WorldWideScience

Sample records for wavelength free-electron lasers

  1. Short wavelength free electron lasers in 1998

    OpenAIRE

    Colson, W.B.

    1999-01-01

    A table is presented that describes the characteristics of 58 short wavelength free electron lasers, operating and proposed, around the world. The author is grateful for support of this work by the Naval Postgraduate School and the Directed Energy Weapons Group, SPAWAR, U.S. Navy.

  2. Nonlinear theory of short-wavelength free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.

    1995-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution of free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers is studied for infrared and shorter wavelengths. The configuration of interest consists in the propagation of an energetic electron beam through a drift tube in the presence of a periodic wiggler magnetic field with planar symmetry. A three-dimensional formulation is derived in which the electromagnetic field is represented as an expansion of Gaussian optical modes. Since the wiggler model is characterized by planar symmetry, the Gauss-Hermite modes are used for this purpose. A set of nonlinear differential equations is derived for the evolution of the amplitude and phase of each mode, and they are solved simultaneously in conjunction with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for an ensemble of electrons in the presence of the magneto-static wiggler, self-electric and self-magnetic fields due to the charge and current distributions of the beam, and the electromagnetic fields. It is important to note that no wiggler average is used in the integration of the electron trajectories. This permits the self-consistent modeling of effects associated with (1) the injection of the beam into the wiggler, (2) emittance growth due to inhomogeneities in the wiggler and radiation fields as well as due to the self-fields, (3) the effect of wiggler imperfections, and (4) betatron oscillations. The optical guiding of the radiation field is implicitly included in the formulation. This approach has important practical advantages in analyzing FELs, since it is necessary only to characterize the beam upon injection into the wiggler, and the subsequent evolution is treated self-consistently. Numerical simulations are performed for two examples corresponding to an infrared FEL at wavelengths near 3.5 μm, and an x-ray FEL operating in the neighborhood of 1.4 Å wavelengths corresponding to the proposed linear coherent light source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results for both cases indicate that

  3. Pulse duration and wavelength stability measurements of a midinfrared free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Yu; Zen, Heishun; Wang, Xiaolong; Kii, Toshiteru; Nakajima, Takashi; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    We report the pulse duration and wavelength stability measurements of a midinfrared free-electron laser (FEL) where the wavelength fluctuation may not be negligible. The technique we employ is a fringe-resolved autocorrelation (FRAC) method that has good sensitivity on not only the pulse duration and the chirp but also the wavelength stability. By the simple manipulation of experimental FRAC signals, we can obtain the pulse duration even if the amounts of the chirp and the wavelength stabilit...

  4. Short-wavelength free-electron laser sources and science: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, E. A.; Clarke, J. A.; Dunning, D. J.; Masciovecchio, C.; Milne, C. J.; Parmigiani, F.; Rugg, D.; Spence, J. C. H.; Thompson, N. R.; Ueda, K.; Vinko, S. M.; Wark, J. S.; Wurth, W.

    2017-11-01

    This review is focused on free-electron lasers (FELs) in the hard to soft x-ray regime. The aim is to provide newcomers to the area with insights into: the basic physics of FELs, the qualities of the radiation they produce, the challenges of transmitting that radiation to end users and the diversity of current scientific applications. Initial consideration is given to FEL theory in order to provide the foundation for discussion of FEL output properties and the technical challenges of short-wavelength FELs. This is followed by an overview of existing x-ray FEL facilities, future facilities and FEL frontiers. To provide a context for information in the above sections, a detailed comparison of the photon pulse characteristics of FEL sources with those of other sources of high brightness x-rays is made. A brief summary of FEL beamline design and photon diagnostics then precedes an overview of FEL scientific applications. Recent highlights are covered in sections on structural biology, atomic and molecular physics, photochemistry, non-linear spectroscopy, shock physics, solid density plasmas. A short industrial perspective is also included to emphasise potential in this area. Dedicated to John M J Madey (1943-2016) and Rodolfo Bonifacio (1940-2016) whose perception, drive and perseverance paved the way for the realisation and development of short-wavelength free-electron lasers.

  5. Pulse duration and wavelength stability measurements of a midinfrared free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yu; Zen, Heishun; Wang, Xiaolong; Kii, Toshiteru; Nakajima, Takashi; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-04-01

    We report the pulse duration and wavelength stability measurements of a midinfrared free-electron laser (FEL) where the wavelength fluctuation may not be negligible. The technique we employ is a fringe-resolved autocorrelation (FRAC) method that has good sensitivity on not only the pulse duration and the chirp but also the wavelength stability. By the simple manipulation of experimental FRAC signals, we can obtain the pulse duration even if the amounts of the chirp and the wavelength stability are not known in advance, which is further used to estimate the wavelength stability. Through this procedure we find that the pulse duration of the Kyoto University FEL at 12 μm is about 0.58 ps without any notable chirp, and the wavelength stability is about 1.3%. We also carry out separate experiments for intensity autocorrelation and sum-frequency mixing. The difference we find for pulse duration and wavelength stability by the different measurements is attributed to the different operation conditions of FEL.

  6. The Effects of Slippage and Diffraction in Long-Wavelength Operation of a Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhulin, V. I.; Haselhoff, E. H.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5-110 mu m. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably longer wavelengths. This would result in the production of

  7. Composite period undulator to improve the wavelength tunability of free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel magnet configuration for permanent magnet undulators is proposed together with the operational procedures to improve the wavelength tunability of free electron lasers (FELs. The magnetization axes of the magnet blocks in the new configuration are inclined at a certain angle to those of the conventional Halbach configuration according to a particular rule. As a result, a composite-period magnetic field is generated, which contains two field components having two different periods, i.e., the fundamental and double periods. Moving the top and bottom magnet arrays toward the opposite directions along the undulator axis, it is possible to eliminate either of the two field components and thus the period is selectable. Simple analysis shows that the operation with the composite field is also useful for FELs despite that the gain length grows slightly due to the effects of the nonsinusoidal field profile. An example of the new undulator scheme applied to expanding the tunability of the SPring-8 x-ray FEL is presented together with discussions on technical issues.

  8. Free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Schmüser, P

    2006-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation of relativistic electrons in undulator magnets and the low-gain Free-Electron Laser (FEL) are discussed in some detail. The highgain FEL based on the principle of Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission is treated on a qualitative level.

  9. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  10. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  11. Frequency-resolved optical gating system with a tellurium crystal for characterizing free-electron lasers in the wavelength range of 10-30 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hokuto; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke J

    2009-12-01

    A second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) system has been developed for the complete characterization of laser pulses in the wavelength range of 10-30 microm. A tellurium crystal is used so that spectrally resolved autocorrelation signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. Pulses (wavelength approximately 22 microm) generated from a free-electron laser are measured by the SHG-FROG system. The SHG intensity profile and the spectrum obtained by FROG measurements are well consistent with those of independent measurements of the pulse length and spectrum. The pulse duration and spectral width determined from the FROG trace are 0.6 ps and 5.2 THz at full width half maximum, respectively.

  12. Second harmonic generation in Te crystal using free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    The second harmonic generation signal converted from the fundamental wavelength of 22 mu m of a free electron laser was observed for the first time using a birefringent Te crystal. The experimental conversion efficiency of Te crystal for second harmonic generation is 0.53%, which is equivalent to the theoretical value within a factor of 2. The Te crystal has been incorporated into an autocorrelator system to measure the micro-pulse width of infrared free electron laser successfully. (author)

  13. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  14. Resonant Laser Incisions: Molecular Targets Using the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Lou; Bryant, Grady; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Laser ablation of tissue for medical incisions is normally concerned with the energy absorption and the subsequent vaporization of intracellular water. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have identified specific non-water resonances within tissues. Then, using the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser (wavelength tunable from 2 to 10 microns) and our Computer Assisted Surgical Techniques program (to standardize the laser delivery), we have targeted specific molecular resonances for laser incisions and tissue removal. Using both acute and chronic studies, we can map out the resonant action spectrum to improve surgical outcomes. We have modeled these ablation mechanisms and working to establish the link between these ablation mechanisms and wound healing. This work has been supported, in part, by a grant from the Department of Defense, Medical Free Electron Laser Program, ONR Grant #N000149411023.

  15. A high brightness electron beam for Free Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oerle, Bartholomeus Mathias; van Oerle, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    In a free electron laser, coherent radiation is generated by letting an electron beam propagate through an alternating magnetic field. The magnetic field is created by a linear array of magnets, which is called an undulator or a wiggler. The wavelength of the laser radiation depends on the amplitude

  16. Theoretical study of free electron laser physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Gwon; Cho, Sung Oh; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Sun Kook; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Byung Heon; Lee, Jong Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    A theoretical study of free electron laser physics is presented in this report. In particular, an analysis is given of the free electron laser with a linearly polarized magnetic wiggler. We describe the basic electron dynamics and gain mechanism in a free electron laser by solving the one-body classical Lorentz force equations in the presence of a periodic magnetic field and a plane electromagnetic wave. Phase space paths for electrons analogously related to those of a simple pendulum are used to describe the laser gain and saturation, and the evolution of the electron beam energy and position distributions. We present an analysis of the single-mode problem and a self-consistent nonlinear treatment of the finite transverse dimensional effects associated with the free electron laser in a steady state. Results computed by applying an external D.C. electric field to the system are discussed for investigating efficiency enhancement of the free electron lasers. Finally optical guiding effect in small signal regime is described to investigate the possibility of amplifying radiation fields in very long wigglers for large gain and high extraction efficiency. 14 refs., 45 figs. (Author)

  17. A Submillimeter Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-30

    radiation fields sinale- etage M design and b) the uv-visible- generated by a single electron have an angar ir region using a two- etage M device...the UCSB M -dill be tested as a two- etage device. The range of wavelength that will be covered with this mode of operation is from the vacuum

  18. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  19. Vanderbilt free electron laser project in biomedical and materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Richard F.; Tolk, N. H.

    1988-06-01

    The Medical Free Electron Laser Program was awarded to develop, construct and operate a free-electron laser facility dedicated to biomedical and materials studies, with particular emphases on: fundamental studies of absorption and localization of electromagnetic energy on and near material surfaces, especially through electronic and other selective, non-statistical processes; non-thermal photon-materials interactions (e.g., electronic bond-breaking or vibrational energy transfer) in physical and biological materials as well as in long-wavelength biopolymer dynamics; development of FEL-based methods to study drug action and to characterize biomolecular properties and metabolic processes in biomembranes; clinical applications in otolaryngology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology and radiology stressing the use of the laser for selective laser-tissue, laser-cellular and laser-molecule interactions in both therapeutic and diagnostic modalities.

  20. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  1. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  2. Chaos in free electron laser oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, C. [Univ Paris 11, LAL, UMR 8607, F-91898 Orsay, (France); Bachelard, R.; Couprie, M.E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Garzella, D. [CEA DSM DRECAM SPAM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Orlandi, G.L. [CR Frascati FIM FISACC, ENEA, I-00044 Frascati, (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The chaotic nature of a storage-ring free electron laser (FEL) is investigated. The derivation of a low embedding dimension for the dynamics allows the low-dimensionality of this complex system to be observed, whereas its unpredictability is demonstrated, in some ranges of parameters, by a positive Lyapounov exponent. The route to chaos is then explored by tuning a single control parameter, and a period-doubling cascade is evidenced, as well as intermittence. (authors)

  3. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiba, R.

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti {rho} is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G({gamma}). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  4. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  5. Free Electron Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Peter; Höche, Daniel

    Functional and smart surfaces and coatings play an increasingly decisive role in the applicability and performance of modern materials. From an industrial point of view, there is a great interest with respect to friction, wear, corrosion, and further properties. Many methods have been developed for the improvement of the respective surface and material properties. Traditionally, these treatments range from simple PVD and CVD processes to complicated plasma and hybrid methods. Recently, it has been established that short laser pulses of high energy can induce a direct laser synthesis of functional coatings if the material's surface is irradiated in a reactive atmosphere. The process is based on a complicated combination of laser plasma - gas - material surface interactions. Tests for steel, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and silicon in nitrogen, methane, and hydrogen atmospheres have been carried out successfully; with these materials, interesting coatings can be produced by direct laser synthesis, for example, AlN and SiC. Various laser types can be used for this purpose: Excimer, Nd:YAG, CO2 Laser, and even the free electron laser (FEL).

  6. Rippled beam free electron Laser Amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1998-04-21

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a T{sub 0n} mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and . A solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  7. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  8. Pulse Duration of Seeded Free-Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Paola; Höppner, Hauke; Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Capotondi, Flavio; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Coreno, Marcello; Cucini, Riccardo; Danailov, Miltcho B.; Demidovich, Alexander; De Ninno, Giovanni; Di Fraia, Michele; Feifel, Raimund; Ferrari, Eugenio; Fröhlich, Lars; Gauthier, David; Golz, Torsten; Grazioli, Cesare; Kai, Yun; Kurdi, Gabor; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Medvedev, Nikita; Nikolov, Ivaylo P.; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Penco, Giuseppe; Plekan, Oksana; Prandolini, Mark J.; Prince, Kevin C.; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Rebernik, Primoz; Riedel, Robert; Roussel, Eleonore; Sigalotti, Paolo; Squibb, Richard; Stojanovic, Nikola; Stranges, Stefano; Svetina, Cristian; Tanikawa, Takanori; Teubner, Ulrich; Tkachenko, Victor; Toleikis, Sven; Zangrando, Marco; Ziaja, Beata; Tavella, Franz; Giannessi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The pulse duration, and, more generally, the temporal intensity profile of free-electron laser (FEL) pulses, is of utmost importance for exploring the new perspectives offered by FELs; it is a nontrivial experimental parameter that needs to be characterized. We measured the pulse shape of an extreme ultraviolet externally seeded FEL operating in high-gain harmonic generation mode. Two different methods based on the cross-correlation of the FEL pulses with an external optical laser were used. The two methods, one capable of single-shot performance, may both be implemented as online diagnostics in FEL facilities. The measurements were carried out at the seeded FEL facility FERMI. The FEL temporal pulse characteristics were measured and studied in a range of FEL wavelengths and machine settings, and they were compared to the predictions of a theoretical model. The measurements allowed a direct observation of the pulse lengthening and splitting at saturation, in agreement with the proposed theory.

  9. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  10. Introduction to free electron lasers (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  11. Introduction to free electron lasers (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  12. Introduction to free electron lasers (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise their applications and current state of development.

  13. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  14. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  15. Quantum regime of free electron lasers starting from noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonifacio, R; Piovella, N; Robb, G. R. M; Schiavi, A

    2006-01-01

    .... In the first part, we neglect the radiation propagation and we formulate a quantum linear theory of the N-particle free-electron laser Hamiltonian model, quantizing both the radiation field and the electron motion...

  16. Anti-Ship Missile Defense and the Free Electron Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herbert, Paul

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve ship self-defense against sea-skimming missiles, several concepts, such as the free electron laser, high-power microwaves, and the Phalanx gun system are reviewed and evaluated in this thesis...

  17. Free electron lasers and other advanced sources of light: Scientific research opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The free electron laser uses a beam of relativistic electrons passing through a periodic, transverse magnetic field to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of these devices are: A resonance condition that involves the energy of the electron beam, the strength of the magnetic field, and the periodicity of the magnet determines the wavelength of the radiation. Because one medium, the electrons, provides the gain in all spectral regions, adjusting either the beam energy or the field strength tunes the wavelength easily and rapidly over a wide range. Waste energy leaves the medium as kinetic energy of the electrons at nearly the speed of light. Moreover, the lasting medium consists only of electrons in a vacuum, and it does not have the material damage or thermal lensing problems associated with ordinary lasers. Therefore, free electron lasers can achieve very high peak powers. The main disadvantages of the free electron laser are its size and cost. Because the free electron laser requires an electron accelerator with its associated shielding, it has not been a device that could be placed in an individual investigator's laboratory and be operated and maintained by graduate students whose primary expertise is in other areas of science. Because free electron lasers are currently used only in central facilities, their use in scientific research involves both the cost of the device, and the cost and inconvenience of maintaining a facility. Unlike synchrotrons, free electron lasers serve one user, or at most a few users, at any one time. The required electron beam energy increases with decreasing wavelength, and the cost and size of the accelerator as well as the cost and size of the magnetic structure increase with decreasing wavelength. In addition to energy requirements, the electron beam must meet other requirements for emittance, energy spread, and peak current that become more stringent at shorter wavelengths. The shortest wavelength reached by existing free

  18. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Moody

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200  MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100  fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  19. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59  μm. Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  20. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Miahnahri, A.; Ratner, D.; Robinson, J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-08-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μ m . Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  1. Investigation of a free electron laser oscillator in the X-ray wavelength regime for the European XFEL; Untersuchungen zu einem Freie-Elektronen-Laser-Oszillator im Roentgen-Wellenlaengenbereich fuer den European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemella, Johann Christian Uwe

    2013-09-15

    In this thesis an X-ray free electron laser oscillator for the European XFEL is described. Such an oscillator consists of at least two Bragg deflecting crystals, in this content two or four Diamond crystals, focussing mirrors and an undulator. The advantage of Diamond is caused by the high reflectivity and the high thermal conductivity, which is necessary for dissipate the absorbed energy out of the center of the crystal. In context of this thesis the principle layout of an XFELO for the European XFEL and the FEL process is presented. Effects on the FEL process due to the disturbances of the electron beam or the XFELO cavity are discussed. As second aspect the thermal evolution in the crystal under absorbed XFELO-pulses is investigated. An experiment for the investigation of the thermal evolution of crystals under simulated XFELO conditions is presented.

  2. Biomedical Studies with the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    Liaw L-H. and &,rns NMW%, Retinal References effects of the frequencý -doubled 15 3- m AG laser Histo- pathological comnparison with argon laser...much mare speaficaiIy locaiznd. (A-fl) X 630- Vol. S.90 No. 5. May 4. 1988 - 4D~~i .i ’’.A. ’A G. ii KieS R6,. -ft ’i 1’a’e- M-.r~.r ~c ji’N ot ýanccr...CHE-4o M-L Biological and biophysical properties of -,hc pntrialocyaninc-s. V. Photodynamic therapy of E.Mt-h mammary tu- tumor localizing component

  3. Storage Ring Technology for Free Electron Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    and 1,,) call be obtained quickly from F(.)) by dividing out the detector response P(W). If 1,(/) is modeled the inverse bunch length can be estimated...If a single harmonic of the comb spectrum of l(.’) is examined the change in the amplitude will be inversely proportional to the bunch-length change...obtained while operating the SRFEL as an amplier to an externa ’ laser [8,)]. All of the measurements presented here were obtained with svnchronous

  4. Short Rayleigh Range Free Electron Laser Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, L H; Murphy, J B; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Wang, X J; Watanabe, T

    2005-01-01

    An important requirement for a high average power laser system is a manageable power density on the first optical element. One possibility to achieve this is a single pass amplifier which generates a short Rayleigh range (SRL) light beam. We present design parameters and calculated performances for several SRL configurations. These include a simulation of the optically guided (pinched) MW class FEL [1], the scalloped beam FEL amplifier [2] and high gain TOK amplifiers we propose to explore at our SDL facility.

  5. Continuous point-like high-temperature laser discharge produced by terahertz free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kubarev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A continuous point-like laser discharge of record high temperature has been produced in argon at atmospheric pressure with focusing of the radiation of the Novosibirsk terahertz free electron laser (NovoFEL. According to spectral measurements, the temperature in the center of the millimeter-sized plasma sphere was 28000 K at a plasma density of 1.5×1017 cm-3 and an average NovoFEL power of 200 W at a wavelength of 130 μm (2.3 THz.

  6. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  7. Extreme-Ultraviolet Vortices from a Free-Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rebernik Ribič

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extreme-ultraviolet vortices may be exploited to steer the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, increase the resolution in microscopy, and gain insight into local symmetry and chirality of a material; they might even be used to increase the bandwidth in long-distance space communications. However, in contrast to the generation of vortex beams in the infrared and visible spectral regions, production of intense, extreme-ultraviolet and x-ray optical vortices still remains a challenge. Here, we present an in-situ and an ex-situ technique for generating intense, femtosecond, coherent optical vortices at a free-electron laser in the extreme ultraviolet. The first method takes advantage of nonlinear harmonic generation in a helical undulator, producing vortex beams at the second harmonic without the need for additional optical elements, while the latter one relies on the use of a spiral zone plate to generate a focused, micron-size optical vortex with a peak intensity approaching 10^{14}  W/cm^{2}, paving the way to nonlinear optical experiments with vortex beams at short wavelengths.

  8. Extreme-Ultraviolet Vortices from a Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebernik Ribič, Primož; Rösner, Benedikt; Gauthier, David; Allaria, Enrico; Döring, Florian; Foglia, Laura; Giannessi, Luca; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Mirian, Najmeh; Principi, Emiliano; Roussel, Eléonore; Simoncig, Alberto; Spampinati, Simone; David, Christian; De Ninno, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet vortices may be exploited to steer the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, increase the resolution in microscopy, and gain insight into local symmetry and chirality of a material; they might even be used to increase the bandwidth in long-distance space communications. However, in contrast to the generation of vortex beams in the infrared and visible spectral regions, production of intense, extreme-ultraviolet and x-ray optical vortices still remains a challenge. Here, we present an in-situ and an ex-situ technique for generating intense, femtosecond, coherent optical vortices at a free-electron laser in the extreme ultraviolet. The first method takes advantage of nonlinear harmonic generation in a helical undulator, producing vortex beams at the second harmonic without the need for additional optical elements, while the latter one relies on the use of a spiral zone plate to generate a focused, micron-size optical vortex with a peak intensity approaching 1014 W /cm2 , paving the way to nonlinear optical experiments with vortex beams at short wavelengths.

  9. Development of a high power free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sun Kook; Jung, Yung Wook; Cho, Sung Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator has been developed. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable in the range of 3 - 12 mm by tuning the energy of the electron beam. The output power is estimated to be 1 kW. The electrostatic accelerator is composed of high-current electron gun, acceleration tube, high-voltage generator, high-voltage terminal, deceleration tube, electron collator, and vacuum pumps. Two types of LaB{sub 6}-based thermionic electron guns (triode gun and diode gun) and their power supplies have been developed. The voltage of the guns is 30 kV and the output current is - 2 A. A beam-focusing planar undulator and a permanent-magnet helical undulator have been developed and 3D trajectories of electron beam in the undulators have been calculated to find optimal input condition of electron beam. 135 figs, 15 pix, 17 tabs, 98 refs. (Author).

  10. Nonlinear Optics with a Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliel, E. R.; van der Ham, E. W. M.; Vrehen, Q. H. F.; Barmentlo, M.; Thooft, G. W.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    We report on an experiment on spectroscopic infrared-visible Sum-Frequency Generation (SFG) with a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) as the IR-source. The SFG spectrum of gallium phosphide has been investigated in detail in an experiment covering the unsurpassed spectral range from 20 to 32 mum. This

  11. Mechanisms for the production of harmonics in free electron lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgin, J.N.; Penman, C.

    1991-01-01

    Harmonics in the radiation of a free electron laser are useful for extending the range of tuning, may originate in spontaneous or parametric processes, and can take part in stimulated emission or amplification. These mechanisms exhibit interesting analogies with those of nonlinear optics. Apart from

  12. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  13. A microtron accelerator for a free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botman, J.I.M.; Delhez, J.L.; Webers, G.A.; Hagedoorn, H.L.; Kleeven, W.J.G.M.; Timmermans, J.C.M.; Ernst, G.J.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Witteman, W.J.; Haselhoff, E.H.; Haselhoff, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    A racetrack microtron as a source for a free electron laser is being constructed. It will accelerate electrons up to 25 MeV to provide 10 ¿m radiation in a hybrid undulator with a periodicity distance of 25 mm. The aim is to accelerate 100 A bunches of 30 ps pulse length at 81.25 MHz. This frequency

  14. Laguerre-Gaussian Modes in the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    www.fel.duke.edu, 20 March 2007. [6] W.B. Colson, C. Pellegrini and A. Renieri, Free Electron Laser Handbook, Volume 6, Chapter 5, North-Holland...California 6. Professor Peter Crooker Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 7. Chairman, Physics Department Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 8. Air Attache Embassy of Greece Washington, DC

  15. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  16. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  17. A Compact Beam Source for Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingchang; Xu, Zhizhan; Yu, Jinhui; Lee, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jongmin

    2000-10-01

    A compact beam source produced by pseudospark discharge for free electron lasers is developed. An impedance match between a Marx generator and a pseudospark discharge chamber is analyzed, the impedance characteristic curve for the pseudospark discharge chamber is measured for the first time. The configuration of the new device is described, it has a length of one meter; the original pulse line accelerator has total length of 6 meters. A voltage of 300 kV, a current of 4 kA for the compact device is measured. The electron beam has a diameter of 1.5 mm and has self-pinch effect. The beam has a brightness of 10^12 A/(m rad)^2, as same as a brightness from photo-cathode. The compact beam source can be used for free electron lasers and high power switch.

  18. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  19. Quantum/classical mode evolution in free electron laser oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, P.; Colson, W. B.; Freedman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of oscillator evolution and mode competition in free electron lasers is studied. Relativistic quantum field theory is used to calculate electron wave functions, the angular distribution of spontaneous emission, and the transition rates for stimulated emission and absorption in each mode. The photon rate equation for the weakfield regime is presented. This rate equation is applied to oscillator evolution with a conventional undulator, a two-stage optical klystron, and a tapered undulator. The effects of noise are briefly discussed.

  20. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  1. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  2. Exponential gain and saturation of a self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, S V; Gluskin, E; Arnold, N D; Benson, C; Berg, W; Biedron, S G; Borland, M; Chae, Y C; Dejus, R J; Den Hartog, P K; Deriy, B; Erdmann, M; Eidelman, Y I; Hahne, M W; Huang, Z; Kim, K J; Lewellen, J W; Li, Y; Lumpkin, A H; Makarov, O; Moog, E R; Nassiri, A; Sajaev, V; Soliday, R; Tieman, B J; Trakhtenberg, E M; Travish, G; Vasserman, I B; Vinokurov, N A; Wang, X J; Wiemerslage, G; Yang, B X

    2001-06-15

    Self-amplified spontaneous emission in a free-electron laser has been proposed for the generation of very high brightness coherent x-rays. This process involves passing a high-energy, high-charge, short-pulse, low-energy-spread, and low-emittance electron beam through the periodic magnetic field of a long series of high-quality undulator magnets. The radiation produced grows exponentially in intensity until it reaches a saturation point. We report on the demonstration of self-amplified spontaneous emission gain, exponential growth, and saturation at visible (530 nanometers) and ultraviolet (385 nanometers) wavelengths. Good agreement between theory and simulation indicates that scaling to much shorter wavelengths may be possible. These results confirm the physics behind the self-amplified spontaneous emission process and forward the development of an operational x-ray free-electron laser.

  3. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Eduardo Alcides; Endler, Antônio; Rizzato, Felipe Barbedo

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12 3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compre...

  4. Control Chaotic Diffusion in a Single Pass Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniazzi, A

    2005-01-01

    We apply an innovative strategy to control chaotic diffusion in conservative systems to the case of a single pass Free Electron Laser. The core of our approach is a small apt modification of the system which channels chaos by building barriers to diffusion. By confining the electrons in phase space and limiting the oscillations of the dense core, we aim at stabilizing the laser intensity. Calculations are perfomed within the framework of a simplified Hamiltonian picture. Further extensions and future experimental applications are also discussed.

  5. Longitudinal coherence measurements of an extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlotter, W F; Sorgenfrei, F; Beeck, T; Beye, M; Gieschen, S; Meyer, H; Nagasono, M; Föhlisch, A; Wurth, W

    2010-02-01

    We have measured the average single-pulse longitudinal coherence characteristics of FLASH, a self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser, at extreme UV wavelengths. Electric field autocorrelation measurements in the time domain were enabled by a wavefront division beam splitter applied to a tunable delay Mach-Zehnder interferometer. These data agree with the spectral bandwidth measurements made in the frequency domain. They exhibit two correlation time scales and the measured coherence curves have relevant implications for single-shot measurements.

  6. Three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation of free-electron lasers with planar, helical, and elliptical undulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, H.P.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Grimminck, D.L.A.G.; Setija, I.D.; Falgari, P.

    2017-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have been built ranging in wavelength from long-wavelength oscillators using partial wave guiding through ultraviolet through hard x-ray that are either seeded or start from noise. In addition, FELs that produce different polarizations of the output radiation ranging from

  7. Free Electron Lasers with Slowly Varying Beam and Undulator Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Zhirong

    2005-01-01

    The performance of a free electron lasers (FEL) is affected when the electron beam energy varies alone the undulator as would be caused by vacuum pipe wakefields and/or when the undulator strength parameter is tapered in the small signal regime until FEL saturation. In this paper, we present a self-consistent theory of FELs with slowly-varying beam and undulator parameters. A general method is developed to apply the WKB approximation to the beam-radiation system by employing the adjoint eigenvector that is orthogonal to the eigenfunctions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations. This method may be useful for other slowly varying processes in beam dynamics.

  8. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Andrew [Yorktown, VA

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  9. Review of x-ray free-electron laser theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhirong Huang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs are being developed as extremely bright sources for a next-generation x-ray facility. In this paper, we review the basic theory of the start-up, the exponential growth, and the saturation of the high-gain process, emphasizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission. The radiation characteristics of an x-ray FEL, including its transverse coherence, temporal characteristics, and harmonic content, are discussed. FEL performance in the presence of machine errors and undulator wakefields is examined. Various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are summarized.

  10. Demonstration of Single-Crystal Self-Seeded Two-Color X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutman, A. A.; Decker, F. -J; Arthur, J.; Chollet, M.; Feng, Y.; Hastings, J.; Huang, Z.; Lemke, H.; Nuhn, H. -D.; Marinelli, A.; Turner, J. L.; Wakatsuki, S.; Welch, J.; Zhu, D.

    2014-12-18

    A scheme for generating two simultaneous hard-x-ray free-electron laser pulses with a controllable difference in photon energy is described and then demonstrated using the self-seeding setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The scheme takes advantage of the existing LCLS equipment, which allows two independent rotations of the self-seeding diamond crystal. The two degrees of freedom are used to select two nearby crystal reflections, causing two wavelengths to be present in the forward transmitted seeding x-ray pulse. The free-electron laser system must support amplification at both desired wavelengths.

  11. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  12. Quantum regime of free electron lasers starting from noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bonifacio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the quantum regime of a high-gain free-electron laser starting from noise. In the first part, we neglect the radiation propagation and we formulate a quantum linear theory of the N-particle free-electron laser Hamiltonian model, quantizing both the radiation field and the electron motion. Quantum effects such as frequency shift, line narrowing, quantum limitation for bunching and energy spread, and minimum uncertainty states are described. Using a second-quantization formalism, we demonstrate quantum entanglement between the recoiling electrons and the radiation field. In the second part, we describe the field classically but we include propagation effects (i.e. slippage and we demonstrate the novel regime of quantum SASE with high temporal coherence and discrete spectrum. Furthermore, we describe “quantum purification” of SASE: the classical chaotic spiking behavior disappears and the spectrum becomes a series of discrete very narrow lines which correspond to transitions between discrete momentum eigenstates (which originate high temporal coherence.

  13. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  14. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  15. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated approximately 125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography as a viable manufacturing technology. However, beyond the 7 nm technology node existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multi-patterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes. Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should free-electron lasers become the preferred next generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE), (2) regenerative amplification (RAFEL), or (3) self-seeding (SS-FEL). Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provide a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUV lithography applications.

  16. Infrared free electron laser enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, Kunio; Uchizono, Takeyuki; Suzuki, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Kazushi

    2005-08-01

    It is necessary to control enhancement of transdermal drug delivery with non-invasive. The present study was investigated to assess the effectivity of enhancing the drug delivery by irradiating 6-μm region mid infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL). The enhancement of transdermal drug (lidocaine) delivery of the samples (hairless mouse skin) irradiated with lasers was examined for flux (μg/cm2/h) and total penetration amount (μg/cm2) of lidocaine by High performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The flux and total amount penatration date was enhanced 200-300 fold faster than the control date by the laser irradiation. FEL irradiating had the stratum corneum, and had the less thermal damage in epidermis. The effect of 6-μm region MIR-FEL has the enhancement of transdermal drug delivery without removing the stratum corneum because it has the less thermal damage. It leads to enhancement drug delivery system with non-invasive laser treatment.

  17. Modal analysis of a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Ackermann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the direct seeding can enhance the performance of a free-electron laser (FEL in terms of its spectral, temporal, and coherence properties and reduces fluctuations in FEL output energy and arrival-time jitter. The properties of the used seed photon pulse are of high importance. In this paper, we describe the influence of the M^{2} onto the achievable power contrast between the direct seeded and the unseeded FEL radiation. The results of these studies are compared with the data from the high harmonic generation direct seeding experiment “sFLASH” in Hamburg, Germany. A method to measure M^{2} from a single transverse intensity distribution of the high harmonics beam at waist is discussed.

  18. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkal, Yashvir, E-mail: yashvirkalkal@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Kumar, Vinit [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  19. Intense Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser-Pulses with a Length of 6 Optical Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; R F X A M Mols,; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    Second-order optical autocorrelation measurements are reported for a far-infrared free-electron laser. Second-harmonic generation in an 840-mu m-long CdTe crystal is used to provide the nonlinear autocorrelation signal. At wavelengths of 10.4 and 24.5 mu m, FWHM pulse durations of 220 and 500 fs,

  20. A Cerenkov free electron laser with high peak power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Couperus, J.; Witteman, W.J.; Lebedev, A.N.; Krastelev, E.G.; Agafonov, A.V.; Voronin, V.S.; Krasnopolsky, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    A Cherenkov FEL can be a suitable source for radiation from the millimeter wavelength region down to the far infrared. With only a few different dielectric materials the laser can range from 6 mm down to ¿ 600 ¿m. Nonlinear theory shows, for an amplifier configuration, power levels of about 100 kW

  1. Intense ultrashort pulse generation using the JAERI far-infrared free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, R; Nishimori, N; Kikuzawa, N; Sawamura, M; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    An intense ultrashort optical pulse has been quasi-continuously generated using a superconducting RF linac-based free-electron laser at a wavelength of 22.5 mu m. The pulse shape and width are measured by second-order optical autocorrelation with a birefringent Te crystal. At synchronism of the optical resonator, the pulse shape is a smooth single pulse with an FWHM width of 255 fs and energy of 74 mu J. A train of subpulses is developed by increasing the desynchronism of the optical resonator. The measured results are in good agreement with numerical simulation.

  2. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  3. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  4. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  5. Gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Andrews

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. The theory describes the electron beam as a moving plasma dielectric, and assumes that the electron beam interacts with an evanescent mode traveling along the surface of a periodic waveguide with a rectangular profile. The phase velocity of the evanescent wave is synchronous with the electron velocity, but the group velocity is actually negative. The electron beam amplifies the evanescent wave, which does not itself radiate. According to this picture, the radiation observed emanating from the grating is Smith-Purcell radiation enhanced by the bunching of the electrons due to the interaction with the evanescent mode. There will also be radiation from the part of the evanescent mode that is outcoupled from the ends of the grating. This radiation appears at a lower frequency than the Smith-Purcell radiation. The new results explain both the gain and the radiation observed in the experiments of Urata and Walsh, and the cube-root current dependence of the gain inferred by Bakhtyari, Walsh, and Brownell.

  6. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  7. LIPSS Free-Electron Laser Searches for Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanaciev, Andrei; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James R; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Robinson, Taylor; Shinn, Michelle D

    2011-09-01

    A variety of Dark Matter particle candidates have been hypothesized by physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) in the very light (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -3} eV) range. In the past decade several international groups have conducted laboratory experiments designed to either produce such particles or extend the boundaries in parameter space. The LIght Pseudo-scalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) Collaboration, using the 'Light Shining through a Wall' (LSW) technique, passes the high average power photon beam from Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser through a magnetic field upstream from a mirror and optical beam dump. Light Neutral Bosons (LNBs), generated by coupling of photons with the magnetic field, pass through the mirror ('the Wall') into an identical magnetic field where they revert to detectable photons by the same coupling process. While no evidence of LNBs was evident, new scalar coupling boundaries were established. New constraints were also determined for hypothetical para-photons and for millicharged fermions. We will describe our experimental setup and results for LNBs, para-photons, and milli-charged fermions. Plans for chameleon particle searches are underway.

  8. Free Electron Laser Pulse Control by Acousto Optic Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Kanai, T; Yoshihashi-Suzuki, S

    2005-01-01

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Osaka University can be continuously varied in the range of 5.0-20.0 μm. A FEL has a double pulse structure. The structure consists of a train of macropulses of the pulse width 15 μs, and each macropulse contains a train of 330 micropulses of the pulse width 5 ps. The tunability and short pulse afford new medical applications such as investigation of protein dynamics and ablation of soft tissues. Precise control of micropulse train is very important for medical applications using FEL because macropulse with long pulse duration sometimes leads to undesirable thermal effects. FEL pulse control system using an acousto optic modulators (AOM) was developed in order to investigate of non-thermal effect between the FEL and tissue. This system provide a very good efficiency (~60 %) and a fast switching speed (>200 ns). A phosphorylated protein was irradiated with FEL that controlled the pulse. These result confirmed that the thermal effect is controlled by pulse durat...

  9. X-ray free electron laser: opportunities for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert K Y; Abela, Rafael; Hennig, Michael

    2017-11-08

    Past decades have shown the impact of structural information derived from complexes of drug candidates with their protein targets to facilitate the discovery of safe and effective medicines. Despite recent developments in single particle cryo-electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography has been the main method to derive structural information. The unique properties of X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) with unmet peak brilliance and beam focus allow X-ray diffraction data recording and successful structure determination from smaller and weaker diffracting crystals shortening timelines in crystal optimization. To further capitalize on the XFEL advantage, innovations in crystal sample delivery for the X-ray experiment, data collection and processing methods are required. This development was a key contributor to serial crystallography allowing structure determination at room temperature yielding physiologically more relevant structures. Adding the time resolution provided by the femtosecond X-ray pulse will enable monitoring and capturing of dynamic processes of ligand binding and associated conformational changes with great impact to the design of candidate drug compounds. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. Visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier free electron laser undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Carr

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier (VISA free electron laser (FEL is an experimental device designed to show self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE to saturation in the near infrared to visible light energy range. It generates a resonant wavelength output from 800–600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is designed to show how SASE FEL theory corresponds with experiment in this wavelength range, using an electron beam with emittance close to that planned for the future Linear Coherent Light Source at SLAC. VISA comprises a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator with four 99 cm segments, each of 55 periods, 18 mm long. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70–85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walk-off, or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, we were able to control trajectory walk-off to less than ±50 μm per field gain length.

  11. Microbunching-instability-induced sidebands in a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the multishot-averaged, soft x-ray, self-seeding spectrum at the LCLS free-electron laser often have a pedestal-like distribution around the seeded wavelength, which limits the spectral purity and can negatively affect some user applications not employing a post-undulator monochromator. In this paper, we study the origins of such pedestals, focusing on longitudinal phase space modulations produced by the microbunching instability upstream of the free-electron laser (FEL undulator. We show from theory and numerical simulation that both energy and density modulations can induce sidebands in a high-gain, seeded FEL whose fractional strength typically grows as the square of the undulator length. The results place a tight constraint on the longitudinal phase space uniformity of the electron beam for a seeded FEL, possibly requiring the amplitude of long-wavelength modulations to be much smaller than the typical incoherent energy spread if the output sideband power is to remain only a couple percent or less of the amplified seed power.

  12. A Low-Energy-Spread Rf Accelerator for a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Gillespie, W. A.; Saxon, G.; Poole, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    A high electron current and a small energy spread are essential for the operation of a free electron laser (FEL). In this paper we discuss the design and performance of the accelerator for FELIX, the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The system consists of a thermionic gun, a prebuncher,

  13. Extension of the Free-Electron Laser-Amplifier Code Tda to Resonator Configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faatz, B.; Best, R. W. B.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Tran, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of many interesting, complex phenomena in a free-electron laser (FEL) requires the use of numerical computer codes. In this paper we describe the extension of one such code (TDA), which in its original form could only be used to study free-electron laser amplifiers, to include

  14. Frequency mixing in accelerator based sources and application to tunable seeded free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Evain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we address the problem of tunability of seeded free-electron lasers (FELs, working typically in the domain of the vacuum ultraviolet. The seeding of FELs with an external laser permits us to obtain FEL pulses with both good longitudinal coherence and good stability properties (contrary to an amplification starting from noise. However, with a fixed external laser wavelength, only amplification at harmonics of this wavelength is possible. If full tunability is wanted, it is necessary to have a tunable external source; but this type of source has much less power, hence it is much harder to reach high harmonics numbers. Here we propose the so-called frequency mixing scheme (from its analogy with the similar process in nonlinear optics, based on two laser/electron interactions. Numerical and analytic studies show that it permits to increase significantly the tunability at short wavelengths using a low-energy tunable source. Numerical simulations are made with the parameters of FERMI-FEL 1, the first seeded FEL for user operation.

  15. Using pipe with corrugated walls for a subterahertz free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Stupakov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A metallic pipe with corrugated walls supports propagation of a high-frequency mode that is in resonance with a relativistic beam propagating along the axis of the pipe. This mode can be excited by a beam whose length is a fraction of the wavelength. In this paper, we study another option of excitation of the resonant mode—via the mechanism of the free electron laser instability. This mechanism works if the bunch length is much longer than the wavelength of the radiation and, hence, does not require bunch compression. It provides an alternative to excitation by short bunches that can be realized with relatively low energy and low peak-current electron beams.

  16. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  17. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Orlandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy. In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al(99∶Si(1 and tungsten (W wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  18. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  19. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossbach, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  20. Low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector for a compact free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Takao; Ego, Hiroyasu; Hanaki, Hirohumi; Hara, Toru; Hasegawa, Taichi; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Inagaki, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toshiaki; Kondo, Chikara; Maesaka, Hirokazu; Matsubara, Shinichi; Matsui, Sakuo; Ohshima, Takashi; Otake, Yuji; Sakurai, Tatsuyuki; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Tajiri, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Togawa, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2017-08-01

    A low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector was developed for the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility known as the SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA). The thermionic-gun-based system has the advantages of maintainability, reliability, and stability over a photocathode radio-frequency (rf) gun because of its robust thermionic cathode. The basic performance of the injector prototype was confirmed at the SPring-8 compact self-amplified spontaneous emission source (SCSS) test accelerator, where stable FEL generation in an extreme ultraviolet wavelength range was demonstrated. The essential XFEL innovation is the achievement of a constant beam peak current of 3-4 kA, which is 10 times higher than that generated by the SCSS test accelerator, while maintaining a normalized-slice emittance below 1 mm mrad. Thus, the following five modifications were applied to the SACLA injector: (i) a nonlinear energy chirp correction; (ii) the optimization of the rf acceleration frequency; (iii) rf system stabilization; (iv) nondestructive beam monitoring; and (v) a geomagnetic field correction. The SACLA injector successfully achieved the target beam performance, which shows that a thermionic-gun-based injector is applicable to an XFEL accelerator system. This paper gives an overview of the SACLA injector and describes the physical and technical details, together with the electron beam performance obtained in the beam commissioning.

  1. Analysis and comparison between electric and magnetic power couplers for accelerators in Free Electron Lasers (FEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serpico, C., E-mail: claudio.serpico@elettra.eu [Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Grudiev, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Vescovo, R. [University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-10-11

    Free-electron lasers represent a new and exciting class of coherent optical sources possessing broad wavelength tunability and excellent optical-beam quality. The FERMI seeded free-electron laser (FEL), located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste, is driven by a 200 m long, S-band linac: the high energy part of the linac is equipped with 6 m long backward traveling wave (BTW) structures. The structures have small iris radius and a nose cone geometry which allows for high gradient operation. Development of new high-gradient, S-band accelerating structures for the replacement of the existing BTWs is under consideration. This paper investigates two possible solutions for the RF power couplers suitable for a linac driven FEL which require reduced wakefields effects, high operating gradient and very high reliability. The first part of the manuscript focuses on the reduction of residual field asymmetries, while in the second analyzes RF performances, the peak surface fields and the expected breakdown rate. In the conclusion, two solutions are compared and pros and cons are highlighted.

  2. Low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector for a compact free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Asaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A low-emittance thermionic-gun-based injector was developed for the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL facility known as the SPring-8 angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA. The thermionic-gun-based system has the advantages of maintainability, reliability, and stability over a photocathode radio-frequency (rf gun because of its robust thermionic cathode. The basic performance of the injector prototype was confirmed at the SPring-8 compact self-amplified spontaneous emission source (SCSS test accelerator, where stable FEL generation in an extreme ultraviolet wavelength range was demonstrated. The essential XFEL innovation is the achievement of a constant beam peak current of 3–4 kA, which is 10 times higher than that generated by the SCSS test accelerator, while maintaining a normalized-slice emittance below 1 mm mrad. Thus, the following five modifications were applied to the SACLA injector: (i a nonlinear energy chirp correction; (ii the optimization of the rf acceleration frequency; (iii rf system stabilization; (iv nondestructive beam monitoring; and (v a geomagnetic field correction. The SACLA injector successfully achieved the target beam performance, which shows that a thermionic-gun-based injector is applicable to an XFEL accelerator system. This paper gives an overview of the SACLA injector and describes the physical and technical details, together with the electron beam performance obtained in the beam commissioning.

  3. Wavelength sweepable laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength sweepable laser source is disclosed, wherein the laser source is a semiconductor laser source adapted for generating laser light at a lasing wavelength. The laser source comprises a substrate, a first reflector, and a second reflector. The first and second reflector together defines...... and having a rest position, the second reflector and suspension together defining a microelectromechanical MEMS oscillator. The MEMS oscillator has a resonance frequency and is adapted for oscillating the second reflector on either side of the rest position.; The laser source further comprises electrical...... connections adapted for applying an electric field to the MEMS oscillator. Furthermore, a laser source system and a method of use of the laser source are disclosed....

  4. Longitudinal Coherence Preservation and Chirp Evolution in a High Gain Laser Seeded Free Electron Laser Amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.B.; /BNL, NSLS; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; Watanabe, T.; /BNL, NSLS

    2006-06-07

    In this letter we examine the start-up of a high gain free electron laser in which a frequency-chirped coherent seed laser pulse interacts with a relativistic electron beam. A Green function formalism is used to evaluate the initial value problem. We have fully characterized the startup and evolution through the exponential growth regime. We obtain explicit expressions for the pulse duration, bandwidth and chirp of the amplified light and show that the FEL light remains fully longitudinally coherent.

  5. Present status of the infrared free-electron laser of the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Shuichi; Isoyama, Goro; Honda, Yoshihide; Kato, Ryukou; Tagawa, Seiichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research

    1997-03-01

    A free-electron laser with a 38-MeV L-band linear accelerator was developed at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University. The self-amplified spontaneous emission was observed at wavelengths of 20 and 40 {mu}m with a high-intensity single-bunch beam passing through a wiggler. In the oscillation experiments with a multibunch beam laser light was obtained at wavelengths from 32 to 40 {mu}m. The peak power in a micropulse of the laser is estimated to be 8.3 MW at a wavelength of 40 {mu}m. In order to apply the laser to basic researches some components of the linac and the optical cavity are being improved. (author)

  6. Statistical and coherence properties of radiation from X-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2009-12-15

    We describe statistical and coherence properties of the radiation from X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). It is shown that the X-ray FEL radiation before saturation is described with gaussian statistics. Particularly important is the case of the optimized X-ray FEL, studied in detail. Applying similarity techniques to the results of numerical simulations allowed us to find universal scaling relations for the main characteristics of an X-ray FEL operating in the saturation regime: efficiency, coherence time and degree of transverse coherence. We find that with an appropriate normalization of these quantities, they are functions of only the ratio of the geometrical emittance of the electron beam to the radiation wavelength. Statistical and coherence properties of the higher harmonics of the radiation are highlighted as well. (orig.)

  7. Free-electron-laser-induced shock-wave control and mechanistic analysis using pulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Taizo; Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Awazu, Kunio

    2008-11-01

    The wavelength of the free electron laser (FEL) in Osaka University can be continuously varied in the range of 5.0-20.0 microm. The FEL has a double-pulse structure, consisting of a train of macropulses of pulse duration 12 micros. Each macropulse contains a train of 330 micropulses of pulse duration 5 ps. The tunability and picosecond pulses afford new medical and biological applications. However, a macropulse of long pulse duration leads to undesirable secondary effects. Precise control of the macropulse duration is essential for the high-precision applications of the FEL. An FEL pulse control system using acousto-optic modulators has been developed to investigate mechanical (shock-wave) effects of the FEL on living tissues. With this system, we have controlled photoinduced shock waves and determine the mechanism of interaction during FEL-induced tissue ablation.

  8. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  9. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernick, Iddo K. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Marshall, Thomas C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at ~1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  10. Medical Application of Free Electron Laser Trasmittance using Hollow Optical Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Sachiko; Ishii, Katsonuri

    2004-01-01

    Mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) is expected as new application for biomedical surgery. However, delivery of MIR-FEL into the body is difficult because the common glass optical fibers have strong absorption at MIR region. A good operational and flexible line for FEL is required at medical field. A Hollow optical fiber is developed for IR laser and high-power laser delivery. We evaluated the fiber for FEL transmission line. This fiber is coated with cyclic olefin polymer (COP) and silver thin film on the inside of glass capillary tube. It is 700 μm-bore and 1m in lengths. The fiber transmission loss of the measured wavelength region of 5.5 μm to 12 μm is less than 1dB/m when the fiber is straight and 1.2 dB/m when bent to radius of 20 cm. Additionally, the output beam profile and the pulse structure is not so different form incidence beam. In conclusion, the fiber is suitable for delivery of the FEL energy for applications in medical and laser surgery.

  11. Circular dichroism measurements at an x-ray free-electron laser with polarization control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G; Lindahl, A O; Knie, A; Hartmann, N; Lutman, A A; MacArthur, J P; Shevchuk, I; Buck, J; Galler, A; Glownia, J M; Helml, W; Huang, Z; Kabachnik, N M; Kazansky, A K; Liu, J; Marinelli, A; Mazza, T; Nuhn, H-D; Walter, P; Viefhaus, J; Meyer, M; Moeller, S; Coffee, R N; Ilchen, M

    2016-08-01

    A non-destructive diagnostic method for the characterization of circularly polarized, ultraintense, short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) light is presented. The recently installed Delta undulator at the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) was used as showcase for this diagnostic scheme. By applying a combined two-color, multi-photon experiment with polarization control, the degree of circular polarization of the Delta undulator has been determined. Towards this goal, an oriented electronic state in the continuum was created by non-resonant ionization of the O2 1s core shell with circularly polarized FEL pulses at hν ≃ 700 eV. An also circularly polarized, highly intense UV laser pulse with hν ≃ 3.1 eV was temporally and spatially overlapped, causing the photoelectrons to redistribute into so-called sidebands that are energetically separated by the photon energy of the UV laser. By determining the circular dichroism of these redistributed electrons using angle resolving electron spectroscopy and modeling the results with the strong-field approximation, this scheme allows to unambiguously determine the absolute degree of circular polarization of any pulsed, ultraintense XUV or X-ray laser source.

  12. Circular dichroism measurements at an x-ray free-electron laser with polarization control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, G.; Shevchuk, I.; Walter, P.; Viefhaus, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lindahl, A. O. [PULSE at Stanford, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Knie, A. [Institut für Physik, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany); Hartmann, N.; Lutman, A. A.; MacArthur, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Marinelli, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Moeller, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Ilchen, M., E-mail: markus.ilchen@xfel.eu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Buck, J.; Galler, A.; Liu, J. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    A non-destructive diagnostic method for the characterization of circularly polarized, ultraintense, short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) light is presented. The recently installed Delta undulator at the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) was used as showcase for this diagnostic scheme. By applying a combined two-color, multi-photon experiment with polarization control, the degree of circular polarization of the Delta undulator has been determined. Towards this goal, an oriented electronic state in the continuum was created by non-resonant ionization of the O{sub 2} 1s core shell with circularly polarized FEL pulses at hν ≃ 700 eV. An also circularly polarized, highly intense UV laser pulse with hν ≃ 3.1 eV was temporally and spatially overlapped, causing the photoelectrons to redistribute into so-called sidebands that are energetically separated by the photon energy of the UV laser. By determining the circular dichroism of these redistributed electrons using angle resolving electron spectroscopy and modeling the results with the strong-field approximation, this scheme allows to unambiguously determine the absolute degree of circular polarization of any pulsed, ultraintense XUV or X-ray laser source.

  13. Attosecond interferometry with self-amplified spontaneous emission of a free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Sergey; Przystawik, Andreas; Jakob, Markus Alexander; Lazzarino, Leslie Lamberto; Brenner, Günter; Toleikis, Sven; Haunhorst, Christian; Kip, Detlef; Laarmann, Tim

    2017-05-01

    Light-phase-sensitive techniques, such as coherent multidimensional spectroscopy, are well-established in a broad spectral range, already spanning from radio-frequencies in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to visible and ultraviolet wavelengths in nonlinear optics with table-top lasers. In these cases, the ability to tailor the phases of electromagnetic waves with high precision is essential. Here we achieve phase control of extreme-ultraviolet pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) on the attosecond timescale in a Michelson-type all-reflective interferometric autocorrelator. By varying the relative phase of the generated pulse replicas with sub-cycle precision we observe the field interference, that is, the light-wave oscillation with a period of 129 as. The successful transfer of a powerful optical method towards short-wavelength FEL science and technology paves the way towards utilization of advanced nonlinear methodologies even at partially coherent soft X-ray FEL sources that rely on self-amplified spontaneous emission.

  14. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  15. Present status of the NIJI-IV storage-ring free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, T.; Yamada, K.; Sei, N. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The tunable region of the free-electron-laser (FEL) wavelength with the NIJI-IV system is now 348{approximately}595 nm. After the lasing at 352 nm in 1994, the quality of the electron beam stored in the ring has been improved further, and the highest peak intensity of the laser obtained so far is more than 300 times as high as that of the resonated spontaneous emission. The macro-temporal structure of the lasing has been greatly improved. Recently, a single-bunch injection system was completed, and the system has been installed in the injector linac, which is expected to increase the peak stored-beam current. The commissioning and the test of the new system is under way. The beam transporting system from the linac to the ring is also being modified by increasing the number of quadrupole magnets. The experiments related to the FEL in the ultraviolet wavelength region will be begun in this coming May. The results and the status of the FEL experiments will be presented at the Conference.

  16. Control of the Polarization of a Vacuum-Ultraviolet, High-Gain, Free-Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Allaria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The two single-pass, externally seeded free-electron lasers (FELs of the FERMI user facility are designed around Apple-II-type undulators that can operate at arbitrary polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet-to-soft x-ray spectral range. Furthermore, within each FEL tuning range, any output wavelength and polarization can be set in less than a minute of routine operations. We report the first demonstration of the full output polarization capabilities of FERMI FEL-1 in a campaign of experiments where the wavelength and nominal polarization are set to a series of representative values, and the polarization of the emitted intense pulses is thoroughly characterized by three independent instruments and methods, expressly developed for the task. The measured radiation polarization is consistently >90% and is not significantly spoiled by the transport optics; differing, relative transport losses for horizontal and vertical polarization become more prominent at longer wavelengths and lead to a non-negligible ellipticity for an originally circularly polarized state. The results from the different polarimeter setups validate each other, allow a cross-calibration of the instruments, and constitute a benchmark for user experiments.

  17. Femtosecond laser high-efficiency drilling of high-aspect-ratio microholes based on free-electron-density adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lan; Fang, Juqiang; Cao, Qiang; Zhang, Kaihu; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yanwu; Huang, Qiang; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-11-01

    We studied the micromachining of high-aspect-ratio holes in poly(methylmethacrylate) using a visible double-pulse femtosecond laser based on free-electron-density adjustments. Hole depth and aspect ratio increased simultaneously upon decreasing the wavelength in the visible-light zone. When the pulse energy reached a high level, the free-electron density was adjusted by using a double-pulse laser, which induced fewer free electrons, a lower reflectivity plasma plume, and more pulse energy deposition in the solid bottom. Thus, the aspect ratio of the hole was improved considerably. At a moderate pulse energy level, a 1.3-1.4 times enhancement of both the ablation depth and the aspect ratio was observed when the double-pulse delay was set between 100 and 300 fs, probably due to an enhanced photon-electron coupling effect through adjusting the free-electron density. At a lower pulse energy level, this effect also induced the generation of a submicrometer string. In addition, the ablation rate was improved significantly by using visible double pulses.

  18. External magnetic field effect on the growth rate of a plasma-loaded free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeildoost, N.; Jafari, S.; Abbasi, E.

    2016-06-01

    In order to extend the production of intense coherent radiation to angstrom wavelengths, a laser wave is employed as a laser wiggler which propagates through a magnetized plasma channel. The plasma-loaded laser wigglers increase the ability of laser guidance and electron bunching process compared to the counterpropagating laser wigglers in vacuum. The presence of the plasma medium can make it possible to propagate the laser wiggler and the electron beam parallel to each other so that the focusing of the pulse will be saved. In addition, employing an external guide magnetic field can confine both the ambient plasma and the transverse motions of the electron beam, therefore, improving the free-electron lasers' efficiency, properly. Electron trajectories have been obtained by solving the steady state equations of motion for a single particle and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method has been used to simulate the electron orbits. To study the growth rate of a laser-pumped free-electron laser in the presence of a plasma medium, perturbation analysis has been performed to combine the momentum transfer, continuity, and wave equations, respectively. Numerical calculations indicate that by increasing the guide magnetic field frequency, the growth rate for group I orbits increases, while for group II and III orbits decreases.

  19. Short period, high field cryogenic undulator for extreme performance x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. O’Shea

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Short period, high field undulators can enable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs at low beam energy, with decreased gain length, thus allowing much more compact and less costly FEL systems. We describe an ongoing initiative to develop such an undulator based on an approach that utilizes novel cryogenic materials. While this effort was begun in the context of extending the photon energy regime of a laser-plasma accelerator based electron source, we consider here implications of its application to sub-fs scenarios in which more conventional injectors are employed. The use of such low-charge, ultrashort beams, which has recently been proposed as a method of obtaining single-spike performance in x-ray FELs, is seen in simulation to give unprecedented beam brightness. This brightness, when considered in tandem with short wavelength, high field undulators, enables extremely high performance FELs. Two examples discussed in this paper illustrate this point well. The first is the use of the SPARX injector at 2.1 GeV with 1 pC of charge to give 8 GW peak power in a single spike at 6.5 Å with a photon beam peak brightness greater than 10^{35}  photons/(s mm^{2} mrad^{2}  0.1%  BW, which will also reach LCLS wavelengths on the 5th harmonic. The second is the exploitation of the LCLS injector with 0.25 pC, 150 as pulses to lase at 1.5 Å using only 4.5 GeV energy; beyond this possibility, we present start-to-end simulations of lasing at unprecedented short wavelength, 0.15 Å, using 13.65 GeV LCLS design energy.

  20. Pulse-by-pulse multi-beam-line operation for x-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Hara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The parallel operation of plural undulator beam lines is an important means of improving the efficiency and usability of x-ray free-electron laser facilities. After the installation of a second undulator beam line (BL2 at SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA, pulse-by-pulse switching between two beam lines was tested using kicker and dc twin-septum magnets. To maintain a compact size, all undulator beam lines at SACLA are designed to be placed within the same undulator hall located downstream of the accelerator. In order to ensure broad tunability of the laser wavelength, the electron bunches are accelerated to different beam energies optimized for the wavelengths of each beam line. In the demonstration, the 30 Hz electron beam was alternately deflected to two beam lines and simultaneous lasing was achieved with 15 Hz at each beam line. Since the electron beam was deflected twice by 3° in a dogleg to BL2, the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR effects became non-negligible. Currently in a wavelength range of 4–10 keV, a laser pulse energy of 100–150  μJ can be obtained with a reduced peak current of around 1 kA by alleviating the CSR effects. This paper reports the results and operational issues related to the multi-beam-line operation of SACLA.

  1. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  2. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  3. Slippage effect on energy modulation in seeded free-electron lasers with frequency chirped seed laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Feng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Free-electron lasers (FELs seeded with external lasers hold great promise for generating high power radiation with nearly transform-limited bandwidth in the soft x-ray region. However, it has been pointed out that the initial seed laser phase error will be amplified by the frequency up-conversion process, which may degrade the quality of the output radiation produced by a harmonic generation scheme. In this paper, theoretical and simulation studies on frequency chirp amplification in seeded FEL schemes with slippage effect taken into account are presented. It is found that the seed laser imperfection experienced by the electron beam can be significantly smoothed by the slippage effect in the modulator when the slippage length is comparable to the seed laser pulse length. This smoothing effect allows one to preserve the excellent temporal coherence of seeded FELs in the presence of large frequency chirp in the seed laser. Our studies show that the tolerance on frequency chirp in the seed laser for generating nearly transform-limited soft x-ray pulses in seeded FELs is much looser than previously thought and fully coherent radiation at nanometer wavelength may be reached with current technologies.

  4. Microscopic study on lasing characteristics of the UVSOR storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)]|[Graduate Univ. for Advanced Stuides, Okazaki (Japan); Yamazaki, J.; Kinoshita, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Characteristics of storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) at a short wavelength region (UV and visible) has been studied at the UVSOR facility, Institute for Molecular Science. We have measured the laser power evolution by using a biplanar photodiode, and the micro-macro temporal structure of both the laser and the electron bunch with a dualsweep streak camera. The saturated energy of the laser micropulse in the gain-switching (Q-switching) mode has been measured as a function of the ring current. We have not observed a limitation of the output power yet within the beam current can be stored. We have analyzed the saturated micropulse energy based on a model of gain reduction due to the bunch-heating. The bunch-heating process seems to be very complicate. We derived time dependent gain variations from the shape of macropulse and the bunch length. Those two gain variations are almost consistent with each other but slightly different in detail. The gain may be not only simply reduced by the energy spread but also affected by the phase space rotation due to synchrotron oscillation of the electron bunch. As reported in previous issue, the lasing macropulse consists of a couple of micropulses that are simultaneously evolved. From high resolution two-dimensional spectra taken by the dual-sweep streak camera, we noticed considerable internal substructures of the laser micropulse in both the time distribution and the spectral shape. There are a couple of peaks separated with almost same distance in a optical bunch. Such substructure does not seem to result from statistical fluctuations of laser seeds. Although the origin of the substructure of macropulse is not dear at the present, we are going to discuss about SRFEL properties.

  5. Hermite-Gaussian Modes and Mirror Distortions in the Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Pellegrini W. B. Colson and A. Renieri, editors. Free Electron Laser Handbook. North-Holland Physics, 1990. [19] W. Silfvast. Laser Fundamentals...Professor Joseph Blau Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 14. Professor Peter Crooker Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 15. Professor Wayne Roberge

  6. A camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Alameda, J; Woods, B; Frank, M; Bogan, M J; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Hajdu, J; Shapiro, D

    2007-09-24

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser. The camera consists of a laterally-graded multilayer mirror which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter both for wavelength and angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from non-sample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates on to a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beamstop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the FLASH FEL (i.e. between 6 nm and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32 nm, 16 nm, 13.5 nm, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH free-electron laser with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance.

  7. Laser-pumped coherent x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sprangle

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In a laser-pumped x-ray free-electron laser (FEL an intense laser field replaces the magnetic wiggler field of a conventional FEL. Depending on the intensity and quality of both the electron beam and pump laser, the Thomson backscattered radiation can be coherently amplified. In a conventional FEL the generation of x rays requires electron beam energies in the multi-GeV range. In a laser-pumped x-ray FEL, electron beam energies in the multi-MeV range would be sufficient. To generate coherent x rays with this mechanism a number of physics and technology issues must be addressed. Foremost among these are the stringent requirements placed on the electron beam quality and brightness as well as on the pump laser. The seed radiation for the laser-pumped FEL is the laser-induced spontaneous radiation. The evolution of incoherent radiation into coherent radiation as well as the power gain lengths associated with the coherent x rays are analyzed and discussed. There is excellent agreement between our analytical results and GENESIS simulations for the radiated power, gain length, conversion efficiency, linewidth, and saturation length. These issues, as well as others, necessary to achieve coherent amplified x rays in a laser-pumped FEL are discussed. While a coherent x-ray source would have a number of attractive features, the requirements placed on both the electron beam and pump laser are extremely challenging.

  8. X-ray free-electron lasers principles, properties and applications f*9493

    CERN Document Server

    Stöhr, J

    2002-01-01

    Creating matter from the vacuum, taking an atomic scale motion picture of a chemical process in a time of a few femtoseconds (1 fs = 10 sup - sup 1 sup 5 sec) or unraveling the complex molecular structure of a single protein or virus. These are some of the new exciting experiments envisioned with a novel radiation source, the X-ray free-electron laser (FEL). John Madey and collaborators built the first FEL in the 1970s. It is a powerful and challenging combination of particle accelerator and laser physics and technology. Until recently FELs have been operating at infrared or near ultraviolet wavelengths. A combination of theoretical, experimental, and technological advances has made possible their extension to the X-ray region. X rays have allowed us to see the invisible for almost a century. With their help we have been making great progress in understanding the properties of materials and of living systems. Today the best sources of X rays utilize synchrotron radiation from relativistic electron beams in st...

  9. Hybrid Modes in Long Wavelength Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    nfc /f)2 , (VI.38) and vgn = c √ 1− ( nλ 2b )2 = c √ 1− ( nλ λc )2 = c √ 1− ( nfc f )2 . (VI.39) 52 VII. FEL THEORY WITH HYBRID (HG...Knox Library Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 3. Chairman, Physics Department Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 4...Professor Joseph Blau Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 7. Headquarter of Army, Library Republic of Korea Army Gyeryong, Republic of Korea 8. Korea National Defense University, Library

  10. A mirrorless photonic free-electron laser oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, P.J.M.; Strooisma, A.; Denis, T.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic crystals have been used to provide fundamental control over the interaction between light and matter, including stimulated emission. For example, in Bloch-mode lasers, the photonic crystal provides field enhancement through reduced group velocity and offers larger mode volumes through

  11. First lasing of the Darmstadt cw free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Brunken, M; Eichhorn, R; Genz, H; Gräf, H D; Loos, H; Richter, A; Schweizer, B; Stascheck, A; Wesp, T

    1999-01-01

    The Darmstadt CW FEL designed for wavelengths between 3 and 10 mu m driven by the superconducting electron accelerator S-DALINAC first lased on December 1st, 1996 and has operated thereafter successfully in the wavelength region between 6.6 and 7.8 mu m. The pulsed electron beam employed had a micro pulse length of about 2ps, with a repetition rate of 10 MHz and a peak current of 2.7 A while its energy was varied between 29.6 and 31.5 MeV. A wedged pole hybrid undulator, with 80 periods each of 0.032 m length and a magnetic field strength of 0.15-0.4T, was located in between a 15.01 m long optical cavity equipped with two high reflectivity (99.8) mirrors of 0.05 m diameter. Due to the low beam current special care with respect to the electron and optical beam properties was necessary to meet the stringent conditions in order to reach a minute small signal gain of at least a few percent resulting in amplification. Saturation was obtained after about 2000 repetitions of the photon pulse inside the cavity. The D...

  12. Super-Radiant Free Electron Laser Measurement and Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Pyrometers Pyrometers measure the energy from electromagnetic radiation by the change in temperature due to the absorption of light in the detector. The...dependence of the resistivity of a certain material to measure the absorption of electromagnetic radiation . Like pyrometers , they are used for...relativistic electron bunches and a periodic magnetic field to generate coherent radiation . These types of lasers are of interest to the Navy because

  13. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  14. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  15. Gain length fitting formula for free-electron lasers with strong space-charge effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Marcus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a power-fit formula, obtained from a variational analysis using three-dimensional free-electron laser theory, for the gain length of a high-gain free-electron laser’s fundamental mode in the presence of diffraction, uncorrelated energy spread, and longitudinal space-charge effects. The approach is inspired by the work of Xie [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 445, 59 (2000NIMAER0168-900210.1016/S0168-9002(0000114-5], and provides a useful shortcut for calculating the gain length of the fundamental Gaussian mode of a free-electron laser having strong space-charge effects in the 3D regime. The results derived from analytic theory are in good agreement with detailed numerical particle simulations that also include higher-order space-charge effects, supporting the assumptions made in the theoretical treatment and the variational solutions obtained in the single-mode limit.

  16. New concept of waveguide for inverse free electron laser accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zakowicz, W Z

    2000-01-01

    A segmented waveguide formed by a periodic system of pairs of wedge prisms with a gap between them is proposed. The prisms are made of single-crystal sapphire for which the refraction index nu<1 for CO sub 2 laser radiation (lambda=10.6 mu m). The attenuation of 0.1 db/m can be estimated for a 5 mm diameter radiation beam for which the Rayleigh distance is approximately 1 m. The gap between adjacent prisms can be useful in FEL-like applications.

  17. Self-amplified coherent spontaneous emission in a free electron laser with “quiet” bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Goryashko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For a planar free electron laser (FEL configuration we study self-amplified coherent spontaneous emission driven by a gradient of the bunch current in the presence of different levels of noise in bunches. The longitudinal granularity of the electron bunch density originating from shot noise is maintained throughout the analysis. For the FEL model with the SwissFEL injector bunch parameters, we calculate the probability density distribution of the maximum power of the radiation pulses for different levels of shot noise. It turns out that the temporal coherence quickly increases as the noise level reduces. We also show that the FEL based on coherent spontaneous emission produces almost Fourier transform limited pulses. The analysis indicates that the time-bandwidth product is mainly determined by the bunch length and the interaction distance in an undulator. Calculations of the FEL characteristics for different rise times of the front of the current pulse are performed, and it is found that a reduced level of the power fluctuations is preserved for the bunch current pulse with a front duration up to several FEL wavelengths. We also propose a novel scheme that permits the formation of electron bunches with a reduced level of noise and a high gradient of the current at the bunch tail to enhance coherent spontaneous emission. The presented scheme uses effects of noise reduction and controlled microbunching instability and consists of a laser heater, a bunch compressor, and a shot noise suppression section. We show that shot noise reduction by 2 orders of magnitude in electron bunches produced by the SwissFEL injector can be achieved in a compact noise suppression section. The noise factor and microbunching gain of the overall proposed scheme with and without laser heater are estimated.

  18. X-ray free-electron lasers: from dreams to reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, C.

    2016-12-01

    The brightness of x-ray sources has been increased one to ten billion times by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) that generate high intensity coherent photon pulses at wavelengths from nanometers to less than one angstrom and a duration of a few to 100 femtoseconds. For the first time XFELs allow for experimental exploration of the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems at the angstrom-femtosecond space and time scale, creating new opportunities for scientific research in physics, chemistry, biology, material science and high energy density physics. This paper reviews the history of this development, concentrating on the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray XFEL. It also presents the physical principles on which XFELs are based, their present status and future developments, together with some recent experimental results in physics, chemistry and biology. LCLS success has spurred the worldwide construction of more XFELs; SACLA in Japan, XFEL and FLASH in Germany, Swiss FEL, Korean XFEL, Fermi in Italy. The characteristics of these other sources are also discussed.

  19. Airborne megawatt class free-electron laser for defense and security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Whitney; David Douglas; George Neil

    2005-03-01

    An airborne megawatt (MW) average power Free-Electron Laser (FEL) is now a possibility. In the process of shrinking the FEL parameters to fit on ship, a surprisingly lightweight and compact design has been achieved. There are multiple motivations for using a FEL for a high-power airborne system for Defense and Security: Diverse mission requirements can be met by a single system. The MW of light can be made available with any time structure for time periods from microseconds to hours, i.e. there is a nearly unlimited magazine. The wavelength of the light can be chosen to be from the far infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV) thereby best meeting mission requirements. The FEL light can be modulated for detecting the same pattern in the small fraction of light reflected from the target resulting in greatly enhanced targeting control. The entire MW class FEL including all of its subsystems can be carried by large commercial size airplanes or on an airship. Adequate electrical power can be generated on the plane or airship to run the FEL as long as the plane or airship has fuel to fly. The light from the FEL will work well with relay mirror systems. The required R&D to achieve the MW level is well understood. The coupling of the capabilities of an airborne FEL to diverse mission requirements provides unique opportunities.

  20. X-band rf driven free electron laser driver with optics linearization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Sun (孙一鹏

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a compact hard X-ray free electron lasers (FEL design is proposed with all X-band rf acceleration and two stage bunch compression. It eliminates the need of a harmonic rf linearization section by employing optics linearization in its first stage bunch compression. Quadrupoles and sextupoles are employed in a bunch compressor one (BC1 design, in such a way that second order longitudinal dispersion of BC1 cancels the second order energy correlation in the electron beam. Start-to-end 6-D simulations are performed with all the collective effects included. Emittance growth in the horizontal plane due to coherent synchrotron radiation is investigated and minimized, to be on a similar level with the successfully operating Linac coherent light source (LCLS. At a FEL radiation wavelength of 0.15 nm, a saturation length of 40 meters can be achieved by employing an undulator with a period of 1.5 cm. Without tapering, a FEL radiation power above 10 GW is achieved with a photon pulse length of 50 fs, which is LCLS-like performance. The overall length of the accelerator plus undulator is around 250 meters which is much shorter than the LCLS length of 1230 meters. That makes it possible to build hard X-ray FEL in a laboratory with limited size.

  1. Compact 13.5-nm free-electron laser for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Socol

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical lithography has been actively used over the past decades to produce more and more dense integrated circuits. To keep with the pace of the miniaturization, light of shorter and shorter wavelength was used with time. The capabilities of the present 193-nm UV photolithography were expanded time after time, but it is now believed that further progress will require deployment of extreme ultraviolet (EUV lithography based on the use of 13.5-nm radiation. However, presently no light source exists with sufficient average power to enable high-volume manufacturing. We report here the results of a study that shows the feasibility of a free-electron laser EUV source driven by a multiturn superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL. The proposed 40×20  m^{2} facility, using MW-scale consumption from the power grid, is estimated to provide about 5 kW of average EUV power. We elaborate the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE option, which is presently technically feasible. A regenerative-amplifier option is also discussed. The proposed design is based on a short-period (2–3 cm undulator. The corresponding electron beam energy is about 0.5–1.0 GeV. The proposed accelerator consists of a photoinjector, a booster, and a multiturn ERL.

  2. Multi-dimensional free-electron laser simulation codes: a comparison study

    CERN Document Server

    Biedron, S G; Dejus, Roger J; Faatz, B; Freund, H P; Milton, S V; Nuhn, H D; Reiche, S

    2000-01-01

    A self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Five FEL simulation codes were used in the design phase: GENESIS, GINGER, MEDUSA, RON, and TDA3D. Initial comparisons between each of these independent formulations show good agreement for the parameters of the APS SASE FEL.

  3. Time-Dependent, Three-Dimensional Simulation of Free-Electron-Laser Oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Freund, H.P.; Miner Jr., W.H.; Benson, S.V.; Shinn, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a procedure for the simulation of free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillators. The simulation uses a combination of the MEDUSA simulation code for the FEL interaction and the OPC code to model the resonator. The simulations are compared with recent observations of the oscillator at the Thomas

  4. High Average Power Operation of a Scraper-Outcoupled Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle D. Shinn; Chris Behre; Stephen Vincent Benson; Michael Bevins; Don Bullard; James Coleman; L. Dillon-Townes; Tom Elliott; Joe Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; Ronald Lassiter; George Neil; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a high average power free-electron laser using scraper outcoupling. Using the FEL in this all-reflective configuration, we achieved approximately 2 kW of stable output at 10 um. Measurements of gain, loss, and output mode will be compared with our models.

  5. Ultrashort electromagnetic clusters formation by two-stream superheterodyne free electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulish, Viktor V.; Lysenko, Alexander V.; Volk, Iurii I.

    2016-01-01

    A cubic nonlinear self-consistent theory of multiharmonic two-stream superheterodyne free electron lasers (TSFEL) of a klystron type, intended to form powerful ultrashort clusters of an electromagnetic field is constructed. Plural three-wave parametric resonant interactions of wave harmonics have...

  6. Fireworks in noble gas clusters a first experiment with the new "free-electron laser"

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    An international group of scientists has published first experiments carried out using the new soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) at the research center DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Using small clusters of noble gas atoms, for the first time, researchers studied the interaction of matter with intense X-ray radiation from an FEL on extremely short time scales (1 page).

  7. Free-Electron Laser-Induced 2-Photon Absorption in Hg1-Xcdxte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghoorn, J.; Anderegg, V. F.; Klaassen, T. O.; Wenckebach, W. T.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1992-01-01

    The powerful output of FELIX, the recently built Rijnhuizen free-electron laser, is used for the first frequency dependent study of nonlinear optical excitation of Hg1-xCdxTe in the far-infrared spectral region. Two-photon interband absorption has been investigated as a function of power and

  8. Growth rate enhancement of free-electron laser by two consecutive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The operative mechanism for a free-electron laser (FEL) with two consecutive helical wigglers having opposite circular polarization in the presence of an axial magnetic field is proposed and ... Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 43 Dr Mofatteh Avenue, Tehran 15614, Iran ...

  9. Time-resolved electron spectrum diagnostics for a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; Martin, P. F.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    Time-resolved electron-beam diagnostics have been developed for use with free-electron lasers (FELs) and associated electron sources, based on the techniques of secondary electron emission and optical transition radiation (OTR). The 32-channel OTR detector forms part of a high-resolution (0.18%)

  10. High Average Power Operation of a Scraper-Outcoupled Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Shinn, Michelle D; Benson, S V; Bevins, Michael; Bullard, Don; Coleman, James; Dillon-Townes, L; Elliott, Tom; Gubeli, Joe; Hardy, David; Jordan, Kevin; Lassiter, Ronald; Neil, George; Zhang, Shukui

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a high average power free electron laser using scraper outcoupling. Using the FEL in this all-reflective configuration, we achieved approximately 2 kW of stable output at 10 um. Measurements of gain, loss, and output mode will be compared with our models.

  11. Longitudinal space charge assisted echo seeding of a free-electron laser with laser-spoiler noise suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hacker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seed lasers are employed to improve the temporal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL light. However, when these seed pulses are short relative to the particle bunch, the noisy, temporally incoherent radiation from the unseeded electrons can overwhelm the coherent, seeded radiation. In this paper, a technique to seed a particle bunch with an external laser is presented in which a new mechanism to improve the contrast between coherent and incoherent free electron laser radiation is employed together with a novel, simplified echo-seeding method. The concept relies on a combination of longitudinal space charge wakes and an echo-seeding technique to make a short, coherent pulse of FEL light together with noise background suppression. Several different simulation codes are used to illustrate the concept with conditions at the soft x-ray free-electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH.

  12. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vyšín, Luděk; Boháček, Pavel; Přeček, Martin; Wild, J.; Özkan, C.; Coppola, N.; Farahani, S.D.; Schulz, J.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Gaudin, J.; Bajt, S.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.N.; Loch, R.A.; Jurek, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Harmand, M.; Galasso, G.; Nagasono, M.; Saskl, K.; Sovák, P.; Juha, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2015), 254-264 ISSN 2159-3930 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fluorescent and luminescent materials * laser damage * free-electron lasers * soft x-rays * laser materials processing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.657, year: 2015

  13. Large-Scale Production of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on our interdisciplinary program to use the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J-Lab) for high-volume pulsed laser vaporization synthesis of carbon nanotubes. Based in part on the funding of from this project, a novel nanotube production system was designed, tested, and patented. Using this new system nanotube production rates over 100 times faster than conventional laser systems were achieved. Analysis of the material produced shows that it is of as high a quality as the standard laser-based materials.

  14. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  15. Laser system with wavelength converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus comprising a diode laser (10) providing radiation in a first wavelength interval, a radiation conversion unit (12) having an input and an output, the radiation converter configured to receive the radiation in the first wavelength interval from the diode...... laser at the input, the radiation conversion unit configured to convert the radiation in the first wavelength interval to radiation in a second wavelength interval and the output configured to output the converted radiation, the second wavelength interval having one end point outside the first...... wavelength interval. Further, the invention relates to a method of optically pumping a target laser (14) in a laser system, the laser system comprising a laser source providing radiation at a first frequency, the laser source being optically connected to an input of a frequency converter, the frequency...

  16. Detailed characterization of electron sources yielding first demonstration of European X-ray Free-Electron Laser beam quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stephan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoinjector test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ, was built to develop and optimize photoelectron sources for superconducting linacs for high-brilliance, short-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL applications like the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH and the European x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL. In this paper, the detailed characterization of two laser-driven rf guns with different operating conditions is described. One experimental optimization of the beam parameters was performed at an accelerating gradient of about 43  MV/m at the photocathode and the other at about 60  MV/m. In both cases, electron beams with very high phase-space density have been demonstrated at a bunch charge of 1 nC and are compared with corresponding simulations. The rf gun optimized for the lower gradient has surpassed all the FLASH requirements on beam quality and rf parameters (gradient, rf pulse length, repetition rate and serves as a spare gun for this facility. The rf gun studied with increased accelerating gradient at the cathode produced beams with even higher brightness, yielding the first demonstration of the beam quality required for driving the European XFEL: The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in the two transverse directions was measured to be 1.26±0.13  mm mrad for a 1-nC electron bunch. When a 10% charge cut is applied excluding electrons from those phase-space regions where the measured phase-space density is below a certain level and which are not expected to contribute to the lasing process, the normalized projected rms emittance is about 0.9 mm mrad.

  17. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  18. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  19. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating

  20. Optical features of a LiF crystal soft X-ray imaging detector irradiated by free electron laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Bolton, Paul; Mitrofanov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Alexander; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Senba, Yashinori; Togashi, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2012-02-13

    Optical features of point defects photoluminescence in LiF crystals, irradiated by soft X-ray pulses of the Free Electron Laser with wavelengths of 17.2 - 61.5 nm, were measured. We found that peak of photoluminescence spectra lies near of 530 nm and are associated with emission of F3+ centers. Our results suggest that redistribution of photoluminescence peak intensity from the red to the green part of the spectra is associated with a shortening of the applied laser pulses down to pico - or femtosecond durations. Dependence of peak intensity of photoluminescence spectra from the soft X-ray irradiation fluence was measured and the absence of quenching phenomena, even at relatively high fluencies was found, which is very important for wide applications of LiF crystal X-ray imaging detectors.

  1. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  2. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  3. Optimization of a seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2000-01-01

    In order to get fully coherent radiation from the Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier starting from the shot noise, it is foreseen to implement a seeding option into the VUV FEL being under construction at DESY (DESY print TESLA-FEL 95-03, Hamburg, DESY, 1995, Seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY: joint DESY and GKSS proposal; Available at DESY upon request only). It consists of an additional undulator, a bypass for electrons and an X-ray monochromator. This paper presents the results of optimization of the seeding option for the VUV FEL providing maximal spectral brightness at minimal shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations. Calculations are performed with three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation code FAST (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 429 (1999) 233).

  4. Tunable optical cavity for an x-ray free-electron-laser oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Je Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator proposed recently for hard x rays [K. Kim, Y. Shvyd’ko, and S. Reiche, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 244802 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.244802] can be made tunable by using an x-ray cavity composed of four crystals, instead of two. The tunability of x-ray energy will significantly enhance the usefulness of an x-ray free-electron laser oscillator. We present a detailed analysis of the four-crystal optical cavity and choice of crystals for several applications: inelastic x-ray scattering, nuclear resonant scattering, bulk-sensitive hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, other high-energy-resolution (≲1  meV spectroscopic probes, and for imaging with hard x rays at near-atomic resolution (≃1  nm.

  5. Soft x-ray free electron laser microfocus for exploring matter under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, A. J.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Chalupsky, J.; Juha, L.; Cihelka, J.; Hajkova, V.; Vysin, L.; Burian, T.; Kozlova, M.; Faustlin, R. R.; Nagler, B.; Vinko, S. M.; Whitcher, T.; Dzelzainis, T.; Renner, O.; Saksl, K.; Khorsand, A. R.; Heimann, P. A.; Sobierajski, R.; Klinger, D.; Jurek, M.; Pelka, J.; Iwan, B.; Andreasson, J.; Timneanu, N.; Fajardo, M.; Wark, J. S.; Riley, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Hajdu, J.; Lee, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    We have focused a beam (BL3) of FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg: lambda = 13.5 nm, pulse length 15 fs, pulse energy 10-40 mu J, 5Hz) using a fine polished off-axis parabola having a focal length of 270 mm and coated with a Mo/Si multilayer with an initial reflectivity of 67% at 13.5 nm. The

  6. Design and test of frequency tuner for CAEP high power THz free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Mi, Zhenghui; Sun, Yi; Pan, Weimin; Lin, Haiying; Zhao, Danyang; Lu, Xiangyang; Quan, Shengwen; Luo, Xing; Li, Ming; Yang, Xingfan; Wang, Guangwei; Dai, Jianping; Li, Zhongquan; Ma, Qiang; Sha, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Peking University is developing a 1.3 GHz superconducting accelerating section for China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP) high power THz free-electron laser. A compact fast/slow tuner has developed by Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) for the accelerating section, to control Lorentz detuning, beam loading effect, compensate for microphonics and liquid Helium pressure fluctuations. The tuner design, warm test and cold test of the first prototype are presented.

  7. From Storage Rings to Free Electron Lasers for Hard X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, H

    2004-01-09

    The intensity of X-ray sources has increased at a rapid rate since the late 1960s by 10 orders of magnitude and more through the use of synchrotron radiation produced by bending magnets, wigglers and undulators. Three generations of radiation sources have been identified depending on amplitude and quality of the radiation provided. While user facilities of the third generation were being constructed a new concept of radiation generating devices was being developed that offers an even larger increase in peak and average brightness than had been achieved till then. The new concept of the X-ray Free Electron Laser based on the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission will be the basis of fourth generation X-ray source user facilities of this century. The paper will start with a brief history of the development of x-ray sources, discuss some of the differences between storage ring and free electron laser based approaches, and close with an update of the present development of x-ray free electron laser user facilities.

  8. Higher-order mode-based cavity misalignment measurements at the free-electron laser FLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellert, Thorsten; Baboi, Nicoleta; Shi, Liangliang

    2017-12-01

    At the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser, superconducting TeV-energy superconducting linear accelerator (TESLA)-type cavities are used for the acceleration of electron bunches, generating intense free-electron laser (FEL) beams. A long rf pulse structure allows one to accelerate long bunch trains, which considerably increases the efficiency of the machine. However, intrabunch-train variations of rf parameters and misalignments of rf structures induce significant trajectory variations that may decrease the FEL performance. The accelerating cavities are housed inside cryomodules, which restricts the ability for direct alignment measurements. In order to determine the transverse cavity position, we use a method based on beam-excited dipole modes in the cavities. We have developed an efficient measurement and signal processing routine and present its application to multiple accelerating modules at FLASH. The measured rms cavity offset agrees with the specification of the TESLA modules. For the first time, the tilt of a TESLA cavity inside a cryomodule is measured. The preliminary result agrees well with the ratio between the offset and angle dependence of the dipole mode which we calculated with eigenmode simulations.

  9. Development of experimental techniques for the characterization of ultrashort photon pulses of extreme ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düsterer, S.; Rehders, M.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Behrens, C.; Brenner, G.; Brovko, O.; DellAngela, M.; Drescher, M.; Faatz, B.; Feldhaus, J.; Frühling, U.; Gerasimova, N.; Gerken, N.; Gerth, C.; Golz, T.; Grebentsov, A.; Hass, E.; Honkavaara, K.; Kocharian, V.; Kurka, M.; Limberg, Th.; Mitzner, R.; Moshammer, R.; Plönjes, E.; Richter, M.; Rönsch-Schulenburg, J.; Rudenko, A.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Senftleben, A.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Siemer, B.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Sorokin, A. A.; Stojanovic, N.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.; Vogt, M.; Wieland, M.; Wurth, W.; Wesch, S.; Yan, M.; Yurkov, M. V.; Zacharias, H.; Schreiber, S.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most challenging tasks for extreme ultraviolet, soft and hard x-ray free-electron laser photon diagnostics is the precise determination of the photon pulse duration, which is typically in the sub 100 fs range. Nine different methods, able to determine such ultrashort photon pulse durations, were compared experimentally at FLASH, the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser at DESY in Hamburg, in order to identify advantages and disadvantages of different methods. Radiation pulses at a wavelength of 13.5 and 24.0 nm together with the corresponding electron bunch duration were measured by indirect methods like analyzing spectral correlations, statistical fluctuations, and energy modulations of the electron bunch and also by direct methods like autocorrelation techniques, terahertz streaking, or reflectivity changes of solid state samples. In this paper, we present a comprehensive overview of the various techniques and a comparison of the individual experimental results. The information gained is of utmost importance for the future development of reliable pulse duration monitors indispensable for successful experiments with ultrashort extreme ultraviolet pulses.

  10. Development of experimental techniques for the characterization of ultrashort photon pulses of extreme ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Düsterer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging tasks for extreme ultraviolet, soft and hard x-ray free-electron laser photon diagnostics is the precise determination of the photon pulse duration, which is typically in the sub 100 fs range. Nine different methods, able to determine such ultrashort photon pulse durations, were compared experimentally at FLASH, the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser at DESY in Hamburg, in order to identify advantages and disadvantages of different methods. Radiation pulses at a wavelength of 13.5 and 24.0 nm together with the corresponding electron bunch duration were measured by indirect methods like analyzing spectral correlations, statistical fluctuations, and energy modulations of the electron bunch and also by direct methods like autocorrelation techniques, terahertz streaking, or reflectivity changes of solid state samples. In this paper, we present a comprehensive overview of the various techniques and a comparison of the individual experimental results. The information gained is of utmost importance for the future development of reliable pulse duration monitors indispensable for successful experiments with ultrashort extreme ultraviolet pulses.

  11. Imaging the He$_2$ quantum halo state using a free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zeller, S; Voigtsberger, J; Kalinin, A; Schottelius, A; Schober, C; Waitz, M; Sann, H; Hartung, A; Bauer, T; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Goihl, C; Janke, C; Richter, M; Kastirke, G; Weller, M; Czasch, A; Kitzler, M; Braune, M; Grisenti, R E; Schöllkopf, W; Schmidt, L Ph H; Schöffer, M; Williams, J B; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2016-01-01

    We report on coulomb explosion imaging of the wavefunction of the quantum halo system He$_2$. Each atom of this system is ionized by tunnelionization in a femto second laser pulse and in a second experiment by single photon ionization employing a free electron laser. We visualize the exponential decay of the probability density of the tunneling particle over distance for over two orders of magnitude up to an internuclear distance of 250 \\r{A}. By fitting the slope of the density in the tunneling regime we obtain a binding energy of 151.9 $\\pm$ 13.3 neV, which is in agreement with most recent calculations.

  12. Initial source of microbunching instability studies in a free electron laser injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, S.; Hidaka, Y; Murphy, J.B.; Podobedov, B.; Qian, H.; Shen, Y.; Wang, X.J.; Yang, X

    2011-11-16

    We present the first experimental studies of the initial source of electron beam microbunching instability in a free electron laser (FEL) injector. By utilizing for the studies a transform-limited laser pulse at the photocathode, we eliminated laser-induced microbunching at the National Synchrotron Light Source Source Development Laboratory (SDL). The detailed measurements of the resulting electron beam led us to conclude that, at SDL, microbunching arising from shot noise is not amplified to any significant level, thereby allowing us to set an upper limit on the initial modulation depth of microbunching arising from shot noise. Our analysis demonstrated that the only significant source of microbunching instability under normal operational conditions at SDL is the longitudinal modulation of the photocathode laser pulse. Our work shows that assuring a longitudinally smoothed photocathode laser pulse allows mitigating microbunching instability at a typical FEL injector with a moderate microbunching gain.

  13. Initial source of microbunching instability studies in a free electron laser injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Seletskiy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first experimental studies of the initial source of electron beam microbunching instability in a free electron laser (FEL injector. By utilizing for the studies a transform-limited laser pulse at the photocathode, we eliminated laser-induced microbunching at the National Synchrotron Light Source Source Development Laboratory (SDL. The detailed measurements of the resulting electron beam led us to conclude that, at SDL, microbunching arising from shot noise is not amplified to any significant level, thereby allowing us to set an upper limit on the initial modulation depth of microbunching arising from shot noise. Our analysis demonstrated that the only significant source of microbunching instability under normal operational conditions at SDL is the longitudinal modulation of the photocathode laser pulse. Our work shows that assuring a longitudinally smoothed photocathode laser pulse allows mitigating microbunching instability at a typical FEL injector with a moderate microbunching gain.

  14. Matching-based fresh-slice method for generating two-color x-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilun Qin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-color high intensity x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs provide powerful tools for probing ultrafast dynamic systems. A novel concept of realizing fresh-slice two-color lasing through slice-dependent transverse mismatch has been proposed by one of the authors [Y. Chao, SLAC Report No. SLAC-PUB-16935, 2016]. In this paper we present a feasible example following this concept based on the Linac Coherent Light Source parameters. Time-dependent mismatch along the bunch is generated by a passive dechirper module and controlled by downstream matching sections, enabling FEL lasing at different wavelength with a split undulator configuration. Simulations for soft x-ray FELs show that tens of gigawatts pulses with femtosecond duration can be generated.

  15. Matching-based fresh-slice method for generating two-color x-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weilun; Ding, Yuantao; Lutman, Alberto A.; Chao, Yu-Chiu

    2017-09-01

    Two-color high intensity x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) provide powerful tools for probing ultrafast dynamic systems. A novel concept of realizing fresh-slice two-color lasing through slice-dependent transverse mismatch has been proposed by one of the authors [Y. Chao, SLAC Report No. SLAC-PUB-16935, 2016]. In this paper we present a feasible example following this concept based on the Linac Coherent Light Source parameters. Time-dependent mismatch along the bunch is generated by a passive dechirper module and controlled by downstream matching sections, enabling FEL lasing at different wavelength with a split undulator configuration. Simulations for soft x-ray FELs show that tens of gigawatts pulses with femtosecond duration can be generated.

  16. Measurement of the single-shot pulse energy of a free electron laser using a cryogenic radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Yuichiro, Morishita; Takahiro, Tanaka [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba (Japan); Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Richter, M.; Takahiro, Tanaka; Mitsuru, Nagasono; Makina, Yabashi; Kensuke, Tono; Tadashi, Togashi; Tetsuya, Ishikawa [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Jastrow, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Sorokin, A.A. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Richter, M.; Kroth, U.; Schoppe, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Berlin (Germany); Tadashi, Togashi; Hiroaki, Kimura; Haruhiko, Ohashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The absolute single-shot pulse energy of the SPring 8 extreme ultraviolet (EUV) free electron laser (FEL) was measured using a cryogenic radiometer with a relative standard uncertainty of 3%. The temperature change of the cavity in the cryogenic radiometer caused by an incident FEL pulse was determined using a lock-in amplifier and an ac Wheatstone bridge. The measured pulse energies were compared with a gas-monitor detector developed by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt/Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron/Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute (Ioffe) at a wavelength of 51.3 nm at the SPring-8 EUV-FEL in a shot-to-shot mode. The pulse energies measured using the two detectors agree within 2.0%. (authors)

  17. Transverse effects in the production of x rays with a free-electron laser based on an optical undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bacci

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between high-brilliance electron beams and counterpropagating laser pulses produces x rays via Thomson backscattering. If the laser source is long and intense enough, the electrons of the beam can bunch on the scale of the emitted x-ray wavelength and a regime of collective effects can establish. In this case of dominating collective effects, the FEL instability can develop and the system behaves like a free-electron laser based on an optical undulator. Coherent x rays can be irradiated, with a bandwidth very much thinner than that of the corresponding incoherent emission. The emittance of the electron beam and the distribution nonuniformity of the laser energy are the principal quantities that limit the growth of the x-ray signal. In this work we analyze with a 3D code the transverse effects in the emission produced by a relativistic electron beam when it is under the action of an optical laser pulse and the x-ray spectra obtained. The scalings typical of the optical wiggler, characterized by very short gain lengths and overall time durations of the process, make possible considerable emission also in violation of the Pellegrini criterion for static wigglers. A generalized form of this criterion is validated on the basis of the numerical evidence.

  18. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  19. Electron Acceleration By The Use Of Segmented Cylindrical Electrodes In An Inverse Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nikrah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- In this paper we expend a theory of high gradient laser excited electron accelerator by the use of an inverse free-electron laser IFEL but with using new structure and design. The wiggler used in our scheme that is to say Paul wiggler is obtainedby segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltagesVosc tover 90-degrees segments. The inverse free-electron laser interaction can be demonstrated by the equations that govern the electron motion in the composed fields of both laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical research of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the electron gains the maximum energy at a short distance for high wiggler amplitude intensities a0w. In addition it is discovered that the electron energy gains various peaks for different initial axial velocities. It is seen that aappropriate small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces remarkably high energy gain. According to the transverse limitation of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this devise.

  20. Energy-gain measurements from a microwave inverse free-electron-laser accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, R B; Marshall, T C; Hirshfield, J L

    2001-02-26

    Experiments are reported on inverse free-electron-laser acceleration, including for the first time observations of the energy change as a function of relative injection phase of the electron bunches. The microwave accelerating structure consists of a uniform circular waveguide with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field. Acceleration of the entire beam by 6% is seen for 6 MeV electron bunches at optimum relative phase. Experimental results compare favorably, for accelerating phases, with predictions of a three-dimensional simulation that includes large-orbit effects.

  1. Nonlinear study on the terahertz free electron laser amplifier with elliptical waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghong; Liu, Pukun; Xue, Qianzhong; Dong, Ruixin

    2008-12-01

    The use of an elliptical waveguide and a planar wiggler with parabolically tapered pole pieces as the terahertz free electron laser (FEL) amplifier model is proposed. A set of self-consistent differential equations for the FEL amplifier is derived by using nonlinear theory, and the characteristics of this amplifier are numerically analyzed. Our numerical simulations are conducted to the 1000GHz amplifier with an electron beam energy of 1.74MeV. The results indicate that the peak power of 180kW and frequency bandwidth of 13.5GHz can be obtained.

  2. A free-electron laser for cyclotron resonant heating in magnetic fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.; Read, M. E.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    A G-band free-electron laser designed for plasma heating is described using a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler formed by insertion into a solenoid of a central rod and an outer ring of alternating ferrite and nonferrite spacers positioned so that the central ferrite (nonferrite) spacers are opposite the outer nonferrite (ferrite) spacers. The CHI wiggler provides for enhanced beam focusing and the ability to handle intense beams and high-power continuous wave radiation. Simulations indicate that a power/efficiency of 3.5 MW/13% are possible using a 690 kV/40 A beam. No beam loss was found in simulation.

  3. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring high......-quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  4. A Review of X-ray Free-Electron Laser Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC; Kim, Kwang-Je; /ANL, APS

    2006-12-18

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed as extremely bright sources for a next-generation x-ray facility. In this paper, we review the basic theory of the startup, the exponential growth, and the saturation of the high-gain process, emphasizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The radiation characteristics of an x-ray FEL, including its transverse coherence, temporal characteristics, and harmonic content, are discussed. FEL performance in the presence of machine errors and undulator wakefields is examined. Various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are summarized.

  5. Performance of the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator with crystal cavity

    OpenAIRE

    R. R. Lindberg; K.-J. Kim; Yu. Shvyd’ko; W. M. Fawley

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include the frequency-dependent Bragg crystal reflectivity and the transverse diffraction and focusing using the two-dimensional FEL code GINGER. A review of the physics of Bragg crystal reflectors and the x-ray FEL oscillator is made, followed by a discussion of its numerical implementation in GINGER. The simulation results for a two-crystal cavity and realistic FEL parameters indicate ∼10^{9} photons in a nearl...

  6. Dissociative multiple ionization of diatomic molecules by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Leth, Henriette Astrup

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dissociative multiple ionization processes of diatomic molecules exposed to extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses is studied theoretically using the Monte Carlo wave packet approach. By simulated detection of the emitted electrons, the model reduces a full propagation...... of the system to propagations of the nuclear wave packet in one specific electronic charge state at a time. Suggested ionization channels can be examined, and kinetic energy release spectra for the nuclei can be calculated and compared with experiments. Double ionization of O2 is studied as an example, and good...

  7. Variational Approach for Coupled Backward and Forward Wave Excitation in Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yahalom, A; Pinhasi, Y

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper [1] we have described a novel variational formulation for the propagation and generation of radiation in wave-guides. The formulation is based on the representation of all the involved quantities in the frequency domain and the decomposition of field and currents in terms of the wave-guide transversal Eigen function. In this work we present the utilization of this formalism to the derivation of a numerical scheme that is used to study the build up of radiation in free electron lasers in the linear approximation.

  8. AN OSCILLATOR CONFIGURATION FOR FULL REALIZATION OF HARD X-RAY FREE ELECTRON LASER*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.-J.; Kolodziej, T.; Lindberg, R. R.; Shu, D.; Shvyd' ko, Y.; Stoupin, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Fawley, W. M.; Hastings, J.; Huang, Z; Krzywinski, J.; Marcus, G.; Qin, Weilun; Medvedev, N.; Zemella, J.; Blank, V.; Terentyev, S.

    2017-06-01

    An x-ray free electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is feasible by employing an X-ray cavity with Bragg mirrors such as diamond crystals. An XFELO at the 5th harmonic frequency may be implemented at the LCLS II using its 4 GeV superconducting linac, producing stable, fully coherent, high-spectral-purity hard x-rays. In addition, its output can be a coherent seed to the LCLS amplifier for stable, high-power, femto-second x-ray pulses. We summarize the recent progress in various R&D efforts addressing critical issues for realizing an XFELO at LCLS II.

  9. Matter under extreme conditions probed by a seeded free-electron-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencivenga, F.; Principi, E.; Cucini, R.; Danailov, M. B.; Demidovich, A.; D’Amico, F.; Di Fonzo, S.; Gessini, A.; Kurdi, N.; Mahne, N.; Raimondi, L.; Zangrando, M.; Masciovecchio, C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza (Italy); Giangrisostomi, E.; Battistoni, A.; Svetina, C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, Piazzale Europa, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Hatada, K. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Filipponi, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Universita' dell’Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); and others

    2015-08-17

    FERMI is the first user dedicated seeded free-electron-laser (FEL) working in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray range. The EIS-TIMEX experimental end-station was availabe to external users since from the beginning of the user operation of the facility, in Dicember 2012. EIS-TIMEX has been conceived to exploit the unique properties of the FERMI source to study matter under extreme and metastable thermodynamic conditions. We hereby report on its basic parameters and applications, which includes very low jitter (i.e., high time resolution) pump-probe measurements.

  10. Time resolved temperature measurement of polymer surface irradiated by mid-IR free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Chiba, Tomoyuki; Oyama, Takahiro; Imai, Takayuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2017-08-01

    We have developed the time-resolved temperature measurement system by using a radiation thermometer FLIR SC620. Temporal temperature profiles of an acrylic resin surface by the irradiation of infrared free electron laser (FEL) pulse were recorded in an 8 ms resolution to measure an instantaneous temperature rise and decay profile. Under the single-shot condition, a peak temperature defined as the temperature jump from the ambient temperature was found to be proportional to the absorbance. Under the multi-shot condition, the temperature accumulation was found to reach a roughly constant value where the supply and release of the heat is balanced.

  11. Beam shaping to improve the free-electron laser performance at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new operating mode has been developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS in which we shape the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. This mode of operation is realized using a horizontal collimator located in the middle of the first bunch compressor to truncate the head and tail of the beam. With this method, the electron beam longitudinal phase space and current profile are reshaped, and improvement in lasing performance can be realized. We present experimental studies at the LCLS of the beam shaping effects on the free-electron laser performance.

  12. Design consideration for Tohoku light source storage ring equipped with UV free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. E-mail: hama@lns.tohoku.ac.jp; Hinode, F.; Shinto, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Tanaka, T

    2004-08-01

    An integrated photon source facility has been planed at Laboratory of Nuclear Science, Tohoku University. A 1.5 GeV main ring designed as a synchrotron light source of VUV and soft X-ray region contains straight sections with very low beta function to accept high field superconducting wigglers for X-ray. One of two 8-m long straight sections is allocated for storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) in the UV region. The beam property in the ring is evaluated and then the beam quality for the SRFEL oscillation is also discussed including possibility of coherent higher harmonic generation by showing results of numerical simulation.

  13. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...... Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.......We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent...

  14. High gain harmonic generation free electron lasers enhanced by pseudoenergy bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for high gain harmonic generation free electron lasers (HGHG FELs, which is seeded by a pair of intersecting laser beams to interact with an electron beam in a modulator undulator located in a dispersive section. The interference of the laser beams gives rise to a two-dimensional modulation in the energy-time phase space because of a strong correlation between the electron energy and the position in the direction of dispersion. This eventually forms pseudoenergy bands in the electron beam, which result in efficient harmonic generation in HGHG FELs in a similar manner to the well-known scheme using the echo effects. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that the beam quality is less deteriorated than in other existing schemes.

  15. Alignment of Duke free electron laser storage ring and optical beam delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emamian, M.; Hower, N. [Duke Univ., FEL Lab., Physics Dept., Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL) hosts a 1.1 GeV electron beam storage ring facility which is capable of generating beams in the range of nearly monochromatic gamma rays to high peak power infra red (IR) laser. In this report specifications and procedures for alignment of OK-4 /Duke storage ring FEL wiggler and optical cavity mirrors will be discussed. The OK-4 FEL lasing has demonstrated a series of world record in the last few years. In August of this year the OK-4 FEL successfully commissioned to laser at 193.7 nm. Also in this article, alignment of the {gamma}-ray and UV optical beam delivery system that is currently in progress will be described. (authors)

  16. Mid infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a viable alternative to tissue ablation with the free electron laser (FEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackanos, Mark A; Simanovskii, Dmitrii; Joos, Karen M; Schwettman, H Alan; Jansen, E Duco

    2007-03-01

    Investigations with a Mark-III free electron laser, tuned to 6.45 microm in wavelength have demonstrated minimal collateral damage and high ablation yield in ocular and neural tissues. While the use of mid-IR light produced by the free electron laser (FEL) has shown much promise for surgical applications, further advances are limited due the high costs of its use. Further investigation and widespread clinical use of six-micron radiation requires the development of an alternative laser source. In this research, we compared a Mark-III FEL and an Er:YAG pumped ZGP-OPO with respect to the effect of pulse duration on ablation efficiency and thermal damage on porcine cornea. A five by seven grid of craters was made about the center of each cornea. Craters were made with a 60-microm spotsize with a 500-microm spacing. Ablation craters were made using 50 pulses per crater at approximately three times the ablation threshold (for water). Histological analysis was used to determine crater depth and thermal damage. The average zone of thermal damage at 6.1 microm was found to be 4.1 microm for the optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and 5.4 microm for the FEL. At 6.45 microm, the damaged zone was 7.2 microm for the OPO and 7.2 microm for the FEL. At 6.73 microm, the damaged zone was 6.3 microm for the OPO and 7.6 microm+/-0.3 microm for the FEL. The OPO caused similar or significantly less thermal damage in porcine cornea when compared with the FEL while generating significantly deeper craters. We determined that the ZGP-OPO has much promise as a bench-top replacement for the FEL for soft tissue ablation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  17. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  18. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  19. Two electron response to an intense x-ray free electron laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L R; Parker, J S; Meharg, K J; Armstrong, G S J; Taylor, K T, E-mail: l.moore@qub.ac.u [DAMTP, David Bates Building, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-01

    New x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) promise an ultra-fast ultra-intense regime in which new physical phenomena, such as double core hole formation in at atom, should become directly observable. Ahead of x-ray FEL experiments, an initial key task is to theoretically explore such fundamental laser-atom interactions and processes. To study the response of a two-electron positive ion to an intense x-ray FEL pulse, our theoretical approach is a direct numerical integration, incorporating non-dipole Hamiltonian terms, of the full six-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We present probabilities of double K-shell ionization in the two-electron positive ions Ne{sup 8+} and Ar{sup 16+} exposed to x-ray FEL pulses with frequencies in the range 50 au to 300 au and intensities in the range 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Obtaining attosecond x-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zholents

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond x-ray pulse in a free-electron laser (FEL, via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, subfemtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator, this current spike emits a ∼250   attosecond x-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the x-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  1. Electron bunch timing with femtosecond precision in a superconducting free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhl, F; Arsov, V; Felber, M; Hacker, K; Jalmuzna, W; Lorbeer, B; Ludwig, F; Matthiesen, K-H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmüser, P; Schulz, S; Szewinski, J; Winter, A; Zemella, J

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  2. A High-Average-Power Free Electron Laser for Microfabrication and Surface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylla, H. F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bohn, C. L.; Cardman, L.; Engwall, D.; Fugitt, J.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Li, Z.; hide

    1995-01-01

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt ultraviolet (UV) (160-1000 mm) and infrared (IR) (2-25 micron) free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating, energy recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users, CEBAF's partners in the Lase Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop Grumman, 3M, and Xerox, are developing applications such as metal, ceramic, and electronic material micro-fabrication and polymer and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability, and pulse structure.

  3. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Gorelick, S.; Rutishauser, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Guzenko, V. A.; Bunk, O.; Färm, E.; Ritala, M.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Barrett, R.; Samoylova, L.; Grünert, J.; Sinn, H.

    2011-08-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×1017 W/cm2 was obtained at 70 fs pulse length.

  4. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  5. Quantized form factor shift in the presence of free electron laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fratini, F; Hayrapetyan, A G; Jänkälä, K; Amaro, P; Santos, J P

    2015-01-01

    In electron scattering, the target form factors contribute significantly to the diffraction pattern and carry information on the target electromagnetic charge distribution. Here we show that the presence of electromagnetic radiation, as intense as currently available in Free Electron Lasers, shifts the dependence of the target form factors by a quantity that depends on the number of photons absorbed or emitted by the electron as well as on the parameters of the electromagnetic radiation. As example, we show the impact of intense ultraviolet and soft X-ray radiation on elastic electron scattering by Ne-like Argon ion and by Xenon atom. We find that the shift brought by the radiation to the form factor is in the order of some percent. Our results may open up a new avenue to explore matter with the assistance of laser.

  6. Generating stable attosecond x-ray pulse trains with a mode-locked seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Feng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Generation of attosecond x-ray pulses is attracting much attention within the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL user community. We propose a novel scheme for the generation of coherent stable attosecond x-ray pulse trains in a seeded FEL, via a process of mode-locked amplification. Three modulators and two chicanes are used for generating separated attosecond scale microstructures in the electron beam using the beam echo effect. Such electron beam will produce high harmonic radiation with a comb of longitudinal modes at the very beginning of the radiator. By using a series of spatiotemporal shifts between the copropagating radiation and electron beam in the radiator, all these modes can be preserved and amplified to saturation. Using a representative realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulation results show that trains of 200 attosecond soft x-ray pulses with stable peak powers at gigawatt level can be generated directly from ultraviolet seed lasers. The even spacing between the attosecond pulses can be easily altered from subfemtosecond to tens of femtoseconds by slightly changing the wavelength of one seed laser.

  7. Selective Photothermolysis to target Sebaceous Glands: Theoretical Estimation of Parameters and Preliminary Results Using a Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernanda Sakamoto, Apostolos Doukas, William Farinelli, Zeina Tannous, Michelle D. Shinn, Stephen Benson, Gwyn P. Williams, H. Dylla, Richard Anderson

    2011-12-01

    The success of permanent laser hair removal suggests that selective photothermolysis (SP) of sebaceous glands, another part of hair follicles, may also have merit. About 30% of sebum consists of fats with copious CH2 bond content. SP was studied in vitro, using free electron laser (FEL) pulses at an infrared CH2 vibrational absorption wavelength band. Absorption spectra of natural and artificially prepared sebum were measured from 200 nm to 3000 nm, to determine wavelengths potentially able to target sebaceous glands. The Jefferson National Accelerator superconducting FEL was used to measure photothermal excitation of aqueous gels, artificial sebum, pig skin, human scalp and forehead skin (sebaceous sites). In vitro skin samples were exposed to FEL pulses from 1620 to 1720 nm, spot diameter 7-9.5 mm with exposure through a cold 4C sapphire window in contact with the skin. Exposed and control tissue samples were stained using H and E, and nitroblue tetrazolium chloride staining (NBTC) was used to detect thermal denaturation. Natural and artificial sebum both had absorption peaks near 1210, 1728, 1760, 2306 and 2346 nm. Laser-induced heating of artificial sebum was approximately twice that of water at 1710 and 1720 nm, and about 1.5x higher in human sebaceous glands than in water. Thermal camera imaging showed transient focal heating near sebaceous hair follicles. Histologically, skin samples exposed to {approx}1700 nm, {approx}100-125 ms pulses showed evidence of selective thermal damage to sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands were positive for NBTC staining, without evidence of selective loss in samples exposed to the laser. Epidermis was undamaged in all samples. Conclusions: SP of sebaceous glands appears to be feasible. Potentially, optical pulses at {approx}1720 nm or {approx}1210 nm delivered with large beam diameter and appropriate skin cooling in approximately 0.1 s may provide an alternative treatment for acne.

  8. Free electron laser and microwave instability interplay in a storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Orlandi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Collective effects, such as the microwave instability, influence the longitudinal dynamics of an electron beam in a storage ring. In a storage ring free electron laser (FEL they can compete with the induced beam heating and thus be treated as a further concomitant perturbing source of the beam dynamics. Bunch length and energy spread measurements, carried out at the Super-ACO storage ring, can be correctly interpreted according to a broad-band impedance model. Quantitative estimations of the relative role that is played by the microwave instability and the laser heating in shaping the beam longitudinal dynamics have been obtained by the analysis of the equilibrium laser power. It has been performed in terms of either a theoretical limit, implemented with the measured beam longitudinal characteristics, or the numerical results obtained by a macroparticle tracking code, which includes the laser pulse propagation. Such an analysis, carried out for different operating points of the Super-ACO storage ring FEL, indicates that the laser heating counteracts the microwave instability.

  9. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  10. Optical afterburner for an x-ray free electron laser as a tool for pump-probe experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Saldin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for two-color operation of an x-ray self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL. The scheme is based on an intrinsic feature of such a device: chaotic modulations of electron beam energy and energy spread on the scale of FEL coherence length are converted into large density modulations on the same scale with the help of a dispersion section, installed behind the x-ray undulator. Powerful radiation is then generated with the help of a dedicated radiator (like an undulator that selects a narrow spectral line, or one can simply use, for instance, broadband edge radiation. A typical radiation wavelength can be as short as a FEL coherence length, and can be redshifted by increasing the dispersion section strength. In practice it means the wavelength ranges from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared. The long-wavelength radiation pulse is naturally synchronized with the x-ray pulse and can be either directly used in pump-probe experiments or cross correlated with a high-power pulse from a conventional laser system. In this way experimenters overcome jitter problems and can perform pump-probe experiments with femtosecond resolution. Additional possibilities like on-line monitoring of x-ray pulse duration (making “optical replica” of an x-ray pulse are also discussed in the paper. The proposed scheme is very simple, cheap, and robust, and therefore can be easily realized in facilities like FLASH, European XFEL, LCLS, and SCSS.

  11. Contrasting behavior of covalent and molecular carbon allotropes exposed to extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufarová, M.; Hájková, V.; Chalupský, J.; Burian, T.; Vacík, J.; Vorlíček, V.; Vyšín, L.; Gaudin, J.; Medvedev, N.; Ziaja, B.; Nagasono, M.; Yabashi, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Sinn, H.; Störmer, M.; Koláček, K.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Juha, L.

    2017-12-01

    All carbon materials, e.g., amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings and C60 fullerene thin films, play an important role in short-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) research motivated by FEL optics development and prospective nanotechnology applications. Responses of a-C and C60 layers to the extreme ultraviolet (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source in Japan) and soft x-ray (free-electron laser in Hamburg) free-electron laser radiation are investigated by Raman spectroscopy, differential interference contrast, and atomic force microscopy. A remarkable difference in the behavior of covalent (a-C) and molecular (C60) carbonaceous solids is demonstrated under these irradiation conditions. Low thresholds for ablation of a fullerene crystal (estimated to be around 0.15 eV/atom for C60 vs 0.9 eV/atom for a-C in terms of the absorbed dose) are caused by a low cohesive energy of fullerene crystals. An efficient mechanism of the removal of intact C60 molecules from the irradiated crystal due to Coulomb repulsion of fullerene-cage cation radicals formed by the ionizing radiation is revealed by a detailed modeling.

  12. Time-interleaved multienergy acceleration for an x-ray free-electron laser facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Hara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To meet the demand from the growing number of user experiments, multi-beam-line operation with a wide spectral range is seriously considered in x-ray free-electron laser facilities. In a conventional design, the beam line of low photon energies branches off from the middle of the accelerator to take out low energy electron beams. Here in this paper, a novel method is proposed to deliver bunch-to-bunch energy changed electron beams at the end of the accelerator. Since all accelerator components are operated in steady state, this method enables quasisimultaneous operation of multi-beam-line in the same undulator hall without degrading the stability and performance of the electron beam.

  13. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  14. Relativistic x-ray free-electron lasers in the quantum regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, P K

    2012-06-01

    We present a nonlinear theory for relativistic x-ray free-electron lasers in the quantum regime, using a collective Klein-Gordon (KG) equation (for relativistic electrons), which is coupled with the Maxwell-Poisson equations for the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields. In our model, an intense electromagnetic wave is used as a wiggler which interacts with a relativistic electron beam to produce coherent tunable radiation. The KG-Maxwell-Poisson model is used to derive a general nonlinear dispersion relation for parametric instabilities in three space dimensions, including an arbitrarily large amplitude electromagnetic wiggler field. The nonlinear dispersion relation reveals the importance of quantum recoil effects and oblique scattering of the radiation that can be tuned by varying the beam energy.

  15. Assessing the quantum physics impacts on future x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-06

    A new quantum mechanical theory of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) has been successfully developed that has placed LANL at the forefront of the understanding of quantum effects in XFELs. Our quantum theory describes the interaction of relativistic electrons with x-ray radiation in the periodic magnetic field of an undulator using the same mathematical formalism as classical XFEL theory. This places classical and quantum treatments on the same footing and allows for a continuous transition from one regime to the other eliminating the disparate analytical approaches previously used. Moreover, Dr. Anisimov, the architect of this new theory, is now considered a resource in the international FEL community for assessing quantum effects in XFELs.

  16. Emerging opportunities in structural biology with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Ilme; Miao, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FELs) produce X-ray pulses with extremely brilliant peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration. It has been proposed that radiation damage can be “outrun” by using an ultra intense and short X-FEL pulse that passes a biological sample before the onset of significant radiation damage. The concept of “diffraction-before-destruction” has been demonstrated recently at the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first operational hard X-ray FEL, for protein nanocrystals and giant virus particles. The continuous diffraction patterns from single particles allow solving the classical “phase problem” by the oversampling method with iterative algorithms. If enough data are collected from many identical copies of a (biological) particle, its three-dimensional structure can be reconstructed. We review the current status and future prospects of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) and single-particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) with X-FELs. PMID:22922042

  17. Longitudinal phase space manipulation in energy recovering linac-driven free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Piot

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy recovering an electron beam after it has participated in a free-electron laser (FEL interaction can be quite challenging because of the substantial FEL-induced energy spread and the energy antidamping that occurs during deceleration. In the Jefferson Lab infrared FEL driver accelerator, such an energy recovery scheme was implemented by properly matching the longitudinal phase space throughout the recirculation transport by employing the so-called energy compression scheme. In the present paper, after presenting a single-particle dynamics approach of the method used to energy recover the electron beam, we report on experimental validation of the method obtained by measurements of the so-called “compression efficiency” and “momentum compaction” lattice transfer maps at different locations in the recirculation transport line. We also compare these measurements with numerical tracking simulations.

  18. Design and test of frequency tuner for a CAEP high power THz free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zheng-Hui; Zhao, Dan-Yang; Sun, Yi; Pan, Wei-Min; Lin, Hai-Ying; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Luo, Xing; Li, Ming; Yang, Xing-Fan; Wang, Guang-Wei; Dai, Jian-Ping; Li, Zhong-Quan; Ma, Qiang; Sha, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Peking University is developing a 1.3 GHz superconducting accelerating section highpower THz free-electron laser for the China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). A compact fast/slow tuner has been developed by the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) for the accelerating section to control Lorentz detuning, compensate for beam loading effect, microphonics and liquid helium pressure fluctuations. The tuner design, warm test and cold test of the first prototype are presented, which has a guiding significance for the manufacture of the formal tuner and cryomodule assembly. Supported by the 500 MHz superconducting cavity electromechanical tuning system (Y190KFEOHD), NSAF (11176003) and National Major Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development projects(2011YQ130018)

  19. Design of sub-Angstrom compact free-electron laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Fares, Hesham; Ferrario, Massimo; McNeil, Brian W. J.; Robb, Gordon, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose for first time practical parameters to construct a compact sub-Angstrom Free Electron Laser (FEL) based on Compton backscattering. Our recipe is based on using picocoulomb electron bunch, enabling very low emittance and ultracold electron beam. We assume the FEL is operating in a quantum regime of Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). The fundamental quantum feature is a significantly narrower spectrum of the emitted radiation relative to classical SASE. The quantum regime of the SASE FEL is reached when the momentum spread of the electron beam is smaller than the photon recoil momentum. Following the formulae describing SASE FEL operation, realistic designs for quantum FEL experiments are proposed. We discuss the practical constraints that influence the experimental parameters. Numerical simulations of power spectra and intensities are presented and attractive radiation characteristics such as high flux, narrow linewidth, and short pulse structure are demonstrated.

  20. Effect of undulator harmonics field on free-electron laser harmonic generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qika Jia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The harmonics field effect of a planar undulator on free-electron laser (FEL harmonic generation has been analyzed. For both the linear case and the nonlinear case, the harmonic fraction of the radiation can be characterized by the coupling coefficients. The modification of the coupling coefficients is given when the third harmonics magnetic field component exists, thus the enhancement of the harmonic radiation can be predicted. The numerical results show that with the third harmonics magnetic field component that has the opposite sign to the fundamental, the intensity of third-harmonic radiation can be increased distinctly for both the small signal gain and the nonlinear harmonic generation. The increase is larger for the smaller undulator deflecting parameter.

  1. Status of the Northrop Grumman Compact Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehrman, I.S.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Hartley, R.A. [Northrop Grumman Advanced Technology & Development Center, Princeton, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Compact Infrared Free Electron Laser (CIRFEL) was built as part of a joint collaboration between the Northrop Grumman Corporation and Princeton University to develop FEL`s for use by researchers in the materials, medical and physical sciences. The CIRFEL was designed to lase in the Mid-IR and Far-IR regimes with picosecond pulses, megawatt level peak powers and an average power of a few watts. The micropulse separation is 7 nsec which allows a number of relaxation phenomenon to be observed. The CIRFEL utilizes an RF photocathode gun to produce high-brightness time synchronized electron bunches. The operational status and experimental results of the CERFEL will be presented.

  2. Performance of the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator with crystal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, R. R.; Kim, K.-J.; Shvyd'Ko, Yu.; Fawley, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include the frequency-dependent Bragg crystal reflectivity and the transverse diffraction and focusing using the two-dimensional FEL code GINGER. A review of the physics of Bragg crystal reflectors and the x-ray FEL oscillator is made, followed by a discussion of its numerical implementation in GINGER. The simulation results for a two-crystal cavity and realistic FEL parameters indicate ˜109 photons in a nearly Fourier-limited, ps pulse. Compressing the electron beam to 100 A and 100 fs results in comparable x-ray characteristics for relaxed beam emittance, energy spread, and/or undulator parameters, albeit in a larger radiation bandwidth. Finally, preliminary simulation results indicate that the four-crystal FEL cavity can be tuned in energy over a range of a few percent.

  3. The European X-ray Free Electron Laser Project at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    On February 5, 2003, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research decided that the X-ray free-electron laser XFEL, proposed by the International TESLA Collaboration, should be realized as a European project and located at DESY/Hamburg. The ministry also announced that in view of the locational advantage, Germany is prepared to cover half of the investment and personnel costs for the XFEL. In the course of the last year work has concentrated on the following areas: setting up of an organizational structure at DESY for the preparation of the project, discussions with potential European partners on several levels, selection of a new site for the XFEL facility and the preparation of the 'plan approval procedure'. The present status of the technical layout of the Linear Accelerator, the SASE Undulator and Photon Beamlines and the experiment stations will be presented.

  4. High average current electron guns for high-power free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Sprangle

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High average power free-electron lasers (FELs require high average current electron injectors capable of generating high quality, short duration electron bunches with a repetition rate equal to the frequency of the rf linac. In this paper we propose, analyze, and simulate an rf-gated, gridded thermionic electron gun for use in high average power FELs. Thermionic cathodes can provide the necessary high current, have long lifetimes, and require modest vacuums. In the proposed configuration the rf-gated grid is modulated at the fundamental and 3rd harmonic of the linac frequency. The addition of the 3rd harmonic on the grid results in shorter electron bunches. In this configuration, every rf bucket of the linac accelerating field contains an electron bunch. Particle-in-cell simulations indicate that this approach can provide the necessary charge per bunch, bunch duration, longitudinal and transverse emittance, and repetition rate for high average power FELs operating in the IR regime.

  5. Liner radius fluctuations in a high-gain Cherenkov free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. de la Fuente

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Phase shifts in the propagating electromagnetic field of a Cherenkov free-electron laser (CFEL can affect its gain. The phase velocity of an electromagnetic wave varies, for example, when the lined waveguide is inhomogeneous along its length. In this paper, we study quantitatively the saturated power of a particular CFEL at both weak and strong electron-beam pumping when the inner radius of the liner contains fluctuations along the waveguide. We show that the gain bandwidth of the CFEL is substantially broadened when the CFEL is pumped with a high-current beam. We also show that the design of a CFEL needs to include optimization with respect to sensitivity to liner fluctuations, especially for weakly pumped CFELs, that is, CFELs that use a low-current electron-beam density. This optimization can be relaxed for more strongly pumped CFELs.

  6. Generation of large-bandwidth x-ray free-electron-laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Saa Hernandez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs are modern research tools in disciplines such as biology, material science, chemistry, and physics. Besides the standard operation that aims at minimizing the bandwidth of the produced XFEL radiation, there is a strong scientific demand to produce large-bandwidth XFEL pulses for several applications such as nanocrystallography, stimulated Raman spectroscopy, and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction. We present a self-consistent method that maximizes the XFEL pulse bandwidth by systematically maximizing the energy chirp of the electron beam at the undulator entrance. This is achieved by optimizing the compression scheme and the electron distribution at the source in an iterative back-and-forward tracking. Start-to-end numerical simulations show that a relative bandwidth of 3.25% full-width can be achieved for the hard x-ray pulses in the SwissFEL case.

  7. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  8. CAS on Free-Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs in Hamburg

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and DESY held a jointly-organised specialised course on Free-Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs (FELs and ERLs) in Hamburg, Germany, from 31 May to 10 June 2016.      The course was held in the Hotel Scandic Emporio in Hamburg and was attended by 68 participants of 13 nationalities, coming from countries as far away as China, Iran and Japan. The intensive programme comprised 44 lectures and one seminar. Following introductory lectures on electromagnetism, relativity and synchrotron radiation issues, the basic requirements of linacs and ERLs were discussed. Detailed lectures on the theory of FEL science followed. Undulators and the process of lasing and seeding were covered in some detail along with lectures on various beam dynamics and beam control issues. Case studies, for which seven hours were allocated, completed the academic programme. For these, the students were divided into small groups and tasked with completing the basic desig...

  9. Performance of the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator with crystal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Lindberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL oscillator are presented that include the frequency-dependent Bragg crystal reflectivity and the transverse diffraction and focusing using the two-dimensional FEL code GINGER. A review of the physics of Bragg crystal reflectors and the x-ray FEL oscillator is made, followed by a discussion of its numerical implementation in GINGER. The simulation results for a two-crystal cavity and realistic FEL parameters indicate ∼10^{9} photons in a nearly Fourier-limited, ps pulse. Compressing the electron beam to 100 A and 100 fs results in comparable x-ray characteristics for relaxed beam emittance, energy spread, and/or undulator parameters, albeit in a larger radiation bandwidth. Finally, preliminary simulation results indicate that the four-crystal FEL cavity can be tuned in energy over a range of a few percent.

  10. Effects of beam-tube roughness on x-ray free electron laser performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Stupakov

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available In an x-ray free electron laser like the Linear Coherent Light Source being designed at SLAC, electron bunches about 70μm FWHM long are sent into a beam tube only 5 mm in internal diameter and more than 100 m in length. Because of the surface roughness of the beam tube, wakefields can be generated that catch up to the bunch and interact with it, causing energy spread and emittance growth. The strength of this effect depends on the details of the roughness of the surface. We present here a study in which the roughness of the beam tube was measured and the longitudinal impedance of the tube was calculated. Our result shows that a commercially available beam tube can be made smooth enough so the resulting wakefield effects are within the tolerance determined by the requirement that the induced relative energy spread of the beam be less than 5×10^{-4}.

  11. Biomolecular imaging and electronic damage using X-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Quiney, Harry M

    2010-01-01

    Proposals to determine biomolecular structures from diffraction experiments using femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses involve a conflict between the incident brightness required to achieve diffraction-limited atomic resolution and the electronic and structural damage induced by the illumination. Here we show that previous estimates of the conditions under which biomolecular structures may be obtained in this manner are unduly restrictive, because they are based on a coherent diffraction model that is not appropriate to the proposed interaction conditions. A more detailed imaging model derived from optical coherence theory and quantum electrodynamics is shown to be far more tolerant of electronic damage. The nuclear density is employed as the principal descriptor of molecular structure. The foundations of the approach may also be used to characterize electrodynamical processes by performing scattering experiments on complex molecules of known structure.

  12. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P. [CNR - Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), via Trasea 7, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F. [Physics Division, School of Science and Technology, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Finetti, P. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Kivimäki, A. [CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Stagira, S. [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Physics, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Coreno, M. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); CNR – Istituto di Struttura della Materia (CNR-ISM), UOS Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  13. Undulator beamline optimization with integrated chicanes for X-ray free-electron-laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Eduard; Calvi, Marco; Ganter, Romain; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    An optimization of the undulator layout of X-ray free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities based on placing small chicanes between the undulator modules is presented. The installation of magnetic chicanes offers the following benefits with respect to state-of-the-art FEL facilities: reduction of the required undulator length to achieve FEL saturation, improvement of the longitudinal coherence of the FEL pulses, and the ability to produce shorter FEL pulses with higher power levels. Numerical simulations performed for the soft X-ray beamline of the SwissFEL facility show that optimizing the advantages of the layout requires shorter undulator modules than the standard ones. This proposal allows a very compact undulator beamline that produces fully coherent FEL pulses and it makes possible new kinds of experiments that require very short and high-power FEL pulses.

  14. Emittance Measurements of the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Charged particle accelerators, such as the ones that power Free Electron Lasers (FEL), require high quality (low emittance) beams for efficient operation. Accurate and reliable beam diagnostics are essential to monitoring beam parameters in order to maintain a high quality beam. Optical Transition Radiation Interferometry (OTRI) has shown potential to be a quality diagnostic that is especially useful for high brightness electron beams such as Jefferson Labs FEL energy recovery linac. The purpose of this project is to further develop OTRI beam diagnostic techniques. An optical system was designed to make beam size and divergence measurements as well as to prepare for experiments in optical phase space mapping. Beam size and beam divergence measurements were taken to calculate the emittance of the Jefferson Lab FEL. OTRI is also used to separate core and halo beam divergences in order to estimate core and halo emittance separately.

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  16. Reflection of femtosecond pulses from soft X-ray free-electron laser by periodical multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, D.; Grigorian, S.; Pietsch, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany); Hendel, S.; Bienert, F.; Sacher, M.D.; Heinzmann, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Recent experiments on a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) source (FLASH in Hamburg) have shown that multilayers (MLs) can be used as optical elements for highly intense X-ray irradiation. An effort to find most appropriate MLs has to consider the femtosecond time structure and the particular photon energy of the FEL. In this paper we have analysed the time response of 'low absorbing' MLs (e.g. such as La/B{sub 4}C) as a function of the number of periods. Interaction of a pulse train of Gaussian shaped sub-pulses using a realistic ML grown by electron-beam evaporation technique has been analysed in the soft-X-ray range. The structural parameters of the MLs were obtained by reflectivity measurements at BESSY II and subsequent profile fittings. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Daniel J.; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A.; MacArthur, James P.; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L3,2-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  18. Pulse-by-pulse multi-beam-line operation for x-ray free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Toru Hara; Kenji Fukami; Takahiro Inagaki; Hideaki Kawaguchi; Ryota Kinjo; Chikara Kondo; Yuji Otake; Yasuyuki Tajiri; Hideki Takebe; Kazuaki Togawa; Tatsuya Yoshino; Hitoshi Tanaka; Tetsuya Ishikawa

    2016-01-01

    The parallel operation of plural undulator beam lines is an important means of improving the efficiency and usability of x-ray free-electron laser facilities. After the installation of a second undulator beam line (BL2) at SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA), pulse-by-pulse switching between two beam lines was tested using kicker and dc twin-septum magnets. To maintain a compact size, all undulator beam lines at SACLA are designed to be placed within the same undulator hall ...

  19. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Daniel J; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A; MacArthur, James P; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H; Dürr, Hermann A; Schlotter, William F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L(3,2)-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  20. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  1. Generation and Amplification of Coherent Radiation with Optical Orbital Angular Momentum in a Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsing, Erik Willard

    The object of this work is to examine how coherent light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be generated and amplified in a single pass, high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) at the fundamental operating frequency. This concept unites two rapidly expanding, but at present largely non-overlapping fields of study: high-order OAM light modes, which interact in new ways with matter, and FELs, in which a relativistically energetic electron beam emits coherent, ultra high-brightness, highly frequency-tunable light. The ability to generate OAM light in an FEL enables new regimes of laser interaction physics to be explored at wavelengths down to hard x-rays. The theoretical portion of this dissertation attempts to provide a new predictive mathematical framework. It builds on existing work, and describes the three-dimensional electromagnetic field of the high-gain FEL as a sum of OAM modes such that the amplification properties of individual modes can be characterized. The effects of uncorrelated energy spread, longitudinal space charge, energy detuning, and transverse emittance in the electron beam are included, as is the diffraction of the laser light. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by detailed numerical Genesis 1.3 simulations. When the theory is extended to frequency harmonics, a novel interaction is uncovered that generates a helical electron beam density distribution. These predictions are also supported by numerical Tredi simulations. This type of highly correlated structure is shown to naturally emit OAM light, and forms the basis of a new high-gain, high-mode generation (HGHMG) scheme proposed in its entirety here. The experimental section examines the helical microbunching concept in a proof-of-principle experiment dubbed HELIX, performed at the UCLA Neptune laboratory. We present detailed measurement of the coherent transition radiation emitted by the 12.5 MeV electron beam that is microbunched in a second harmonic interaction with an input

  2. X-ray comb generation from nuclear-resonance-stabilized x-ray free-electron laser oscillator for fundamental physics and precision metrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Adams

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as ^{57}Fe as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as ^{181}Ta or ^{45}Sc.

  3. Theory and simulation of an inverse free-electron laser experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J.-M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high-power CO2 laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam moving along a wiggler has been carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2690 (1996)]. The data generated by this inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) experiment are studied by means of theory and simulation. Included in the simulations are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge; energy spread of the electrons; and arbitrary wiggler-field profile. Two types of wiggler profile are considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period. (The period of the wiggler is ˜3 cm, its magnetic field is ˜1 T, and the wiggler length is 0.47 m.) The energy increment of the electrons (˜1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (˜40 MeV). At a laser power level ˜0.5 Gw, the simulation results on energy gain are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. Preliminary results on the electron energy distribution at the end of the IFEL are presented. Whereas the experiment produces a near-monotone distribution of electron energies with the peak shifted to higher energy, the simulation shows a more structured and non-monotonic distribution at the end of the wiggler. Effects that may help reconcile these differences are considered.

  4. Creation and diagnosis of a solid-density plasma with an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinko, S M; Ciricosta, O; Cho, B I; Engelhorn, K; Chung, H-K; Brown, C R D; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Falcone, R W; Graves, C; Hájková, V; Higginbotham, A; Juha, L; Krzywinski, J; Lee, H J; Messerschmidt, M; Murphy, C D; Ping, Y; Scherz, A; Schlotter, W; Toleikis, S; Turner, J J; Vysin, L; Wang, T; Wu, B; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Lee, R W; Heimann, P A; Nagler, B; Wark, J S

    2012-01-25

    Matter with a high energy density (>10(5) joules per cm(3)) is prevalent throughout the Universe, being present in all types of stars and towards the centre of the giant planets; it is also relevant for inertial confinement fusion. Its thermodynamic and transport properties are challenging to measure, requiring the creation of sufficiently long-lived samples at homogeneous temperatures and densities. With the advent of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser, high-intensity radiation (>10(17) watts per cm(2), previously the domain of optical lasers) can be produced at X-ray wavelengths. The interaction of single atoms with such intense X-rays has recently been investigated. An understanding of the contrasting case of intense X-ray interaction with dense systems is important from a fundamental viewpoint and for applications. Here we report the experimental creation of a solid-density plasma at temperatures in excess of 10(6) kelvin on inertial-confinement timescales using an X-ray free-electron laser. We discuss the pertinent physics of the intense X-ray-matter interactions, and illustrate the importance of electron-ion collisions. Detailed simulations of the interaction process conducted with a radiative-collisional code show good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. We obtain insights into the evolution of the charge state distribution of the system, the electron density and temperature, and the timescales of collisional processes. Our results should inform future high-intensity X-ray experiments involving dense samples, such as X-ray diffractive imaging of biological systems, material science investigations, and the study of matter in extreme conditions.

  5. Stable operation of a self-amplified spontaneous-emission free-electron laser in the extremely ultraviolet region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsumoru Shintake

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We achieved stable operation of a free-electron laser (FEL based on the self-amplified spontaneous-emission (SASE scheme at the SPring-8 Compact SASE Source (SCSS test accelerator in the extremely ultraviolet region. Saturation of the SASE FEL power has been achieved at wavelengths ranging from 50 to 60 nm. The pulse energy has reached ∼30  μJ at 60 nm. The observed fluctuation of the pulse energy is about 10% (standard deviation for several hours, which agrees with the expectation from the SASE theory showing the stable operation of the accelerator. The SASE FEL has been routinely operated to provide photon beams for user experiments over a period of a few weeks. Analysis on the experimental data gave the normalized-slice emittance at the lasing part is around 0.7π   mm mrad. This result indicates that the normalized-slice emittance of the initial electron beam, 0.6π   mm mrad in a 90% core part, is kept almost unchanged after the bunch compression process with a compression factor of approximately 300. The success of the SCSS test accelerator strongly encourages the realization of a compact XFEL source.

  6. Comparison of the coherent radiation-induced microbunching instability in a free-electron laser and a magnetic chicane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reiche

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser (SASE FEL is a device which is based on the creation of a very intense, relativistic electron beam which has very little temperature in all three phase planes. The beam in this system is described as having “high brightness,” and when it is bent repetitively in a magnetic undulator, undergoes a radiation-mediated microbunching instability. This instability can amplify the original radiation amplitude at a particular, resonant wavelength by many orders of magnitude. In order to obtain high brightness beams, it is necessary to compress them to obtain higher currents than available from the electron source. Compression is accomplished by the use of magnetic chicanes, which are quite similar to, if much longer than, a single period of the undulator. It should not be surprising that such chicanes also support a radiation-mediated microbunching interaction, which has recently been investigated, and has been termed coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR instability. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the characteristics of the closely related FEL and CSR microbunching instabilities. We show that a high-gain regime of the CSR instability exists which is formally similar to the FEL instability.

  7. An imaging dataset of cervical cells using scanning near-field optical microscopy coupled to an infrared free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Diane E.; Morais, Camilo L. M.; Lima, Kássio M. G.; Trevisan, Júlio; Siggel-King, Michele R. F.; Craig, Tim; Ingham, James; Martin, David S.; Heys, Kelly; Kyrgiou, Maria; Mitra, Anita; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Theophilou, Georgios; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L.; Cricenti, Antonio; Luce, Marco; Weightman, Peter; Martin, Francis L.

    2017-07-01

    Using a scanning near-field optical microscope coupled to an infrared free electron laser (SNOM-IR-FEL) in low-resolution transmission mode, we collected chemical data from whole cervical cells obtained from 5 pre-menopausal, non-pregnant women of reproductive age, and cytologically classified as normal or with different grades of cervical cell dyskaryosis. Imaging data are complemented by demography. All samples were collected before any treatment. Spectra were also collected using attenuated total reflection, Fourier-transform (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, to investigate the differences between the two techniques. Results of this pilot study suggests SNOM-IR-FEL may be able to distinguish cervical abnormalities based upon changes in the chemical profiles for each grade of dyskaryosis at designated wavelengths associated with DNA, Amide I/II, and lipids. The novel data sets are the first collected using SNOM-IR-FEL in transmission mode at the ALICE facility (UK), and obtained using whole cells as opposed to tissue sections, thus providing an 'intact' chemical profile. These data sets are suited to complementing future work on image analysis, and/or applying the newly developed algorithm to other datasets collected using the SNOM-IR-FEL approach.

  8. German and U.S. laboratories to collaborate on the development of X-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Multimedia

    Calder, N

    2002-01-01

    Germany's leading particle physics and synchrotron radiation laboratory (DESY), and the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to establish a unique international collaboration for the development of X-ray free-electron lasers (1 page).

  9. Differences between intra- and extra-cavity pulse time structure in a hole-coupled free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weits, H. H.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van Werkhoven, G. H. C.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    In the strong-slippage regime of a free-electron laser, the optical pulse inside the resonator is composed of a series of subsequently growing and decaying subpulses due to a limit-cycle oscillation. The picosecond time structure of the outcoupled pulses can be quite different from that of the

  10. Low-charge, hard x-ray free electron laser driven with an X-band injector and accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Sun (孙一鹏

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam’s longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms, low-charge (10 pC electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters, which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  11. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  12. Three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation of free-electron lasers with planar, helical, and elliptical undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.; van der Slot, P. J. M.; Grimminck, D. L. A. G.; Setija, I. D.; Falgari, P.

    2017-02-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have been built ranging in wavelength from long-wavelength oscillators using partial wave guiding through ultraviolet through hard x-ray that are either seeded or start from noise. In addition, FELs that produce different polarizations of the output radiation ranging from linear through elliptic to circular polarization are currently under study. In this paper, we develop a three-dimensional, time-dependent formulation that is capable of modeling this large variety of FEL configurations including different polarizations. We employ a modal expansion for the optical field, i.e., a Gaussian expansion with variable polarization for free-space propagation. This formulation uses the full Newton-Lorentz force equations to track the particles through the optical and magnetostatic fields. As a result, arbitrary three-dimensional representations for different undulator configurations are implemented, including planar, helical, and elliptical undulators. In particular, we present an analytic model of an APPLE-II undulator to treat arbitrary elliptical polarizations, which is used to treat general elliptical polarizations. To model oscillator configurations, and allow propagation of the optical field outside the undulator and interact with optical elements, we link the FEL simulation with the optical propagation code OPC. We present simulations using the APPLE-II undulator model to produce elliptically polarized output radiation, and present a detailed comparison with recent experiments using a tapered undulator configuration at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Validation of the nonlinear formation is also shown by comparison with experimental results obtained in the Sorgente Pulsata Auto-amplificata di Radiazione Coerente SASE FEL experiment at ENEA Frascati, a seeded tapered amplifier experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the 10 kW upgrade oscillator experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  13. Higher-order harmonics coupling in different free-electron laser codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannessi, L.; Freund, H. P.; Musumeci, P.; Reiche, S.

    2008-08-01

    The capability for simulation of the dynamics of a free-electron laser including the higher-order harmonics in linear undulators exists in several existing codes as MEDUSA [H.P. Freund, S.G. Biedron, and S.V. Milton, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 27 (2000) 243; H.P. Freund, Phys. Rev. ST-AB 8 (2005) 110701] and PERSEO [L. Giannessi, Overview of Perseo, a system for simulating FEL dynamics in Mathcad, , in: Proceedings of FEL 2006 Conference, BESSY, Berlin, Germany, 2006, p. 91], and has been recently implemented in GENESIS 1.3 [See ]. MEDUSA and GENESIS also include the dynamics of even harmonics induced by the coupling through the betatron motion. In addition MEDUSA, which is based on a non-wiggler averaged model, is capable of simulating the generation of even harmonics in the transversally cold beam regime, i.e. when the even harmonic coupling arises from non-linear effects associated with longitudinal particle dynamics and not to a finite beam emittance. In this paper a comparison between the predictions of the codes in different conditions is given.

  14. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  15. An XUV-split and delay line at the free electron laser in Hamburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeck, Torben; Meyer, Holger; Gieschen, Sven; Beye, Martin; Schlotter, William F.; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Foehlisch, Alexander; Wurth, Wilfried [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Nagasono, Mitsuru [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); XFEL Project Head Office, RIKEN, Hyogo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    At the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) we are integrating a soft X-ray beam split and delay line to the plane grating monochromator beamline (PG2). This system will enable pump-probe spectroscopy of ultrafast dynamics. Pulse to pulse timing jitter is circumvented by the controlled synchronisation of the delay line. The wavefront of the incoming beam is divided by illuminating the edge of a mirror. By controlling the optical path length for each beam, pulse delays as short as 10 fs or as long as 20 ps can be generated. The system employs four mirrors to split and mix the beam and four mirrors to control the delay. Each mirror is a silicon single crystal with a diamond like carbon coating. The four delay mirrors are arranged at grazing incidence forming a parallelogram. Together with the beam splitters this forms an adjustable path Mach-Zehnder interferometer. For stability the delay mirrors are fixed to a rigid support structure. Simply translating the structure imparts a delay between the pulses.

  16. Structural biology at the European X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarelli, Massimo; Mancuso, Adrian P

    2014-07-17

    The European X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility, under construction in the Hamburg region, will provide high-peak brilliance (greater than 10(33) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) per 0.1% BW), ultrashort pulses (approx. 10 fs) of X-rays, with a high repetition rate (up to 27 000 pulses s(-1)) from 2016 onwards. The main features of this exceptional X-ray source, and the instrumentation developments necessary to exploit them fully, for application to a variety of scientific disciplines, are briefly summarized. In the case of structural biology, that has a central role in the scientific case of this new facility, the instruments and ancillary laboratories that are being planned and built within the baseline programme of the European XFEL and by consortia of users are also discussed. It is expected that the unique features of the source and the advanced features of the instrumentation will allow operation modes with more efficient use of sample materials, faster acquisition times, and conditions better approaching feasibility of single molecule imaging. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Angular correlations of photons from solution diffraction at a free-electron laser encode molecular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Mendez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During X-ray exposure of a molecular solution, photons scattered from the same molecule are correlated. If molecular motion is insignificant during exposure, then differences in momentum transfer between correlated photons are direct measurements of the molecular structure. In conventional small- and wide-angle solution scattering, photon correlations are ignored. This report presents advances in a new biomolecular structural analysis technique, correlated X-ray scattering (CXS, which uses angular intensity correlations to recover hidden structural details from molecules in solution. Due to its intense rapid pulses, an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL is an excellent tool for CXS experiments. A protocol is outlined for analysis of a CXS data set comprising a total of half a million X-ray exposures of solutions of small gold nanoparticles recorded at the Spring-8 Ångström Compact XFEL facility (SACLA. From the scattered intensities and their correlations, two populations of nanoparticle domains within the solution are distinguished: small twinned, and large probably non-twinned domains. It is shown analytically how, in a solution measurement, twinning information is only accessible via intensity correlations, demonstrating how CXS reveals atomic-level information from a disordered solution of like molecules.

  18. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  19. Electron beam optics and trajectory control in the Fermi free electron laser delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Di Mitri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam optics (particle betatron motion and trajectory (centroid secular motion in the FERMI@Elettra free electron laser (FEL are modeled and experimentally controlled by means of the elegant particle tracking code. This powerful tool, well known to the accelerator community, is here for the first time fully integrated into the Tango-server based high level software of an FEL facility, thus ensuring optimal charge transport efficiency and superposition of the beam Twiss parameters to the design optics. The software environment, the experimental results collected during the commissioning of FERMI@Elettra, and the comparison with the model are described. As a result, a matching of the beam optics to the design values is accomplished and quantified in terms of the betatron mismatch parameter with relative accuracy down to the 10^{-3} level. The beam optics control allows accurate energy spread measurements with sub-keV accuracy in dedicated dispersive lines. Trajectory correction and feedback is achieved to a 5  μm level with the implementation of theoretical response matrices. In place of the empirical ones, they speed up the process of trajectory control when the machine optics is changed, avoid particle losses that may occur during the on-line computation of experimental matrices, and confirm a good agreement of the experimental magnetic lattice with the model.

  20. Effects of beam quality in a free-electron laser oscillator with two electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soon-Kwon

    2017-11-01

    We have studied the electron beam quality in a free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator by using two electron beams of different harmonically related energies in the FEL facility, which is operated in the infrared and far-infrared regions. The electron beam quality, such as emittance, energy spread, and higher-order modes were studied using an extended three-dimensional (3D) FEL code for two electron beams that we have developed. The variations in the radiation amplitude of the electron beam's emittances, and energy spread were also calculated for a tapered wiggler for the multiparticle and multi-pass number using a new 3D code. The evolution of the radiation field intensity for higher-order modes of the wiggler with beam emittance and energy spread was studied for the two-electron beam's FEL performance. We found that the radiation intensity was degraded due to the energy spread and the emittance of the electron beam. We minimized the degradation of the radiation intensity by optimizing the tapered wiggler for the coupled two-beam FEL oscillator.

  1. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, J. A. G.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Setija, I. D.

    2017-08-01

    High gain free electron lasers (FELs) driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ˜20 m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  2. A method for estimating the temperature in high energy density free electron laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principi, Emiliano, E-mail: emiliano.principi@unicam.i [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Camerino via Madonna delle Carceri, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Ferrante, Carino; Filipponi, Adriano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila, Via Vetoio, I-67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Bencivenga, Filippo; D' Amico, Francesco; Masciovecchio, Claudio [Synchrotron ELETTRA, Strada Statale 14-I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Cicco, Andrea [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Camerino via Madonna delle Carceri, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); IMPMC, Universite Paris 6, CNRS, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)

    2010-09-21

    Present and forthcoming free electron laser (FEL) large scale facilities deliver high fluence ultrafast soft and hard X-ray pulses able to create and probe warm dense matter (WDM). Proper diagnostic for basic physical quantities, like temperature and density, is necessary, but the short lifetime of the WDM state (few ps) makes their measurements a challenging task. In this work we propose a method to estimate the WDM temperature using the experimental information from a slow temperature pyrometric probe exploiting the properties of the heat diffusion equation. Numerical simulations show that for typical thin foil samples, a temperature measurement with 1-10{mu}s temporal resolution at the distance of about 300-500{mu}m from the beam center contains sufficient information to retrieve the initial spatial temperature distribution with sufficient accuracy providing information on the temperature reached in the WDM regime. The inversion of the experimental information is obtained by means of a Bayesian approach exploiting a Metropolis Monte Carlo numerical procedure. The model and calculations presented in this work provide the theoretical background for the development of a device for temperature diagnostics of the TIMEX end-station at the Fermi-Elettra FEL facility.

  3. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form.

  4. Seeded free-electron and inverse free-electron laser techniques for radiation amplification and electron microbunching in the terahertz range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sung

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive analysis is presented that describes amplification of a seed THz pulse in a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL driven by a photoinjector. The dynamics of the radiation pulse and the modulated electron beam are modeled using the time-dependent FEL code, GENESIS 1.3. A 10-ps (FWHM electron beam with a peak current of 50–100 A allows amplification of a ∼1  kW seed pulse in the frequency range 0.5–3 THz up to 10–100 MW power in a relatively compact 2-m long planar undulator. The electron beam driving the FEL is strongly modulated, with some inhomogeneity due to the slippage effect. It is shown that THz microbunching of the electron beam is homogeneous over the entire electron pulse when saturated FEL amplification is utilized at the very entrance of an undulator. This requires seeding of a 30-cm long undulator buncher with a 1–3 MW of pump power with radiation at the resonant frequency. A narrow-band seed pulse in the THz range needed for these experiments can be generated by frequency mixing of CO_{2} laser lines in a GaAs nonlinear crystal. Two schemes for producing MW power pulses in seeded FELs are considered in some detail for the beam parameters achievable at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA: the first uses a waveguide to transport radiation in the 0.5–3 THz range through a 2-m long FEL amplifier and the second employs high-gain third harmonic generation using the FEL process at 3–9 THz.

  5. Beam manipulation for compact laser wakefield accelerator based free-electron lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loulergue, A; Labat, M; Evain, C; Benabderrahmane, C; Malka, Victor; Couprie, M E

    2015-01-01

    .... After the success of FELs based on conventional acceleration using radio-frequency cavities, an important challenge is the development of FELs based on electron bunching accelerated by a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA...

  6. New results of the high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Doyuran, A; Ben-Zvi, I; Biedron, S G; Di Mauro, Louis F; Graves, W; Jagger, J M; Johnson, E; Krinsky, S; Malone, R; Pogorelsky, I V; Rakowsky, G; Sajaev, Vadim; Shaftan, T; Skaritka, J; Vasserman, I B; Wang, X J; Woodle, M; Yakimenko, V; Yu, L H

    2001-01-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of high-gain harmonic generation carried out at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A seed CO sub 2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 mu m was used to generate FEL output at a 5.3-mu m wavelength. The duration of the output pulse was measured using a second-harmonic intensity autocorrelator, and the coherence length was measured using an interferometer. We also measured the energy distribution of the electron beam after it exited the second undulator, observing behavior consistent with that is expected at saturation. The intensity of the harmonic components of the output at 2.65 and 1.77 mu m was determined relative to that of the 5.3-mu m fundamental. Finally, using a corrector magnet upstream of the radiator, steering effects on the trajectories of the electron and light beams were studied.

  7. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahige G. Abdallah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also

  8. Nonlinear resonances in a multi-stage free-electron laser amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, S. [Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Takayama, K. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    A two-beam accelerator (TBA) is a possible candidate of future linear colliders, in which the demanded rf power is provided by a multi-stage free-electron laser (MFEL). After if amplification in each stage, a driving beam is re-accelerated by an induction unit and propagates into the next stage. Recently it has been recognized that the multi-stage character of the MFEL causes resonances between its periodicity and the synchrotron motion in an rf bucket. Since the synchrotron oscillation is strongly modulated by the resonance and at the worst a large fraction of particles is trapped in the resonance islands, the nonlinear resonances in the FEL longitudinal beam dynamics can lead to notable degradation of the MFEL performance, such as output fluctuation and phase modulation which have been big concerns in the accelerator society. The overall efficiency of the MFEL and the quality of the amplified microwave power are key issues for realizing the TBA/FEL Particularly the rf phase and amplitude errors must be maintained within tolerance. One of significant obstacles is an amplification of undesired modes. If a small-size waveguide is employed, the FEL resonance energies for undesired higher order modes shift very far from that for a fundamental mode; so it is possible to prevent higher order modes from evolving. Such a small-size waveguide, however, gives a high power density in the FEL. Simulation results have demonstrated that the nonlinear resonances occur in die FEL longitudinal motion when the power density exceeds some threshold. An analytical method for studying the nonlinear resonance in the TBA/FEL is developed based on the macroparticle model which can describe analytically the drastic behaviors in the evolutions of the phase and amplitude. In the theory the basic 1D-FEL equations are reduced to a nonlinear pendulum equation with respect to the ponderomotive phase.

  9. Characterizing the luminescence properties of LiF crystal imaging detectors using femtosecond soft X-ray monochromatic free electron laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Bolton, Paul [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Mitrofanov, Alexander [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, Alexander [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nagasono, Mitsuru; Tono, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Tetsuya [XFEL RIKEN, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina [XFEL RIKEN, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Senba, Yashinori; Togashi, Tadashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    The monochromatic soft X-ray femtosecond pulses of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) with wavelengths of 17.2-61.5 nm were applied for measurements of optical features of point defects photoluminescence in LiF crystals. It was observed that peak of photoluminescence spectra appears near 530 nm and is associated with emission of F{sub 3}{sup +} centers. Our results suggest that a shortening of the applied laser pulses down to pico - or femtosecond duration causes redistribution of photolumi-nescence peak intensity from the red to the green part of the spectra and does not depend on the energy of EUV or X-ray photons. Dependence of peak intensity of photoluminescence spectra on the fluence of FEL radiation was measured. Even for relatively high fluencies a quenching phenomenon was not observed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. An optical resonator with insertable scraper output coupler for the JAERI far-infrared free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, R; Nishimori, N; Sawamura, M; Kikuzawa, N; Shizuma, T; Minehara, E J

    2001-01-01

    The performance of an optical resonator featuring an insertable scraper output coupler was evaluated for the JAERI far-infrared free-electron laser. An efficiency factor of the resonator was introduced for evaluation. The efficiency factor was derived from the amount of the output coupling and diffractive loss of the optical resonator, which were calculated by using an optical mode calculation code, using the iterative computation called Fox-Li procedure. As a result of the evaluation, it was found that the insertable scraper coupler was the most suitable for the far-infrared free-electron lasers.Dependencies of insertion direction and scraper radius were also investigated to find out the optimum geometry of the insertable scraper coupler. It was found that the optimum direction of the scraper was parallel to the wiggling plane of the electron beam and the efficiency of the optical resonator increased with the enlargement of the scraper radius.

  11. Generation of High-Power High-Intensity Short X-Ray Free-Electron-Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetg, Marc W; Lutman, Alberto A; Ding, Yuantao; Maxwell, Timothy J; Decker, Franz-Josef; Bergmann, Uwe; Huang, Zhirong

    2018-01-05

    X-ray free-electron lasers combine a high pulse power, short pulse length, narrow bandwidth, and high degree of transverse coherence. Any increase in the photon pulse power, while shortening the pulse length, will further push the frontier on several key x-ray free-electron laser applications including single-molecule imaging and novel nonlinear x-ray methods. This Letter shows experimental results at the Linac Coherent Light Source raising its maximum power to more than 300% of the current limit while reducing the photon pulse length to 10 fs. This was achieved by minimizing residual transverse-longitudinal centroid beam offsets and beam yaw and by correcting the dispersion when operating over 6 kA peak current with a longitudinally shaped beam.

  12. Design and operation of an inverse free-electron-laser accelerator in the microwave regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Rodney Bruce

    2000-09-01

    A novel electron accelerator demonstrating the inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) principle has been designed, built, and operated using radio-frequency power at 2.856 GHz. Such an accelerator uses a stationary, periodic magnetic field to impart transverse motion to charged particles, which are then accelerated by guided electromagnetic waves. The experiment described here demonstrates for the first time the phase dependence of IFEL acceleration. This design uses up to 15 MW of RF power propagating in a smooth-walled circular waveguide surrounded by a pulsed bifilar helical undulator; an array of solenoids provides an axial guiding magnetic field undulator; pitch, which is initially 11.75 cm, is linearly increased to 12.3 cm. over the 1-meter length of the structure to maintain acceleration gradient. Numerical computations predict an energy gain of up to 0.7 MeV using a 6 MeV injected beam from a 2-1/2 cell RF gun, with small energy spread and strong phase trapping. The initial injection phase is the most important parameter, determining the rate of energy gain or loss. These simulations are compared with experimental measurements at low power in which electron beams at energies between 5 and 6 MeV gain up to 0.35 MeV with minimal energy spread, all exiting particles having been accelerated. The predicted phase sensitivity of the mechanism is verified, with beams injected into accelerating phases gaining energy cleanly while those injected into ``decelerating'' phases are shown to be degraded in quality and hardly changed in energy, demonstrating the asymmetry of a tapered-wiggler design. Agreement with simulation is very good for accelerating phases, though less exact otherwise. Scaling to higher power and frequency is investigated. The maximum attainable acceleration gradient for a MIFELA using 150 MW of RF power at 34 GHz is estimated to be at least 30 MV/m, and laser IFELs could conceivably reach gradients in the GeV/m range.

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Kroll, Thomas; Kern, Jan; Kubin, Markus; Ratner, Daniel; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D.; Löchel, Heike; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Ding, Yuantao; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Turner, Joshua J.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis L.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. However, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatization is needed. Here we compare L-...

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Kroll, T.; J. Kern; Kubin, M; Ratner, D.; Gul, S.; Fuller, FD; Löchel, H.; Krzywinski, J.; A. Lutman; Ding, Y.; Dakovski, GL; Moeller, S.; Turner, JJ; Alonso-Mori, R.; Nordlund, DL

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Optical Society of America. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. However, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatiz...

  15. Free Electron Laser For Siberian Centre For Photochemical Research The Control System For The Magnet Power Supplies

    CERN Document Server

    Velikanov, Yu M; Evtushenko, Yu A; Kayran, D A; Kozak, V R; Kuper, E A; Medvedev, L E; Medvedko, A S; Oreshkov, A D; Petrov, S P; Serednyakov, S I; Tararyshkin, S V; Veremeenko, V F; Vinokurov, N A; Zagorodnikov, E I

    2004-01-01

    A control system for the magnetic system of the free electron laser (FEL) is described. The characteristics and structure of the power supply system are presented. The control system is based on embedded intelligent controllers with the CAN-BUS interfaced. The control software structure and capabilities are described. A possibility of connection of the control software to the integrated control system using the Epics Channel Access protocol is also discussed.

  16. Saturable absorption of an x-ray free-electron-laser heated solid-density aluminum plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackstraw, D S; Ciricosta, O; Vinko, S M; Barbrel, B; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Cho, B I; Chung, H-K; Dakovski, G L; Engelhorn, K; Hájková, V; Heimann, P; Holmes, M; Juha, L; Krzywinski, J; Lee, R W; Toleikis, S; Turner, J J; Zastrau, U; Wark, J S

    2015-01-09

    High-intensity x-ray pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser are used to heat and probe a solid-density aluminum sample. The photon-energy-dependent transmission of the heating beam is studied through the use of a photodiode. Saturable absorption is observed, with the resulting transmission differing significantly from the cold case, in good agreement with atomic-kinetics simulations.

  17. International Conference on Free Electron Lasers (11th) Conference Digest Held in Naples, Florida on 28 August-1 September 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Kimel, CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Conference Program Committee Robert E. Behringer, Ballena Systems Corp., Alameda, CA Stephen V...FREE ELECTRON LASERS Naples, Florida August 28 - September 1, 1989 90 02 %3 028 Larry Altgilbers Robert Behringer US Army Missile Command Ballena ...Systems Corporation 1150 Ballena Blvd. Redstone Arsenal, AL 35899 Alameda, CA 94501 USA USA Avner Amir George Bekefi Quantum Institute MIT University of

  18. Comparing an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a viable alternative for mid-infrared tissue ablation with a free electron laser (FEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackanos, Mark A; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M; Contag, Christopher H; Kozub, John A; Jansen, E Duco

    2012-11-01

    Beneficial medical laser ablation removes material efficiently with minimal collateral damage. A Mark-III free electron laser (FEL), at a wavelength of 6.45 μm has demonstrated minimal damage and high ablation yield in ocular and neural tissues. While this wavelength has shown promise for surgical applications, further advances are limited by the high overhead for FEL use. Alternative mid-infrared sources are needed for further development. We compared the FEL with a 5-μs pulse duration with a Q-switched ZGP-OPO with a 100-ns pulse duration at mid-infrared wavelengths. There were no differences in the ablation threshold of water and mouse dermis with these two sources in spite of the difference in their pulse structures. There was a significant difference in crater depth between the ZGP:OPO and the FEL. At 6.1 μm, the OPO craters are eight times the depth of the FEL craters. The OPO craters at 6.45 and 6.73 μm were six and five times the depth of the FEL craters, respectively. Bright-field (pump-probe) images showed the classic ablation mechanism from formation of a plume through collapse and recoil. The crater formation, ejection, and collapse phases occurred on a faster time-scale with the OPO than with the FEL. This research showed that a ZGP-OPO laser could be a viable alternative to FEL for clinical applications.

  19. Development of an intravascular laser treatment with an infrared free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Yoshihashi, Sachiko; Ishii, Katsunori; Sano, Tomoko; Awazu, Kunio

    2005-04-01

    A cholesterol ester is selective dissociated by MIR-FEL irradiation with wavelength of 5.75 μm correspond to C=O stretching vibration of ester bond. To evaluate the optimum irradiation condition for cholesterol ester decomposition without normal endothelium cell damage, we perform a 5.75 μm-FEL irradiation to a two-layer vessel model which is cholesterol oleate as a model of atherosclerotic lesions and gelatin as a model of endothelial cells. The ester decomposition and gelatin damege depends on total power density of 5.75 μm-FEL provided the two-layer model. Exposure of the FEL with power density exceed 17.8 W/cm2 decomposed cholesterol ester thorough gelain layer of 15 μm thickness. If FEL with power density of 25.0 W/cm2 is exposed during 10 seconds, the gelatin is evaporized. Therefore, the optimum condition for ester decomposition without gelatin evaporation is between 75 J/cm2 from 20 J/cm2 in the case of 15 μm gelatin layer thickness. The maximum ester decomposition rate without gelatin vaporization is 71% on FEL of power density of 17.8 W/cm2 for 10 seconds.

  20. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel

    2008-07-21

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10{sup -4} in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  1. Synthesis of highly oriented TiN coatings by free electron laser processing of titanium in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettore Carpene; Michelle D. Shinn; Peter Schaaf

    2004-11-01

    Titanium was irradiated in pure nitrogen gas by means of a free electron laser. The treatment resulted in the formation of -TiNx layers, with surface stoichiometry of x {approx} 1. Under certain circumstances the nitride phase showed an almost perfect crystallographic texture with the delta-TiNx(200) planes parallel to the irradiated surface, and well aligned dendrites growing normal to the surface. The mechanism of the dendritic alignment and the origin of the texture correlate with the existence of a solidification front starting at the surface, which is very peculiar for laser surface treatments. This phenomenon is explained with the help of numerical simulations.

  2. First lasing of the KAERI millimeter-wave free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.; Cho, S.O. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The millimeter-wave FEL program at KAERI aims at the generation of high-power CW laser beam with high efficiency at the wavelength of 3{approximately}10 mm for the application in plasma heating and in power beaming. In the first oscillation experiment, the FEL has lased at the wavelength of 10 mm with the pulsewidth of 10{approximately}30 {mu}s. The peak power is about 1 kW The FEL is driven by a recirculating electrostatic accelerator having tandem geometry. The energy and the current of the electron beam are 400 keV and 2 A, respectively. The FEL resonator is located in the high-voltage terminal and is composed of a helical undulator, two mesh mirrors, and a cylindrical waveguide. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. At present, with no axial guiding magnetic field only 15 % of the injected beam pass through the undulator. Transport ratio of the electron beam through the undulator is very sensitive to the injection parameters such as the diameter and the divergence of the electron beam Simulations show that, with unproved injection condition, the FEL can generate more than 50 kW of average power in CW operation. Details of the experiments, including the spectrum measurement and the recirculation of electron beam, are presented.

  3. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  4. High Energy Gain of Trapped Electrons in a Tapered, Diffraction-Dominated Inverse-Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Boucher, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Doyuran, A.; England, R. J.; Joshi, C.; Pellegrini, C.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sung, C.; Tolmachev, S.; Travish, G.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Yarovoi, T.; Yoder, R. B.

    2005-04-01

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, ˜1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  5. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  6. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Thumm, M K

    2002-01-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in...

  7. Transform-limited x-ray pulse generation from a high-brightness self-amplified spontaneous-emission free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, B W J; Thompson, N R; Dunning, D J

    2013-03-29

    A method to achieve high-brightness self-amplified spontaneous emission (HB-SASE) in the free-electron laser (FEL) is described. The method uses repeated nonequal electron beam delays to delocalize the collective FEL interaction and break the radiation coherence length dependence on the FEL cooperation length. The method requires no external seeding or photon optics and so is applicable at any wavelength or repetition rate. It is demonstrated, using linear theory and numerical simulations, that the radiation coherence length can be increased by approximately 2 orders of magnitude over SASE with a corresponding increase in spectral brightness. Examples are shown of HB-SASE generating transform-limited FEL pulses in the soft x-ray and near transform-limited pulses in the hard x-ray. Such pulses may greatly benefit existing applications and may also open up new areas of scientific research.

  8. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  9. Distributed seeding for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, IV, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    We describe a new FEL line-narrowing technique called distributed seeding (DS), using Si(111) Bragg crystal monochromators to enhance the spectral brightness of the MaRIE hard X-ray freeelectron laser. DS differs from self-seeding in three important aspects. First, DS relies on spectral filtering of the radiation at multiple locations along the undulator, with a monochromator located every few power gain lengths. Second, DS performs filtering early in the exponential gain region before SASE spikes start to appear in the radiation longitudinal profile. Third, DS provides the option to select a wavelength longer than the peak of the SASE gain curve, which leads to improved spectral contrast of the seeded FEL over the SASE background. Timedependent Genesis simulations show the power-vs-z growth curves for DS exhibit behaviors of a seeded FEL amplifier, such as exponential growth region immediately after the filters. Of the seeding approaches considered, the two-stage DS spectra produce the highest contrast of seeded FEL over the SASE background and that the three-stage DS provides the narrowest linewidth with a relative spectral FWHM of 8 X 10-5 .

  10. Wavelength-versatile optical vortex lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omatsu, Takashige; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Lee, Andrew J.

    2017-12-01

    The unique properties of optical vortex beams, in particular their spiral wavefront, have resulted in the emergence of a wide range of unique applications for this type of laser output. These applications include optical tweezing, free space optical communications, microfabrication, environmental optics, and astrophysics. However, much like the laser in its infancy, the adaptation of this type of laser output requires a diversity of wavelengths. We report on recent progress on development of optical vortex laser sources and in particular, focus on their wavelength extension, where nonlinear optical processes have been used to generate vortex laser beams with wavelengths which span the ultraviolet to infrared. We show that nonlinear optical conversion can be used to not only diversify the output wavelength of these sources, but can be used to uniquely engineer the wavefront and spatial properties of the laser output.

  11. Planar undulator motion excited by a fixed traveling wave: Quasiperiodic averaging, normal forms, and the free electron laser pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, James A.; Heinemann, Klaus; Vogt, Mathias; Gooden, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of planar motion of energetic electrons moving through a planar dipole undulator, excited by a fixed planar polarized plane wave Maxwell field in the x-ray free electron laser (FEL) regime. Our starting point is the 6D Lorentz system, which allows planar motions, and we examine this dynamical system as the wavelength λ of the traveling wave varies. By scalings and transformations the 6D system is reduced, without approximation, to a 2D system in a form for a rigorous asymptotic analysis using the method of averaging (MoA), a long-time perturbation theory. The two dependent variables are a scaled energy deviation and a generalization of the so-called ponderomotive phase. As λ varies the system passes through resonant and nonresonant (NonR) intervals and we develop NonR and near-to-resonant (NearR) MoA normal form approximations to the exact equations. The NearR normal forms contain a parameter which measures the distance from a resonance. For the planar motion, with the special initial condition that matches into the undulator design trajectory, and on resonance, the NearR normal form reduces to the well-known FEL pendulum system. We then state and prove NonR and NearR first-order averaging theorems which give explicit error bounds for the normal form approximations. We prove the theorems in great detail, giving the interested reader a tutorial on mathematically rigorous perturbation theory in a context where the proofs are easily understood. The proofs are novel in that they do not use a near-identity transformation and they use a system of differential inequalities. The NonR case is an example of quasiperiodic averaging where the small divisor problem enters in the simplest possible way. To our knowledge the planar problem has not been analyzed with the generality we aspire to here nor has the standard FEL pendulum system been derived with associated error bounds as we do here. We briefly discuss the low gain theory in light of

  12. Transverse and temporal characteristics of a high-gain free-electron laser in the saturation regime

    CERN Document Server

    Huang Zhi Rong

    2002-01-01

    The transverse and the temporal characteristics of a high-gain free-electron laser are governed by refractive guiding and sideband instability, respectively. Using the self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell equations, we explicitly determine the effective index of refraction and the guided radiation mode for an electron beam with arbitrary transverse size. Electrons trapped by the guided radiation execute synchrotron oscillation and hence are susceptible to the sideband instability. We explain the spectral evolution and determine the sideband growth rate. These theoretical predictions agree well with GINGER simulation results.

  13. Nonlinear delayed symmetry breaking in a solid excited by hard x-ray free electron laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, A., E-mail: aferrer@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Johnson, J. A., E-mail: jjohnson@chem.byu.edu; Mariager, S. O.; Grübel, S.; Staub, U. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Huber, T.; Trant, M.; Johnson, S. L., E-mail: johnson@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Zhu, D.; Chollet, M.; Robinson, J.; Lemke, H. T. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Ingold, G.; Beaud, P. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Milne, C. [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-04-13

    We have studied the ultrafast changes of electronic states in bulk ZnO upon intense hard x-ray excitation from a free electron laser. By monitoring the transient anisotropy induced in an optical probe beam, we observe a delayed breaking of the initial c-plane symmetry of the crystal that lasts for several picoseconds. Interaction with the intense x-ray pulses modifies the electronic state filling in a manner inconsistent with a simple increase in electronic temperature. These results may indicate a way to use intense ultrashort x-ray pulses to investigate high-energy carrier dynamics and to control certain properties of solid-state materials.

  14. Size-dependent ultrafast ionization dynamics of nanoscale samples in intense femtosecond x-ray free-electron-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Swiggers, Michelle L; Coffee, Ryan N; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth; Bozek, John D; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Kornilov, Oleg; Möller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph

    2012-06-08

    All matter exposed to intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser is strongly ionized on time scales competing with the inner-shell vacancy lifetimes. We show that for nanoscale objects the environment, i.e., nanoparticle size, is an important parameter for the time-dependent ionization dynamics. The Auger lifetimes of large Ar clusters are found to be increased compared to small clusters and isolated atoms, due to delocalization of the valence electrons in the x-ray-induced nanoplasma. As a consequence, large nanometer-sized samples absorb intense femtosecond x-ray pulses less efficiently than small ones.

  15. Visualizing a protein quake with time-resolved X-ray scattering at a free-electron laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to measure ultrafast protein structural changes using time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free-electron laser. We demonstrated this approach using multiphoton excitation of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center, observing an ultrafast global...... conformational change that arises within picoseconds and precedes the propagation of heat through the protein. This provides direct structural evidence for a 'protein quake': the hypothesis that proteins rapidly dissipate energy through quake-like structural motions....

  16. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schlotter, W.F.; Turner, J.J.; Rowen, M.; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Krupin, O.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Soufli, R.; Fernández-Perea, M.; Kelez, N.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G.; Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Hau-Riege, S.; Juha, Libor; Chalupský, Jaromír; Hájková, Věra; Mancuso, A.P.; Singer, A.; Yefanov, O.; Vartanyants, I.A.; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; Nugent, K.A.; Sinn, H.; Lüning, J.; Schaffert, S.; Eisebitt, S.; Lee, W.-S.; Scherz, A.; Nilsson, A.R.; Wurth, W.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 4 (2012), "043107-1"-"043107-11" ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : free-electron laser * materials science * beamline * x-ray laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012

  17. A photodiode amplifier system for pulse-by-pulse intensity measurement of an x-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Togo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Togashi, Tadashi; Sato, Takahiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Omodani, Motohiko; Kirihara, Yoichi; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Yamaga, Mitsuhiro; Uchiyama, Sadayuki; Hatsui, Takaki

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a single-shot intensity-measurement system using a silicon positive-intrinsic-negative (PIN) photodiode for x-ray pulses from an x-ray free electron laser. A wide dynamic range (10(3)-10(11) photons/pulse) and long distance signal transmission (>100 m) were required for this measurement system. For this purpose, we developed charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers, which can process charge pulses with a wide dynamic range and variable durations (ns-μs) and charge levels (pC-μC). Output signals from the amplifiers were transmitted to a data acquisition system through a long cable in the form of a differential signal. The x-ray pulse intensities were calculated from the peak values of the signals by a waveform fitting procedure. This system can measure 10(3)-10(9) photons/pulse of ~10 keV x-rays by direct irradiation of a silicon PIN photodiode, and from 10(7)-10(11) photons/pulse by detecting the x-rays scattered by a diamond film using the silicon PIN photodiode. This system gives a relative accuracy of ~10(-3) with a proper gain setting of the amplifiers for each measurement. Using this system, we succeeded in detecting weak light at the developmental phase of the light source, as well as intense light during lasing of the x-ray free electron laser. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  18. Constraints on photon pulse duration from longitudinal electron beam diagnostics at a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Behrens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The successful operation of x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs, like the Linac Coherent Light Source or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH, makes unprecedented research on matter at atomic length and ultrafast time scales possible. However, in order to take advantage of these unique light sources and to meet the strict requirements of many experiments in photon science, FEL photon pulse durations need to be known and tunable. This can be achieved by controlling the FEL driving electron beams, and high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics can be utilized to provide constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In this paper, we present comparative measurements of soft x-ray pulse durations and electron bunch lengths at FLASH. The soft x-ray pulse durations were measured by FEL radiation pulse energy statistics and compared to electron bunch lengths determined by frequency-domain spectroscopy of coherent transition radiation in the terahertz range and time-domain longitudinal phase space measurements. The experimental results, theoretical considerations, and simulations show that high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics provide reasonable constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In addition, we demonstrated the generation of soft x-ray pulses with durations below 50 fs (FWHM after the implementation of the new uniform electron bunch compression scheme used at FLASH.

  19. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

    2014-01-01

    .... By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators...

  20. Exact and variational calculations of eigenmodes for three-dimensional free electron laser interaction with a warm electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    I present an exact calculation of free-electron-laser (FEL) eigenmodes (fundamental as well as higher order modes) in the exponential-gain regime. These eigenmodes specify transverse profiles and exponential growth rates of the laser field, and they are self-consistent solutions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the FEL interaction taking into account the effects due to energy spread, emittance and betatron oscillations of the electron beam, and diffraction and guiding of the laser field. The unperturbed electron distribution is assumed to be of Gaussian shape in four dimensional transverse phase space and in the energy variable, but uniform in longitudinal coordinate. The focusing of the electron beam is assumed to be matched to the natural wiggler focusing in both transverse planes. With these assumptions the eigenvalue problem can be reduced to a numerically manageable integral equation and solved exactly with a kernel iteration method. An approximate, but more efficient solution of the integral equation is also obtained for the fundamental mode by a variational technique, which is shown to agree well with the exact results. Furthermore, I present a handy formula, obtained from interpolating the numerical results, for a quick calculation of FEL exponential growth rate. Comparisons with simulation code TDA will also be presented. Application of these solutions to the design and multi-dimensional parameter space optimization for an X-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC linac will be demonstrated. In addition, a rigorous analysis of transverse mode degeneracy and hence the transverse coherence of the X-ray FEL will be presented based on the exact solutions of the higher order guided modes.

  1. Spectrometer for shot-to-shot photon energy characterization in the multi-bunch mode of the free electron laser at Hamburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palutke, S; Gerken, N C; Mertens, K; Klumpp, S; Mozzanica, A; Schmitt, B; Wunderer, C; Graafsma, H; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Wurth, W; Martins, M

    2015-11-01

    The setup and first results from commissioning of a fast online photon energy spectrometer for the vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser at Hamburg (FLASH) at DESY are presented. With the use of the latest advances in detector development, the presented spectrometer reaches readout frequencies up to 1 MHz. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability to record online photon energy spectra on a shot-to-shot base in the multi-bunch mode of FLASH. Clearly resolved shifts in the mean wavelength over the pulse train as well as shot-to-shot wavelength fluctuations arising from the statistical nature of the photon generating self-amplified spontaneous emission process have been observed. In addition to an online tool for beam calibration and photon diagnostics, the spectrometer enables the determination and selection of spectral data taken with a transparent experiment up front over the photon energy of every shot. This leads to higher spectral resolutions without the loss of efficiency or photon flux by using single-bunch mode or monochromators.

  2. Optical beam transport to a remote location for low jitter pump-probe experiments with a free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cinquegrana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a scheme that allows a strong reduction of the timing jitter between the pulses of a free electron laser (FEL and external laser pulses delivered simultaneously at the FEL experimental stations for pump-probe–type experiments. The technique, applicable to all seeding-based FEL schemes, relies on the free-space optical transport of a portion of the seed laser pulse from its optical table to the experimental stations. The results presented here demonstrate that a carefully designed laser beam transport, incorporating also a transverse beam position stabilization, allows one to keep the timing fluctuations, added by as much as 150 m of free space propagation and a number of beam folding mirrors, to less than 4 femtoseconds rms. By its nature our scheme removes the major common timing jitter sources, so the overall jitter in pump-probe measurements done in this way will be below 10 fs (with a margin to be lowered to below 5 fs, much better than the best results reported previously in the literature amounting to 33 fs rms.

  3. Theory, Design and Operation of a Compact Cerenkov Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Fuente Valentin, M.I.

    2007-01-01

    Microwave radiation is extensively used in various elds of research and applications. An important example is the selective heating of materials. In particular, the so-called millimetre-wave radiation, which covers the wavelength range between 1 mm and 10 mm, has several advantages compared to

  4. Drop-on-demand sample delivery for studying biocatalysts in action at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Franklin D; Gul, Sheraz; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Burgie, E Sethe; Young, Iris D; Lebrette, Hugo; Srinivas, Vivek; Brewster, Aaron S; Michels-Clark, Tara; Clinger, Jonathan A; Andi, Babak; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Pastor, Ernest; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Hussein, Rana; Pollock, Christopher J; Zhang, Miao; Stan, Claudiu A; Kroll, Thomas; Fransson, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Kubin, Markus; Aller, Pierre; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Miller, Mitchell D; Amin, Muhamed; Koroidov, Sergey; Roessler, Christian G; Allaire, Marc; Sierra, Raymond G; Docker, Peter T; Glownia, James M; Nelson, Silke; Koglin, Jason E; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Matthieu; Song, Sanghoon; Lemke, Henrik; Liang, Mengning; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Boal, Amie K; Bollinger, J Martin; Krebs, Carsten; Högbom, Martin; Phillips, George N; Vierstra, Richard D; Sauter, Nicholas K; Orville, Allen M; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2017-04-01

    X-ray crystallography at X-ray free-electron laser sources is a powerful method for studying macromolecules at biologically relevant temperatures. Moreover, when combined with complementary techniques like X-ray emission spectroscopy, both global structures and chemical properties of metalloenzymes can be obtained concurrently, providing insights into the interplay between the protein structure and dynamics and the chemistry at an active site. The implementation of such a multimodal approach can be compromised by conflicting requirements to optimize each individual method. In particular, the method used for sample delivery greatly affects the data quality. We present here a robust way of delivering controlled sample amounts on demand using acoustic droplet ejection coupled with a conveyor belt drive that is optimized for crystallography and spectroscopy measurements of photochemical and chemical reactions over a wide range of time scales. Studies with photosystem II, the phytochrome photoreceptor, and ribonucleotide reductase R2 illustrate the power and versatility of this method.

  5. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  6. Status of the Development of Superconducting Undulators for Storage Rings and Free Electron Lasers at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Doose, C.; Fuerst, J.; Harkay, K.; Hasse, Q.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Skiadopoulos, D.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Gluskin, E.; Emma, P.

    2017-06-01

    Development of superconducting undulator (SCU) technology continues at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The experience of building and successful operating the first short-length, 16-mm period length superconducting undulator SCU0 paved the way for a 1-m long, 18-mm period device— SCU18-1— which has been in operation since May 2015. The APS SCU team has also built and tested a 1.5-m long, 21-mm period length undulator as a part of the LCLS SCU R&D program, aimed at demonstration of SCU technology availability for free electron lasers. This undulator successfully achieved all the requirements including a phase error of 5° RMS. Our team has recently completed one more 1-m long, 18-mm period length undulator— SCU18-2— that is replacing the SCU0. We are also working on a helical SCU for the APS. The status of these projects will be presented.

  7. The effect of electron transport on the characterization of x-ray free-electron laser pulses via ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Pardini, Tom

    2017-10-01

    The spatial intensity distribution of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses in-focus is commonly characterized by performing ablative imprints in thin gold films on silica substrates. In many cases, the range of the electrons generated in the gold by x-ray absorption far exceeds the beam size, and so, it is not clear if the results of imprint studies are compromised by electron transport. Thermal conduction could further modify the energy density profile in the material. We used a combination of Monte-Carlo transport and continuum models to quantify the accuracy of the imprint method for characterizing XFEL beam profiles. We found that for x-ray energies in the range of 1 to 10 keV, the actual and the measured beam diameters agree within 12% or better for beam diameters between 0.1 and 1 μm.

  8. Electron beam qualities with and without free electron laser oscillations in the compact storage ring NIJI-IV

    CERN Document Server

    Sei, N; Ogawa, H; Yasumoto, M; Mikado, T

    2003-01-01

    The electron-beam qualities with and without free electron laser (FEL) oscillations were investigated in the compact storage ring NIJI-IV. The peak-electron density in a bunch was suppressed by beam instabilities, so that it was limited to about 1.0 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 m sup - sup 3. The maximum FEL gain estimated for 215 and 300 nm using a well-known one-dimension theory was about 2.8% and 4.6%. The cavity loss at 300 nm was evaluated to be about 2% from the threshold beam current. The bunch length and energy spread with FEL oscillations increased by 1.3 times or more due to bunch heating. The ratio of the FEL gain to a cavity loss estimated from the beam qualities with and without FEL oscillations was almost in accord with the ratio evaluated directly with the measured data of the FEL gain and the cavity loss.

  9. Electron-bunch lengthening on higher-harmonic oscillations in storage-ring free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Norihiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Okuda, Shuichi

    2017-09-01

    The influence of higher-harmonic free-electron laser (FEL) oscillations on an electron beam have been studied by measuring its bunch length at the NIJI-IV storage ring. The bunch length and the lifetime of the electron beam were measured, and were observed to have become longer owing to harmonic lasing, which is in accord with the increase of the FEL gain. It was demonstrated that the saturated FEL power could be described by the theory of bunch heating, even for the harmonic lasing. Cavity-length detuning curves were measured for the harmonic lasing, and it was found that the width of the detuning curve was proportional to a parameter that depended on the bunch length. These experimental results will be useful for developing compact resonator-type FELs by using higher harmonics in the extreme-ultraviolet and the X-ray regions.

  10. Simple convergent-nozzle aerosol injector for single-particle diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Kirian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in high-resolution x-ray free-electron laser-based coherent diffractive imaging is the development of aerosol injectors that can efficiently deliver particles to the peak intensity of the focused X-ray beam. Here, we consider the use of a simple convergent-orifice nozzle for producing tightly focused beams of particles. Through optical imaging we show that 0.5 μm particles can be focused to a full-width at half maximum diameter of 4.2 μm, and we demonstrate the use of such a nozzle for injecting viruses into a micro-focused soft-X-ray FEL beam.

  11. Second harmonic generation spectroscopy in the Reststrahl band of SiC using an infrared free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paarmann, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.paarmann@fhi-berlin.mpg.de; Razdolski, Ilya; Melnikov, Alexey; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Wolf, Martin [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-08-24

    The Reststrahl spectral region of silicon carbide has recently attracted much attention owing to its potential for mid-infrared nanophotonic applications based on surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). Studies of optical phonon resonances responsible for surface polariton formation, however, have so far been limited to linear optics. In this Letter, we report the first nonlinear optical investigation of the Reststrahl region of SiC, employing an infrared free-electron laser to perform second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy. We observe two distinct resonance features in the SHG spectra, one attributed to resonant enhancement of the nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (2)} and the other due to a resonance in the Fresnel transmission. Our work clearly demonstrates high sensitivity of mid-infrared SHG to phonon-driven phenomena and opens a route to studying nonlinear effects in nanophotonic structures based on SPhPs.

  12. Photon transport of the superradiant TeraFERMI THz beamline at the FERMI free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Perucchi, Andrea; Di Pietro, Paola; Lupi, Stefano; Schmidt, Bernhard; Zangrando, Marco

    2016-01-01

    TeraFERMI is the new terahertz (THz) beamline for pump-probe studies on the femtosecond time-scale, under construction at the FERMI free-electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. The beamline will take advantage of the coherent radiation emitted by the spent electrons from the FEL undulators, before being dumped. This will result in short, coherent, high-power THz pulses to be used as a pump beam, in order to modulate structural properties of matter, thereby inducing phase transitions. The TeraFERMI beamline collects THz radiation in the undulator hall and guides it along a beam pipe which is approximately 30 m long, extending across the safety hutch and two shielding walls. Here the optical design, which will allow the efficient transport of the emitted THz radiation in the experimental hall, is presented.

  13. Optical dephasing of a near infrared dye in PMMA: photon echoes using the superconducting accelerator pumped free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, S. R.; Bai, Y. S.; Fayer, M. D.

    1990-07-01

    A superconducting accelerator pumped free electron laser is used to perform picosecond photon echo experiments on the near infrared dye 1,1‧,3,3,3‧,3‧-hexamethylindotricarbocyanine iodide (HITCI) in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The temperature dependence of the optical dephasing is measured from 1.5 to 10 K. At the lowest temperatures a temperature dependence, T-1.4, characteristic of two-level system glass dynamics is observed. Above 5 K, the optical dephasing is exponentially activated with an activation energy of 15 cm-1. This is the same activation energy reported for rhodamine B in PMMA, demonstrating that 15 cm-1 corresponds to an intrinsic glass mode. These are the first photon echo experiments, and to our knowledge, the first nonlinear optical coherence experiments, performed using a FEL as a source.

  14. Modeling of the interaction of an x-ray free-electron laser with large finite samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrusse, O.; André, J.-M.; Jonnard, P.; Gaudin, J.

    2017-10-01

    We describe a model for the study of the interaction of short x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses with large finite samples. Hydrodynamics is solved in one-dimensional planar geometry with consideration of the electron-ion energy exchange and of the possible elastoplastic behavior. From a time-dependent calculation of the complex refractive index and of the underlying atomic physics, XFEL energy deposition is modeled through a calculation of the radiation field in the material. In the case of hard x-ray irradiation, energetic electrons induced by the XFEL absorption can propagate and deposit their energy outside the interaction region. Simulations of the interaction of hard x-ray ultrashort pulses with solid materials Ru and Si at different grazing incidence angles are presented and discussed. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of this approach to predict damage dynamics for materials of interest for x-ray optics.

  15. Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Penn

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available One scheme for harmonic generation employs free electron lasers (FELs with two undulators: the first uses a seed laser to modulate the energy of the electron beam; following a dispersive element which acts to bunch the beam, the second undulator radiates at a higher harmonic. These processes are currently evaluated using extensive calculations or simulation codes which can be slow to evaluate and difficult to set up. We describe a simple algorithm to predict the output of a harmonic generation beam line in the low-gain FEL regime, based on trial functions for the output radiation. Full three-dimensional effects are included. This method has been implemented as a Mathematica® package, named CAMPANILE, which runs rapidly and can be generalized to include effects such as asymmetric beams and misalignments. This method is compared with simulation results using the FEL code GENESIS, both for single stages of harmonic generation and for the LUX project, a design concept for an ultrafast x-ray facility, where multiple stages upshift the input laser frequency by factors of up to 200.

  16. Comparison of optical and electron spectra in an infra-red free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, A.M.; Gillespie, W.A.; Martin, P.F. [Univ. of Abertay, Dundee (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Time-resolved electron and optical spectra recently acquired at the FELIX facility are presented, showing the evolution of the respective macropulses. A comparison is made between the optical power output during the macropulse and the measured power extracted from the electron beam using a simple model of the cavity losses. Data are available for a wide range of operating conditions: the wavelength range is from 9 {mu}m to 28 {mu}m and detuning are between 1/4{lambda} and 2{lambda}. The effect of rapid electron beam energy changes on the optical and electron spectra will also be discussed.

  17. Synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers accelerator physics, instrumentation and science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat; Schneider, Jochen; Hastings, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Hardly any other discovery of the nineteenth century did have such an impact on science and technology as Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen’s seminal find of the X-rays. X-ray tubes soon made their way as excellent instruments for numerous applications in medicine, biology, materials science and testing, chemistry and public security. Developing new radiation sources with higher brilliance and much extended spectral range resulted in stunning developments like the electron synchrotron and electron storage ring and the freeelectron laser. This handbook highlights these developments in fifty chapters. The reader is given not only an inside view of exciting science areas but also of design concepts for the most advanced light sources. The theory of synchrotron radiation and of the freeelectron laser, design examples and the technology basis are presented. The handbook presents advanced concepts like seeding and harmonic generation, the booming field of Terahertz radiation sources and upcoming brilliant light sources dri...

  18. Modeling of terahertz radiation emission from a free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Panwar, Jyotsna; Sharma, Rinku [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi (India)

    2017-05-15

    In this article, we report the generation of terahertz (THz) radiation using the interaction of a laser-modulated relativistic electron beam (REB) with a surface plasma wave. Two laser beams propagating through the modulator interact with the REB, leading to velocity modulation of the beam. This results in pre-bunching of the REB. The pre-bunched beam travels through the drift space, where the velocity modulation translates into density modulation. The density-modulated beam, on interacting with the surface plasma pump wave, acquires an oscillatory velocity that couples with the modulated beam density to give rise to a nonlinear current density which acts as an antenna to give THz radiation. By optimizing the parameters of the beam and the wiggler, we obtain power of the order of 10{sup -4} using the current scheme. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Megawatt Class Free Electron Lasers for Naval Application - Short Rayleigh Length and Stability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    CW Continuous Wave C3I Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence DC Direct Current DD/DDG Destroyer DF Deuterium Fluoride DSBTF...fuel, the ship has both an offensive and defensive capability. e. Lasing Medium Most lasers use a lasing medium such as CO2, Deuterium Fluoride (DF...an agreement with Denmark, Norway , and Italy for development of a joint missile defense system, dubbed NATO Sea Sparrow missile system (NSSMS). Today

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Research on a Millimeter-Wavelength Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    guiding axial magne- mounted on the dump resistor; the latter is used for impedance tic field serves as the electromagnetic pump wave in the beam...beam was obtained by field emission from tic equation in (6w) can be approximated by a relatively sim- a graphite cathode in a foil-less diode. A...York. He is currently a Profesor of Applied Physics NY. Rep. 106. 1986. at Columbia University. New York. In addition to 1101 J. Masud. F. G. Yee. T. C

  1. Development of a far infrared free electron laser based on compact microtron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    1998-11-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between KAERI and BINP, a FIR FEL having tunable range of output wavelength from 30 {mu}m to 50 {mu}m. The peak power is 10kW at maximum. The micropulse width is 10 ps and the macropulse width is 5 {mu}s. The repetition rate of micropulses is 2.8 GHz and that of macropulses is 1 - 10 Hz. In addition to the FIR FEL system, many key technologies of high power FELs have been developed. Among them are there electron accelerator technology, design and optimization of electron beamline, design of undulator, measurement of magnetic field of undulators, high-voltage technology, optical cavity, etc.. (author). 10 refs., 11 tabs., 48figs.

  2. Development of a Free-Electron Laser Center and Research in Medicine, Biology and Materials Science,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-14

    10%) 5.3x10 17 photons per 5 mins per I mm dia. beam size The penetration depth for 50 eV photon in silica is 3.2 tpm Table 11 5 eV (248 nm) KrF...tissue is probably mutagenic (Tomita et al., 1981). Filters in the suction lines should be useC to prevent clogging by the black carbonaceous smoke...Mihashi, S., and Nagata, K., Mutagenicity of smoke condensates induced by C0 2 laser irradiation and electrocauterization. Mutat Res, 89:145-149, 1981

  3. Laser wavelength metrology with color sensor chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tyler B; Otterstrom, Nils; Jackson, Jarom; Archibald, James; Durfee, Dallin S

    2015-12-14

    We present a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip. The chip consists of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined. In addition to absorption in the filters, etalon effects add additional spectral features which improve the precision of the device. Comparing the measurements from the device to a commercial wavelength meter and to an atomic reference, we found that the device has picometer-level precision and picometer-scale drift over a period longer than a month.

  4. Photoionization and Velocity Map Imaging spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters with Synchrotron and Free Electron Laser radiation at Elettra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fraia, M.; Sergo, R.; Stebel, L.; Giuressi, D.; Cautero, G.; Tudor, M.; Callegari, C.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Lyamayev, V.; Feyer, V.; Moise, A.; Devetta, M.; Piseri, P.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in laser and Synchrotron Radiation instrumentation are continuously boosting fundamental research on the electronic structure of matter. At Elettra the collaboration between several groups active in the field of atomic, molecular and cluster physics and the Instrumentation and Detector Laboratory has resulted in an experimental set-up that successfully tackles the challenges posed by the investigation of the electronic structure of isolated species in the gas phase. The use of Synchrotron Radiation (SR) and Free Electron Laser (FEL) light, allows to cover a wide spectrum of targets from energetic to dynamics. We developed a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) spectrometer that allows to perform as well SR as FEL experiments, just by changing part of the detection system. In SR experiments, at the Gasphase beamline of Elettra, a cross delay line detector is used, coupled to a 4-channel time-to-digital converter that reconstructs the position of the electrons. Simultaneously, a Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer is used to acquire photoion spectra. Such a system allows PhotoElectron-PhotoIon-Coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy of atoms, molecules and clusters. In FEL experiments (notably differing from SR experiments in the much higher rate of events produced and detected, which forces one to forfeit coincidence detection), at the Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline of FERMI, a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) a phosphor screen and a CCD camera are used instead, capable of shot-by-shot collection of practically all events, albeit without time resolution.

  5. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Katayama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (−1st-order is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the −1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL.

  6. Towards Gotthard-II: development of a silicon microstrip detector for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Andrä, M.; Barten, R.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Lopez-Cuenca, C.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Redford, S.; Ruat, M.; Ruder, C.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Thattil, D.; Tinti, G.; Turcato, M.; Vetter, S.

    2018-01-01

    Gotthard-II is a 1-D microstrip detector specifically developed for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser. It will not only be used in energy dispersive experiments but also as a beam diagnostic tool with additional logic to generate veto signals for the other 2-D detectors. Gotthard-II makes use of a silicon microstrip sensor with a pitch of either 50 μm or 25 μm and with 1280 or 2560 channels wire-bonded to adaptive gain switching readout chips. Built-in analog-to-digital converters and digital memories will be implemented in the readout chip for a continuous conversion and storage of frames for all bunches in the bunch train. The performance of analogue front-end prototypes of Gotthard has been investigated in this work. The results in terms of noise, conversion gain, dynamic range, obtained by means of infrared laser and X-rays, will be shown. In particular, the effects of the strip-to-strip coupling are studied in detail and it is found that the reduction of the coupling effects is one of the key factors for the development of the analogue front-end of Gotthard-II.

  7. Rotational coherence as an alternative to coincidence techniques at x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Ryan; Hegazy, Kareem; Hartmann, Nick; Walter, Peter; Osipov, Timur; Lindahl, Anton; Helml, Wolfram; Ilchen, Markus; Galler, Andreas; Liu, Jia; Buck, Jens; Shevchuk, Ivan; Viefhaus, Jens; Hartmann, Gregor; Knie, Andre; Demekhin, Philipp; Inhester, Ludger; Li, Zheng; Ziaja-Motyka, Beata; Medvedev, Nikita; Bostedt, Christoph; Guillemin, Renaud; Simon, Marc; Novella-Piancastelli, Maria; Miron, Catalin; LCLS-AMOI0314 Team

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate an alternative approach to coincidence particle detection, based on impulsive rotational Raman excitation, for molecular frame measurements at x-ray FELs. A train of 8 infrared laser pulses induces the lab-frame observable coherence. At a field-free alignment revival, we register the angle-resolved laboratory frame Auger and photo-electron spectral feature variations with the tumbling molecular body frame. The time and angle dependence of the electron emission patterns that constrain theory are amenable to large numbers of interactions per pulse and, more importantly, has no axial recoil requirement for kinematic reconstruction. We see this as a method to bypass experimental challenges at XFELs by accepting The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is supported by the U.S. DoE-BES Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF0051.

  8. Simulation of a high-average power free-electron laser oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Freund

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we compare the 10 kW-Upgrade experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA, with numerical simulations using the MEDUSA code. MEDUSA is a three-dimensional FEL simulation code that is capable of treating both amplifiers and oscillators in both the steady-state and time-dependent regimes. MEDUSA employs a Gaussian modal expansion, and treats oscillators by decomposing the modal representation at the exit of the wiggler into the vacuum Gaussian modes of the resonator and then analytically determining the propagation of these vacuum resonator modes through the resonator back to the entrance of the wiggler in synchronism with the next electron bunch. The bunch length in the experiment is of the order of 380–420 fsec FWHM. The experiment operates at a wavelength of about 1.6 microns and the wiggler is 30 periods in length; hence, the slippage time is about 160 fsec. Because of this, slippage is important, and must be included in the simulation. The observed single pass gain is 65%–75% and, given the experimental uncertainties, this is in good agreement with the simulation. Multipass simulations including the cavity detuning yield an output power of 12.4 kW, which is also in good agreement with the experiment.

  9. Interaction of short x-ray pulses with low-Z x-ray optics materials at the LCLS free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hau-Riege, S. P.; London, R. A.; Graf, A.; Baker, S. L.; Soufli, R.; Sobierajski, R.; Burian, T.; Chalupsky, J.; Juha, L.; Gaudin, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Moeller, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Bozek, J.; Bostedt, C.

    2010-01-01

    Materials used for hard x-ray-free-electron laser (XFEL) optics must withstand high-intensity x-ray pulses. The advent of the Linac Coherent Light Source has enabled us to expose candidate optical materials, such as bulk B4C and SiC films, to 0.83 keV XFEL pulses with pulse energies between 1 mu J

  10. Population dynamics of H- local modes in CaF2 : Lu3+ crystals studied using a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J. P. R.; Bradley, I. V.; Jones, G. D.; Pidgeon, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    We report on pump-probe measurements of vibrational decay times for the H- (X, Y) and Z local modes of CaF2:Lu3+ C-4 nu H- centres using the Dutch free-electron laser. For excitation of the (X, Y) mode, a 10 K lifetime of 43 picoseconds is measured and is attributable to three-phonon anharmonic

  11. Influence of a step-tapered undulator field on the optical pulse shape of a far-infrared free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; R F X A M Mols,; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The optical output of the free-electron laser for infrared experiments (FELIX), which operates in the regime of strong slippage, consists of picosecond pulses, Depending on the amount of cavity desynchronization, the optical pulse can develop substantial structure in the form of multiple subpulses,

  12. Nonlinear analysis of wiggler-imperfections in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, H.P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Yu, L.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We present an analysis of the effect of wiggler imperfections in FELs using a variety of techniques. Our basic intention is to compare wiggler averaged nonlinear simulations to determine the effect of various approximations on the estimates of gain degradation due to wiggler imperfections. The fundamental assumption in the wiggler-averaged formulations is that the electrons are described by a random walk model, and an analytic representation of the orbits is made. This is fundamentally different from the approach taken for the non-wiggler-averaged formulation in which the wiggler imperfections are specified at the outset, and the orbits are integrated using a field model that is consistent with the Maxwell equations. It has been conjectured on the basis of prior studies using the non-wiggler-averaged formalism that electrons follow a {open_quotes}meander line{close_quotes} through the wiggler governed by the specific imperfections; hence, the electrons behave more as a ball-in-groove than as a random walk. This conjecture is tested by comparison of the wiggler-averaged and non-wiggler-averaged simulations. In addition, two different wiggler models are employed in the non-wiggler-averaged simulation: one based upon a parabolic pole face wiggler which is not curl and divergence free in the presence of wiggler imperfections, and a second model in which the divergence and z-component of the curl vanish identically. This will gauge the effect of inconsistencies in the wiggler model on the estimation of the effect of the imperfections. Preliminary results indicate that the inconsistency introduced by the non-vanishing curl and divergence result in an overestimation of the effect of wiggler imperfections on the orbit. The wiggler-averaged simulation is based upon the TDA code, and the non-wiggler-averaged simulation is a variant of the ARACHNE and WIGGLIN codes called MEDUSA developed to treat short-wavelength Gauss-Hermite modes.

  13. Development of a multichannel RF field detector for the low-level RF control of the free-electron laser at Hamburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Matthias

    2008-10-15

    Modern free electron lasers produce synchrotron radiation with constantly shortening wavelengths of up to 6 nm and pulse widths of up to 100 fs. That requires a constantly increasing stability of the beam energy and arrival time of the electron beam at the undulator entrance which is situated at the end of the accelerator. At the same time, the increasing speed of digital signal processing and data acquisition facilitates new possibilities for the digital radio frequency control and field detection. In this thesis the development of a multichannel radio frequency field detector for the low level radio frequency (LLRF) control of the superconducting cavities of the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH) is described. The applied method of IF sampling is state of the technology and is utilized in many areas of digital communication. It is evaluated concerning its applicability for the LLRF control. Analytical and numerical investigations of the noise behavior and transport in the control loop have been accomplished to define the requirements for the measurement accuracy of the field detector that was to be developed. Therefore, simplified models of the noise behavior of each system component of the control loop, e.g. amplifier, radio frequency mixer and analog-to-digital converter, were established and subsequently assorted to a the model of the control loop. Due to the application of the vector-sum control, where several separately measured field vectors are added to a vector-sum, requirements concerning the allowable compression error of the detector nonlinearity were defined. These were investigated by analytical and numerical methods, as well. Requirements for the hardware that was to be developed were compiled from the simulation results. For the development of the field detector, a modular and EMC-compatible concept with a high-level passive front-end for an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio was chosen. The following tests in the lab delivered the

  14. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth.

  15. Using the X-ray free-electron laser to drive a photo-pumped helium-like neon X-ray laser at 23 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Joseph; Scott, Howard A.

    2011-03-01

    Nearly four decades ago resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes based on hydrogen-like and helium-like ions were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. These schemes have yet to be demonstrated because of the difficulty of finding a strong pump line with an adequate resonance to pump the laser transition. With the construction of the X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) researchers now have a very bright tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow one to study the physics and feasibility of photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we model the sodium-pumped neon X-ray laser scheme that was proposed and studied many years ago by replacing the Na He-α pump line at 1127 eV with the X-FEL. Using the X-FEL to photo-ionize Ne down to He-like Ne and then photo-pump the He-γ line we predict gains greater than 400 cm -1 on the 4f - 3d transition at 23.1 nm in He-like Ne. The 4d - 3p line at 23.16 nm and the 4p - 3s line at 22.27 nm are also predicted to lase strongly.

  16. Opportunities and challenges for time-resolved studies of protein structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard

    2014-07-17

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are revolutionary X-ray sources. Their time structure, providing X-ray pulses of a few tens of femtoseconds in duration; and their extreme peak brilliance, delivering approximately 10(12) X-ray photons per pulse and facilitating sub-micrometre focusing, distinguish XFEL sources from synchrotron radiation. In this opinion piece, I argue that these properties of XFEL radiation will facilitate new discoveries in life science. I reason that time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering are promising areas of scientific investigation that will be advanced by XFEL capabilities, allowing new scientific questions to be addressed that are not accessible using established methods at storage ring facilities. These questions include visualizing ultrafast protein structural dynamics on the femtosecond to picosecond time-scale, as well as time-resolved diffraction studies of non-cyclic reactions. I argue that these emerging opportunities will stimulate a renaissance of interest in time-resolved structural biochemistry.

  17. High-power free-electron laser amplifier using a scalloped electron beam and a two-stage wiggler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Nguyen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High-power free-electron laser (FEL amplifiers present many practical design and construction problems. One such problem is possible damage to any optical beam control elements beyond the wiggler. The ability to increase the optical beam’s divergence angle after the wiggler, thereby reducing the intensity on the first optical element, is important to minimize such damage. One proposal to accomplish this optical beam spreading is to pinch the electron beam thereby focusing the radiation as well. In this paper, we analyze an approach that relies on the natural betatron motion to pinch the electron beam near the end of the wiggler. We also consider a step-tapered, two-stage wiggler to enhance the efficiency. The combination of a pinched electron beam and step-taper wiggler leads to additional optical guiding of the optical beam. This novel configuration is studied in simulation using the MEDUSA code. For a representative set of beam and wiggler parameters, we discuss (i the effect of the scalloped beam on the interaction in the FEL and on the focusing and propagation of the radiation, and (ii the efficiency enhancement in the two-stage wiggler.

  18. An accelerator scenario for a hard X-ray free electron laser combined with high energy electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tao; Li, Yiding; Yang, Guojun; Pang, Jian; Li, Yuhui; Li, Peng; Pflueger, Joachim; He, Xiaozhong; Lu, Yaxin; Wang, Ke; Long, Jidong; Zhang, Linwen; Wu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In order to study the dynamic response of the material and the physical mechanism of fluid dynamics, an accelerator scenario which can be applied to both hard X-ray free electron laser and high energy electron radiography is proposed. This accelerator is mainly composed of a 12 GeV linac, an undulator branch and an eRad beamline. In order to characterize a sample’s dynamic behavior in situ and real-time with XFEL and eRad simultaneously, the linac should be capable of accelerating the two kinds of beam within the same operation mode. Combining in-vacuum and tapering techniques, the undulator branch can produce more than 1011 photons per pulse in 0.1% bandwidth at 42 keV. Finally, an eRad amplifying beamline with 1:10 ratio is proposed as an important complementary tool for the wider view field and density identification ability. Supported by China Academy of Engineering Physics (2014A0402016) and Institute of Fluid Physics (SFZ20140201)

  19. Production of superconducting 1.3-GHz cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of over 800 1.3-GHz superconducting (SC cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL, the largest in the history of cavity fabrication, has now been successfully completed. In the past, manufacturing of SC resonators was only partly industrialized; the main challenge for the EXFEL production was transferring the high-performance surface treatment to industry. The production was shared by the two companies RI Research Instruments GmbH (RI and Ettore Zanon S.p.A. (EZ on the principle of “build to print”. DESY provided the high-purity niobium and NbTi for the resonators. Conformity with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED was developed together with the contracted notified body TUEV NORD. New or upgraded infrastructure has been established at both companies. Series production and delivery of fully-equipped cavities ready for cold rf testing was started in December 2012, and finished in December 2015. More than half the cavities delivered to DESY as specified (referred to “as received” fulfilled the EXFEL specification. Further improvement of low-performing cavities was achieved by supplementary surface treatment at DESY or at the companies. The final achieved average gradient exceeded the EXFEL specification by approximately 25%. In the following paper, experience with the 1.3-GHz cavity production for EXFEL is reported and the main lessons learned are discussed.

  20. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Bublitz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport of e.g. ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data reveal the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins.

  1. Comparative study of nonideal beam effects in high gain harmonic generation and self-seeded free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Marinelli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate and compare the properties of two narrow-bandwidth free-electron laser (FEL schemes, one using self-seeding and the other high gain harmonic generation (HGHG. The two systems have been thoroughly studied analytically and numerically in the past. The aim of this work is to compare their performances when the FEL is driven by an electron beam with nonideal properties, thus including effects such as shot-to-shot energy fluctuations and nonlinear energy chirp. In both cases nonlinearities produce a bandwidth larger than the Fourier transform limited value. However, our analysis indicates that, for approximately the same output power levels, the self-seeding scheme is less affected than the HGHG scheme by quadratic energy chirps in the electron beam longitudinal phase space. This is confirmed by a specific numerical example corresponding to SPARX parameters where the electron beam was optimized to minimize the FEL gain length. The work has been carried out with the aid of the time dependent FEL codes GENESIS 1.3 (3D and PERSEO (1D.

  2. Optimization of power output and study of electron beam energy spread in a Free Electron Laser oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Abramovich, A; Efimov, S; Gover, A; Pinhasi, Y; Yahalom, A

    2001-01-01

    Design of a multi-stage depressed collector for efficient operation of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) oscillator requires knowledge of the electron beam energy distribution. This knowledge is necessary to determine the voltages of the depressed collector electrodes that optimize the collection efficiency and overall energy conversion efficiency of the FEL. The energy spread in the electron beam is due to interaction in the wiggler region, as electrons enter the interaction region at different phases relative to the EM wave. This interaction can be simulated well by a three-dimensional simulation code such as FEL3D. The main adjustable parameters that determine the electron beam energy spread after interaction are the e-beam current, the initial beam energy, and the quality factor of the resonator out-coupling coefficient. Using FEL3D, we study the influence of these parameters on the available radiation power and on the electron beam energy distribution at the undulator exit. Simulations performed for I=1.5 A, E...

  3. Physics study of the application of an IFEL (Induction-Accelerator Free-Electron Laser) to CIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, E. B.; Cohen, B. I.; Cohen, R. H.; Matsuda, Y.; Rognlein, T. D.; Smith, G. R.

    1990-10-01

    The induction accelerator free electron laser (IFEL) presents an important option for generating high power millimeter waves for electron cyclotron heating and current drive in CIT. Application of the technology to this purpose requires resolution of a number of technical and physics issues. An effort was undertaken this year to resolve several of the CIT issues. The interim report for this effort analyzed the control of tritium in the quasi-optical transmission line from the IFEL to the tokamak. It was concluded that the use of cryopumping could reduce tritium to the level that it would not pose a breathing hazard in the IFEL vault and that hands-on maintenance would be possible. Preliminary indications were that likely accident scenarios could be handled safely by closing valves between the tokamak and the IFEL. The present report describes the analyses of physics issues associated with the intense microwave fields during heating of CIT. Constraints and opportunities are identified. Details are provided in the appendices about the topics in the following summaries.

  4. Multi-dimensional optimization of a terawatt seeded tapered Free Electron Laser with a Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juhao; Hu, Newman; Setiawan, Hananiel; Huang, Xiaobiao; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Jiao, Yi; Yu, George; Mandlekar, Ajay; Spampinati, Simone; Fang, Kun; Chu, Chungming; Qiang, Ji

    2017-02-01

    There is a great interest in generating high-power hard X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) in the terawatt (TW) level that can enable coherent diffraction imaging of complex molecules like proteins and probe fundamental high-field physics. A feasibility study of producing such X-ray pulses was carried out employing a configuration beginning with a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission FEL, followed by a "self-seeding" crystal monochromator generating a fully coherent seed, and finishing with a long tapered undulator where the coherent seed recombines with the electron bunch and is amplified to high power. The undulator tapering profile, the phase advance in the undulator break sections, the quadrupole focusing strength, etc. are parameters to be optimized. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) is adopted for this multi-dimensional optimization. Concrete examples are given for LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and LCLS-II-type systems. Analytical estimate is also developed to cross check the simulation and optimization results as a quick and complimentary tool.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thomas; Kern, Jan; Kubin, Markus; Ratner, Daniel; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D; Löchel, Heike; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Ding, Yuantao; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Turner, Joshua J; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis L; Rehanek, Jens; Weniger, Christian; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hill, Ethan; Borovik, Andrew; Erko, Alexei; Föhlisch, Alexander; Mitzner, Rolf; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko; Wernet, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-10-03

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. However, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatization is needed. Here we compare L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of a prototypical transition metal system based on monochromatizing the SASE radiation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) with a new technique based on self-seeding of LCLS. We demonstrate how L-edge XAS can be performed using the self-seeding scheme without the need of an additional beam line monochromator. We show how the spectral shape and pulse energy depend on the undulator setup and how this affects the x-ray spectroscopy measurements.

  6. Free-electron lasers in the ultraviolet and X-ray regime physical principles, experimental results, technical realization

    CERN Document Server

    Schmüser, Peter; Rossbach, Jörg; Behrens, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the book is to provide a systematic and didactic approach to the physics and technology of free-electron lasers. Numerous figures are used for illustrating the underlying ideas and concepts, and links to other fields of physics are provided. After an introduction to undulator radiation and the low-gain FEL, the one-dimensional theory of the high-gain FEL is developed in a systematic way. Particular emphasis is put on explaining and justifying the various assumptions and approximations that are needed to obtain the differential and integral equations governing the FEL dynamics. Analytical and numerical solutions are presented and important FEL parameters are defined, such as gain length, FEL bandwidth and saturation power. One of the most important features of a high-gain FEL, the formation of microbunches, is studied at length. The increase of gain length due to beam energy spread, space charge forces, and three-dimensional effects such as betatron oscillations and optical diffraction is anal...

  7. Flow-aligned, single-shot fiber diffraction using a femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, David [A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) (Singapore); Loh, N. Duane [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Zorgati, Habiba [A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) (Singapore); National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Ghoshdastider, Umesh [A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) (Singapore); Liow, Lu Ting [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Ivanova, Magdalena I. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Larsson, Mårten [A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) (Singapore); DePonte, Daniel P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bean, Richard [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Beyerlein, Kenneth R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gati, Cornelius [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Oberthuer, Dominik [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Arnlund, David [Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden); Branden, Gisela [Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden); Berntsen, Peter [Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden); Cascio, Duilio [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chavas, Leonard M. G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Chen, Joe P. J. [Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ding, Ke [A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) (Singapore); Fleckenstein, Holger [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gumprecht, Lars [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Harimoorthy, Rajiv [Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden); Mossou, Estelle [Institut Laue - Langevin, Grenoble (France); Keele Univ., Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Sawaya, Michael R. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brewster, Aaron S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hattne, Johan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sauter, Nicholas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Seibert, Marvin [Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Seuring, Carolin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Stellato, Francesco [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Tilp, Thomas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Eisenberg, David S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Messerschmidt, Marc [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Williams, Garth J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Koglin, Jason E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Makowski, Lee [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Millane, Rick P. [Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); Forsyth, Trevor [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Keele Univ., Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Boutet, Sebastien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); White, Thomas A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Barty, Anton [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Chapman, Henry [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Chen, Swaine L. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) (Singapore); Liang, Mengning [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Neutze, Richard [Univ. of Gothenburg (Sweden); Robinson, Robert C. [A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research) (Singapore); National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan)

    2017-06-02

    A major goal for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) based science is to elucidate structures of biological molecules without the need for crystals. Filament systems may provide some of the first single macromolecular structures elucidated by XFEL radiation, since they contain one-dimensional translational symmetry and thereby occupy the diffraction intensity region between the extremes of crystals and single molecules. Here, we demonstrate flow alignment of as few as 100 filaments (Escherichia coli pili, F-actin, and amyloid fibrils), which when intersected by femtosecond X-ray pulses result in diffraction patterns similar to those obtained from classical fiber diffraction studies. We also determine that F-actin can be flow-aligned to a disorientation of approximately 5 degrees. Using this XFEL-based technique, we determine that gelsolin amyloids are comprised of stacked β-strands running perpendicular to the filament axis, and that a range of order from fibrillar to crystalline is discernable for individual α-synuclein amyloids.

  8. Multi-dimensional optimization of a terawatt seeded tapered Free Electron Laser with a Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Juhao, E-mail: jhwu@SLAC.Stanford.EDU [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hu, Newman [Valley Christian High School, 100 Skyway Drive, San Jose, CA 95111 (United States); Setiawan, Hananiel [The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Huang, Xiaobiao; Raubenheimer, Tor O. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Jiao, Yi [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yu, George [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Mandlekar, Ajay [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Spampinati, Simone [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A. di interesse nazionale, Strada Statale 14-km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Fang, Kun [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Chu, Chungming [The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Qiang, Ji [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-02-21

    There is a great interest in generating high-power hard X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) in the terawatt (TW) level that can enable coherent diffraction imaging of complex molecules like proteins and probe fundamental high-field physics. A feasibility study of producing such X-ray pulses was carried out employing a configuration beginning with a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission FEL, followed by a “self-seeding” crystal monochromator generating a fully coherent seed, and finishing with a long tapered undulator where the coherent seed recombines with the electron bunch and is amplified to high power. The undulator tapering profile, the phase advance in the undulator break sections, the quadrupole focusing strength, etc. are parameters to be optimized. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) is adopted for this multi-dimensional optimization. Concrete examples are given for LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and LCLS-II-type systems. Analytical estimate is also developed to cross check the simulation and optimization results as a quick and complimentary tool.

  9. Single-shot method for measuring femtosecond bunch length in linac-based free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Huang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the generation and characterization of femtosecond and subfemtosecond pulses from linac-based free-electron lasers (FELs. In this report, following the method of Ricci and Smith [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 3, 032801 (2000PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.3.032801], we investigate the measurement of the longitudinal bunch profile of an ultrashort electron bunch produced by these FELs. We show that this method can be applied in a straightforward manner at x-ray FEL facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source by slightly adjusting the second bunch compressor followed by running the bunch on an rf zero-crossing phase of the final linac. We find that the linac wakefield strongly perturbs the measurement, and through analysis show that it can be compensated in a simple way. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and wakefield compensation through numerical simulations, including effects of coherent synchrotron radiation and longitudinal space charge. When used in conjunction with a high-resolution electron spectrometer, this method potentially reveals the temporal profile of the electron beam down to the femtosecond and subfemotsecond scale.

  10. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D.; Markvardsen, Anders J.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L.; Doak, R. Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin M.; Williams, Garth J.; Foucar, Lutz; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Gregersen, Jonas L.; Clausen, Johannes D.; Boesen, Thomas; Gotfryd, Kamil; Wang, Kai-Tuo; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V.; Nissen, Poul; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-06-11

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport ofe.g.ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data reveal the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins.

  11. Chirality Emergence in Thin Solid Films of Amino Acids by Polarized Light from Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashahiro Adachi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bioorganic compounds is that a kind of “chiral impulse” as an asymmetric excitation source induced asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such materials such as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life (Cosmic Scenario. To experimentally introduce chiral structure into racemic films of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, isovaline, etc., we irradiated them with linearly polarized light (LPL from synchrotron radiation and circularly polarized light (CPL from a free electron laser. After the irradiation, we evaluated optical anisotropy by measuring the circular dichroism (CD spectra and verified that new Cotton peaks appeared at almost the same peak position as those of the corresponding non-racemic amino acid films. With LPL irradiation, two-dimensional anisotropic structure expressed as linear dichroism and/or linear birefringence was introduced into the racemic films. With CPL irradiation, the signs of the Cotton peaks exhibit symmetrical structure corresponding to the direction of CPL rotation. This indicates that some kinds of chiral structure were introduced into the racemic film. The CD spectra after CPL irradiation suggest the chiral structure should be derived from not only preferential photolysis but also from photolysis-induced molecular structural change. These results suggest that circularly polarized light sources in space could be associated with the origin of terrestrial homochirality; that is, they would be effective asymmetric exciting sources introducing chiral structures into bio-organic molecules or complex organic compounds.

  12. Nonlocal heat transport and improved target design for x-ray heating studies at x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoidn, Oliver; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2018-01-01

    The extremely high-power densities and short durations of single pulses of x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) have opened new opportunities in atomic physics, where complex excitation-relaxation chains allow for high ionization states in atomic and molecular systems, and in dense plasma physics, where XFEL heating of solid-density targets can create unique dense states of matter having temperatures on the order of the Fermi energy. We focus here on the latter phenomena, with special emphasis on the problem of optimum target design to achieve high x-ray heating into the warm dense matter (WDM) state. We report fully three-dimensional simulations of the incident x-ray pulse and the resulting multielectron relaxation cascade to model the spatial energy density deposition in multicomponent targets, with particular focus on the effects of nonlocal heat transport due to the motion of high energy photoelectrons and Auger electrons. We find that nanoscale high-Z /low-Z multicomponent targets can give much improved energy density deposition in lower-Z materials, with enhancements reaching a factor of 100. This has three important benefits. First, it greatly enlarges the thermodynamic parameter space in XFEL x-ray heating studies of lower-Z materials. Second, it allows the use of higher probe photon energies, enabling higher-information content x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements such as in two-color XFEL operations. Third, while this is merely one step toward optimization of x-ray heating target design, the demonstration of the importance of nonlocal heat transport establishes important common ground between XFEL-based x-ray heating studies and more traditional laser plasma methods.

  13. Ablation in teeth with the free-electron laser around the absorption peak of hydroxyapatite (9.5 μm) and between 6.0 and 7.5 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Manfred; Walker, Rudolf; Weber, Heiner; van der Meer, Lex; McKinley, Jim T.; Tolk, Norman H.; Jean, Benedikt J.

    1996-04-01

    Pulsed IR laser ablation on dental hard substances was studied in the wavelength range between 9.5 and 11.5 micrometers with the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) in Nieuwegein/NL and between 6.0 and 7.5 micrometers with the FEL at Vanderbilt University in Nashville/TN. Depth, diameter and volume of the ablation crater were determined with a special silicon replica method and subsequent confocal laser topometry. The irradiated surfaces and the ejected debris were examined with an SEM 9.5 - 11.5 micrometers : depth, diameter and volume of the ablation crater are greater and the ablation threshold is lower for ablation with a wavelength corresponding to the absorption max. of hydroxyapatite (9.5 micrometers ), compared to ablation at wavelengths with lower absorption (10.5 - 11.5 micrometers ). For all wavelengths, no thermal cracking can be observed after ablation in dentine, however a small amount of thermal cracking can be observed after ablation in enamel. After ablation at 9.5 micrometers , a few droplets of solidified melt were seen on the irradiated areas, whereas the debris consisted only of solidified melt. In contrast, the surface and the debris obtained from ablation using the other wavelengths showed the natural structure of dentine 6.0 - 7.5 micrometers : the depth of the ablation crater increases and the ablation threshold decreases for an increasing absorption coefficient of the target material. Different tissue components absorbed the laser radiation of different wavelengths (around 6.0 micrometers water and collagen, 6.5 micrometers collagen and water, 7.0 micrometers carbonated hydroxyapatite). Nevertheless the results have shown no major influence on the primary tissue absorber.

  14. Three-dimensional simulation of harmonic up-conversion in a prebunched two-beam free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rouhani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional simulation of harmonic up-conversion in a free-electron laser amplifier operating simultaneously with two cold and relativistic electron beams with different energy is presented in the steady-state regime. The fundamental resonance of the higher energy beam is adjusted at the third harmonic of the lower energy beam. By using slowly varying envelope approximation, the hyperbolic wave equations can be transformed into parabolic diffusion equations. By applying the source-dependent expansion to these equations, electromagnetic fields are represented in terms of the Hermite Gaussian modes which are well suited for the planar wiggler configuration. The electron dynamics is described by the fully three-dimensional Lorentz force equation in the presence of the realistic planar magnetostatic wiggler and electromagnetic fields. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations is derived and solved numerically. This set of equations describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes, in this system, are investigated for the fundamental resonance and its harmonic up-conversion. In addition to uniform beam, prebunched electron beam has also been studied. The effect of sinusoidal distribution of entry times for low energy electron beam on the evolution of radiation is compared with water bag distribution. It is shown that prebunching reduces the saturation length substantially. The analysis is related to extreme ultraviolet and x-ray emission where by seeding the lower frequency of the fundamental resonance of the lower energy beam substantial power is obtained at its third harmonic.

  15. Characterization of temporal coherence of hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses with single-shot interferograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taito Osaka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal coherence is one of the most fundamental characteristics of light, connecting to spectral information through the Fourier transform relationship between time and frequency. Interferometers with a variable path-length difference (PLD between the two branches have widely been employed to characterize temporal coherence properties for broad spectral regimes. Hard X-ray interferometers reported previously, however, have strict limitations in their operational photon energies, due to the specific optical layouts utilized to satisfy the stringent requirement for extreme stability of the PLD at sub-ångström scales. The work presented here characterizes the temporal coherence of hard X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL pulses by capturing single-shot interferograms. Since the stability requirement is drastically relieved with this approach, it was possible to build a versatile hard X-ray interferometer composed of six separate optical elements to cover a wide photon energy range from 6.5 to 11.5 keV while providing a large variable delay time of up to 47 ps at 10 keV. A high visibility of up to 0.55 was observed at a photon energy of 10 keV. The visibility measurement as a function of time delay reveals a mean coherence time of 5.9 ± 0.7 fs, which agrees with that expected from the single-shot spectral information. This is the first result of characterizing the temporal coherence of XFEL pulses in the hard X-ray regime and is an important milestone towards ultra-high energy resolutions at micro-electronvolt levels in time-domain X-ray spectroscopy, which will open up new opportunities for revealing dynamic properties in diverse systems on timescales from femtoseconds to nanoseconds, associated with fluctuations from ångström to nanometre spatial scales.

  16. Three-dimensional structure determination protocol for noncrystalline biomolecules using x-ray free-electron laser diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-02-01

    Coherent and intense x-ray pulses generated by x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources are paving the way for structural determination of noncrystalline biomolecules. However, due to the small scattering cross section of electrons for x rays, the available incident x-ray intensity of XFEL sources, which is currently in the range of 10(12)-10(13) photons/μm(2)/pulse, is lower than that necessary to perform single-molecule diffraction experiments for noncrystalline biomolecules even with the molecular masses of megadalton and submicrometer dimensions. Here, we propose an experimental protocol and analysis method for visualizing the structure of those biomolecules by the combined application of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction methods. To compensate the small scattering cross section of biomolecules, in our protocol, a thin vitreous ice plate containing several hundred biomolecules/μm(2) is used as sample, a setup similar to that utilized by single-molecule cryoelectron microscopy. The scattering cross section of such an ice plate is far larger than that of a single particle. The images of biomolecules contained within irradiated areas are then retrieved from each diffraction pattern, and finally provide the three-dimensional electron density model. A realistic atomic simulation using large-scale computations proposed that the three-dimensional structure determination of the 50S ribosomal subunit embedded in a vitreous ice plate is possible at a resolution of 0.8 nm when an x-ray beam of 10(16) photons/500×500 nm(2)/pulse is available.

  17. Sample Injector Fabrication and Delivery Method Development for Serial Crystallography using Synchrotrons and X-ray Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Garrett Charles

    Sample delivery is an essential component in biological imaging using serial diffraction from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotrons. Recent developments have made possible the near-atomic resolution structure determination of several important proteins, including one G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug target, whose structure could not easily have been determined otherwise (Appendix A). In this thesis I describe new sample delivery developments that are paramount to advancing this field beyond what has been accomplished to date. Soft Lithography was used to implement sample conservation in the Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzle (GDVN). A PDMS/glass composite microfluidic injector was created and given the capability of millisecond fluidic switching of a GDVN liquid jet within the divergent section of a 2D Laval-like GDVN nozzle, providing a means of collecting sample between the pulses of current XFELs. An oil/water droplet immersion jet was prototyped that suspends small sample droplets within an oil jet such that the sample droplet frequency may match the XFEL pulse repetition rate. A similar device was designed to use gas bubbles for synchronized "on/off" jet behavior and for active micromixing. 3D printing based on 2-Photon Polymerization (2PP) was used to directly fabricate reproducible GDVN injectors at high resolution, introducing the possibility of systematic nozzle research and highly complex GDVN injectors. Viscous sample delivery using the "LCP injector" was improved with a method for dealing with poorly extruding sample mediums when using full beam transmission from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), and a new viscous crystal-carrying medium was characterized for use in both vacuum and atmospheric environments: high molecular weight Polyethylene Glycol.

  18. A new fixed-target approach for serial crystallography at synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, Philip

    2017-07-15

    In the framework of this thesis, a new method for high-speed fixed-target serial crystallography experiments and its applicability to biomacromolecular crystallography at both synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is presented. The method is based on a sample holder, which can carry up to 20,000 microcrystals and which is made of single-crystalline silicon. Using synchrotron radiation, the structure of Operophtera brumata cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 18 polyhedrin, lysozyme and cubic insulin was determined by collecting X-ray diffraction data from multiple microcrystals. Data collection was shown to be possible at both cryogenic and ambient conditions. For room-temperature measurements, both global and specific indications of radiation damage were investigated and characterized. Due to the sieve-like structure of the chip, the microcrystals tend to arrange themselves according to the micropore pattern, which allows for efficient sampling of the sample material. In combination with a high-speed scanning stage, the sample holder was furthermore shown to be highly suitable for serial femtosecond crystallography experiments. By fast raster scanning of the chip through the pulsed X-ray beam of an XFEL, structure determination of a virus, using the example of bovine enterovirus type 2, has been demonstrated at an XFEL for the first time. Hit rates of up to 100% were obtained by the presented method, which refers to a reduction in sample consumption by at least three orders of magnitude with respect to common liquid-jet injection methods used for sample delivery. In this way, the typical time needed for data collection in serial femtosecond crystallography is significantly decreased. The presented technique for sample loading of the chip is easy to learn and results in efficient removal of the surrounding mother liquor, thereby reducing the generated background signal. Since the chip is made of single-crystalline silicon, in principle no

  19. Time-resolved electron beam phase space tomography at a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Röhrs

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs in the ultraviolet and x-ray regime put stringent demands on the peak current, transverse emittance, and energy spread of the driving electron beam. At the soft x-ray FEL FLASH, a transverse deflecting microwave structure (TDS has been installed to determine these parameters for the longitudinally compressed bunches, which are characterized by a narrow leading peak of high charge density and a long tail. The rapidly varying electromagnetic field in the TDS deflects the electrons vertically and transforms the time profile into a streak on an observation screen. The bunch current profile was measured single shot with an unprecedented resolution of 27 fs under FEL operating conditions. A precise single-shot measurement of the energy distribution along a bunch was accomplished by using the TDS in combination with an energy spectrometer. Variation of quadrupole strengths allowed for a determination of the horizontal emittance as a function of the longitudinal position within a bunch, the so-called slice emittance. In the bunch tail, a normalized slice emittance of about 2  μm was found, in agreement with expectations. In the leading spike, however, surprisingly large emittance values were observed, in apparent contradiction with the low emittance deduced from the measured FEL gain. By applying three-dimensional phase space tomography, we were able to show that the bunch head contains a central core of low emittance and high local current density, which is presumably the lasing part of the bunch.

  20. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Tomohiro, E-mail: tkita@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  1. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. The technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II. PMID:23129631

  2. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Coffee, R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Decker, F. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Emma, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Field, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helml, W. [Technische Univ. Munchen, Garching (Germany); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krejcik, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krzywinski, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lutman, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  3. Free-electron-laser studies of the relaxation of H- and D- local modes in CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J. P. R.; Bradley, I. V.; Jones, G. D.; Pidgeon, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    We report a three-pulse, pump-probe experiment on H- and D- local modes in CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2 using the Dutch free electron laser, FELIX. The 10-K lifetimes of the H- local modes were measured as 43 +/-5, 170 +/- 15, and 212 +/- 20 ps for CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2, respectively. For D-, the

  4. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  5. Response Time-Shortened Zinc Oxide Scintillator for Accurate Single-Shot Synchronization of Extreme Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser and Short-Pulse Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Yamanoi, Kohei; Sakai, Kohei; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Nakazato, Tomoharu; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Kano, Masataka; Wakamiya, Akira; Ehrentraut, Dirk; Fukuda, Tsuguo; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Togashi, Tadashi; Matsubara, Shinichi; Tono, Kensuke; Higashiya, Atsushi; Yabashi, Makina; Kimura, Hiroaki; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    We report an over one-order-of magnitude improvement in the response time of conventional hydrothermal method-grown zinc oxide (ZnO) scintillator by introducing additional quenching channels via intentional indium ion doping. A 3-ps fluorescence decay time constant is achieved, therefore making it the fastest scintillator operating below 100 nm to date. Using this indium-doped ZnO, relative jitter between extreme ultraviolet free electron laser (EUV-FEL) probe and optical pump pulses is evaluated to be less than 3 ps. Moreover, pulses from these sources can be synchronized with 3-ps accuracy through in-situ observation of relative time difference in single-shot base.

  6. Stark-effect measurement of high FEL (free-electron laser) electric fields in MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) by laser-aided particle-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, T.; Takiyama, K. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Odajima, K.; Ohasa, K.; Shiho, M. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Mizuno, K. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA) Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Foote, J.H.; Nilson, D.G. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-05-04

    We are constructing a diagnostic system to measure the electric field (>100 kV/cm) of a free-electron laser (FEL) beam when injected into the plasma of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX). The apparatus allows a crossed-beam measurement, with 2-cm spatial resolution in the plasma, involving the FEL beam (with 140-GHz, {approx}1-GW ECH pulses), a neutral-helium beam, and a dye-laser beam. After the laser beam pumps metastable helium atoms to higher excited states, their decay light is detected by a collimated optical system. Because of the Stark effect due to the FEL electric field ({rvec E}), a forbidden transition can be strongly induced. The intensity of emitted light resulting from the forbidden transition is proportional to E{sup 2}. Because photon counting rates are calculated to be low, extra effort is made to minimize background and noise levels. It is possible that the lower {rvec E} of an MTX gyrotron-produced ECH beam with its longer-duration pulses also can be measured using this method. Other applications may include measurements of ion temperature (using charge-exchange recombination), edge-density fluctuations, and core impurity concentrations. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Start-effect measurement of high FEL (free-electron laser) electric fields in MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) by laser-aided particle-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, T.; Takiyama, K. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Odajima, K.; Ohasa, K.; Shiho, M. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Mizuno, K. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA) Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Foote, J.H.; Nilson, D.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-05-10

    We are constructing a diagnostic system to measure the electric field (>100 kV/cm) of a free-electron laser (FEL) beam when injected into the plasma of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX). The apparatus allows a crossed-beam measurement, with 2-cm spatial resolution in the plasma, involving the FEL beam (with 140-GHz, {approx}1-GW ECH pulses), a neutral-helium beam, and a dye-laser beam. After the laser beam pumps metastable helium atoms to higher excited states, their decay light is detected by an efficient optical system. Because of the Stark effect arising from the FEL electric field ({rvec E}), a forbidden transition can be strongly induced. The intensity of emitted light resulting from the forbidden transition is proportional to E{sup 2}. Because photon counting rates are estimated to be low, extra effort is made to minimize background and noise levels. It is possible that the lower {rvec E} of an MTX gyrotron-produced ECH beam with its longer-duration pulses can also be measured using this method. Other applications of the apparatus described here may include measurements of ion temperature (using charge-exchange recombination), edge-density fluctuations, and core impurity concentrations.

  8. A 12 GHz wavelength spacing multi-wavelength laser source for wireless communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, P. C.; Shiu, R. K.; Bitew, M. A.; Chang, T. L.; Lai, C. H.; Junior, J. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a multi-wavelength laser source with 12 GHz wavelength spacing based on a single distributed feedback laser. A light wave generated from the distributed feedback laser is fed into a frequency shifter loop consisting of 50:50 coupler, dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator, optical amplifier, optical filter, and polarization controller. The frequency of the input wavelength is shifted and then re-injected into the frequency shifter loop. By re-injecting the shifted wavelengths multiple times, we have generated 84 optical carriers with 12 GHz wavelength spacing and stable output power. For each channel, two wavelengths are modulated by a wireless data using the phase modulator and transmitted through a 25 km single mode fiber. In contrast to previously developed schemes, the proposed laser source does not incur DC bias drift problem. Moreover, it is a good candidate for radio-over-fiber systems to support multiple users using a single distributed feedback laser.

  9. First Results on Ultrafast and Ultraintense X-Ray Studies of Molecular Photoabsorption using the LCLS Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrah, Nora

    2010-03-01

    The study of atomic and molecular inner-shell photoionization with conventional x-ray sources is dominated by processes involving the production of single core holes. However, the unprecedented short pulses and peak power at x-ray wavelengths of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provides new research opportunities and opens the door to study ultra fast, nonlinear x-ray physics. We have used the LCLS to investigate fundamental questions concerning laser pulse duration dependent ionization as well as examine the creation and decay of multiple core-holes. In particular, we focused on double core-holes ionization in N2. We measured the photoelectron, Auger and secondary electron relaxation pathways subsequent to multiple core vacancies in molecules as well as the fragmentation patterns and the charge-state distributions of the resulting ions as a function of wavelength, pulse duration and intensity. The new light source allows the characterization of the molecular ionization and dissociation dynamics and provides new insight into the interaction of matter with intense short pulses. In addition we expect our results to contribute to the foundation for future imaging experiments on molecules. The LCLS photon beam was focused to about 2μm^2 area producing an intense x-ray laser beam of up to 10^18 W/cm^2. We have used x-ray pulses with duration from about 7fs to 280 fs and a photon energy of 1.1 keV to investigate the production of multiple core holes. We have observed the multiple ionization of N2 resulting in fragment ions of up to bare N^7+ [1]. Furthermore, evidence for double core hole has been observed. The experiment was performed at the LCLS AMO beamline which is equipped with an ion time-of-flight spectrometer to determine the ion charge state distribution as well five angle and energy resolving electron time-of-flight spectrometers to detect the emitted photoelectrons and Auger electrons. [4pt] [1] Work done in

  10. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guimei [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  11. Nonstoichiometric Laser Materials: Designer Wavelengths in Neodymium Doped Garnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2008-01-01

    The tunable nature of lasers provides for a wide range of applications. Most applications rely on finding available laser wavelengths to meet the needs of the research. This article presents the concept of compositional tuning, whereby the laser wavelength is designed by exploiting nonstoichiometry. For research where precise wavelengths are required, such as remote sensing, this is highly advantageous. A theoretical basis for the concept is presented and experimental results in spectroscopic measurements support the theoretical basis. Laser operation nicely demonstrates the validity of the concept of designer lasers.

  12. Focusing X-ray free-electron laser pulses using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors at the NCI hutch of the PAL-XFEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangwoo; Kim, Hyo Yun; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Rah, Seungyu; Lim, Jun; Nam, Ki Hyun

    2018-01-01

    The Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free-Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) is a recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility that provides intense ultrashort X-ray pulses based on the self-amplified spontaneous emission process. The nano-crystallography and coherent imaging (NCI) hutch with forward-scattering geometry is located at the hard X-ray beamline of the PAL-XFEL and provides opportunities to perform serial femtosecond crystallography and coherent X-ray diffraction imaging. To produce intense high-density XFEL pulses at the interaction positions between the X-rays and various samples, a microfocusing Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror system that includes an ultra-precision manipulator has been developed. In this paper, the design of a KB mirror system that focuses the hard XFEL beam onto a fixed sample point of the NCI hutch, which is positioned along the hard XFEL beamline, is described. The focusing system produces a two-dimensional focusing beam at approximately 2 µm scale across the 2-11 keV photon energy range. XFEL pulses of 9.7 keV energy were successfully focused onto an area of size 1.94 µm × 2.08 µm FWHM.

  13. Temporal cross-correlation of x-ray free electron and optical lasers using soft x-ray pulse induced transient reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, O; Trigo, M; Schlotter, W F; Beye, M; Sorgenfrei, F; Turner, J J; Reis, D A; Gerken, N; Lee, S; Lee, W S; Hays, G; Acremann, Y; Abbey, B; Coffee, R; Messerschmidt, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Lapertot, G; Lüning, J; Heimann, P; Soufli, R; Fernández-Perea, M; Rowen, M; Holmes, M; Molodtsov, S L; Föhlisch, A; Wurth, W

    2012-05-07

    The recent development of x-ray free electron lasers providing coherent, femtosecond-long pulses of high brilliance and variable energy opens new areas of scientific research in a variety of disciplines such as physics, chemistry, and biology. Pump-probe experimental techniques which observe the temporal evolution of systems after optical or x-ray pulse excitation are one of the main experimental schemes currently in use for ultrafast studies. The key challenge in these experiments is to reliably achieve temporal and spatial overlap of the x-ray and optical pulses. Here we present measurements of the x-ray pulse induced transient change of optical reflectivity from a variety of materials covering the soft x-ray photon energy range from 500eV to 2000eV and outline the use of this technique to establish and characterize temporal synchronization of the optical-laser and FEL x-ray pulses.

  14. Influence of three laser wavelengths on human fibroblasts cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Bogdan; Soritau, Olga; Baciut, Mihaela; Campian, Radu; Crisan, Liana; Baciut, Grigore

    2013-02-01

    Although experimental studies in vitro and vivo have been numerous, the effect of laser wavelength irradiation on human fibroblast cell culture is poorly understood. This emphasizes the need of additional cellular and molecular research into laser influence with low energy and power. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of three different laser wavelengths on the human skin fibroblasts cell culture. We wanted to evaluate if near infrared lasers had any influence in healing of wounds by stimulating mitochondrial activity of fibroblasts. The cells were irradiated using 830-, 980- and 2,940-nm laser wavelengths. The irradiated cells were incubated and their mitochondrial activity was assessed by the MTT assay at 24, 48 and 72 h. Simultaneously, an apoptosis assay was assessed on the irradiated fibroblasts. It can be concluded that laser light of the near-infrared region (830 and 980 nm) influences fibroblasts mitochondrial activity compared to the 2,940-nm wavelength which produces apoptosis.

  15. A multi-wavelength IR laser for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Sun, Xiaoli; Fahey, Molly E.; Numata, Kenji; Krainak, Michael A.

    2017-05-01

    We present a laser technology development with space flight heritage to generate laser wavelengths in the near- to midinfrared (NIR to MIR) for space lidar applications. Integrating an optical parametric crystal to the LOLA (Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter) laser transmitter design affords selective laser wavelengths from NIR to MIR that are not easily obtainable from traditional diode pumped solid-state lasers. By replacing the output coupler of the LOLA laser with a properly designed parametric crystal, we successfully demonstrated a monolithic intra-cavity optical parametric oscillator (iOPO) laser based on all high technology readiness level (TRL) subsystems and components. Several desired wavelengths have been generated including 2.1 µm, 2.7 μm and 3.4 μm. This laser can also be used in trace-gas remote sensing, as many molecules possess their unique vibrational transitions in NIR to MIR wavelength region, as well as in time-of-flight mass spectrometer where desorption of samples using MIR laser wavelengths have been successfully demonstrated

  16. A Multi-Wavelength IR Laser for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Steven X.; Yu, Anthony W.; Sun, Xiaoli; Fahey, Molly E.; Numata, Kenji; Krainak, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a laser technology development with space flight heritage to generate laser wavelengths in the near- to mid-infrared (NIR to MIR) for space lidar applications. Integrating an optical parametric crystal to the LOLA (Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter) laser transmitter design affords selective laser wavelengths from NIR to MIR that are not easily obtainable from traditional diode pumped solid-state lasers. By replacing the output coupler of the LOLA laser with a properly designed parametric crystal, we successfully demonstrated a monolithic intra-cavity optical parametric oscillator (iOPO) laser based on all high technology readiness level (TRL) subsystems and components. Several desired wavelengths have been generated including 2.1 microns, 2.7 microns and 3.4 microns. This laser can also be used in trace-gas remote sensing, as many molecules possess their unique vibrational transitions in NIR to MIR wavelength region, as well as in time-of-flight mass spectrometer where desorption of samples using MIR laser wavelengths have been successfully demonstrated.

  17. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.

  18. Physics of short-wavelength-laser design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    The physics and design of vuv and soft x-ray lasers pumped by ICF class high intensity infrared laser drivers are described (for example, the SHIVA laser facility at LLNL). Laser design and physics issues are discussed in the case of a photoionization pumping scheme involving Ne II and line pumping schemes involving H-like and He-like neon.

  19. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measured...... on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of the electronic configuration on specific metal...... orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could...

  20. Performance of the thermionic RF gun injector for the linac-based IR free electron laser at the FEL-SUT

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, F; Kawai, M; Koike, H; Sobajima, M

    2001-01-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) has developed a linac-based compact IR free electron laser device and has installed it in the FEL-SUT (IR FEL Research Center of Science University of Tokyo). The FEL device adopts a combination of a multi-cell RF gun with a thermionic cathode and an alpha-magnet as an injector. The fundamental design of this RF gun is the pi/2 mode standing wave structure. It has two accelerating cells and a coupling cell located on the beam axis, a so-called 'on axis coupled structure' (OCS). Characteristics of momentum distribution and micropulse bunch length of the electron beam are compared with beam dynamics simulation results in this paper. We succeeded in obtaining sufficient peak current for FEL lasing with this injector, and the first lasing was achieved on 6 July 2000.

  1. Experimental Characterization Of The Saturating, Near Infrared, Self-amplified Spontaneous Emission Free Electron Laser Analysis Of Radiation Properties And Electron Beam Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Murokh, A

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the main results of the VISA experiment (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) are presented and analyzed. The purpose of the experiment was to build a state-of-the-art single pass self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL) based on a high brightness electron beam, and characterize its operation, including saturation, in the near infrared spectral region. This experiment was hosted by Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is a users facility that provides high brightness relativistic electron beams generated with the photoinjector. During the experiment, SASE FEL performance was studied in two regimes: a long bunch, lower gain operation; and a short bunch high gain regime. The transition between the two conditions was possible due to a novel bunch compression mechanism, which was discovered in the course of the experiment. This compression allowed the variation of peak current in the electron beam before it was launched into the 4-m VISA...

  2. Interaction of short x-ray pulses with low-Z x-ray optics materials at the LCLS free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau-Riege, S P; London, R A; Graf, A; Baker, S L; Soufli, R; Sobierajski, R; Burian, T; Chalupsky, J; Juha, L; Gaudin, J; Krzywinski, J; Moeller, S; Messerschmidt, M; Bozek, J; Bostedt, C

    2010-11-08

    Materials used for hard x-ray-free-electron laser (XFEL) optics must withstand high-intensity x-ray pulses. The advent of the Linac Coherent Light Source has enabled us to expose candidate optical materials, such as bulk B4C and SiC films, to 0.83 keV XFEL pulses with pulse energies between 1 μJ and 2 mJ to determine short-pulse hard x-ray damage thresholds. The fluence required for the onset of damage for single pulses is around the melt fluence and slightly lower for multiple pulses. We observed strong mechanical cracking in the materials, which may be due to the larger penetration depths of the hard x-rays.

  3. Soft x-ray free-electron laser imaging by LiF crystal and film detectors over a wide range of fluences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuz, Tatiana A; Faenov, Anatoly Ya; Fukuda, Yuji; Kando, Masaki; Bolton, Paul; Mitrofanov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Alexander V; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Senba, Yasunori; Togashi, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-01-20

    LiF crystal and film detectors were used to measure the far-field fluence profile of a self-amplified spontaneous-emission free-electron laser beam and diffraction imaging with high spatial resolution. In these measurements the photoluminescence (PL) response of LiF crystal and film was compared over a wide range of soft x-ray fluences. It was found that the soft x-ray fluence dependences of LiF crystal and film differ. At low fluence, the LiF crystal shows higher PL response compared to LiF film, while this comparison is the opposite at higher fluence. Accurate measurement of LiF crystal and film PL response is important for precise characterization of the spatial, spectral, and coherence features of x-ray beams across the full profile and in localized areas. For such measurements, crucial LiF detector attributes are high spatial resolution and high dynamic range.

  4. Electron slicing for the generation of tunable femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free electron laser and slice diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Di Mitri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the experimental results of femtosecond slicing an ultrarelativistic, high brightness electron beam with a collimator. In contrast to some qualitative considerations reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.92.074801, we first demonstrate that the collimation process preserves the slice beam quality, in agreement with our theoretical expectations, and that the collimation is compatible with the operation of a linear accelerator in terms of beam transport, radiation dose, and collimator heating. Accordingly, the collimated beam can be used for the generation of stable femtosecond soft x-ray pulses of tunable duration, from either a self-amplified spontaneous emission or an externally seeded free electron laser. The proposed method also turns out to be a more compact and cheaper solution for electron slice diagnostics than the commonly used radio frequency deflecting cavities and has minimal impact on the machine design.

  5. Evaluation of the cone-shaped pickup performance for low charge sub-10 fs arrival-time measurements at free electron laser facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Angelovski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the cone-shaped pickup performance as a part of the high bandwidth bunch arrival-time monitors (BAMs for a low charge sub-10 fs arrival-time measurements is presented. Three sets of pickups are installed at the free electron laser FLASH at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, the quasi-cw SRF accelerator ELBE at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the SwissFEL injector test facility at Paul Scherrer Institute. Measurements and simulations are in good agreement and the pickups fulfill the design specifications. Utilizing the high bandwidth BAM with the cone-shaped pickups, an improvement of the signal slope by a factor of 10 is demonstrated at ELBE compared to the BAM with a low bandwidth.

  6. Generating high-brightness and coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based on the coherent harmonic generation (CHG and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate a coherent signal at ultrahigh harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of a realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultrashort (∼20  fs coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using a 1.6 GeV electron beam based on the proposed technique.

  7. Multi-colour pulses from seeded free-electron-lasers: towards the development of non-linear core-level coherent spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, Filippo; Capotondi, Flavio; Casolari, Francesco; Dallari, Francesco; Danailov, Miltcho B; De Ninno, Giovanni; Fausti, Daniele; Kiskinova, Maya; Manfredda, Michele; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Pedersoli, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    We report on new opportunities for ultrafast science thanks to the use of two-colour extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses at the FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility. The two pulses have been employed to carry out a pioneering FEL-pump/FEL-probe diffraction experiment using a Ti target and tuning the FEL pulses to the M(2/3)-edge in order to explore the dependence of the dielectric constant on the excitation fluence. The future impact that the use of such a two-colour FEL emission will have on the development of ultrafast wave-mixing methods in the XUV/soft X-ray range is addressed and discussed.

  8. Scaling EUV and X-ray Thomson sources to optical free-electron laser operation with traveling-wave Thomson scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiniger, Klaus; Albach, Daniel; Debus, Alexander; Loeser, Markus; Pausch, Richard; Roeser, Fabian; Schramm, Ulrich; Siebold, Matthias; Bussmann, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Traveling-Wave Thomson-Scattering (TWTS) allows for the realization of optical free-electron lasers (OFELs) from the interaction of short, high-power laser pulses with brilliant relativistic electron bunches. The laser field provides the optical undulator which is traversed by the electrons. In order to achieve coherent amplification of radiation through electron microbunching the interaction between electrons and laser must be maintained over hundreds to thousands of undulator periods. Traveling-Wave Thomson-Scattering is the only scattering geometry so far allowing for the realization of optical undulators of this length which is at the same time scalable from extreme ultraviolet to X-ray photon energies. TWTS is also applicable for the realization of incoherent high peak brightness hard X-ray to gamma-ray sources which can provide orders of magnitude higher photon output than classic head-on Thomson sources. In contrast to head-on Thomson sources TWTS employs a side-scattering geometry where laser and electron propagation direction of motion enclose an angle. Tilting the laser pulse front with respect to the wave front by half of this interaction angle optimizes electron and laser pulse overlap. In the side-scattering geometry the tilt of the pulse-front compensates the spatial offset between electrons and laser pulse-front which would be present otherwise for an electron bunch far from the interaction point where it overlaps with the laser pulse center. Thus the laser pulse-front tilt ensures continuous overlap between laser pulse and electrons while these traverse the laser pulse cross-sectional area. This allows to control the interaction distance in TWTS by the laser pulse width rather than laser pulse duration as is the case for head-on Thomson scattering. Utilizing petawatt class laser pulses with millimeter to centimeter scale width allows for the realization of compact optical undulators with thousands of periods. When laser pulses for TWTS are prepared

  9. Dual-wavelength InP quantum dot lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shutts, S.; Smowton, P. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Krysa, A. B. [EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-16

    We have demonstrated a two-section dual-wavelength diode laser incorporating distributed Bragg reflectors, with a peak-wavelength separation of 62.5 nm at 300 K. Each lasing wavelength has a different temperature dependence, providing a difference-tuning of 0.11 nm/K. We discuss the mechanisms governing the light output of the two competing modes and explain how the short wavelength can be relatively insensitive to output changes at the longer wavelength. Starting from an initial condition when the output at both wavelengths are equal, a 500% increase in the long wavelength output causes the short wavelength output to fall by only 6%.

  10. Ultrafast free electron quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Maria Gabriel

    Free electron quantum optics is an emerging sub-field of physics that uses laser light, often in combination with nano-structures, to manipulate electrons in free space. Integration of femtosecond lasers into this technology is facilitating the move of free electron quantum optics into the ultrafast regime. A vision for this technology is ultrahigh temporal resolution in free electron time-of-flight experiments. Such a system would make fundamental physics studies involving small forces accessible that are not feasible with current technology. Realization of this vision will require an ultrafast source and an ultrafast detection scheme. Tungsten nano-tip sources capable of generating sub-100 fs electron pulses are already in use in our lab. Elsewhere, this type of source has been reported to emit on a sub-cycle timescale. Following up on a proposed scheme for observing sub-cycle emission, a two-color interferometer has been built and pump-probe electron emission measurements have been performed. Other efforts to develop ultrafast sources have involved implementing additional control parameters. GaAs has been investigated as a possible ultrafast source of spin-polarized electrons, and tungsten nano-tips have been modified with an ion beam to create a double tip source. Spin control and transverse separation control are expected to make studies of Pauli degeneracy pressure possible. The temporal resolution of current electronic particle detectors is ~1 ns. Schemes involving the interaction of laser pulses with nanostructures could improve this resolution by several orders of magnitude. As a first step towards a femtosecond electron switch, the temporal resolution of a nano-fabricated plasmonic antenna has been measured in a femtosecond pump-probe experiment. The possibility of an ultrafast diffraction switch has also been analyzed for nonrelativistic and relativistic electrons. In an application of a free electron time-of-flight system, the prediction of

  11. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  12. Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    the laser pulse is just starting to ionize air with full ionization across the SHED field of view within approximately 1.33 ps. With a 100-fs laser...with color scale in arbitrary units; b) HASO 3– generated phasefront map with color scale in radians .........................10 Fig. 5 a) Cross ...6 Cross section of phasefront map for f = 50 cm at varying energies .....11 Fig. 7 Temporal scan of phasefront from E = 4.2 mJ, f = 25 cm where a

  13. Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses of different wavelengths in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigate the filaments formed by the ultrashort laser pulses with different wavelengths of 400 nm, 586 nm and 800 nm propagating in argon. Numerical results show that, when the input power or the ratio of the input power to the critical power is given, the pulse with 400 nm wavelength has the largest on-axis intensity, ...

  14. SIMCON 3.0 eight channel FPGA-based cavity simulator and controller for VUV free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2006-10-01

    The work describes integrated system of hardware controller and simulator of superconductive cavity. The controller was realized on FPGA chip Xilinx-VirtexII-V4000. The solution uses DSP EMBEDDED BOARD positioned on a LLRF Modular Control Platform. The algorithm was realized in VHDL using hardware multiplication components existing in VirtexII series of chips. There was obtained implementation of a device working in real-time according to the control condition demands of LLRF system for TESLA superconductive cavities. The system is predicted as a developmental stage for FLASH accelerator and FEL laser and next for XFEL. The paper describes in detail functional layer, parameter programming, control basics for particular blocks, monitoring of real-time processes. There are presented results of system usage for control of the module ACC1 of FLASH laser.

  15. DarkLight: A Search for Dark Forces at the Jefferson Laboratory Free-Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balewski, Jan; Bernauer, J; Bertozzi, William; Bessuille, Jason; Buck, B; Cowan, Ray; Dow, K; Epstein, C; Fisher, Peter; Gilad, Shalev; Ihloff, Ernest; Kahn, Yonatan; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelsey, J; Milner, Richard; Moran, C; Ou, Longwu; Russell, R; Schmookler, Barak; Thaler, J; Tschalar, C; Vidal, Christopher; Winnebeck, A; Benson, Stephen [JLAB; Gould, Christopher [JLAB; Biallas, George [JLAB; Boyce, James [JLAB; Coleman, James [JLAB; Douglas, David [JLAB; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Fenker, Howard [JLAB; Gubeli, Joseph [JLAB; Hannon, Fay [JLAB; Huang, Jia [JLAB; Jordan, Kevin [JLAB; Legg, Robert [JLAB; Marchlik, Matthew [JLAB; Moore, Steven [JLAB; Neil, George [JLAB; Shinn, Michelle D [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher [JLAB; Walker, Richard [JLAB; Williams, Gwyn [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Freytsis, M; Fiorito, Ralph; O' Shea, P; Alarcon, Ricardo; Dipert, R; Ovanesyan, G; Gunter, Thoth; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kohl, M; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Gunarathne, D S; Martoff, C J; Olvitt, D L; Surrow, Bernd; Lia, X; Beck, Reinhard; Schmitz, R; Walther, D; Brinkmann, K; Zaunig, H

    2014-05-01

    We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays.

  16. Method of stabilizing a laser apparatus with wavelength converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A method of controlling beam quality and stability of a laser apparatus, the laser apparatus comprising, a diode laser (10) providing first radiation of at least a first wavelength, and a frequency conversion unit (12) configured to frequency-convert the first radiation from the diode laser......) into the first section (222), a second contact (221) for injecting a second current (I2) into the second section (223), and means for controlling a temperature of the diode laser; wherein the method comprises monitoring a first parameter indicative of the power content of a dominant lobe of the first radiation...

  17. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  18. X-ray Production by Cascading Stages of a High-Gain Harmonic Generation Free-Electron Laser II: Special Topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we study the tolerance of a new approach to produce coherent x-ray by cascading several stages of a High-Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Being a harmonic generation process, a small noise in the initial fundamental signal will lead to a significant noise-to-signal (NTS) ratio in the final harmonic, so the noise issue is studied in this paper. We study two sources of noise: the incoherent undulator radiation, which is a noise with respect to the seed laser; and the noise of the seed laser itself. In reality, the electron beam longitudinal current profile is not uniform. Since the electron beam is the amplification medium for the FEL, this non- uniformity will induce phase error in the FEL. Therefore, this effect is studied. Phase error due to the wakefield and electron beam self-field is also studied. Synchrotronization of the electron beam and the seed laser is an important issue determining the success of the HGHG. We study the timing jitter induced frequency jitter in this paper. We also show that an HGHG FEL poses a less stringent requirement on the emittance than a SASE FEL does, due to a Natural Emittance Effect Reduction (NEER) mechanism. This NEER mechanism suggests a new operation mode, i.e., the HGHG FEL could adopt a high current, though unavoidable, a high emittance electron beam. Study in this paper shows that, production of hard x-rays with good longitudinal coherence by cascading stages of a HGHG FEL is promising. However, technical improvement is demanded.

  19. Study on the selection of laser wavelengths in the intravascular low-level laser irradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanliang; Lin, Yuexia; Gao, Simin

    2015-05-01

    According to the absorption spectra of blood and hemoglobin, a photon-bond energy formula is established using physical methods and the effects on hemoglobin of low-level laser at different wavelengths are analyzed. The results show that lasers with the peak wavelengths of 200∼240, 275, and 342 nm in the whole blood absorption spectra curve are easy to destroy protein molecules and then lead to hemoglobin lose biological activity. While lasers with wavelengths longer than 800 nm will reduce the oxygen carrying capacity of blood, only lasers with wavelengths between 630 and 670 nm have the best efficacy.

  20. High power continuous-wave dual-wavelength alexandrite laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2017-10-01

    A high power dual-wavelength alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser using a single plate birefringent filter (BRF) was demonstrated. Using a 6 mm thick BRF, dual-wavelength output at 745.2 nm and 756.2 nm (5.9 THz of frequency difference) with 850 mW of average output power was achieved as well as with 16.8% optical-to-optical and 24.2% slope efficiency. The tunability of dual-wavelength separation was also demonstrated by employing the 4 mm and 2 mm thick BRFs with similar output powers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a dual-wavelength alexandrite laser.

  1. Choice of the laser wavelength for a herpetic keratitis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razhev, Alexander M.; Bagayev, Sergei N.; Chernikh, Valery V.; Kargapoltsev, Evgeny S.; Trunov, Alexander; Zhupikov, Andrey A.

    2002-06-01

    For the first time the effect of the UV laser radiation to human eye cornea with herpetic keratitis was experimentally investigated. In experiments the UV radiation of ArF (193 nm), KrCl (223 nm), KrF (248 nm) excimer lasers were used. Optimal laser radiation parameters for the treatment of the herpetic keratitis were determined. The immuno-biochemical investigations were carried out and the results of clinical trials are presented. The maximum ablation rate was obtained for the 248 nm radiation wavelength. The process of healing was successful but in some cases the haze on the surface of the cornea was observed. When used the 193 nm radiation wavelength the corneal surface was clear without any hazes but the epithelization process was slower than for 248 nm wavelength and in some cases the relapse was occurred. The best results for herpetic keratitis treatment have been achieved by utilizing the 223 nm radiation wavelength of the KrCl excimer laser. The use of the 223 nm radiation wavelength allows treating the herpetic keratitis with low traumatic process of ablation and provides high quality of corneal surface.

  2. Performance in the vertical test of the 832 nine-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, D.; Gubarev, V.; Schaffran, J.; Steder, L.; Walker, N.; Wenskat, M.; Monaco, L.

    2017-04-01

    The successful production and associated vertical testing of over 800 superconducting 1.3 GHz accelerating cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) represents the culmination of over 20 years of superconducting radio-frequency R&D. The cavity production took place at two industrial vendors under the shared responsibility of INFN Milano-LASA and DESY. Average vertical testing rates at DESY exceeded 10 cavities per week, peaking at up to 15 cavities per week. The cavities sent for cryomodule assembly at Commissariat à l'énergie atomique (CEA) Saclay achieved an average maximum gradient of approximately 33 MV /m , reducing to ˜30 MV /m when the operational specifications on quality factor (Q) and field emission were included (the so-called usable gradient). Only 16% of the cavities required an additional surface retreatment to recover their low performance (usable gradient less than 20 MV /m ). These cavities were predominantly limited by excessive field emission for which a simple high pressure water rinse (HPR) was sufficient. Approximately 16% of the cavities also received an additional HPR, e.g. due to vacuum problems before or during the tests or other reasons, but these were not directly related to gradient performance. The in-depth statistical analyses presented in this report have revealed several features of the series produced cavities.

  3. X-ray Free Electron Laser Determination of Crystal Structures of Dark and Light States of a Reversibly Photoswitching Fluorescent Protein at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. M. Hutchison

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The photochromic fluorescent protein Skylan-NS (Nonlinear Structured illumination variant mEos3.1H62L is a reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein which has an unilluminated/ground state with an anionic and cis chromophore conformation and high fluorescence quantum yield. Photo-conversion with illumination at 515 nm generates a meta-stable intermediate with neutral trans-chromophore structure that has a 4 h lifetime. We present X-ray crystal structures of the cis (on state at 1.9 Angstrom resolution and the trans (off state at a limiting resolution of 1.55 Angstrom from serial femtosecond crystallography experiments conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free Electron Laser (SACLA at 7.0 keV and 10.5 keV, and at Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS at 9.5 keV. We present a comparison of the data reduction and structure determination statistics for the two facilities which differ in flux, beam characteristics and detector technologies. Furthermore, a comparison of droplet on demand, grease injection and Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzle (GDVN injection shows no significant differences in limiting resolution. The photoconversion of the on- to the off-state includes both internal and surface exposed protein structural changes, occurring in regions that lack crystal contacts in the orthorhombic crystal form.

  4. Start-up and saturation in self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron lasers using a time-independent analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinit; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in free-electron lasers (FELs) is typically performed using time-dependent computer codes, which take large CPU time and require large memory. Recently, Yu [Phys. Rev. E 58, 4991 (1998)] has shown that one can even use a time-independent code for this purpose (where the requirement on CPU time and memory is significantly reduced) by modifying it to include multiple phase-space buckets and using a scaling relation between the output power and the number of simulation particles, which is valid only in the linear regime. In this paper, we take a fresh look at the problem and show that incorporating multiple buckets in TDA3D is not needed to simulate the SASE process. We give a new interpretation of time-independent simulations of the SASE process and present detailed justification for using a single-frequency steady-state simulation code for the study of evolution of shot noise. We further extend the simulation studies to the nonlinear regime by modifying the code TDA3D to take the incoherent input power. We use this technique to study the start-up and saturation of the TTF-II FEL at DESY and discuss the results.

  5. Performance in the vertical test of the 832 nine-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Reschke

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The successful production and associated vertical testing of over 800 superconducting 1.3 GHz accelerating cavities for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL represents the culmination of over 20 years of superconducting radio-frequency R&D. The cavity production took place at two industrial vendors under the shared responsibility of INFN Milano–LASA and DESY. Average vertical testing rates at DESY exceeded 10 cavities per week, peaking at up to 15 cavities per week. The cavities sent for cryomodule assembly at Commissariat à l’énergie atomique (CEA Saclay achieved an average maximum gradient of approximately 33  MV/m, reducing to ∼30  MV/m when the operational specifications on quality factor (Q and field emission were included (the so-called usable gradient. Only 16% of the cavities required an additional surface retreatment to recover their low performance (usable gradient less than 20  MV/m. These cavities were predominantly limited by excessive field emission for which a simple high pressure water rinse (HPR was sufficient. Approximately 16% of the cavities also received an additional HPR, e.g. due to vacuum problems before or during the tests or other reasons, but these were not directly related to gradient performance. The in-depth statistical analyses presented in this report have revealed several features of the series produced cavities.

  6. Wiggler Effects on the Growth Rate of a Raman Free-electron Laser with Axial Magnetic Field or Ion-Channel Guiding

    CERN Document Server

    Maraghechi, Behrouz

    2004-01-01

    A relativistic theory for Raman backscattering in the beam frame of electrons is presented and is used to find the growth rate of a free-electron laser (FEL), in the Raman regime. A one dimensional helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field are considered. The effects of static self-electric and self-magnetic fields, induced by the steady-state charge density and currents of the non-neutral electron beam, are taken into account to find the steady-state trajectories. The wiggler effects on the linear dispersion relations of the space-charge wave and radiation are included in the analysis. A numerical computation is conducted to compare the growth rate of the excited waves with nonrelativistic treatment. It was found that self-field effects increase the growth rate in the group II orbits and decrease it in the group I orbits. However, the wiggler effects on growth rate are stronger and increase the growth rate on both group I and group II orbits. The discontinuity, due to the cyclotron resonance with the radia...

  7. Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins and high-valent metal-complexes at room temperature using free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubin, Markus; Kern, Jan; Gul, Sheraz; Kroll, Thomas; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Löchel, Heike; Fuller, Franklin D; Sierra, Raymond G; Quevedo, Wilson; Weniger, Christian; Rehanek, Jens; Firsov, Anatoly; Laksmono, Hartawan; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis L; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Glownia, James M; Krzywinski, Jacek; Moeller, Stefan; Turner, Joshua J; Minitti, Michael P; Dakovski, Georgi L; Koroidov, Sergey; Kawde, Anurag; Kanady, Jacob S; Tsui, Emily Y; Suseno, Sandy; Han, Zhiji; Hill, Ethan; Taguchi, Taketo; Borovik, Andrew S; Agapie, Theodor; Messinger, Johannes; Erko, Alexei; Föhlisch, Alexander; Bergmann, Uwe; Mitzner, Rolf; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko; Wernet, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the L-edge of 3d transition metals provides unique information on the local metal charge and spin states by directly probing 3d-derived molecular orbitals through 2p-3d transitions. However, this soft x-ray technique has been rarely used at synchrotron facilities for mechanistic studies of metalloenzymes due to the difficulties of x-ray-induced sample damage and strong background signals from light elements that can dominate the low metal signal. Here, we combine femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser with a novel x-ray fluorescence-yield spectrometer to overcome these difficulties. We present L-edge absorption spectra of inorganic high-valent Mn complexes (Mn ∼ 6-15 mmol/l) with no visible effects of radiation damage. We also present the first L-edge absorption spectra of the oxygen evolving complex (Mn4CaO5) in Photosystem II (Mn < 1 mmol/l) at room temperature, measured under similar conditions. Our approach opens new ways to study metalloenzymes under functional conditions.

  8. Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins and high-valent metal-complexes at room temperature using free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kubin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the L-edge of 3d transition metals provides unique information on the local metal charge and spin states by directly probing 3d-derived molecular orbitals through 2p-3d transitions. However, this soft x-ray technique has been rarely used at synchrotron facilities for mechanistic studies of metalloenzymes due to the difficulties of x-ray-induced sample damage and strong background signals from light elements that can dominate the low metal signal. Here, we combine femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser with a novel x-ray fluorescence-yield spectrometer to overcome these difficulties. We present L-edge absorption spectra of inorganic high-valent Mn complexes (Mn ∼ 6–15 mmol/l with no visible effects of radiation damage. We also present the first L-edge absorption spectra of the oxygen evolving complex (Mn4CaO5 in Photosystem II (Mn < 1 mmol/l at room temperature, measured under similar conditions. Our approach opens new ways to study metalloenzymes under functional conditions.

  9. Measurements of the temporal and spatial phase variations of a 33 GHz pulsed free electron laser amplifier and application to high gradient RF acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volfbeyn, P.; Bekefi, G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We report the results of temporal and spatial measurements of phase of a pulsed free electron laser amplifier (FEL) operating in combined wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields. The 33 GHz FEL is driven by a mildly relativistic electron beam (750 kV, 90-300 A, 30 ns) and generates 61 MW of radiation with a high power magnetron as the input source. The phase is measured by an interferometric technique from which frequency shifting is determined. The results are simulated with a computer code. Experimental studies on a CERN-CLIC 32.98 GHz 26-cell high gradient accelerating section (HGA) were carried out for input powers from 0.1 MW to 35 MW. The FEL served as the r.f. power source for the HGA. The maximum power in the transmitted pulse was measured to be 15 MW for an input pulse of 35 MW. The theoretically calculated shunt impedance of 116 M{Omega}/m predicts a field gradient of 65 MeV/m inside the HGA. For power levels >3MW the pulse transmitted through the HGA was observed to be shorter than the input pulse and pulse shortening became more serious with increasing power input. At the highest power levels the output pulse length (about 5 nsec) was about one quarter of the input pulse length. Various tests suggest that these undesirable effects occur in the input coupler to the HGA. Light and X-ray production inside the HGA have been observed.

  10. Optimal laser wavelength for photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeeun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Young Kwak, Jin; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Ho Chang, Jin

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for real-time detection of micro-scale calcifications (e.g., breast, which are an indicator of the cancer occurrence. Optimal wavelength of incident laser for the microcalcification imaging was ascertained through ex vivo experiments with seven breast specimens of volunteers. In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum amplitude of photoacoustic signals from the microcalcifications occurred when the laser wavelength ranged from 690 to 700 nm. This result demonstrated that PAI can serve as a real-time imaging and guidance tool for diagnosis and biopsy of the breast microcalcifications.

  11. Excision of oral mucocele by different wavelength lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Romeo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucocele is a common benign neoplasm of oral soft tissues and the most common after fibroma. It generally occurs in the lower lip and its treatment includes excision of cyst and the responsible salivary gland, in order to prevent recurrences. Aims: To evaluate the capability of three different lasers in performing the excision of labial mucocele with two different techniques. Materials and Methods: In the presented cases, excision was performed using two different techniques (circumferential incision technique and mucosal preservation technique and three different laser wavelengths (Er,Cr:YSGG 2780 nm, diode 808 nm, and KTP 532 nm. Results: All the tested lasers, regardless of wavelength, showed many advantages (bloodless surgical field, no postoperative pain, relative speed, and easy execution. The most useful surgical technique depends on clinical features of the lesion. Conclusion: Tested lasers, with both techniques, are helpful in the management of labial mucocele.

  12. Laser warning receiver to identify the wavelength and angle of arrival of incident laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair; Michael B.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-03-23

    A laser warning receiver is disclosed which has up to hundreds of individual optical channels each optically oriented to receive laser light from a different angle of arrival. Each optical channel has an optical wedge to define the angle of arrival, and a lens to focus the laser light onto a multi-wavelength photodetector for that channel. Each multi-wavelength photodetector has a number of semiconductor layers which are located in a multi-dielectric stack that concentrates the laser light into one of the semiconductor layers according to wavelength. An electrical signal from the multi-wavelength photodetector can be processed to determine both the angle of arrival and the wavelength of the laser light.

  13. Plasmonic distributed feedback lasers at telecommunications wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marell, Milan J H; Smalbrugge, Barry; Geluk, Erik Jan; van Veldhoven, Peter J; Barcones, Beatrix; Koopmans, Bert; Nötzel, Richard; Smit, Meint K; Hill, Martin T

    2011-08-01

    We investigate electrically pumped, distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, based on gap-plasmon mode metallic waveguides. The waveguides have nano-scale widths below the diffraction limit and incorporate vertical groove Bragg gratings. These metallic Bragg gratings provide a broad bandwidth stop band (~500 nm) with grating coupling coefficients of over 5000/cm. A strong suppression of spontaneous emission occurs in these Bragg grating cavities, over the stop band frequencies. This strong suppression manifests itself in our experimental results as a near absence of spontaneous emission and significantly reduced lasing thresholds when compared to similar length Fabry-Pérot waveguide cavities. Furthermore, the reduced threshold pumping requirements permits us to show strong line narrowing and super linear light current curves for these plasmon mode devices even at room temperature.

  14. Wavelength scaling of silicon laser ablation in picosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, A.; Grojo, D.; Sentis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of silicon has been investigated at 343, 515, and 1030 nm using a laser pulse duration of 50 ps. In this large spectral range, ablation thresholds of silicon vary from 0.01 to 0.83 J/cm2, confirming a strong dependence on the wavelength. By solving the free-carrier density rate equation at threshold conditions, we show that band-to-band linear absorption dominates energy deposition at 343 and 515 nm, whereas at 1030 nm, the energy leading to ablation is primarily absorbed by the generated free-carriers. This allows us to determine the relevant criteria to derive a simple model predicting the wavelength dependence of the ablation threshold in this regime. We obtain an excellent agreement between experimental measurements and calculations by simply considering an averaged energy density required in the absorption depth for surface ablation and accounting for the laser-induced variations of the important thermophysical parameters. On the basis of this analysis, we discuss the optimal wavelength and fluence conditions for maximum removal rate, ablation efficiency, and accuracy. Despite the difference in mechanisms at the different wavelengths, we find that the maximal efficiency remains at around 7 times the ablation threshold fluence for all investigated wavelengths. This work provides guidelines for high-quality and efficient micromachining of silicon in the scarcely explored picosecond regime, while new picosecond sources offer numerous advantages for real throughput industrial applications.

  15. Fourier ptychographic microscopy at telecommunication wavelengths using a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Alotaibi, Maged; Skinner-Ramos, Sueli; Dominguez, Daniel; Bernussi, Ayrton A.; de Peralta, Luis Grave

    2017-12-01

    We report the implementation of the Fourier Ptychographic Microscopy (FPM) technique, a phase retrieval technique, at telecommunication wavelengths using a low-coherence ultrafast pulsed laser source. High quality images, near speckle-free, were obtained with the proposed approach. We demonstrate that FPM can also be used to image periodic features through a silicon wafer.

  16. Emission wavelength of multilayer distributed feedback dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Brøkner Christiansen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    mode is reported. The method is advantageous to established methods as it predicts the wavelength precisely with reduced complexity. Four-layered hybrid polymer-TiO2 first order DFB dye lasers with different TiO2 layer thicknesses are studied. Varying the TiO2 thickness from 0 nm to 30 nm changes...

  17. Polarization in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadichev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  18. Biomedical Free Electron Laser Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    are mainly derived from the fluorescein skeleton structure (eosin is a tetrabromo of fluorescein while erythrosin is a tetraodo derivative). However...Micrococcal nuclease catalyzes cleavage of both DNA and RNA to yield 3’-nucleotides. It exhibits both exo - and endo-5-phosphodiesterase activities and

  19. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-03-29

    In this paper, we propose a seeding scheme that compresses an initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space of an electron beam by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C , where Cis the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Using two lasers as energy chirpers, such a modulation compression scheme can generate kilo-Ampershort wavelength current modulation with significant bunching factor from an initial a few tens Amper current. This compression scheme can also be used togenerate a prebunched single atto-second short wavelength current modulation and prebunched two color, two atto-second modulations.

  20. Short-wavelength infrared laser activates the auditory neurons: comparing the effect of 980 vs. 810 nm wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lan; Wang, Jingxuan; Wei, Ying; Lu, Jianren; Xu, Anting; Xia, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Research on auditory neural triggering by optical stimulus has been developed as an emerging technique to elicit the auditory neural response, which may provide an alternative method to the cochlear implants. However, most previous studies have been focused on using longer-wavelength near-infrared (>1800 nm) laser. The effect comparison of different laser wavelengths in short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) range on the auditory neural stimulation has not been previously explored. In this study, the pulsed 980- and 810-nm SWIR lasers were applied as optical stimuli to irradiate the auditory neurons in the cochlea of five deafened guinea pigs and the neural response under the two laser wavelengths was compared by recording the evoked optical auditory brainstem responses (OABRs). In addition, the effect of radiant exposure, laser pulse width, and threshold with the two laser wavelengths was further investigated and compared. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze those data. Results showed that the OABR amplitude with the 980-nm laser is higher than the amplitude with the 810-nm laser under the same radiant exposure from 10 to 102 mJ/cm(2). And the laser stimulation of 980 nm wavelength has lower threshold radiant exposure than the 810 nm wavelength at varied pulse duration in 20-500 μs range. Moreover, the 810-nm laser has a wider optimized pulse duration range than the 980-nm laser for the auditory neural stimulation.

  1. Swept wavelength lasers in the 1 um region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Frederik Donbæk

    2006-01-01

    , there is a plethora of applications in which tunable lasers can be utilized, one such application is refractive index waveguide sensing. One method, of performing waveguide sensing is through the so-called wavelength-interrogation method, for which the cavity tuned laser has been tested in this project. The large...... scanning range which can be achieved, with the cavity tuned source allows measurements over large dynamic refractive index ranges....... a serious limitation on the achievable scanning speed if the YDFA is to be used using for so-called cavity tuned lasers. Another swept wavelength configuration, the so-called lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper, is therefore in this work experimentally and numerically investigated as a possible...

  2. Optimal laser wavelength for efficient laser power converter operation over temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, O.; Walker, A. W.; Bett, A. W.; Helmers, H.

    2016-06-01

    A temperature dependent modeling study is conducted on a GaAs laser power converter to identify the optimal incident laser wavelength for optical power transmission. Furthermore, the respective temperature dependent maximal conversion efficiencies in the radiative limit as well as in a practically achievable limit are presented. The model is based on the transfer matrix method coupled to a two-diode model, and is calibrated to experimental data of a GaAs photovoltaic device over laser irradiance and temperature. Since the laser wavelength does not strongly influence the open circuit voltage of the laser power converter, the optimal laser wavelength is determined to be in the range where the external quantum efficiency is maximal, but weighted by the photon flux of the laser.

  3. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  4. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lin X.; Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W.; Stickrath, Andrew B.; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were successfully measured for optically excited state at a timescale from 100 fs to 50 ps, providing insight into its sub-ps electronic and structural relaxation processes. Importantly, a transient reduced state Ni(I) (π, 3dx2-y2) electronic state is captured through the interpretation of a short-lived excited state absorption on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of electronic configuration on specific metal orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could influence d-orbital energies up to a few eV and any attempt to steer the reaction pathway should account for this to ensure that external energies can be used optimally in driving desirable processes. NiTMP structural evolution and the influence of the porphyrin macrocycle conformation on relaxation kinetics can be likewise inferred from this study.

  5. Wavelength-stepped, actively mode-locked fiber laser based on wavelength-division-multiplexed optical delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjoo; Kim, Byoung Yoon

    2017-12-01

    We propose a new scheme for an actively mode-locked wavelength-swept fiber laser that produces a train of discretely wavelength-stepped pulses from a short fiber cavity. Pulses with different wavelengths are split and combined by standard wavelength division multiplexers with fiber delay lines. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate a laser using an erbium doped fiber amplifier and commercially available wavelength-division multiplexers with wavelength spacing of 0.8 nm. The results show simultaneous mode-locking at three different wavelengths. Laser output parameters in time domain, optical and radio frequency spectral domain, and the noise characteristics are presented. Suggestions for the improved design are discussed.

  6. Cost-effective wavelength selectable light source using DFB fiber laser array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fenghai; Xueyan, Zheng; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    2000-01-01

    A cost-effective wavelength selectable light source comprising a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser array is proposed. A large number of wavelengths can be selected via optical space switches using only one shared pump laser. The structure is a good candidate for use as a wavelength selectabl...... backup transmitter for wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) systems....

  7. The effect of laser wavelength on the delay time of laser triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yinan; He, Zhenghao; Liu, Yuchen

    2017-11-01

    The study on the influence of laser wavelength on the initial plasma properties of laser-triggered vacuum switch (LTVS) is not only beneficial to understanding the trigger mechanism but also to optimizing its design for miniaturization and generalization. In this paper, the one-dimensional heat conduction model of the target was developed and then the effect of laser wavelength on the depth of laser ablation and the quantity of initial plasma were investigated experimentally and theoretically with the laser absorption rate. The theoretical analysis was in good agreement with experimental measurement of the delay time of the LTVS. It is clear that the shorter the wavelength, the shorter the delay time will be after the LTVS is triggered.

  8. A multi-wavelength fiber laser based on superimposed fiber grating and chirp fiber Bragg grating for wavelength selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Bi, Wei-hong; Fu, Xing-hu; Jiang, Peng; Wu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a new type of multi-wavelength fiber laser is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. Superimposed fiber grating (SIFG) and chirp fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) are used for wavelength selection. Based on gain equalization technology, by finely adjusting the stress device in the cavity, the gain and loss are equal, so as to suppress the modal competition and achieve multi-wavelength lasing at room temperature. The experimental results show that the laser can output stable multi-wavelength lasers simultaneously. The laser coupling loss is small, the structure is simple, and it is convenient for integration, so it can be widely used in dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) system and optical fiber sensors.

  9. Dynamic Sensor Interrogation Using Wavelength-Swept Laser with a Polygon-Scanner-Based Wavelength Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hyun Park

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a high-speed (~2 kHz dynamic multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor interrogation using a wavelength-swept laser (WSL with a polygon-scanner-based wavelength filter. The scanning frequency of the WSL is 18 kHz, and the 10 dB scanning bandwidth is more than 90 nm around a center wavelength of 1,540 nm. The output from the WSL is coupled into the multiplexed FBG array, which consists of five FBGs. The reflected Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are 1,532.02 nm, 1,537.84 nm, 1,543.48 nm, 1,547.98 nm, and 1,553.06 nm, respectively. A dynamic periodic strain ranging from 500 Hz to 2 kHz is applied to one of the multiplexed FBGs, which is fixed on the stage of the piezoelectric transducer stack. Good dynamic performance of the FBGs and recording of their fast Fourier transform spectra have been successfully achieved with a measuring speed of 18 kHz. The signal-to-noise ratio and the bandwidth over the whole frequency span are determined to be more than 30 dB and around 10 Hz, respectively. We successfully obtained a real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the periodic strain. The dynamic FBG sensor interrogation system can be read out with a WSL for high-speed and high-sensitivity real-time measurement.

  10. Dynamic sensor interrogation using wavelength-swept laser with a polygon-scanner-based wavelength filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Seok; Ko, Myeong Ock; Jung, Mi Sun; Park, Ik Gon; Kim, Namje; Han, Sang-Pil; Ryu, Han-Cheol; Park, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Min Yong

    2013-07-29

    We report a high-speed (~2 kHz) dynamic multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation using a wavelength-swept laser (WSL) with a polygon-scanner-based wavelength filter. The scanning frequency of the WSL is 18 kHz, and the 10 dB scanning bandwidth is more than 90 nm around a center wavelength of 1,540 nm. The output from the WSL is coupled into the multiplexed FBG array, which consists of five FBGs. The reflected Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are 1,532.02 nm, 1,537.84 nm, 1,543.48 nm, 1,547.98 nm, and 1,553.06 nm, respectively. A dynamic periodic strain ranging from 500 Hz to 2 kHz is applied to one of the multiplexed FBGs, which is fixed on the stage of the piezoelectric transducer stack. Good dynamic performance of the FBGs and recording of their fast Fourier transform spectra have been successfully achieved with a measuring speed of 18 kHz. The signal-to-noise ratio and the bandwidth over the whole frequency span are determined to be more than 30 dB and around 10 Hz, respectively. We successfully obtained a real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the periodic strain. The dynamic FBG sensor interrogation system can be read out with a WSL for high-speed and high-sensitivity real-time measurement.

  11. Sensitivity of heterointerfaces on emission wavelength of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. A.; Schwarz, B.; Siriani, D. F.; Connors, M. K.; Missaggia, L. J.; Calawa, D. R.; McNulty, D.; Akey, A.; Zheng, M. C.; Donnelly, J. P.; Mansuripur, T. S.; Capasso, F.

    2017-04-01

    The measured emission wavelengths of AlInAs/GaInAs/InP quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) have been reported to be 0.5-1 μm longer than the designed QCL wavelength. This work clarifies the origin of the red-shifted wavelength. It was found that AlInAs/GaInAs heterointerfaces are compositionally graded over 2.5-4.5 nm, and indium accumulates at the AlInAs-to-GaInAs interface. Thus, the as-grown QCLs are far from the ideal abrupt interfaces used in QCL modeling. When graded layers are incorporated in QCL band structure and wavefunction calculations, the emission wavelengths are red shifted. Furthermore, we demonstrate that QCLs with graded interfaces can be designed without compromising performance and show greatly improved correlation between designed and measured emission wavelength. QCLs were designed for emission between 7.5 and 8.5 μm. These structures were grown and wet-etched ridge devices were fabricated. The QCLs exhibit room temperature peak powers exceeding 900 mW and pulsed efficiencies of 8 to 10%.

  12. Ultra-broadband wavelength-swept Tm-doped fiber laser using wavelength-combined gain stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokurakawa, M; Daniel, J M O; Chenug, C S; Liang, H; Clarkson, W A

    2015-01-12

    A wavelength-swept thulium-doped fiber laser system employing two parallel cavities with two different fiber gain stages is reported. The fiber gain stages were tailored to provide emission in complementary bands with external wavelength-dependent feedback cavities sharing a common rotating polygon mirror for wavelength scanning. The wavelength-swept laser outputs from the fiber gain elements were spectrally combined by means of a dichroic mirror and yielded over 500 mW of output with a scanning range from ~1740 nm to ~2070 nm for a scanning frequency of ~340 Hz.

  13. Intra-laser-cavity microparticle sensing with a dual-wavelength distributed-feedback laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, Edward H.; van der Werf, Kees O; Hollink, Anton J F; Wörhoff, Kerstin; de Ridder, René M; Subramaniam, Vinod; Pollnau, Markus

    An integrated intra-laser-cavity microparticle sensor based on a dual-wavelength distributed-feedback channel waveguide laser in ytterbium-doped amorphous aluminum oxide on a silicon substrate is demonstrated. Real-time detection and accurate size measurement of single micro-particles with diameters

  14. Modeling the DBR laser used as wavelength conversion device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braagaard, Carsten; Mikkelsen, Benny; Durhuus, Terji

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a novel and efficient way to model the dynamic field in optical DBR-type semiconductor devices is presented. The model accounts for the longitudinal carrier, photon, and refractive index distribution. Furthermore, the model handles both active and passive sections that may include...... gratings. Thus, simulations of components containing, e.g., gain sections, absorptive sections, phase sections, and gratings, placed arbitrarily along the longitudinal direction of the cavity, are possible. Here, the model has been used for studying the DBR laser as a wavelength converter. Particularly...

  15. Wavelength-tunable laser based on nonlinear dispersive-wave generation in a tapered optical waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a wavelength tunable laser comprising a first laser source configured to emit a first optical pulse having a pump wavelength, the first optical pulse being emitted in a first longitudinal direction. Furthermore, the wavelength tunable laser comprises...... a waveguide extending in the first longitudinal direction, the waveguide having longitudinally varying phase matching conditions, the waveguide being configured to generate a second optical pulse with a centre wavelength upon receiving the first optical pulse, wherein the wavelength tunable laser...

  16. Single fiber laser based wavelength tunable excitation for CRS spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jue; Xie, Ruxin; Johnson, Carey K; Hui, Rongqing

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate coherent Raman spectroscopy (CRS) using a tunable excitation source based on a single femtosecond fiber laser. The frequency difference between the pump and the Stokes pulses was generated by soliton self-frequency shifting (SSFS) in a nonlinear optical fiber. Spectra of C-H stretches of cyclohexane were measured simultaneously by stimulated Raman gain (SRG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and compared. We demonstrate the use of spectral focusing through pulse chirping to improve CRS spectral resolution. We analyze the impact of pulse stretching on the reduction of power efficiency for CARS and SRG. Due to chromatic dispersion in the fiber-optic system, the differential pulse delay is a function of Stokes wavelength. This differential delay has to be accounted for when performing spectroscopy in which the Stokes wavelength needs to be scanned. CARS and SRG signals were collected and displayed in two dimensions as a function of both the time delay between chirped pulses and the Stokes wavelength, and we demonstrate how to find the stimulated Raman spectrum from the two-dimensional plots. Strategies of system optimization consideration are discussed in terms of practical applications.

  17. Control of laser wavelength tuning and its application in coherent optical time domain reflectometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lidong; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Binglin

    2017-02-01

    A laser diode temperature control scheme is adopted to achieve the laser wavelength tuning of a narrow linewidth laser, which sends commands by serial communication to change the laser diode temperature. The laser diode temperature is presented by the temperature sensitive resistance. And then the laser wavelength tuning method is also used in a coherent optical time domain reflectometer (C-OTDR) to reduce the coherent Rayleigh noise (CRN) caused by the coherence of the narrow linewidth laser. As the serial communication for the laser wavelength tuning is time-consuming which costs at least 10ms to finish the wavelength tuning once, the measurement time and efficiency of the C-OTDR should be considered. And then the relationship between the times for the laser wavelength changing and the CRN fluctuation is experimentally studied to balance the measurement time consumption and the measurement results, which illustrates that the laser wavelength needs not be changed in each measurement period of the C-OTDR and it can also obtain the ideal result to change the laser wavelength every 500 measurement periods. In traditional C-OTDR, by serial communication, the laser wavelength is changed in each measurement period and the total measurement periods are 218, so by the new scheme it can save about 2600 seconds to achieve an ideal measurement, which is of high efficiency.

  18. Laser wavelength effects in ultrafast near-field laser nanostructuring of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zormpa, Vasileia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-03-18

    We study the effect of laser wavelength (400 nm and 800 nm) on the near-field processing of crystalline silicon (Si) in the femtosecond (fs) pulse duration regime through sub-wavelength apertures. Distinct differences in the obtained nanostructures are found in each case both in terms of their physical sizes as well as their structure which can be tuned between craters and protrusions. A single or a few fs pulses can deliver enough energy on the substrate to induce sub-diffraction limited surface modification, which is among the smallest ever reported in sub-wavelength apertured Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope (NSOM) schemes.

  19. Nearly-octave wavelength tuning of a continuous wave fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Yang, Xuezong; Pan, Weiwei; Cui, Shuzhen; Feng, Yan

    2017-02-01

    The wavelength tunability of conventional fiber lasers are limited by the bandwidth of gain spectrum and the tunability of feedback mechanism. Here a fiber laser which is continuously tunable from 1 to 1.9 μm is reported. It is a random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser, pumped by a tunable Yb doped fiber laser. The ultra-wide wavelength tunability is enabled by the unique property of random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser that both stimulated Raman scattering gain and Rayleigh scattering feedback are available at any wavelength. The dispersion property of the gain fiber is used to control the spectral purity of the laser output.

  20. All-fiber femtosecond Cherenkov laser at visible wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Møller, Uffe Visbech

    2013-01-01

    -matching condition [1]. The resonant ultrafast wave conversion via the fiber-optic CR mechanism is instrumental for applications in biophotonics such as bio-imaging and microscopy [2]. In this work, we demonstrate a highly-stable all-fiber, fully monolithic CR system based on an Yb-fiber femtosecond laser, producing...... electrically tunable femtosecond CR output in the visible (VIS) spectral range of 580-630 nm, with the 3 dB spectral bandwidth not exceeding 36 nm, with average power in the milliwatt range. Relative intensity noise (RIN) of this laser, affecting the sensitivity of bio-imaging and microscopy systems, is found...... to be as low as -103 dBc/Hz. This is 2 orders of magnitudes lower noise as compared to spectrally-sliced supercontinuum, which is the current standard of ultrafast fiber-optic generation at visible wavelength. The layout of the laser system is shown in Fig. 1(a). The system consists of two parts: an all...

  1. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Blood Type Transmutation Induced by Multiple Ultrashort Wavelength Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multi laser beams with the flowing blood thin films leads to the transmutation of the blood types A, B, and AB into O type. This is a novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine. Laser radiation is in resonance with the eigen-frequency modes of the antigen proteins and forces the proteins to parametrically oscillate until they get kicked out from the surface. The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation), upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. The scanning laser beam is partially reflected as long as the antigen(s) is not eliminated. The process of the protein detachment can last a few minutes. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  2. Free-space QKD system hacking by wavelength control using an external laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Soo; Woo, Min Ki; Jung, Jisung; Kim, Yong-Su; Han, Sang-Wook; Moon, Sung

    2017-05-15

    We develop a way to hack free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) systems by changing the wavelength of the quantum signal laser using an external laser. Most free-space QKD systems use four distinct lasers for each polarization, thereby making the characteristics of each laser indistinguishable. We also discover a side-channel that can distinguish the lasers by using an external laser. Our hacking scheme identifies the lasers by automatically applying the external laser to each signal laser at different intensities and detecting the wavelength variation according to the amount of incident external laser power. We conduct a proof-of-principle experiment to verify the proposed hacking structure and confirm that the wavelength varies by several gigahertzes to several nanometers, depending on the intensity of the external laser. The risk of hacking is successfully proven through the experimental results. Methods for prevention are also suggested.

  3. The Study of Advanced Accelerator Physics Research at UCLA Using the ATF at BNL: Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, David B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-09-07

    An experiment was designed and data were taken to demonstrate that a tightly focused laser on vacuum can accelerate an electron beam in free space. The experiment was proof-of-principle and showed a clear effect for the laser beam off and on. The size of the effect was about 20% and was consistent over 30 laser and beam shots.

  4. Multi-DOF Incremental Optical Encoder with Laser Wavelength Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha'o-Kuang Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study used a reflective diffraction grating as the medium to develop a multi-DOF incremental optical encoder for motion stage. The optical encoder can measure three angular displacements, roll, yaw and pitch of the motion stage simultaneously, as well as the horizontal straightness and linear displacement, summed to five DOF errors of motion stage by only using the positive and negative first-order diffracted light. The grating diffraction theory, Doppler effect, and optical interference technique were used. Two quadrant photodetectors were used to measure the changes in three-dimensional space of diffraction direction of diffracted light, in order to construct a multi-DOF incremental optical encoder. Considering the working stability of a laser diode and preventing the influence of the zeroth-order diffracted light returning to the laser diode, an additional optical isolation system was designed and a wavelength variation monitoring module was created. The compensation for the light source wavelength variation could be 0.001 nm. The multi-DOF verification results showed that the roll error is ±0.7/60 arcsec, the standard deviation is 0.025 arcsec; the yaw error is ±0.7/30 arcsec, the standard deviation is 0.05 arcsec; the pitch error is ±0.8/90 arcsec, the standard deviation is 0.18 arcsec, the horizontal straightness error is ±0.5/250 μm, the standard deviation is 0.05 μm and the linear displacement error is ±1/20000 μm, the standard deviation is 12 nm.

  5. High-gain thompson-scattering X-ray free-electron laser by time-synchronic laterally tilted optical wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wu, Juhao

    2017-05-09

    An improved optical undulator for use in connection with free electron radiation sources is provided. A tilt is introduced between phase fronts of an optical pulse and the pulse front. Two such pulses in a counter-propagating geometry overlap to create a standing wave pattern. A line focus is used to increase the intensity of this standing wave pattern. An electron beam is aligned with the line focus. The relative angle between pulse front and phase fronts is adjusted such that there is a velocity match between the electron beam and the overlapping optical pulses along the line focus. This allows one to provide a long interaction length using short and intense optical pulses, thereby greatly increasing the radiation output from the electron beam as it passes through this optical undulator.

  6. Study of laser preheating dependence on laser wavelength and intensity for MagLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M. S.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Glinsky, M.; Nagayama, T.; Weis, M.; Geissel, M.; Peterson, K.; Fooks, J.; Krauland, C.; Giraldez, E.; Davies, J.; Campbell, E. M.; Bahr, R.; Edgell, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Emig, J.; Heeter, R.; Strozzi, D.

    2017-10-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) scheme requires preheating underdense fuel to 100's eV temperature by a TW-scale long pulse laser via collisional absorption. To better understand how laser preheat scales with laser wavelength and intensity as well as to provide data for code validation, we have conducted a well-characterized experiment on OMEGA to directly compare laser propagation, energy deposition and laser plasma instabilities (LPI) using 2 ω (527 nm) and 3 ω (351 nm) lasers with intensity in the range of (1-5)x1014 Wcm-2. The laser beam (1 - 1.5 ns square pulse) enters the gas-filled plastic liner though a 2-µm thick polyimide window to heat an underdense Ar-doped deuterium gas with electron density of 5.5% of critical density. Laser propagation and plasma temperature are diagnosed by time-resolved 2D x-ray images and Ar emission spectroscopy, respectively. LPI is monitored by backscattering and hard x-ray diagnostics. The 2 ω beam propagation shows a noticeable larger lateral spread than the 3 ω beam, indicating laser spray due to filamentation. LPI is observed to increase with laser intensity and the 2 ω beam produces more hot electrons compared with the 3 ω beam under similar conditions. Results will be compared with radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Work supported by the U.S. DOE ARPA-E and NNSA.

  7. Multi-wavelength high efficiency laser system for lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Christina C. C.; Culpepper, Charles; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the growing need for more efficient, high output power laser transmitters, we demonstrate a multi-wavelength laser system for lidar-based applications. The demonstration is performed in two stages, proving energy scaling and nonlinear conversion independently for later combination. Energy scaling is demonstrated using a 1064 nm MOPA system which employs two novel ceramic Nd:YAG slab amplifiers, the structure of which is designed to improve the amplifier's thermal performance and energy extraction via three progressive doping stages. This structure improved the extraction efficiency by 19% over previous single-stage dopant designs. A maximum energy of 34 mJ was produced at 500 Hz with a 10.8 ns pulse duration. High efficiency non-linear conversion from 1064 nm to 452 nm is demonstrated using a KTP ring OPO with a BBO intra-cavity doubler pumped with 50 Hz, 16 ns 1064 nm pulses. The OPO generates 1571 nm signal which is frequency doubled to 756 nm by the BBO. Output 786 nm pulses are mixed with the 1064 nm pump pulses to generate 452 nm. A conversion efficiency of 17.1% was achieved, generating 3 mJ of 452 nm pulses of 7.8 ns duration. Pump power was limited by intra-cavity damage thresholds, and in future experiments we anticipate >20% conversion efficiency.

  8. Holographic free-electron light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanhai; Clarke, Brendan P.; So, Jin-Kyu; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in the physics and technology of light generation via free-electron proximity and impact interactions with nanostructures (gratings, photonic crystals, nano-undulators, metamaterials and antenna arrays) have enabled the development of nanoscale-resolution techniques for such applications as mapping plasmons, studying nanoparticle structural transformations and characterizing luminescent materials (including time-resolved measurements). Here, we introduce a universal approach allowing generation of light with prescribed wavelength, direction, divergence and topological charge via point-excitation of holographic plasmonic metasurfaces. It is illustrated using medium-energy free-electron injection to generate highly-directional visible to near-infrared light beams, at selected wavelengths in prescribed azimuthal and polar directions, with brightness two orders of magnitude higher than that from an unstructured surface, and vortex beams with topological charge up to ten. Such emitters, with micron-scale dimensions and the freedom to fully control radiation parameters, offer novel applications in nano-spectroscopy, nano-chemistry and sensing.

  9. Heterogeneous quantum dot/silicon photonics-based wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 44 nm wavelength-tuning range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Yamada, Hirohito

    2016-04-01

    A heterogeneous wavelength-tunable laser diode combining quantum dot and silicon photonics technologies is proposed. A compact wavelength-tunable filter with two ring resonators was carefully designed and fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The tunable laser combining the wavelength-tunable filter and an optical amplifier, which includes InAs quantum dots, achieved a 44.0 nm wavelength-tuning range at around 1250 nm. The broadband optical gain of the quantum dot optical amplifier was effectively used by the optimized wavelength-tunable filter. This heterogeneous wavelength-tunable laser diode could become a breakthrough technology for high-capacity data transmission systems.

  10. Effects of wavelength filtering on pulse dynamics in a tunable, actively Q-switched fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Manas; Venkitesh, Deepa; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation, validated by experimental analysis, of the effect of wavelength filtering on pulse dynamics of a wavelength-tunable Erbium-doped fiber Q-switched laser in a ring configuration. Travelling wave time-dependent model is implemented using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to accurately simulate the population dynamics and the pulse evolution in the ring laser. Such a model is experimentally validated for a wavelength tunable Q-switched fiber laser and stable Q-switched pulses are obtained over a wavelength tuning range of ∼30 nm in the C-band.

  11. Fourier optics for wavefront engineering and wavelength control of lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Romain

    Since their initial demonstration in 1994, quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become prominent sources of mid-infrared radiation. Over the years, a large scientific and engineering effort has led to a dramatic improvement in their efficiency and power output, with continuous wave operation at room temperature and Watt-level output power now standard. However, beyond this progress, new functionalities and capabilities need to be added to this compact source to enable its integration into consumer-ready systems. Two main areas of development are particularly relevant from an application standpoint and were pursued during the course of this thesis: wavelength control and wavefront engineering of QCLs. The first research direction, wavelength control, is mainly driven by spectroscopic applications of QCLs, such as trace gas sensing, process monitoring or explosive detection. We demonstrated three different capabilities, corresponding to different potential spectroscopic measurement techniques: widely tunable single longitudinal mode lasing, simultaneous lasing on multiple well-defined longitudinal modes, and simultaneous lasing over a broad and continuous range of the spectrum. The second research direction, wavefront engineering of QCLs, i.e. the improvement of their beam quality, is relevant for applications necessitating transmission of the QCL output over a large distance, for example for remote sensing or military countermeasures. To address this issue, we developed plasmonic lenses directly integrated on the facets of QCLs. The plasmonic structures designed are analogous to antenna arrays imparting directionality to the QCLs, as well as providing means for polarization control. Finally, a research interest in plasmonics led us to design passive flat optical elements using plasmonic antennas. All these projects are tied together by the involvement of Fourier analysis as an essential design tool to predict the interaction of light with various gratings and periodic

  12. Fiber grating sensor array interrogation with direct-wavelength readout of a wavelength-scanned fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minho

    2003-10-01

    We present a novel interrogation method to measure wavelength shifts in fiber Bragg grating sensor array. A fiber laser tuned by an intracavity FP (Fabry-Perot) filter was used to interrogate Bragg wavelength variations. To solve the linearity, stability, and accuracy problems caused by the nonlinear response of FP filter, we calculated the wavelength variation of the fiber laser using quadrature signal processing with an unbalanced M/Z (Mach-Zehnder) interferometer and time-delayed sampling technique. The phase modulated interferometric signal is sampled with time delay, generating quadrature phase-delayed signals. By applying arctangent demodulation and phase unwrapping algorithm to the signals, accurate wavelength readout is performed. The calculated wavelengths are mapped to corresponding temporal reflection peaks from the sensor array, which enables more accurate fiber grating interrogation without the problems from the FP filter"s nonlinear response. The wavelength resolution of ~ 20 pm was obtained in our experimental setup, which could have been greatly enhanced with faster phase modulation.

  13. Passively synchronized dual-wavelength Q-switched lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janousek, Jiri; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Mortensen, Jesper Liltorp

    We present a simple and efficient way of generating synchronized Q-switched pulses at wavelengths hundreds of nanometers apart. This principle can result in new pulsed all-solid-state light sources at new wavelengths based on SFG....

  14. Numerical optimization of multi-wavelength and cascaded Raman fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierullies, Sven; Renner, Hagen; Brinkmeyer, Ernst

    2003-03-01

    We present a model for the simulation and optimization of Raman fiber lasers. Applications include cascaded Raman lasers as well as lasers running on several wavelengths within one Stokes band. The model takes into account forward and backward propagating waves as well as Raman induced interactions between all pump and Stokes lines. Example calculations for both the simulation of a laser and the optimization of the mirror reflectivities for maximum overall output power and equalized laser lines are performed.

  15. Electron-cyclotron maser utilizing free-electron two-quantum magnetic-wiggler radiation, and explanation of effective laser injection in an electron cyclotron maser as lift-up of saturated power level arisen from uncertainty in electron energy due to electron's transverse wiggling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    We reason that in the free-electron radiation if the transition rate τ is less than the radiation frequency ν, the radiation is of broad-band spectrum whereas if τ ≫ ν, the radiation is of monochromatic. We find that when a weaker magnetic wiggler (MW) is superpositioned on a predominantly strong uniform magnetic field, free-electron two-quantum magnetic-wiggler (FETQMW) radiation takes place. In FETQMW radiation, the MW and the electron's intrinsic motivity to change its internal configuration through radiation play as two first-order perturbers while the uniform magnetic field acts as the sole zeroth-order perturber. When Δ E≪ hν, where Δ E is the uncertainty in the electron energy produced by transverse wiggling due to the MW in conjuction with a Heisenberg's uncertainty principle Δ EΔ x h and E = ( m 2 c 4 + c 2 p 2)1/2, the power of FETQMW radiation cannot exceed hν 2. However, we find that this power cap is lifted by the amount of νΔ E when Δ E ≫ hν holds [1,2]. This lift-up of the saturated radiation power is the responsible mechanism for the effective external injection of a 20 kW maser in an electron-cyclotron maser (ECM). We find that an MW-added ECM with radius 5 cm and length 1 m and operating parameters of the present beam technology can yield laser power of 50 MW at the radiation wavelength of 0.001 cm.

  16. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, A. E. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G4 (Canada); Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  17. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  18. Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Utilization in Space Applications (Ship-Borne Pointing Accuracy, Deep-Space Communications, and Orbital Debris Tracking)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    required in order for a physical system to attain the power levels discussed within this thesis, but the theory and thought experiments herein will remain...provided in [32]. This method requires three different geocentric vectors and their associated elevation angles with respect to the laser bore sight

  19. Multi-wavelength lasers with suppressed spectral linewidth of 10 kHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhe; Yang, Tianxin; Jia, Dongfang; Wang, Zhaoying; Ge, Chunfeng

    2014-11-03

    High coherent multi-wavelength or multi-tone light source are in high demand for optical density wavelength division multiplexed (DWDM) networks as the telecommunication capacity expands exponentially. However the linewidths of commercial multi-wavelength semiconductor lasers are typically a few MHz which is not acceptable when the frequency spacing of the multi-tones is 10 GHz. In this paper, a novel and simple method to suppress the linewidths of the multi-wavelength from ~6 MHz to ~10 kHz using an all-optical approach is proposed and demonstrated. The linewidths of the multi-wavelength are suppressed by a factor of 600 and the noise level of the multi-wavelength is decreased by nearly 20 dB. Each wavelength of the multi-wavelength operates in single longitudinal mode. Finally, more than 8 wavelengths over 10 nm are suppressed simultaneously through the approach and scheme presented in this work.

  20. The effect of laser wavelength on the ablation rate of carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.; Kucharski, S.; Moscicki, T.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Ristoscu, C.; Szymanski, Z.

    2014-10-01

    The ablation of graphite is studied as a function of laser fluence for 355, 532 and 1,064 nm wavelength generated by a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. It has been found that in the case of lower wavelengths, the transition from the thermal ablation to the phase explosion takes place at lower laser fluences. The change of crater shape due to the effect of deep drilling in the proximity of the phase explosion threshold was observed. The calculations of plasma radiation flux to the target surface were made, and the considerable increase of absorbed energy density was found in the case of 355 nm wavelength.

  1. Light field driven streak-camera for single-shot measurements of the temporal profile of XUV-pulses from a free-electron laser; Lichtfeld getriebene Streak-Kamera zur Einzelschuss Zeitstrukturmessung der XUV-Pulse eines Freie-Elektronen Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruehling, Ulrike

    2009-10-15

    The Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is a source for highly intense ultra short extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light pulses with pulse durations of a few femtoseconds. Due to the stochastic nature of the light generation scheme based on self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), the duration and temporal profile of the XUV pulses fluctuate from shot to shot. In this thesis, a THz-field driven streak-camera capable of single pulse measurements of the XUV pulse-profile has been realized. In a first XUV-THz pump-probe experiment at FLASH, the XUV-pulses are overlapped in a gas target with synchronized THz-pulses generated by a new THz-undulator. The electromagnetic field of the THz light accelerates photoelectrons produced by the XUV-pulses with the resulting change of the photoelectron momenta depending on the phase of the THz field at the time of ionisation. This technique is intensively used in attosecond metrology where near infrared streaking fields are employed for the temporal characterisation of attosecond XUV-Pulses. Here, it is adapted for the analysis of pulse durations in the few femtosecond range by choosing a hundred times longer far infrared streaking wavelengths. Thus, the gap between conventional streak cameras with typical resolutions of hundreds of femtoseconds and techniques with attosecond resolution is filled. Using the THz-streak camera, the time dependent electric field of the THz-pulses was sampled in great detail while on the other hand the duration and even details of the time structure of the XUV-pulses were characterized. (orig.)

  2. Measurements of the K -Shell Opacity of a Solid-Density Magnesium Plasma Heated by an X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, T. R.; Vinko, S. M.; Ciricosta, O.; Hollebon, P.; Chung, H.-K.; Dakovski, G. L.; Krzywinski, J.; Minitti, M.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Hájková, V.; Juha, L.; Vozda, V.; Zastrau, U.; Lee, R. W.; Wark, J. S.

    2017-08-01

    We present measurements of the spectrally resolved x rays emitted from solid-density magnesium targets of varying sub-μ m thicknesses isochorically heated by an x-ray laser. The data exhibit a largely thickness-independent source function, allowing the extraction of a measure of the opacity to K -shell x rays within well-defined regimes of electron density and temperature, extremely close to local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The deduced opacities at the peak of the K α transitions of the ions are consistent with those predicted by detailed atomic-kinetics calculations.

  3. Measurements of the K-Shell Opacity of a Solid-Density Magnesium Plasma Heated by an X-Ray Free-Electron Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, T R; Vinko, S M; Ciricosta, O; Hollebon, P; Chung, H-K; Dakovski, G L; Krzywinski, J; Minitti, M; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Hájková, V; Juha, L; Vozda, V; Zastrau, U; Lee, R W; Wark, J S

    2017-08-25

    We present measurements of the spectrally resolved x rays emitted from solid-density magnesium targets of varying sub-μm thicknesses isochorically heated by an x-ray laser. The data exhibit a largely thickness-independent source function, allowing the extraction of a measure of the opacity to K-shell x rays within well-defined regimes of electron density and temperature, extremely close to local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The deduced opacities at the peak of the Kα transitions of the ions are consistent with those predicted by detailed atomic-kinetics calculations.

  4. Five Wavelength DFB Fibre Laser Source for WDM Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Varming, Poul; Kristensen, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Singlemode UV-induced distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers with a linewidth of <15 kHz and a sidemode suppression better than 61 dB are presented. The stability of the lasers is verified by a 10 Gbit/s transmission experiment. Five DFB fibre lasers are cascaded and pumped by a single semicondu......Singlemode UV-induced distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers with a linewidth of pumped by a single...

  5. Wavelength blending with reduced speckle and improved color for laser projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model was established to study speckle reduction using the wavelength blending technique with multiple lasers for the first time. An optimized power ratio of two lasers was then obtained using the theoretical model. A diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser at 532 nm and a semiconductor laser diode (LD) at 520 nm were used to verify the simulated results. A speckle reduction system which utilizes wavelength blending was also proposed and demonstrated. Using wavelength blending, this system has a lower speckle as compared with one in which only one wavelength is used, and an improved green primary color (with respect to the Rec. 2020 standard) as compared with the one that only semiconductor LD is employed.

  6. Wavelength-tunable passively mode-locked mid-infrared Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanlong; Wang, Yishan; Chen, Hongwei; Luan, Kunpeng; Tao, Mengmeng; Si, Jinhai

    2017-11-02

    A passively mode-locked Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser around 3 μm with a wide wavelength tuning range is proposed and demonstrated. The laser cavity was comprised of a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror and a blazed grating to provide a wavelength tunable feedback. The central wavelength of the mode-locked fiber laser can be continuously tuned from 2710 to 2820 nm. The pulse train had a maximum average power of higher than 203 mW, a repetition rate of 28.9 MHz and a pulse duration of 6.4 ps, yielding a peak power of exceeding 1.1 kW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a wavelength-tunable passively mode-locked mid-infrared fiber laser at 3 μm.

  7. Tuning method for phase shifters with very low first field integral errors for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhui Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For the long gap tunable undulator systems of the European XFEL, 91 phase shifters are needed. They need to fulfil stringent and demanding field integral tolerances if their strengths, i.e., their magnetic gaps, are changed. In order to avoid additional correctors, their first field integral errors must not exceed ±0.004  Tmm for self-amplified spontaneous emission operation at 1 Å. For longer wavelengths there are slightly relaxed requirements. In addition, a good field range of ±0.5  mm is required. Phase shifters are manufactured by using state of the art techniques such as measurement and sorting of magnets, measurement and sorting of subassemblies, etc. In spite of these efforts, inhomogeneities of the permanent magnet material as well as mechanic manufacturing errors, which cannot be avoided and lead to violations of the demanding first field integral specifications. Therefore, a fast and robust shimming technique was developed for the serial production of these devices. It is based on measured signatures of shims with different geometries and uses symmetry properties of shims placed on different positions and poles with different polarity. In this paper, the specifications for the phase shifters in the European XFEL are derived first. Then the method is described in detail and results are presented, which demonstrate that all requirements can be fulfilled.

  8. Tuning method for phase shifters with very low first field integral errors for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhui; Pflueger, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    For the long gap tunable undulator systems of the European XFEL, 91 phase shifters are needed. They need to fulfil stringent and demanding field integral tolerances if their strengths, i.e., their magnetic gaps, are changed. In order to avoid additional correctors, their first field integral errors must not exceed ±0.004 Tmm for self-amplified spontaneous emission operation at 1 Å. For longer wavelengths there are slightly relaxed requirements. In addition, a good field range of ±0.5 mm is required. Phase shifters are manufactured by using state of the art techniques such as measurement and sorting of magnets, measurement and sorting of subassemblies, etc. In spite of these efforts, inhomogeneities of the permanent magnet material as well as mechanic manufacturing errors, which cannot be avoided and lead to violations of the demanding first field integral specifications. Therefore, a fast and robust shimming technique was developed for the serial production of these devices. It is based on measured signatures of shims with different geometries and uses symmetry properties of shims placed on different positions and poles with different polarity. In this paper, the specifications for the phase shifters in the European XFEL are derived first. Then the method is described in detail and results are presented, which demonstrate that all requirements can be fulfilled.

  9. Multi-kW cw fiber oscillator pumped by wavelength stabilized fiber coupled diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Winkelmann, Lutz; Belke, Steffen; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich; Köhler, Bernd; Wolf, Paul; Biesenbach, Jens

    2013-02-01

    High power Yb doped fiber laser sources are beside CO2- and disk lasers one of the working horses of industrial laser applications. Due to their inherently given robustness, scalability and high efficiency, fiber laser sources are best suited to fulfill the requirements of modern industrial laser applications in terms of power and beam quality. Pumping Yb doped single-mode fiber lasers at 976nm is very efficient. Thus, high power levels can be realized avoiding limiting nonlinear effects like SRS. However the absorption band of Yb doped glass around 976nm is very narrow. Therefore, one has to consider the wavelength shift of the diode lasers used for pumping. The output spectrum of passively cooled diode lasers is mainly defined by the applied current and by the heat sink temperature. Furthermore the overall emission line width of a high power pump source is dominated by the large number of needed diode laser emitters, each producing an individual spectrum. Even though it is possible to operate multi-kW cw single-mode fiber lasers with free running diode laser pumps, wavelength stabilizing techniques for diode lasers (e.g. volume holographic gratings, VHG) can be utilized in future fiber laser sources to increase the output power level while keeping the energy consumption constant. To clarify the benefits of wavelength stabilized diode lasers with integrated VHG for wavelength locking the performance of a dual side pumped fiber oscillator is discussed in this article. For comparison, different pumping configurations consisting of stabilized and free-running diode lasers are presented.

  10. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Infrabony Periodontal Defects Using Dual-Wavelength Laser Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Falaki, Rana; Hughes, Francis J.; Wadia, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical management of infrabony defects is an invasive procedure, frequently requiring the use of adjunctive material such as grafts or biologics, which is time-consuming and associated with expense and morbidity to the patient. Lasers in periodontal regeneration have been reported in the literature, with each wavelength having potential benefits through different laser-tissue interactions. The purpose of this case series was to assess the efficacy of a new dual-wavelength prot...

  11. Comparison of SHG Power Modulation by Wavelength Detuning of DFB- and DBR-Tapered Laser Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mathias; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed visible lasers are used for a number of applications such as laser displays and medical treatments. Generating this visible light by direct frequency doubling of high power diode lasers opens new possibilities on how the power modulation can be performed. We present an investigation...... of the response of the second harmonic light to perturbations of the infrared laser diode and compare how the response differs for DFB- and DBR-Tapered laser diodes. We show that the visible light can be modulated from CW to kHz with modulation depths above 90% by wavelength detuning the laser diode....

  12. [Application of mid-infrared wavelength tunable laser in glucose determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Song-Lin; Li, Da-Chao; Zhong, Hao; Sun, Chang-Yue; Xu, Ke-Xin

    2013-04-01

    The authors proposed a method of control and stabilization for laser emission wavelengths and power, and presented the mid-infrared wavelength tunable laser with broad emission spectrum band of 9.19-9.77 microm, half wave width of 4 cm(-1), spectral resolution of 2.7 x 10(4) and max power of 800 mW with fluctuation glucose measurement in PBS solution. In our experiments, absorbance at the five laser emission wavelengths, including 1 081, 1 076, 1 051, 1 041 and 1 037 cm(-1) in the 9R and 9P band of the laser emission spectrum, all correlates well with the glucose concentration (R2 > 0.99, SD < 0.0004, P < 0.000 1). Especially, the sensitivity of this laser spectroscopy system is about 4 times as high as that of traditional FTIR spectrometer.

  13. The Potential for the Development of the X-ray Free Electron Laser Multi-User Photon Distribution System for XFEL Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, Evgeny L; Yurkov, Mikhail V

    2004-01-01

    X-ray photon beam from a SASE FEL undulator is in principle a single user tool, just like an optical laser. Therefore, the operation and amortization cost cannot be easily spread over many simultaneous experiments. To avoid prohibitive cost for each experiment, a new XFEL laboratory scheme is proposed. A photon beam distribution system based on movable multilayer X-ray mirrors can provide an efficient way to generate a multi-user facility. Distribution of photons is achieved on the basis of pulse trains and it is possible to partition the photon beam among a few tens independent beamlines thereby obtaining many users working in parallel. The second way to increase the number of simultaneous experiments is based on the working with a series of perfect crystals in transmission (Laue) geometry. The later concept is the basic idea of the Troika beamline at ESRF. In principle, a hundred of photon beamlines with different experiments can be served by a single XFEL source.

  14. Influence of ns-laser wavelength in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for discrimination of painting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xueshi; Syvilay, Delphine; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Texier, Annick; Martinez, Loic; Serfaty, Stéphane; Martos-Levif, Dominique; Detalle, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    The influence of ns-laser wavelength to discriminate ancient painting techniques such as are fresco, casein, animal glue, egg yolk and oil was investigated in this work. This study was carried out with a single shot laser on samples covered by a layer made of a mixture of the cinnabar pigment and different binders. Three wavelengths based on Nd: YAG laser were investigated (1064, 532 and 266 nm). The plasma is controlled at the same electron temperature after an adjustment of pulse energy for these three wavelengths on a fresco sample without organic binder. This approach allows to eliminate the effects of laser pulse energy and the material laser absorption. Afterwards, the emission spectra were compared to separate different techniques. The organic binding media has been separated based on the relative emission intensity of the present CN or C2 rovibrational emissions. In order to test the capability of separating or identifying, the chemometric approach (PCA) was applied to the different matrix. The different solutions in term of wavelength range to optimise the identification was investigated. We focused on the evaluation for the laser wavelength to insure a better separation. The different capacity was interpreted by differentiating the binders by the altered interaction mechanisms between the laser photon and the binders. Also, the electron temperature in the plasma was estimated, which provided the evidences to our findings.

  15. Improving selectivity of free electron maser with 1D Bragg resonator using coupling of propagating and trapped waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Ginzburg

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel scheme of the Bragg free-electron maser (free-electron laser [FEM (FEL] based on the coupling of an amplified propagating wave with a quasicutoff mode trapped inside the cavity is considered. The cutoff mode is essential for FEM self-excitation while energy extraction from the electron beam in the steady-state oscillation regime is almost completely determined by the propagating mode, synchronous to the beam. The main advantage of the discussed scheme over the traditional scheme of Bragg FEM is improving selectivity over the transverse index. Based on the proposed feedback scheme the advance of the JINR-IAP FEM to the shorter wavelength is discussed.

  16. Atomic and free electrons in a strong light field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, Mikhail V

    1997-01-01

    This book presents and describes a series of unusual and striking strong-field phenomena concerning atoms and free electrons. Some of these phenomena are: multiphoton stimulated bremsstrahlung, free-electron lasers, wave-packet physics, above-threshold ionization, and strong-field stabilization in Rydberg atoms. The theoretical foundations and causes of the phenomena are described in detail, with all the approximations and derivations discussed. All the known and relevant experiments are described too, and their results are compared with those of the existing theoretical models.An extensive ge

  17. Switchable multi-wavelength Tm-doped mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiyu; Tang, Yulong; Sun, Biao; Liu, Tao; Li, Xiaohui; Ping, Perry Shum; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate for the first time a switchable tri-wavelength Tm-doped ultra-fast fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) technique. The NPE effect induces wavelength-dependent loss in the cavity that changes the homogeneous broadening of the effective gain to become inhomogeneous. This inhomogeneous effective gain spectral profile enables the multi-wavelength mode locking. Binary control of three bits can be realized by controlling the polarization in the compact fiber ring cavity. Such switchable laser has potential applications in optical signal processing and communication.

  18. Isotope analysis of water by means of near-infrared dual-wavelength diode laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gianfrani, L.; Gagliardi, G.; Burgel, M. van; Kerstel, E.R.Th.; Gianfrani, I.; Galgiardi, G.

    2003-01-01

    A novel diode laser spectrometer was developed using dual-wavelength multiplexing, ensuring ideal conditions for high-precision and simultaneous measurements of the H-2/H-1, O-17/O-16, and O-18/O-16 isotope ratios in water. A 1.4-mum diode laser probed a (HOH)-O-16/(HOH)-H-2 line pair near 7198

  19. Effects of particle size and laser wavelength on heating of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-15

    Jul 15, 2016 ... In this study, optical properties of spherical silver nanoparticles at laser radiation wavelengths have been examined for some laser applications in nanomedicine and nanotechnology by using Mie theory. Calcula- tion of absorption factors and their maximal tempe- ratures when the radii of the nanoparticles ...

  20. A fast 8-channel wavelength switching DFB diode laser array based on reconstruction-equivalent-chirp technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Du, Yinchao; Du, Weikang; Zhao, Guowang; Fang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new method to investigate fast wavelength switching, which consists of control circuit, driving circuit and 8-channel DFB laser array using reconstruction-equivalent-chirp technique. The control circuit is in charge of selecting required lasers to switch wavelength, the driving circuit supply adjustable and stable direct current to the DFB laser arrays. Experimental results show that wavelength switching time of 8 channels is about 500ns and stability of laser output is promised.

  1. Diode laser arrays for 1.8 to 2.3 μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Márc T.; Gilly, Jürgen; Ahlert, Sandra; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Rattunde, Marcel; Wagner, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    High-power diode lasers in the mid-infrared wavelength range between 1.8μm and 2.3μm have emerged new possibilities either for direct military applications or as efficient pump sources for laser sources in the 2-4μm wavelength range for infrared countermeasures. GaSb based diode lasers are naturally predestinated for this wavelength range and offer clear advantages in comparison to InP based diode lasers in terms of output power and wall-plug efficiency. We will present results on different MBE grown (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode laser single emitters and linear laser arrays, the latter consisting of 19 emitters on a 1cm long bar, emitting at different wavelengths between 1.8μm and 2.3μm. Single emitters have resonator lengths between 1.0 and 1.5mm and stripe widths between 90μm and 200μm. Laser bars with 20% and 30% fill factors have been processed. For single emitters the electro-optical behaviour, beam quality and wavelength tunability have been investigated in detail. For diode laser bars mounted either on actively or passively cooled heat sinks by Indium or AuSn solder, more than 20W at 1.9μm in continuous-wave mode have been achieved at a heat sink temperature of 20°C resulting in maximum wall-plug efficiencies of 30%. Even at 2.2μm more than 16W have been measured, impressively demonstrating the potential of GaSb based diode lasers well beyond wavelengths of 2μm. Application driven fiber coupled single emitter based modules with 600mW as well as fiber coupled bar based modules with 20W have been realized.

  2. Laser wavelength dependence on angular emission dynamics of Nd : YAG laser-produced Sn plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J. R.; Harilal, S. S.; Verhoff, B.; Hassanein, A.; Rice, B.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the laser wavelength effect on angular atomic and ionic emission from laser-produced Sn plasma, since it is regarded as a viable candidate for an EUV lithography source. For producing plasmas, the fundamental, second and fourth harmonics radiation from a Nd : YAG laser were used. The angular variation of atomic and ionic particle analysis was carried out using quartz crystal microbalance and Faraday cups by moving them in a circular path at a constant distance from the target normal. Along with atomic and ionic emission, we also compared the plasma emission features in the visible and EUV spectral regions. Results indicate strong forward bias in atomic and ionic plasma debris at all wavelengths. Shorter wavelength plasmas are found to generate more atomic particles while ion flux showed a similar trend irrespective of the excitation wavelength.

  3. Telecom-Wavelength Bottom-up Nanobeam Lasers on Silicon-on-Insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunseok; Lee, Wook-Jae; Farrell, Alan C; Balgarkashi, Akshay; Huffaker, Diana L

    2017-09-13

    Semiconductor nanowire lasers are considered promising ultracompact and energy-efficient light sources in the field of nanophotonics. Although the integration of nanowire lasers onto silicon photonic platforms is an innovative path toward chip-scale optical communications and photonic integrated circuits, operating nanowire lasers at telecom-wavelengths remains challenging. Here, we report on InGaAs nanowire array lasers on a silicon-on-insulator platform operating up to 1440 nm at room temperature. Bottom-up photonic crystal nanobeam cavities are formed by growing nanowires as ordered arrays using selective-area epitaxy, and single-mode lasing by optical pumping is demonstrated. We also show that arrays of nanobeam lasers with individually tunable wavelengths can be integrated on a single chip by the simple adjustment of the lithographically defined growth pattern. These results exemplify a practical approach toward nanowire lasers for silicon photonics.

  4. Laser Treatment of Professional Tattoos With a 1064/532-nm Dual-Wavelength Picosecond Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauvar, Arielle N B; Keaney, Terrence C; Alster, Tina

    2017-09-19

    Picosecond-domain laser pulses improve the photomechanical disruption of tattoos. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of a novel, dual-wavelength, 1,064/532-nm, picosecond-domain laser for tattoo clearance. This was a prospective, self-controlled, clinical study of 34 subjects with 39 tattoos treated at 2 sites with an interval of 4.8 ± 1.6 weeks and up to 10 treatments (mean, 7.5). Blinded evaluation and investigator assessment of serial digital images was performed to evaluate treatment efficacy in the 36 tattoos that received at least 3 treatments. Investigators also assessed efficacy before each treatment visit up to 10 treatments. Safety and tolerability was evaluated for all 39 tattoos that underwent at least 1 treatment. Blinded evaluation demonstrated that lightening of tattoos was achieved in all subjects, with 86% (31 of 36 tattoos) showing at least a 50% clearance after 3 treatments. Adverse events were few and transient in nature. Patient satisfaction and treatment tolerability were high. Treatment of single-colored and multicolored tattoos with this novel 1,064/532-nm picosecond laser is highly safe and effective.

  5. Bi-wavelength operation of a short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, M.R.X. de; Becker, P.C. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have demonstrated a femtosecond mode locked Ti:sapphire laser that simultaneously generates synchronous and colinear near transform limited two color pulses. The two color operating was obtained from a single laser cavity and the separation between the two wavelengths can be tuned from 55 to 90 nm. This laser is ideally suited for the generation of femtosecond mid-infrared pulses by difference frequency mixing.

  6. Application-oriented nitride substrates: The key to long-wavelength nitride lasers beyond 500 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, T. K.; Towe, E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results based on quantum mechanical estimates of the longest emission wavelength for nitride laser diodes grown on c-plane GaN/sapphire substrates. The results indicate that the absence of polarization-induced electric fields in nonpolar/semipolar GaN substrates does not necessarily guarantee that nitride lasers will operate at the longest possible wavelength for a given set of parameters. Our calculations suggest that the limit on the longest possible wavelength of nitride lasers is constrained by the lattice mismatch rather than by the strength of the polarization-induced electric field. Although it may be possible to develop lasers that approach the green portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (˜520 nm) by growing the structures on nonpolar/semipolar GaN substrates, the development of red and near-infrared nitride lasers appears extremely difficult by merely growing the structures on any crystallographic orientation of the GaN substrate. We suggest that efficient lasers emitting at the green, red, and near-infrared wavelengths can be developed by growing the laser structures on a proposed application-oriented nitride substrate (AONS) that is lattice-matched to the epilayers grown on it. The AONSs are bulk InxGa1-xN ternary substrates with Indium compositions chosen to lattice-match the epilayers to be grown on them. The concept of the AONS can be extended deep into the infrared region by increasing the Indium mole fraction of the quantum well layers in the active region of the laser and by choosing the AONS that best matches the specific wavelength desired. We believe it would be possible, by using this concept, to make nitride lasers at the fiber-optic communication windows at 1.3 and 1.55 μm, thus eliminating the need to use the hazardous arsenides/phosphides materials currently used to make the communications lasers.

  7. Observing Structure and Motion in Molecules with Ultrafast Strong Field and Short Wavelength Laser Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2011-04-13

    The term "molecular movie" has come to describe efforts to track and record Angstrom-scale coherent atomic and electronic motion in a molecule. The relevant time scales for this range cover several orders of magnitude, from sub-femtosecond motion associated with electron-electron correlations, to 100-fs internal vibrations, to multi-picosecond motion associated with the dispersion and quantum revivals of molecular reorientation. Conventional methods of cinematography do not work well in this ultrafast and ultrasmall regime, but stroboscopic "pump and probe" techniques can reveal this motion with high fidelity. This talk will describe some of the methods and recent progress in exciting and controlling this motion, using both laboratory lasers and the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source x-ray free electron laser, and will further try to relate the date to the goal of molecular movies.

  8. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s, and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III(C2O43]3−. The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II, followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II. Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2•Fe(II(C2O42]3− and subsequently [Fe(II(C2O42]2−.

  9. Multi-wavelength imaging with the adaptive optics scanning laser Ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, Kate; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Zhang, Yuhua; Roorda, Austin

    2006-12-01

    The adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope has been fitted with three light sources of different wavelengths to allow simultaneous or separate imaging with one, two or three wavelength combinations. The source wavelengths used are 532 nm, 658 nm and 840 nm. Typically the instrument is used in dual-frame mode, performing imaging at 840 nm and precisely coincident retinal stimulation in one of the visible wavelengths. Instrument set-up and single-detector image capture are described. Simultaneous multi-wavelength imaging in the living human retina is demonstrated. The chromatic aberrations of the human eye lead to lateral and axial shifts, as well as magnification differences in the image, from one wavelength to another. Measurement of these chromatic effects is described for instrument characterization purposes.

  10. Free electron maser amplifier experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Whyte, C G; Cross, A W; He, W; Ronald, K; Young, A; Phelps, A D R

    2000-01-01

    We present results from the X-band reversed guide magnetic field Raman Free Electron Maser (FEM) amplifier experiment at Strathclyde University. The FEM has been designed for zero slippage to achieve maximum instantaneous bandwidth. The tuneablity is further extended by the adjustment of beam voltage and undulator field strength. A 1 kW TWT has been used as the input source for broadband measurements and two 25 kW magnetrons for saturated output power measurements at discrete frequencies. Results show an instantaneous -3 dB bandwidth of 30% for a fixed cathode voltage and magnetic field. The device can be tuned over a range of 65% of the centre frequency by adjusting the cathode voltage. A saturated power of over 1 MW has been measured for 50 A input current. Broadband unsaturated gains of over 35 dB have been measured. An experiment using a 50 A beam from a thermionic cathode electron gun designed at Strathclyde is currently in progress. This will theoretically allow CW operation of the FEM using a DC undula...

  11. The effect of excitation wavelength on dynamics of laser-produced tin plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Campos, D.; Hough, P.; Sizyuk, V.

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the excitation wavelength on the density evolution of laser-produced tin plasmas, both experimentally and numerically. For producing plasmas, Sn targets were excited with either 10.6 μm CO2 laser or 1.06 μm Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser; both are considered to be potential excitation lasers for extreme ultraviolet lithography laser-produced plasma light sources. The electron density of the plasma during the isothermal expansion regime was estimated using an interferometric technique. The Stark broadening of isolated singly-ionized emission was employed for deducing the density during the plasma adiabatic expansion regime. Our results indicate that the excitation source wavelength determines the initial density of the plasma, as well the plume expansion dynamics. Numerical simulation using HEIGHTS simulation package agrees well with the experimentally measured density profile.

  12. Delay time calculation for dual-wavelength quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadou, A., E-mail: abd-hamado@yahoo.fr [Département des Sciences et Techniques, Faculté des Sciences et de la Technologie, Université de Bordj Bou Arreridj 34000 (Algeria); Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Lamari, S. [Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Sétif 1, 19000 (Algeria); Thobel, J.-L. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR 8520, Université Lille1, Avenue Poincaré, BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France)

    2013-11-28

    In this paper, we calculate the turn-on delay (t{sub th}) and buildup (Δt) times of a midinfrared quantum cascade laser operating simultaneously on two laser lines having a common upper level. The approach is based on the four-level rate equations model describing the variation of the electron number in the states and the photon number present within the cavity. We obtain simple analytical formulae for the turn-on delay and buildup times that determine the delay times and numerically apply our results to both the single and bimode states of a quantum cascade laser, in addition the effects of current injection on t{sub th} and Δt are explored.

  13. The Free Electron Laser Sideband Instability Reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-12

    Meson Jet Propulsion Lab. DARPA MS 198-330 1400 Wilson Boulevard 4800 Oak Grove Drive Arlington, VA 22209 Pasadena, CA 91109 Lt Col Thomas Meyer Dr. A...Nazionale Energia Nucleare Stittung Deutsches Centro di Fr3scati Elektronen-Synchrotron C.P. 65 Notkestrasse 85 00044 Frascati D-2000 Hamburg 52 Rome...E.N.E.A. C.P. 1000 Div. Nuove Attivita Varennes JOL2PO Centro Ricerche Energia P.O. CANADA C.P. 65 00044-Frascati (Rome) Dr. I. Shraga ITALY Applied

  14. Free Electron Laser Research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-03

    given the time Transactions in Nuclear Science). required to lower the undulator after stable operation has been <ummary achieved, the actual current...C.N.E.N. engaged in nuclear physics. The Centre di Frascati FEL experimental project underC.P. 65 the leadership of Renieri was C.P. 5 Rfunded by the...injection); modification to injection from Instituto Nazionale di Fisica within the cavity (Kapitza Nuclere injection) has increased the electron beam

  15. Wide and Fast Wavelength-Swept Fiber Laser Based on Dispersion Tuning for Dynamic Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yamashita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a unique wide and fast wavelength-swept fiber laser for dynamic and accurate fiber sensing. The wavelength tuning is based on the dispersion tuning technique, which simply modulates the loss/gain in the dispersive laser cavity. By using wideband semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs, the sweep range could be as wide as ∼180 nm. Since the cavity contains no mechanical components, such as tunable filters, we could achieve very high sweep rate, as high as ∼200 kHz. We have realized the swept lasers at three wavelength bands, 1550 nm, 1300 nm, and 800 nm, using SOAs along with erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs, and in two laser configurations, ring and linear ones. We also succeeded in applying the swept laser for a dynamic fiber-Bragg grating (FBG sensor system. In this paper, we review our researches on the wide and fast wavelength-swept fiber lasers.

  16. [Study on wavelength locking technology in trace gases detection system based on laser techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-ming; Zhang, Yu-jun; He, Ying; You, Kun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-04-01

    In the trace gases detection system with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology, the measurement of trace gases concentration was influenced by the laser wavelength drift resulting from the change in ambient temperature and noise of laser control electronics. With open-path TDLAS ammonia concentration detection system as an example, in the present paper the scanning law of laser center wavelength with current was analyzed, and the adaptive locking method of scanning laser center wavelength was presented based on controlling laser current. The aligning algorithm of measurement spectroscopy with calibration reference spectroscopy was studied. The open-path ammonia concentration was achieved in real time. Experiment results show that the precision and the stability of retrieving the concentration of trace gases were improved satisfactorily by wavelength locking. The variation of ammonia concentration has an obvious diurnal periodicity, which increased in rush hour time and got to the maximum at noon, then decreased at night. The system detection limit is about 3.8 mg x m(-3) x m.

  17. Exploring the effect of laser excitation wavelength on signal recovery with deep tissue transmission Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghita, Adrian; Matousek, Pavel; Stone, Nicholas

    2016-10-21

    The aim of this research was to find the optimal Raman excitation wavelength to attain the largest possible sensitivity in deep Raman spectroscopy of breast tissue. This involved careful consideration of factors such as tissue absorption, scattering, fluorescence and instrument response function. The study examined the tissue absorption profile combined with Raman scattering and detection sensitivity at seven different, laser excitation wavelengths in the near infrared region of the spectrum. Several key scenarios in regards to the sample position within the tissue were examined. The highest Raman band visibility over the background ratio in respect to biological tissue provides the necessary information for determining the optimum laser excitation wavelength for deep tissue analysis using transmission Raman spectroscopy, including detection of breast calcifications. For thick tissues with a mix of protein and fat, such as breast tissue, 790-810 nm is concluded to be the optimum excitation wavelength for deep Raman measurements.

  18. Dissipative soliton and synchronously dual-wavelength mode-locking Yb:YSO lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenlong; Wang, Zhaohua; Liu, Jiaxing; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Zheng, Lihe; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Jun; Wei, Zhiyi

    2015-04-06

    We experimentally demonstrate the dissipative soliton mode-locking operation of a Yb:YSO laser by using an all-normal dispersion cavity. Strongly chirped pulses are obtained with pulse duration of 9.3 ps at a repetition rate of 113.4 MHz. The central wavelength is 1082 nm with 3.1 nm FWHM bandwidth. A dual-wavelength synchronously mode-locking operation at central wavelengths of 1059.2 nm and 1082.2 nm is also reported. Stable mode-locked pulses are achieved with pulse duration of 10 ps and total average output power of 164 mW. Periodic ultrashort beat pulses with pulse duration of 169 fs at an ultrahigh repetition rate of 1.4 THz can be distinctly observed from the measured autocorrelation trace. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of dual-wavelength synchronously mode-locking operation from a Yb:YSO laser.

  19. Polarization-multiplexed and phase-stepped fibre optic shearography using laser wavelength modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Roger M.; James, Stephen W.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2000-09-01

    A shearography system that measures the deformation gradient using two orthogonal shear directions and performs phase stepping, using no moving mechanical components and a single CCD camera, is described. The light exiting from a highly linearly birefringent optical fibre is switched between two orthogonal linearly polarized states by tuning the optical wavelength of a laser diode via injection current modulation. A polarization sensitive Michelson interferometer is used to shear the image in orthogonal directions for p- and s-polarized light. The change in the optical wavelength is also used to provide a phase step in the pathlength imbalanced interferometer. In this way wavelength modulation of a laser diode source is used to accomplish simultaneously polarization multiplexing and phase stepping in the shearing interferometer. By carefully matching the optical wavelength shift, the optical fibre length and the pathlength imbalance in the interferometer, the π/2 polarization shift can be matched to the required phase step.

  20. Influence of laser wavelength on two-dimensional carbon nanosheet formation from laser-induced exfoliation of naphthalene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Min; Niu, Yue Ping; Gong, Shang Qing

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG (532 nm) and Excimer (248 nm) lasers were employed to produce freestanding, two-dimensional (2D), carbon nanosheets (CNSs) from naphthalene, through laser-induced exfoliation. The polymer-to-carbon transition was investigated in terms of laser wavelengths, fluences, as well as target preparations. Continuous and porous CNSs of several nanometers in thickness and micrometers in size were obtained from 532 and 248 nm pulsed laser exfoliation of spin-coated naphthalene films, respectively. The porous morphology is ascribed to the photon-induced dissociation of chemical bonds dominated in 248 nm laser interaction with ablated naphthalene. With the increase of laser fluences from 1 to 5 J cm-2, amorphous carbon and ultrathin CNS structures were obtained in sequence. This work revealed a general mechanism of producing 2D structured carbon materials from pulsed laser exfoliation.