interfaces. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  16. Harmonic vibrations and waves in a cylindrical helically anisotropic shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilov, I. A.; Ustinov, Yu. A.

    2012-04-01

    A Kirchhoff-Love type applied theory is used to study the specific characteristics of harmonic waves and vibrations of a helically anisotropic shell. Special attention is paid to axisymmetric and bending vibrations. In both cases, the dispersion equations are constructed and a qualitative and numerical analysis of their roots and the corresponding elementary solutions is performed. It is shown that the skew anisotropy in the axisymmetric case generates a relation between the longitudinal and torsional vibrations which is mathematically described by the amplitude coefficients of homogeneous waves. In the case of a shell with rigidly fixed end surfaces, the dependence of the first two natural frequencies on the shell length and the helical line slope α, i.e., the geometric parameter of helical anisotropy, is studied. A boundary value problem in which longitudinal vibrations are generated on one of the end surfaces and the other end is free of forces and moments is considered to analyze the degree of transformation of longitudinal vibrations into longitudinally torsional vibrations. In the case of bending vibrations, two problems for a half-infinite shell are studied as well. In the first problem, the waves are excited kinematically by generating harmonic vibrations of the shell end surface in the plane of the axial cross-section, and it is shown that the axis generally moves in some closed trajectories far from the end surface. In the second problem, the reflection of a homogeneous wave incident on the shell end is examined. It is shown that the "boundary resonance" phenomenon can arise in some cases.

  17. Observation of an optical vortex beam from a helical undulator in the XUV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Fujimoto, Masaki; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Hosaka, Masahito; Shigemasa, Eiji; Katoh, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    The observation of an optical vortex beam at 60 nm wavelength, produced as the second-harmonic radiation from a helical undulator, is reported. The helical wavefront of the optical vortex beam was verified by measuring the interference pattern between the vortex beam from a helical undulator and a normal beam from another undulator. Although the interference patterns were slightly blurred owing to the relatively large electron beam emittance, it was possible to observe the interference features thanks to the helical wavefront of the vortex beam. The experimental results were well reproduced by simulation.

  18. Self-assembly of a double-helical complex of sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T W; Jousselin, H

    1994-02-03

    Spontaneous self-organization of helical and multiple-helical molecular structures occurs on several levels in living organisms. Key examples are alpha-helical polypeptides, double-helical nucleic acids and helical protein structures, including F-actin, microtubules and the protein sheath of the tobacco mosaic virus. Although the self-assembly of double-helical transition-metal complexes bears some resemblance to the molecular organization of double-stranded DNA, selection between monohelical, double-helical and triple-helical structures is determined largely by the size and geometrical preference of the tightly bound metal. Here we present an example of double-helical assembly induced by the weaker and non-directional interactions of an alkali-metal ion with an organic ligand that is pre-organized into a coil. We have characterized the resulting complex by two-dimensional NMR and fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry. These results provide a step toward the creation of molecular tubes or ion channels consisting of intertwined coils.

  19. Experimental investigation of transverse mixing in porous media under helical flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2016-01-01

    Plume dilution and transverse mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flow occurring in three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume...... proof of helical flow was obtained by freezing and slicing the porous media at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. We simulated flow and transport to interpret our experimental observations and investigate the effects of helical flow on mixing-controlled reactive...

  20. Study of helical flow inducers with different thread pitches and diameters in vena cava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoyan; Shan, Xinying; Xing, Yubin

    2018-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a severe, potentially life-threatening condition. Inferior vena cava filters have been used to prevent recurrent pulmonary embolisms. However, the build-up of thrombosis in vena cava filters after deployment presents a severe problem to patients. Previous studies proposed that filters with helical flow are beneficial and capable of alleviating this problem. In this study, the hemodynamic performances of four typical helical flow inducers in the vena cava are determined using computational fluid dynamics simulations (steady-state and pulsatile flow) and compared. Pilot in vitro experiments were also conducted. The simulation results demonstrate that large-diameter inducers produce helical flow. Among inducers with identical diameter, those with a smaller thread pitch are more likely to induce increased helical flow. We also observed that the small thread pitch inducers can yield higher shear rates. Furthermore, a large diameter, small thread pitch helical flow inducer increases the time-averaged wall shear stress and reduces the oscillating shear index and relative residence time on the vessel wall in the vicinity of the helical flow inducer. In vitro experiments also verify that large diameter inducers generate a helical flow. A notable observation of this study is that the diameter is the key parameter that affects the induction of a helical flow. This study will likely provide important guidance for the design of interventional treatments and the deployment of filters associated with helical flow in the vena cava. PMID:29298357

  1. Helical Phase Structure of Radiation from an Electron in Circular Motion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M Katoh; M Fujimoto; N S Mirian; T Konomi; Y Taira; T Kaneyasu; M Hosaka; N Yamamoto; A Mochihashi; Y Takashima; K Kuroda; A Miyamoto; K Miyamoto; S Sasaki

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically show that a single free electron in circular motion radiates an electromagnetic wave possessing helical phase structure, which is closely related to orbital angular momentum carried...

  2. Generation of helical gears with new surfaces topology by application of CNC machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, F. L.; Chen, N. X.; Hsiao, C. L.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of helical involute gears by tooth contact analysis shows that such gears are very sensitive to angular misalignment that leads to edge contact and the potential for high vibration. A new topology of tooth surfaces of helical gears that enables a favorable bearing contact and a reduced level of vibration is described. Methods for grinding of the helical gears with the new topology are proposed. A TCA (tooth contact analysis) program for simulation of meshing and contact of helical gears with the new topology has been developed. Numerical examples that illustrate the proposed ideas are discussed.

  3. On the inverse transfer of (non-)helical magnetic energy in a decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiwan

    2017-12-01

    In our conventional understanding, large-scale magnetic fields are thought to originate from an inverse cascade in the presence of magnetic helicity, differential rotation or a magneto-rotational instability. However, as recent simulations have given strong indications that an inverse cascade (transfer) may occur even in the absence of magnetic helicity, the physical origin of this inverse cascade is still not fully understood. We here present two simulations of freely decaying helical and non-helical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We verified the inverse transfer of helical and non-helical magnetic fields in both cases, but we found the underlying physical principles to be fundamentally different. In the former case, the helical magnetic component leads to an inverse cascade of magnetic energy. We derived a semi-analytic formula for the evolution of large-scale magnetic field using α coefficient and compared it with the simulation data. But in the latter case, the α effect, including other conventional dynamo theories, is not suitable to describe the inverse transfer of non-helical magnetic energy. To obtain a better understanding of the physics at work here, we introduced a `field structure model' based on the magnetic induction equation in the presence of inhomogeneities. This model illustrates how the curl of the electromotive force leads to the build up of a large-scale magnetic field without the requirement of magnetic helicity. And we applied a quasi-normal approximation to the inverse transfer of magnetic energy.

  4. Helicity conservation in gauge boson scattering at high energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounaris, G J; Renard, F M

    2005-04-08

    We remark that the high energy gauge boson scattering processes involving two-body initial and final states satisfy certain selection rules described as helicity conservation of the gauge boson amplitudes (GBHC). These rules are valid at the Born level, as well as at the level of the leading and subleading 1-loop logarithmic corrections, in both the standard model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). A "fermionic equivalence" theorem is also proved, which suggests that GBHC is valid at all orders in the MSSM at sufficiently high energies, where the mass suppressed contributions are neglected.

  5. Nonlinear simulation of resistive ballooning modes in Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Hideaki; Hayashi, Takaya; Sato, Tetsuya

    2001-06-01

    Nonlinear simulations of a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) plasma in full three-dimensional geometry of the Large Helical Device (LHD) are conducted to study nonlinear evolution of pressure-driven instabilities. A series of simulations for a resistive plasma shows growth of resistive ballooning instability. The growth rate of the most unstable resistive ballooning mode is shown to be proportional to the one-third power of the resistivity. Nonlinear saturation of the instability and its slow decay are observed. After the nonlinear saturation, the pressure takes a profile similar to so-called pedestal. A possible scenario of nonlinear relaxation of a plasma toward a new equilibrated state is discussed. (author)

  6. Nucleation of Multiple Buckled Structures in Intertwined DNA Double Helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmachari, Sumitabha; Gunn, Kathryn H.; Giuntoli, Rebecca D.; Mondragón, Alfonso; Marko, John F.

    2017-11-01

    We study the statistical-mechanical properties of intertwined double-helical DNAs (DNA braids). In magnetic tweezers experiments, we find that torsionally stressed stretched braids supercoil via an abrupt buckling transition, which is associated with the nucleation of a braid end loop, and that the buckled braid is characterized by a proliferation of multiple domains. Differences between the mechanics of DNA braids and supercoiled single DNAs can be understood as an effect of the increased bulkiness in the structure of the former. The experimental results are in accord with the predictions of a statistical-mechanical model.

  7. Biologically inspired, sophisticated motions from helically assembled, conducting fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Guo, Wenhan; Zhang, Zhitao; Qiu, Longbin; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-02-11

    A hierarchically helical organization of carbon nanotubes into macroscopic fibers enables sophistication while controlling three-dimensional electromechanical actuations, e.g., an artificial swing and tail. The actuation generates a stress of more than 260 times that of a typical natural skeletal muscle and an accelerated velocity of more than 10 times that of a cheetah at low electric currents with high reversibility, good stability, and availability to various media. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Uniaxial indefinite material formed by helical-shaped wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Tiago A.; Maslovski, Stanislav I.; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that a racemic array of helical-shaped metallic wires may be regarded as a local uniaxial epsilon-negative (ENG) material even when the metal conductivity is very large (e.g. in the microwave regime) and, as a result, enables strong negative refraction over a wide frequency range. Based on the negative refraction effect, we demonstrate partial focusing of p-polarized electromagnetic radiation using a planar lens formed by such a composite material. The results reported here are supported by full-wave simulations as well as by analytical calculations based on effective medium theory.

  9. Dynamo transition in a five-mode helical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-09-01

    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition (Rmc) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers (Pm). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo states as the forcing amplitude is increased and chaos appears through a quasi-periodic route.

  10. Studies on positive conveying in helically channeled single screw extruders

    OpenAIRE

    L. Pan; M. Y. Jia; Jin, Z. M.; Wang, K. J.; Xue, P

    2012-01-01

    A solids conveying theory called double-flight driving theory was proposed for helically channeled single screw extruders. In the extruder, screw channel rotates against static barrel channel, which behaves as cooperative embedded twin-screws for the positive conveying. They turn as two parallel arc plates, between which an arc-plate solid-plug was assumed. By analyzing the forces on the solid-plug in the barrel channel and screw channel, the boundary conditions when the solid-plug is waived ...

  11. Helicity-dependent generalized parton distributions for nonzero skewness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Chandan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-09-15

    We investigate the helicity-dependent generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in momentum as well as transverse position (impact) spaces for the u and d quarks in a proton when the momentum transfer in both the transverse and the longitudinal directions are nonzero. The GPDs are evaluated using the light-front wave functions of a quark-diquark model for nucleon where the wave functions are constructed by the soft-wall AdS/QCD correspondence. We also express the GPDs in the boost-invariant longitudinal position space. (orig.)

  12. Helical tomotherapy. Experiences of the first 150 patients in Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzing, F.; Schubert, K.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Kalz, J.; Debus, J.; Herfarth, K. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: helical tomotherapy was introduced into clinical routine at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Germany, in July 2006. This report is intended to describe the experience with the first 150 patients treated with helical tomotherapy. Patient selection, time effort, handling of daily image guidance with megavoltage (MV) CT, and quality of radiation plans shall be assessed. Patients and methods: between July 2006 and May 2007, 150 patients were treated with helical tomotherapy in the University Hospital of Heidelberg. Mean age was 60 years with a minimum of 30 years and a maximum of 85 years. 79 of these patients received radiotherapy as a part of multimodal treatment pre- or postoperatively, 17 patients received treatment as a combined radiochemotherapy. 76% were treated with curative intent. Radiotherapy sites were central nervous system (n = 7), head and neck (n = 28), thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 58) and skeletal system (n = 20). Most common tumor entities were prostate cancer (n = 28), breast cancer (n = 17), gastrointestinal tumors (n = 19), pharyngeal carcinoma (n = 14), lymphoma (n = 13), metastatic disease (bone n = 14, liver n = 6, lung n = 4, lymph node n = 2), sarcoma (n = 8), malignant pleural mesothelioma (n = 5), ovarian cancer treated with whole abdominal irradiation (n = 4), lung cancer (n = 3), skin malignancies (n = 3), chordoma (n = 2), meningioma (n = 2), one ependymoma and one medulloblastoma treated with craniospinal axis irradiation (n = 2), and others (n = 4). Nine patients were treated with single-fraction radiosurgery, nine with image-guided spinal reirradiation, and twelve patients were treated at multiple targets simultaneously. A pretreatment MV-CT scan was performed in 98.2% of the 3,026 fractions applied. After matching with the kilovoltage planning CT, corrections for translations and rotation around longitudinal axis (roll) were done. Results: mean time on table was 24

  13. Rotational and Helical Surface Approximation for Reverse Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup, Thomas; Pottmann, Helmut

    1997-01-01

    to basic shapes used in computer aided design. The algorithms apply methods of line geometry to the set of surface normals in combination with techniques of numerical approximation. The presented results possess applications in reverse engineering and computer aided manufacturing.......Given a surface in 3-space or scattered points from a surface, we investigate the problem of deciding whether the data may be fitted well by a cylindrical surface, a surface of revolution or a helical surface. Furthermore, we show how to compute an approximating surface and put special emphasis...

  14. Helicity-dependent generalized parton distributions for nonzero skewness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Chandan

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the helicity-dependent generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in momentum as well as transverse position (impact) spaces for the u and d quarks in a proton when the momentum transfer in both the transverse and the longitudinal directions are nonzero. The GPDs are evaluated using the light-front wave functions of a quark-diquark model for nucleon where the wave functions are constructed by the soft-wall AdS/QCD correspondence. We also express the GPDs in the boost-invariant longitudinal position space.

  15. Helical Foldamers Incorporating Photoswitchable Residues for Light-Mediated Modulation of Conformational Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzier, Daniela; Crisma, Marco; De Poli, Matteo; Marafon, Giulia; Peggion, Cristina; Clayden, Jonathan; Moretto, Alessandro

    2016-06-29

    An E unsaturated fumaramide linkage may be introduced into Aib peptide foldamer structures by standard coupling methods and photoisomerized to its Z (maleamide) isomer by irradiation with UV light. As a result of the photoisomerization, a new hydrogen-bonded contact becomes possible between the peptide domains located on either side of the unsaturated linkage. Using the fumaramide/maleamide linker to couple a chiral and an achiral fragment allows the change in hydrogen bond network to communicate a conformational preference, inducing a screw sense preference in the achiral domain of the maleamide-linked foldamers that is absent from the fumaramides. Evidence for the induced screw sense preference is provided by NMR and CD, and also by the turning on by light of the diastereoselectivity of a peptide chain extension reaction. The fumaramide/maleamide linker thus acts as a "conformational photodiode" that conducts stereochemical information as a result of irradiation by UV light.

  16. Chirality and helicity in the frustrated langasite Ba3NbFe3Si2O14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Karol; Simonet, Virginie; Bordet, Pierre; Ballou, Rafik; Ressouche, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Ba3NbFe3Si2O14 cristallizes in the trigonal non-centrosymmetric space group P321. The Fe^3+ carry a spin 5/2 and form a triangular lattice of equilateral triangles. This compound orders magnetically at TN=27K, well below the Curie-Weiss temperature of θ=-171K, which is a fingerprint of magnetic frustration. Neutron diffraction experiments allowed solving the magnetic structure. This consists in a ferro-chiral configuration of equal moments lying in the plane perpendicular to the 3- fold c axis, oriented at 120^o from each other on each triangle of Fe^3+ (due to the intra-plane geometrical frustration), with the same chirality for all the triangles, the whole helically modulated (due to the inter-plane frustration of interactions) along the 3-fold c axis with a 2π/7 period. Additional neutron polarimetry experiments revealed that a single helicity is selected and that, in turn, this selects a single chirality, in agreement with group representation analysis. A mean field analysis shows that this unique feature is due to the twist in the spin-spin exchange path from plane to plane.

  17. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klüter, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.klueter@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlegel, Wolfgang [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  18. Backbone Hydrogen Bond Strengths Can Vary Widely in Transmembrane Helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheng; Hutchison, James M; Sanders, Charles R; Bowie, James U

    2017-08-09

    Although backbone hydrogen bonds in transmembrane (TM) helices have the potential to be very strong due to the low dielectric and low water environment of the membrane, their strength has never been assessed experimentally. Moreover, variations in hydrogen bond strength might be necessary to facilitate the TM helix breaking and bending that is often needed to satisfy functional imperatives. Here we employed equilibrium hydrogen/deuterium fractionation factors to measure backbone hydrogen bond strengths in the TM helix of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We find an enormous range of hydrogen bond free energies, with some weaker than water-water hydrogen bonds and some over 6 kcal/mol stronger than water-water hydrogen bonds. We find that weak hydrogen bonds are at or near preferred γ-secretase cleavage sites, suggesting that the sequence of APP and possibly other cleaved TM helices may be designed, in part, to make their backbones accessible for cleavage. The finding that hydrogen bond strengths in a TM helix can vary widely has implications for membrane protein function, dynamics, evolution, and design.

  19. Magnetic and luminescent binuclear double-stranded helicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucos, Paula; Tuna, Floriana; Sorace, Lorenzo; Matei, Iulia; Maxim, Catalin; Shova, Sergiu; Gheorghe, Ruxandra; Caneschi, Andrea; Hillebrand, Mihaela; Andruh, Marius

    2014-07-21

    Three new binuclear helicates, [M2L2]·3DMF (M = Co(II), 1, Zn(II), 3) and [Cu2L2]·DMF·0.4H2O (2), have been assembled using the helicand H2L that results from the 2:1 condensation reaction between o-vanillin and 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether. The metal ions within the binuclear helicates are tetracoordinated with a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Direct current magnetic characterization and EPR spectroscopy of the Co(II) derivative point to an easy axis type anisotropy for both Co(II) centers, with a separation of at least 55 K between the two doublets. Dynamic susceptibility measurements evidence slow relaxation of the magnetization in an applied dc field. Since the distance between the cobalt ions is quite large (11.59 Å), this is attributed in a first instance to the intrinsic properties of each Co(II) center (single-ion magnet behavior). However, the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate and the absence of slow dynamics in the Zn(II)-doped sample suggest that neither the simple Orbach mechanism nor Raman or direct processes can account for the relaxation, and collective phenomena have to be invoked for the observed behavior. Finally, due to the rigidization of the two organic ligands upon coordination, the pure zinc derivative exhibits fluorescence emission in solution, which was analyzed in terms of fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes.

  20. Analysis of Third-Grade Fluid in Helical Screw Rheometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zeb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The steady flow of an incompressible, third-grade fluid in helical screw rheometer (HSR is studied by “unwrapping or flattening” the channel, lands, and the outside rotating barrel. The geometry is approximated as a shallow infinite channel, by assuming that the width of the channel is large as compared to the depth. The developed second-order nonlinear coupled differential equations are reduced to single differential equation by using a transformation. Using Adomian decomposition method, analytical expressions are calculated for the the velocity profiles and volume flow rates. The results have been discussed with the help of graphs as well. We observed that the velocity profiles are strongly dependant on non-Newtonian parameter (β~, and with the increase in β~, the velocity profiles increase progressively, which conclude that extrusion process increases with the increase in β~. We also observed that the increase in pressure gradients in x- and z-direction increases the net flow inside the helical screw rheometer, which increases the extrusion process. We noticed that the flow increases as the flight angle increase.

  1. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in stochastic helical media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, David; Reyes, J Adrian

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a model for studying the axial propagation of elliptically polarized electromagnetic waves in a spatially random helical media. We start by writing Maxwell equations for a structurally chiral medium whose dielectric permittivities, polar, and helical angles contain both a stochastic contribution and a deterministic one. We write the electromagnetic equations into a Marcuvitz-Schwigner representation to transform them afterward in a simpler expression by using the Oseen transformation. We exhibit that in the Oseen frame the Marcuvitz-Schwigner equations turns out to be a linear vector stochastic system of differential equations with multiplicative noise. Applying to the resulting equation a formalism for treating stochastic differential equations, we find the governing equations for the first moments of the electromagnetic field amplitudes for a general autocorrelation function for the system diffractive indexes, and calculate their corresponding band structure for a particular spectral noise density. We have shown that the average resulting electromagnetic fields exhibit a decaying exponential dependence which stems from by dissipation and the presence of qualitative modifications in the band structure including a considerable widening of the band gap and the existence of new local maxima for the modes without a band gap.

  2. Helicity non-conserving form factor of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, E.; Furget, C.; Knox, S. [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)] [and others

    1994-04-01

    The study of the hadron structure in the high Q{sup 2} range contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the confinement of quarks and gluons. Among the numerous experimental candidates sensitive to these mechanisms, the helicity non-conserving form factor of the proton is a privileged observable since it is controlled by non-perturbative effects. The authors investigate here the feasibility of high Q{sup 2} measurements of this form factor by means of the recoil polarization method in the context of the CEBAF 8 GeV facility. For that purpose, they discuss the development of a high energy proton polarimeter, based on the H({rvec p},pp) elastic scattering, to be placed at the focal plane of a new hadron spectrometer. It is shown that this experimental method significantly improves the knowledge of the helicity non-conserving form factor of the proton up to 10 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}.

  3. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmyrek, Bryan David [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the fraction, f+, of right-handed W bosons produced in top quark decays is presented. This analysis is based on a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb-1, collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The helicity angle, θ*, is reconstructed for each lepton. f+ is determined by comparing the cos θ* distribution from the data with that for the expected background and signal for various values of f+. The fraction of longitudinal W bosons, f0, is assumed to be 0.7 as predicted by the standard model. This yields f+ = 0.109 ± 0.094 (stat) ± 0.063 (syst), consistent with the standard model prediction of f+ = 3.6x 10-4. The possibility that both f+ and f0 stray from standard model values is also investigated. In this case cos θ* distributions for each possible W helicity state, along with the backgrounds, are fit to the cos θ* distribution for the data. The best fit values are f+ = 0.82 ± 0.30(stat) and f0 = -0.58 ± 0.50(stat).

  4. Forces between hydrophilic surfaces adsorbed with apolipoprotein AII alpha helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S; Campos-Terán, J; Mas-Oliva, J; Nylander, Tommy; Castillo, R

    2008-08-19

    To provide better understanding of how a protein secondary structure affects protein-protein and protein-surface interactions, forces between amphiphilic alpha-helical proteins (human apolipoprotein AII) adsorbed on a hydrophilic surface (mica) were measured using an interferometric surface force apparatus (SFA). Forces between surfaces with adsorbed layers of this protein are mainly composed of electrostatic double layer forces at large surface distances and of steric repulsive forces at small distances. We suggest that the amphiphilicity of the alpha-helix structure facilitates the formation of protein multilayers next to the mica surfaces. We found that protein-surface interaction is stronger than protein-protein interaction, probably due to the high negative charge density of the mica surface and the high positive charge of the protein at our experimental conditions. Ellipsometry was used to follow the adsorption kinetics of this protein on hydrophilic silica, and we observed that the adsorption rate is not only controlled by diffusion, but rather by the protein-surface interaction. Our results for dimeric apolipoprotein AII are similar to those we have reported for the monomeric apolipoprotein CI, which has a similar secondary structure but a different peptide sequence and net charge. Therefore, the observed force curves seem to be a consequence of the particular features of the amphiphilic alpha-helices.

  5. Design and Analysis of an Active Helical Drive Downhole Tractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Yujia; LIU, Qingyou; CHEN, Yonghua; REN, Tao

    2017-03-01

    During oil-gas well drilling and completion, downhole tools and apparatus should be conveyed to the destination to complete a series of downhole works. Downhole tractors have been used to convey tools in complex wellbores, however a very large tractive force is needed to carry more downhole tools to accomplish works with high efficiency. A novel serial active helical drive downhole tractor which has significantly improved performance compared with previous work is proposed. All previously reported helical drive downhole tractors need stators to balance the torque generated by the rotator. By contrast, the proposed serial downhole tractor does not need a stator; several rotator-driven units should only be connected to one another to achieve a tractive force multifold higher than that was previously reported. As a result, the length of a single unit is shortened, and the motion flexibility of the downhole tractor is increased. The major performance indicators, namely, gear ratio, velocity, and tractive force, are analyzed. Experimental results show that the maximum tractive force of a single-unit prototype with a length of 900 mm is 165.3 kg or 1620 N. The analysis and experimental results show that the proposed design has considerable potential for downhole works.

  6. Nonequilibrium transport of helical Luttinger liquids through a quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Sung-Po; Silotri, Salman A.; Chung, Chung-Hou

    2013-08-01

    We study a steady-state nonequilibrium transport between two interacting helical edge states of a two-dimensional topological insulator, described by helical Luttinger liquids, through a quantum dot. For a noninteracting dot, the current is obtained analytically by including the self-energy correction to the dot's Green function. For an interacting dot, we use the equation-of-motion method to study the influence of weak on-site Coulomb interaction on the transport. We find the metal-to-insulator quantum phase transition for attractive or repulsive interactions in the leads when the magnitude of the interaction strength characterized by a charge sector Luttinger parameter K goes beyond a critical value. The critical Luttinger parameter Kcr depends on the hopping strengths between the dot and the leads, as well as the energy level of the dot with respect to the Fermi levels of the leads, ranging from the weak-interaction regime for the dot level off-resonance to the strong-interaction regime for the dot in resonance with the equilibrium Fermi level. Near the transition, there are various singular behaviors of current noise, dot density of state, and the decoherence rate (inverse of lifetime) of the dot, which are briefly discussed.

  7. Helicity methods in LO and NLO QCD calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Daniel

    2014-07-17

    The goal of this thesis is the acceleration of numerical calculations of QCD observables, both at leading order and next-to-leading order in the coupling constant. In particular, the optimization of helicity and spin summation in the context of VEGAS Monte Carlo algorithms is investigated. In the literature, two such methods are mentioned but without detailed analyses. Only one of these methods can be used at next-to-leading order. This work presents a total of five different methods that replace the helicity sums with a Monte Carlo integration. This integration can be combined with the existing phase space integral, in the hope that this causes less overhead than the complete summation. For three of these methods, an extension to existing subtraction terms is developed which is required to enable next-to-leading order calculations. All methods are analyzed with respect to efficiency, accuracy, and ease of implementation before they are compared with each other. In this process, one method shows clear advantages in relation to all others.

  8. Suppression and control of leakage field in electromagnetic helical microwiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohigashi, N. [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Tsunawaki, Y. [Osaka Sangyo Univ. (Japan); Imasaki, K. [Institute for Laser Technology, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Shortening the period of electromagnetic wiggler introduces both the radical increase of the leakage field and the decrease of the field in the gap region. The leakage field is severer problem in planar electromagnetic wiggler than in helical wiggler. Hence, in order to develop a short period electromagnetic wiggler, we have adopted {open_quotes}three poles per period{close_quotes} type electromagnetic helical microwiggler. In this work, we inserted the permanent magnet (PM) blocks with specific magnetized directions in the space between magnetic poles, for suppressing the leakage field flowing out from a pole face to the neighboring pole face. These PM-blocks must have higher intrinsic coersive force than saturation field of pole material. The gap field due to each pole is adjustable by controlling the leakage fields, that is, controlling the position of each iron screw set in each retainer fixing the PM-blocks. At present time, a test wiggler with period 7.8mm, periodical number 10 and gap length 4.6mm has been manufactured. Because the ratio of PM-block aperture to gap length is important parameter to suppress the leakage field, the parameter has been surveyed experimentally for PM-blocks with several dimensions of aperture. The field strength of 3-5kG (K=0.2-0.4) would be expected in the wiggler.

  9. Studies on positive conveying in helically channeled single screw extruders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A solids conveying theory called double-flight driving theory was proposed for helically channeled single screw extruders. In the extruder, screw channel rotates against static barrel channel, which behaves as cooperative embedded twin-screws for the positive conveying. They turn as two parallel arc plates, between which an arc-plate solid-plug was assumed. By analyzing the forces on the solid-plug in the barrel channel and screw channel, the boundary conditions when the solid-plug is waived of being cut off on barrel wall, were found to have the capacity of the positive conveying. Experimental data were obtained using a specially designed extruder with a helically channeled barrel in the feeding zone and a pressure-adjustable die. The effects of the barrel channel geometry and friction coefficients on the conveying mechanism were presented and compared with the experimental results. The simulations showed that the positive conveying could be achieved after optimizing extruder designs. Compared with the traditional design with the friction-drag conveying, the throughput is higher while screw torque and energy consumption are decreased. Besides, the design criteria of the barrel channel were also discussed.

  10. Helicity decoupling in the massless limit of massive tensor fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Mund

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Massive and massless potentials play an essential role in the perturbative formulation of particle interactions. Many difficulties arise due to the indefinite metric in gauge theoretic approaches, or the increase with the spin of the UV dimension of massive potentials. All these problems can be evaded in one stroke: modify the potentials by suitable terms that leave unchanged the field strengths, but are not polynomial in the momenta. This feature implies a weaker localization property: the potentials are “string-localized”. In this setting, several old issues can be solved directly in the physical Hilbert space of the respective particles: We can control the separation of helicities in the massless limit of higher spin fields and conversely we recover massive potentials with 2s+1 degrees of freedom by a smooth deformation of the massless potentials (“fattening”. We construct stress–energy tensors for massless fields of any helicity (thus evading the Weinberg–Witten theorem. We arrive at a simple understanding of the van Dam–Veltman–Zakharov discontinuity concerning, e.g., the distinction between a massless or a very light graviton. Finally, the use of string-localized fields opens new perspectives for interacting quantum field theories with, e.g., vector bosons or gravitons.

  11. Quasiparticle dynamics in reshaped helical Dirac cone of topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lin; Wang, Z F; Ming, Wenmei; Yao, Meng-Yu; Wang, Meixiao; Yang, Fang; Song, Y R; Zhu, Fengfeng; Fedorov, Alexei V; Sun, Z; Gao, C L; Liu, Canhua; Xue, Qi-Kun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Liu, Feng; Qian, Dong; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2013-02-19

    Topological insulators and graphene present two unique classes of materials, which are characterized by spin-polarized (helical) and nonpolarized Dirac cone band structures, respectively. The importance of many-body interactions that renormalize the linear bands near Dirac point in graphene has been well recognized and attracted much recent attention. However, renormalization of the helical Dirac point has not been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report the experimental observation of the renormalized quasiparticle spectrum with a skewed Dirac cone in a single Bi bilayer grown on Bi(2)Te(3) substrate from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. First-principles band calculations indicate that the quasiparticle spectra are likely associated with the hybridization between the extrinsic substrate-induced Dirac states of Bi bilayer and the intrinsic surface Dirac states of Bi(2)Te(3) film at close energy proximity. Without such hybridization, only single-particle Dirac spectra are observed in a single Bi bilayer grown on Bi(2)Se(3), where the extrinsic Dirac states Bi bilayer and the intrinsic Dirac states of Bi(2)Se(3) are well separated in energy. The possible origins of many-body interactions are discussed. Our findings provide a means to manipulate topological surface states.

  12. Insulin mimetic peptide S371 folds into a helical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2017-06-05

    Insulin plays a crucial physiological role in glucose control by initiating a number of signaling events on binding and activating its cell surface receptor. Insulin mimics have, therefore, become promising agents for treating diabetes and to probe the mechanism of interaction of insulin with its receptor. Specifically, many insulin-mimetic peptide sequences have been discovered and found to selectively function as agonists and antagonists, but their structures and the mechanistic details of their interactions with the receptor remain challenging to characterize. In this work, we have studied the folding properties and structure of a Site 1 insulin mimetic peptide S371 that has sequence similarities with the insulin B-chain as well as with a critical hormone-binding element of the receptor known as the C-terminal (CT) peptide. We first validated our simulation approaches by predicting the known solution structure of the insulin B-chain helix and then applied them to study the folding of the mimetic peptide S371. Our data predict a helical fold for the first 16 residues of S371 that has a resemblance to the helical motifs in the insulin B-chain and CT. We also propose receptor-bound models of S371 that provide mechanistic explanations for competing binding properties of S371 and CT to the Site 1 of IR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Vorticity and helicity in relativistic heat-conducting fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of heat-conducting fluid described by a pair of Maxwell-like equations is used to construct thermal-fluid helicity and thermal-helicity currents. These currents are found to be dissipative. It is shown that the magnetic part of the particle vorticity two-form is a thermal-fluid vorticity flux vector field composed of a linear combination of the fluid’s vorticity and a spacelike twist of heat flow lines. Heat flow lines are non-geodesic because of the interplay between gravitation and the entropy entrainment in a system composed of a heat-conducting fluid which is in state of rapid differential rotation and far from equilibrium. In general, alignment of the heat flux vector with that of the fluid’s vorticity leads to non-conservation of thermal-fluid vorticity flux in both a thermal-fluid flux tube and a stream tube. It is demonstrated that the twist of the fluid’s vortex lines is caused by the heat flow along the fluid’s vorticity vector in the case of an axisymmetric stationary differentially rotating heat-conducting fluid configuration. In this case, dissipation of thermal-fluid vorticity flux along the flux tube is caused by coupled effects of the fluid’s vorticity magnitude, thermal resistivity and entropy entrainment.

  14. Collective helicity switching of a DNA-coat assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongju; Li, Huichang; He, Ying; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xiaoteng; Lee, Myongsoo

    2017-07-01

    Hierarchical assemblies of biomolecular subunits can carry out versatile tasks at the cellular level with remarkable spatial and temporal precision. As an example, the collective motion and mutual cooperation between complex protein machines mediate essential functions for life, such as replication, synthesis, degradation, repair and transport. Nucleic acid molecules are far less dynamic than proteins and need to bind to specific proteins to form hierarchical structures. The simplest example of these nucleic acid-based structures is provided by a rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus, which consists of genetic material surrounded by coat proteins. Inspired by the complexity and hierarchical assembly of viruses, a great deal of effort has been devoted to design similarly constructed artificial viruses. However, such a wrapping approach makes nucleic acid dynamics insensitive to environmental changes. This limitation generally restricts, for example, the amplification of the conformational dynamics between the right-handed B form to the left-handed Z form of double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Here we report a virus-like hierarchical assembly in which the native DNA and a synthetic coat undergo repeated collective helicity switching triggered by pH change under physiological conditions. We also show that this collective helicity inversion occurs during translocation of the DNA-coat assembly into intracellular compartments. Translating DNA conformational dynamics into a higher level of hierarchical dynamics may provide an approach to create DNA-based nanomachines.

  15. Quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic helical rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Beytullah; Fırat Çalim, Faruk; Tütüncü, Naki

    2004-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behaviour of cylindrical helical rods made of linear viscoelastic materials are investigated in the Laplace domain. The governing equations for naturally twisted and curved spatial rods obtained using the Timoshenko beam theory are rewritten for cylindrical helical rods. The curvature of the rod axis, effect of rotary inertia, and shear and axial deformations are considered in the formulation. The material of the rod is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and linear viscoelastic. In the viscoelastic material case, according to the correspondence principle, the material constants are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace domain. Ordinary differential equations in scalar form obtained in the Laplace domain are solved numerically using the complementary functions method to calculate the dynamic stiffness matrix of the problem. In the solutions, the Kelvin model is employed. The solutions obtained are transformed to the real space using the Durbin's numerical inverse Laplace transform method. Numerical results for quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic models are presented in the form of graphics.

  16. Frequency-domain synthetic aperture focusing for helical ultrasonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H.; Chen, J.; Wu, E.; Yang, K.

    2017-04-01

    The synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is widely used to provide significant improvement in the lateral resolution of ultrasonic images. Frequency-domain SAFT has shown higher accuracy and greater efficiency than time-domain SAFT. However, frequency-domain SAFT should be helix-based for ultrasonic scanning of cylindrical structures such as pipes and axletrees. In this study, a frequency-domain SAFT is proposed for 3D helical ultrasonic imaging applications. This technique adjusts the phase spectra of the images to complete the synthetic aperture focusing process. The focused image is precise because the proposed algorithm is established on the basis of the wave equation in a helical coordinate system. In addition, the algorithm can efficiently separate out point scatterers and present volume scatterers. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm yields lower side lobes and enhances the angular resolution of the ultrasonic image to approximately 1°- 1.5°, which is much better than the performance of time-domain SAFT. The maximum deviations are only 0.6 mm, 0.5°, and 0.4 mm along the r-axes, θ-axes, and z-axes, respectively, which are appropriate for normal ultrasonic nondestructive testing.

  17. A new self-propelled magnetic bearing with helical windings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayak, B.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a design is proposed for an active, permanent magnet based, self-propelled magnetic bearing, i.e. levitating motor having the following features: (i) simple winding structure, (ii) high load supporting capacity, (iii) no eccentricity sensors, (iv) stable confinement in all translational dimensions, (v) stable confinement in all rotational dimensions, and (vi) high efficiency. This design uses an architecture consisting of a helically wound three-phase stator, and a rotor with the magnets also arranged in a helical manner. Active control is used to excite the rotor at a torque angle lying in the second quadrant. This torque angle is independent of the rotor's position inside the stator cavity; hence the control algorithm is similar to that of a conventional permanent magnet synchronous motor. It is motivated through a physical argument that the bearing rotor develops a lift force proportional to the output torque and that it remains stably confined in space. These assertions are then proved rigorously through a calculation of the magnetic fields, forces and torques. The stiffness matrix of the system is presented and a discussion of stable and unstable operating regions is given.

  18. ALOHA: Automatic libraries of helicity amplitudes for Feynman diagram computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Priscila; Link, William; Maltoni, Fabio; Mattelaer, Olivier; Stelzer, Tim

    2012-10-01

    We present an application that automatically writes the HELAS (HELicity Amplitude Subroutines) library corresponding to the Feynman rules of any quantum field theory Lagrangian. The code is written in Python and takes the Universal FeynRules Output (UFO) as an input. From this input it produces the complete set of routines, wave-functions and amplitudes, that are needed for the computation of Feynman diagrams at leading as well as at higher orders. The representation is language independent and currently it can output routines in Fortran, C++, and Python. A few sample applications implemented in the MADGRAPH 5 framework are presented. Program summary Program title: ALOHA Catalogue identifier: AEMS_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: http://www.opensource.org/licenses/UoI-NCSA.php No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6094320 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7479819 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python2.6 Computer: 32/64 bit Operating system: Linux/Mac/Windows RAM: 512 Mbytes Classification: 4.4, 11.6 Nature of problem: An effcient numerical evaluation of a squared matrix element can be done with the help of the helicity routines implemented in the HELAS library [1]. This static library contains a limited number of helicity functions and is therefore not always able to provide the needed routine in the presence of an arbitrary interaction. This program provides a way to automatically create the corresponding routines for any given model. Solution method: ALOHA takes the Feynman rules associated to the vertex obtained from the model information (in the UFO format [2]), and multiplies it by the different wavefunctions or propagators. As a result the analytical expression of the helicity routines is obtained. Subsequently, this expression is

  19. Thermal denaturation and structural changes of α-helical proteins in keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Franz J; Wortmann, Gabriele; Marsh, Jennifer; Meinert, Knut

    2012-02-01

    To gain insight into the thermal stability of intermediate filaments and matrix in the biological composite structure of α-keratins, the thermal denaturation performance of human hair fibers was investigated by Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (MDSC) in the dry and the wet state. Denaturation enthalpy ΔH(D) in water was found to be independent of heating rate (11.5J/g) and to be approximately double as high as in the dry state (5.2J/g). The lower enthalpy (dry) and its dependency on heating rate are attributed to effects of pyrolysis. The stepwise change of reversing heat capacity ΔC(p) marks the denaturation process as a classic two-stage transition. The increase of ΔC(p) with heating rate reflects a continuous shift of the nature of the denaturation of the α-helical material, first, into random coil and then towards random β-materials for lower heating rates. Denaturation temperatures follow Arrhenius relationships with heating rate, yielding activation energies of 416kJ/mol (dry) and 263kJ/mol (wet), respectively. A decrease of activation energy (wet) for high heating rates supports the hypothesis of systematic changes of the pathway of denaturation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Profile stiffness measurements in the Helically Symmetric experiment and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, G. M.; Faber, B. J.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B. [HSX Plasma Laboratory, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Stiffness measurements are presented in the quasi-helically symmetric experiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to that in a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. Electron cyclotron emission is used to measure the local electron temperature response to modulated electron cyclotron resonant heating. The amplitude and phase of the heat wave through the steep electron temperature gradient (ETG) region of the plasma are used to determine a transient electron thermal diffusivity that is close to the steady-state diffusivity. The low stiffness in the region between 0.2 ≤ r/a ≤ 0.4 agrees with the scaling of the steady-state heat flux with temperature gradient in this region. These experimental results are compared to gyrokinetic calculations in a flux-tube geometry using the gyrokinetic electromagnetic numerical experiment code with two kinetic species. Linear simulations show that the ETG mode may be experimentally relevant within r/a ≤ 0.2, while the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) is the dominant long-wavelength microturbulence instability across most of the plasma. The TEM is primarily driven by the density gradient. Non-linear calculations of the saturated heat flux driven by the TEM and ETG bracket the experimental heat flux.

  1. Epitaxial Single-Layer MoS2 on GaN with Enhanced Valley Helicity

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Yi

    2017-12-19

    Engineering the substrate of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides can couple the quasiparticle interaction between the 2D material and substrate, providing an additional route to realize conceptual quantum phenomena and novel device functionalities, such as realization of a 12-time increased valley spitting in single-layer WSe2 through the interfacial magnetic exchange field from a ferromagnetic EuS substrate, and band-to-band tunnel field-effect transistors with a subthreshold swing below 60 mV dec−1 at room temperature based on bilayer n-MoS2 and heavily doped p-germanium, etc. Here, it is demonstrated that epitaxially grown single-layer MoS2 on a lattice-matched GaN substrate, possessing a type-I band alignment, exhibits strong substrate-induced interactions. The phonons in GaN quickly dissipate the energy of photogenerated carriers through electron–phonon interaction, resulting in a short exciton lifetime in the MoS2/GaN heterostructure. This interaction enables an enhanced valley helicity at room temperature (0.33 ± 0.05) observed in both steady-state and time-resolved circularly polarized photoluminescence measurements. The findings highlight the importance of substrate engineering for modulating the intrinsic valley carriers in ultrathin 2D materials and potentially open new paths for valleytronics and valley-optoelectronic device applications.

  2. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous...

  3. What Helicity Can Tell Us about Solar Magnetic Fields Alexei A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    damental properties as hemispheric helicity rule, and role of helicity in .... A summary of these mechanisms can be found in Longcope et al. (1999) and Longcope & Pevtsov (2003). Similar to Joy's law that describes active region tilt ... active regions' magnetic field is about 1.7 × 1043 Mx2, about three times larger than.

  4. Ruby-Helix: an implementation of helical image processing based on object-oriented scripting language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlagel, Zoltan; Kikkawa, Yayoi S; Kikkawa, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    Helical image analysis in combination with electron microscopy has been used to study three-dimensional structures of various biological filaments or tubes, such as microtubules, actin filaments, and bacterial flagella. A number of packages have been developed to carry out helical image analysis. Some biological specimens, however, have a symmetry break (seam) in their three-dimensional structure, even though their subunits are mostly arranged in a helical manner. We refer to these objects as "asymmetric helices". All the existing packages are designed for helically symmetric specimens, and do not allow analysis of asymmetric helical objects, such as microtubules with seams. Here, we describe Ruby-Helix, a new set of programs for the analysis of "helical" objects with or without a seam. Ruby-Helix is built on top of the Ruby programming language and is the first implementation of asymmetric helical reconstruction for practical image analysis. It also allows easier and semi-automated analysis, performing iterative unbending and accurate determination of the repeat length. As a result, Ruby-Helix enables us to analyze motor-microtubule complexes with higher throughput to higher resolution.

  5. Chemical signals turn on guest binding through structural reconfiguration of triangular helicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne; Castilla, Ana M.; Ronson, Tanya K.

    2013-01-01

    Be my guest: The function of a system based on self-assembled Zn(II) complexes can be controlled by external chemical stimuli. The complexes are based on a C3 -symmetric ligand that forms a unique triangular triple helicate structure 1. Upon subcomponent substitution, 1 is able to transform into ...... into a triangular double helicate 2 which, unlike 1, can encapsulate guests....

  6. Field theoretic calculation of energy cascade rates in non-helical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Energy cascade rates and Kolmogorov's constant for non-helical steady magnetohydrodynamic turbulence have been calculated by solving the flux equations to the first order in perturbation. For zero cross helicity and space dimension d = 3 , magnetic energy cascades from large length-scales to small length-scales ...

  7. Numerical analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a helical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    Helical channels are widely applied in areas like refrigeration and air conditioning, steam generation, thermal processing plants, oil heating etc. In a converging diverging nozzle helical channels are mainly used for regenerative cooling of wall. Regenerative cooling is the most widely used method of cooling a rocket nozzle ...

  8. Photochemically and Thermally Driven Full-Color Reflection in a Self-Organized Helical Superstructure Enabled by a Halogen-Bonded Chiral Molecular Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Wang, Ling; Urbas, Augustine M; Bunning, Timothy J; Li, Quan

    2018-02-05

    Supramolecular approaches toward the fabrication of functional materials and systems have been an enabling endeavor. Recently, halogen bonding has been harnessed as a promising supramolecular tool. Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of a novel halogen-bonded light-driven axially chiral molecular switch. The photoactive halogen-bonded chiral switch is able to induce a self-organized, tunable helical superstructure, that is, cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC), when doped into an achiral liquid crystal (LC) host. The halogen-bonded switch as a chiral dopant has a high helical twisting power (HTP) and shows a large change of its HTP upon photoisomerization. This light-driven dynamic modulation enables reversible selective reflection color tuning across the entire visible spectrum. The chiral switch also displays a temperature-dependent HTP change that enables thermally driven red, green, and blue (RGB) reflection colors in the self-organized helical superstructure. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Helical turbulence with small-scale energy and helicity sources and external intermediate scale noises as the origin of large scale generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhetiani, Otto G.; Gledzer, Evgeny B.

    2017-11-01

    Interactions violating the symmetry of positive and negative total helicity components are considered. In the ideal case where one of the components is zero, the system have two sign-definite integrals of motion, which lead to an inverse energy cascade, as occurs in two-dimensional turbulence. The generation of large-scale modes is considered in the quasi-normal approximation and is manifested as the instability of second moments, a mechanism of which was discussed at the end of previous century. A crucial point in this mechanism is the presence of mean turbulence with large-scale helical disturbances and small-scale sources of energy and helicity. In the case of both helicity components being nonzero, the possibility of the large-scale generation is studied by applying numerical experiments with a shell model and by analyzing special cases of interactions between different shells of the model. In all the approaches used, it is shown that an inverse energy flux (from small to large scales) can exist at a certain level of external helical noises in large-scale modes, which depends on the degree of ;mixing; oppositely signed helicity components.

  10. Internal transport barrier in tokamak and helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Fujita, T.

    2018-03-01

    The differences and similarities between the internal transport barriers (ITBs) of tokamak and helical plasmas are reviewed. By comparing the characteristics of the ITBs in tokamak and helical plasmas, the mechanisms of the physics for the formation and dynamics of the ITB are clarified. The ITB is defined as the appearance of discontinuity of temperature, flow velocity, or density gradient in the radius. From the radial profiles of temperature, flow velocity, and density the ITB is characterized by the three parameters of normalized temperature gradient, R/{L}T, the location, {ρ }{ITB}, and the width, W/a, and can be expressed by ‘weak’ ITB (small R/{L}T) or ‘strong’ (large R/{L}T), ‘small’ ITB (small {ρ }{ITB}) or ‘large’ ITB (large {ρ }{ITB}), and ‘narrow’ (small W/a) or ‘wide’ (large W/a). Three key physics elements for the ITB formation, radial electric field shear, magnetic shear, and rational surface (and/or magnetic island) are described. The characteristics of electron and ion heat transport and electron and impurity transport are reviewed. There are significant differences in ion heat transport and electron heat transport. The dynamics of ITB formation and termination is also discussed. The emergence of the location of the ITB is sometimes far inside the ITB foot in the steady-state phase and the ITB region shows radial propagation during the formation of the ITB. The non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport become more dominant in the plasma with the ITB. The reversal of the sign of non-diffusive terms in momentum transport and impurity transport associated with the formation of the ITB reported in helical plasma is described. Non-local transport plays an important role in determining the radial profile of temperature and density. The spontaneous change in temperature curvature (second radial derivative of temperature) in the ITB region is described. In addition, the key parameters of the control of the

  11. Hexagonally Ordered Arrays of α-Helical Bundles Formed from Peptide-Dendron Hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkley, Deborah A. [Department; Rokhlenko, Yekaterina [Department; Marine, Jeannette E. [Department; David, Rachelle [Department; Sahoo, Dipankar [Department; Watson, Matthew D. [Department; Koga, Tadanori [Department; Department; Osuji, Chinedum O. [Department; Rudick, Jonathan G. [Department

    2017-10-24

    Combining monodisperse building blocks that have distinct folding properties serves as a modular strategy for controlling structural complexity in hierarchically organized materials. We combine an α-helical bundle-forming peptide with self-assembling dendrons to better control the arrangement of functional groups within cylindrical nanostructures. Site-specific grafting of dendrons to amino acid residues on the exterior of the α-helical bundle yields monodisperse macromolecules with programmable folding and self-assembly properties. The resulting hybrid biomaterials form thermotropic columnar hexagonal mesophases in which the peptides adopt an α-helical conformation. Bundling of the α-helical peptides accompanies self-assembly of the peptide-dendron hybrids into cylindrical nanostructures. The bundle stoichiometry in the mesophase agrees well with the size found in solution for α-helical bundles of peptides with a similar amino acid sequence.

  12. Helical graphene oxide fibers as a stretchable sensor and an electrocapillary sucker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chunfei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiying; Hu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xinchang; Zhang, Yingjiu; Li, Xinjian; Duan, Huiling; Cao, Anyuan

    2016-05-01

    Fibers made from carbon nanotubes or graphene are strong and conductive; encoding helical structures into these fibers may render useful properties such as high stretchability. Here, we directly spin freestanding graphene oxide (GO) films into helical fibers consisting of uniformly arranged loops with tunable diameters, under controlled environmental humidity. Reduced GO fibers with a helical shape are stretched elastically with a reversible electrical resistance change for many strain cycles. Stretchable temperature sensors built on helical fibers work at large strains (up to 50%) and high temperature (up to 300 °C), with a reliable deformation-independent response. The GO fibers also contain through-channels inside with suitable pore size, which can take up an aqueous electrolyte quickly under a low bias, resulting in a fiber-shaped, on-off switchable electrocapillary sucker. Our multifunctional helical and hollow GO fibers have potential applications in stretchable fiber-shaped sensors, actuators and nano-fluid systems.Fibers made from carbon nanotubes or graphene are strong and conductive; encoding helical structures into these fibers may render useful properties such as high stretchability. Here, we directly spin freestanding graphene oxide (GO) films into helical fibers consisting of uniformly arranged loops with tunable diameters, under controlled environmental humidity. Reduced GO fibers with a helical shape are stretched elastically with a reversible electrical resistance change for many strain cycles. Stretchable temperature sensors built on helical fibers work at large strains (up to 50%) and high temperature (up to 300 °C), with a reliable deformation-independent response. The GO fibers also contain through-channels inside with suitable pore size, which can take up an aqueous electrolyte quickly under a low bias, resulting in a fiber-shaped, on-off switchable electrocapillary sucker. Our multifunctional helical and hollow GO fibers have potential

  13. Comparing conformal, arc radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy in craniospinal irradiation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Pamela A; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2014-09-08

    Currently, radiotherapy treatment plan acceptance is based primarily on dosimetric performance measures. However, use of radiobiological analysis to assess benefit in terms of tumor control and harm in terms of injury to normal tissues can be advantageous. For pediatric craniospinal axis irradiation (CSI) patients, in particular, knowing the technique that will optimize the probabilities of benefit versus injury can lead to better long-term outcomes. Twenty-four CSI pediatric patients (median age 10) were retrospectively planned with three techniques: three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and helical tomotherapy (HT). VMAT plans consisted of one superior and one inferior full arc, and tomotherapy plans were created using a 5.02cm field width and helical pitch of 0.287. Each plan was normalized to 95% of target volume (whole brain and spinal cord) receiving prescription dose 23.4Gy in 13 fractions. Using an in-house MATLAB code and DVH data from each plan, the three techniques were evaluated based on biologically effective uniform dose (D=), the complication-free tumor control probability (P+), and the width of the therapeutically beneficial range. Overall, 3D CRT and VMAT plans had similar values of D= (24.1 and 24.2 Gy), while HT had a D= slightly lower (23.6 Gy). The average values of the P+ index were 64.6, 67.4, and 56.6% for 3D CRT, VMAT, and HT plans, respectively, with the VMAT plans having a statistically significant increase in P+. Optimal values of D= were 28.4, 33.0, and 31.9 Gy for 3D CRT, VMAT, and HT plans, respectively. Although P+ values that correspond to the initial dose prescription were lower for HT, after optimizing the D= prescription level, the optimal P+ became 94.1, 99.5, and 99.6% for 3D CRT, VMAT, and HT, respectively, with the VMAT and HT plans having statistically significant increases in P+. If the optimal dose level is prescribed using a radiobiological evaluation method, as

  14. Numerical analysis of particle recycling in the TEXTOR helical divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, H.; Clever, M.; Feng, Y.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Schmitz, O.

    2012-02-01

    The TEXTOR helical divertor is a magnetic configuration created by the application of external resonant magnetic perturbations with the intention to control plasma edge transport and the resulting particle and heat fluxes to the divertor target. It is confirmed by 3D computer simulations that no high-recycling-like regime is established under TEXTOR relevant conditions, despite the fact that a transition to detachment (i.e. a saturation or even a roll-over of the recycling flux) is observed at high densities. The driving mechanisms are, distinct from apparently similar observations in poloidal divertors and stellarator divertors, a combination of volumetric power losses and enhanced upstream-to-downstream heat transport, but with no significant role of the momentum balance.

  15. In-Orbit Construction with a Helical Seam Pipe Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhooley, N.

    The challenges of building large structures in space, and in particular a torus habitat, require novel processes. One potential method is to manufacture helical seam (also called spiral) pipe in orbit using a pipe mill. These machines turn rolls of steel or alloy into fully formed, welded and inspected pipe, pressure vessels and silos of various diameters. Pipe mills are highly automated and efficient in a factory environment and are increasingly being used for in-situ repair. By constructing in-orbit (on-orbit assembly) the launch vehicle can supply full payloads of compact, robust rolls of material; and the installation design is less restricted by fairing constraints and modular limitations. The use of a pipe mill is discussed as a possible construction method, for comparison an example design envelope is shown and further pipe mill products are considered.

  16. Imaging of Composites by Helical X-Ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ying; Pyka, Grzegorz; Jespersen, Kristine Munk

    Understanding the fatigue damage mechanisms of composite materials used in wind turbine rotor blades could potentially enhance the reliability and energy efficiency of wind turbines by improving the structure design. In this paper, the fatigue damage propagating mechanisms of unidirectional glass...... fibre composites was characterised by helical X-ray CT. The staining approach was used and it was effective to enhance the visibility of thin matrix cracks and partly closed fibre breaks instead of widely opened cracks. Fibre breaks in the centre UD bundle were found to occur locally, instead of being...... evenly distributed along the 0° fibre direction after 500,000 cycles. The locations of these damage sites were found to be correlated with intersecting points of +/-80° backing bundles. At higher number of cycles, edge effect becomes dominant with extensive fibre breaks in the edge UD bundles and matrix...

  17. Analysis of vibration characteristic for helical gear under hydrodynamic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuhao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication theory, a 2-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamic model of helical gears with double-sided film is proposed, in which the minimum film thickness behaves as a function of load parameters, lubricant parameters, and the geometry of the contact. Then, the comparison of the hysteresis loops in different gear models shows the soundness of the presented model. Using numerical method, the time evolution of lubricant normal force, minimum film thickness, and lubricant stiffness is obtained in order to demonstrate the influence of the driving torque and pinion’s velocity. The results obtained in this article can contribute to the root cause for the gear vibration and show that the hydrodynamic flank friction has almost no influence on the gear system.

  18. Helical Motion of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Skhirtladze, N.

    2008-08-01

    Photospheric granulation may excite transverse kink pulses in anchored vertical magnetic flux tubes. The pulses propagate upward along the tubes with the kink speed, while oscillating wakes are formed behind the wave front in a stratified atmosphere. The wakes oscillate at the kink cutoff frequency of stratified medium and gradually decay in time. When two or more consecutive kink pulses with different polarizations propagate in the same thin tube, then the wakes corresponding to different pulses may be superimposed. The superposition sets up helical motions of magnetic flux tubes in the photosphere/chromosphere as seen in recent Hinode movies. The energy carried by the pulses is enough to heat the solar chromosphere/corona and accelerate the solar wind.

  19. Flexibility of short DNA helices under mechanical stretching

    CERN Document Server

    Zoli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The flexibility of short DNA fragments is studied by a Hamiltonian model which treats the inter-strand and intra-strand forces at the level of the base pair. The elastic response of a set of homogeneous helices to externally applied forces is obtained by computing the average bending angles between adjacent base pairs along the molecule axis. The ensemble averages are performed over a room temperature equilibrium distribution of base pair separations and bending fluctuations. The analysis of the end-to-end distances and persistence lengths shows that even short sequences with less than $100$ base pairs maintain a significant bendability ascribed to thermal fluctuational effects and kinks with large bending angles. The discrepancies between the outcomes of the discrete model and those of the worm-like-chain model are examined pointing out the inadequacy of the latter on short length scales.

  20. Robust zero-energy bound states in a helical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengke; Sau, Jay D.; Appelbaum, Ian

    2017-09-01

    Atomic-scale helices exist as motifs for several material lattices. We examine a tight-binding model for a single one-dimensional monatomic chain with a p -orbital basis coiled into a helix. A topologically nontrivial phase emerging from this model supports a chiral symmetry-protected zero-energy mode localized to a boundary, always embedded within a continuum band, regardless of termination site. We identify a topological invariant for this phase that is related to the number of zero energy end modes by means of the bulk-boundary correspondence, and give strict conditions for the existence of the bound state. An additional class of gapped edge modes in the model spectrum has practical consequences for surface states in, e.g., trigonal tellurium and selenium and other van der Waals-bonded one-dimensional semiconductors.

  1. Fault diagnosis of helical gearbox using acoustic signal and wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranesh, SK; Abraham, Siju; Sugumaran, V.; Amarnath, M.

    2017-05-01

    The efficient transmission of power in machines is needed and gears are an appropriate choice. Faults in gears result in loss of energy and money. The monitoring and fault diagnosis are done by analysis of the acoustic and vibrational signals which are generally considered to be unwanted by products. This study proposes the usage of machine learning algorithm for condition monitoring of a helical gearbox by using the sound signals produced by the gearbox. Artificial faults were created and subsequently signals were captured by a microphone. An extensive study using different wavelet transformations for feature extraction from the acoustic signals was done, followed by waveletselection and feature selection using J48 decision tree and feature classification was performed using K star algorithm. Classification accuracy of 100% was obtained in the study

  2. Helical peptide-polyamine and -polyether conjugates as synthetic ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Monica; Francescon, Marco; Fregonese, Massimo; Gennaro, Renato; Pengo, Paolo; Rossi, Paola; Scrimin, Paolo; Tecilla, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Two new synthetic ionophores in which the hydrophobic portion is represented by a short helical Aib-peptide (Aib=α-amino-isobutyric acid) and the hydrophilic one is a poly-amino (1a) or a polyether (1b) chain have been prepared. The two conjugates show a high ionophoric activity in phospholipid membranes being able to efficiently dissipate a pH gradient and, in the case of 1b, to transport Na(+) across the membrane. Bioactivity evaluation of the two conjugates shows that 1a has a moderate antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of microorganisms and it is able to permeabilize the inner and the outer membrane of Escherichia coli cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  4. Caulobacter crescentus exploits its helical cell body to swim efficiently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Mendoza, Marcos; Valenzuela, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    How an organism gets its shape remains an open question of fundamental science. In this study, we measure the 3D shape of a bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, using a computational graphic technique for free-swimming microorganisms to analyze thousands of image frames of the same individual bacterium. Rather than having a crescent shape, the cell body of the organism is found to be twisted with a helical pitch angle around 45 degrees. Moreover, the detailed size and geometry of the cell body, matches the optimized cell body obtained by the slender body theory for swimming at fixed power. This result sheds new light on the shape evolution of microorganisms, and suggests that C. crescentus has adapted to its natural habitat of fresh-water lakes and streams, lacking nutrients.

  5. Sperm navigation along helical paths in 3D chemoattractant landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jikeli, Jan F.; Alvarez, Luis; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Wilson, Laurence G.; Pascal, René; Colin, Remy; Pichlo, Magdalena; Rennhack, Andreas; Brenker, Christoph; Kaupp, U. Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Sperm require a sense of direction to locate the egg for fertilization. They follow gradients of chemical and physical cues provided by the egg or the oviduct. However, the principles underlying three-dimensional (3D) navigation in chemical landscapes are unknown. Here using holographic microscopy and optochemical techniques, we track sea urchin sperm navigating in 3D chemoattractant gradients. Sperm sense gradients on two timescales, which produces two different steering responses. A periodic component, resulting from the helical swimming, gradually aligns the helix towards the gradient. When incremental path corrections fail and sperm get off course, a sharp turning manoeuvre puts sperm back on track. Turning results from an `off' Ca2+ response signifying a chemoattractant stimulation decrease and, thereby, a drop in cyclic GMP concentration and membrane voltage. These findings highlight the computational sophistication by which sperm sample gradients for deterministic klinotaxis. We provide a conceptual and technical framework for studying microswimmers in 3D chemical landscapes.

  6. Homochiral helical metal-organic frameworks of group 1 metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Daniel L; Leitner, Andrew; Smith, Mark D; Tran, T Thao; Halasyamani, P Shiv

    2013-09-03

    The reactions of (S)-2-(1,8-naphthalimido)propanoic acid (HL(ala)) and (S)-2-(1,8-naphthalimido)-3-hydroxypropanoic acid (HL(ser)), protonated forms of ligands that contain a carboxylate donor group, an enantiopure chiral center, and a 1,8-naphthalimide π···π stacking supramolecular tecton and in the case of HL(ser) an alcohol functional group, with the appropriate alkali metal hydroxide followed by a variety of crystallization methods leads to the formation of crystalline K(L(ala))(MeOH) (1), K(L(ala))(H2O) (2), Na(L(ala))(H2O) (3), KL(ser) (4), CsL(ser) (5), and CsL(ala) (6). Each of these new complexes has a solid state structure based on six-coordinate metals linked into homochiral helical rod secondary building unit (SBU) central cores. In addition to the bonding of the carboxylate and solvent (in the case of L(ser) the ligand alcohol) to the metals, both oxygens on the 1,8-naphthalimide act as donor groups. One naphthalimide oxygen bonds to the same helical rod SBU as the carboxylate group of that ligand forming a chelate ring. The other naphthalimide oxygen bonds to adjacent SBUs. In complexes 1-3, this inter-rod link has a square arrangement bonding four other rods forming a three-dimensional enantiopure metal-organic framework (MOF) structure, whereas in 4-6 this link has a linear arrangement bonding two other rods forming a two-dimensional, sheet structure. In the latter case, the third dimension is supported exclusively by interdigitated π···π stacking interactions of the naphthalimide supramolecular tecton, forming enantiopure supramolecular MOF solids. Compounds 1-3 lose the coordinated solvent when heating above 100 °C. For 1, the polycrystalline powder reverts to 1 only by recrystallization from methanol, whereas compounds 2 and 3 undergo gas/solid, single-crystal to single-crystal transformations to form dehydrated compounds 2* and 3*, and rehydration occurs when crystals of these new complexes are left out in air. The reversible single

  7. Stretchable Helical Architecture Inorganic-Organic Hetero Thermoelectric Generator

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2016-10-26

    To achieve higher power output from a thermoelectric generator (TEG), one needs to maintain a larger temperature difference between hot and cold end. In that regard, a stretchable TEG can be interesting to adaptively control the temperature difference. Here we show, the development of simple yet versatile and highly stretchable thermoelectric generators (TEGs), by combining well-known inorganic thermoelectric materials Bismuth Telluride and Antimony Telluride (Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3) with organic substrates (Off-Stoichiometry Thiol-Enes polymer platform – OSTE, polyimide or paper) and novel helical architecture (double-arm spirals) to achieve over 100% stretchability. First, an OSTE-based TEG design demonstrates higher open circuit voltage generation at 100% strain than at rest, although it exhibits high internal resistance and a relatively complex fabrication process. The second, simpler TEG design, achieves a significant resistance reduction and two different structural substrates (PI and paper) are compared. The paper-based TEG generates 17 nW (ΔT = 75 °C) at 60% strain, which represents more than twice the power generation while at rest (zero strain). On the other hand, polyimide produces more conductive TE films and higher power (~35 nW at ΔT = 75 °C) but due to its higher thermal conductivity, power does not increase at stretch. In conclusion, highly stretchable TEGs can lead to higher temperature gradients (thus higher power generation), given that thermal conductivity of the structural material is low enough. Furthermore, either horizontal or vertical displacement can be achieved with double-arm helical architecture, hence allowing to extend the device to any nearby and mobile heat sink for continuous, effectively higher power generation.

  8. Enantiomeric resolution of supramolecular helicates with different surface topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhoffs, Jessica M C A; Peberdy, Jemma C; Meistermann, Isabelle; Childs, Laura J; Isaac, Christian J; Pearmund, Christopher R; Reudegger, Veronika; Khalid, Syma; Alcock, Nathaniel W; Hannon, Michael J; Rodger, Alison

    2007-02-21

    The enantiomeric resolution of an extended range of di-metallo supramolecular triple-helical molecules are reported. The ligands for all complexes are symmetric with two units containing an aryl group linked via an imine bond to a pyridine. Alkyl substituents have been attached in different positions on the ligand backbone. Previous work on the parent compound, whose molecular formula is [Fe(2)(C(25)H(20)N(4))(3)]Cl4, showed that it could be resolved into enantiomerically pure solutions using cellulose and 20 mM aqueous sodium chloride. In this work a range of mobile phases have been investigated to see if the separation and speed of elution could be increased and the amount of NaCl co-eluted with the compounds decreased. Methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile were considered, together with aqueous NaCl : organic mixtures. Effective separation was most often achieved when using 90% acetonitrile : 10% 20 mM NaCl (aq) w/v, which gives scope for scaling up to incorporate the use of HPLC. The overall most efficient (i.e. fastest) separation was generally achieved where the cellulose column was packed with 20 mM NaCl (aq) and the column first eluted with 100% acetonitrile, then with 75% ethanol : 25% 20 mM NaCl (aq) until the M enantiomer had fully eluted and finally with 90% acetonitrile : 10% 20 mM NaCl (aq) until the P enantiomer had been collected. The sequence of eluents ensured minimum NaCl accompanying the enantiomers and minimum total solvent being required to elute the enantiomers, especially the second one, from the column. No helicate with a methyl group on the imine bond could be resolved and methyl groups on the pyridine rings also have an adverse effect on resolution.

  9. Metastatic tumor of the pancreas: helical CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo Keun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Choi, Sang Hee; Jang, Hyun Jung; Lee, Ji Yeon [Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    To analyze the helical computed tomographic (CT) findings of distant metastatic tumors to the pancreas and to determine the differential points between these and primary pamcreatic carcinomas. We sruveyed 22 patients with metastatic tumor of the pancreas, proven on the basis of clinical and pathological findings. Seventeen patients were men, and five were women, and their ages ranged between 36 and 83 years. Their primary conditions were lung cancer (n=3D15), rectal cancer (n=3D2), melanoma of the foot, chondrosarcoma of the sacrum, cervical cancer, leiomyosarcoma of the uterus, and extragonadal choriocarcinoma of the mediastinum. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal helical CT findings, analysing the number, location, size and attenuation of masses, as well as secondary change, which included dilatation of the pancreatic and biliary ducts and invasion of peripancreatic tissue or vessels. We also evaluated the differential findings of primary pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients had a solitary focal mass, while in five, two masses were present. Among the 22 patients, low-density nodular masses were present in 21; in the other, in whom multiple metastasis from chondrosarcoma had occurred, there was dense calcification. The size of metastatic masses varied, ranging from 0.6 to 6 cm in diameter. The pancreatic duct proximal to the mass was dilated in ten cases, while the bile duct was dilated in six. The metastatic masses masses demonstrated no peripancreatic or vascular invasion, though they showed a discrete margin and contour bulging. Single metastasis to the pancreas was most common, and metastatic masses had a discrete margin, with contour bulging. There was no peripancreatic or vascular invasion. If the metastasis involved a single low-attenuated mass, however, with pancreatic or biliary dilatation, it was difficult to differentiate this from primary pancreatic cancer. (author)

  10. Local study of helical magnetorotational instability in viscous Keplerian disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    MahdaviGharavi, M.; Hajisharifi, K.; Mehidan, H.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, regarding the recent detection of significant azimuthal magnetic field in some accretion disks such as protostellar (Donati et al. in Nature 438:466, 2005), the multi-fluid model has been employed to analysis the stability of Keplerian rotational viscous dusty plasma system in a current-free helical magnetic field structure. Using the fluid-Maxwell equations, the general dispersion relation of the excited modes in the system has been obtained by applying the local approximation method in the linear perturbation theory. The typical numerical analysis of the obtained dispersion relation in the high-frequency regime shows that the presence of azimuthal magnetic field component in Keplerian flow has a considerable role in the stability conditions of the system. It also shows that the magnetic field helicity has a stabilization role against the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the system due to contraction of the unstable wavelength region and decreasing the maximum growth rate of the instability. In this sense, the stabilization role of the viscosity term is more considerable for HMRI (instability in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field component) than the corresponding MRI (instability in the absence of azimuthal magnetic field component). Moreover, considering the discovered azimuthal magnetic field in these systems, the MRI can be arisen in the over-all range of dust grains construction values in contract with traditional MRI. This investigation can greatly contribute to better understanding the physics of some astrophysical phenomena, such as the main source of turbulence and angular momentum transport in protostellar and the other sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks, where the azimuthal magnetic field component in these systems can play a significant role.

  11. Dynamic control of chirality and self-assembly of double-stranded helicates with light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Depeng; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Cheng, Jinling; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-03-01

    Helicity switching in biological and artificial systems is a fundamental process that allows for the dynamic control of structures and their functions. In contrast to chemical approaches to responsive behaviour in helicates, the use of light as an external stimulus offers unique opportunities to invert the chirality of helical structures in a non-invasive manner with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we report that unidirectional rotary motors with connecting oligobipyridyl ligands, which can dynamically change their chirality upon irradiation, assemble into metal helicates that are responsive to light. The motor function controls the self-assembly process as well as the helical chirality, allowing switching between oligomers and double-stranded helicates with distinct handedness. The unidirectionality of the light-induced motion governs the sequence of programmable steps, enabling the highly regulated self-assembly of fully responsive helical structures. This discovery paves the way for the future development of new chirality-dependent photoresponsive systems including smart materials, enantioselective catalysts and light-driven molecular machines.

  12. Helicity conservation by flow across scales in reconnecting vortex links and knots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kleckner, Dustin; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2014-01-01

    The conjecture that helicity (or knottedness) is a fundamental conserved quantity has a rich history in fluid mechanics, but the nature of this conservation in the presence of dissipation has proven difficult to resolve. Making use of recent advances, we create vortex knots and links in viscous fluids and simulated superfluids and track their geometry through topology-changing reconnections. We find that the reassociation of vortex lines through a reconnection enables the transfer of helicity from links and knots to helical coils. This process is remarkably efficient, owing to the antiparallel orientation spontaneously adopted by the reconnecting vortices. Using a new method for quantifying the spatial helicity spectrum, we find that the reconnection process can be viewed as transferring helicity between scales, rather than dissipating it. We also infer the presence of geometric deformations that convert helical coils into even smaller scale twist, where it may ultimately be dissipated. Our results suggest that helicity conservation plays an important role in fluids and related fields, even in the presence of dissipation. PMID:25326419

  13. Effect of helicity on the correlation time of large scales in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Alexandre; Alexakis, Alexandros; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2017-11-01

    Solutions of the forced Navier-Stokes equation have been conjectured to thermalize at scales larger than the forcing scale, similar to an absolute equilibrium obtained for the spectrally truncated Euler equation. Using direct numeric simulations of Taylor-Green flows and general-periodic helical flows, we present results on the probability density function, energy spectrum, autocorrelation function, and correlation time that compare the two systems. In the case of highly helical flows, we derive an analytic expression describing the correlation time for the absolute equilibrium of helical flows that is different from the E-1 /2k-1 scaling law of weakly helical flows. This model predicts a new helicity-based scaling law for the correlation time as τ (k ) ˜H-1 /2k-1 /2 . This scaling law is verified in simulations of the truncated Euler equation. In simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations the large-scale modes of forced Taylor-Green symmetric flows (with zero total helicity and large separation of scales) follow the same properties as absolute equilibrium including a τ (k ) ˜E-1 /2k-1 scaling for the correlation time. General-periodic helical flows also show similarities between the two systems; however, the largest scales of the forced flows deviate from the absolute equilibrium solutions.

  14. Dynamic control of chirality and self-assembly of double-stranded helicates with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Depeng; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Cheng, Jinling; Feringa, Ben L.

    2017-03-01

    Helicity switching in biological and artificial systems is a fundamental process that allows for the dynamic control of structures and their functions. In contrast to chemical approaches to responsive behaviour in helicates, the use of light as an external stimulus offers unique opportunities to invert the chirality of helical structures in a non-invasive manner with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we report that unidirectional rotary motors with connecting oligobipyridyl ligands, which can dynamically change their chirality upon irradiation, assemble into metal helicates that are responsive to light. The motor function controls the self-assembly process as well as the helical chirality, allowing switching between oligomers and double-stranded helicates with distinct handedness. The unidirectionality of the light-induced motion governs the sequence of programmable steps, enabling the highly regulated self-assembly of fully responsive helical structures. This discovery paves the way for the future development of new chirality-dependent photoresponsive systems including smart materials, enantioselective catalysts and light-driven molecular machines.

  15. Modification of Spalart-Allmaras model with consideration of turbulence energy backscatter using velocity helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yangwei, E-mail: liuyangwei@126.com [Group 404, National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-thermodynamics, School of Jet Propulsion, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Lipeng [Group 404, National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-thermodynamics, School of Jet Propulsion, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Laboratoire International Associe, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Fang, Le [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 69134 (France); Laboratoire International Associe, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Gao, Feng [Group 404, National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-thermodynamics, School of Jet Propulsion, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-06-13

    The correlation between the velocity helicity and the energy backscatter is proved in a DNS case of 256{sup 3}-grid homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. The helicity is then proposed to be employed to improve turbulence models and SGS models. Then Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model (SA) is modified with the helicity to take account of the energy backscatter, which is significant in the region of corner separation in compressors. By comparing the numerical results with experiments, it can be concluded that the modification for SA model with helicity can appropriately represent the energy backscatter, and greatly improves the predictive accuracy for simulating the corner separation flow in compressors. -- Highlights: → We study the relativity between the velocity helicity and the energy backscatter. → Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is modified with the velocity helicity. → The modified model is employed to simulate corner separation in compressor cascade. → The modification can greatly improve the accuracy for predicting corner separation. → The helicity can represent the energy backscatter in turbulence and SGS models.

  16. Influence of drill helical direction on exit damage development in drilling carbon fiber reinforced plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Jia, Z. Y.; Wang, F. J.; Fu, R.; Guo, H. B.; Cheng, D.; Zhang, B. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Drilling is inevitable for CFRP components’ assembling process in the aviation industry. The exit damage frequently occurs and affects the load carrying capacity of components. Consequently, it is of great urgency to enhance drilling exit quality on CFRP components. The article aims to guide the reasonable choice of drill helical direction and effectively reduce exit damage. Exit observation experiments are carried out with left-hand helical, right-hand helical and straight one-shot drill drilling T800S CFRP laminates separately. The development rules of exit damage and delamination factor curves are obtained. Combined with loading conditions and fracture modes of push-out burrs, and thrust force curves, the influence of drill helical direction on exit damage development is derived. It is found that the main fracture modes for left-hand helical, right-hand helical, and straight one-shot drill are mode I, extrusive fracture, mode III respectively. Among them, mode III has the least effect on exit damage development. Meanwhile, the changing rate of thrust force is relative slow for right-hand helical and straight one-shot drill in the thrust force increasing phase of stage II, which is disadvantaged for exit damage development. Therefore, straight one-shot drill’s exit quality is the best.

  17. Checking Asymmetry of Magnetic Helicity Using Magnetograms with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lirong; Zhu, C.; Alexander, D.

    2010-05-01

    In order to check if the helicity imbalance is robust between the leading and following polarities, found by Tian & Alexander, we use an improved technique, differential affline velocity estimator (DAVE), on series of MDI 1m and 96m line-of-sight magnetograms with spatial resolution of 0.6 and 2 arcsecs. respectively, to measure photospheric flow motions of an emerging active region: NOAA 10365 (S08). A better parameter of helicity density (Gθ) than GA is employed to calculate helicity injection rate of leading and following polarities. Our results display that the helicity injection rate of using MDI/1m data is 2 times larger than that of using MDI/ 96m data. The helicity injection rate is little affected by the size of apodizing window selected and the noise level (20 Gauss). However, it is improved so much due to decreasing time difference (up to Δt=10 mines) of two images tracked. The helicity injection rate of two polarities of the active region developed as roughly same step with flux emergence,and maintain its imbalance with more amount in the negative (leading) polarity over tracking period of three days, which is a similar development tendency no matter using MDI/1m data or MDI/96m data. These results reflect that the time difference of two tracking images is the most important factor affecting amount of helicity injection rate, while there is little relation with spatial resolution of data, the size of apodizing window, and the noise level. Therefore, it should be reliable to study the development of helicity injection rate and imbalanced relationship of two polarities when using MDI/96m data, though the amount calculated is two times smaller. Further test for MDI/96m data of ARs 8214 and 0656 confirm that the helicity imbalance indeed exists between the leading and following polarities.

  18. Global existence of weak solutions to the three-dimensional Euler equations with helical symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu, Quansen; Li, Jun; Niu, Dongjuan

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we mainly investigate the weak solutions of the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with helical symmetry in the whole space when the helical swirl vanishes. Specifically, we establish the global existence of weak solutions when the initial vorticity lies in L1 ∩Lp with p > 1. Our result extends the previous work [2], where the initial vorticity is compactly supported and belongs to Lp with p > 4 / 3. The key ingredient in this paper involves the explicit analysis of Biot-Savart law with helical symmetry in domain R2 × [ - π , π ] via the theories of singular integral operators and second order elliptic equations.

  19. Diffraction patterns from holographic masks generated using combined axicon and helical phase distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, M.; Preda, L.; Kusko, C.; Scarlat, E. I.

    2015-02-01

    The diffraction patterns (DPs) from helical phase distributions were intensively studied due to their peculiar capability of carrying orbital angular momentum. In the present study, we investigated the combination between a helical phase distribution and another distribution: axicon in our case. Such phase distributions were digitally embedded into holographic masks (HMs). The reconstruction step is performed by simulating the propagation through these HMs, using scalar diffraction theory, Fraunhofer approximation. The spatial intensity arrangement of the DPs is investigated linked with the radial and azimuthal constructive parameters values of the diffractive phase structures embedded in the HMs and transferred in these DPs. Keywords: helical phase distribution

  20. Anisotropy in the helicity modulus of a three-dimensional XY-model: application to YBCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrovic, Bozidar; Bose, Shyamal K; Samokhin, Kirill [Physics Department, Brock University, St Catharines, ON L2S 3A1 (Canada)

    2003-04-09

    We present a Monte Carlo study of the helicity moduli of an anisotropic classical three-dimensional XY-model of YBCO in the superconducting state. It is found that both the ab-plane and the c-axis helicity moduli, which are proportional to the inverse square of the corresponding magnetic field penetration depth, vary linearly with temperature at low temperatures. The result for the c-axis helicity modulus is in disagreement with the experiments on high-quality samples of YBCO. Thus we conclude that purely classical phase fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter cannot account for the observed c-axis electrodynamics of YBCO.

  1. WEB-THERMODYN: sequence analysis software for profiling DNA helical stability

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yanlin; Kowalski, David

    2003-01-01

    WEB-THERMODYN analyzes DNA sequences and computes the DNA helical stability, i.e. the free energy required to unwind and separate the strands of the double helix. A helical stability profile across a selected DNA region or the entire sequence is generated by sliding-window analysis. WEB-THERMODYN can predict sites of low helical stability present at regulatory regions for transcription and replication and can be used to test the influence of mutations. The program can be accessed at: http://w...

  2. Note on the helicity decomposition of spin and orbital optical currents

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In the helicity representation, the Poynting vector (current) for a monochromatic optical field, when calculated using either the electric or the magnetic field, separates into right-handed and left-handed contributions, with no cross-helicity contributions. Cross-helicity terms do appear in the orbital and spin contributions to the current. But when the electric and magnetic formulas are averaged ('electric-magnetic democracy'), these terms cancel, restoring the separation into right-handed and left-handed currents for orbital and spin separately.

  3. New mode of operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for injecting magnetic helicity into a spheromak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, S; Hill, D N; Stallard, B W; Bulmer, R; Cohen, B; Holcomb, C T; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2003-03-07

    By operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun continuously with just sufficient current to enable plasma ejection, large gun-voltage spikes (approximately 1 kV) are produced, giving the highest sustained voltage approximately 500 V and highest sustained helicity injection rate observed in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment. The spheromak magnetic field increases monotonically with time, exhibiting the lowest fluctuation levels observed during formation of any spheromak (B/B>/=2%). The results suggest an important mechanism for field generation by helicity injection, namely, the merging of helicity-carrying filaments.

  4. Animal Experiments of the Helical Flow Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ishii, Kohei; Sato, Masami; Hara, Shintaro; Yurimoto, Terumi; Li, Xinyang; Murakami, Haruka; Ariyoshi, Koki; Kawase, Yukino; Ono, Toshiya; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Severe cardiac failure patients require a total artificial heart (TAH) to save life. To realize a TAH that can fit a body of small stature and has high performance, high durability, good anatomical fitting, good blood compatibility, and physiological control, we have been developing the helical flow TAH (HFTAH) with two helical flow pumps with hydrodynamic levitation impeller. Animal experiments of the HFTAH were conducted to perform in vivo studies. The HFTAH was implanted in 13 adult female goats weighing 45.0-64.0 kg. After surgery, neither anti-coagulant nor anti-platelet medication was given systemically. The HFTAH was usually driven with a quasi-pulsatile mode. The 1/R control or ΔP control was applied to control the circulation. The ΔP control is a new method using simplified equation of the 1/R control. The HFTAH could be implanted in all goats with good anatomical fitting. Two goats survived for a long time (100 and 68 days). Major causes of termination were device failure and surgical complications. In the device failure, trouble with hydrodynamic bearing was conspicuous. In the two long-term survived goats, experiments were terminated with bearing instability that was probably caused by the suction effect. In these goats, hemolysis occurred on postoperative day 88 and 44, which was considered to be relevant to the bearing trouble. Thrombus was found at the broken right bearing of the 100-day survived goat. However, antithrombogenicity of the pump is expected to be good unless bearing trouble occurs. In two long-term survived goats, the 1/R control or ΔP control worked appropriately to prevent the elevation of right atrial pressure. In both goats, hemodynamic parameters changed with the condition of the animals, liver and kidney functions remained almost normal except when recovering from surgery and during hemolysis, and total protein recovered 2 weeks after surgery. Although instability of the hydrodynamic bearing should be improved, performance of

  5. Stretchable Persistent Spin Helices in GaAs Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettwiler, Florian; Fu, Jiyong; Mack, Shawn; Weigele, Pirmin J.; Egues, J. Carlos; Awschalom, David D.; Zumbühl, Dominik M.

    2017-07-01

    The Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit (SO) interactions in 2D electron gases act as effective magnetic fields with momentum-dependent directions, which cause spin decay as the spins undergo arbitrary precessions about these randomly oriented SO fields due to momentum scattering. Theoretically and experimentally, it has been established that by fine-tuning the Rashba α and renormalized Dresselhaus β couplings to equal fixed strengths α =β , the total SO field becomes unidirectional, thus rendering the electron spins immune to decay due to momentum scattering. A robust persistent spin helix (PSH), i.e., a helical spin-density wave excitation with constant pitch P =2 π /Q , Q =4 m α /ℏ2, has already been experimentally realized at this singular point α =β , enhancing the spin lifetime by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Here, we employ the suppression of weak antilocalization as a sensitive detector for matched SO fields together with independent electrical control over the SO couplings via top gate voltage VT and back gate voltage VB to extract all SO couplings when combined with detailed numerical simulations. We demonstrate for the first time the gate control of the renormalized β and the continuous locking of the SO fields at α =β ; i.e., we are able to vary both α and β controllably and continuously with VT and VB, while keeping them locked at equal strengths. This makes possible a new concept: "stretchable PSHs," i.e., helical spin patterns with continuously variable pitches P over a wide parameter range. Stretching the PSH, i.e., gate controlling P while staying locked in the PSH regime, provides protection from spin decay at the symmetry point α =β , thus offering an important advantage over other methods. This protection is limited mainly by the cubic Dresselhaus term, which breaks the unidirectionality of the total SO field and causes spin decay at higher electron densities. We quantify the cubic term, and find it to be sufficiently weak so that

  6. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  7. Stretchable Persistent Spin Helices in GaAs Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Dettwiler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit (SO interactions in 2D electron gases act as effective magnetic fields with momentum-dependent directions, which cause spin decay as the spins undergo arbitrary precessions about these randomly oriented SO fields due to momentum scattering. Theoretically and experimentally, it has been established that by fine-tuning the Rashba α and renormalized Dresselhaus β couplings to equal fixed strengths α=β, the total SO field becomes unidirectional, thus rendering the electron spins immune to decay due to momentum scattering. A robust persistent spin helix (PSH, i.e., a helical spin-density wave excitation with constant pitch P=2π/Q, Q=4mα/ℏ^{2}, has already been experimentally realized at this singular point α=β, enhancing the spin lifetime by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Here, we employ the suppression of weak antilocalization as a sensitive detector for matched SO fields together with independent electrical control over the SO couplings via top gate voltage V_{T} and back gate voltage V_{B} to extract all SO couplings when combined with detailed numerical simulations. We demonstrate for the first time the gate control of the renormalized β and the continuous locking of the SO fields at α=β; i.e., we are able to vary both α and β controllably and continuously with V_{T} and V_{B}, while keeping them locked at equal strengths. This makes possible a new concept: “stretchable PSHs,” i.e., helical spin patterns with continuously variable pitches P over a wide parameter range. Stretching the PSH, i.e., gate controlling P while staying locked in the PSH regime, provides protection from spin decay at the symmetry point α=β, thus offering an important advantage over other methods. This protection is limited mainly by the cubic Dresselhaus term, which breaks the unidirectionality of the total SO field and causes spin decay at higher electron densities. We quantify the cubic term, and find it to be

  8. First evidence for helical transitions in supercoiled DNA by amyloid Beta Peptide (1-42) and aluminum: a new insight in understanding Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Anitha, Suram; Latha, Kallur S; Mustak, Mohammed S; Stein, Reuven; Ravid, Rivka; Rao, K S Jagannatha

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we evidenced a B --> Z helical change in Alzheimer's brain genomic DNA, leading to a hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease (AD) etiological factors such as aluminum (Al), amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide, and Tau might play a role in modulating DNA topology. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of Al and Abeta with DNA. Our results show that Abeta(1-42) could induce a B --> Psi (Psi) conformational change in pUC 18 supercoiled DNA (scDNA), Abeta(1-16) caused an altered B-form, whereas Al induced a complex B-C-A mixed conformation. Ethidium bromide binding and agarose gel electrophoresis studies revealed that Al uncoiled the DNAto a fully relaxed form, whereas Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-16) effected a partial uncoiling and also showed differential sensitivity toward chloroquine-induced topoisomer separation. Our findings show for the first time that Abeta and Al modulate both helicity and superhelicity in scDNA. A new hypothetical model explaining the potential toxicity of Abeta and Al in terms of their DNA binding properties leading to DNA conformational alteration is proposed.

  9. Chirality and helicity of poly-benzyl-L-glutamate in liquid crystals and a wave structure that mimics collagen helicity in crimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Benedicto de Campos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideal biocompatible polymers must show a mimetic superstructure with biological supra-organization. Collagen-rich structures like tendons and ligaments are materials with various levels of order, from molecules to bundles of fibers, which affect their biomechanical properties and cellular interactions. Poly-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG displaying helicity was used here to test the development of wave-like structures as those occurring in collagen fibers. Birefringence of PBLG under various crystallization conditions was studied with a lambda/4 compensator according to Sénarmont. Qualitative observations were plainly sufficient to conclude that the PBLG fibrils were supra-organized helically as a chiral object. During crystallization stretched PBLG formed a helical superstructure with characteristic striation resembling waves (crimp. Supported by optical anisotropy findings, a twisted grain boundary liquid crystal type is proposed as a transition phase in the formation of the PBLG chiral object. A similarity with the wavy organization (crimp of collagen bundles is proposed.

  10. Mesothelioma at era of helical tomotherapy: results of two institutions in combining chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvestre, Alma; Mahé, Marc-André; Lisbona, Albert; Zefkili, Sofia; Savignoni, Alexia; Bonnette, Pierre; Barthes, Françoise Le Pimpec; Paris, Edouard; Perigaud, Christian; Yassa, Michael; Giraud, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    There is a scarce clinical experience about adjuvant helical tomotherapy (HT) in patients affected by malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) even though it appears as a useful technique to treat complex volume as the pleural cavity, and seems to have better dose distribution than the "classic" intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Twenty-four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) by HT from August 1st, 2007 to December 1st, 2009 at Curie Institute (Paris) and René Gauducheau Cancer Center (Nantes). Thirteen patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Extrapleural pleuropneumonectomy (EPP) was done in 23 patients. Median dose to PTV was 50Gy [48.7-55.9Gy] (2Gy/fraction). Acute and long term toxicities, disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and relapses are presented. Average follow up after RT was 7 months. The disease was staged mostly as T2-T3, N1-N2. Nineteen patients had epithelial type histology. Most patients tolerated radiotherapy with grade 1-2 side effects: redness of the skin, light cough or dyspnea, fatigue, nausea and odynophagia, mild increase of the post-operative thoracic pain. Grade 3 pneumonitis was suspected in 2 patients. Two grade 5 pneumonitis were also suspected. Eleven patients had a follow up of more than 6 months and no long term side effects related with HT were noted. At 24 months, 51.8% of patients were free of disease. Thirty percent of patients relapsed, with 2 patients presenting local relapses. Two patients died from recurrence. With limited follow up, HT has comparable toxicity to those observed with traditional IMRT. Higher radiation dose and good coverage results in excellent local control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural fragment clustering reveals novel structural and functional motifs in α-helical transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilev Boris

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large proportion of an organism's genome encodes for membrane proteins. Membrane proteins are important for many cellular processes, and several diseases can be linked to mutations in them. With the tremendous growth of sequence data, there is an increasing need to reliably identify membrane proteins from sequence, to functionally annotate them, and to correctly predict their topology. Results We introduce a technique called structural fragment clustering, which learns sequential motifs from 3D structural fragments. From over 500,000 fragments, we obtain 213 statistically significant, non-redundant, and novel motifs that are highly specific to α-helical transmembrane proteins. From these 213 motifs, 58 of them were assigned to function and checked in the scientific literature for a biological assessment. Seventy percent of the motifs are found in co-factor, ligand, and ion binding sites, 30% at protein interaction interfaces, and 12% bind specific lipids such as glycerol or cardiolipins. The vast majority of motifs (94% appear across evolutionarily unrelated families, highlighting the modularity of functional design in membrane proteins. We describe three novel motifs in detail: (1 a dimer interface motif found in voltage-gated chloride channels, (2 a proton transfer motif found in heme-copper oxidases, and (3 a convergently evolved interface helix motif found in an aspartate symporter, a serine protease, and cytochrome b. Conclusions Our findings suggest that functional modules exist in membrane proteins, and that they occur in completely different evolutionary contexts and cover different binding sites. Structural fragment clustering allows us to link sequence motifs to function through clusters of structural fragments. The sequence motifs can be applied to identify and characterize membrane proteins in novel genomes.

  12. Feasibility Study of Pelvic Helical IMRT for Elderly Patients with Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Nickers, Philippe; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Cordoba, Abel; Leblanc, Eric; Comte, Pauline; Lacornerie, Thomas; Lartigau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Standard treatment for early-stage endometrial cancer involves surgery (when possible) followed by brachytherapy or external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for high-risk tumors. EBRT is not without toxicity, meaning that it could be difficult to complete for elderly patients, who typically have decreased reserve and resistance to stressors. Patients and methods Patients aged 70 and over treated between April 2009 and May 2013 for endometrial cancer and received IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy) were included in this observational study. IMRT could be performed as adjuvant treatment or as an exclusive treatment for patients not amenable to surgery. The primary endpoints of this study were to assess the feasibility and toxicity of pelvic IMRT in this population. Secondary endpoints were to assess disease-specific survival, overall survival, and local control. Predictors of toxicity were also explored. Results Forty seven consecutive patients were included in the analysis. Median age at diagnosis was 75 years (range, 70–89 years). Eleven patients were aged 80 years and older. Toxicities were found in thirty four patients (72%) during treatment. Among these, toxicity did not exceed grade 2 for 32 patients (68%). Two patients had a grade 3 toxicity (4%). Overall survival rates were 87% and 83% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Six patients (12.8%) had a local relapse and nine others (19.1%) had distant relapse. Conclusions Pelvic helical IMRT for patients aged 70 and older is feasible with full standard radiation doses, showing that age greater than 70 should not be considered as a reason not to perform optimal treatment. PMID:25423024

  13. Anisotropy in the helicity modulus of a quantum three-dimensional XY model: application to YBCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrovic, Bozidar; Samokhin, Kirill; Bose, Shyamal K [Physics Department, Brock University, St Catharines, ON, L2S 3A1 (Canada)

    2003-11-12

    We present a variational study of the helicity moduli of an anisotropic quantum three-dimensional (3D) XY model of YBCO in its superconducting state. It is found that both the ab-plane and the c-axis helicity moduli, which are proportional to the inverse square of the corresponding magnetic field penetration depth, vary with temperature T as T{sup 4} in the zero temperature limit. Moreover, the c-axis helicity modulus drops with temperature much faster than the ab-plane helicity modulus because of the weaker Josephson couplings along the c-axis compared to those along the ab-plane. These findings are in disagreement with experiments on high quality samples of YBCO.

  14. Effect of initial stagger selection on the handedness of Amyloid beta helical fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K [ORNL; Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Various structural models for Amyloid $\\beta$ fibrils derived from a variety of experimental techniques are currently available. However, this data cannot differentiate between the relative position of the two arms of the $\\beta$ hairpin called the stagger. Amyloid fibrils of various heirarchical levels form left--handed helices composed of $\\beta$ sheets. However it is unclear if positive, negative and neutral staggers all form the macroscopic left--handed helices. Studying this is important since the success of computational approaches to develop drugs for amyloidic diseases will depend on selecting the physiologically relevant structure of the sheets. To address this issue we have conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations of Amyloid$\\beta$ sheets of various staggers and show that only negative staggers generate the experimentally observed left--handed helices while positive staggers generate the incorrect right--handed helices. The implications of this result extend in to all amyloidic--aggregation type diseases.

  15. Exploring the Changes in the Structure of α-Helical Peptides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sathish

    Exploring the Changes in the Structure of α-Helical Peptides. Adsorbed onto Carbon and Boron Nitride based Nanomaterials. Dr. V. Subramanian. Chemical Laboratory, IPC Division. CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai-600 020. 1 ...

  16. Helical structure of single-crystalline ZnGa2O4 nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Seung Yong; Lee, Jinyoung; Jung, Hyunsung; Park, Jeunghee; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung

    2005-08-10

    Two unique helical zinc gallate (ZnGa2O4) nanostructures were synthesized by thermal evaporation using the zinc selenide (ZnSe) nanowires; helical ZnGa2O4 nanowire rolls either on a straight ZnSe nanowire support or without any support. They all consist of single-crystalline cubic ZnGa2O4 crystals without any dislocation over the entire helical structure and have four equivalent growth directions of 011 with the axial direction of [001]. We suggest that the lattice matching with the ZnSe nanowires would be an important factor in determining the growth direction of the helical ZnGa2O4 nanowires.

  17. Exact scaling laws for helical three-dimensional two-fluid turbulent plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, Nahuel; Sahraoui, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    We derive exact scaling laws for a three-dimensional incompressible helical two-fluid plasma, without the assumption of isotropy. For each ideal invariant of the two-fluid model, i.e. the total energy, the electron helicity and the proton helicity, we derive simple scaling laws in terms of two-point increments correlation functions expressed in terms of the velocity field of each species and the magnetic field. These variables are appropriate for comparison with \\textit{in-situ} measurements in the solar wind at different spatial ranges and data from numerical simulations. Finally, with the exact scaling laws and dimensional analysis we predict the magnetic energy and electron helicity spectra for different ranges of scales.

  18. Alzheimer's disease: insolubility of partially purified paired helical filaments in sodium dodecyl sulfate and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkoe, D J; Ihara, Y; Salazar, F J

    1982-03-05

    A method is described for the partial purification of the paired helical filaments that accumulate progressively in human neurons in Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia). Paired helical filaments have unusual solubility characteristics, including insolubility in sodium dodecyl sulfate, urea, reducing agent, and guanidine, which prevent analysis of their molecular composition by gel electrophoresis. The paired helical filaments appear to contain covalent bonds other than disulfide, which cross-link individual filaments into a rigid intracellular polymer. Thus, paired helical filaments appear to represent an example in neurons of an insoluble cross-linked protein. Covalently cross-linked protein polymers occur in lens senile cataracts and in terminally differentiated skin keratinocytes, suggesting that there may be a common mechanism for remodeling some structural proteins during cell aging.

  19. Alpha-helical cationic anticancer peptides: a promising candidate for novel anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yibing; Feng, Qi; Yan, Qiuyan; Hao, Xueyu; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become a serious concern in public health. Harmful side effects and multidrug resistance of traditional chemotherapy have prompted urgent needs for novel anticancer drugs or therapeutic approaches. Anticancer peptides (ACPs) have become promising molecules for novel anticancer agents because of their unique mechanism and several extraordinary properties. Most α-helical ACPs target the cell membrane, and interactions between ACPs and cell membrane components are believed to be the key factor in the selective killing of cancer cells. In this review, we focus on the exploitation of the structure and function of α-helical ACPs, including the distinction between cancer and normal cells, the proposed anticancer mechanisms, and the influence of physicochemical parameters of α-helical ACPs on the biological activities and selectivity against cancer cells. In addition, the design and modification methods to optimize the cell selectivity of α-helical ACPs are considered. Furthermore, the suitability of ACPs as cancer therapeutics is discussed.

  20. Geostrophic balance and the emergence of helicity in rotating stratified turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Raffaele; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2012-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying rotating stratified turbulence and show, in the Boussinesq framework, that helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation), as observed in super-cell storms and hurricanes, is spontaneously created due to geostrophic balance common to large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Helicity emerges from the joint action of eddies and of inertial and gravity waves of respective frequencies $f$ and $N$, and it occurs when the waves are sufficiently strong. For $N/f < 3$ the amount of helicity produced is correctly predicted by a linear balance equation. Outside this regime, and up to the highest Reynolds number obtained in this study, namely $Re\\approx 10000$, helicity production is found to be persistent for $N/f$ as large as $\\approx 17$ and for $ReFr^2$ and $ReRo^2 $ as large as $\\approx 100, \\approx 24000 $.

  1. Self-trapped vibrational states in synthetic beta-sheet helices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, Erik; Schwartz, E.; Bodis, Pavol; Koepf, Matthieu; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Rowan, Alan E.; Woutersen, Sander; Nolte, Roeland J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Femtosecond vibrational pump–probespectroscopy on β-helical polyisocyanopeptides reveals vibrational self-trapping in the well-defined hydrogen-bonded side groups that is absent when non-hydrogen bonded monomers are mixed in.

  2. Initial Measurements of Electrostatic Turbulence in Local Helicity Injection Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, A. T.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Richner, N. J.

    2017-10-01

    Investigation of the edge turbulence during local helicity injection (LHI) in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment is being pursued using a pair of triple Langmuir probes. Temperature and density profiles in the plasma edge have been measured during LHI, showing 100 eV and 4 ×1019 m-3, and agree with Thomson scattering to within measurement uncertainty. Fluctuation spectra of the probe measurements show a shift in spectral power density from low (10-100 kHz) to high (300-400 kHz) frequency between the early and later times of the discharge. This change in the frequency spectra is aligned with a spontaneous reduction of the n = 1 MHD signature observed by magnetics diagnostics. Correlation with magnetic fluctuations is observed in the higher frequency range of the probes. Experiments are being conducted to measure electric potential fluctuations in the edge for a larger frequency range (up to 2 MHz) to understand the effects of the MHD transition on the edge turbulence. Additionally, recent LHI plasmas with βt 100 % have shown a minimum | B | well spanning 50 % of the plasma volume. This | B | well is theoretically predicted to be stabilizing of drift wave turbulence. Measurements to explore the turbulence behavior in high- β LHI plasmas are in progress. Work supported by US DOE Grants DE-FG02-96ER54375 and DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  3. A mechanical explanation for cytoskeletal rings and helices in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Steven S; Arkin, Adam P

    2007-09-15

    Several bacterial proteins have been shown to polymerize into coils or rings on cell membranes. These include the cytoskeletal proteins MreB, FtsZ, and MinD, which together with other cell components make up what is being called the bacterial cytoskeleton. We believe that these shapes arise, at least in part, from the interaction of the inherent mechanical properties of the protein polymers and the constraints imposed by the curved cell membrane. This hypothesis, presented as a simple mechanical model, was tested with numerical energy-minimization methods from which we found that there are five low-energy polymer morphologies on a rod-shaped membrane: rings, lines, helices, loops, and polar-targeted circles. Analytic theory was used to understand the possible structures and to create phase diagrams that show which parameter combinations lead to which structures. Inverting the results, it is possible to infer the effective mechanical bending parameters of protein polymers from fluorescence images of their shapes. This theory also provides a plausible explanation for the morphological changes exhibited by the Z ring in a sporulating Bacillus subtilis; is used to calculate the mechanical force exerted on a cell membrane by a polymer; and allows predictions of polymer shapes in mutant cells.

  4. A numerical study of flow characteristics in a helical pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingdi Tang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics and loss mechanism inside the helical pipe with large-caliber and large-scale Dean number were analyzed in this study. Numerical simulation was carried out for exploring velocity distribution, pressure field, and secondary flow by varying coil parameters such as Dean number, curvature radius, and coil pitch. The velocity gradient in the cross-section increases along the pipe and causes unsteady flow in the pipe. Large pressure differences in the 180° and 315° cross-section generate centrifugal forces on the pipe. The secondary flow is the major factor resulting in flow loss, presented obviously by the streamlines to analyze the effects of pipe parameters on the vortices. The vortex center shifts toward the upper wall with the increase in Dean number and takes a slight deflection with the increase in coil pitch. Meanwhile, a correlation of the flow loss extent inside the pipe as a function of friction factor was presented. The increases in curvature radius and coil pitch can diminish the friction factor to reduce flow losses. The accuracy of the numerical methodology was also validated by conducting corresponding experiments and empirical mathematical analysis. The maximum deviation between the experimental values and the simulated results of the pressure drop is just 2.9%.

  5. Continuum model for chiral induced spin selectivity in helical molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Ernesto [Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, 21827, Caracas 1020 A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); González-Arraga, Luis A. [IMDEA Nanoscience, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Mujica, Vladimiro [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Berche, Bertrand [Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, 21827, Caracas 1020 A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Groupe de Physique Statistique, Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2015-05-21

    A minimal model is exactly solved for electron spin transport on a helix. Electron transport is assumed to be supported by well oriented p{sub z} type orbitals on base molecules forming a staircase of definite chirality. In a tight binding interpretation, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens up an effective π{sub z} − π{sub z} coupling via interbase p{sub x,y} − p{sub z} hopping, introducing spin coupled transport. The resulting continuum model spectrum shows two Kramers doublet transport channels with a gap proportional to the SOC. Each doubly degenerate channel satisfies time reversal symmetry; nevertheless, a bias chooses a transport direction and thus selects for spin orientation. The model predicts (i) which spin orientation is selected depending on chirality and bias, (ii) changes in spin preference as a function of input Fermi level and (iii) back-scattering suppression protected by the SO gap. We compute the spin current with a definite helicity and find it to be proportional to the torsion of the chiral structure and the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan phase. To describe room temperature transport, we assume that the total transmission is the result of a product of coherent steps.

  6. Vibrational properties of a regular helical Se chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuma; Ikawa, Atsushi

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we calculated the phonon dispersion curves and the infrared (IR)/Raman spectra of an infinite regular helical selenium (Se) chain. The ingredients needed for their calculations, i.e., the force constant matrix, dynamical-charge tensor (DCT), and polarizability-derivative tensor (PDT), were obtained from ab initio molecular orbital calculations with the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for a Se chain with finite length. Assignments for the IR and Raman spectra were performed in terms of a rotational angle τ of the helix; i.e., the phonon modes with wave number Q~=0 or τ are IR active, while the phonon modes with Q~=0, τ, or 2τ are Raman active. Therefore, IR and Raman spectroscopy are useful, not only for identifying the static structure but also for deriving the phonon dispersions of the Se chain. From analyses based on a valence force field model, we found that the ab initio phonon dispersion curve of the stretching band strongly depends on the off-diagonal couplings in the force constant matrix and on the chain geometry, especially the bond angle. The ab initio DCT and PDT were also analyzed with the so-called bond-current and bond-polarizability models, respectively. We found that these simple models reproduce the ab initio IR/Raman intensities quite accurately.

  7. High Field Side MHD Activity During Local Helicity Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachicano, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Richner, N. J.

    2017-10-01

    MHD is an essential part of understanding the mechanism for local helicity injection (LHI) current drive. The new high field side (HFS) LHI system on the Pegasus ST permits new tests of recent NIMROD simulations. In that model, LHI current streams in the plasma edge undergo large-scale reconnection events, leading to current drive. This produces bursty n = 1 activity around 30 kHz on low field side (LFS) Mirnov coils, consistent with experiment. The simulations also feature coherent injector streams winding down the center column. Improvements to the core high-resolution poloidal Mirnov array with Cat7A Ethernet cabling and differentially driven signal processing eliminated EMI-driven switching noise, enabling detailed spectral analysis. Preliminary results from the recovered HFS poloidal Mirnov coils suggest n = 1 activity is present at the top of the vessel core, but does not persist down the centerstack. HFS LHI experiments can exhibit an operating regime where the high amplitude MHD is abruptly reduced by more than an order of magnitude on LFS Mirnov coils, leading to higher plasma current and improved particle confinement. This reduction is not observed on the HFS midplane magnetics. Instead, they show broadband turbulence-like magnetic features with near consistent amplitude in a frequency range of 90-200 kHz. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  8. Homodyne reflectometer for NBI interlock on Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Kenji; Ito, Yasuhiko; Kawahata, Kazuo; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Osakabe, Masaki; Takeiri, Yasuhiko [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Ejiri, Akira [Tokyo Univ., Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) under low density causes serious damage on vacuum vessel wall. It is necessary to stop NBI when electron density becomes lower than 1x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. This needs reliable density monitor for NBI interlock. A three-channel homodyne reflectometer was installed on Large Helical Device (LHD) and was used for NBI interlock. 28.5, 34.9 and 40.2 GHz Gunn oscillators were used with O mode injection. Their O mode cut off density correspond to 1x10{sup 19}, 1.5x10{sup 19} and 2x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} respectively. The simple homodyne detection is presently used. When the density reaches to the cutoff density, the reflected signals are detected. The reflected signal consists of DC signal due to local and reflected power, and AC signal due to position of cut off layer and density fluctuation. Since the change of DC signal at lower and higher than cut off density was very small, root mean square (RMS) value of AC signal were used for interlock signal. This interlock system is successfully working from the beginning of the NBI experiments campaign on LHD. (author)

  9. Attractive forces between cation condensed DNA double helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brian A; Parsegian, V Adrian; Shirahata, Akira; Thomas, T J; Rau, Donald C

    2008-06-01

    By combining single-molecule magnetic tweezers and osmotic stress on DNA assemblies, we separate attractive and repulsive components of the total intermolecular interaction between multivalent cation condensed DNA. Based on measurements of several different cations, we identify two invariant properties of multivalent cation-mediated DNA interactions: repulsive forces decay exponentially with a 2.3 +/- 0.1 A characteristic decay length and the attractive component of the free energy is always 2.3 +/- 0.2 times larger than the repulsive component of the free energy at force-balance equilibrium. These empirical constraints are not consistent with current theories that attribute DNA-DNA attractions to a correlated lattice of counterions. The empirical constraints are consistent with theories for Debye-Hückel interactions between helical line charges and with the order-parameter formalism for hydration forces. Each of these theories posits exponentially decaying attractions and, if we assume this form, our measurements indicate a cation-independent, 4.8 +/- 0.5 A characteristic decay length for intermolecular attractions between condensed DNA molecules.

  10. Analysis of the Forming Process of Conical-Like Helical Surfaces with Roller Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Kacalak W.; Budniak Z.; Szafraniec F.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a methodology of an analysis and modeling of technological systems and the grinding process of conical-like helical surfaces with the use of modern CAD/CAE systems and calculations in the Matlab system. The methodology developed allows one to carry out simulation tests for the accuracy of the grinding process of helical surfaces taking into consideration the deviations of the location and shape of the system’s elements, axial and radial striking the spindle of the workpie...

  11. Active trajectory control for a heavy ion beam probe on the compact helical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, A.; Iguchi, H.; Lee, S.; Crowley, T.P.; Hamada, Y.; Hidekuma, S.; Kojima, M.

    1996-05-01

    A 200 keV heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) on the Compact Helical System torsatron/heliotron uses a newly proposed method in order to control complicated beam trajectories in non-axisymmetrical devices. As a result, the HIBP has successfully measured potential profiles of the toroidal helical plasma. The article will describe the results of the potential profile measurements, together with the HIBP hardware system and procedures to realize the method. (author)

  12. Use of Helical Fields to Allow a Long Pulse Reversed Field Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boozer and N. Pomphrey

    2008-11-20

    The maintenance of the magnetic configuration of a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is an unsolved problem. Even a toroidal loop voltage does not suffice to maintain the magnetic configuration in axisymmetry but could if the plasma had helical shaping. The theoretical tools for plasma optimization using helical shaping have advanced, so an RFP could be relatively easily designed for optimal performance with a spatially constant toroidal loop voltage. A demonstration that interesting solutions exist is given.

  13. Creation of helical vortices during magnetization of aligned carbon nanotubes filled with Fe: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Urías, F; Muñoz-Sandoval, E; Reyes-Reyes, M; Romero, A H; Terrones, M; Morán-López, J L

    2005-06-03

    We report a novel magnetic phenomenon consisting of the formation of helical spin configurations during the magnetization of densely packed ferromagnetic nanowires encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes. We studied the hysteresis loops when the magnetic fields are applied parallel and perpendicular to the nanotubes axes. We also performed theoretical calculations on aligned nanowire arrays that clearly indicate the creation of helical spin vortices in the hysteresis loops. The latter are caused by the presence of strong dipolar interactions among neighboring wires.

  14. Modeling of an once through helical coil steam generator of a superheated cycle for sizing analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Sik; Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Eui Kwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A thermal sizing code, named as HSGSA (Helical coil Steam Generator Sizing Analyzer), for a sodium heated helical coil steam generator is developed for KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor) design. The theoretical modeling of the shell and tube sides is described and relevant correlations are presented. For assessment of HSGSA, a reference plant design case is compared to the calculational outputs from HSGSA simulation. 9 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  15. Influence of helical external driven current on nonlinear resistive tearing mode evolution and saturation in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2017-06-01

    The influences of helical driven currents on nonlinear resistive tearing mode evolution and saturation are studied by using a three-dimensional toroidal resistive magnetohydrodynamic code (CLT). We carried out three types of helical driven currents: stationary, time-dependent amplitude, and thickness. It is found that the helical driven current is much more efficient than the Gaussian driven current used in our previous study [S. Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 23(5), 052503 (2016)]. The stationary helical driven current cannot persistently control tearing mode instabilities. For the time-dependent helical driven current with f c d = 0.01 and δ c d < 0.04 , the island size can be reduced to its saturated level that is about one third of the initial island size. However, if the total driven current increases to about 7% of the total plasma current, tearing mode instabilities will rebound again due to the excitation of the triple tearing mode. For the helical driven current with time dependent strength and thickness, the reduction speed of the radial perturbation component of the magnetic field increases with an increase in the driven current and then saturates at a quite low level. The tearing mode is always controlled even for a large driven current.

  16. Laboratory and field study of the performance of helical piles in sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Nabizadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Developing different method in construction of deep footing plays a major role in optimized and economized performing of civil projects especially in problematic soils. One of the common types of deep footing is helical piles which have several advantages such as fast procedure, useful in different soil types, performing without noise and vibration, effective in pressure and tension and etc. In this paper, the performance of 1-helix & 2-helixes and 3-helixes in an un-grouted and grouted with the field and laboratory studies are discussed. Field studies include of helical piles behavior in sand. Laboratory tests with physical FCV modeling is also carried out on the soil of the site. Grouting effect on helical piles resistance is evaluated. Comparison load test results with analytical method were compared. Results show that performance cylindrical in sandy soils in helical piles is not suitable and increasing helical number pile capacity is decreases. Also, after grouting helical pile with three helixes increases more resistant compare to one helix and double helixes.

  17. Engineering and Design of the Steady Inductive Helicity Injected Torus (HIT--SI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, P. E.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Rogers, J. A.; Shumlak, U.

    1999-11-01

    Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) is an inductive helicity injection method that injects helicity at a nearly constant rate, without open field lines, and without removing any helicity or magnetic energy from the plasma.(T.R. Jarboe, Fusion Technology, 36) (1), p. 85, 1999 SIHI directly produces a rotating magnetic field structure, and in the frame of the rotating field the current profile is nearly time independent. The Steady Inductive Helicity Injected Torus (HIT--SI) is a spheromak designed to implement SIHI so that the current profile in the rotating frame is optimized. The geometry of HIT--SI will be presented, including the manufacturing techniques and metallurgical processes planned for construction of the close-fitting flux conserver. The flux conserver is made of aged chromium copper with 80% the conductivity of pure copper. The detailed electrical insulation requirements in the helicity injector design lead to a complex o-ring seal and a plasma-sprayed alumina insulation coating. This has prompted the construction of an o-ring prototype test fixture having the main features of the o-ring design and the alumina coating. The design and evaluation of this fixture will also be presented with vacuum and voltage test results.

  18. Research on the influence of helical strakes on dynamic response of floating wind turbine platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qin-wei; Li, Chun

    2017-04-01

    The stability of platform structure is the paramount guarantee of the safe operation of the offshore floating wind turbine. The NREL 5MW floating wind turbine is established based on the OC3-Hywind Spar Buoy platform with the supplement of helical strakes for the purpose to analyze the impact of helical strakes on the dynamic response of the floating wind turbine Spar platform. The dynamic response of floating wind turbine Spar platform under wind, wave and current loading from the impact of number, height and pitch ratio of the helical strakes is analysed by the radiation and diffraction theory, the finite element method and orthogonal design method. The result reveals that the helical strakes can effectively inhibit the dynamic response of the platform but enlarge the wave exciting force; the best parameter combination is two pieces of helical strakes with the height of 15% D ( D is the diameter of the platform) and the pitch ratio of 5; the height of the helical strake and its pitch ratio have significant influence on pitch response.

  19. An unprecedented 3D POM-Ag architecture with intertwined and homological helical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jing-Quan; Li, Meng-Ting; Sun, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Nan; Yan, Peng-Fei; Li, Guang-Ming

    2013-06-07

    A new hybrid compound, Na[Ag6(pyttz)2(H2O)][PMo12O40] (pyttz = 3-(pyrid-3-yl)-5-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-1,2,4-triazolyl), has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by routine techniques. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the title compound is constructed by the 2D Ag-pyttz coordination polymer and 3D Ag-POM architecture with helix. A fascinating structural feature is the assembling fashion of the right- and left-helical chain, namely, the helical chains with different orientations are intertwined with each other forming intertwined double helical layers along the c-axis, and the identical left- or right-handed helical chains are fused together in a hand-by-hand mode generating another homological helical layer along the a-axis. As a result, these helical layers intersect each other obtaining an unprecedented 3D POM-Ag inorganic architecture. Note that the 3D framework with a helix constructed by POMs and metal ions has never been observed up to date. Additionally, its photocatalytic degradation of RhB was also investigated.

  20. Three-dimensional helical CT for treatment planning of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Hideko; Enomoto, Kohji; Ikeda, Tadashi [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1999-01-01

    The role of three-dimensional (3D) helical CT in the treatment planning of breast cancer was evaluated. Of 36 patients examined, 30 had invasive ductal carcinoma, three had invasive lobular carcinoma, one had DCIS, one had DCIS with minimal invasion, and 1 had Paget`s disease. Patients were examined in the supine position. The whole breast was scanned under about 25 seconds of breath-holding using helical CT (Proceed, Yokogawa Medical Systems, or High-speed Advantage, GE Medical Systems). 3D imaging was obtained with computer assistance (Advantage Windows, GE Medical Systems). Linear and/or spotty enhancement on helical CT was considered to suggest DCIS or intraductal spread in the area surrounding the invasive cancer. Of 36 patients, 24 showed linear and/or spotty enhancement on helical CT, and 22 of those 24 patients had DCIS or intraductal spread. In contrast, 12 of 36 patients were considered to have little or no intraductal spread on helical CT, and eight of the 12 patients had little or no intraductal spread on pathological examination. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy rates for detecting intraductal spread on MRI were 85%, 80%, and 83%, respectively. 3D helical CT was considered useful in detecting intraductal spread and planning surgery, however, a larger study using a precise correlation with pathology is necessary. (author)

  1. Numerical Analysis of Helical Pile–Soil Interaction under Compressive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, A. I.; Maksimov, F. A.

    2017-11-01

    The results of the field tests of full-scale steel helical piles in clay soils intended for prefabricated temporary buildings foundations are presented in this article. The finite element modeling was used for the evaluation of stress distribution of the clay soil around helical piles. An approach of modeling of the screw-pile geometry has been proposed through the Finite Element Analysis. Steel helical piles with a length of 2.0 m, shaft diameter of 0.108 m and a blade diameter of 0.3 m were used in the experiments. The experiments have shown the efficiency of double-bladed helical piles in the clay soils compared to single-bladed piles. It has been experimentally established that the introduction of the second blade into the pile shaft provides an increase of the bearing capacity in clay soil up to 30% compared to a single-bladed helical pile with similar geometrical dimensions. The numerical results are compared with the measurements obtained by a large scale test and the bearing capacity has been estimated. It has been found that the model results fit the field results. For a double-bladed helical pile it was revealed that shear stresses upon pile loading are formed along the lateral surface forming a cylindrical failure surface.

  2. Measurements of the canonical helicity evolution of a gyrating kinked plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Linden, Jens; Sears, Jason; Intrator, Thomas; You, Setthivoine

    2017-10-01

    Conversions between kinetic and magnetic energy occur over a wide range of plasma scales as exhibited in astrophysical and solar dynamos, and reconnection in the solar corona and laboratory experiments. Canonical flux tubes present the distinct advantage of reconciling all plasma regimes - e.g. kinetic, two-fluid, and MHD - with the topological concept of helicity: twists, writhes, and linkages. This poster presents the first visualization and analysis of the 3D dynamics of canonical flux tubes and their relative helicity evolution from experimental measurements. Ion and electron canonical flux tubes are visualized from Mach, triple, and Ḃ probe measurements at over 10,000 spatial locations of a gyrating kinked plasma column. The flux tubes co-gyrate with the peak density and electron temperature in and out of a measurement volume. The electron and ion canonical flux tubes twist with opposite handedness and the ion flux tube writhes around the electron flux tube. The relative cross helicity between the magnetic and ion flow vorticity flux tubes dominates the relative ion canonical helicity and is anticorrelated with the relative magnetic helicity. The 3D nature of the kink and a reverse eddy current affect the helicity evolution. This work is supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0010340 and the DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research Program and prepared in part by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734669.

  3. Coupled Calculations in Helical Steam Generator: Validation on Legacy Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzari, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yuan, Haomin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kraus, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Solberg, Jerome [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ferencz, Robert M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    programs, especially at the design stage. Over the past five years, the Reactor Product Line has developed the integrated multi-physics code suite SHARP. The goal of developing such a tool is to perform multi-physics neutronics, thermal/fluid, and structural mechanics modeling of the components inside the full reactor core or portions of it with a user-specified fidelity. In particular SHARP contains high-fidelity single-physics codes Diablo for structural mechanics and Nek5000 for fluid mechanics calculations. Both codes are state-of-the-art, highly scalable tools that have been extensively validated. These tools form a strong basis on which to build a flow-induced vibration modeling capability. In this report we discuss one-way coupled calculations performed with Nek5000 and Diablo aimed at simulating available FIV experiments in helical steam generators in the turbulent buffeting regime. In this regime one-way coupling is judged sufficient because the pressure loads do not cause substantial displacements. It is also the most common source of vibration in helical steam generators at the low flows expected in integral PWRs. The legacy data is obtained from two datasets developed at Argonne and B&W.

  4. Poster - Thurs Eve-19: IGRT QA for helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W; Evans, M; Ruo, R; Patrocinio, H

    2008-07-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) with daily imaging using mega-voltage computed tomography for 3D image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We present two techniques developed in our department to verify the integrity of the HT IGRT process. A phantom was constructed of two equally sized (5×10×10cm3 ) polystyrene blocks stacked on top of each other, each piece having a hole capable of receiving a small volume ionization chamber. A piece of Radiochromic film fits neatly in between the blocks. The phantom was CT scanned and the CT slices were transferred to the HT treatment planning system (TPS). The first procedure is used daily to test the image registration aspects of the IGRT process, and involves setting the phantom on the tomotherapy treatment unit table in an arbitrary position, imaging it, and performing image registration to determine what displacements are necessary to return the phantom to the planned position. A variation of this test is to place the phantom at a position incurring known displacements and ensuring the registration recognizes the shifts. The second procedure verifies the entire IGRT procedure, and includes the first procedure and the delivery of a treatment plan. An inverse plan is created to deliver simultaneously 2 and 3 Gy to 2 pre-defined targets. The treatment plan can be setup as a QA plan in the TPS software, allowing for a detailed comparison of ion chamber measurements and film dosimetry to the planned dose distribution. We have found that these QA procedures adequately test the IGRT capabilities of our HT unit. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Helical tomotherapy for spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae; Han, Hee Ji; Baek, Jong Geal; Seong, Jin Sil [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    This study evaluated the treatment effectiveness and proper radiation dose of helical tomotherapy (HT) in spine oligometastases from gastrointestinal cancers. From 2006 to 2010, 20 gastrointestinal cancer patients were treated with HT for spine oligometastases (31 spine lesions). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was the tumor evident from magnetic resonance imaging images fused with simulation computed tomography images. Clinical target volume (CTV) encompassed involved vertebral bodies or dorsal elements. We assumed that the planning target volume was equal to the CTV. We assessed local control rate after HT for 31 spine metastases. Pain response was scored by using a numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS, from 0 to 10). Spine metastatic lesions were treated with median dose of 40 Gy (range, 24 to 51 Gy) and median 5 Gy per fraction (range, 2.5 to 8 Gy) to GTV with median 8 fractions (range, 3 to 20 fraction). Median biologically equivalent dose (BED, {alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy) was 52 Gy10 (range, 37.5 to 76.8 Gy10) to GTV. Six month local control rate for spine metastasis was 90.3%. Overall infield failure rate was 15% and outfield failure rate was 75%. Most patients showed pain relief after HT (93.8%). Median local recurrence free survival was 3 months. BED over 57 Gy10 and oligometastases were identified as prognostic factors associated with improved local progression free survival (p = 0.012, p = 0.041). HT was capable of delivering higher BED to metastatic lesions in close proximity of the spinal cord. Spine metastases from gastrointestinal tumors were sensitive to high dose radiation, and BED ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy) higher than 57 Gy10 could improve local control.

  6. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Fahner, Tasha [University of Wisconsin Riverview Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Paliwal, Bhudatt [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  7. Severity assessment of acute pulmonary embolism: evaluation using helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collomb, D.; Paramelle, P.J.; Calaque, O. [Department of Radiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Bosson, J.L. [Department of Statistics and Vascular diseases, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Vanzetto, G. [Department of Cardiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Barnoud, D. [Department of Medical Intensive Care, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Pison, C. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Coulomb, M.; Ferretti, G.

    2003-07-01

    The objective was to evaluate the helical CT (HCT) criteria that could indicate severe pulmonary embolism (PE). In a retrospective study, 81 patients (mean age 62 years) with clinical suspicion of PE explored by HCT were studied. The patients were separated into three different groups according to clinical severity and treatment decisions: group SPE included patients with severe PE based on clinical data who were treated by fibrinolysis or embolectomy (n=20); group NSPE included patients with non-severe PE who received heparin (n=30); and group WPE included patients without PE (n=31). For each patient we calculated a vascular obstruction index based on the site of obstruction and the degree of occlusion in the pulmonary artery. We noted the HCT signs, i.e., cardiac and pulmonary artery dimensions, that could indicate acute cor pulmonale. According to multivariate analysis, factors significantly correlated with the severity of PE were: the vascular obstruction index (group SPE: 54%; group NSPE: 24%; p<0.001); the maximum minor axis of the left ventricle (group SPE: 30.2 mm; group NSPE: 40.4 mm; p<0.001); the diameter of the central pulmonary artery (group SPE: 32.4 mm; group NSPE: 28.3 mm; p<0.001); the maximum minor axis of the right ventricle (group SPE: 47.5 mm; group NSPE: 42.7 mm; p=0.029); the right ventricle/left ventricle minor axis ratio (group SPE: 1.63; group NSPE: 1.09; p<0.0001). Our data suggest that hemodynamic severity of PE can be assessed on HCT scans by measuring four main criteria: the vascular obstruction index; the minimum diameter of the left ventricle; the RV:LV ratio; and the diameter of the central pulmonary artery. (orig.)

  8. Helical crack-front instability in mixed-mode fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Antonio J; Karma, Alain

    2010-03-04

    Planar crack propagation under pure tension loading (mode I) is generally stable. However, it becomes universally unstable with the superposition of a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). Under this mixed-mode (I + III) loading configuration, an initially flat parent crack segments into an array of daughter cracks that rotate towards a direction of maximum tensile stress. This segmentation produces stepped fracture surfaces with characteristic 'lance-shaped' markings observed in a wide range of engineering and geological materials. The origin of this instability remains poorly understood and a theory with which to predict the surface roughness scale is lacking. Here we perform large-scale simulations of mixed-mode I + III brittle fracture using a continuum phase-field method that describes the complete three-dimensional crack-front evolution. The simulations reveal that planar crack propagation is linearly unstable against helical deformations of the crack front, which evolve nonlinearly into a segmented array of finger-shaped daughter cracks. Furthermore, during their evolution, facets gradually coarsen owing to the growth competition of daughter cracks in striking analogy with the coarsening of finger patterns observed in nonequilibrium growth phenomena. We show that the dynamically preferred unstable wavelength is governed by the balance of the destabilizing effect of far-field stresses and the stabilizing effect of cohesive forces on the process zone scale, and we derive a theoretical estimate for this scale using a new propagation law for curved cracks in three dimensions. The rotation angles of coarsened facets are also compared to theoretical predictions and available experimental data.

  9. Transmembrane helical interactions in the CFTR channel pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhuma Das

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR gene affect CFTR protein biogenesis or its function as a chloride channel, resulting in dysregulation of epithelial fluid transport in the lung, pancreas and other organs in cystic fibrosis (CF. Development of pharmaceutical strategies to treat CF requires understanding of the mechanisms underlying channel function. However, incomplete 3D structural information on the unique ABC ion channel, CFTR, hinders elucidation of its functional mechanism and correction of cystic fibrosis causing mutants. Several CFTR homology models have been developed using bacterial ABC transporters as templates but these have low sequence similarity to CFTR and are not ion channels. Here, we refine an earlier model in an outward (OWF and develop an inward (IWF facing model employing an integrated experimental-molecular dynamics simulation (200 ns approach. Our IWF structure agrees well with a recently solved cryo-EM structure of a CFTR IWF state. We utilize cysteine cross-linking to verify positions and orientations of residues within trans-membrane helices (TMHs of the OWF conformation and to reconstruct a physiologically relevant pore structure. Comparison of pore profiles of the two conformations reveal a radius sufficient to permit passage of hydrated Cl- ions in the OWF but not the IWF model. To identify structural determinants that distinguish the two conformations and possible rearrangements of TMHs within them responsible for channel gating, we perform cross-linking by bifunctional reagents of multiple predicted pairs of cysteines in TMH 6 and 12 and 6 and 9. To determine whether the effects of cross-linking on gating observed are the result of switching of the channel from open to close state, we also treat the same residue pairs with monofunctional reagents in separate experiments. Both types of reagents prevent ion currents indicating that pore blockage is primarily responsible.

  10. The architecture of parallel beta-helices and related folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J; Pickersgill, R

    2001-10-01

    Three-dimensional structures have been determined of a large number of proteins characterized by a repetitive fold where each of the repeats (coils) supplies a strand to one or more parallel beta-sheets. Some of these proteins form superfamilies of proteins, which have probably arisen by divergent evolution from a common ancestor. The classical example is the family including four families of pectinases without obviously related primary sequences, the phage P22 tailspike endorhamnosidase, chrondroitinase B and possibly pertactin from Bordetella pertusis. These show extensive stacking of similar residues to give aliphatic, aromatic and polar stacks such as the asparagine ladder. This suggests that coils can be added or removed by duplication or deletion of the DNA corresponding to one or more coils and explains how homologous proteins can have different numbers of coils. This process can also account for the evolution of other families of proteins such as the beta-rolls, the leucine-rich repeat proteins, the hexapeptide repeat family, two separate families of beta-helical antifreeze proteins and the spiral folds. These families need not be related to each other but will share features such as relative untwisted beta-sheets, stacking of similar residues and turns between beta-strands of approximately 90 degrees often stabilized by hydrogen bonding along the direction of the parallel beta-helix.Repetitive folds present special problems in the comparison of structures but offer attractive targets for structure prediction. The stacking of similar residues on a flat parallel beta-sheet may account for the formation of amyloid with beta-strands at right-angles to the fibril axis from many unrelated peptides.

  11. Fully interferometric controllable anomalous refraction efficiency using cross modulation with plasmonic metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaocheng; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Jianxiong; Cheng, Hua; Li, Zhancheng; Liu, Wenwei; Yu, Ping; Xia, Ji; Tian, Jianguo

    2014-12-01

    We present a method of fully interferometric, controllable anomalous refraction efficiency by introducing cross-modulated incident light based on plasmonic metasurfaces. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations indicate that the anomalous and ordinary refracted beams generated from two opposite-helicity incident beams and following the generalized Snell's law will have a superposition for certain incident angles, and the anomalous refraction efficiency can be dynamically controlled by changing the relative phase of the incident sources. As the incident wavelength nears the resonant wavelength of the plasmonic metasurfaces, two equal-amplitude incident beams with opposite helicity can be used to control the anomalous refraction efficiency. Otherwise, two unequal-amplitude incident beams with opposite helicity can be used to fully control the anomalous refraction efficiency. This Letter may offer a further step in the development of controllable anomalous refraction.

  12. Seeded and unseeded helical modes in magnetized, non-imploding cylindrical liner-plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Zhang, P.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    In this research, we generated helical instability modes using unseeded and kink-seeded, non-imploding liner-plasmas at the 1 MA Linear Transformer Driver facility at the University of Michigan in order to determine the effects of externally applied, axial magnetic fields. In order to minimize the coupling of sausage and helical modes to the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the 400 nm-thick aluminum liners were placed directly around straight-cylindrical (unseeded) or threaded-cylindrical (kink-seeded) support structures to prevent implosion. The evolution of the instabilities was imaged using a combination of laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission, collected by a 12-frame fast intensified CCD camera. With no axial magnetic field, the unseeded liners developed an azimuthally correlated m = 0 sausage instability (m is the azimuthal mode number). Applying a small external axial magnetic field of 1.1 T (compared to peak azimuthal field of 30 T) generated a smaller amplitude, helically oriented instability structure that is interpreted as an m = +2 helical mode. The kink-seeded liners showed highly developed helical structures growing at the seeded wavelength of λ = 1.27 mm. It was found that the direction of the axial magnetic field played an important role in determining the overall stabilization effects; modes with helices spiraling in the opposite direction of the global magnetic field showed the strongest stabilization. Finally, the Weis-Zhang analytic theory [Weis et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 032706 (2015)] is used to calculate sausage and helical growth rates for experimental parameters in order to study the effects of axial magnetic fields.

  13. On Asymmetry of Magnetic Helicity in Emerging Active Regions: High-resolution Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lirong; Démoulin, Pascal; Alexander, David; Zhu, Chunming

    2011-01-01

    We employ the DAVE (differential affine velocity estimator) tracking technique on a time series of Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI)/1 minute high spatial resolution line-of-sight magnetograms to measure the photospheric flow velocity for three newly emerging bipolar active regions (ARs). We separately calculate the magnetic helicity injection rate of the leading and following polarities to confirm or refute the magnetic helicity asymmetry, found by Tian & Alexander using MDI/96 minute low spatial resolution magnetograms. Our results demonstrate that the magnetic helicity asymmetry is robust, being present in the three ARs studied, two of which have an observed balance of the magnetic flux. The magnetic helicity injection rate measured is found to depend little on the window size selected, but does depend on the time interval used between the two successive magnetograms being tracked. It is found that the measurement of the magnetic helicity injection rate performs well for a window size between 12 × 10 and 18 × 15 pixels and at a time interval Δt = 10 minutes. Moreover, the short-lived magnetic structures, 10-60 minutes, are found to contribute 30%-50% of the magnetic helicity injection rate. Comparing with the results calculated by MDI/96 minute data, we find that the MDI/96 minute data, in general, can outline the main trend of the magnetic properties, but they significantly underestimate the magnetic flux in strong field regions and are not appropriate for quantitative tracking studies, so provide a poor estimate of the amount of magnetic helicity injected into the corona.

  14. Thermionic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-18

    Modules of assembled microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures manufactured using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices and modules can be fabricated at modest costs.

  15. Comparison of radiation dose and image quality of triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography between conventional helical scanning and a strategy incorporating sequential scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Eric D; Peters, M Robert; Wolff, Steven D; Qureshi, Mehreen A; Atluri, Prashanth; Pearson, Gregory D N; Einstein, Andrew J

    2011-04-01

    Triple-rule-out computed tomographic angiography (TRO CTA), performed to evaluate the coronary arteries, pulmonary arteries, and thoracic aorta, has been associated with high radiation exposure. The use of sequential scanning for coronary computed tomographic angiography reduces the radiation dose. The application of sequential scanning to TRO CTA is much less well defined. We analyzed the radiation dose and image quality from TRO CTA performed at a single outpatient center, comparing the scans from a period during which helical scanning with electrocardiographically controlled tube current modulation was used for all patients (n = 35) and after adoption of a strategy incorporating sequential scanning whenever appropriate (n = 35). Sequential scanning was able to be used for 86% of the cases. The sequential-if-appropriate strategy, compared to the helical-only strategy, was associated with a 61.6% dose decrease (mean dose-length product of 439 mGy × cm vs 1,144 mGy × cm and mean effective dose of 7.5 mSv vs 19.4 mSv, respectively, p strategy (326 mGy × cm vs 1,141 mGy × cm and 5.5 mSv vs 19.4 mSv, respectively, p strategies, a nonstatistically significant trend was seen toward better quality in the sequential protocol than in the helical protocol. In conclusion, approaching TRO CTA with a diagnostic strategy of sequential scanning, as appropriate, can offer a marked reduction in the radiation dose while maintaining the image quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The optical theorem for the conservation of the electromagnetic helicity: Its significance for molecular transfer and enantiomeric discrimination by dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto-Vesperinas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We put forward the physical meaning of the conservation equation for the helicity on scattering of an electromagnetic field with a generally magnetodielectric bi-isotropic dipolar object. This is the optical theorem for the helicity that, as we find, plays a role for this quantity analogous to that of the optical thorem for energy. We discuss its consequences for helicity transfer between molecules and for new detection procedures of circular dichroism based on ellipsometric measurements.

  17. ON SPACELIKE BIHARMONIC SLANT HELICES ACCORDING TO BISHOP FRAME IN THE LORENTZIAN GROUP OF RIGID MOTIONS E(1,1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talat Körpınar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study spacelike biharmonic slant helices according to Bishop frame in the Lorentzian group of rigid motions E(1,1. We characterize the spacelike biharmonic slant helices in terms of their curvatures in the Lorentzian group of rigid motions E(1,1. Finally, we obtain parametric equations of spacelike biharmonic slant helices according to Bishop frame in the Lorentzian group of rigid motions E(1,1.

  18. Helicity-dependent terahertz emission spectroscopy of topological insulator S b2T e3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chien-Ming; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Ping; Chuang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Ming-Yu; Cheng, Cheng-Maw; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Huang, Jung-Chun A.; Pong, Way-Faung; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Luo, Chih-Wei

    2017-11-01

    We report on helicity-dependent terahertz emissions that originate from the helicity-dependent photocurrents in topological insulator S b2T e3 thin films due to ultrafast optical excitation. The polarity of the emitted terahertz radiation is controlled by both the incident angle and the helicity of optical pulses. Using an unprecedented decomposition-recombination procedure in the time domain, the signals of the Dirac fermions are fully separated from bulk contributions. These results provide insights into the optical coupling of topological surface states and open up opportunities for applying helicity-dependent terahertz emission spectroscopy in spintronics.

  19. Structures and related properties of helical, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, Mark D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-11-01

    The three dimensional structure of several peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations. Each peptide formed a predictable, rigid structure, consisting of an α-helix, a "scaffold" region which packed along one face of the helix, and two disulfide bridges which covalently connect the helix and scaffold regions. The peptide Apa-M5 was designed to constrain the M5 peptide from MLCK in a helical geometry using the apamin disulfide scaffold. This scaffold constrains the N- terminal end of the helix with two disulfide bridges and a reverse turn. Like the M5 peptide, Apa-M5 was found to bind calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent 1:1 stoichiometry. However, the dissociation constant of the (Apa-M5)-calmodulin complex, 107 nM, was 100-fold higher than the dissociation constant of the M5-calmodulin complex. This difference was due to a putative steric overlap between the Apa-M5 scaffold and calmodulin. The peptide Apa-Cro was designed to replace the large structural protein matrix of λ Cro with the apamin disulfide scaffold. However, Apa-Cro did not bind the consensus DNA operator half-site of λ Cro, probably due to a steric overlap between the Apa-Cro disulfide framework and the DNA. The amino acid sequence of the scaffold-disulfide bridge arrangement of the peptide Max was derived from the core sequence of scyllatoxin, which contains an α-helix constrained at the C-terminal end by two disulfide bridges and a two-stranded βsheet scaffold. Max was shown to fold with >84% yield to form a predictable, stable structure that is similar to scyllatoxin. The folding and stability properties of Max make this scaffold and disulfide bridge arrangement an ideal candidate for the development of hybrid sequence peptides. The dynamics of a fraying C-terminal end of the helix of the peptide Apa-AlaN was determined by analysis of 15N NMR relaxation properties.

  20. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive

  1. Module descriptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon; Klausen, Bodil; Kjær Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The Module Descriptor including a Teacher’s Guide explains and describes how to work innovatively and co-creatively with wicked problems and young people. The descriptor shows how interested educators and lecturers in Europe can copy the lessons of the Erasmus+ project HIP when teaching their own...

  2. Helical structure of basic proteins from spermatozoa. Comparison with model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaguer, N; Perelló, M; Palau, J; Subirana, J A

    1993-06-15

    We describe structural studies carried out with some basic proteins found in association with DNA in the spermatozoa of molluscs and echinoderms. We have studied proteins related to histone H1 as well as protamines. Structural prediction methods show that these proteins have a strong helical potential and contain several turns, mainly of the SPKK type. No beta structures were found. Strong structural similarities have been detected between distantly related species. The presence of helical regions is confirmed by circular dichroism in trifluoroethanol solution. The influence of the SPKK turns is also evident in the CD spectra. In proteins which contain a high percentage of arginine we conclude that conventional prediction methods should be modified in order to allow for a higher helical potential for this amino acid residue. Synthetic peptides with a sequence present in the C-terminal region of histone H1 have also been studied. It was found that octapeptides may only acquire a small amount of structure, whereas hexadecapeptides are 50-60% helical. These studies strongly suggest that both protamines and proteins related to the C-terminal part of histone H1 interact with DNA mainly in the alpha-helical conformation.

  3. Magnetization directions and geometries of helical microswimmers for linear velocity-frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Henry C.; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Meshkati, Farshad

    2015-04-01

    Recently, there has been much progress in creating microswimmers or microrobots capable of controlled propulsion in fluidic environments. These microswimmers have numerous possible applications in biomedicine, microfabrication, and sensing. One type of effective microrobot consists of rigid magnetic helical microswimmers that are propelled when rotated at a range of frequencies by an external rotating magnetic field. Here we focus on investigating which magnetic dipoles and helical geometries optimally lead to linear velocity-frequency response, which may be desirable for the precise control and positioning of microswimmers. We identify a class of optimal magnetic field moments. We connect our results to the wobbling behavior previously observed and studied in helical microswimmers. In contrast to previous studies, we find that when the full helical geometry is taken into account, wobble-free motion is not possible for magnetic fields rotating in a plane. Our results compare well quantitatively to previously reported experiments, validating the theoretical analysis method. Finally, in the context of our optimal moments, we identify helical geometries for minimization of wobbling and maximization of swimming velocities.

  4. [Development of a computerized three-dimension system for displaying and analyzing mandibular helical axis pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Hao; Feng, Hailan; Zhang, Fengjun

    2014-12-01

    This paper is aimed to develop a computerized three dimensional system for displaying and analyzing mandibular helical axis pathways. Mandibular movements were recorded using a six-degrees-of-freedom ultrasonic jaw movement recording device. The three-dimensional digital models of the midface and the mandible were reconstructed and segmented from CT skull images. The digital models were then transformed to the coordinate system of mandibular motion data by using an optical measuring system. The system was programmed on the base of the Visualization ToolKit and Open Scene Graphics Library. According to the motion data, transformation matrices were calculated to simulate mandibular movements. Meanwhile, mandibular helical axis pathways were calculated and displayed three dimensionally by means of an eigenvalues method. The following parameters of mandibular helical axis were calculated: the rotation around instantaneous helical axis, the translation along it, its spatial orientation, its position and distance relative to any special reference point. These parameters could be exported to describe comprehensively the whole mandiblular movements. It could be concluded that our system would contribute to the study of mandiblular helical axis pathways.

  5. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF CURVATURE AND TORSION EFFECTS ON WATER FLOW FIELD IN HELICAL RECTANGULAR CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. ELBATRAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Helical channels have a wide range of applications in petroleum engineering, nuclear, heat exchanger, chemical, mineral and polymer industries. They are used in the separation processes for fluids of different densities. The centrifugal force, free surface and geometrical effects of the helical channel make the flow pattern more complicated; hence it is very difficult to perform physical experiment to predict channel performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD can be suitable alternative for studying the flow pattern characteristics in helical channels. The different ranges of dimensional parameters, such as curvature and torsion, often cause various flow regimes in the helical channels. In this study, the effects of physical parameters such as curvature, torsion, Reynolds number, Froude number and Dean Number on the characteristics of the turbulent flow in helical rectangular channels have been investigated numerically, using a finite volume RANSE code Fluent of Ansys workbench 10.1 UTM licensed. The physical parameters were reported for range of curvature (δ of 0.16 to 0.51 and torsion (λ of 0.032 to 0.1 .The numerical results of this study showed that the decrease in the channel curvature and the increase in the channel torsion numbers led to the increase of the flow velocity inside the channel and the change in the shape of water free surface at given Dean, Reynolds and Froude numbers.

  6. Numerical simulation of helical-vortex effects in Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Levina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical approach is substantiated for searching for the large-scale alpha-like instability in thermoconvective turbulence. The main idea of the search strategy is the application of a forcing function which can have a physical interpretation. The forcing simulates the influence of small-scale helical turbulence generated in a rotating fluid with internal heat sources and is applied to naturally induced fully developed convective flows. The strategy is tested using the Rayleigh-Bénard convection in an extended horizontal layer of incompressible fluid heated from below. The most important finding is an enlargement of the typical horizontal scale of the forming helical convective structures accompanied by a cells merging, an essential increase in the kinetic energy of flows and intensification of heat transfer. The results of modeling allow explaining how the helical feedback can work providing the non-zero mean helicity generation and the mutual intensification of horizontal and vertical circulation, and demonstrate how the energy of the additional helical source can be effectively converted into the energy of intensive large-scale vortex flow.

  7. Dynamic modeling of double-helical gear with Timoshenko beam theory and experiment verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jincheng Dong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the dynamic study of the double-helical gear transmission, the coupling shaft in the middle of the two helical gears is difficult to be handled accurately. In this article, the coupling shaft is treated as the Timoshenko beam elements and is synthesized with the lumped-mass method of the two helical gear pairs. Then, the numerical integration method is used to solve the amplitude–frequency responses and dynamic factors under diverse operating conditions. A gear vibration test rig of closed power circuit is developed for in-depth experimental measurements and model validation. After comparing the theoretical data with the practical results, the following conclusions are drawn: (1 the dynamic model with the Timoshenko beam element is quite appropriate and reliable in the dynamic analysis of double-helical gear transmission and is of great theoretical value in the accurate dynamic research of the double-helical gear transmission. (2 In both theoretical analysis and experimental measurements, the dynamic factors of gear pair diminish with the increase in the input torque and augment with the increase in the input speed. (3 The deviation ratio of the theoretical data and the experimental results decrease with the increase in the input torque, reaching the minimum at the highest input speed.

  8. Molecular Structure of a Helical ribbon in a Peptide Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Marini, Davide; Kamm, Roger D.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the molecular structure of nanometer scale helical ribbons observed during self-assembly of the peptide KFE8 (amino acid sequence: FKFEFKFE) (NanoLetters (2002, in press)). By analyzing the hydrogen bonding patterns between neighboring peptide backbones, we constructed a number of possible β-sheets. Using all possible combinations of these, we built helical ribbons with dimensions close to those found experimentally and performed molecular dynamics simulations to identify the most stable structure. Solvation effects were implemented by the analytic continuum electrostatics (ACE) model developed by Schaefer and Karplus (J. Phys. Chem. 100, 1578 (1996)). By applying electrostatic double layer theory, we incorporated the effect of pH by scaling the amount of charge on the sidechains. Our results suggest that the helical ribbon is comprised of a double β-sheet where the inner and the outer helices have distinct hydrogen bonding patterns. Our approach has general applicability to the study of helices formed by the self-assembly of β-sheet forming peptides with various amino acid sequences.

  9. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  10. Electrochemical sensor for rutin detection based on Au nanoparticle-loaded helical carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haitang; Li, Bingyue; Cui, Rongjing; Xing, Ruimin; Liu, Shanhu

    2017-10-01

    The key step in the fabrication of highly active electrochemical sensors is seeking multifunctional nanocomposites as electrode modified materials. In this study, the gold nanoparticle-decorated helical carbon nanotube nanocomposites (AuNPs-HCNTs) were fabricated for rutin detection because of its superior sensitivity, the chemical stability of AuNPs, and the superior conductivity and unique 3D-helical structure of helical carbon nanotubes. Results showed the prepared nanocomposites exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity towards rutin due to the synergetic effects of AuNPs and HCNTs. Under the optimized conditions, the developed sensor exhibited a linear response range from 0.1 to 31 μmol/L for rutin with a low detectable limit of 81 nmol/L. The proposed method might offer a possibility for electrochemical analysis of rutin in Chinese medical analysis or serum monitoring owing to its low cost, simplicity, high sensitivity, good stability, and few interferences against common coexisting ions in real samples.

  11. Moderation of neoclassical impurity accumulation in high temperature plasmas of helical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco, J L; Satake, S; Alonso, A; Nunami, M; Yokoyama, M; Sato, M; Dinklage, A; Estrada, T; Fontdecaba, J M; Liniers, M; McCarthy, K J; Medina, F; Van Milligen, B Ph; Ochando, M; Parra, F; Sugama, H; Zhezhera, A

    2016-01-01

    Achieving impurity and helium ash control is a crucial issue in the path towards fusion-grade magnetic confinement devices, and this is particularly the case of helical reactors, whose low-collisionality ion-root operation scenarios usually display a negative radial electric field which is expected to cause inwards impurity pinch. In these work we discuss, based on experimental measurements and standard predictions of neoclassical theory, how plasmas of very low ion collisionality, similar to those observed in the impurity hole of the Large Helical Device, can be an exception to this general rule, and how a negative radial electric field can coexist with an outward impurity flux. This interpretation is supported by comparison with documented discharges available in the International Stellarator-Heliotron Profile Database, and it can be extrapolated to show that achievement of high ion temperature in the core of helical devices is not fundamentally incompatible with low core impurity content.

  12. Beta sheets with a twist: the conformation of helical polyisocyanopeptides determined by using vibrational circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Erik; Liégeois, Vincent; Koepf, Matthieu; Bodis, Pavol; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Brocorens, Patrick; Beljonne, David; Nolte, Roeland J M; Rowan, Alan E; Woutersen, Sander; Champagne, Benoît

    2013-09-23

    Detailed information on the architecture of polyisocyanopeptides based on vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy in combination with DFT calculations is presented. It is demonstrated that the screw sense of the helical polyisocyanides can be determined directly from the C=N-stretch vibrational region of the VCD spectrum. Analysis of the VCD signals associated with the amide I and amide II modes provides detailed information on the peptide side-chain arrangement in the polymer and indicates the presence of a helical β-sheet architecture, in which the dihedral angles are slightly different to those of natural β-sheet helices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Magnetic Skyrmions and Skyrmion Clusters in the Helical Phase of Cu2OSeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jan; Rajeswari, Jayaraman; Huang, Ping; Murooka, Yoshie; Rønnow, Henrik M.; Carbone, Fabrizio; Rosch, Achim

    2017-09-01

    Skyrmions are nanometric spin whirls that can be stabilized in magnets lacking inversion symmetry. The properties of isolated Skyrmions embedded in a ferromagnetic background have been intensively studied. We show that single Skyrmions and clusters of Skyrmions can also form in the helical phase and investigate theoretically their energetics and dynamics. The helical background provides natural one-dimensional channels along which a Skyrmion can move rapidly. In contrast to Skyrmions in ferromagnets, the Skyrmion-Skyrmion interaction has a strong attractive component and thus Skyrmions tend to form clusters with characteristic shapes. These clusters are directly observed in transmission electron microscopy measurements in thin films of Cu2OSeO3 . Topological quantization, high mobility, and the confinement of Skyrmions in channels provided by the helical background may be useful for future spintronics devices.

  14. Photogalvanic probing of helical edge channels in two-dimensional HgTe topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantscher, K.-M.; Kozlov, D. A.; Scherr, M. T.; Gebert, S.; Bärenfänger, J.; Durnev, M. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Kvon, Z. D.; Ziegler, J.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the observation of a circular photogalvanic current excited by terahertz laser radiation in helical edge channels of two-dimensional (2D) HgTe topological insulators (TIs). The direction of the photocurrent reverses by switching the radiation polarization from a right-handed to a left-handed one and, for fixed photon helicity, is opposite for the opposite edges. The photocurrent is detected in a wide range of gate voltages. With decreasing the Fermi level below the conduction band bottom, the current emerges, reaches a maximum, decreases, changes its sign close to the charge neutrality point (CNP), and again rises. Conductance measured over a ≈3 μ m distance at CNP approaches 2 e2/h , the value characteristic for ballistic transport in 2D TIs. The data reveal that the photocurrent is caused by photoionization of helical edge electrons to the conduction band. We discuss the microscopic model of this phenomenon and compare calculations with experimental data.

  15. Note: On-chip multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic Janus helical microswimmers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, G., E-mail: gilgueng.hwang@lpn.cnrs.fr; Decanini, D.; Leroy, L.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS, Route de Nozay, Marcoussis 91460 (France)

    2016-03-15

    Microswimmers integrated into microfluidic devices that are capable of self-illumination through fluorescence could revolutionize many aspects of technology, especially for biological applications. Few illumination and propulsion techniques of helical microswimmers inside microfluidic channels have been demonstrated. This paper presents the fabrication, detachment, and magnetic propulsions of multifunctional fluorescent-magnetic helical microswimmers integrated inside microfluidics. The fabrication process is based on two-photon laser lithography to pattern 3-D nanostructures from fluorescent photoresist coupled with conventional microfabrication techniques for magnetic thin film deposition by shadowing. After direct integration inside a microfluidic device, injected gas bubble allows gentle detachment of the integrated helical microswimmers whose magnetic propulsion can then be directly applied inside the microfluidic channel using external electromagnetic coil setup. With their small scale, fluorescence, excellent resistance to liquid/gas surface tension, and robust propulsion capability inside the microfluidic channel, the microswimmers can be used as high-resolution and large-range mobile micromanipulators inside microfluidic channels.

  16. Synthesis of Norbornene Derived Helical Copolymer by Simple Molecular Marriage Approach to Produce Smart Nanocarrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Shivshankar R.; Sathyan, Ashlin; Shunmugam, Raja

    2017-03-01

    A novel library of norbornene derived helical copolymer has been synthesized through the coupling of two homopolymers via Molecular Marriage Approach. The helicity is governed by the non-covalent interactions like hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking and the influence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic motifs. The detailed characterization of the copolymer (Copoly 1) has been provided and the super structures are confirmed through dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed size of the aggregates was about 200 nm. The density functional theory (DFT) is favorably supported for the formation of proposed structure of Copoly 1. Circular dichroism (CD) measurement has confirmed the one handed helical structure of the copolymer. Reservoir capability of this pH responsive polymer (Copoly 1) to encapsulate anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) warrants its potential applications in the field of bio-medical sciences.

  17. A field theory approach to the evolution of canonical helicity and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, S. [William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A redefinition of the Lagrangian of a multi-particle system in fields reformulates the single-particle, kinetic, and fluid equations governing fluid and plasma dynamics as a single set of generalized Maxwell's equations and Ohm's law for canonical force-fields. The Lagrangian includes new terms representing the coupling between the motion of particle distributions, between distributions and electromagnetic fields, with relativistic contributions. The formulation shows that the concepts of self-organization and canonical helicity transport are applicable across single-particle, kinetic, and fluid regimes, at classical and relativistic scales. The theory gives the basis for comparing canonical helicity change to energy change in general systems. For example, in a fixed, isolated system subject to non-conservative forces, a species' canonical helicity changes less than total energy only if gradients in density or distribution function are shallow.

  18. Magnetic Skyrmions and Skyrmion Clusters in the Helical Phase of Cu_{2}OSeO_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jan; Rajeswari, Jayaraman; Huang, Ping; Murooka, Yoshie; Rønnow, Henrik M; Carbone, Fabrizio; Rosch, Achim

    2017-09-29

    Skyrmions are nanometric spin whirls that can be stabilized in magnets lacking inversion symmetry. The properties of isolated Skyrmions embedded in a ferromagnetic background have been intensively studied. We show that single Skyrmions and clusters of Skyrmions can also form in the helical phase and investigate theoretically their energetics and dynamics. The helical background provides natural one-dimensional channels along which a Skyrmion can move rapidly. In contrast to Skyrmions in ferromagnets, the Skyrmion-Skyrmion interaction has a strong attractive component and thus Skyrmions tend to form clusters with characteristic shapes. These clusters are directly observed in transmission electron microscopy measurements in thin films of Cu_{2}OSeO_{3}. Topological quantization, high mobility, and the confinement of Skyrmions in channels provided by the helical background may be useful for future spintronics devices.

  19. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis, E-mail: pablogm@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and Sede Andina—Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (UNRN), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche (CAB-CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  20. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis; Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  1. Signatures of interaction-induced helical gaps in nanowire quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heedt, S.; Traverso Ziani, N.; Crépin, F.; Prost, W.; Trellenkamp, St.; Schubert, J.; Grützmacher, D.; Trauzettel, B.; Schäpers, Th.

    2017-06-01

    Spin-momentum locking in a semiconductor device with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is thought to be an important prerequisite for the formation of Majorana bound states. Such a helical state is predicted in one-dimensional (1D) nanowires subject to strong Rashba SOC and spin-mixing--its hallmark being a characteristic re-entrant behaviour in the conductance. Here, we report direct experimental observations of the re-entrant conductance feature, which reveals the formation of a helical liquid, in the lowest 1D subband of an InAs nanowire. Surprisingly, the feature is very prominent also in the absence of magnetic fields. This behaviour suggests that exchange interactions have a substantial impact on transport in our device. We attribute the opening of the pseudogap to spin-flipping two-particle backscattering. The all-electric origin of the ideal helical transport could have important implications for topological quantum computing.

  2. In silico modeling of the rheological properties of covalently crosslinked collagen triple helices

    CERN Document Server

    Head, David A; Russell, Stephen J; Wood, David J

    2016-01-01

    Biomimetic hydrogels based on natural polymers are a promising class of biomaterial, mimicking the natural extra-cellular matrix of biological tissues and providing cues for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. With a view to providing an upstream method to guide subsequent experimental design, the aim of this study was to introduce a mathematical model that described the rheological properties of a hydrogel system based on covalently crosslinked collagen triple helices. In light of their organization, such gels exhibit limited collagen bundling that cannot be described by existing fibril network models. The model presented here treats collagen triple helices as discrete semi-flexible polymers, permits full access to metrics for network microstructure, and should provide a comprehensive understanding of the parameter space associated with the development of such multi-functional materials. Triple helical hydrogel networks were experimentally obtained via reaction of type I collagen with both ar...

  3. Comparing Turbulent Transport in Quasi-Helically Symmetric and Quasi-Axisymmetric Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, I. J.; Pueschel, M. J.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Faber, B. J.; Mynick, H. E.

    2017-10-01

    Stellarator optimization of turbulent transport requires designing a magnetic geometry unfavorable to excitation of microinstabilities and turbulence. This work focuses on a comprehensive comparison of two neoclassically optimized configurations, quasi-axisymmetry (NCSX) and quasi-helical symmetry (HSX), using a hierarchy of gyrokinetic models from adiabatic to kinetic electrons to fully electromagnetic physics. Linear simulations of the ion-temperature-gradient-driven mode with gyrokinetic code Gene reveal distinct differences between geometries. There are a significantly greater number of unstable eigenmodes in quasi-helical symmetry, with the long wavelength eigenmodes being more slab-like for quasi-helical symmetry as opposed to toroidal-like for quasi-axisymmetry. Additionally, each configuration has unique finite- β and kinetic ballooning characteristics. Nonlinear simulations show key differences in transport levels and scaling between flux tubes in each geometry. These findings inform the next step: changing magnetic geometry to affect microturbulence. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  4. Helical tomotherapy with dynamic running-start-stop delivery compared to conventional tomotherapy delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Yi, E-mail: yi.rong@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Yu; Lu, Weiguo [21st Century Oncology, Madison, Wisconsin 53719 (United States); Shang, Lu [Guangxi Polytechnic of Construction and Technology, Nanning (China); Zuo, Li [Radiologic Sciences and Respiratory Therapy Division, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chen, Quan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Despite superior target dose uniformity, helical tomotherapy{sup ®} (HT) may involve a trade-off between longitudinal dose conformity and beam-on time (BOT), due to the limitation of only three available jaw sizes with the conventional HT (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 cm). The recently introduced dynamic running-start-stop (RSS) delivery allows smaller jaw opening at the superior and inferior ends of the target when a sharp penumbra is needed. This study compared the dosimetric performance of RSS delivery with the fixed jaw HT delivery. Methods: Twenty patient cases were selected and deidentified prior to treatment planning, including 16 common clinical cases (brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate) and four special cases of whole brain with hippocampus avoidance (WBHA) that require a high degree of dose modulation. HT plans were generated for common clinical cases using the fixed 2.5 cm jaw width (HT2.5) and WBHA cases using 1.0 cm (HT1.0). The jaw widths for RSS were preset with a larger size (RSS5.0 vs HT2.5 and RSS2.5 vs HT1.0). Both delivery techniques were planned based on identical contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared using dose-volume histograms, BOT, and monitor units. Results: The average BOT was reduced from 4.8 min with HT2.5 to 2.5 min with RSS5.0. Target dose homogeneity with RSS5.0 was shown comparable to HT2.5 for common clinical sites. Superior normal tissue sparing was observed in RSS5.0 for optic nerves and optic chiasm in brain and HN cases. RSS5.0 demonstrated improved dose sparing for cord and esophagus in lung cases, as well as penile bulb in prostate cases. The mean body dose was comparable for both techniques. For the WBHA cases, the target homogeneity was significantly degraded in RSS2.5 without distinct dose sparing for hippocampus, compared to HT1.0. Conclusions: Compared to the fixed jaw HT delivery, RSS combined with a larger jaw width provides faster

  5. Peripheral Dose Heterogeneity Due to the Thread Effect in Total Marrow Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yutaka [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Verneris, Michael R. [Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Dusenbery, Kathryn E. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wilke, Christopher T. [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Storme, Guy; Weisdorf, Daniel J. [Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Hui, Susanta K., E-mail: huixx019@umn.edu [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To report potential dose heterogeneity leading to underdosing at different skeletal sites in total marrow irradiation (TMI) with helical tomotherapy due to the thread effect and provide possible solutions to reduce this effect. Methods and Materials: Nine cases were divided into 2 groups based on patient size, defined as maximum left-to-right arm distance (mLRD): small mLRD (≤47 cm) and large mLRD (>47 cm). TMI treatment planning was conducted by varying the pitch and modulation factor while a jaw size (5 cm) was kept fixed. Ripple amplitude, defined as the peak-to-trough dose relative to the average dose due to the thread effect, and the dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters for 9 cases with various mLRD was analyzed in different skeletal regions at off-axis (eg, bones of the arm or femur), at the central axis (eg, vertebrae), and planning target volume (PTV), defined as the entire skeleton plus 1-cm margin. Results: Average ripple amplitude for a pitch of 0.430, known as one of the magic pitches that reduce thread effect, was 9.2% at 20 cm off-axis. No significant differences in DVH parameters of PTV, vertebrae, or femur were observed between small and large mLRD groups for a pitch of ≤0.287. Conversely, in the bones of the arm, average differences in the volume receiving 95% and 107% dose (V95 and V107, respectively) between large and small mLRD groups were 4.2% (P=.016) and 16% (P=.016), respectively. Strong correlations were found between mLRD and ripple amplitude (rs=.965), mLRD and V95 (rs=−.742), and mLRD and V107 (rs=.870) of bones of the arm. Conclusions: Thread effect significantly influences DVH parameters in the bones of the arm for large mLRD patients. By implementing a favorable pitch value and adjusting arm position, peripheral dose heterogeneity could be reduced.

  6. SU-E-T-337: Dosimetric Study of TMI Using Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phurailatpam, R; Swamidas, J; Sastri, J; Josi, K; Mathankar, M; Paul, S; Sawant, M; Moundekar, P [ACTREC, TMC, Mumbai, Maharastra (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimtry of TMI using Helical Tomotherapy (HT). Methods: Whole body CT data sets of 4 patients (median age : range:12–37 years) with 5mm slice thickness were used for planning in HT (TPS version 4.2.3). The contouring of the target and organ at risks (OAR) were delineated ( Oncentra Master Plan v 4.1). Two plans were generated using 5cm and 2.5 cm field widths.The modulation factor and pitch was 3 and 0.3 respectively. Dose to PTV, OARs and the dose homogeneity were evaluated. The doses obtained were compared with the existimg literature. Dose delivery verification was carried out by point dose and 2D array measurements with ion chamber and Arc check dosimetry (Sun NuclearTM) system repectively. The prescribed dose was 14.4 Gy in 8 fractions. Results: The mean PTV volume was 7341.28cc (sd=2353) The dose homogeneity index of PTV was 12.03(sd=2.98) for 2.5cm-FW and 14.61 (sd=1.33) for 5cm-FW.The conformation number for 2.5 and 5 cm plans are 0.6328(sd=0.09) and 0.5915 (sd=0.0376) respectively. The mean dose(Gy) to the OARs were as follows for 2.5cm-FW : eyes, lens, lungs, kidneys, heart, liver,thyroid and testes for are 4.12,1.9,6.61,4.04,4.85,6.06,7.17 and 1.27. The mean dose(Gy) to the OARs were as follows for 5cm-FW :eyes, lens, lungs, kidneys, heart, liver,thyroid and testes for are 4.45,3.14,6.79,4.02,5.01,6.01,10.8 and 1.33. The mean variation of the point dose as compared to the expected dose was within 2% and the gamma analysis was at 91%. Conclusion: It was concluded that 5cm field width plans produces optimal dose volume parameters with deliverable treatment time. From this initial dissymmetric study, it was concluded that the treatment planning and the dose delivery verification was feasible considering the complexity of the TMI.

  7. Helical distribution of hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viliani, Dafne; Pozo, Eduardo; Aguirre, Norma; Cecconi, Alberto; Olivera, María J; Caballero, Paloma; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis J; Alfonso, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Recently a novel pattern of helical distribution of hypertrophy has been described in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Our aim was to determine its prevalence and potential implications in an unselected cohort. One-hundred- and eight consecutive patients diagnosed with HCM by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) were included (median clinical follow up of 1718 days). All clinical and complementary test information was prospectively collected. The presence of a helical pattern was assessed by a simple measurement of the maximal left ventricle (LV) wall thickness (LVWT) for each of the 17 classical LV segments and it was classified in one of three types according to its extension. A helical distribution was detected in 58% of patients, and was associated to a higher incidence of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOT; 35% vs. 10%; p = 0.005) and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM; 30% vs. 13%, p = 0.053). No significant difference in the maximal LVWT was observed. However, the presence of a helical pattern showed a significant association with non sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT; 22% vs. 7%; p = 0.029) and was associated to a higher risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) calculated with the European society of cardiology (ESC) calculator (p = 0.006). Notably, patients with a more extense spiral had a higher incidence of heart failure (75% vs. 34%, p = 0.012) and all-cause death (21 vs. 3%, p = 0.049). A helical pattern is frequent in HCM and can be readily assessed on CMR standard cine sequences. In conclusion, a helical pattern carries negative clinical implications and is associated to a higher estimated risk of SCD.

  8. Global-Scale Consequences of Magnetic-Helicity Injection and Condensation on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Duncan H.; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent paper of Antiochos, a new concept for the injection of magnetic helicity into the solar corona by small-scale convective motions and its condensation onto polarity inversion lines (PILs) has been developed. We investigate this concept through global simulations of the Sun's photospheric and coronal magnetic fields and compare the results with the hemispheric pattern of solar filaments. Assuming that the vorticity of the cells is predominately counter-clockwise/clockwise in the northern/southern hemisphere, the convective motions inject negative/positive helicity into each hemisphere. The simulations show that: (i) On a north-south orientated PIL, both differential rotation and convective motions inject the same sign of helicity which matches that required to reproduce the hemispheric pattern of filaments. (ii) On a high latitude east-west orientated polar crown or sub-polar crown PIL, the vorticity of the cells has to be approximately 2-3 times greater than the local differential rotation gradient in order to overcome the incorrect sign of helicity injection from differential rotation. (iii) In the declining phase of the cycle, as a bipole interacts with the polar field, in some cases helicity condensation can reverse the effect of differential rotation along the East-West lead arm, but not in all cases. The results show that this newly developed concept of magnetic helicity injection and condensation is a viable method to explain the hemispheric pattern of filaments in conjunction with the mechanisms used in Yeates et al. (2008). Future observational studies should focus on determining the vorticity component within convective motions to determine, both its magnitude and latitudinal variation relative to the differential rotation gradient on the Sun.

  9. Spontaneous formation of non-uniform double helices for elastic rods under torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongyuan [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Shumin, E-mail: zhaosm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xia, Minggang [Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); He, Siyu [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yang, Qifan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Yan, Yuming [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Zhao, Hanqiao [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2017-02-19

    The spontaneous formation of double helices for filaments under torsion is common and significant. For example, the research on the supercoiling of DNA is helpful for understanding the replication and transcription of DNA. Similar double helices can appear in carbon nanotube yarns, cables, telephone wires and so forth. We noticed that non-uniform double helices can be produced due to the surface friction induced by the self-contact. Therefore an ideal model was presented to investigate the formation of double helices for elastic rods under torque. A general equilibrium condition which is valid for both the smooth surface and the rough surface situations is derived by using the variational method. By adding further constraints, the smooth and rough surface situations are investigated in detail respectively. Additionally, the model showed that the specific process of how to twist and slack the rod can determine the surface friction and hence influence the configuration of the double helix formed by rods with rough surfaces. Based on this principle, a method of manufacturing double helices with designed configurations was proposed and demonstrated. Finally, experiments were performed to verify the model and the results agreed well with the theory. - Highlights: • An ideal model is conceived to investigate the spontaneous formation of double helices for rods under torsion. • Variational method is used to obtain a universal result for the double helix formation process • Self-contact and surface friction is considered to analyze the non-uniform double helix. • A novel method of producing double helix with arbitrary configuration is proposed and demonstrated. • The experiment results agree well with the theory.

  10. Imaging bowel obstruction: A comparison between fast magnetic resonance imaging and helical computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beall, D.P.; Fortman, B.J.; Lawler, B.C.; Regan, F

    2002-08-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of fast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using the half-Fourier single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) sequence with helical computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing bowel obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective evaluation of 44 patients with clinical evidence of bowel obstruction was conducted using various investigations including HASTE MR and helical CT. MR was performed with a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MR Imaging System and CT was performed with one of two Siemens ARHP CT systems using helical technique. MR acquisition allowed data to be gathered in 6-10 minutes and no contrast media were administered. CT imaging consisted of consecutive helical CT through the abdomen and pelvis with oral and intravenous contrast medium used when indicated. Bowel dilation along with the presence and level of obstruction were determined. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients had bowel obstruction confirmed at laparotomy or by radiographic assessment. Of these, 25 had small bowel obstruction and three had colonic obstructions. The obstruction was due to fibrous adhesions in nine patients, metastases or primary carcinoma in seven, Crohn's disease in four, hernias in two, and inflammation or abscess in two. Other causes of obstruction included lymphoma, intussusception and anastomotic stricture. The cause of obstruction was correctly diagnosed by CT in 71%, and by MR in 95% of cases. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for HASTE MR imaging was 95%, 100% and 96% respectively as compared to 71%, 71% and 71% for helical CT. CONCLUSION: Fast MR imaging using the HASTE sequence is more accurate than helical CT in diagnosing bowel obstruction. Beall, D.P. et al. (2002)

  11. Helical light emission from plasmonic vortices via magnetic tapered tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaferri, N.; Gorodetski, Y.; Garoli, D.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate an architecture where a plasmonic vortex excited in a gold surface propagates on an adiabatically tapered magnetic tip and detaches to the far-field while carrying a well-defined optical angular momentum. We analyze the out-coming light and show that, despite generally high losses of flat magnetic surface, our 3D structure exhibits high energy throughput. Moreover, we show that once a magneto-optical activity is activated inside the magnetic tip a modulation of the total power transmittance is possible.

  12. Numerical simulation of an excited round jet under helical disturbances by three-dimensional discrete vortex method; Helical kakuran ni yoru reiki enkei funryu no uzuho simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izawa, S.; Kiya, M.; Mochizuki, O. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1998-09-25

    The evolution of vortical structure in an impulsively started round jet has been studied numerically by means of a three-dimensional vortex blob method. The viscous diffusion of vorticity is approximated by a core spreading model originally proposed by Leonard (1980). The jet is forced by axisymmetric, helical and multiple disturbances. The multiple disturbances are combinations of two helical disturbances of the same mode rotating in the opposite directions. The multiple disturbances are found to enhance both the generation of small-scale structures and the growth rate of the jet. The small-scale structures have highly organized spatial distributions. The core spreading method is effective in aquiring the core overlapping in regions of high extensional rate of strain. 21 refs., 12 figs.

  13. Analysis of the Forming Process of Conical-Like Helical Surfaces with Roller Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacalak W.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a methodology of an analysis and modeling of technological systems and the grinding process of conical-like helical surfaces with the use of modern CAD/CAE systems and calculations in the Matlab system. The methodology developed allows one to carry out simulation tests for the accuracy of the grinding process of helical surfaces taking into consideration the deviations of the location and shape of the system’s elements, axial and radial striking the spindle of the workpiece machined and the grinding wheel as well as the tool’s geometrical features.

  14. Transport barriers in helical equilibria: structural change in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Piero

    2009-11-01

    Self-organization of RFX plasmas in single helical axis equilibrium, with m=1,n=7 helicity, is a structural change for the reversed field pinch (RFP) [Lorenzini et al., Nature Phys 2009 doi:10.1038/nphys1308]. This happens at high plasma current (I>1 MA) while axisymmetric boundary conditions are enforced: the helical state has almost conserved magnetic flux surfaces, interpreted as ghost surfaces [Hudson&Breslau PRL 2008], leading to strong core electron transport barriers. Electron temperature Te reaches 1.3keV @1.7MA. Ion temperature Ti is ˜(0.5-0.75)Te, consistent with collisional ion heating. The core barrier extends up to ˜0.65r/a. Magnetic surfaces quality improves with Lundquist number S, thanks to the simultaneous decrease of magnetic chaos and increase of the helical field strength. Helical equilibria are reconstructed by the 3d code VMEC. The (1,7) helicity acts to hold the core safety factor almost flat and below 1/7. The barrier foot coincides with a zero magnetic shear region, where density of rational surfaces is minimum, as in other configurations. Plasma-wall interaction is smoother. Main gas particle confinement time improves in pellet-fuelled plasmas, with record value ˜10ms. No core impurity accumulation is evident in Laser Blow Off experiments, which is consistent with numerical simulation results. High current sets a transition also for the edge, where robust Te gradients are observed with a pedestal of ˜1keV in ˜3cm, possibly due to improved magnetic topology and synergic with core barrier. As persistence and quality of these improved helical states increase with current, the likelihood of achieving steady helical multi-MA RFPs can be inferred. RFX experiments allow a study of the beneficial effects of non-axisymmetric shaping and may provide a platform for a more general validation of theoretical tools developed for stellarators. Moreover, these results are transformational in supporting the RFP as a low-external field, non

  15. Damage types of crossed helical gears with wheels from sintered steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miltenović A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintered steel appears to be a very effective material for wheels in crossed helical gears. High demands are set on gears made from sintered steel regarding wear, fretting, tooth fracture and pitting load capacity. This report shows results of iron-based sintered material Fe1.5Cr0.2Mo in case of crossed helical gears concerning wear resistance and other damage types under different speed, torque and lubricants. As material variants, samples with additional treatment, such as pyrohydrolysis, case hardening, shot peening, sinter-hardening, and 2% copper addition are used.

  16. Preliminary Investigation of the Thermal Behavior of High-Speed Helical Gear Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Kilmain, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    A preliminary experimental investigation of the thermal behavior of high-speed helical gears will be presented. A full-scale torque regenerative test stand has been built to test a representative helical gear train as that used in tiltrotor aircraft. Power loss and temperature data from a wide range of operating conditions were measured. Loop power ranged up to 3730 kW (5000 hp). Drive system components representative of flight quality hardware were used in the test program. The results attained in this initial study indicated that windage losses due to the high rotational speeds that were tested were far more important than the losses due to the gear meshing losses.

  17. Operational Influence on Thermal Behavior of High-Speed Helical Gear Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Kilmain, Charles J.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental effort has been conducted on an aerospace-quality helical gear train to investigate the thermal behavior of the gear system as many important operational conditions were varied. Drive system performance measurements were made at varying speeds and loads (to 5,000 hp and 15,000 rpm). Also, an analytical effort was undertaken for comparison to the measured results. The influence of the various loss mechanisms from the analysis for this high speed helical gear train gearbox will be presented and compared to the experimental results.

  18. Helicity in proton–proton elastic scattering and the spin structure of the pomeron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ewerz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss different models for the spin structure of the nonperturbative pomeron: scalar, vector, and rank-2 symmetric tensor. The ratio of single-helicity-flip to helicity-conserving amplitudes in polarised high-energy proton–proton elastic scattering, known as the complex r5 parameter, is calculated for these models. We compare our results to experimental data from the STAR experiment. We show that the spin-0 (scalar pomeron model is clearly excluded by the data, while the vector pomeron is inconsistent with the rules of quantum field theory. The tensor pomeron is found to be perfectly consistent with the STAR data.

  19. Using Algebraic Space Curves to Investigate Magnetic Helicity and Its Application to the Spheromak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. E.; Williams, R. L.

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this research is to study magnetic helicity and the topology of magnetic flux tubes using the homotopy groups of braids, knots, links and tangles. Flux tubes are represented as real algebraic curves in three dimensional space. We are interested in developing a stochastic, dynamic group of curves representing knotted, braided, and tangled flux tubes that evolve around and converge onto a torus. The group will be modeled using a computer algebra system. Using our model, we propose to define helicity, writhe and linking number parameters to analyze their relation to the time for magnetic relaxation and confinement.

  20. Helical structure of longitudinal vortices embedded in turbulent wall-bounded flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Okulov, Valery

    2009-01-01

    Embedded vortices in turbulent wall-bounded flow over a flat plate, generated by a passive rectangular vane-type vortex generator with variable angle \\beta to the incoming flow in a low-Reynolds number flow (Re = 2600 based on the inlet grid mesh size L = 0:039 m and free stream velocity U......_{\\infty} = 1.0 ms^{-1}) have been studied with respect to helical symmetry. The studies were carried out in a low-speed closed-circuit wind tunnel utilizing Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV). The vortices have been shown to possess helical symmetry, allowing the flow to be described in a simple...

  1. Self-Similarity and helical symmetry in vortex generator flow simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Velte, Clara Marika; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2014-01-01

    According to experimental observations, the vortices generated by vortex generators have previously been observed to be self-similar for both the axial (uz) and azimuthal (uӨ) velocity profiles. Further, the measured vortices have been observed to obey the criteria for helical symmetry. This is a......According to experimental observations, the vortices generated by vortex generators have previously been observed to be self-similar for both the axial (uz) and azimuthal (uӨ) velocity profiles. Further, the measured vortices have been observed to obey the criteria for helical symmetry...

  2. Self-similarity and helical symmetry in vortex generator flow simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Velte, Clara Marika; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2012-01-01

    According to experimental observations, the vortices generated by vortex generators have previously been observed to be self-similar for both the axial (uz) and azimuthal (u) velocity profiles. Further, the measured vortices have been observed to obey the criteria for helical symmetry. This is a ......According to experimental observations, the vortices generated by vortex generators have previously been observed to be self-similar for both the axial (uz) and azimuthal (u) velocity profiles. Further, the measured vortices have been observed to obey the criteria for helical symmetry...

  3. Three-dimensional structure of helical and zigzagged nanowires using electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Sung; Hwang, Seon Oh; Myung, Yoon; Park, Jeunghee; Bae, Seung Yong; Ahn, Jae Pyoung

    2008-02-01

    Electron tomography and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the unique three-dimensional structures of helical or zigzagged GaN, ZnGa2O4, and Zn2SnO4 nanowires. The GaN nanowires adopt a helical structure that consists of six equivalent growth directions with the axial [0001] direction. We also confirmed that the ZnGa2O4 nanosprings have four equivalent growth directions with the [001] axial direction. The zigzagged Zn2SnO4 nanowires consisted of linked rhombohedrons having the side edges matched to the direction and the [111] axial direction.

  4. Supramolecular helical nanofibers assembled from a pyridinium-functionalized methyl glycyrrhetate amphiphile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuxia; Hao, Jie; Wu, Jindan; Zhang, Xun; Hu, Jun; Ju, Yong

    2015-08-01

    A glycyrrhetate-containing amphiphile, MGP (1-[2-(methyl glycyrrhetate)-2-oxoethyl]pyridinium bromide), has been synthesized, and found to assemble into supramolecular helical nanofibers in chloroform/aromatic solvents, which are primarily driven by π-π stacking, van der Waals forces, and hydrophobic interactions. During the assembly process, MGP stacked into J-aggregates resulting in the sequestration of the hydrophilic pyridinium cation within the interior with the concomitant projection of its hydrophobic skeleton on the outside surface. Ultimately, this protrusion generated a staggered angle due to the steric hindrance between stacked molecules. This staggered angle further led to molecular misalignments and the formation of helical fibrils, which could twist with each other to fabricate larger helical fibers. Consequently, a gel was formed by intertwining these nanofibers into three-dimensional networks. Using this strategy, we found that other triterpenoid-tailored pyridinium amphiphiles are also potential scaffolds for supramolecular helical structures. This work provides a facile approach for the fabrication of supramolecular macroscopic chiral nanostructures that originate from natural products.A glycyrrhetate-containing amphiphile, MGP (1-[2-(methyl glycyrrhetate)-2-oxoethyl]pyridinium bromide), has been synthesized, and found to assemble into supramolecular helical nanofibers in chloroform/aromatic solvents, which are primarily driven by π-π stacking, van der Waals forces, and hydrophobic interactions. During the assembly process, MGP stacked into J-aggregates resulting in the sequestration of the hydrophilic pyridinium cation within the interior with the concomitant projection of its hydrophobic skeleton on the outside surface. Ultimately, this protrusion generated a staggered angle due to the steric hindrance between stacked molecules. This staggered angle further led to molecular misalignments and the formation of helical fibrils, which could

  5. Bifurcation to 3D helical magnetic equilibrium in an axisymmetric toroidal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, W F; Auriemma, F; Chapman, B E; Ding, W X; Zanca, P; Brower, D L; Innocente, P; Lin, L; Lorenzini, R; Martines, E; Momo, B; Sarff, J S; Terranova, D

    2011-12-16

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established. © 2011 American Physical Society

  6. Rupture of an aneurysm of the coronary sinus of Valsalva: diagnosis by helical CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarine, A.; Lions, C.; Beregi, J.P. [Dept. of Vascular Surgery, Hopital Cardiologique, CHRU de Lille (France); Koussa, M. [Dept. of Vascular Radiology, Hopital Cardiologique, CHRU de Lille (France)

    2001-08-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with a 5-day history of upper chest discomfort. On auscultation, there was a systolic murmur in the left parasternal area that radiated to the apex. Electrocardiography showed flat T waves in the anterior precordial leads. Chest X ray revealed mediastinal enlargement. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a dilated proximal ascending aorta with moderate aortic regurgitation. A contrast-enhanced helical CT scan, performed to eliminate an aortic dissection, showed a ruptured left coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, confirmed at surgery. This case highlights the fact that helical CT, in patients with suspected aortic dissection, may reveal other pathology that accounts for the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  7. Chiral Organic Cages with a Triple-Stranded Helical Structure Derived from Helicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Abaid Ullah; Gan, Fuwei; Shen, Chengshuo; Yu, Na; Wang, Ruibin; Crassous, Jeanne; Shu, Mouhai; Qiu, Huibin

    2018-02-28

    We report the use of helicene with an intrinsic helical molecular structure to prepare covalent organic cages via imine condensation. The organic cages revealed a [3+2]-type architecture containing a triple-stranded helical structure with three helicene units arranged in a propeller-like fashion with the framework integrally twisted. Such structural chirality was retained upon dissolution in organic solvents, as indicated by a strong diastereotopy effect in proton NMR and unique Cotton effects in circular dichroism spectra. Further study on chiral adsorption showed that the chiral organic cages possess considerable enantioselectivity toward a series of aromatic racemates.

  8. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity by a helical current and an axial electron beam current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, M. V.; Bushuev, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    The explicit expressions (in the Vainshtein and Markov forms) are derived for the excitation of a cylindrical cavity with perfectly conducting walls and with impedance end faces. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity and a cylindrical waveguide with a preset nonuniform axial electron-beam current and a helical current with a variable pitch, which is excited by a concentrated voltage source and is loaded by a preset pointlike matched load, is considered. For the helical current, the integro-differential equation is formulated. The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is simulated in the preset beam current approximation taking into account the nonuniform winding of the spiral coil, nonuniform electron beam, and losses.

  9. New helical-shape magnetic pole design for Magnetic Lead Screw enabling structure simplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Xia, Yongming; Wu, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic lead screw (MLS) is a new type of high performance linear actuator that is attractive for many potential applications. The main difficulty of the MLS technology lies in the manufacturing of its complicated helical-shape magnetic poles. Structure simplification is, therefore, quite essent......-shape magnetic poles. The performance of the new structure is compared with a MLS with ideal helical-shape magnetic poles using 3-D finite-element analysis. Halbach and flux concentration designs using the new approach are introduced....

  10. The synthesis, properties and uses of carbon materials with helical morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shaikjee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures have been widely studied due to their unique properties and potential use in various applications. Of interest has been the study of carbonaceous material with helical morphologies, due to their unique chemical, mechanical, electrical and field emission properties. As such it is envisaged that these materials could be excellent candidates for incorporation in numerous nanotechnology applications. However in order to achieve these aspirations, an understanding of the growth mechanisms and synthetic strategies is necessary. Herein we consider historical and current investigations as reported in the literature, and provide a comprehensive outline of growth mechanisms, synthetic strategies and applications related to helical carbon nanomaterials.

  11. Homogenization of granular pipe flow by means of helical inner-wall texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbücheln Felix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogenization of granular flows through narrow pipes is important for a broad range of technological and industrial applications. Here we show, by means of molecular dynamics simulations, that such homogenization can be achieved by adding a helical inner-wall texture to the pipe, without the need for energy input from any external source. By using such a texture, jamming is prevented and the granular flux can be predicted using a modified Beverloo equation that accounts for the wavelength of the helical texture.

  12. Exact results for the Kondo screening cloud of two helical liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posske, Thore; Liu, Chao-Xing; Budich, Jan Carl; Trauzettel, Björn

    2013-01-04

    We analyze the screening of a magnetic quantum dot with spin 1/2 coupled to two helical liquids. Interestingly, we find two qualitatively different sets of Toulouse points, i.e., nontrivial parameters for which we can solve the two channel Kondo model exactly. This enables us to calculate the temperature and voltage dependent Kondo screening cloud, which develops oscillations for an applied spin voltage μ(s). Such a spin voltage can be conveniently applied by a charge bias in a four-terminal helical liquid setup.

  13. Performance of Helical Coil Heat Recovery Exchanger using Nanofluid as Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Bozorgan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are expected to be a promising coolant condidate in chemical processes for heat transfer system size reduction. This paper focuses on reducing the number of turns in a helical coil heat recovery exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity in a biomass heating plant using γ-Al2O3/n-decane nanofluid as coolant. The nanofluid flows through the tubes and the hot n-hexane flows through the shell. The numerical results show that using nanofluid as coolant in a helical coil heat exchanger can reduce the manufacturing cost of the heat exchanger and pumping power by reducing the number of turns of the coil.

  14. Helical Magnetic Fields in AGN Jets Y. J. Chen1,2,∗ , G.-Y. Zhao1,2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We establish a simple model to describe the helical mag- netic fields in AGN jets projected on the sky plane and the line-of-sight. This kind of profile has been detected in the polarimetric VLBI observa- tion of many blazar objects, suggesting the existence of helical magnetic fields in these sources. Key words.

  15. Helical Conformation of Treponema pallidum (Nichols Strain), Treponema paraluis-cuniculi, Treponema denticola, Borrelia turicatae, and Unidentified Oral Spirochetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, Daniel E.; Johnson, Russell C.

    1981-01-01

    Borrelia turicatae (mouse virulent) and Treponema denticola, a small oral treponeme, formed right-handed helices as determined by scanning electron microscopy. Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain), Treponema paraluis-cuniculi, and two unidentified oral spirochetes displayed left-handed helices. Images PMID:7019083

  16. Analysis of concentration response curves to describe and compare tha antimicrobial activity anof model cationic alpha-helical peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rautenbach, M.; Gerstner, G.D.; Vlok, N.M.; Kulenkampff, J.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    To assess and compare different model Leu-Lys-containing cationic α-helical peptides, their antimicrobial activities were tested against Escherichia coli as target organism over a broad peptide concentration range. The natural cationic α-helical peptides magainin 2 and PGLa and the cyclic cationic

  17. The Great Solar Active Region NOAA 12192: Helicity Transport, Filament Formation, and Impact on the Polar Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon; McMaken, Tyler C.

    2017-08-01

    The solar active region (AR), NOAA 12192, appeared in 2014 October as the largest AR in 24 years. Here we examine the counterintuitive nature of two diffusion-driven processes in the region: the role of helicity buildup in the formation of a major filament, and the relationship between the effects of supergranular diffusion and meridional flow on the AR and on the polar field. Quantitatively, calculations of current helicity and magnetic twist from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms indicate that, though AR 12192 emerged with negative helicity, positive helicity from subsequent flux emergence, consistent with the hemispheric sign-preference of helicity, increased over time within large-scale, weak-field regions such as those near the polarity inversion line (PIL). Morphologically, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of filament barbs, sigmoidal patterns, and bases of Fe xii stalks initially exhibited signatures of negative helicity, and the long filament that subsequently formed had a strong positive helicity consistent with the helicity buildup along the PIL. We find from full-disk HMI magnetograms that AR 12192's leading positive flux was initially closer to the equator but, owing either to the region’s magnetic surroundings or to its asymmetric flux density distribution, was transported poleward more quickly on average than its trailing negative flux, contrary to the canonical pattern of bipole flux transport. This behavior caused the AR to have a smaller effect on the polar fields than expected and enabled the formation of the very long neutral line where the filament formed.

  18. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, Jonathan [El Cerrito, CA; Graves, Simon [Berkeley, CA; Lenox, Carl J. S. [Oakland, CA; Culligan, Matthew [Berkeley, CA; Danning, Matt [Oakland, CA

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  19. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2013-08-27

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame, The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  20. Design of a linear detector array unit for high energy x-ray helical computed tomography and linear scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Tae; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gi Yoon [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Geun [Medical Imaging Department, ASTEL Inc., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Shin Woong; Yi, Yun [Dept. of Electronics and Information Eng, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Duk [Research Center, Luvantix ADM Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    A linear detector array unit (LdAu) was proposed and designed for the high energy X-ray 2-d and 3-d imaging systems for industrial non-destructive test. Specially for 3-d imaging, a helical CT with a 15 MeV linear accelerator and a curved detector is proposed. the arc-shape detector can be formed by many LdAus all of which are arranged to face the focal spot when the source-to-detector distance is fixed depending on the application. An LdAu is composed of 10 modules and each module has 48 channels of CdWO{sub 4} (CWO) blocks and Si PIn photodiodes with 0.4 mm pitch. this modular design was made for easy manufacturing and maintenance. through the Monte carlo simulation, the CWO detector thickness of 17 mm was optimally determined. the silicon PIn photodiodes were designed as 48 channel arrays and fabricated with NTD (neutron transmutation doping) wafers of high resistivity and showed excellent leakage current properties below 1 nA at 10 V reverse bias. to minimize the low-voltage breakdown, the edges of the active layer and the guard ring were designed as a curved shape. the data acquisition system was also designed and fabricated as three independent functional boards; a sensor board, a capture board and a communication board to a Pc. this paper describes the design of the detectors (CWO blocks and Si PIn photodiodes) and the 3-board data acquisition system with their simulation results.