WorldWideScience

Sample records for waveform inversion applied

  1. Partitioned Waveform Inversion Applied to Eurasia and Northern Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bedle, H; Matzel, E; Flanagan, M

    2006-07-27

    This report summarizes the data analysis achieved during Heather Bedle's eleven-week Technical Scholar internship at Lawrence Livermore National Labs during the early summer 2006. The work completed during this internship resulted in constraints on the crustal and upper mantle S-velocity structure in Northern Africa, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Europe, through the fitting of regional waveform data. This data extends current raypath coverage and will be included in a joint inversion along with data from surface wave group velocity measurements, S and P teleseismic arrival time data, and receiver function data to create an improved velocity model of the upper mantle in this region. The tectonic structure of the North African/Mediterranean/Europe/Middle Eastern study region is extremely heterogeneous. This region consists of, among others, stable cratons and platforms such as the West Africa Craton, and Baltica in Northern Europe; oceanic subduction zones throughout the Mediterranean Sea where the African and Eurasian plate collide; regions of continental collision as the Arabian Plate moves northward into the Turkish Plate; and rifting in the Red Sea, separating the Arabian and Nubian shields. With such diverse tectonic structures, many of the waveforms were difficult to fit. This is not unexpected as the waveforms are fit using an averaged structure. In many cases the raypaths encounter several tectonic features, complicating the waveform, and making it hard for the software to converge on a 1D average structure. Overall, the quality of the waveform data was average, with roughly 30% of the waveforms being discarded due to excessive noise that interfered with the frequency ranges of interest. An inversion for the 3D S-velocity structure of this region was also performed following the methodology of Partitioned Waveform Inversion (Nolet, 1990; Van der Lee and Nolet, 1997). The addition of the newly fit waveforms drastically extends the range of the

  2. Pseudo waveform inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Soo; Park, Keun Pil [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Hee; Hyun, Byung Koo; Shin, Sung Ryul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The seismic reflection exploration technique which is one of the geophysical methods for oil exploration became effectively to image the subsurface structure with rapid development of computer. However, the imagining of subsurface based on the conventional data processing is almost impossible to obtain the information on physical properties of the subsurface such as velocity and density. Since seismic data are implicitly function of velocities of subsurface, it is necessary to develop the inversion method that can delineate the velocity structure using seismic topography and waveform inversion. As a tool to perform seismic inversion, seismic forward modeling program using ray tracing should be developed. In this study, we have developed the algorithm that calculate the travel time of the complex geologic structure using shooting ray tracing by subdividing the geologic model into blocky structure having the constant velocity. With the travel time calculation, the partial derivatives of travel time can be calculated efficiently without difficulties. Since the current ray tracing technique has a limitation to calculate the travel times for extremely complex geologic model, our aim in the future is to develop the powerful ray tracer using the finite element technique. After applying the pseudo waveform inversion to the seismic data of Korea offshore, we can obtain the subsurface velocity model and use the result in bring up the quality of the seismic data processing. If conventional seismic data processing and seismic interpretation are linked with this inversion technique, the high quality of seismic data processing can be expected to image the structure of the subsurface. Future research area is to develop the powerful ray tracer of ray tracing which can calculate the travel times for the extremely complex geologic model. (author). 39 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  4. Full Waveform Inversion Using Waveform Sensitivity Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Florian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    We present a full waveform inversion concept for applications ranging from seismological to enineering contexts, in which the steps of forward simulation, computation of sensitivity kernels, and the actual inversion are kept separate of each other. We derive waveform sensitivity kernels from Born scattering theory, which for unit material perturbations are identical to the Born integrand for the considered path between source and receiver. The evaluation of such a kernel requires the calculation of Green functions and their strains for single forces at the receiver position, as well as displacement fields and strains originating at the seismic source. We compute these quantities in the frequency domain using the 3D spectral element code SPECFEM3D (Tromp, Komatitsch and Liu, 2008) and the 1D semi-analytical code GEMINI (Friederich and Dalkolmo, 1995) in both, Cartesian and spherical framework. We developed and implemented the modularized software package ASKI (Analysis of Sensitivity and Kernel Inversion) to compute waveform sensitivity kernels from wavefields generated by any of the above methods (support for more methods is planned), where some examples will be shown. As the kernels can be computed independently from any data values, this approach allows to do a sensitivity and resolution analysis first without inverting any data. In the context of active seismic experiments, this property may be used to investigate optimal acquisition geometry and expectable resolution before actually collecting any data, assuming the background model is known sufficiently well. The actual inversion step then, can be repeated at relatively low costs with different (sub)sets of data, adding different smoothing conditions. Using the sensitivity kernels, we expect the waveform inversion to have better convergence properties compared with strategies that use gradients of a misfit function. Also the propagation of the forward wavefield and the backward propagation from the receiver

  5. Tsunami Data Assimilation and Waveform Inversion Applied to a Possible Future Scenario of Nankai Trough Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, I. E.; Inazu, D.; Waseda, T.; Gusman, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The currently operating offshore tsunami observational systems around the Nankai Trough consist of Ocean Bottom Pressure (OBP) gauges and Global Positioning System (GPS) buoys. Their performance in producing rapid tsunami forecasts based on a tsunami waveform inversion (WI) (Tsushima et al., 2012, JGR) is analyzed. Furthermore, additional tsunami data from ships (Inazu et al., 2016, GL) are incorporated through a tsunami data assimilation (DA) (Maeda et al., 2015, GRL). Because the OBP gauges are located inside the source region, the recorded tsunami signals exhibit significant offsets with respect to surface measurements caused by coseismic seafloor deformation effects. Such biased data are not applicable to the DA, but can be taken into account in the WI. On the other hand, the use of WI for the ship data may not be practical as we need to store considerable precomputed tsunami database due to the spontaneous ship locations. The combined approach of DA and WI, however, allows us to concurrently make use of all observational resources to produce more accurate forecasts. The true state of the tsunami wave field is obtained by a 60 min forward simulation of a hypothetical tsunami source using a linear shallow-water model. Synthetic pressures at OBP gauges and synthetic elevations at ship and GPS buoys locations are extracted from the true state. Subsequently, noises obtained from real data (Inazu et al., 2016, GL) are injected to the respective observational system. We use maximum coastal tsunami heights of the true state to validate the forecasts, and a statistical measure based on percentage of accuracy (Gusman, et al, 2016, GRL) to assess the forecasts performance. Forecasts accuracies at 5, 10, and 20 min based on the existing observational systems (OBP and GPS) using WI are 62%, 68%, and 75% respectively. In the next model, we use the resulted tsunami source by WI as a first guess for the DA background state, and the ships data are successively assimilated

  6. Workflows for Full Waveform Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian; Krischer, Lion; Afanasiev, Michael; van Driel, Martin; May, Dave A.; Rietmann, Max; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Despite many theoretical advances and the increasing availability of high-performance computing clusters, full seismic waveform inversions still face considerable challenges regarding data and workflow management. While the community has access to solvers which can harness modern heterogeneous computing architectures, the computational bottleneck has fallen to these often manpower-bounded issues that need to be overcome to facilitate further progress. Modern inversions involve huge amounts of data and require a tight integration between numerical PDE solvers, data acquisition and processing systems, nonlinear optimization libraries, and job orchestration frameworks. To this end we created a set of libraries and applications revolving around Salvus (http://salvus.io), a novel software package designed to solve large-scale full waveform inverse problems. This presentation focuses on solving passive source seismic full waveform inversions from local to global scales with Salvus. We discuss (i) design choices for the aforementioned components required for full waveform modeling and inversion, (ii) their implementation in the Salvus framework, and (iii) how it is all tied together by a usable workflow system. We combine state-of-the-art algorithms ranging from high-order finite-element solutions of the wave equation to quasi-Newton optimization algorithms using trust-region methods that can handle inexact derivatives. All is steered by an automated interactive graph-based workflow framework capable of orchestrating all necessary pieces. This naturally facilitates the creation of new Earth models and hopefully sparks new scientific insights. Additionally, and even more importantly, it enhances reproducibility and reliability of the final results.

  7. Direct Waveform Inversion by Iterative Inverse Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Schlottmann, R B

    2009-01-01

    Seismic waves are the most sensitive probe of the Earth's interior we have. With the dense data sets available in exploration, images of subsurface structures can be obtained through processes such as migration. Unfortunately, relating these surface recordings to actual Earth properties is non-trivial. Tomographic techniques use only a small amount of the information contained in the full seismogram and result in relatively low resolution images. Other methods use a larger amount of the seismogram but are based on either linearization of the problem, an expensive statistical search over a limited range of models, or both. We present the development of a new approach to full waveform inversion, i.e., inversion which uses the complete seismogram. This new method, which falls under the general category of inverse scattering, is based on a highly non-linear Fredholm integral equation relating the Earth structure to itself and to the recorded seismograms. An iterative solution to this equation is proposed. The res...

  8. Seismic Waveform Inversion by Stochastic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan van Leeuwen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the use of stochastic optimization methods for seismic waveform inversion. The basic principle of such methods is to randomly draw a batch of realizations of a given misfit function and goes back to the 1950s. The ultimate goal of such an approach is to dramatically reduce the computational cost involved in evaluating the misfit. Following earlier work, we introduce the stochasticity in waveform inversion problem in a rigorous way via a technique called randomized trace estimation. We then review theoretical results that underlie recent developments in the use of stochastic methods for waveform inversion. We present numerical experiments to illustrate the behavior of different types of stochastic optimization methods and investigate the sensitivity to the batch size and the noise level in the data. We find that it is possible to reproduce results that are qualitatively similar to the solution of the full problem with modest batch sizes, even on noisy data. Each iteration of the corresponding stochastic methods requires an order of magnitude fewer PDE solves than a comparable deterministic method applied to the full problem, which may lead to an order of magnitude speedup for waveform inversion in practice.

  9. Source-independent elastic waveform inversion using a logarithmic wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    The logarithmic waveform inversion has been widely developed and applied to some synthetic and real data. In most logarithmic waveform inversion algorithms, the subsurface velocities are updated along with the source estimation. To avoid estimating the source wavelet in the logarithmic waveform inversion, we developed a source-independent logarithmic waveform inversion algorithm. In this inversion algorithm, we first normalize the wavefields with the reference wavefield to remove the source wavelet, and then take the logarithm of the normalized wavefields. Based on the properties of the logarithm, we define three types of misfit functions using the following methods: combination of amplitude and phase, amplitude-only, and phase-only. In the inversion, the gradient is computed using the back-propagation formula without directly calculating the Jacobian matrix. We apply our algorithm to noise-free and noise-added synthetic data generated for the modified version of elastic Marmousi2 model, and compare the results with those of the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion. For the noise-free data, the source-independent algorithms yield velocity models close to true velocity models. For random-noise data, the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion yields better results than the source-independent method, whereas for coherent-noise data, the results are reversed. Numerical results show that the source-independent and source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion methods have their own merits for random- and coherent-noise data. © 2011.

  10. Full waveform inversion for ultrasonic flaw identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Robert; Rank, Ernst

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing is concerned with detecting flaws inside components without causing physical damage. It is possible to detect flaws using ultrasound measurements but usually no additional details about the flaw like position, dimension or orientation are available. The information about these details is hidden in the recorded experimental signals. The idea of full waveform inversion is to adapt the parameters of an initial simulation model of the undamaged specimen by minimizing the discrepancy between these simulated signals and experimentally measured signals of the flawed specimen. Flaws in the structure are characterized by a change or deterioration in the material properties. Commonly, full waveform inversion is mostly applied in seismology on a larger scale to infer mechanical properties of the earth. We propose to use acoustic full waveform inversion for structural parameters to visualize the interior of the component. The method is adapted to US NDT by combining multiple similar experiments on the test component as the typical small amount of sensors is not sufficient for a successful imaging. It is shown that the combination of simulations and multiple experiments can be used to detect flaws and their position, dimension and orientation in emulated simulation cases.

  11. Preconditioning Strategies in Elastic Full Waveform Inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, G.; Sacchi, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) is inherently more non-linear than its acoustic counterpart, a property that stems from the increased model space of the problem. Whereas acoustic media can be parametrized by density and P-wave velocity, visco-elastic media are parametrized by density, attenuation and 21 independent coefficients of the elastic tensor. Imposing assumptions of isotropy and perfect elasticity to simplify the physics, reduces the number of independent parameters required to characterize a medium. Isotropic, elastic media can be parametrized in terms of density and the Lamé parameters. The different parameters can exhibit trade-off that manifest as attributes in the data. In the context of FWI, this means that certain parameters cannot be uniquely resolved. An ideal model update in full waveform inversion is equivalent to a Newton step. Explicit computation of the Hessian and its inverse is not computationally feasible in elastic FWI. The inverse Hessian scales the gradients to account for trade-off between parameters as well as compensating for inadequate illumination related to source-receiver coverage. Gradient preconditioners can be applied to mimic the action of the inverse Hessian and partially correct for inaccuracies in the gradient. In this study, we investigate the effects of model reparametrization by recasting a regularized form of the least-squares waveform misfit into a preconditioned formulation. New model parameters are obtained by applying invertible weighting matrices to the model vector. The weighting matrices are related to estimates of the prior model covariance matrix and incorporate information about spatially variant correlations of model parameters as well as correlations between independent parameters. We compare the convergence of conventional FWI to FWI after model reparametrization.

  12. Parallel Algorithm in Surface Wave Waveform Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In Surface wave waveform inversion, we want to reconstruct 3Dshear wav e velocity structure, which calculation beyond the capability of the powerful pr esent day personal computer or even workstation. So we designed a high parallele d algorithm and carried out the inversion on Parallel computer based on the part itioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large scale optimization pro blem into a number of independent small scale problems and reduces the computati onal effort by several orders of magnitude. We adopted surface waveform inversio n with a equal block(2°×2°) discretization.

  13. Elastic reflection waveform inversion with variable density

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuanyuan

    2017-08-17

    Elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) provides a better description of the subsurface than those given by the acoustic assumption. However it suffers from a more serious cycle skipping problem compared with the latter. Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to build a good background model, which can serve as an initial model for elastic FWI. Therefore, we introduce the concept of RWI for elastic media, and propose elastic RWI with variable density. We apply Born modeling to generate the synthetic reflection data by using optimized perturbations of P- and S-wave velocities and density. The inversion for the perturbations in P- and S-wave velocities and density is similar to elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM). An incorrect initial model will lead to some misfits at the far offsets of reflections; thus, can be utilized to update the background velocity. We optimize the perturbation and background models in a nested approach. Numerical tests on the Marmousi model demonstrate that our method is able to build reasonably good background models for elastic FWI with absence of low frequencies, and it can deal with the variable density, which is needed in real cases.

  14. Efficient 2d full waveform inversion using Fortran coarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Donghyun; Kim, ahreum; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a time-domain seismic inversion program using the coarray feature of the Fortran 2008 standard to parallelize the algorithm. We converted a 2d acoustic parallel full waveform inversion program with Message Passing Interface (MPI) to a coarray program and examined performance of the two inversion programs. The results show that the speed of the waveform inversion program using the coarray is slightly faster than that of the MPI version. The standard coarray lacks features for collective communication; however, it can be improved in following standards since it is introduced recently. The parallel algorithm can be applied for 3D seismic data processing.

  15. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the unwrapped phase

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2011-01-01

    Phase wrapping in the frequency-domain (or cycle skipping in the time-domain) is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion. The unwrapped phase has the potential to provide us with a robust and reliable waveform inversion, with reduced local minima. We propose a waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase objective function in the frequency-domain. The unwrapped phase, or what we call the instantaneous traveltime, is given by the imaginary part of dividing the derivative of the wavefield with respect to the angular frequency by the wavefield itself. As a result, the objective function is given a traveltime-like function, which allows us to smooth it and reduce its nonlinearity. The gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm based on the adjoint-state technique. We apply both our waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase and the conventional waveform inversion and show that our inversion algorithm gives better convergence to the true model than the conventional waveform inversion. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  16. Resolution analysis in full waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fichtner, A.; Trampert, J.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method for the quantitative resolution analysis in full seismic waveform inversion that overcomes the limitations of classical synthetic inversions while being computationally more efficient and applicable to any misfit measure. The method rests on (1) the local quadratic approximat

  17. Tsunami waveform inversion by adjoint methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carlos; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2001-09-01

    An adjoint method for tsunami waveform inversion is proposed, as an alternative to the technique based on Green's functions of the linear long wave model. The method has the advantage of being able to use the nonlinear shallow water equations, or other appropriate equation sets, and to optimize an initial state given as a linear or nonlinear function of any set of free parameters. This last facility is used to perform explicit optimization of the focal fault parameters, characterizing the initial sea surface displacement of tsunamigenic earthquakes. The proposed methodology is validated with experiments using synthetic data, showing the possibility of recovering all relevant details of a tsunami source from tide gauge observations, providing that the adjoint method is constrained in an appropriate manner. It is found, as in other methods, that the inversion skill of tsunami sources increases with the azimuthal and temporal coverage of assimilated tide gauge stations; furthermore, it is shown that the eigenvalue analysis of the Hessian matrix of the cost function provides a consistent and useful methodology to choose the subset of independent parameters that can be inverted with a given dataset of observations and to evaluate the error of the inversion process. The method is also applied to real tide gauge series, from the tsunami of the February 28, 1969, Gorringe Bank earthquake, suggesting some reasonable changes to the assumed focal parameters of that event. It is suggested that the method proposed may be able to deal with transient tsunami sources such as those generated by submarine landslides.

  18. Full Waveform Inversion of Solar Interior Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2014-01-01

    The inference of flows of material in the interior of the Sun is a subject of major interest in helioseismology. Here we apply techniques of Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) to synthetic data to test flow inversions. In this idealized setup, we do not model seismic realization noise, training the focus entirely on the problem of whether a chosen supergranulation flow model can be seismically recovered. We define the misfit functional as a sum of L_2 norm deviations in travel times between prediction and observation, as measured using short-distance f and p_1 filtered and large-distance unfiltered $p$ modes. FWI allows for the introduction of measurements of choice and iteratively improving the background model, while monitoring the evolution of the misfit in all desired categories. Although the misfit is seen to uniformly reduce in all categories, convergence to the true model is very slow, possibly because it is trapped in a local minimum. The primary source of error is inaccurate depth localization, which, owi...

  19. Breast ultrasound computed tomography using waveform inversion with source encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the speed-of-sound distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Computer-simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. Using a single graphics processing unit card, each iteration can be completed within 25 seconds for a 128 × 128 mm2 reconstruction region. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden.

  20. Full Waveform Inversion Using Nonlinearly Smoothed Wavefields

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Y.

    2017-05-26

    The lack of low frequency information in the acquired data makes full waveform inversion (FWI) conditionally converge to the accurate solution. An initial velocity model that results in data with events within a half cycle of their location in the observed data was required to converge. The multiplication of wavefields with slightly different frequencies generates artificial low frequency components. This can be effectively utilized by multiplying the wavefield with itself, which is nonlinear operation, followed by a smoothing operator to extract the artificially produced low frequency information. We construct the objective function using the nonlinearly smoothed wavefields with a global-correlation norm to properly handle the energy imbalance in the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. Similar to the multi-scale strategy, we progressively reduce the smoothing width applied to the multiplied wavefield to welcome higher resolution. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state technique, which is similar to the conventional FWI except for the adjoint source. Examples on the Marmousi 2 model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed FWI method to mitigate the cycle-skipping problem in the case of a lack of low frequency information.

  1. Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps

    KAUST Repository

    Beydoun, Wafik B.

    2015-09-01

    After receiving an outstanding response to its inaugural workshop in 2013, SEG once again achieved great success with its 2015 SEG Middle East Workshop, “Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps,” which took place 30 March–1 April 2015 in Abu Dhabi, UAE. The workshop was organized by SEG, and its partner sponsors were Saudi Aramco (gold sponsor), ExxonMobil, and CGG. Read More: http://library.seg.org/doi/10.1190/tle34091106.1

  2. Optimal Transport for Seismic Full Waveform Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Engquist, Bjorn; Yang, Yunan

    2016-01-01

    Full waveform inversion is a successful procedure for determining properties of the earth from surface measurements in seismology. This inverse problem is solved by a PDE constrained optimization where unknown coefficients in a computed wavefield are adjusted to minimize the mismatch with the measured data. We propose using the Wasserstein metric, which is related to optimal transport, for measuring this mismatch. Several advantageous properties are proved with regards to convexity of the objective function and robustness with respect to noise. The Wasserstein metric is computed by solving a Monge-Ampere equation. We describe an algorithm for computing its Frechet gradient for use in the optimization. Numerical examples are given.

  3. Multisource waveform inversion of marine streamer data using normalized wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-01

    Multisource full-waveform inversion based on the L1- and L2-norm objective functions cannot be applied to marine streamer data because it does not take into account the unmatched acquisition geometries between the observed and modeled data. To apply multisource full-waveform inversion to marine streamer data, we construct the L1- and L2-norm objective functions using the normalized wavefield. The new residual seismograms obtained from the L1- and L2-norms using the normalized wavefield mitigate the problem of unmatched acquisition geometries, which enables multisource full-waveform inversion to work with marine streamer data. In the new approaches using the normalized wavefield, we used the back-propagation algorithm based on the adjoint-state technique to efficiently calculate the gradients of the objective functions. Numerical examples showed that multisource full-waveform inversion using the normalized wavefield yields much better convergence for marine streamer data than conventional approaches. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. A nonlinear approach of elastic reflection waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang

    2016-09-06

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) embodies the original intention of waveform inversion at its inception as it is a better representation of the mostly solid Earth. However, compared with the acoustic P-wave assumption, EFWI for P- and S-wave velocities using multi-component data admitted mixed results. Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem and this nonlinearity only increases under the elastic assumption. Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) can mitigate the nonlinearity by relying on transmissions from reflections focused on inverting low wavenumber components of the model. In our elastic endeavor, we split the P- and S-wave velocities into low wavenumber and perturbation components and propose a nonlinear approach to invert for both of them. The new optimization problem is built on an objective function that depends on both background and perturbation models. We utilize an equivalent stress source based on the model perturbation to generate reflection instead of demigrating from an image, which is applied in conventional RWI. Application on a slice of an ocean-bottom data shows that our method can efficiently update the low wavenumber parts of the model, but more so, obtain perturbations that can be added to the low wavenumbers for a high resolution output.

  5. Facies Constrained Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-05-26

    Current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion (FWI) as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example for reservoir analysis, face inherent limitations on resolution and also on the potential trade-off between elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues. However, current approaches to add such constraints are based on averaged type rock physics regularization terms. Since the true earth model consists of different facies, averaging over those facies naturally leads to smoothed models. To overcome this, we propose a novel way to utilize facies based constraints in elastic FWI. A so-called confidence map is calculated and updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and the prior information. The numerical example shows that the proposed method can reduce the cross-talks and also can improve the resolution of inverted elastic properties.

  6. Towards Full-Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Korbinian; Ermert, Laura; Afanasiev, Michael; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Noise tomography usually works under the assumption that the inter-station ambient noise correlation is equal to a scaled version of the Green function between the two receivers. This assumption, however, is only met under specific conditions, e.g. wavefield diffusivity and equipartitioning, or the isotropic distribution of both mono- and dipolar uncorrelated noise sources. These assumptions are typically not satisfied in the Earth. This inconsistency inhibits the exploitation of the full waveform information contained in noise correlations in order to constrain Earth structure and noise generation. To overcome this limitation, we attempt to develop a method that consistently accounts for the distribution of noise sources, 3D heterogeneous Earth structure and the full seismic wave propagation physics. This is intended to improve the resolution of tomographic images, to refine noise source distribution, and thereby to contribute to a better understanding of both Earth structure and noise generation. First, we develop an inversion strategy based on a 2D finite-difference code using adjoint techniques. To enable a joint inversion for noise sources and Earth structure, we investigate the following aspects: i) the capability of different misfit functionals to image wave speed anomalies and source distribution and ii) possible source-structure trade-offs, especially to what extent unresolvable structure can be mapped into the inverted noise source distribution and vice versa. In anticipation of real-data applications, we present an extension of the open-source waveform modelling and inversion package Salvus (http://salvus.io). It allows us to compute correlation functions in 3D media with heterogeneous noise sources at the surface and the corresponding sensitivity kernels for the distribution of noise sources and Earth structure. By studying the effect of noise sources on correlation functions in 3D, we validate the aforementioned inversion strategy and prepare the

  7. Inversion method for initial tsunami waveform reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Voronin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of r-solution method to recover the initial tsunami waveform in a tsunami source area by remote water-level measurements. Wave propagation is considered within the scope of a linear shallow-water theory. An ill-posed inverse problem is regularized by means of least square inversion using a truncated SVD approach. The properties of obtained solution are determined to a large extent by the properties of an inverse operator, which were numerically investigated. The method presented allows one to control instability of the numerical solution and to obtain an acceptable result in spite of ill-posedness of the problem. It is shown that the accuracy of tsunami source reconstruction strongly depends on the signal-to-noise ratio, the azimuthal coverage of recording stations with respect to the source area and bathymetric features along the wave path. The numerical experiments were carried out with synthetic data and various computational domains including a real bathymetry. The method proposed allows us to make a preliminary prediction of the efficiency of the inversion with a given set of the recording stations and to find out the most informative part of the existing observation system. This essential property of the method can prove to be useful in designing a monitoring system for tsunamis.

  8. Anisotropic wave-equation traveltime and waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Shihang

    2016-09-06

    The wave-equation traveltime and waveform inversion (WTW) methodology is developed to invert for anisotropic parameters in a vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) meidum. The simultaneous inversion of anisotropic parameters v0, ε and δ is initially performed using the wave-equation traveltime inversion (WT) method. The WT tomograms are then used as starting background models for VTI full waveform inversion. Preliminary numerical tests on synthetic data demonstrate the feasibility of this method for multi-parameter inversion.

  9. Waveform inversion for acoustic VTI media in frequency domain

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2016-09-06

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the background model using a single scattered wavefield from an inverted perturbation. However, current RWI methods are mostly based on isotropic media assumption. We extend the idea of the combining inversion for the background model and perturbations to address transversely isotropic with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI) media taking into consideration of the optimal parameter sensitivity information. As a result, we apply Born modeling corresponding to perturbations in only for the variable e to derive the relative reflected waveform inversion formulation. To reduce the number of parameters, we assume the background part of η = ε and work with a single variable to describe the anisotropic part of the wave propagation. Thus, the optimization variables are the horizontal velocity v, η = ε and the e perturbation. Application to the anisotropic version of Marmousi model with a single frequency of 2.5 Hz shows that this method can converge to the accurate result starting from a linearly increasing isotropic initial velocity. Application to a real dataset demonstrates the versatility of the approach.

  10. Image-domain full waveform inversion: Field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2014-08-05

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is the result of cycle skipping which degrades the low-wavenumber update in the absence of low-frequencies and long-offset data. An image-domain objective function is defined as the normed difference between the predicted and observed common image gathers (CIGs) in the subsurface offset domain. This new objective function is not constrained by cycle skipping at the far subsurface offsets. To test the effectiveness of this method, we apply it to marine data recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive to the initial model and the absence of low-frequency data compared with conventional FWI. The liability, however, is that it is almost an order of magnitude more expensive than standard FWI.

  11. Full Waveform Inversion Using Oriented Time Migration Method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2016-04-12

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) for reflection events is limited by its linearized update requirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate the resulting gradient can have an inaccurate update direction leading the inversion to converge into what we refer to as local minima of the objective function. In this thesis, I first look into the subject of full model wavenumber to analysis the root of local minima and suggest the possible ways to avoid this problem. And then I analysis the possibility of recovering the corresponding wavenumber components through the existing inversion and migration algorithms. Migration can be taken as a generalized inversion method which mainly retrieves the high wavenumber part of the model. Conventional impedance inversion method gives a mapping relationship between the migration image (high wavenumber) and model parameters (full wavenumber) and thus provides a possible cascade inversion strategy to retrieve the full wavenumber components from seismic data. In the proposed approach, consider a mild lateral variation in the model, I find an analytical Frechet derivation corresponding to the new objective function. In the proposed approach, the gradient is given by the oriented time-domain imaging method. This is independent of the background velocity. Specifically, I apply the oriented time-domain imaging (which depends on the reflection slope instead of a background velocity) on the data residual to obtain the geometrical features of the velocity perturbation. Assuming that density is constant, the conventional 1D impedance inversion method is also applicable for 2D or 3D velocity inversion within the process of FWI. This method is not only capable of inverting for velocity, but it is also capable of retrieving anisotropic parameters relying on linearized representations of the reflection response. To eliminate the cross-talk artifacts between different parameters, I

  12. Source-independent time-domain waveform inversion using convolved wavefields: Application to the encoded multisource waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2011-09-01

    Full waveform inversion requires a good estimation of the source wavelet to improve our chances of a successful inversion. This is especially true for an encoded multisource time-domain implementation, which, conventionally, requires separate-source modeling, as well as the Fourier transform of wavefields. As an alternative, we have developed the source-independent time-domain waveform inversion using convolved wavefields. Specifically, the misfit function consists of the convolution of the observed wavefields with a reference trace from the modeled wavefield, plus the convolution of the modeled wavefields with a reference trace from the observed wavefield. In this case, the source wavelet of the observed and the modeled wavefields are equally convolved with both terms in the misfit function, and thus, the effects of the source wavelets are eliminated. Furthermore, because the modeled wavefields play a role of low-pass filtering, the observed wavefields in the misfit function, the frequency-selection strategy from low to high can be easily adopted just by setting the maximum frequency of the source wavelet of the modeled wavefields; and thus, no filtering is required. The gradient of the misfit function is computed by back-propagating the new residual seismograms and applying the imaging condition, similar to reverse-time migration. In the synthetic data evaluations, our waveform inversion yields inverted models that are close to the true model, but demonstrates, as predicted, some limitations when random noise is added to the synthetic data. We also realized that an average of traces is a better choice for the reference trace than using a single trace. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  13. Automated multimode inversion of surface and S waveforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Nolet, Guust; Meier, Thomas; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2005-01-01

    Inversion of the surface, S, and multiple-S waveforms is an effective means of constraining the structure of the upper mantle, including the transition zone. Exploiting the resolving power of the enormous volume of presently available data requires efficiency of data processing and waveform modellin

  14. Inversion of tsunami waveforms and tsunami warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chao

    Ever since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the technique of inversion of tsunami data and the importance of tsunami warning have drawn the attention of many researchers. However, since tsunamis are rare and extreme events, developed inverse techniques lack validation, and open questions rise when they are applied to a real event. In this study, several of those open questions are investigated, i.e., the wave dispersion, bathymetry grid size and subfault division. First, tsunami records from three large tsunami events -- 2010 Maule, 2011 Tohoku and 2012 Haida Gwaii -- are analyzed to extract the main characteristics of the leading tsunami waves. Using the tool of wavelet transforming, the instant wave period can be obtained and thus the dispersive parameter mu2 can be calculated. mu2 is found to be smaller than 0.02 for all records, indicating that the wave dispersion is minor for the propagation of tsunami leading waves. Second, inversions of tsunami data are carried out for three tsunami events -- 2011 Tohoku, 2012 Haida Gwaii and 2014 Iquique. By varying the subfault size and the bathymetry grid size in the inversions, general rules are established for choosing those two parameters. It is found that the choice of bathymetry grid size depends on various parameters, such as the subfault size and the depth of subfaults. The global bathymetry data GEBCO with spatial resolution of 30 arcsec is generally good if the subfault size is larger than 40 km x 40 km; otherwise, bathymetry data with finer resolution is desirable. Detailed instructions of choosing the bathymetry size can be found in Chapter 2. By contrast, the choice of subfault size has much more freedom; our study shows that the subfault size can be very large without significant influence on the predicted tsunami waves. For earthquakes with magnitude of 8.0 ˜ 9.0, the subfault size can be 60 km ˜ 100 km. In our study, the maximum subfault size results in 9 ˜ 16 subfault patches on the ruptured fault surface

  15. Waveform Inversion with Source Encoding for Breast Sound Speed Reconstruction in Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kun; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conduc...

  16. A new earthquake location method based on the waveform inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao; Huang, Xueyuan; Yang, Dinghui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new earthquake location method based on the waveform inversion is proposed. As is known to all, the waveform misfit function is very sensitive to the phase shift between the synthetic waveform signal and the real waveform signal. Thus, the convergence domain of the conventional waveform based earthquake location methods is very small. In present study, by introducing and solving a simple sub-optimization problem, we greatly expand the convergence domain of the waveform based earthquake location method. According to a large number of numerical experiments, the new method expands the range of convergence by several tens of times. This allows us to locate the earthquake accurately even from some relatively bad initial values.

  17. Guided Wave Tomography Based on Full-Waveform Inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jing; Ratassepp, Madis; Fan, Zheng

    2016-02-29

    In this paper, a guided wave tomography method based on Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is developed for accurate and high resolu- tion reconstruction of the remaining wall thickness in isotropic plates. The forward model is computed in the frequency domain by solving a full-wave equation in a two-dimensional acoustic model, accounting for higher order eects such as diractions and multiple scattering. Both numerical simulations and experiments were carried out to obtain the signals of a dispersive guided mode propagating through defects. The inversion was based on local optimization of a waveform mist func- tion between modeled and measured data, and was applied iteratively to discrete frequency components from low to high frequencies. The resulting wave velocity maps were then converted to thickness maps by the dispersion characteristics of selected guided modes. The results suggest that the FWI method is capable to reconstruct the thickness map of a irregularly shaped defect accurately on a 10 mm thick plate with the thickness error within 0.5 mm.

  18. Application of Carbonate Reservoir using waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.; Kim, H.; Min, D.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent exploration targets of oil and gas resources are deeper and more complicated subsurface structures, and carbonate reservoirs have become one of the attractive and challenging targets in seismic exploration. To increase the rate of success in oil and gas exploration, it is required to delineate detailed subsurface structures. Accordingly, migration method is more important factor in seismic data processing for the delineation. Seismic migration method has a long history, and there have been developed lots of migration techniques. Among them, reverse-time migration is promising, because it can provide reliable images for the complicated model even in the case of significant velocity contrasts in the model. The reliability of seismic migration images is dependent on the subsurface velocity models, which can be extracted in several ways. These days, geophysicists try to obtain velocity models through seismic full waveform inversion. Since Lailly (1983) and Tarantola (1984) proposed that the adjoint state of wave equations can be used in waveform inversion, the back-propagation techniques used in reverse-time migration have been used in waveform inversion, which accelerated the development of waveform inversion. In this study, we applied acoustic waveform inversion and reverse-time migration methods to carbonate reservoir models with various reservoir thicknesses to examine the feasibility of the methods in delineating carbonate reservoir models. We first extracted subsurface material properties from acoustic waveform inversion, and then applied reverse-time migration using the inverted velocities as a background model. The waveform inversion in this study used back-propagation technique, and conjugate gradient method was used in optimization. The inversion was performed using the frequency-selection strategy. Finally waveform inversion results showed that carbonate reservoir models are clearly inverted by waveform inversion and migration images based on the

  19. 2D acoustic-elastic coupled waveform inversion in the Laplace domain

    KAUST Repository

    Bae, Hoseuk

    2010-04-01

    Although waveform inversion has been intensively studied in an effort to properly delineate the Earth\\'s structures since the early 1980s, most of the time- and frequency-domain waveform inversion algorithms still have critical limitations in their applications to field data. This may be attributed to the highly non-linear objective function and the unreliable low-frequency components. To overcome the weaknesses of conventional waveform inversion algorithms, the acoustic Laplace-domain waveform inversion has been proposed. The Laplace-domain waveform inversion has been known to provide a long-wavelength velocity model even for field data, which may be because it employs the zero-frequency component of the damped wavefield and a well-behaved logarithmic objective function. However, its applications have been confined to 2D acoustic media.We extend the Laplace-domain waveform inversion algorithm to a 2D acoustic-elastic coupled medium, which is encountered in marine exploration environments. In 2D acoustic-elastic coupled media, the Laplace-domain pressures behave differently from those of 2D acoustic media, although the overall features are similar to each other. The main differences are that the pressure wavefields for acoustic-elastic coupled media show negative values even for simple geological structures unlike in acoustic media, when the Laplace damping constant is small and the water depth is shallow. The negative values may result from more complicated wave propagation in elastic media and at fluid-solid interfaces.Our Laplace-domain waveform inversion algorithm is also based on the finite-element method and logarithmic wavefields. To compute gradient direction, we apply the back-propagation technique. Under the assumption that density is fixed, P- and S-wave velocity models are inverted from the pressure data. We applied our inversion algorithm to the SEG/EAGE salt model and the numerical results showed that the Laplace-domain waveform inversion

  20. Early arrival waveform inversion of shallow seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2013-09-22

    We estimate the near-surface velocity distribution over Wadi Qudaid in Saudi Arabia by applying early arrival waveform inversion (EWI) to shallow seismic land data collected with source-receiver offsets no longer than 232 m. The main purpose is to characterize the shallow subsurface for its water storage and reuse potential. To enhance the accuracy of EWI, we extracted a natural source wavelet from the data, and also corrected for the attenuation effects with an estimated factor Q. Results suggest that, compared to traveltime tomography, EWI can generate a highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data. The more accurate EWI tomogram can make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi; in this case we find an increase of 18% of storage potential in the EWI tomogram relative to the traveltime tomogram. This approach suggests that FWI might be a more accurate means for economically characterizing the water storage potential for wadis’ throughout the world.

  1. Conditioning the full waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-08-05

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual tradeoff between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain in which the small scattering angles of the gradient update is initially muted out. A model update hierarchical filtering strategy includes applying varying degree of filtering to the different parameter updates. A feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using both FWI and reection based FWI (RFWI), two strategies to combat the tradeoff between anisotropic parameters are outlined.

  2. The Modularized Software Package ASKI - Full Waveform Inversion Based on Waveform Sensitivity Kernels Utilizing External Seismic Wave Propagation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present the modularized software package ASKI which is a flexible and extendable toolbox for seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as sensitivity or resolution analysis operating on the sensitivity matrix. It utilizes established wave propagation codes for solving the forward problem and offers an alternative to the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have typically been written for solving inverse problems. It is available under the GPL at www.rub.de/aski. The Gauss-Newton FWI method for 3D-heterogeneous elastic earth models is based on waveform sensitivity kernels and can be applied to inverse problems at various spatial scales in both Cartesian and spherical geometries. The kernels are derived in the frequency domain from Born scattering theory as the Fréchet derivatives of linearized full waveform data functionals, quantifying the influence of elastic earth model parameters on the particular waveform data values. As an important innovation, we keep two independent spatial descriptions of the earth model - one for solving the forward problem and one representing the inverted model updates. Thereby we account for the independent needs of spatial model resolution of forward and inverse problem, respectively. Due to pre-integration of the kernels over the (in general much coarser) inversion grid, storage requirements for the sensitivity kernels are dramatically reduced.ASKI can be flexibly extended to other forward codes by providing it with specific interface routines that contain knowledge about forward code-specific file formats and auxiliary information provided by the new forward code. In order to sustain flexibility, the ASKI tools must communicate via file output/input, thus large storage capacities need to be accessible in a convenient way. Storing the complete sensitivity matrix to file, however, permits the scientist full manual control over each step in a customized procedure of sensitivity/resolution analysis and full

  3. Adaptive multi-step Full Waveform Inversion based on Waveform Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Han, Liguo; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Fengjiao; Zeng, Jingwen

    2017-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) can be used to build high resolution velocity models, but there are still many challenges in seismic field data processing. The most difficult problem is about how to recover long-wavelength components of subsurface velocity models when seismic data is lacking of low frequency information and without long-offsets. To solve this problem, we propose to use Waveform Mode Decomposition (WMD) method to reconstruct low frequency information for FWI to obtain a smooth model, so that the initial model dependence of FWI can be reduced. In this paper, we use adjoint-state method to calculate the gradient for Waveform Mode Decomposition Full Waveform Inversion (WMDFWI). Through the illustrative numerical examples, we proved that the low frequency which is reconstructed by WMD method is very reliable. WMDFWI in combination with the adaptive multi-step inversion strategy can obtain more faithful and accurate final inversion results. Numerical examples show that even if the initial velocity model is far from the true model and lacking of low frequency information, we still can obtain good inversion results with WMD method. From numerical examples of anti-noise test, we see that the adaptive multi-step inversion strategy for WMDFWI has strong ability to resist Gaussian noise. WMD method is promising to be able to implement for the land seismic FWI, because it can reconstruct the low frequency information, lower the dominant frequency in the adjoint source, and has a strong ability to resist noise.

  4. Waveform inversion of lateral velocity variation from wavefield source location perturbation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-22

    It is challenge in waveform inversion to precisely define the deep part of the velocity model compared to the shallow part. The lateral velocity variation, or what referred to as the derivative of velocity with respect to the horizontal distance, with well log data can be used to update the deep part of the velocity model more precisely. We develop a waveform inversion algorithm to obtain the lateral velocity variation by inverting the wavefield variation associated with the lateral shot location perturbation. The gradient of the new waveform inversion algorithm is obtained by the adjoint-state method. Our inversion algorithm focuses on resolving the lateral changes of the velocity model with respect to a fixed reference vertical velocity profile given by a well log. We apply the method on a simple-dome model to highlight the methods potential.

  5. A Convergent Iterative Algorithm for Solving Elastic Waveform Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张剑锋

    1994-01-01

    The numerical method for elastic waveform inversion is studied and a convergent iterative algorithm is achieved by designing vinual source and altering objective function of the optimization solution in the computational process, which enables the solutions to converge to the real values and improves the convergence rate by changing the property of curved surface of the objective function, thus opening a new way for further developing the optimization solution of inverse problems.

  6. Seismic Waveform Inversion Using the Finite-Difference Contrast Source Inversion Method

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Han; Qinglong He; Yong Chen; Yixin Dou

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the finite-difference contrast source inversion method to reconstruct the mass density for two-dimensional elastic wave inversion in the framework of the full-waveform inversion. The contrast source inversion method is a nonlinear iterative method that alternatively reconstructs contrast sources and contrast function. One of the most outstanding advantages of this inversion method is the highly computational efficiency, since it does not need to simulate a fu...

  7. On the Contribution of Head Waves to Full Waveform Inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazei, V.V.; Ponomarenko, A.V.; Troyan, V.N.; Kashtan, B.M.; Mulder, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full waveform inversion suffers from local minima, due to a lack of low frequencies in the data. A reflector below the zone of interest may, however, help in recovering the long-wavelength components of a velocity perturbation, as demonstrated in a paper by Mora. With the Born approximation for the

  8. Structural similarity regularization scheme for multiparameter seismic full waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, M.; Liang, L.; Abubakar, A.; Van den Berg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new regularization scheme for multiparameter seismic full-waveform inversion (FWI). Using this scheme, we can constrain spatial variations of parameters which are having a weak sensitivity with the one that having a good sensitivity to the measurement, assuming that these parameters h

  9. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the phase derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-26

    Phase wrapping in the frequency domain or cycle skipping in the time domain is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion when the starting model is far from the true model. Since the phase derivative does not suffer from the wrapping effect, its inversion has the potential of providing a robust and reliable inversion result. We propose a new waveform inversion algorithm using the phase derivative in the frequency domain along with the exponential damping term to attenuate reflections. We estimate the phase derivative, or what we refer to as the instantaneous traveltime, by taking the derivative of the Fourier-transformed wavefield with respect to the angular frequency, dividing it by the wavefield itself and taking the imaginary part. The objective function is constructed using the phase derivative and the gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm. Numerical examples show that our inversion algorithm with a strong damping generates a tomographic result even for a high ‘single’ frequency, which can be a good initial model for full waveform inversion and migration.

  10. Waveform Inversion with Source Encoding for Breast Sound Speed Reconstruction in Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden. PMID:25768816

  11. Waveform inversion with source encoding for breast sound speed reconstruction in ultrasound computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer simulation and experimental phantom studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden.

  12. Application of multi-source waveform inversion to marine streamer data using the global correlation norm

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-05-02

    Conventional multi-source waveform inversion using an objective function based on the least-square misfit cannot be applied to marine streamer acquisition data because of inconsistent acquisition geometries between observed and modelled data. To apply the multi-source waveform inversion to marine streamer data, we use the global correlation between observed and modelled data as an alternative objective function. The new residual seismogram derived from the global correlation norm attenuates modelled data not supported by the configuration of observed data and thus, can be applied to multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data. We also show that the global correlation norm is theoretically the same as the least-square norm of the normalized wavefield. To efficiently calculate the gradient, our method employs a back-propagation algorithm similar to reverse-time migration based on the adjoint-state of the wave equation. In numerical examples, the multi-source waveform inversion using the global correlation norm results in better inversion results for marine streamer acquisition data than the conventional approach. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  13. Genetic algorithm in seismic waveform inversion and its application in deep seismic sounding data interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fu-yun; ZHANG Xian-kang

    2006-01-01

    A genetic algorithm of body waveform inversion is presented for better understanding of crustal and upper mantle structures with deep seismic sounding (DSS) waveform data. General reflection and transmission synthetic seismogram algorithm, which is capable of calculating the response of thin alternating high and low velocity layers, is applied as a solution for forward modeling, and the genetic algorithm is used to find the optimal solution of the inverse problem. Numerical tests suggest that the method has the capability of resolving low-velocity layers, thin alternating high and low velocity layers, and noise suppression. Waveform inversion using P-wave records from Zeku, Xiahe and Lintao shots in the seismic wide-angle reflection/refraction survey along northeastern Qinghai-Xizang (Tibeteau) Plateau has revealed fine structures of the bottom of the upper crust and alternating layers in the middle/lower crust and topmost upper mantle.

  14. Conditioning the full-waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-04-23

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual trade-off between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which small scattering-angles of the gradient update are initially muted out. The model update hierarchical filtering strategy include applying varying degrees of filtering to the different anisotropic parameter updates, a feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using FWI and reflection-based FWI, when the modeled data are obtained with the single-scattering theory, allows access to additional low model wavenumber components. Combining such access to wavenumbers with scattering-angle filters applied to the individual parameter gradients allows for multiple strategies to avoid complex FWI nonlinearity as well as the parameter trade-off.

  15. Application of the finite-difference contrast-source inversion algorithm to seismic full-waveform data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abubakar, A.; Hu, W.; Habashy, T.M.; Van den Berg, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    We have applied the finite-difference contrast-source inversion (FDCSI) method to seismic full-waveform inversion problems. The FDCSI method is an iterative nonlinear inversion algorithm. However, unlike the nonlinear conjugate gradient method and the Gauss-Newton method, FDCSI does not solve any fu

  16. Waveform inversion of mantle Love waves: The born seismogram approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, T.

    1983-01-01

    Normal mode theory, extended to the slightly laterally heterogeneous Earth by the first-order Born approximation, is applied to the waveform inversion of mantle Love waves (200-500 sec) for the Earth's lateral heterogeneity at l=2 and a spherically symmetric anelasticity (Q sub mu) structure. The data are from the Global Digital Seismograph Network (GDSN). The l=2 pattern is very similar to the results of other studies that used either different methods, such as phase velocity measurements and multiplet location measurements, or a different data set, such as mantle Rayleigh waves from different instruments. The results are carefully analyzed for variance reduction and are most naturally explained by heterogeneity in the upper 420 km. Because of the poor resolution of the data set for the deep interior, however, a fairly large heterogeneity in the transition zones, of the order of up to 3.5% in shear wave velocity, is allowed. It is noteworthy that Love waves of this period range can not constrain the structure below 420 km and thus any model presented by similar studies below this depth are likely to be constrained by Rayleigh waves (spheroidal modes) only.

  17. Waveform inversion of mantle Love waves - The Born seismogram approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, T.

    1984-01-01

    Normal mode theory, extended to the slightly laterally heterogeneous earth by the first-order Born approximation, is applied to the waveform inversion of mantle Love waves (200-500 sec) for the earth's lateral heterogeneity at l = 2 and a spherically symmetric anelasticity (Q sub mu) structure. The data are from the Global Digital Seismograph Network (GDSN). The l = 2 pattern is very similar to the results of other studies that used either different methods, such as phase velocity measurements and multiplet location measurements, or a different data set, such as mantle Rayleigh waves from different instruments. The results are carefully analyzed for variance reduction and are most naturally explained by heterogeneity in the upper 420 km. Because of the poor resolution of the data set for the deep interior, however, a fairly large heterogeneity in the transition zones, of the order of up to 3.5 percent in shear wave velocity, is allowed. It is noteworthy that Love waves of this period range can not constrain the structure below 420 km and thus any model presented by similar studies below this depth are likely to be constrained by Rayleigh waves (spheroidal modes) only.

  18. Strategies for efficient resolution analysis in full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, A.; van Leeuwen, T.; Trampert, J.

    2016-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion is developing into a standard method in the seismological toolbox. It combines numerical wave propagation for heterogeneous media with adjoint techniques in order to improve tomographic resolution. However, resolution becomes increasingly difficult to quantify because of the enormous computational requirements. Here we present two families of methods that can be used for efficient resolution analysis in full-waveform inversion. They are based on the targeted extraction of resolution proxies from the Hessian matrix, which is too large to store and to compute explicitly. Fourier methods rest on the application of the Hessian to Earth models with harmonic oscillations. This yields the Fourier spectrum of the Hessian for few selected wave numbers, from which we can extract properties of the tomographic point-spread function for any point in space. Random probing methods use uncorrelated, random test models instead of harmonic oscillations. Auto-correlating the Hessian-model applications for sufficiently many test models also characterises the point-spread function. Both Fourier and random probing methods provide a rich collection of resolution proxies. These include position- and direction-dependent resolution lengths, and the volume of point-spread functions as indicator of amplitude recovery and inter-parameter trade-offs. The computational requirements of these methods are equivalent to approximately 7 conjugate-gradient iterations in full-waveform inversion. This is significantly less than the optimisation itself, which may require tens to hundreds of iterations to reach convergence. In addition to the theoretical foundations of the Fourier and random probing methods, we show various illustrative examples from real-data full-waveform inversion for crustal and mantle structure.

  19. Full waveform inversion using oriented time-domain imaging method for vertical transverse isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-07-11

    Full waveform inversion for reection events is limited by its linearized update re-quirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate, the resulting gradient can have an inaccurate update direction leading the inversion to converge what we refer to as local minima of the objective function. In our approach, we consider mild lateral variation in the model, and thus, use a gradient given by the oriented time-domain imaging method. Specifically, we apply the oriented time-domain imaging on the data residual to obtain the geometrical features of the velocity perturbation. After updating the model in the time domain, we convert the perturbation from the time domain to depth using the average velocity. Considering density is constant, we can expand the conventional 1D impedance inversion method to 2D or 3D velocity inversion within the process of full waveform inversion. This method is not only capable of inverting for velocity, but it is also capable of retrieving anisotropic parameters relying on linearized representations of the reection response. To eliminate the cross-talk artifacts between different parameters, we utilize what we consider being an optimal parametrization for this step. To do so, we extend the prestack time-domain migration image in incident angle dimension to incorporate angular dependence needed by the multiparameter inversion. For simple models, this approach provides an efficient and stable way to do full waveform inversion or modified seismic inversion and makes the anisotropic inversion more practicable. The proposed method still needs kinematically accurate initial models since it only recovers the high-wavenumber part as conventional full waveform inversion method does. Results on synthetic data of isotropic and anisotropic cases illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method.

  20. Integrated inversion using combined wave-equation tomography and full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyang; Singh, Satish C.; Calandra, Henri

    2014-07-01

    Wave-equation tomography (WT) and full waveform inversion (FWI) are combined through a hybrid misfit function to estimate high-resolution subsurface structures starting from a poorly constrained initial velocity model. Both methods share the same wavefield forward modelling and inversion schemes, while they differ only on the ways to calculate misfit functions and hence the ways to sample in the model space. Aiming at minimizing the cross-correlation phase delay between synthetic and real data, WT can be used to retrieve the long- and middle-wavelength model components, which are essential to FWI. Compared to ray-based traveltime tomography that is based on asymptotic high-frequency approximation, WT provides a better resolution by exploring the band-limited feature of seismic wavefield. On the other hand, FWI is capable of resolving the short-wavelength model component, complementing the WT. In this study, we apply WT to surface first-arrival refraction data, and apply FWI to both refraction and reflection data. We assign adaptive weights to the two different misfit measurements and build a progressive inversion strategy. To illustrate the advantage of our strategy over conventional `ray tomography + FWI' approach, we show in a synthetic lens test that WT can provide extra subsurface information that is critical for a successful FWI application. To further show the efficiency, we test our strategy on the 2-D Marmousi model where satisfactory inversion results are achieved without much manual intervention. Finally, we apply the inversion strategy to a deep-water seismic data set acquired offshore Sumatra with a 12-km-long streamer. In order to alleviate several practical problems posed by the deep-water setting, we apply downward continuation (DC) to generate a virtual ocean bottom experiment data set prior to inversion. The new geometry after DC boosts up the shallow refractions, as well as avoiding cumbersome modelling through the thick water column, thus

  1. Full Waveform Inversion for Reservoir Characterization - A Synthetic Study

    KAUST Repository

    Zabihi Naeini, E.

    2017-05-26

    Most current reservoir-characterization workflows are based on classic amplitude-variation-with-offset (AVO) inversion techniques. Although these methods have generally served us well over the years, here we examine full-waveform inversion (FWI) as an alternative tool for higher-resolution reservoir characterization. An important step in developing reservoir-oriented FWI is the implementation of facies-based rock physics constraints adapted from the classic methods. We show that such constraints can be incorporated into FWI by adding appropriately designed regularization terms to the objective function. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated on both isotropic and VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) models with pronounced lateral and vertical heterogeneity. The inversion results are explained using the theoretical radiation patterns produced by perturbations in the medium parameters.

  2. Acoustic 2D full waveform inversion to solve gas cloud challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srichand Prajapati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing conventional inversion algorithm does not provide satisfactory results due to the complexity of propagated wavefield though the gas cloud. Acoustic full waveform inversion has been developed and applied to a realistic synthetic offshore shallow gas cloud feature with Student-t approach, with and without simultaneous sources encoding. As a modeling operator, we implemented the grid based finite-difference method in frequency domain using second order elastic wave equation. Jacobin operator and its adjoint provide a necessary platform for solving full waveform inversion problem in a reduced Hessian matrix. We invert gas cloud model in 5 frequency band selected from 1 to 12 Hz, each band contains 3 frequencies. The inversion results are highly sensitive to the misfit. The model allows better convergence and recovery of amplitude losses. This approach gives better resolution then the existing least-squares approach. In this paper, we implement the full waveform inversion for low frequency model with minimum number of iteration providing a better resolution of inversion results.

  3. A new optimization approach for source-encoding full-waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moghaddam, P.P.; Keers, H.; Herrmann, F.J.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Waveform inversion is the method of choice for determining a highly heterogeneous subsurface structure. However, conventional waveform inversion requires that the wavefield for each source is computed separately. This makes it very expensive for realistic 3D seismic surveys. Source-encoding waveform

  4. A new optimization approach for source-encoding full-waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moghaddam, P.P.; Keers, H.; Herrmann, F.J.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Waveform inversion is the method of choice for determining a highly heterogeneous subsurface structure. However, conventional waveform inversion requires that the wavefield for each source is computed separately. This makes it very expensive for realistic 3D seismic surveys. Source-encoding waveform

  5. Anisotropic seismic-waveform inversion: Application to a seismic velocity model from Eleven-Mile Canyon in Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gao, Kai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sabin, Andrew [Geothermal Program Office, China Lake, CA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Accurate imaging and characterization of fracture zones is crucial for geothermal energy exploration. Aligned fractures within fracture zones behave as anisotropic media for seismic-wave propagation. The anisotropic properties in fracture zones introduce extra difficulties for seismic imaging and waveform inversion. We have recently developed a new anisotropic elastic-waveform inversion method using a modified total-variation regularization scheme and a wave-energy-base preconditioning technique. Our new inversion method uses the parameterization of elasticity constants to describe anisotropic media, and hence it can properly handle arbitrary anisotropy. We apply our new inversion method to a seismic velocity model along a 2D-line seismic data acquired at Eleven-Mile Canyon located at the Southern Dixie Valley in Nevada for geothermal energy exploration. Our inversion results show that anisotropic elastic-waveform inversion has potential to reconstruct subsurface anisotropic elastic parameters for imaging and characterization of fracture zones.

  6. Modularized seismic full waveform inversion based on waveform sensitivity kernels - The software package ASKI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Florian; Friederich, Wolfgang; Lamara, Samir; Gutt, Phillip; Paffrath, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    We present a seismic full waveform inversion concept for applications ranging from seismological to enineering contexts, based on sensitivity kernels for full waveforms. The kernels are derived from Born scattering theory as the Fréchet derivatives of linearized frequency-domain full waveform data functionals, quantifying the influence of elastic earth model parameters and density on the data values. For a specific source-receiver combination, the kernel is computed from the displacement and strain field spectrum originating from the source evaluated throughout the inversion domain, as well as the Green function spectrum and its strains originating from the receiver. By storing the wavefield spectra of specific sources/receivers, they can be re-used for kernel computation for different specific source-receiver combinations, optimizing the total number of required forward simulations. In the iterative inversion procedure, the solution of the forward problem, the computation of sensitivity kernels and the derivation of a model update is held completely separate. In particular, the model description for the forward problem and the description of the inverted model update are kept independent. Hence, the resolution of the inverted model as well as the complexity of solving the forward problem can be iteratively increased (with increasing frequency content of the inverted data subset). This may regularize the overall inverse problem and optimizes the computational effort of both, solving the forward problem and computing the model update. The required interconnection of arbitrary unstructured volume and point grids is realized by generalized high-order integration rules and 3D-unstructured interpolation methods. The model update is inferred solving a minimization problem in a least-squares sense, resulting in Gauss-Newton convergence of the overall inversion process. The inversion method was implemented in the modularized software package ASKI (Analysis of Sensitivity

  7. Multiparameter Elastic Full Waveform Inversion With Facies Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-08-17

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) aims fully benefit from all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters describing the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example in reservoir analysis, faces inherent challenges related to the limited resolution and the potential trade-off between the elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues, but current approaches to add such constraints are based on including them as a priori knowledge mostly valid around the well or as a boundary condition for the whole area. Since certain rock formations inside the Earth admit consistent elastic properties and relative values of elastic and anisotropic parameters (facies), utilizing such localized facies information in FWI can improve the resolution of inverted parameters. We propose a novel confidence map based approach to utilize the facies-based constraints in both isotropic and anisotropic elastic FWI. We invert for such a confidence map using Bayesian theory, in which the confidence map is updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and a prior information. The numerical examples show that the proposed method can reduce the trade-offs and also can improve the resolution of the inverted elastic and anisotropic properties.

  8. Interferometric full-waveform inversion of time-lapse data

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2017-08-17

    One of the key challenges associated with time-lapse surveys is ensuring the repeatability between the baseline and monitor surveys. Non-repeatability between the surveys is caused by varying environmental conditions over the course of different surveys. To overcome this challenge, we propose the use of interferometric full waveform inversion (IFWI) for inverting the velocity model from data recorded by baseline and monitor surveys. A known reflector is used as the reference reflector for IFWI, and the data are naturally redatumed to this reference reflector using natural reflections as the redatuming operator. This natural redatuming mitigates the artifacts introduced by the repeatability errors that originate above the reference reflector.

  9. Introduction of uncertainty of Green's function into waveform inversion for seismic source processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Yuji; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2011-08-01

    In principle, we can never know the true Green's function, which is a major error source in seismic waveform inversion. So far, many studies have devoted their efforts to obtain a Green's function as precise as possible. In this study, we propose a new strategy to cope with this problem. That is to say, we introduce uncertainty of Green's function into waveform inversion analyses. Due to the propagation law of errors, the uncertainty of Green's function results in a data covariance matrix with significant off-diagonal components, which naturally reduce the weight of observed data in later phases. Because the data covariance matrix depends on the model parameters that express slip distribution, the inverse problem to be solved becomes non-linear. Applying the developed inverse method to the teleseismic P-wave data of the 2006 Java, Indonesia, tsunami earthquake, we obtained a reasonable slip-rate distribution and moment-rate function without the non-negative slip constraint. The solution was independent of the initial values of the model parameters. If we neglect the modelling errors due to Green's function as in the conventional formulation, the total slip distribution is much rougher with significant opposite slip components, whereas the moment-rate function is much smoother. If we use a stronger smoothing constraint, more plausible slip distribution can be obtained, but then the moment-rate function becomes even smoother. By comparing the observed waveforms with the synthetic waveforms, we found that high-frequency components were well reproduced only by the new formulation. The modelling errors are essentially important in waveform inversion analyses, although they have been commonly neglected.

  10. Full-waveform inversion of triplicated data using a normalized-correlation-coefficient-based misfit function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Grand, Stephen P.; Niu, Fenglin

    2017-09-01

    In seismic full-waveform inversion (FWI), the choice of misfit function determines what information in data is used and ultimately affects the resolution of the inverted images of the Earth's structure. Misfit functions based on traveltime have been successfully applied in global and regional tomographic studies. However, wave propagation through the upper mantle results in multiple phases arriving at a given receiver in a narrow time interval resulting in complicated waveforms that evolve with distance. To extract waveform information as well as traveltime, we use a misfit function based on the normalized correlation coefficient (CC). This misfit function is able to capture the waveform complexities in both phase and relative amplitude within the measurement window. It is also insensitive to absolute amplitude differences between modeled and recorded data, which avoids problems due to uncertainties in source magnitude, radiation pattern, receiver site effects or even miscalibrated instruments. These features make the misfit function based on normalized CC a good candidate to achieve high-resolution images of complex geological structures when interfering phases coexist in the measurement window, such as triplication waveforms. From synthetic tests, we show the advantages of this misfit function over the cross-correlation traveltime misfit function. Preliminary inversion of data from an earthquake in Northeast China images a sharper and stronger amplitude slab stagnant in the middle of the transition zone than FWI of cross-correlation traveltime.

  11. Elastic-Waveform Inversion with Compressive Sensing for Sparse Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-26

    Accurate velocity models of compressional- and shear-waves are essential for geothermal reservoir characterization and microseismic imaging. Elastic-waveform inversion of multi-component seismic data can provide high-resolution inversion results of subsurface geophysical properties. However, the method requires seismic data acquired using dense source and receiver arrays. In practice, seismic sources and/or geophones are often sparsely distributed on the surface and/or in a borehole, such as 3D vertical seismic profiling (VSP) surveys. We develop a novel elastic-waveform inversion method with compressive sensing for inversion of sparse seismic data. We employ an alternating-minimization algorithm to solve the optimization problem of our new waveform inversion method. We validate our new method using synthetic VSP data for a geophysical model built using geologic features found at the Raft River enhanced-geothermal-system (EGS) field. We apply our method to synthetic VSP data with a sparse source array and compare the results with those obtained with a dense source array. Our numerical results demonstrate that the velocity mode ls produced with our new method using a sparse source array are almost as accurate as those obtained using a dense source array.

  12. Quasi-3D Waveform Inversion for Velocity Structures and Source Process Analyses Using its Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikima, K.; Koketsu, K.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we propose an efficient waveform inversion method for 2-D velocity structures and 3-D velocity structures are constructed by interpolating the results of the 2-D inversions. We apply these methods to a source process study of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake. We will first construct a velocity model, then determine the source processes of this earthquake sequence using the Green's function calculated with the resultant 3-D velocity model. We formulate the inversion procedure in a 2-D cross section. In a 2-D problem, an earthquake is forced to be a line source. Therefore, we introduce approximate transformation from a line source to a point source (Vidale and Helmberger, 1987). We use the 2-D velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference scheme, so that the source representation is somewhat different from the original 'source box method' and we apply additional corrections to calculated waveforms. The boundary shapes of layers are expressed by connected nodes and we invert observed waveforms for layer thicknesses at the nodes. We perform 2-D velocity inversions along cross sections which involve a medium-size earthquake and observation points. We assemble the results for many stations and interpolated them to construct the 3-D velocity model. Finally, we calculate waveforms from the target earthquake by the 3-D finite difference method with this velocity model to confirm the validity of the model. We next perform waveform inversions for source processes of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake sequence using the resultant 3-D velocity model. We divide the fault plane into northern and southern subplanes, so that the southern subplane includes the hypocenter of the mainshock and the largest foreshock. The strike directions of the northern and southern subplanes were N-S and NE-SW, respectively. The Green's functions for these source inversions are calculated using the reciprocal theorem. We determine the slip models using the 3- D structure and

  13. Elastic reflection based waveform inversion with a nonlinear approach

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang

    2017-08-16

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem due to the complex reflectivity of the Earth, and this nonlinearity only increases under the more expensive elastic assumption. In elastic media, we need a good initial P-wave velocity and even a better initial S-wave velocity models with accurate representation of the low model wavenumbers for FWI to converge. However, inverting for the low wavenumber components of P- and S-wave velocities using reflection waveform inversion (RWI) with an objective to fit the reflection shape, rather than produce reflections, may mitigate the limitations of FWI. Because FWI, performing as a migration operator, is in preference of the high wavenumber updates along reflectors. We propose a nonlinear elastic RWI that inverts for both the low wavenumber and perturbation components of the P- and S-wave velocities. To generate the full elastic reflection wavefields, we derive an equivalent stress source made up by the inverted model perturbations and incident wavefields. We update both the perturbation and propagation parts of the velocity models in a nested fashion. Applications on synthetic isotropic models and field data show that our method can efficiently update the low and high wavenumber parts of the models.

  14. Mitigating local minima in full-waveform inversion by expanding the search space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, Felix J.; van Leeuwen, Tristan

    2013-01-01

    Wave-equation based inversions, such as full-waveform inversion, are challenging because of their computational costs, memory requirements, and reliance on accurate initial models. To confront these issues, we propose a novel formulation of full-waveform inversion based on a penalty method. In this

  15. Full Seismic Waveform Inversion for the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukauskaitė, Saulė; Steptoe, Hamish; Fichtner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We present a seismic tomography model for the Japanese archipelago obtained using full waveform inversion and adjoint methods. A credible seismic velocity model is essential for the Japan region as a means to further our understanding of earthquake source mechanics by allowing for more accurate seismic source inversion, to benefit seismic hazard assessment as well as early warning systems, and to comprehend the complexity of the tectonic setting. The study area covers the Japanese islands, Taiwan, Korean peninsula, easternmost parts of China and Russia, Sakhalin and the majority of the Kuril Islands chain. The domain extends down into the mantle transition zone. We choose 58 earthquakes of magnitudes Mw5.0 - 6.9 distributed across the model domain as uniformly as possible. The data are obtained from several seismic networks in the area, namely F-net in Japan, BATS in Taiwan, South Korean National Earthquake Network and several stations from each China National Seismic Network, New China Digital Seismograph Network, Global Seismograph Network and Korean Seismic Network made available by IRIS Data Management Center. To facilitate full waveform inversion the forward problem is solved numerically using the spectral element method (SEM), which comes with the geometric flexibility of the finite-elements method and the accuracy of the spectral methods. Owing to the SEM and the advance in High Performance Computing we are able to perform numerical simulations of seismic waves in realistic 3D heterogeneous visco-elastic structures. Differences between the calculated and the real waveforms are quantified using the time-frequency misfits (Fichtner et al., 2008), which allow us to explore the temporal evolution of the frequency content of the data with no need to identify specific seismic phases. We use adjoint methods as an effective means to obtain sensitivity kernels and ultimately gradients, required for iterative gradient-based minimisation techniques. The obtained model

  16. Multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data using the normalized wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Even though the encoded multi-source approach dramatically reduces the computational cost of waveform inversion, it is generally not applicable to marine streamer data. This is because the simultaneous-sources modeled data cannot be muted to comply with the configuration of the marine streamer data, which causes differences in the number of stacked-traces, or energy levels, between the modeled and observed data. Since the conventional L2 norm does not account for the difference in energy levels, multi-source inversion based on the conventional L2 norm does not work for marine streamer data. In this study, we propose the L2, approximated L2, and L1 norm using the normalized wavefields for the multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data. Since the normalized wavefields mitigate the different energy levels between the observed and modeled wavefields, the multi-source waveform inversion using the normalized wavefields can be applied to marine streamer data. We obtain the gradient of the objective functions using the back-propagation algorithm. To conclude, the gradient of the L2 norm using the normalized wavefields is exactly the same as that of the global correlation norm. In the numerical examples, the new objective functions using the normalized wavefields generate successful results whereas conventional L2 norm does not.

  17. Visco-elastic controlled-source full waveform inversion without surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Marco; Krause, Martin; Bleibinhaus, Florian

    2016-04-01

    We developed a frequency-domain visco-elastic full waveform inversion for onshore seismic experiments with topography. The forward modeling is based on a finite-difference time-domain algorithm by Robertsson that uses the image-method to ensure a stress-free condition at the surface. The time-domain data is Fourier-transformed at every point in the model space during the forward modeling for a given set of frequencies. The motivation for this approach is the reduced amount of memory when computing kernels, and the straightforward implementation of the multiscale approach. For the inversion, we calculate the Frechet derivative matrix explicitly, and we implement a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme that allows for computing the resolution matrix. To reduce the size of the Frechet derivative matrix, and to stabilize the inversion, an adapted inverse mesh is used. The node spacing is controlled by the velocity distribution and the chosen frequencies. To focus the inversion on body waves (P, P-coda, and S) we mute the surface waves from the data. Consistent spatiotemporal weighting factors are applied to the wavefields during the Fourier transform to obtain the corresponding kernels. We test our code with a synthetic study using the Marmousi model with arbitrary topography. This study also demonstrates the importance of topography and muting surface waves in controlled-source full waveform inversion.

  18. A new parameterization for waveform inversion in acoustic orthorhombic media

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil

    2016-05-26

    Orthorhombic anisotropic model inversion is extra challenging because of the multiple parameter nature of the inversion problem. The high number of parameters required to describe the medium exerts considerable trade-off and additional nonlinearity to a full-waveform inversion (FWI) application. Choosing a suitable set of parameters to describe the model and designing an effective inversion strategy can help in mitigating this problem. Using the Born approximation, which is the central ingredient of the FWI update process, we have derived radiation patterns for the different acoustic orthorhombic parameterizations. Analyzing the angular dependence of scattering (radiation patterns) of the parameters of different parameterizations starting with the often used Thomsen-Tsvankin parameterization, we have assessed the potential trade-off between the parameters and the resolution in describing the data and inverting for the parameters. The analysis led us to introduce new parameters ϵd, δd, and ηd, which have azimuthally dependent radiation patterns, but keep the scattering potential of the transversely isotropic parameters stationary with azimuth (azimuth independent). The novel parameters ϵd, δd, and ηd are dimensionless and represent a measure of deviation between the vertical planes in orthorhombic anisotropy. Therefore, these deviation parameters offer a new parameterization style for an acoustic orthorhombic medium described by six parameters: three vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) parameters, two deviation parameters, and one parameter describing the anisotropy in the horizontal symmetry plane. The main feature of any parameterization based on the deviation parameters, is the azimuthal independency of the modeled data with respect to the VTI parameters, which allowed us to propose practical inversion strategies based on our experience with the VTI parameters. This feature of the new parameterization style holds for even the long-wavelength components of

  19. Full-waveform inversion: From near surface to deep

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-11-01

    The ancient Persian Gulf port city of Muscat provided a spectacular setting for the SEG\\'s 2013 Workshop on Full-waveform Inversion (FWI). This active R&D topic attracted about 36 oral presentations and 20 or so posters, which added up to three intense days of ideas, images, and discussion. FWI has progressed from academic research topic to commercial workflow component in roughly 10 years, with many case studies documenting improved imaging and business value and others documenting a definite need for improved understanding of algorithms and applicability. Along with fundamental research issues of worldwide importance, the meeting provided an opportunity to showcase implications of the Middle East\\'s particular exploration challenges for the further development of FWI.

  20. Estimation of earthquake source parameters by the inversion of waveform data: synthetic waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipkin, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Two methods are presented for the recovery of a time-dependent moment-tensor source from waveform data. One procedure utilizes multichannel signal-enhancement theory; in the other a multichannel vector-deconvolution approach, developed by Oldenburg (1982) and based on Backus-Gilbert inverse theory, is used. These methods have the advantage of being extremely flexible; both may be used either routinely or as research tools for studying particular earthquakes in detail. Both methods are also robust with respect to small errors in the Green's functions and may be used to refine estimates of source depth by minimizing the misfits to the data. The multichannel vector-deconvolution approach, although it requires more interaction, also allows a trade-off between resolution and accuracy, and complete statistics for the solution are obtained. The procedures have been tested using a number of synthetic body-wave data sets, including point and complex sources, with satisfactory results. ?? 1982.

  1. Tsunami waveform inversion by numerical finite-elements Green’s functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Piatanesi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, the steady increase in the quantity and quality of the data concerning tsunamis has led to an increasing interest in the inversion problem for tsunami data. This work addresses the usually ill-posed problem of the hydrodynamical inversion of tsunami tide-gage records to infer the initial sea perturbation. We use an inversion method for which the data space consists of a given number of waveforms and the model parameter space is represented by the values of the initial water elevation field at a given number of points. The forward model, i.e. the calculation of the synthetic tide-gage records from an initial water elevation field, is based on the linear shallow water equations and is simply solved by applying the appropriate Green’s functions to the known initial state. The inversion of tide-gage records to determine the initial state results in the least square inversion of a rectangular system of linear equations. When the inversions are unconstrained, we found that in order to attain good results, the dimension of the data space has to be much larger than that of the model space parameter. We also show that a large number of waveforms is not sufficient to ensure a good inversion if the corresponding stations do not have a good azimuthal coverage with respect to source directivity. To improve the inversions we use the available a priori information on the source, generally coming from the inversion of seismological data. In this paper we show how to implement very common information about a tsunamigenic seismic source, i.e. the earthquake source region, as a set of spatial constraints. The results are very satisfactory, since even a rough localisation of the source enables us to invert correctly the initial elevation field.

  2. Efficient scattering angle filtering for Full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-08-19

    Controlling the scattering angles between the state and the adjoint variables for the energy admitted into an inversion gradient or an image can help improve these functions for objectives in full waveform inversion (FWI) or seismic imaging. However, the access of the scattering angle information usually requires an axis extension that could be costly, especially in 3D. For the purpose of a scattering angle filter, I develop techniques that utilize the mapping nature (no domain extension) of the filter for constant-velocity background models to interpolate between such filtered gradients using the actual velocity. The concept has well known roots in the application of phase-shift-plus-interpolation utilized commonly in the downward continuation process. If the difference between the minimum and maximum velocity of the background medium is large, we obtain filtered gradients corresponding to more constant velocity backgrounds and use linear interpolation between such velocities. The accuracy of this approximation for the Marmousi model gradient demonstrates the e ectiveness of the approach.

  3. Spectral implementation of full waveform inversion based on reflections

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2014-01-01

    Using the reflection imaging process as a source to model reflections for full waveform inversion (FWI), referred to as reflection FWI (RFWI), allows us to update the background component of the model, and avoid using the relatively costly migration velocity analysis (MVA), which usually relies on extended images. However, RFWI requires a good image to represent the current reflectivity, as well as, some effort to obtain good smooth gradients. We develop a spectral implementation of RFWI where the wavefield extrapolations and gradient evaluation are performed in the wavenumber domain, obtaining clean dispersion free and fast extrapolations. The gradient, in this case, yields three terms, two of which provide us with each side of the rabbit ear kernel, and the third, often ignored, provides a normalization of the reflectivity within the kernel, which can be used to obtain a reflectivity free background update. Since the image is imperfect (it is an adjoint, not an inverse), an optimization process for the third term scaling is implemented to achieve the smoothest gradient update. A rare application of RFWI on the reflectivity infested Marmousi model shows some of the potential of the approach.

  4. D'' beneath the Arctic from inversion of shear waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.; Fuji, Nobuaki

    2007-11-01

    The structure of the D'' region beneath the Arctic has not previously been studied in detail. Using waveform inversion, we find that the average S-wave velocity in D'' beneath the Arctic is about 0.04 km/s higher than PREM, which is consistent with the existence of post-perovskite (ppv) in D''. It is difficult to strongly constrain the fine structure of S-velocity within D'' due to the small number of stations at epicentral distances Δ weighting those stations heavily in the inversion, we show that the data suggest the existence of high S-velocity in the upper half of D'' and low S-velocity in the lower half, consistent with the possibility of a double crossing (ppv -> pv reverse phase transition) within D''. We conduct a computational experiment to show that resolution of the velocity structure within D'' could be significantly improved by temporary installation of a portable array of seismographs in northern Canada, which would greatly increase the number of stations in the range 70° < Δ < 90°.

  5. Monofrequency waveform acquisition and inversion: A new paradigm

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-08-05

    In seismic inversion, we tend to use the geometrical behavior of the wavefield (the kinematics), extracted from the data, to constrain the long wavelength model components and use the recorded reections to invert for the short wavelength features in a process referred to as full waveform inversion (FWI). For such a recipe, single frequency (the right frequency) data are capable of providing the ingredients for both model components. A frequency that provides model wavelengths (through the transmission components) low enough to update the background and high enough (reections) to map the scattering may render the other frequencies almost obsolete, especially large offset data are available to provide the transition from background to scattering components. Thus, I outline a scenario in which we acquire dedicated mono frequency data, allowing for more time to inject more of that single frequency energy at a reduced cost. The cost savings can be utilized to acquire larger offsets, which is an important for constraining the background model. Combing this single frequency data with a hierarchical scattering angle filter strategy in FWI, and potentially reection FWI, provides an opportunity to invert for complex models starting even with poor initial velocity models. The objective of this new paradigm is a high resolution model of the Earth to replace our focus on the image, which requires a band of frequencies.

  6. Velocity Building by Reflection Waveform Inversion without Cycle-skipping

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Q.

    2017-05-26

    Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) provides estimation of low wavenumber model components using reflections generated from a migration/demigration process. The resulting model tends to be a good initial model for FWI. In fact, the optimization images to combine the migration velocity analysis (MVA) objectives (given here by RWI) and the FWI ones. However, RWI may still encounter cycle-skipping at far offsets if the velocity model is highly inaccurate. Similar to MVA, RWI is devoted to focusing reflection data to its true image positions, yet because of the cycle skipping potential we tend to initially use only near offsets. To make the inversion procedure more robust, we introduce the extended image into our RWI. Extending the model perturbations (or image) allows us to better fit the data at larger offsets even with an inaccurate velocity. Thus, we implement a nested approach to optimize the velocity and extended image simultaneously using the objective function of RWI. We slowly reduce the extension, as the image becomes focused, to allow wavepath updates from far offsets to near as a natural progression from long wavelength updates to shorter ones. Applications on synthetic data demonstrate the effectiveness of our method without much additional cost to RWI.

  7. Estimation of fracture parameters using elastic full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-08-17

    Current methodologies to characterize fractures at the reservoir scale have serious limitations in spatial resolution and suffer from uncertainties in the inverted parameters. Here, we propose to estimate the spatial distribution and physical properties of fractures using full-waveform inversion (FWI) of multicomponent surface seismic data. An effective orthorhombic medium with five clusters of vertical fractures distributed in a checkboard fashion is used to test the algorithm. A shape regularization term is added to the objective function to improve the estimation of the fracture azimuth, which is otherwise poorly constrained. The cracks are assumed to be penny-shaped to reduce the nonuniqueness in the inverted fracture weaknesses and achieve a faster convergence. To better understand the inversion results, we analyze the radiation patterns induced by the perturbations in the fracture weaknesses and orientation. Due to the high-resolution potential of elastic FWI, the developed algorithm can recover the spatial fracture distribution and identify localized “sweet spots” of intense fracturing. However, the fracture azimuth can be resolved only using long-offset data.

  8. Full Waveform Seismic Inversion for the Japan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukauskaitė, Saulė; Steptoe, Hamish; Fichtner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    We present a seismic tomography model for the Japan archipelago obtained using full waveform inversion and adjoint methods. A high-resolution seismic velocity model is essential for Japan as means to comprehend and characterize the complexity of the tectonic setting, and to further our understanding of earthquake sources and rupture propagation. The study area covers the Japanese islands - an area between 20°-50°N and 130°-160°E - and extends to a maximum depth of 500 km. In virtue of complicated tectonics and resulting high seismicity, dense seismic networks are present in Japan and surrounding countries. We make use of broadband data from three networks - F-net in Japan, BATS in Taiwan, and notably, the National Earthquake Network in South Korea. Due to access difficulties, data from this network had not been used in the preceding tomographic study of the same area. We use >50 carefully selected earthquakes, located within the model area and occurring between 1999 and the present. Magnitudes of the events are restricted to 5≤Mw≤6.9 for a point source approximation to be valid. A spectral-element method is used for forward waveform calculation, which comes with the geometric flexibility of finite-elements method and the accuracy of spectral methods. To quantify differences between the observed and synthetic waveforms, we use time-frequency misfits, which exploit the evolution of the frequency content of the data in time. The sensitivities (Fréchet kernels) are then calculated using adjoint methods. The employed methodology allows us to explain the data of dominant period as low as 10 s. To prevent possible over-fitting of the data, we ensure that final misfits are not lower than those obtained if additional (not yet used) data are incorporated. The final results of this study will contribute to the 'Comprehensive Earth Model' being developed by the Computational Seismology group at ETH, with the aim to represent the snapshot of the current knowledge of

  9. Parallel full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain by the Gauss-Newton method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. We first test the inversion ability of three numerical optimization methods, i.e., the steepest-descent method, the Newton-CG method and the Gauss- Newton method, for a simple model. The results show that the Gauss-Newton method performs well and efficiently. Then numerical computations for a benchmark model named Marmousi model by the Gauss-Newton method are implemented. Parallel algorithm based on message passing interface (MPI) is applied as the inversion is a typical large-scale computational problem. Numerical computations show that the Gauss-Newton method has good ability to reconstruct the complex model.

  10. Sparse-promoting Full Waveform Inversion based on Online Orthonormal Dictionary Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Lingchen; McClellan, James H

    2015-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) delivers high-resolution images of a subsurface medium model by minimizing iteratively the least-squares misfit between the observed and simulated seismic data. Due to the limited accuracy of the starting model and the inconsistency of the seismic waveform data, the FWI problem is inherently ill-posed, so that regularization techniques are typically applied to obtain better models. FWI is also a computationally expensive problem because modern seismic surveys cover very large areas of interest and collect massive volumes of data. The dimensionality of the problem and the heterogeneity of the medium both stress the need for faster algorithms and sparse regularization techniques to accelerate and improve imaging results. This paper reaches these goals by developing a compressive sensing approach for the FWI problem, where the sparsity of model perturbations is exploited within learned dictionaries. Based on stochastic approximations, the dictionaries are updated iteratively to adap...

  11. Computational and methodological developments towards 3D full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, V.; Virieux, J.; Hu, G.; Jia, Y.; Operto, S.

    2010-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is one of the most promising techniques for seismic imaging. It relies on a formalism taking into account every piece of information contained in the seismic data as opposed to more classical techniques such as travel time tomography. As a result, FWI is a high resolution imaging process able to reach a spatial accuracy equal to half a wavelength. FWI is based on a local optimization scheme and therefore the main limitation concerns the starting model which has to be closed enough to the real one in order to converge to the global minimum. Another counterpart of FWI is the required computational resources when considering models and frequencies of interest. The task becomes even more tremendous when one tends to perform the inversion using the elastic equation instead of using the acoustic approximation. This is the reason why until recently most studies were limited to 2D cases. In the last few years, due to the increase of the available computational power, FWI has focused a lot of interests and continuous efforts towards inversion of 3D models, leading to remarkable applications up to the continental scale. We investigate the computational burden induced by FWI in 3D elastic media and propose some strategic features leading to the reduction of the numerical cost while providing a great flexibility in the inversion parametrization. First, in order to release the memory requirements, we developed our FWI algorithm in the frequency domain and take benefit of the wave-number redundancy in the seismic data to process a quite reduced number of frequencies. To do so, we extract frequency solutions from time marching techniques which are efficient for 3D structures. Moreover, this frequency approach permits a multi-resolution strategy by proceeding from low to high frequencies: the final model at one frequency is used as the starting model for the next frequency. This procedure overcomes partially the non-linear behavior of the inversion

  12. Frequency Domain Multi-parameter Full Waveform Inversion for Acoustic VTI Media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, R.

    2017-05-26

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) for transversely isotropic (TI) media with vertical axis of symmetry (VTI) suffers from the trade-off between the parameters. The trade-off results in the leakage of one parameter\\'s update into the other during the inversion. It affects the accuracy and convergence of the inversion. The sensitivity analyses suggested a parameterisation using the horizontal velocity vh, epsilon and eta to reduce the trade-off for surface recorded seismic data.We test the (vh, epsilon, eta) parameterisation for acoustic VTI media using a scattering integral (SI) based inversion. The data is modeled in frequency domain and the model is updated using a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. We applied the method to the VTI Marmousi II model and in the inversion, we keep eta parameter fixed as the background initial model and we invert simultaneously for both vh and epsilon. The results show the suitability of the parameterisation for multi-parameter VTI acoustic inversion as well as the accuracy of the inversion approach.

  13. Full waveform inversion with extrapolated low frequency data

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yunyue Elita

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low frequency data is an important factor in the success of full waveform inversion (FWI) in the acoustic regime. The low frequencies help determine the kinematically relevant, low-wavenumber components of the velocity model, which are in turn needed to avoid convergence of FWI to spurious local minima. However, acquiring data below 2 or 3 Hz from the field is a challenging and expensive task. In this paper we explore the possibility of synthesizing the low frequencies computationally from high-frequency data, and use the resulting prediction of the missing data to seed the frequency sweep of FWI. As a signal processing problem, bandwidth extension is a very nonlinear and delicate operation. It requires a high-level interpretation of bandlimited seismic records into individual events, each of which is extrapolable to a lower (or higher) frequency band from the non-dispersive nature of the wave propagation model. We propose to use the phase tracking method for the event separation task. The...

  14. Scattering-angle based filtering of the waveform inversion gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-11-22

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach to maneuver the complex non-linearity associated with the problem of velocity update. In anisotropic media, the non-linearity becomes far more complex with the potential trade-off between the multiparameter description of the model. A gradient filter helps us in accessing the parts of the gradient that are suitable to combat the potential non-linearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which the low scattering angle of the gradient update is initially muted out in the FWI implementation, in what we may refer to as a scattering angle continuation process. The result is a low wavelength update dominated by the transmission part of the update gradient. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce vertically near-zero wavenumber updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Relaxing the filtering at a later stage in the FWI implementation allows for smaller scattering angles to contribute higher-resolution information to the model. The benefits of the extended domain based filtering of the gradient is not only it\\'s ability in providing low wavenumber gradients guided by the scattering angle, but also in its potential to provide gradients free of unphysical energy that may correspond to unrealistic scattering angles.

  15. Tsunami Waveform Inversion without Assuming Fault Models- Application to Recent Three Earthquakes around Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namegaya, Y.; Ueno, T.; Satake, K.; Tanioka, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Tsunami waveform inversion is often used to study the source of tsunamigenic earthquakes. In this method, subsurface fault planes are divided into small subfaults, and the slip distribution, then seafloor deformation are estimated. However, it is sometimes difficult to judge the actual fault plane for offshore earthquake such as those along the eastern margin of Japan Sea. We developed an inversion method to estimate vertical seafloor deformation directly from observed tsunami waveforms. The tsunami source area is divided into many nodes, and the vertical seafloor deformation is calculated around each node by using the B-spline functions. The tsunami waveforms are calculated from each node, and used as the Green’s functions for inversion. To stabilize inversion or avoid overestimation of data errors, we introduce smoothing equations like Laplace’s equations. The optimum smoothing strength is estimated from the Akaike’s Bayesian information criterion (ABIC) Method. Advantage of this method is to estimate the vertical seafloor deformation can be estimated without assuming a fault plane. We applied the method to three recent earthquakes around Japan: the 2007 Chuetsu-oki, 2007 Noto Hanto, and 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquakes. The Chuetsu-oki earthquake (M6.8) occurred off the Japan Sea coast of central Japan on 16 July 2007. For this earthquake, complicated aftershock distribution makes it difficult to judge which of the southeast dipping fault or the northwest dipping fault was the actual fault plane. The tsunami inversion result indicates that the uplifted area extends about 10 km from the coastline, and there are two peaks of uplift: about 40 cm in the south and about 20 cm in the north. TheNoto Hanto earthquake (M6.9) occurred off Noto peninsula, also along the Japan Sea coast of central Japan, on 25 March 2007. The inversion result indicates that the uplifted area extends about 10 km off the coast, and the largest uplift amount is more than 40 cm. Location of

  16. 2.5-D forward and inverse modelling of full-waveform elastic seismic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, J. L.; Lin, Y.; Abubakar, A.; Habashy, T. M.

    2013-05-01

    We present a two-and-half-dimensional (2.5-D) forward and inversion algorithm for the interpretation of surface seismic elastic full-waveform data. The 2-D modelling approach for elastic waves might not be sufficiently accurate because of its line-source assumption. On the other hand, a full 3-D modelling of elastic waves is still computationally very expensive for seismic exploration applications. By employing the 2.5-D modelling approach, we assume that the elastic medium is 2-D while the source is a 3-D point source. We solve the 2.5-D problem by first transforming the elastic wave equation in the spatial domain into the wavenumber domain. Then, for each wavenumber we solve a 2-D problem using the finite difference method with staggered grids. After that an inverse wavenumber transform is performed to compute the 3-D field distribution. To handle the inverse transform, we develop an efficient numerical integration scheme by subdividing the integration domain and applying different integration rules to each subinterval. We show that this approach works well for surface seismic applications. The 2.5-D approach offers a more realistic modelling of the elastic wave data, hence it produces more accurate inversion results than the 2-D inversion approach. Finally, we validate this approach by using a numerical test. In this test we used our 2.5-D full-waveform inversion algorithm to invert the synthetic data generated by a 3-D finite-difference time-domain simulation.

  17. Full waveform inversion based on scattering angle enrichment with application to real dataset

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI). However, the drawback of the existing RWI methods is inability to utilize diving waves and the extra sensitivity to the migrated image. We propose a combined FWI and RWI optimization problem through dividing the velocity into the background and perturbed components. We optimize both the background and perturbed components, as independent parameters. The new objective function is quadratic with respect to the perturbed component, which will reduce the nonlinearity of the optimization problem. Solving this optimization provides a true amplitude image and utilizes the diving waves to update the velocity of the shallow parts. To insure a proper wavenumber continuation, we use an efficient scattering angle filter to direct the inversion at the early stages to direct energy corresponding to large (smooth velocity) scattering angles to the background velocity update and the small (high wavenumber) scattering angles to the perturbed velocity update. This efficient implementation of the filter is fast and requires less memory than the conventional approach based on extended images. Thus, the new FWI procedure updates the background velocity mainly along the wavepath for both diving and reflected waves in the initial stages. At the same time, it updates the perturbation with mainly reflections (filtering out the diving waves). To demonstrate the capability of this method, we apply it to a real 2D marine dataset.

  18. Lossy Wavefield Compression for Full-Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, C.; Fichtner, A.; de la Puente, J.; Hanzich, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present lossy compression techniques, tailored to the inexact computation of sensitivity kernels, that significantly reduce the memory requirements of adjoint-based minimization schemes. Adjoint methods are a powerful tool to solve tomography problems in full-waveform inversion (FWI). Yet they face the challenge of massive memory requirements caused by the opposite directions of forward and adjoint simulations and the necessity to access both wavefields simultaneously during the computation of the sensitivity kernel. Thus, storage, I/O operations, and memory bandwidth become key topics in FWI. In this talk, we present strategies for the temporal and spatial compression of the forward wavefield. This comprises re-interpolation with coarse time steps and an adaptive polynomial degree of the spectral element shape functions. In addition, we predict the projection errors on a hierarchy of grids and re-quantize the residuals with an adaptive floating-point accuracy to improve the approximation. Furthermore, we use the first arrivals of adjoint waves to identify "shadow zones" that do not contribute to the sensitivity kernel at all. Updating and storing the wavefield within these shadow zones is skipped, which reduces memory requirements and computational costs at the same time. Compared to check-pointing, our approach has only a negligible computational overhead, utilizing the fact that a sufficiently accurate sensitivity kernel does not require a fully resolved forward wavefield. Furthermore, we use adaptive compression thresholds during the FWI iterations to ensure convergence. Numerical experiments on the reservoir scale and for the Western Mediterranean prove the high potential of this approach with an effective compression factor of 500-1000. Furthermore, it is computationally cheap and easy to integrate in both, finite-differences and finite-element wave propagation codes.

  19. Local full-waveform inversion using distant data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara; Zhao Zheng, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Imaging remote objects in the deep Earth, such as, subducting slabs, mantle plumes, or large low shear velocity provinces and ultra low velocity zones is key for understanding Earth's structure and the geodynamical processes involved as it cools. In order to image these structures, we developed a strategy for performing regional-scale full-waveform inversions at arbitrary location inside the Earth [1]. Our approach is to confine wave propagation computations inside the region to be imaged. This local wavefield modeling is used in combination with wavefield extrapolation techniques in order to obtain synthetic seismograms at the surface of the Earth [2]. This allows us to evaluate a misfit functional and sensitivity kernels can then be computed locally using the adjoint state method [3]. The Green's functions needed for extrapolating the wavefield are computed once for all in a 3D reference Earth model using the spectral element software Specfem/3DGLOBE. We will present benchmark tests demonstrating that the proposed method allows us to image 3D localized structures - this without having to model wave propagation in the entire Earth at each iteration, which is prohibitively costly, thus improving the feasibility of accurate imaging of regional structures anywhere in the Earth using numerical methods. We will show that our method permits to account for additional data in regional inversions, that is to account for distant earthquakes that are located outside the region of the study - preliminary results for the tomography of the north American continent will be presented. [1] Masson, Yder, Paul Cupillard, Yann Capdeville, and Barbara Romanowicz. On the numerical im- plementation of time-reversal mirrors for tomographic imaging. Geophysical Journal International, 2013. [2] J. O. A. Robertsson, S. Ryan-Grigor, C. M. Sayers, and C. H. Chapman. A finite-difference injection approach to modeling seismic fluid flow monitoring. Geophysics, 65(3):896-906, 2000. [3] R

  20. 3D elastic-orthorhombic anisotropic full-waveform inversion: Application to field OBC data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Ju-Won

    2016-09-06

    For the purpose of extracting higher resolution information from a 3D field data set, we apply a 3D elastic orthorhombic (ORT) anisotropic full waveform inversion (FWI) to hopefully better represent the physics of the Earth. We utilize what we consider as the optimal parameterization for surface acquired seismic data over a potentially orthorhombic media. This parameterization admits the possibility of incorporating a hierarchical implementation moving from higher anisotropy symmetry to lower ones. From the analysis of the radiation pattern of this new parameterization, we focus the inversion of the 3D data on the parameters that may have imprint on the data with minimal tradeoff, and as a result we invert for the horizontal P-wave velocity model, an ε1 model, its orthorhombic deviation, and the shear wave velocity. The inverted higher resolution models provide reasonable insights of the medium.

  1. Simultaneous inversion of the background velocity and the perturbation in full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-09-02

    The gradient of standard full-waveform inversion (FWI) attempts to map the residuals in the data to perturbations in the model. Such perturbations may include smooth background updates from the transmission components and high wavenumber updates from the reflection components. However, if we fix the reflection components using imaging, the gradient of what is referred to as reflected-waveform inversion (RWI) admits mainly transmission background-type updates. The drawback of existing RWI methods is that they lack an optimal image capable of producing reflections within the convex region of the optimization. Because the influence of velocity on the data was given mainly by its background (propagator) and perturbed (reflectivity) components, we have optimized both components simultaneously using a modified objective function. Specifically, we used an objective function that combined the data generated from a source using the background velocity, and that by the perturbed velocity through Born modeling, to fit the observed data. When the initial velocity was smooth, the data modeled from the source using the background velocity will mainly be reflection free, and most of the reflections were obtained from the image (perturbed velocity). As the background velocity becomes more accurate and can produce reflections, the role of the image will slowly diminish, and the update will be dominated by the standard FWI gradient to obtain high resolution. Because the objective function was quadratic with respect to the image, the inversion for the image was fast. To update the background velocity smoothly, we have combined different components of the gradient linearly through solving a small optimization problem. Application to the Marmousi model found that this method converged starting with a linearly increasing velocity, and with data free of frequencies below 4 Hz. Application to the 2014 Chevron Gulf of Mexico imaging challenge data set demonstrated the potential of the

  2. Efficient edge-guided full-waveform inversion by Canny edge detection and bilateral filtering algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shiming; Zhang, Haijiang

    2016-11-01

    It is known full-waveform inversion (FWI) is generally ill-conditioned and various strategies including pre-conditioning and regularizing the inversion system have been proposed to obtain a reliable estimation of the velocity model. Here, we propose a new edge-guided strategy for FWI in frequency domain to efficiently and reliably estimate velocity models with structures of the size similar to the seismic wavelength. The edges of the velocity model at the current iteration are first detected by the Canny edge detection algorithm that is widely used in image processing. Then, the detected edges are used for guiding the calculation of FWI gradient as well as enforcing edge-preserving total variation (TV) regularization for next iteration of FWI. Bilateral filtering is further applied to remove noise but keep edges of the FWI gradient. The proposed edge-guided FWI in the frequency domain with edge-guided TV regularization and bilateral filtering is designed to preserve model edges that are recovered from previous iterations as well as from lower frequency waveforms when FWI is conducted from lower to higher frequencies. The new FWI method is validated using the complex Marmousi model that contains several steeply dipping fault zones and hundreds of horizons. Compared to FWI without edge guidance, our proposed edge-guided FWI recovers velocity model anomalies and edges much better. Unlike previous image-guided FWI or edge-guided TV regularization strategies, our method does not require migrating seismic data, thus is more efficient for real applications.

  3. Application of weighted early-arrival waveform inversion to shallow land data

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-03-01

    Seismic imaging of deep land targets is usually difficult since the near-surface velocities are not accurately estimated. Recent studies have shown that inverting traces weighted by the energy of the early-arrivals can improve the accuracy of estimating shallow velocities. In this work, it is explained by showing that the associated misfit gradient function tends to be sensitive to the kinetics of wave propagation and insensitive to the dynamics. A synthetic example verifies the theoretical predictions and shows that the effects of noise and unpredicted amplitude variations in the inversion are reduced using this weighted early arrival waveform inversion (WEWI). We also apply this method to a 2D land data set for estimating the near-surface velocity distribution. The reverse time migration images suggest that, compared to the tomogram inverted directly from the early arrival waveforms, the WEWI tomogram provides a more convincing velocity model and more focused reflections in the deeper part of the image. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Waveform inversion of volcano-seismic signals for an extended source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method to investigate the dimensions and oscillation characteristics of the source of volcano-seismic signals based on waveform inversion for an extended source. An extended source is realized by a set of point sources distributed on a grid surrounding the centroid of the source in accordance with the source geometry and orientation. The source-time functions for all point sources are estimated simultaneously by waveform inversion carried out in the frequency domain. We apply a smoothing constraint to suppress short-scale noisy fluctuations of source-time functions between adjacent sources. The strength of the smoothing constraint we select is that which minimizes the Akaike Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). We perform a series of numerical tests to investigate the capability of our method to recover the dimensions of the source and reconstruct its oscillation characteristics. First, we use synthesized waveforms radiated by a kinematic source model that mimics the radiation from an oscillating crack. Our results demonstrate almost complete recovery of the input source dimensions and source-time function of each point source, but also point to a weaker resolution of the higher modes of crack oscillation. Second, we use synthetic waveforms generated by the acoustic resonance of a fluid-filled crack, and consider two sets of waveforms dominated by the modes with wavelengths 2L/3 and 2W/3, or L and 2L/5, where W and L are the crack width and length, respectively. Results from these tests indicate that the oscillating signature of the 2L/3 and 2W/3 modes are successfully reconstructed. The oscillating signature of the L mode is also well recovered, in contrast to results obtained for a point source for which the moment tensor description is inadequate. However, the oscillating signature of the 2L/5 mode is poorly recovered owing to weaker resolution of short-scale crack wall motions. The triggering excitations of the oscillating cracks are successfully

  5. Applying the Moment Distance Framework to LiDAR Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, E. L.; Aguilar-Amuchastegui, N.; Henebry, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    In the past decade or so, there have only been limited approaches formulated for the analysis of waveform LiDAR data. We illustrate how the Moment Distance (MD) framework can characterize the shape of the LiDAR waveforms using simple, computationally fast, geometric operations. We assess the relationship of the MD metrics to some key waveform landmarks - such as locations of peaks, power of returns, and pseudo-heights - using LVIS datasets acquired over a tropical forest in La Selva, Costa Rica in 1998 and 2005. We also apply the MD framework to 2003 LVIS data from Howland Forest, Maine. We also explore the effects of noise on the MD Index (MDI). Our results reveal that the MDI can capture important dynamics in canopy structure. Movement in the location of the peaks is detected by shifts in the MDI. Because this new approach responds to waveform shape, it is more sensitive to changes of location of peak returns than to the power of the return. Results also suggest a positive relationship between the MDI and the canopy pseudo-height.

  6. Free-surface Multiples and full-waveform inversion spectral resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazei, V.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequencies play a crucial role in the convergence of full-waveform inversion to the correct model in most of its current implementations. However, the lower the frequencies, the bigger are the amplitudes of the surface waves, causing the inversion to be driven by the latter. If they are not bla

  7. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari Basin: Full waveform inversion

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    ; full waveform inversion; P-wave velocity; P-wave attenuation 1. INTRODUCTION Hydrates can play a potentially significant role in climate change (Gu et al., 2011), seafloor stability (Brown et al., 2006), and energy security (Boswell and Collett, 2011... distribution within fine-grained, clay-dominated, and faulted sediments of the Krishna-Godavari (KG) Basin located offshore of eastern continental margin of India (Figure 1). We apply FWI in the frequency domain. The domain choice is driven by a) efficiency...

  8. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source-domain FTI is capable of automatically generating a background velocity that can kinematically match the reconstructed plane-wave sources of early arrivals with true plane-wave sources. This method does not require picking first arrivals for inversion, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based first-arrival tomographic inversion. Moreover, compared with conventional Born-based methods, source-domain FTI can distinguish between slower or faster initial model errors via providing the correct sign of the model gradient. In addition, this method does not need estimation of the source wavelet, which is a requirement for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. The model derived from source-domain FTI is then used as input to early-arrival waveform inversion to obtain the short-wavelength velocity components. We have tested the workflow on synthetic and field seismic data sets. The results show source-domain FTI can generate reasonable background velocities for early-arrival waveform inversion even when subsurface velocity reversals are present and the workflow can produce a high-resolution near-surface velocity model.

  9. Joint Inversion for Earthquake Depths Using Local Waveforms and Amplitude Spectra of Rayleigh Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhe; Ni, Sidao; Chu, Risheng; Zhan, Zhongwen

    2017-01-01

    Reliable earthquake depth is fundamental to many seismological problems. In this paper, we present a method to jointly invert for centroid depths with local (distance distance of 5°-15°) Rayleigh wave amplitude spectra on sparse networks. We use earthquake focal mechanisms and magnitudes retrieved with the Cut-and-Paste (CAP) method to compute synthetic amplitude spectra of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave for a range of depths. Then we grid search to find the optimal depth that minimizes the joint misfit of amplitude spectra and local waveforms. As case studies, we apply this method to the 2008 Wells, Nevada Mw6.0 earthquake and a Mw5.6 outer-rise earthquake to the east of Japan Trench in 2013. Uncertainties estimated with a bootstrap re-sampling approach show that this joint inversion approach constrains centroid depths well, which are also verified by independent teleseismic depth-phase data.

  10. Multisource full waveform inversion of marine streamer data with frequency selection

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2013-01-01

    Multisource migration with frequency selection is now extended to multisource full waveform inversion (FWI) of supergathers for marine streamer data. There are three advantages of this approach compared to conventional FWI for marine streamer data. 1. The multisource FWI method with frequency selection is computationally more efficient than conventional FWI. 2. A supergather requires more than an order of magnitude less storage than the the original data. 3. Frequency selection overcomes the acquisition mismatch between the observed data and the simulated multisource supergathers for marine data. This mismatch problem has prevented the efficient application of FWI to marine geometries in the space-time domain. Preliminary result of applying multisource FWI with frequency selection to a synthetic marine data set suggests it is at least four times more efficient than standard FWI.

  11. Spatially-Variant Tikhonov Regularization for Double-Difference Waveform Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Zhigang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Double-difference waveform inversion is a potential tool for quantitative monitoring for geologic carbon storage. It jointly inverts time-lapse seismic data for changes in reservoir geophysical properties. Due to the ill-posedness of waveform inversion, it is a great challenge to obtain reservoir changes accurately and efficiently, particularly when using time-lapse seismic reflection data. Regularization techniques can be utilized to address the issue of ill-posedness. The regularization parameter controls the smoothness of inversion results. A constant regularization parameter is normally used in waveform inversion, and an optimal regularization parameter has to be selected. The resulting inversion results are a trade off among regions with different smoothness or noise levels; therefore the images are either over regularized in some regions while under regularized in the others. In this paper, we employ a spatially-variant parameter in the Tikhonov regularization scheme used in double-difference waveform tomography to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness. We compare the results obtained using a spatially-variant parameter with those obtained using a constant regularization parameter and those produced without any regularization. We observe that, utilizing a spatially-variant regularization scheme, the target regions are well reconstructed while the noise is reduced in the other regions. We show that the spatially-variant regularization scheme provides the flexibility to regularize local regions based on the a priori information without increasing computational costs and the computer memory requirement.

  12. Waveform inversion with exponential damping using a deconvolution-based objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2016-09-06

    The lack of low frequency components in seismic data usually leads full waveform inversion into the local minima of its objective function. An exponential damping of the data, on the other hand, generates artificial low frequencies, which can be used to admit long wavelength updates for waveform inversion. Another feature of exponential damping is that the energy of each trace also exponentially decreases with source-receiver offset, where the leastsquare misfit function does not work well. Thus, we propose a deconvolution-based objective function for waveform inversion with an exponential damping. Since the deconvolution filter includes a division process, it can properly address the unbalanced energy levels of the individual traces of the damped wavefield. Numerical examples demonstrate that our proposed FWI based on the deconvolution filter can generate a convergent long wavelength structure from the artificial low frequency components coming from an exponential damping.

  13. Time-domain incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion of Gulf of Mexico data

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2013-09-22

    We apply the incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion (TDIGN-FWI) to Gulf of Mexico (GOM) data in the space-time domain. In our application, iterative least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM) is used to estimate the model update at each non-linear iteration, and the number of LSRTM iterations is progressively increased after each non-linear iteration. With this method, model updating along deep reflection wavepaths are automatically enhanced, which in turn improves imaging below the reach of diving-waves. The forward and adjoint operators are implemented in the space-time domain to simultaneously invert the data over a range of frequencies. A multiscale approach is used where higher frequencies are down-weighted significantly at early iterations, and gradually included in the inversion. Synthetic data results demonstrate the effectiveness of reconstructing both the high- and low-wavenumber features in the model without relying on diving waves in the inversion. Results with Gulf of Mexico field data show a significantly improved migration image in both the shallow and deep sections.

  14. The Evaluations of the Inverse .Transform of Eight Often-used Waveforms by Mobius Transform-The Inverse Transform of Their Fourier Series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUWuxun; ZHANGWeibin; WANGJiancheng

    2005-01-01

    Applying the Mobius transform to the eight often-used waveforms and the evaluations of their inverse transform as well as the inverse transform of their Fourier series, were investigated. Then the results, the sine, cosine and general periodic function expanded on these waveforms and the formula for evaluating the expanding coefficients on these non-orthogonal function set were derived. Perhaps more important, in the evaluation process, another non-orthogonal function set were deduced, which are orthogonal to the former set that the integral of their product in a period T was orthogonal. These two function set orthogonal to each other, as the modulation function set and the demodulation function set, could play an important role in the information modulatingdemodulating.

  15. Implementation of MASW and waveform inversion techniques for new seismic hazard estimation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-aziz abd el-aal, abd; Kamal, heba

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, an integrated multi-channel analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) technique is applied to explore the geotechnical parameters of subsurface layers at the Zafarana Wind Farm site. The study area includes many active fault systems along the Gulf of Suez that cause many moderate and large earthquakes. Overall, the seismic activity of the area has recently become better understood following the use of waveform inversion method and software to develop accurate focal mechanism solutions for recent recorded earthquakes around the studied area. These earthquakes resulted in major stress-drops in the Eastern Desert and the Gulf of Suez area. These findings have helped to reshape the understanding of the seismotectonic environment of the Gulf of Suez area, which is a perplexing tectonic domain. Based on the collected new information and data, this study uses new an extended stochastic technique to re-examine the seismic hazard for the Gulf of Suez region, particularly the wind turbine towers sites at Zafarana Wind Farm and its vicinity. The essential characteristics of the extended stochastic technique are to obtain and simulate ground motion in order to minimize future earthquake consequences. The first step of this technique is defining the seismic sources which mostly affect the study area. Then, the maximum expected magnitude is defined for each of these seismic sources. It is followed by estimating the ground motion using an empirical attenuation relationship. Finally, the site amplification is implemented in calculating the peak ground acceleration (PGA) at each site of interest. Key words: MASW, waveform inversion, extended stochastic technique, Zafarana Wind Farm

  16. Taming waveform inversion non-linearity through phase unwrapping of the model and objective functions

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-09-25

    Traveltime inversion focuses on the geometrical features of the waveform (traveltimes), which is generally smooth, and thus, tends to provide averaged (smoothed) information of the model. On other hand, general waveform inversion uses additional elements of the wavefield including amplitudes to extract higher resolution information, but this comes at the cost of introducing non-linearity to the inversion operator, complicating the convergence process. We use unwrapped phase-based objective functions in waveform inversion as a link between the two general types of inversions in a domain in which such contributions to the inversion process can be easily identified and controlled. The instantaneous traveltime is a measure of the average traveltime of the energy in a trace as a function of frequency. It unwraps the phase of wavefields yielding far less non-linearity in the objective function than that experienced with conventional wavefields, yet it still holds most of the critical wavefield information in its frequency dependency. However, it suffers from non-linearity introduced by the model (or reflectivity), as reflections from independent events in our model interact with each other. Unwrapping the phase of such a model can mitigate this non-linearity as well. Specifically, a simple modification to the inverted domain (or model), can reduce the effect of the model-induced non-linearity and, thus, make the inversion more convergent. Simple numerical examples demonstrate these assertions.

  17. Full waveform inversion of seismic reflection data from the Forsmark planned repository for spent nuclear fuel, eastern central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Juhlin, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has been carrying out extensive studies at the planned repository for spent nuclear fuel at the Forsmark site in the eastern part of central Sweden since 2002. Identification of subhorizontal to gently dipping seismic reflections is especially important since these may represent transport routes for radionuclides. Studies have shown that such reflections can be generated by water filled fracture zones that have a lower velocity than the surrounding bedrock. Lithological changes, that is, mafic sills, may also be responsible for reflections in some cases. At the Forsmark site, it is difficult to distinguish fracture zones from mafic sills in the standard reflection seismic processed sections. However, since mafic sills usually have a positive velocity contrast with the background velocity field compared to fractures zones that have a negative one, the two possibilities could be differentiated if we could reconstruct the underground velocity field. Seismic full waveform inversion has the potential to perform this reconstruction, allowing us to discriminate between fractures zones and mafic sills. In this study, we apply a 2-D waveform inversion code on crooked line data sets acquired at the Forsmark site. This implies we are dealing with a 3-D geometry. We handle this problem by applying 3-D to 2-D coordinate projections. First, we perform a synthetic benchmark test with a similar geometry to that of the projected real data. We test both amplitude and phase inversion and phase only inversion on the synthetic data. The results show that the phase only inversion has fewer artefacts and is more stable. After successful application on the synthetic data, we apply the phase only waveform inversion on the real data. The resulting velocity fields show more details compared with the starting model based on first arrival traveltime tomography. Time domain synthetic data sets generated from the final velocity fields

  18. Frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion using encoded simultaneous sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, W.; Son, W.; Pyun, S.; Min, D.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, numerous studies have endeavored to develop robust full waveform inversion and migration algorithms. These processes require enormous computational costs, because of the number of sources in the survey. To avoid this problem, the phase encoding technique for prestack migration was proposed by Romero (2000) and Krebs et al. (2009) proposed the encoded simultaneous-source inversion technique in the time domain. On the other hand, Ben-Hadj-Ali et al. (2011) demonstrated the robustness of the frequency-domain full waveform inversion with simultaneous sources for noisy data changing the source assembling. Although several studies on simultaneous-source inversion tried to estimate P- wave velocity based on the acoustic wave equation, seismic migration and waveform inversion based on the elastic wave equations are required to obtain more reliable subsurface information. In this study, we propose a 2-D frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion technique using phase encoding methods. In our algorithm, the random phase encoding method is employed to calculate the gradients of the elastic parameters, source signature estimation and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix. The crosstalk for the estimated source signature and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix are suppressed with iteration as for the gradients. Our 2-D frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion algorithm is composed using the back-propagation technique and the conjugate-gradient method. Source signature is estimated using the full Newton method. We compare the simultaneous-source inversion with the conventional waveform inversion for synthetic data sets of the Marmousi-2 model. The inverted results obtained by simultaneous sources are comparable to those obtained by individual sources, and source signature is successfully estimated in simultaneous source technique. Comparing the inverted results using the pseudo Hessian matrix with previous inversion results

  19. Waveform inversion of very long period impulsive signals associated with magmatic injection beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohminato, T.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.; Kedar, S.

    1998-01-01

    We use data from broadband seismometers deployed around the summit of Kilauea Volcano to quantify the mechanism associated with a transient in the flow of magma feeding the east rift eruption of the volcano. The transient is marked by rapid inflation of the Kilauea summit peaking at 22 ??rad 4.5 hours after the event onset, followed by slow deflation over a period of 3 days. Superimposed on the summit inflation is a series of sawtooth displacement pulses, each characterized by a sudden drop in amplitude lasting 5-10 s followed by an exponential recovery lasting 1-3 min. The sawtooth waveforms display almost identical shapes, suggesting a process involving the repeated activation of a fixed source. The particle motion associated with each sawtooth is almost linear, and its major swing shows compressional motion at all stations. Analyses of semblance and particle motion are consistent with a point source located 1 km beneath the northeast edge of the Halemaumau pit crater. To estimate the source mechanism, we apply a moment tensor inversion to the waveform data, assuming a point source embedded in a homogeneous half-space with compressional and shear wave velocities representative of the average medium properties at shallow depth under Kilauea. Synthetic waveforms are constructed by a superposition of impulse responses for six moment tensor components and three single force components. The origin times of individual impulses are distributed along the time axis at appropriately small, equal intervals, and their amplitudes are determined by least squares. In this inversion, the source time functions of the six tensor and three force components are determined simultaneously. We confirm the accuracy of the inversion method through a series of numerical tests. The results from the inversion show that the waveform data are well explained by a pulsating transport mechanism operating on a subhorizontal crack linking the summit reservoir to the east rift of Kilauea. The crack

  20. Optimal time alignment of tide-gauge tsunami waveforms in nonlinear inversions: Application to the 2015 Illapel (Chile) earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, F.; Piatanesi, A.; Lorito, S.; Tolomei, C.; Atzori, S.; Murphy, S.

    2016-11-01

    Tsunami waveform inversion is often used to retrieve information about the causative seismic tsunami source. Tide gauges record tsunamis routinely; however, compared to deep-ocean sensor data, tide-gauge waveform modeling is more difficult due to coarse/inaccurate local bathymetric models resulting in a time mismatch between observed and predicted waveforms. This can affect the retrieved tsunami source model, thus limiting the use of tide-gauge data. A method for nonlinear inversion with an automatic optimal time alignment (OTA), calculated by including a time shift parameter in the cost function, is presented. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated through a series of synthetic tests and is applied as part of a joint inversion with interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for the slip distribution of the 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel earthquake. The results show that without OTA, the resolution on the slip model degrades significantly and that using this method for a real case strongly affects the retrieved slip pattern.

  1. Full Waveform Inversion for Time-Distance Helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan

    2014-01-01

    Inferring interior properties of the Sun from photospheric measurements of the seismic wavefield constitutes the helioseismic inverse problem. Deviations in seismic measurements (such as wave travel times) from their fiducial values estimated for a given model of the solar interior imply that the model is inaccurate. Contemporary inversions in local helioseismology assume that properties of the solar interior are linearly related to measured travel-time deviations. It is widely known, however, that this assumption is invalid for sunspots and active regions, and likely for supergranular flows as well. Here, we introduce nonlinear optimization, executed iteratively, as a means of inverting for the sub-surface structure of large-amplitude perturbations. Defining the penalty functional as the $L_2$ norm of wave travel-time deviations, we compute the the total misfit gradient of this functional with respect to the relevant model parameters %(only sound speed in this case) at each iteration around the corresponding...

  2. Research Note: Full-waveform inversion of the unwrapped phase of a model

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-12-06

    Reflections in seismic data induce serious non-linearity in the objective function of full- waveform inversion. Thus, without a good initial velocity model that can produce reflections within a half cycle of the frequency used in the inversion, convergence to a solution becomes difficult. As a result, we tend to invert for refracted events and damp reflections in data. Reflection induced non-linearity stems from cycle skipping between the imprint of the true model in observed data and the predicted model in synthesized data. Inverting for the phase of the model allows us to address this problem by avoiding the source of non-linearity, the phase wrapping phenomena. Most of the information related to the location (or depths) of interfaces is embedded in the phase component of a model, mainly influenced by the background model, while the velocity-contrast information (responsible for the reflection energy) is mainly embedded in the amplitude component. In combination with unwrapping the phase of data, which mitigates the non-linearity introduced by the source function, I develop a framework to invert for the unwrapped phase of a model, represented by the instantaneous depth, using the unwrapped phase of the data. The resulting gradient function provides a mechanism to non-linearly update the velocity model by applying mainly phase shifts to the model. In using the instantaneous depth as a model parameter, we keep track of the model properties unfazed by the wrapping phenomena. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  3. Applications of multiscale waveform inversion to marine data using a flooding technique and dynamic early-arrival windows

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-11-01

    A recently developed time-domain multiscale waveform tomography (MWT) method is applied to synthetic and field marine data. Although the MWT method was already applied to synthetic data, the synthetic data application leads to a development of a hybrid method between waveform tomography and the salt flooding technique commonly use in subsalt imaging. This hybrid method can overcome a convergence problem encountered by inversion with a traveltime velocity tomogram and successfully provides an accurate and highly resolved velocity tomogram for the 2D SEG/EAGE salt model. In the application of MWT to the field data, the inversion process is carried out using a multiscale method with a dynamic early-arrival muting window to mitigate the local minima problem of waveform tomography and elastic effects. With the modified MWT method, reasonably accurate results as verified by comparison of migration images and common image gathers were obtained. The hybrid method with the salt flooding technique is not used in this field data example because there is no salt in the subsurface according to our interpretation. However, we believe it is applicable to field data applications. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Randomly distributed unit sources to enhance optimization in tsunami waveform inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Mulia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of sea surface deformation generated by earthquakes is crucial to the success of tsunami modeling. Using waveforms recorded at measurement stations and assuming that the rupture velocity is much faster than the tsunami wave celerity, sea surface deformation caused by a tsunamigenic earthquake can be inferred through an inversion operation using the Green's function technique. However, this inversion method for tsunami waveforms possesses a limitation, in that the inverse matrix does not always exist because of the non-uniqueness of the solution. In addition to the large number of unknown parameters, which might produce many local optima on the misfit function measure, the search towards optimality is confined by the uniform distance of unit sources used in the regular Green's function. This study proposes a new method to both optimize the determination of the unknown parameters and introduce a global optimization method for tsunami waveform inversion. The method has been tested using an artificial tsunami source with real bathymetry data. A significant improvement is achieved by stochastically searching for an optimal distribution of unit source locations prior to the inversion.

  5. Full waveform inversion of repeating seismic events to estimate time-lapse velocity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, R.; Lumley, D.

    2017-02-01

    Seismic monitoring provides valuable information regarding the time-varying changes in subsurface physical properties caused by natural or man-made processes. However, the resulting changes in the earth's subsurface properties are often small both in terms of magnitude and spatial extent, leading to minimal time-lapse differences in seismic amplitude or traveltime. In order to better extract information from the time-lapse data, we show that exploiting the full seismic waveform information can be critical. In this study, we develop and test methods of full waveform inversion that estimate an optimal subsurface model of time-varying elastic properties in order to fit the observed time-lapse seismic data with predicted waveforms based on numerical solutions of the wave equation. Time-lapse full waveform inversion is non-linear and non-unique, and depends on the knowledge of the baseline velocity model before a change, and (non-)repeatability of earthquake source and sensor parameters, and of ambient and cultural noise. We propose to use repeating earthquake data sets acquired with permanent arrays of seismic sensors to enhance the repeatability of source and sensor parameters. We further develop and test time-lapse parallel, double-difference and bootstrapping inversion strategies to mitigate the dependence on the baseline velocity model. The parallel approach uses a time-invariant full waveform inversion method to estimate velocity models independently of the different source event times. The double-difference approach directly estimates velocity changes from time-lapse waveform differences, requiring excellent repeatability. The bootstrapping approach inverts for velocity models sequentially in time, implicitly constraining the time-lapse inversions, while relaxing an explicit requirement for high data repeatability. We assume that prior to the time-lapse inversion, we can estimate the true source locations and the origin time of the events, and also we can also

  6. Full waveform inversion of repeating seismic events to estimate time-lapse velocity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, R.; Lumley, D.

    2017-05-01

    Seismic monitoring provides valuable information regarding the time-varying changes in subsurface physical properties caused by natural or man-made processes. However, the resulting changes in the earth's subsurface properties are often small both in terms of magnitude and spatial extent, leading to minimal time-lapse differences in seismic amplitude or traveltime. In order to better extract information from the time-lapse data, we show that exploiting the full seismic waveform information can be critical. In this study, we develop and test methods of full waveform inversion that estimate an optimal subsurface model of time-varying elastic properties in order to fit the observed time-lapse seismic data with predicted waveforms based on numerical solutions of the wave equation. Time-lapse full waveform inversion is nonlinear and non-unique, and depends on the knowledge of the baseline velocity model before a change, and (non-)repeatability of earthquake source and sensor parameters, and of ambient and cultural noise. We propose to use repeating earthquake data sets acquired with permanent arrays of seismic sensors to enhance the repeatability of source and sensor parameters. We further develop and test time-lapse parallel, double-difference and bootstrapping inversion strategies to mitigate the dependence on the baseline velocity model. The parallel approach uses a time-invariant full waveform inversion method to estimate velocity models independently of the different source event times. The double-difference approach directly estimates velocity changes from time-lapse waveform differences, requiring excellent repeatability. The bootstrapping approach inverts for velocity models sequentially in time, implicitly constraining the time-lapse inversions, while relaxing an explicit requirement for high data repeatability. We assume that prior to the time-lapse inversion, we can estimate the true source locations and the origin time of the events, and also we can also

  7. Full-waveform inversion with reflected waves for 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pattnaik, Sonali

    2016-09-06

    Full-waveform inversion in anisotropic media using reflected waves suffers from the strong non-linearity of the objective function and trade-offs between model parameters. Estimating long-wavelength model components by fixing parameter perturbations, referred to as reflection-waveform inversion (RWI), can mitigate nonlinearity-related inversion issues. Here, we extend RWI to acoustic VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media. To minimize trade-offs between the model parameters, we employ a new hierarchical two-stage approach that operates with the P-wave normal-moveout velocity and anisotropy coefficents ζ and η. First, is estimated using a fixed perturbation in ζ, and then we invert for η by fixing the updated perturbation in . The proposed 2D algorithm is tested on a horizontally layered VTI model.

  8. Fast full waveform inversion with source encoding and second-order optimization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Clara; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Brossier, Romain; Virieux, Jean

    2015-02-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) of 3-D data sets has recently been possible thanks to the development of high performance computing. However, FWI remains a computationally intensive task when high frequencies are injected in the inversion or more complex wave physics (viscoelastic) is accounted for. The highest computational cost results from the numerical solution of the wave equation for each seismic source. To reduce the computational burden, one well-known technique is to employ a random linear combination of the sources, rather that using each source independently. This technique, known as source encoding, has shown to successfully reduce the computational cost when applied to real data. Up to now, the inversion is normally carried out using gradient descent algorithms. With the idea of achieving a fast and robust frequency-domain FWI, we assess the performance of the random source encoding method when it is interfaced with second-order optimization methods (quasi-Newton l-BFGS, truncated Newton). Because of the additional seismic modelings required to compute the Newton descent direction, it is not clear beforehand if truncated Newton methods can indeed further reduce the computational cost compared to gradient algorithms. We design precise stopping criteria of iterations to fairly assess the computational cost and the speed-up provided by the source encoding method for each optimization method. We perform experiment on synthetic and real data sets. In both cases, we confirm that combining source encoding with second-order optimization methods reduces the computational cost compared to the case where source encoding is interfaced with gradient descent algorithms. For the synthetic data set, inspired from the geology of Gulf of Mexico, we show that the quasi-Newton l-BFGS algorithm requires the lowest computational cost. For the real data set application on the Valhall data, we show that the truncated Newton methods provide the most robust direction of descent.

  9. Broadband waveform inversion of moderate earthquakes in the Messina Straits, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Sebastiano; Orecchio, Barbara; Presti, Debora; Zhu, Lupei; Herrmann, Robert B.; Neri, Giancarlo

    2010-04-01

    We report the first application of the Cut and Paste (CAP) method to compute earthquake focal mechanisms in the Messina Straits area by waveform inversion of Pnl and surface wave segments. This application of CAP has furnished new knowledge about low-magnitude earthquake mechanics that will be useful for improved understanding of the local geodynamics. This is possible because the CAP inversion technique can be applied to small earthquakes, for which traditional moment tensor inversion methods are not appropriate and P-onset focal mechanisms in the study area fail because of a lack of sufficient observations. We estimate the focal mechanisms of 23 earthquakes with local magnitudes in the range of 3-4 occurring in the 2004-2008 time period, and recorded by the broadband stations of the Italian National Seismic Network and the Mediterranean Very Broadband Seismographic Network (MedNet) run by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). The solutions show that normal faulting is the prevailing style of seismic deformation in the northern part of the study area while co-existence of normal faulting and strike-slip has been detected in the southern part. In the whole area of investigation the T-axes of focal mechanisms display a preferential northwest-southeast direction of extension. Combined with the findings of previous investigations, this improved database of focal mechanisms allows us to better detail the transitional area between the extensional domain related to subduction trench retreat (southern Calabria) and the compressional one associated with continental collision (western-central Sicily). The observed spatial change of seismic deformation regime offers new data to current seismotectonic and seismic hazard investigations in the area of Messina Straits where a magnitude 7.2 earthquake caused more than 60,000 casualties on 28 December 1908.

  10. On Optimal Truncated Biharmonic Current Waveforms for Class-F and Inverse Class-F Power Amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Juhas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two-parameter families of periodic current waveforms for class-F and inverse class-F power amplifiers (PAs are considered. These waveforms are obtained by truncating cosine waveforms composed of dc component and fundamental and either second (k=2 or third (k=3 harmonic. In each period, waveforms are truncated to become zero outside of a prescribed interval (so-called conduction angle. The considered families of waveforms include both discontinuous and continuous waveforms. Fourier series expansion of truncated waveform contains an infinite number of harmonics, although a number of harmonics may be missing. Taking into account common assumptions that for class-F PA the third (n=3 harmonic is missing in current waveform and for inverse class-F PA the second (n=2 harmonic is missing in current waveform, we consider the following four cases: (i n=k=3, (ii n=3, k=2, (iii n=k=2, and (iv n=2, k=3. We show that, in each of these cases, current waveform enabling maximal efficiency (optimal waveform of class-F and inverse class-F PA is continuous for all conduction angles of practical interest. Furthermore, we provide closed-form expressions for parameters of optimal current waveforms and maximal efficiency of class-F (inverse class-F PA in terms of conduction angle only. Two case studies of practical interest for PA design, involving suboptimal current waveforms, along with the results of nonlinear simulation of inverse class-F PA, are also presented.

  11. An application of multiscale early arrival waveform inversion to shallow seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the near surface velocity distribution by applying multiscale early arrival waveform inversion (MEWI) to shallow seismic land data. This data set is collected at Wadi Qudaid in western Saudi Arabia with the purpose of characterizing the shallow subsurface for its water storage and reuse potential. To enhance the accuracy of MEWI, we correct for the attenuation effects with an estimated factor Q, and also extract a natural source wavelet from the data. We then applied MEWI to invert the processed data for tomograms on different scales starting from a traveltime tomogram as our initial velocity model. Results suggest that, compared to traveltime tomography, MEWI can generate a more highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data by inverting its low-frequency components on coarse grids and its high-frequency components on fine grids. The estimated water table in the MEWI tomogram is generally consistent with, but 9% deeper than, the traveltime tomogram, showing that the water storage in this wadi might be less than expected from the traveltime tomogram. We believe that the more accurate MEWI tomogram will make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi and wadis throughout the world. © 2014 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  12. Waveform inversion for localized seismic structure and its application to D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, K.; Geller, R. J.; Fuji, N.; Konishi, K.

    2008-12-01

    In order to fully extract information on localized seismic structure from observed seismic data, we have developed a methodology for seismic waveform inversion. The calculation of synthetic seismograms and their partial derivatives are the key steps in such an inversion. We have developed accurate and efficient methods for calculating broadband synthetic seismograms for spherically symmetric transversely isotropic media for both shallow and deep events, which allows us to compute synthetics up to 2 Hz or higher frequencies (Kawai et al. 2006, GJI). Then, wWe formulate the inverse problem of waveform inversion for localized structure using the efficient algorithm of Geller and Hara (1993), computing partial derivatives for the 3-D anisotropic elastic parameters, including anelasticity, at particular points in space. Our method allows us to conduct both local and multi-scale global waveform inversion using pixel (or local shell) parameterization. We previouslyhave conducted waveform inversion for the vertical profile of the shear velocity in the lowermost mantle beneath Central America and the Arctic, beneath which the shear velocity is faster than the global average (Kawai et al., 2007ab, GRL). The obtained models suggest that the S-velocity increase in D'' may be localized in the zone from 100-200 km above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), while the S-velocity does not significantly deviate from PREM in the zone from 0-100 km above the CMB. In this studywork, we studied D'' beneath the Pacific, where the S-velocity is supposed thought to be slower than the global average on the basis of by many tomographic studies. models (e.g. Takeuchi 2007). We use the transverse component of broadband waveforms (for the period range, 8- 200 s). observed waveforms. We found 1-1.5% velocity decreases and increases in the zones from 400-500 km and from 300-400 km above the CMB, respectively. In addition, we found 0.5-1% velocity increases and decreases in the zones from 100-200 km

  13. Seismic waveform inversion best practices: regional, global and exploration test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrak, Ryan; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    Reaching the global minimum of a waveform misfit function requires careful choices about the nonlinear optimization, preconditioning and regularization methods underlying an inversion. Because waveform inversion problems are susceptible to erratic convergence associated with strong nonlinearity, one or two test cases are not enough to reliably inform such decisions. We identify best practices, instead, using four seismic near-surface problems, one regional problem and two global problems. To make meaningful quantitative comparisons between methods, we carry out hundreds of inversions, varying one aspect of the implementation at a time. Comparing nonlinear optimization algorithms, we find that limited-memory BFGS provides computational savings over nonlinear conjugate gradient methods in a wide range of test cases. Comparing preconditioners, we show that a new diagonal scaling derived from the adjoint of the forward operator provides better performance than two conventional preconditioning schemes. Comparing regularization strategies, we find that projection, convolution, Tikhonov regularization and total variation regularization are effective in different contexts. Besides questions of one strategy or another, reliability and efficiency in waveform inversion depend on close numerical attention and care. Implementation details involving the line search and restart conditions have a strong effect on computational cost, regardless of the chosen nonlinear optimization algorithm.

  14. Inversion of ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) waveforms for oceanic crust structure: a synthetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyan; Wang, Yanbin; Chen, Yongshun John

    2016-08-01

    The waveform inversion method is applied—using synthetic ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) data—to study oceanic crust structure. A niching genetic algorithm (NGA) is used to implement the inversion for the thickness and P-wave velocity of each layer, and to update the model by minimizing the objective function, which consists of the misfit and cross-correlation of observed and synthetic waveforms. The influence of specific NGA method parameters is discussed, and suitable values are presented. The NGA method works well for various observation systems, such as those with irregular and sparse distribution of receivers as well as single receiver systems. A strategy is proposed to accelerate the convergence rate by a factor of five with no increase in computational complexity; this is achieved using a first inversion with several generations to impose a restriction on the preset range of each parameter and then conducting a second inversion with the new range. Despite the successes of this method, its usage is limited. A shallow water layer is not favored because the direct wave in water will suppress the useful reflection signals from the crust. A more precise calculation of the air-gun source signal should be considered in order to better simulate waveforms generated in realistic situations; further studies are required to investigate this issue.

  15. Fast and cheap approximation of Green function uncertainty for waveform-based earthquake source inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallo, M.; Gallovič, F.

    2016-11-01

    Green functions (GFs) are an essential ingredient in waveform-based earthquake source inversions. Hence, the error due to imprecise knowledge of a crustal velocity model is one of the major sources of uncertainty of the inferred earthquake source parameters. Recent strategies in Bayesian waveform inversions rely on statistical description of the GF uncertainty by means of a Gaussian distribution characterized by a covariance matrix. Here we use Monte-Carlo approach to estimate the GF covariance considering randomly perturbed velocity models. We analyse the dependence of the covariance on various parameters (strength of velocity model perturbations, GF frequency content, source-station distance, etc.). Recognizing that the major source of the GF uncertainty is related to the random time shifts of the signal, we propose a simplified approach to obtain approximate covariances, bypassing the numerically expensive Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting closed-form formulae for the approximate auto-covariances and cross-covariances between stations and components can be easily implemented in existing inversion techniques. We demonstrate that the approximate covariances exhibit very good agreement with the Monte-Carlo estimates, providing realistic variations of the GF waveforms. Furthermore, we show examples of implementation of the covariance matrix in a Bayesian moment tensor inversion using both synthetic and real data sets. We demonstrate that taking the GF uncertainty into account leads to improved estimates of the moment tensor parameters and their uncertainty.

  16. Adjoint Tomography of Taiwan Region: From Travel-Time Toward Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. H.; Lee, S. J.; Tromp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The complicated tectonic environment such as Taiwan region can modulate the seismic waveform severely and hamper the discrimination and the utilization of later phases. Restricted to the use of only first arrivals of P- and S-wave, the travel-time tomographic models of Taiwan can simulate the seismic waveform barely to a frequency of 0.2 Hz to date. While it has been sufficient for long-period studies, e.g. source inversion, this frequency band is still far from the applications to the community and high-resolution studies. To achieve a higher-frequency simulation, more data and the considerations of off-path and finite-frequency effects are necessary. Based on the spectral-element and the adjoint method recently developed, we prepared 94 MW 3.5-6.0 earthquakes with well-defined location and focal mechanism solutions from Real-Time Moment Tensor Monitoring System (RMT), and preformed an iterative gradient-based inversion employing waveform modeling and finite-frequency measurements of adjoint method. By which the 3-D sensitivity kernels are taken into account realistically and the full waveform information are naturally sought, without a need of any phase pick. A preliminary model m003 using 10-50 sec data was demonstrated and compared with previous travel-time models. The primary difference appears in the mountainous area, where the previous travel-time model may underestimate the S-wave speed in the upper crust, but overestimates in the lower crust.

  17. Micro-seismic Imaging Using a Source Independent Waveform Inversion Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-04-18

    Overthrust model. On the other hand, a new imaging condition of natural Green’s function has been implemented to mitigate the effect of the unknown velocity model. It is based on putting receivers in a horizontal well close to the micro-seismic events so that only a small part of the velocity model is required for the imaging. In order to focus the multi scattering energy to the source location, as well as to suppress the influence of the noise in the data, we introduced a new method to compensate the energy in the receiver wavefield. It is based on reflection waveform inversion (RWI) theory. We simply migrate for the scatters (reflectors) in the medium, and set the image as a secondary source to compensate for the multi scattering energy in the receiver wavefield. By applying the same imaging condition, the energy of those scattering events can be traced to the source location. Thus the source point has higher energy in the source image. A simple two-layer medium test demonstrates the features.

  18. A method for improving the computational efficiency of a Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion based on depth estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Yuan, Jianzheng; Ke, Rui; Yang, Yan; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The Laplace-Fourier domain full waveform inversion can simultaneously restore both the long and intermediate short-wavelength information of velocity models because of its unique characteristics of complex frequencies. This approach solves the problem of conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion in which the inversion result is excessively dependent on the initial model due to the lack of low frequency information in seismic data. Nevertheless, the Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion requires substantial computational resources and long computation time because the inversion must be implemented on different combinations of multiple damping constants and multiple frequencies, namely, the complex frequencies, which are much more numerous than the Fourier frequencies. However, if the entire target model is computed on every complex frequency for the Laplace-Fourier domain inversion (as in the conventional frequency domain inversion), excessively redundant computation will occur. In the Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion, the maximum depth penetrated by the seismic wave decreases greatly due to the application of exponential damping to the seismic record, especially with use of a larger damping constant. Thus, the depth of the area effectively inverted on a complex frequency tends to be much less than the model depth. In this paper, we propose a method for quantitative estimation of the effective inversion depth in the Laplace-Fourier domain inversion based on the principle of seismic wave propagation and mathematical analysis. According to the estimated effective inversion depth, we can invert and update only the model area above the effective depth for every complex frequency without loss of accuracy in the final inversion result. Thus, redundant computation is eliminated, and the efficiency of the Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion can be improved. The proposed method was tested in numerical experiments. The experimental results show that

  19. The natural combination of full and image-based waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-06-01

    Integrating migration velocity analysis and full waveform inversion can help reduce the high non-linearity of the classic full waveform inversion objective function. The combination of inverting for the long and short wavelength components of the velocity model using a dual objective function that is sensitive to both components is still very expensive and have produced mixed results. We develop an approach that includes both components integrated to complement each other. We specifically utilize the image to generate reflections in our synthetic data only when the velocity model is not capable of producing such reflections. As a result, we get the migration velocity analysis working when we need it, and we mitigate its influence when the velocity model produces accurate reflections (possibly first for the low frequencies). This is achieved using a novel objective function that includes both objectives. Applications to a layered model and the Marmousi model demonstrate the main features of the approach. © 2015 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  20. Inverting reflections using full-waveform inversion with inaccurate starting models

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2015-08-19

    We present a method for inverting seismic reflections using full-waveform inversion (FWI) with inaccurate starting models. For a layered medium, near-offset reflections (with zero angle of incidence) are unlikely to be cycle-skipped regardless of the low-wavenumber velocity error in the initial models. Therefore, we use them as a starting point for FWI, and the subsurface velocity model is then updated during the FWI iterations using reflection wavepaths from varying offsets that are not cycle-skipped. To enhance low-wavenumber updates and accelerate the convergence, we take several passes through the non-linear Gauss-Seidel iterations, where we invert traces from a narrow range of near offsets and finally end at the far offsets. Every pass is followed by applying smoothing to the cumulative slowness update. The smoothing is strong at the early stages and relaxed at later iterations to allow for a gradual reconstruction of the subsurface model in a multiscale manner. Applications to synthetic and field data, starting from inaccurate models, show significant low-wavenumber updates and flattening of common-image gathers after many iterations.

  1. Full–waveform inversion using the excitation representation of the source wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Kalita, Mahesh

    2016-09-06

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative method of data-fitting, aiming at high resolution recovery of the unknown model parameters. However, it is a cumbersome process, requiring a long computational time and large memory space/disc storage. One of the reasons for this computational limitation is the gradient calculation step. Based on the adjoint state method, it involves the temporal cross-correlation of the forward propagated source wavefield with the backward propagated residuals, in which we usually need to store the source wavefield, or include an extra extrapolation step to propagate the source wavefield from its storage at the boundary. We propose, alternatively, an amplitude excitation gradient calculation based on the excitation imaging condition concept that represents the source wavefield history by a single, specifically the most energetic arrival. An excitation based Born modeling allows us to derive the adjoint operation. In this case, the source wavelet is injected by a cross-correlation step applied to the data residual directly. Representing the source wavefield through the excitation amplitude and time, we reduce the large requirements for both storage and the computational time. We demonstrate the application of this approach on a 2-layer model with an anomaly and the Marmousi II model.

  2. Efficient full waveform inversion using the excitation representation of the source wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Kalita, Mahesh

    2017-05-16

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative method of data-fitting, aiming at high-resolution recovery of the unknown model parameters. However, its conventional implementation is a cumbersome process, requiring a long computational time and large memory space/disk storage. One of the reasons for this computational limitation is the gradient calculation step. Based on the adjoint state method, it involves the temporal cross-correlation of the forward propagated sourcewavefield with the backward propagated residuals, inwhichwe usually need to store the source wavefield, or include an extra extrapolation step to propagate the source wavefield from its storage at the boundary. We propose, alternatively, an amplitude excitation gradient calculation based on the excitation imaging condition concept that represents the source wavefield history by a single, specifically the most energetic arrival. An excitation based Born modelling allows us to derive the adjoint operation. In this case, the source wavelet is injected by a cross-correlation step applied to the data residual directly. Representing the source wavefield through the excitation amplitude and time, we reduce the large requirements for both storage and the computational time. We demonstrate the application of this approach on a two-layer model with an anomaly, the Marmousi II model and a marine data set acquired by CGG.

  3. Wavefront picking for 3D tomography and full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-09-08

    We have developed an efficient approach for picking firstbreak wavefronts on coarsely sampled time slices of 3D shot gathers. Our objective was to compute a smooth initial velocity model for multiscale full-waveform inversion (FWI). Using interactive software, first-break wavefronts were geometrically modeled on time slices with a minimal number of picks. We picked sparse time slices, performed traveltime tomography, and then compared the predicted traveltimes with the data in-between the picked slices. The picking interval was refined with iterations until the errors in traveltime predictions fell within the limits necessary to avoid cycle skipping in early arrivals FWI. This approach was applied to a 3D ocean-bottom-station data set. Our results indicate that wavefront picking has 28% fewer data slices to pick compared with picking traveltimes in shot gathers. In addition, by using sparse time samples for picking, data storage is reduced by 88%, and therefore allows for a faster visualization and quality control of the picks. Our final traveltime tomogram is sufficient as a starting model for early arrival FWI. © 2016 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Measuring the misfit between seismograms using an optimal transport distance: application to full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-04-01

    Full waveform inversion using the conventional L2 distance to measure the misfit between seismograms is known to suffer from cycle skipping. An alternative strategy is proposed in this study, based on a measure of the misfit computed with an optimal transport distance. This measure allows to account for the lateral coherency of events within the seismograms, instead of considering each seismic trace independently, as is done generally in full waveform inversion. The computation of this optimal transport distance relies on a particular mathematical formulation allowing for the non-conservation of the total energy between seismograms. The numerical solution of the optimal transport problem is performed using proximal splitting techniques. Three synthetic case studies are investigated using this strategy: the Marmousi 2 model, the BP 2004 salt model, and the Chevron 2014 benchmark data. The results emphasize interesting properties of the optimal transport distance. The associated misfit function is less prone to cycle skipping. A workflow is designed to reconstruct accurately the salt structures in the BP 2004 model, starting from an initial model containing no information about these structures. A high-resolution P-wave velocity estimation is built from the Chevron 2014 benchmark data, following a frequency continuation strategy. This estimation explains accurately the data. Using the same workflow, full waveform inversion based on the L2 distance converges towards a local minimum. These results yield encouraging perspectives regarding the use of the optimal transport distance for full waveform inversion: the sensitivity to the accuracy of the initial model is reduced, the reconstruction of complex salt structure is made possible, the method is robust to noise, and the interpretation of seismic data dominated by reflections is enhanced.

  5. Regularized Laplace-Fourier-Domain Full Waveform Inversion Using a Weighted l 2 Objective Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Hyunggu; Kwon, Jungmin; Shin, Changsoo; Zhou, Hongbo; Cogan, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) can be applied to obtain an accurate velocity model that contains important geophysical and geological information. FWI suffers from the local minimum problem when the starting model is not sufficiently close to the true model. Therefore, an accurate macroscale velocity model is essential for successful FWI, and Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is appropriate for obtaining such a velocity model. However, conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI remains an ill-posed and ill-conditioned problem, meaning that small errors in the data can result in large differences in the inverted model. This approach also suffers from certain limitations related to the logarithmic objective function. To overcome the limitations of conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI, we introduce a weighted l 2 objective function, instead of the logarithmic objective function, as the data-domain objective function, and we also introduce two different model-domain regularizations: first-order Tikhonov regularization and prior model regularization. The weighting matrix for the data-domain objective function is constructed to suitably enhance the far-offset information. Tikhonov regularization smoothes the gradient, and prior model regularization allows reliable prior information to be taken into account. Two hyperparameters are obtained through trial and error and used to control the trade-off and achieve an appropriate balance between the data-domain and model-domain gradients. The application of the proposed regularizations facilitates finding a unique solution via FWI, and the weighted l 2 objective function ensures a more reasonable residual, thereby improving the stability of the gradient calculation. Numerical tests performed using the Marmousi synthetic dataset show that the use of the weighted l 2 objective function and the model-domain regularizations significantly improves the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI. Because the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is improved, the

  6. Regularized Laplace-Fourier-Domain Full Waveform Inversion Using a Weighted l 2 Objective Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Hyunggu; Kwon, Jungmin; Shin, Changsoo; Zhou, Hongbo; Cogan, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) can be applied to obtain an accurate velocity model that contains important geophysical and geological information. FWI suffers from the local minimum problem when the starting model is not sufficiently close to the true model. Therefore, an accurate macroscale velocity model is essential for successful FWI, and Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is appropriate for obtaining such a velocity model. However, conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI remains an ill-posed and ill-conditioned problem, meaning that small errors in the data can result in large differences in the inverted model. This approach also suffers from certain limitations related to the logarithmic objective function. To overcome the limitations of conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI, we introduce a weighted l 2 objective function, instead of the logarithmic objective function, as the data-domain objective function, and we also introduce two different model-domain regularizations: first-order Tikhonov regularization and prior model regularization. The weighting matrix for the data-domain objective function is constructed to suitably enhance the far-offset information. Tikhonov regularization smoothes the gradient, and prior model regularization allows reliable prior information to be taken into account. Two hyperparameters are obtained through trial and error and used to control the trade-off and achieve an appropriate balance between the data-domain and model-domain gradients. The application of the proposed regularizations facilitates finding a unique solution via FWI, and the weighted l 2 objective function ensures a more reasonable residual, thereby improving the stability of the gradient calculation. Numerical tests performed using the Marmousi synthetic dataset show that the use of the weighted l 2 objective function and the model-domain regularizations significantly improves the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI. Because the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is improved, the

  7. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R. L.; Snieder, R. K.

    1996-07-01

    correcting for the crustal thickness the phase velocity perturbations obtained from the subsequent linear waveform inversion for the different period bands are converted to a three-layer model of S velocity perturbations (layer 1, 25-100 km; layer 2, 100-200 km; layer 3, 200-300 km). We have applied this method on 275 high-quality Rayleigh waves recorded by a variety of instruments in North America (IRIS/USGS, IRIS/IDA, TERRAscope, RSTN). Sensitivity tests indicate that the lateral resolution is especially good in the densely sampled western continental United States, Mexico, and the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    correcting for the crustal thickness the phase velocity perturbations obtained from the subsequent linear waveform inversion for the different period bands are converted to a three-layer model of S velocity perturbations (layer 1, 25-100 km; layer 2, 100-200 km) layer 3, 200-300 km). We have applied this method on 275 high-quality Rayleigh waves recorded by a variety of instruments in North America (IRIS/USGS, IRIS/IDA, TERRAscope, RSTN). Sensitivity tests indicate that the lateral resolution is especially good in the densely sampled western continental United States, Mexico, and the Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Pre-stack full waveform inversion of ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Giuseppe; Vardy, Mark E.; Henstock, Timothy J.

    2017-06-01

    The full waveform inversion (FWI) of seismic reflection data aims to reconstruct a detailed physical properties model of the subsurface, fitting both the amplitude and the traveltime of the reflections generated at physical discontinuities in the propagation medium. Unlike reservoir-scale seismic exploration, where seismic inversion is a widely adopted remote characterization tool, ultrahigh-frequency (UHF, 0.2-4.0 kHz) multichannel marine reflection seismology is still most often limited to a qualitative interpretation of the reflections' architecture. Here we propose an elastic FWI methodology, custom-tailored for pre-stack UHF marine data in vertically heterogeneous media to obtain a decimetric-scale distribution of P-impedance, density and Poisson's ratio within the shallow subseabed sediments. We address the deterministic multiparameter inversion in a sequential fashion. The complex trace instantaneous phase is first inverted for the P-wave velocity to make up for the lack of low frequency in the data and reduce the nonlinearity of the problem. This is followed by a short-offset P-impedance optimization and a further step of full offset range Poisson's ratio inversion. Provided that the seismogram contains wide reflection angles (>40°), we show that it is possible to invert for density and decompose a posteriori the relative contribution of P-wave velocity and density to the P-impedance. A broad range of synthetic tests is used to prove the potential of the methodology and highlights sensitivity issues specific to UHF seismic. An example application to real data is also presented. In the real case, trace normalization is applied to minimize the systematic error deriving from an inaccurate source wavelet estimation. The inverted model for the top 15 m of the subseabed agrees with the local lithological information and core-log data. Thus, we can obtain a detailed remote characterization of the shallow sediments using a multichannel sub-bottom profiler within a

  10. Joint Traveltime and Waveform Envelope Inversion for Near-surface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyang; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    In the linearized seismic full waveform inversion (FWI), it is well known that a good initial model is needed to avoid cycle-skipping issue, especially when the low-frequency components of data are lacking. To solve the problem, we develop a joint first-arrival traveltime and early arrival envelope inversion method (JTE) to build a good near-surface velocity model with low-wavenumber components. The JTE method combines the robustness of nonlinear traveltime inversion and the low-frequency information embedded in the waveform envelope. In two synthetic experiments, we confirm that traveltime inversion constrains the top near-surface velocity structures tightly, while the envelope inversion recovers the low-wavenumber structures with low-velocity objects or layers. Using the results of JTE as starting models, we find that FWI can produce accurate solutions for complex numerical models. In a real-data example, JTE followed by FWI resolves a near-surface velocity model to improve statics corrections for the subsurface stacking image.

  11. Heeding the waveform inversion nonlinearity by unwrapping the model and data

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traveltime inversion, waveform inversion provides relatively higher-resolution inverted models. This feature, however, comes at the cost of introducing complex nonlinearity to the inversion operator complicating the convergence process. We use unwrapped-phase-based objective functions to reduce such nonlinearity in a domain in which the high-frequency component is given by the traveltime inversion. Such information is packaged in a frequency-dependent attribute (or traveltime) that can be easily manipulated at different frequencies. It unwraps the phase of the wavefield yielding far less nonlinearity in the objective function than those experienced with the conventional misfit objective function, and yet it still holds most of the critical waveform information in its frequency dependency. However, it suffers from nonlinearity introduced by the model (or reflectivity), as events interact with each other (something like cross talk). This stems from the sinusoidal nature of the band-limited reflectivity model. Unwrapping the phase for such a model can mitigate this nonlinearity as well. Specifically, a simple modification to the inverted domain (or model), can reduce the effect of the model-induced nonlinearity and, thus, make the inversion more convergent. Simple examples are used to highlight such features.

  12. Complex Crustal Structure Beneath Western Turkey Revealed by 3D Seismic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubuk-Sabuncu, Yesim; Taymaz, Tuncay; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present a 3D radially anisotropic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle structure beneath the Sea of Marmara and surroundings based on the full waveform inversion method. The intense seismic activity and crustal deformation are observed in the Northwest Turkey due to transition tectonics between the strike-slip North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the extensional Aegean region. We have selected and simulated complete waveforms of 62 earthquakes (Mw > 4.0) occurred during 2007-2015, and recorded at (Δ DAD). The spectral-element solver of the wave equation, SES3D algorithm, is used to simulate seismic wave propagation in 3D spherical coordinates (Fichtner, 2009). The Large Scale Seismic Inversion Framework (LASIF) workflow tool is also used to perform full seismic waveform inversion (Krischer et al., 2015). The initial 3D Earth model is implemented from the multi-scale seismic tomography study of Fichtner et al. (2013). Discrepancies between the observed and simulated synthetic waveforms are determined using the time-frequency misfits which allows a separation between phase and amplitude information (Fichtner et al., 2008). The conjugate gradient optimization method is used to iteratively update the initial Earth model when minimizing the misfit. The inversion is terminated after 19 iterations since no further advances are observed in updated models. Our analysis revealed shear wave velocity variations of the shallow and deeper crustal structure beneath western Turkey down to depths of ~35-40 km. Low shear wave velocity anomalies are observed in the upper and mid crustal depths beneath major fault zones located in the study region. Low velocity zones also tend to mark the outline of young volcanic areas. Our final 3D Earth model is tested using forward wave simulations of earthquakes (M ≥ 3.7) that were not used during the inversion process. The comparison of observed and synthetic seismograms, calculated by initial and final models, showed significant

  13. Monte Carlo full-waveform inversion of crosshole GPR data using multiple-point geostatistical a priori information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordua, Knud Skou; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We present a general Monte Carlo full-waveform inversion strategy that integrates a priori information described by geostatistical algorithms with Bayesian inverse problem theory. The extended Metropolis algorithm can be used to sample the a posteriori probability density of highly nonlinear...... into account during the inversion. The suggested inversion strategy is tested on synthetic tomographic crosshole ground-penetrating radar full-waveform data using multiple-point-based a priori information. This is, to our knowledge, the first example of obtaining a posteriori realizations of a full......-waveform inverse problem. Benefits of the proposed methodology compared with deterministic inversion approaches include: (1) The a posteriori model variability reflects the states of information provided by the data uncertainties and a priori information, which provides a means of obtaining resolution analysis. (2...

  14. Multi-parameter Full-waveform Inversion for Acoustic VTI Medium with Surface Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X.; Jiao, K.; Sun, D.; Huang, W.; Vigh, D.

    2013-12-01

    Full-waveform Inversion (FWI) attracts wide attention recently in oil and gas industry as a new promising tool for high resolution subsurface velocity model building. While the traditional common image point gather based tomography method aims to focus post-migrated data in depth domain, FWI aims to directly fit the observed seismic waveform in either time or frequency domain. The inversion is performed iteratively by updating the velocity fields to reduce the difference between the observed and the simulated data. It has been shown the inversion is very sensitive to the starting velocity fields, and data with long offsets and low frequencies is crucial for the success of FWI to overcome this sensitivity. Considering the importance of data with long offsets and low frequencies, in most geologic environment, anisotropy is an unavoidable topic for FWI especially at long offsets, since anisotropy tends to have more pronounced effects on waves traveled for a great distance. In VTI medium, this means more horizontal velocity will be registered in middle-to-long offset data, while more vertical velocity will be registered in near-to-middle offset data. Up to date, most of real world applications of FWI still remain in isotropic medium, and only a few studies have been shown to account for anisotropy. And most of those studies only account for anisotropy in waveform simulation, but not invert for those anisotropy fields. Multi-parameter inversion for anisotropy fields, even in VTI medium, remains as a hot topic in the field. In this study, we develop a strategy for multi-parameter FWI for acoustic VTI medium with surface seismic data. Because surface seismic data is insensitivity to the delta fields, we decide to hold the delta fields unchanged during our inversion, and invert only for vertical velocity and epsilon fields. Through parameterization analysis and synthetic tests, we find that it is more feasible to invert for the parameterization as vertical and horizontal

  15. Practical waveform inversion in anisotropic media: The natural combination of the data and image objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-09-06

    Addressing anisotropy in full wavenumber inversion (FWI) is crucial to obtaining credible models, and it is extremely challenging considering the multi parameter nature of the inversion. A successful FWI in anisotropic media takes into account the sensitivity of the data (or the wave) to the long and short wavelength components of the anisotropic parameters. Considering the low sensitivity of FWI to the anellipticity parameter ? when parametrizing the acoustic transversely isotropic model with the horizontal velocity, η and ε, we develop a combined FWI and reflection waveform inversion (RWI) to invert for the anisotropic parameters that influence surface seismic data. This practical waveform inversion (PWI) separates the parameters to their resolvable scales, with information accessed from the data fitting (FWI) and the image focusing (RWI) objectives. With this parametrization, the RWI role is to obtain a smooth ηmodel, as well as velocity, while FWI focusses on the scattering potential of the horizontal velocity. The parameter η is used to produce the Born scattered wavefield for the RWI part and eventually fit the amplitude for the imperfect physics in the FWI part.

  16. Pseudo waveform inversion and model driven AVO(Amplitude Versus with Offset) analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Soo; Park, Keun Pil [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jung Hee; Hyun, Byung Koo; Shin, Sung Ryul [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The seismic reflection exploration technique which is one of the geophysical methods for oil exploration became effectively to image the subsurface structure with rapid development of computer. However, the imagining of subsurface based on the conventional data processing is almost impossible to obtain the information on physical properties of the subsurface such as velocity and density. Since seismic data are implicitly function of velocities of subsurface, it is necessary to develop the inversion method that can delineate the velocity structure using seismic topography and waveform inversion. As a tool to perform seismic inversion, seismic forward modeling program using ray tracing should be developed. This report consists of two articles. (1) Pseudo waveform inversion: In this study, we have developed the algorithm that calculate the travel time of the complex geologic structure using shooting ray tracing by subdividing the geologic model into blocky structure having the constant velocity. With the travel time calculation, the partial derivatives of travel time can be calculated efficiently without difficulties. (2) Hessian matrices and multiples: In this article we review the three possible approaches (gradient, Gauss-Newton and full Newton methods). By specifying from the outset implicit, frequency domain, modeling using finite difference or finite element methods, we are able to introduce a new discrete, matrix formalism that considerably simplifies the analysis. (author). 57 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Ultrasonic computed tomography based on full-waveform inversion for bone quantitative imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Simon; Monteiller, Vadim; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Lasaygues, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    We introduce an ultrasonic quantitative imaging method for long bones based on full-waveform inversion. The cost function is defined as the difference in the L 2-norm sense between observed data and synthetic results at a given iteration of the iterative inversion process. For simplicity, and in order to reduce the computational cost, we use a two-dimensional acoustic approximation. The inverse problem is solved iteratively based on a quasi-Newton technique called the Limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method. We show how the technique can be made to work fine for benchmark models consisting of a single cylinder, and then five cylinders, the latter case including significant multiple diffraction effects. We then show pictures obtained for a tibia-fibula bone pair model. Convergence is fast, typically in 15 to 30 iterations in practice in each frequency band used. We discuss the so-called ‘cycle skipping’ effect that can occur in such full waveform inversion techniques and make them remain trapped in a local minimum of the cost function. We illustrate strategies that can be used in practice to avoid this. Future work should include viscoelastic materials rather than acoustic, and real data instead of synthetic data.

  18. 3D elastic full waveform inversion: case study from a land seismic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormann, Jean; Marti, David; Rodriguez, Juan-Esteban; Marzan, Ignacio; Ferrer, Miguel; Gutierrez, Natalia; Farres, Albert; Hanzich, Mauricio; de la Puente, Josep; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is one of the most advanced processing methods that is recently reaching a mature state after years of solving theoretical and technical issues such as the non-uniqueness of the solution and harnessing the huge computational power required by realistic scenarios. BSIT (Barcelona Subsurface Imaging Tools, www.bsc.es/bsit) includes a FWI algorithm that can tackle with very complex problems involving large datasets. We present here the application of this system to a 3D dataset acquired to constrain the shallow subsurface. This is where the wavefield is the most complicated, because most of the wavefield conversions takes place in the shallow region and also because the media is much more laterally heterogeneous. With this in mind, at least isotropic elastic approximation would be suitable as kernel engine for FWI. The current study explores the possibilities to apply elastic isotropic FWI using only the vertical component of the recorded seismograms. The survey covers an area of 500×500 m2, and consists in a receivers grid of 10 m×20 m combined with a 250 kg accelerated weight-drop as source on a displaced grid of 20 m×20 m. One of the main challenges in this case study is the costly 3D modeling that includes topography and substantial free surface effects. FWI is applied to a data subset (shooting lines 4 to 12), and is performed for 3 frequencies ranging from 15 to 25 Hz. The starting models are obtained from travel-time tomography and the all computation is run on 75 nodes of Mare Nostrum supercomputer during 3 days. The resulting models provide a higher resolution of the subsurface structures, and show a good correlation with the available borehole measurements. FWI allows to extend in a reliable way this 1D knowledge (borehole) to 3D.

  19. Truncated Gauss-Newton Implementation for Multi-Parameter Full Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Yang, J.; Dong, L.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a numerical optimization method which aims at minimizing the difference between the synthetic and recorded seismic data to obtain high resolution subsurface images. A practical implementation for FWI is the adjoint-state method (AD), in which the data residuals at receiver locations are simultaneously back-propagated to form the gradient. Scattering-integral method (SI) is an alternative way which is based on the explicit building of the sensitivity kernel (Fréchet derivative matrix). Although it is more memory-consuming, SI is more efficient than AD when the number of the sources is larger than the number of the receivers. To improve the convergence of FWI, the information carried out by the inverse Hessian operator is crucial. Taking account accurately of the effect of this operator in FWI can correct illumination deficits, reserve the amplitude of the subsurface parameters, and remove artifacts generated by multiple reflections. In multi-parameter FWI, the off-diagonal blocks of the Hessian operator reflect the coupling between different parameter classes. Therefore, incorporating its inverse could help to mitigate the trade-off effects. In this study, we focus on the truncated Gauss-Newton implementation for multi-parameter FWI. The model update is computed through a matrix-free conjugate gradient solution of the Newton linear system. Both the gradient and the Hessian-vector product are calculated using the SI approach instead of the first- and second-order AD. However, the gradient expressed by kernel-vector product is calculated through the accumulation of the decomposed vector-scalar products. Thus, it's not necessary to store the huge sensitivity matrix beforehand. We call this method the matrix decomposition approach (MD). And the Hessian-vector product is replaced by two kernel-vector products which are then calculated by the above MD. By this way, we don't need to solve two additional wave propagation problems as in the

  20. Applications of elastic full waveform inversion to shallow seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, Thomas; Forbriger, Thomas; Groos, Lisa; Schäfer, Martin; Metz, Tilman

    2015-04-01

    Shallow-seismic Rayleigh waves are attractive for geotechnical site investigations. They exhibit a high signal to noise ratio in field data recordings and have a high sensitivity to the S-wave velocity, an important lithological and geotechnical parameter to characterize the very shallow subsurface. Established inversion methods assume (local) 1-D subsurface models, and allow the reconstruction of the S-wave velocity as a function of depth by inverting the dispersion properties of the Rayleigh waves. These classical methods, however, fail if significant lateral variations of medium properties are present. Then the full waveform inversion (FWI) of the elastic wave field seems to be the only solution. Moreover, FWI may have the potential to recover multi-parameter models of seismic wave velocities, attenuation and eventually mass density. Our 2-D elastic FWI is a conjugate-gradient method where the gradient of the misfit function is calculated by the time-domain adjoint method. The viscoelastic forward modelling is performed with a classical staggered-grid 2-D finite-difference forward solver. Viscoelastic damping is implemented in the time-domain by a generalized standard linear solid. We use a multi-scale inversion approach by applying frequency filtering in the inversion. We start with the lowest frequency oft the field data and increase the upper corner frequency sequentially. Our modelling and FWI software is freely available under the terms of GNU GPL on www.opentoast.de. In recent years we studied the applicability of two-dimensional elastic FWI using numerous synthetic reconstruction tests and several field data examples. Important pre-processing steps for the application of 2-D elastic FWI to shallow-seismic field data are the 3D to 2D correction of geometrical spreading and the estimation of a priori Q-values that must be used as a passive medium parameter during the FWI. Furthermore, a source-wavelet correction filter should be applied during the FWI

  1. A New Wave Equation Based Source Location Method with Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2017-05-26

    Locating the source of a passively recorded seismic event is still a challenging problem, especially when the velocity is unknown. Many imaging approaches to focus the image do not address the velocity issue and result in images plagued with illumination artifacts. We develop a waveform inversion approach with an additional penalty term in the objective function to reward the focusing of the source image. This penalty term is relaxed early to allow for data fitting, and avoid cycle skipping, using an extended source. At the later stages the focusing of the image dominates the inversion allowing for high resolution source and velocity inversion. We also compute the source location explicitly and numerical tests show that we obtain good estimates of the source locations with this approach.

  2. High-resolution Fracture Characterization Using Elastic Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-05-26

    Current methodologies to characterize fractures at the reservoir scale have serious limitations in spatial resolution. Here, we propose to estimate both the spatial distribution and physical properties of fractures using full waveform inversion (FWI) of multicomponent surface seismic data. An effective orthorhombic medium with five clusters of vertical fractures distributed in a checkboard fashion is used to test the algorithm. To better understand the inversion results, we analyze the FWI radiation patterns of the fracture weaknesses. A shape regularization term is added to the objective function to improve the inversion for the horizontal weakness, which is otherwise poorly constrained. Alternatively, a simplified model of penny-shaped cracks is used to reduce the nonuniqueness in the inverted weaknesses and achieve a faster convergence.

  3. Elastic full-waveform inversion of transmission data in 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Kamath, Nishant

    2014-08-05

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) has been implemented mostly for isotropic media, with extensions to anisotropic models typically limited to acoustic approximations. Here, we develop elastic FWI for transmitted waves in 2D heterogeneous VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media. The model is parameterized in terms of the P- and S-wave vertical velocities and the P-wave normal-moveout and horizontal velocities. To test the FWI algorithm, we introduce Gaussian anomalies in the Thomsen parameters of a homogeneous VTI medium and perform FWI of transmission data for different configurations of the source and receiver arrays. The inversion results strongly depend on the acquisition geometry and the aperture because of the parameter trade-offs. In contrast to acoustic FWI, the elastic inversion helps constrain the S-wave vertical velocity, which for our model is decoupled from the other parameters.

  4. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Double-Difference Waveform Inversion with a Modified Total-Variation Regularization Scheme: Application to Time-Lapse Walkaway VSP Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Huang, L.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying reservoir changes is crucial for safe and long-term geologic carbon storage. We develop a new double-difference waveform inversion method with a modified total-variation regularization scheme to jointly invert time-lapse seismic data for geophysical properties changes in reservoirs/target monitoring regions. Our new method avoids the non-differentiability of the total-variation regularization scheme, and improves the robustness of waveform inversion. We use time-lapse seismic data for joint inversion to reduce inversion artifacts outside target monitoring regions. Two walkaway vertical seismic profiling (VSP) datasets were acquired at the SACROC enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) field in Texas in 2008 and 2009 for monitoring CO2 injection and migration. We apply our new double-difference waveform inversion method to the SACROC time-lapse VSP datasets. Our joint inversion result reveals a region with seismic-wave velocities lower than the other regions in the reservoir. This velocity decrease is caused by CO2 injection and migration.

  6. Evidence of Fluid/Gas Along the Backthrust Offshore Central Sumatra from Seismic Full Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. C.; Huot, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is one of the most seismically active zones on the earth and has experienced great earthquakes in the last decade, including one of the largest earthquakes of the 21st century on December 26, 2004 (M 9.3) producing a devastating tsunami. Geodetic and seismological studies suggest that a part of the subduction is still fully locked and may produce a great earthquake up to Mw=9 in the coming future. In order to understand the earthquake and subduction zone processes, we applied elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) on 50km deep seismic reflection data from Benkulu forearc basin. Data were acquired in partnership with CGG in 2009 using a 15 km ultra-long offset streamer, with shots every 50m and receivers every 12.5m. Unlike usual exploration data, the streamer was dived at 22.5m and the source was triggered at 15m. These characteristics provided wide aperture and low frequencies to the data which are required for FWI. To match our modelling with the observed data before applying FWI, we first estimated the source wavelet from simulated far-offset signature. Then, the same pass-band filter was applied to both the source and the observed data from 1 to 15 Hz frequency bandwidth. Additionally, an f-k filter was applied to the real data to remove the remaining swell noise up to 4 Hz, without losing any useful signal. Our starting 2D Vp model was found by applying traveltime tomography to a smooth 1D model. Our Vs model was linked by empirical relationship to our Vp model. By inverting first for far-offset refraction to recover the background velocity model and using a multi-scale strategy by going from 1Hz to 15Hz, we image the forearc basin down to 10km depth. We highlight the presence of a 10km wide low velocity structure at 3km depth. The sharp velocity change from 4km/s to 2km/s indicates the presence of gaz or fluid which could come from the mantle through the backthrust fault. The complexity of the sea floor makes the reflection

  7. ASKI: A modular toolbox for scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion and sensitivity analysis utilizing external forward codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Florian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    Due to increasing computational resources, the development of new numerically demanding methods and software for imaging Earth's interior remains of high interest in Earth sciences. Here, we give a description from a user's and programmer's perspective of the highly modular, flexible and extendable software package ASKI-Analysis of Sensitivity and Kernel Inversion-recently developed for iterative scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion. In ASKI, the three fundamental steps of solving the seismic forward problem, computing waveform sensitivity kernels and deriving a model update are solved by independent software programs that interact via file output/input only. Furthermore, the spatial discretizations of the model space used for solving the seismic forward problem and for deriving model updates, respectively, are kept completely independent. For this reason, ASKI does not contain a specific forward solver but instead provides a general interface to established community wave propagation codes. Moreover, the third fundamental step of deriving a model update can be repeated at relatively low costs applying different kinds of model regularization or re-selecting/weighting the inverted dataset without need to re-solve the forward problem or re-compute the kernels. Additionally, ASKI offers the user sensitivity and resolution analysis tools based on the full sensitivity matrix and allows to compose customized workflows in a consistent computational environment. ASKI is written in modern Fortran and Python, it is well documented and freely available under terms of the GNU General Public License (http://www.rub.de/aski).

  8. Global thermochemical inversion of seismic waveforms, gravity satellite data, and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, J.; Lebedev, S.; Martinec, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Conventional methods of seismic tomography, topography, gravity and electromagnetic data analysis and geodynamic modelling constrain distributions of seismic velocity, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity at depth, all depending on temperature and composition of Earth's rocks. However, modelling and interpretation of multiple data provide a multifaceted image of the true thermochemical structure of the Earth that needs to be consistently integrated. A simple combination of gravity, electromagnetic, geodynamics, petrological and seismic models alone is insufficient due to the non-uniqueness and different sensitivities of these models, and the internal consistency relationships that must connect all the intermediate parameters describing the Earth. In fact, global Earth models based on different observables often lead to rather different images of the Earth. A breakthrough in global and consistent imaging of the fine-scale thermochemical hydrous and rheological structure of the Earth's lithosphere and underlying mantle is needed. Thermodynamic and petrological links between seismic velocities, density, electrical conductivity, viscosity, melt, water, temperature, pressure and composition within the Earth can now be modelled accurately using new methods of computational petrology and data from laboratory experiments. The growth of very large terrestrial and satellite geophysical data over the last few years, together with the advancement of petrological and geophysical modelling techniques, now present an opportunity for global, thermochemical and deformation 3D imaging of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle with unprecedented resolution. Here we present a method for self-consistent joint inversion of multiple data sets, including seismic, satellite gravity and surface topography data, applied to obtain a detailed and robust global thermochemical image of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle. This project combines state-of-the-art seismic

  9. An optimal transport approach for seismic tomography: application to 3D full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-11-01

    The use of optimal transport distance has recently yielded significant progress in image processing for pattern recognition, shape identification, and histograms matching. In this study, the use of this distance is investigated for a seismic tomography problem exploiting the complete waveform; the full waveform inversion. In its conventional formulation, this high resolution seismic imaging method is based on the minimization of the L 2 distance between predicted and observed data. Application of this method is generally hampered by the local minima of the associated L 2 misfit function, which correspond to velocity models matching the data up to one or several phase shifts. Conversely, the optimal transport distance appears as a more suitable tool to compare the misfit between oscillatory signals, for its ability to detect shifted patterns. However, its application to the full waveform inversion is not straightforward, as the mass conservation between the compared data cannot be guaranteed, a crucial assumption for optimal transport. In this study, the use of a distance based on the Kantorovich-Rubinstein norm is introduced to overcome this difficulty. Its mathematical link with the optimal transport distance is made clear. An efficient numerical strategy for its computation, based on a proximal splitting technique, is introduced. We demonstrate that each iteration of the corresponding algorithm requires solving the Poisson equation, for which fast solvers can be used, relying either on the fast Fourier transform or on multigrid techniques. The development of this numerical method make possible applications to industrial scale data, involving tenths of millions of discrete unknowns. The results we obtain on such large scale synthetic data illustrate the potentialities of the optimal transport for seismic imaging. Starting from crude initial velocity models, optimal transport based inversion yields significantly better velocity reconstructions than those based on

  10. Earthquake source mechanisms from body-waveform inversion and intraplate tectonics in the northern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, E. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Double-couple point-source parameters for 11 of the largest intraplate earthquakes in the northern Indian Ocean during the last 20 years were determined from a formal inversion of the long-period P and SH waveforms. Two major intraplate tectonic provinces are distinguished in the northern Indian Ocean. The plate-wide stress pattern found and the high level of intraplate seismicity are probably the results of substantial resistance, along the Himalayan continental collision zone, to the continued northward motion of the western portion of the Indian plate.

  11. A flexible, extendable, modular and computationally efficient approach to scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.; Lamara, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new conceptual approach to scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) that allows a flexible, extendable, modular and both computationally and storage-efficient numerical implementation. To achieve maximum modularity and extendability, interactions between the three fundamental steps carried out sequentially in each iteration of the inversion procedure, namely, solving the forward problem, computing waveform sensitivity kernels and deriving a model update, are kept at an absolute minimum and are implemented by dedicated interfaces. To realize storage efficiency and maximum flexibility, the spatial discretization of the inverted earth model is allowed to be completely independent of the spatial discretization employed by the forward solver. For computational efficiency reasons, the inversion is done in the frequency domain. The benefits of our approach are as follows: (1) Each of the three stages of an iteration is realized by a stand-alone software program. In this way, we avoid the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have often been written for solving inverse problems. (2) The solution of the forward problem, required for kernel computation, can be obtained by any wave propagation modelling code giving users maximum flexibility in choosing the forward modelling method. Both time-domain and frequency-domain approaches can be used. (3) Forward solvers typically demand spatial discretizations that are significantly denser than actually desired for the inverted model. Exploiting this fact by pre-integrating the kernels allows a dramatic reduction of disk space and makes kernel storage feasible. No assumptions are made on the spatial discretization scheme employed by the forward solver. (4) In addition, working in the frequency domain effectively reduces the amount of data, the number of kernels to be computed and the number of equations to be solved. (5) Updating the model by solving a large equation system can be

  12. Full-waveform inversion of GPR data acquired between boreholes in Rustrel carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinard Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Full waveform inversion (FWI of seismic or Ground Penetrating Radar data provides high-resolution quantitative images of the constitutive parameters of the rock/soil which control seismic/GPR wave propagation. We developed a 2D inversion tool in the frequency domain adapted to the multi-parameter physics controlling GPR propagation in isotropic non dispersive media, i.e. dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity. This inversion engine was previously tested using synthetic 2D data to mitigate the trade-off between the two parameter classes. In this paper, we present the required processing techniques and first inversion results obtained on a real GPR dataset acquired in carbonates with a cross-hole configuration. The presence of the 2 m diameter underground gallery at depth constitutes a nice target to test the robustness, efficiency and resolution of the inversion in such high-contrasts context. Starting from a time tomographic image for the dielectric permittivity and from a homogeneous conductivity, we show that FWI is efficient to retrieve high resolution images of dielectric permittivity but struggles with electrical conductivity. As a quality control, we compare real and synthetic radargrams computed from the tomography and final images, showing the efficiency of the process to reconstruct some events but also underlying some issues, particularly on large incidence angles amplitude traces.

  13. 3D Multisource Full‐Waveform Inversion using Dynamic Random Phase Encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-10-17

    We have developed a multisource full‐waveform inversion algorithm using a dynamic phase encoding strategy with dual‐randomization—both the position and polarity of simultaneous sources are randomized and changed every iteration. The dynamic dual‐randomization is used to promote the destructive interference of crosstalk noise resulting from blending a large number of common shot gathers into a supergather. We compare our multisource algorithm with various algorithms in a numerical experiment using the 3D SEG/EAGE overthrust model and show that our algorithm provides a higher‐quality velocity tomogram than the other methods that use only monorandomization. This suggests that increasing the degree of randomness in phase encoding should improve the quality of the inversion result.

  14. Inversion for slip distribution using teleseismic P waveforms: North Palm Springs, Borah Peak, and Michoacan earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    We have inverted the teleseismic P waveforms recorded by stations of the Global Digital Seismograph Network for the 8 July 1986 North Palm Springs, California, the 28 October 1983 Borah Peak, Idaho, and the 19 September 1985 Michoacan, Mexico, earthquakes to recover the distribution of slip on each of the faults using a point-by-point inversion method with smoothing and positivity constraints. Results of the inversion indicate that the Global digital Seismograph Network data are useful for deriving fault dislocation models for moderate to large events. However, a wide range of frequencies is necessary to infer the distribution of slip on the earthquake fault. Although the long-period waveforms define the size (dimensions and seismic moment) of the earthquake, data at shorter period provide additional constraints on the variation of slip on the fault. Dislocation models obtained for all three earthquakes are consistent with a heterogeneous rupture process where failure is controlled largely by the size and location of high-strength asperity regions. -from Authors

  15. Microseismic imaging using a source-independent full-waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-09-06

    Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate microseismic and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, waveform inversion of microseismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We develop a source independent FWI of microseismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for source wavelet in z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also the angle gather is calculated to see if the velocity model is correct. By inverting for all the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for part of the SEG overthrust model.

  16. A Modified Normalization Technique for Frequency-Domain Full Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Jeong, G.; Min, D. J.; KIM, S.; Heo, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique to estimate subsurface material properties minimizing the misfit function built with residuals between field and modeled data. To achieve computational efficiency, FWI has been performed in the frequency domain by carrying out modeling in the frequency domain, whereas observed data (time-series data) are Fourier-transformed.One of the main drawbacks of seismic FWI is that it easily gets stuck in local minima because of lacking of low-frequency data. To compensate for this limitation, damped wavefields are used, as in the Laplace-domain waveform inversion. Using damped wavefield in FWI plays a role in generating low-frequency components and help recover long-wavelength structures. With these newly generated low-frequency components, we propose a modified frequency-normalization technique, which has an effect of boosting contribution of low-frequency components to model parameter update.In this study, we introduce the modified frequency-normalization technique which effectively amplifies low-frequency components of damped wavefields. Our method is demonstrated for synthetic data for the SEG/EAGE salt model. AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning(KETEP) and the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy(MOTIE) of the Republic of Korea (No. 20168510030830) and by the Dual Use Technology Program, granted financial resource from the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy, Republic of Korea.

  17. Least-squares Migration and Full Waveform Inversion with Multisource Frequency Selection

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2013-09-01

    Multisource Least-Squares Migration (LSM) of phase-encoded supergathers has shown great promise in reducing the computational cost of conventional migration. But for the marine acquisition geometry this approach faces the challenge of erroneous misfit due to the mismatch between the limited number of live traces/shot recorded in the field and the pervasive number of traces generated by the finite-difference modeling method. To tackle this mismatch problem, I present a frequency selection strategy with LSM of supergathers. The key idea is, at each LSM iteration, to assign a unique frequency band to each shot gather, so that the spectral overlap among those shots—and therefore their crosstallk—is zero. Consequently, each receiver can unambiguously identify and then discount the superfluous sources—those that are not associated with the receiver in marine acquisition. To compare with standard migration, I apply the proposed method to 2D SEG/EAGE salt model and obtain better resolved images computed at about 1/8 the cost; results for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model, with Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) survey, show a speedup of 40×. This strategy is next extended to multisource Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) of supergathers for marine streamer data, with the same advantages of computational efficiency and storage savings. In the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, to mitigate spectral leakage due to delayed onsets of sine waves detected at receivers, I double the simulation time and retain only the second half of the simulated records. To compare with standard FWI, I apply the proposed method to 2D velocity model of SEG/EAGE salt and to Gulf Of Mexico (GOM) field data, and obtain a speedup of about 4× and 8×. Formulas are then derived for the resolution limits of various constituent wavepaths pertaining to FWI: diving waves, primary reflections, diffractions, and multiple reflections. They suggest that inverting multiples can provide some low and intermediate

  18. Changes in repeating earthquake slip behavior following the 2004 Parkfield main shock from waveform empirical Green's functions finite-source inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ahyi; Dreger, Douglas S.; Taira, Taka'aki; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2016-03-01

    Finite-source inversions are performed using small earthquake waveforms as empirical Green's functions (eGf) to investigate the rupture process of repeating earthquakes along the San Andreas Fault in Parkfield, California. The eGf waveform inversion method is applied to a repeating Mw 2.1 Parkfield earthquake sequence using three-component velocity waveforms recorded by an array of borehole seismometers. The obtained models show a circular slip distribution with a ~20 m radius, a 3.0-4.2 cm average slip of the main asperity, and peak displacement of 10.6-13.5 cm. The static stress drop distribution shows that the main asperity has a peak stress drop of 69.5-94.7 MPa. The inversion results support an earlier finding by Dreger et al. (2007) that high-strength asperities exist in the rupture areas of the Mw 2.1 events at Parkfield. In addition, notable temporal peak slip and stress drop reduction was observed after the 2004 Parkfield event while the average value remains constant (~12 MPa) over time. These events may represent mechanically strong sections of the fault, surrounded by regions that are undergoing continuous deformation (creep), Given repeated loading of the strong asperities, it would be expected that these similar repeating earthquakes should also have very similar slip distributions since surrounding regions are deforming aseismically. There are small differences in the waveforms of these repeating earthquakes, and this could be because of rupture nucleation points not being in exactly the same location within the region of the fault that is capable of stick-slip behavior. Our result indicates that waveform slip inversion is needed to reveal spatial and temporal variations of the stress drop within the rupture area to improve understanding of fault healing and rupture mechanics.

  19. A review on the systematic formulation of 3D multiparameter full waveform inversion in viscoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengliang; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Virieux, Jean

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study 3D multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) in viscoelastic media based on the generalized Maxwell/Zener body (GMB/GZB) including arbitrary number of attenuation mechanisms. We present a frequency-domain energy analysis to establish the stability condition of a full anisotropic viscoelastic system, according to zero-valued boundary condition and the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle: the real-valued stiffness matrix becomes a complex-valued one in Fourier domain when seismic attenuation is taken into account. We develop a least-squares optimization approach to linearly relate the quality factor with the anelastic coefficients by estimating a set of constants which are independent of the spatial coordinates, which supplies an explicit incorporation of the parameter Q in the general viscoelastic wave equation. By introducing the Lagrangian multipliers into the matrix expression of the wave equation with implicit time integration, we build a systematic formulation of multiparameter full waveform inversion for full anisotropic viscoelastic wave equation, while the equivalent form of the state and adjoint equation with explicit time integration is available to be resolved efficiently. In particular, this formulation lays the foundation for the inversion of the parameter Q in the time domain with full anisotropic viscoelastic properties. In the 3D isotropic viscoelastic settings, the anelastic coefficients and the quality factors using bulk and shear moduli parameterization can be related to the counterparts using P- and S- velocity. Gradients with respect to any other parameter of interest can be found by chain rule. Pioneering numerical validations as well as the real applications of this most generic framework will be carried out to disclose the potential of viscoelastic FWI when adequate high performance computing resources and the field data are available.

  20. Full seismic waveform inversion of the African crust and Mantle - Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Michael; Ermert, Laura; Staring, Myrna; Trampert, Jeannot; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We report on the progress of a continental-scale full-waveform inversion (FWI) of Africa. From a geodynamic perspective, Africa presents an especially interesting case. This interest stems from the presence of several anomalous features such as a triple junction in the Afar region, a broad region of high topography to the south, and several smaller surface expressions such as the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Congo Basin. The mechanisms behind these anomalies are not fully clear, and debate on their origin spans causative mechanisms from isostatic forcing, to the influence of localized asthenospheric upwelling, to the presence of deep mantle plumes. As well, the connection of these features to the African LLSVP is uncertain. Tomographic images of Africa present unique challenges due to uneven station coverage: while tectonically active areas such as the Afar rift are well sampled, much of the continent exhibits a severe dearth of seismic stations. As well, while mostly surrounded by tectonically active spreading plate boundaries (a fact which contributes to the difficulties in explaining the South's high topography), sizeable seismic events (M > 5) in the continent's interior are relatively rare. To deal with these issues, we present a combined earthquake and ambient noise full-waveform inversion of Africa. The noise component serves to boost near-surface sensitivity, and aids in mitigating issues related to the sparse source / station coverage. The earthquake component, which includes local and teleseismic sources, aims to better resolve deeper structure. This component also has the added benefit of being especially useful in the search for mantle plumes: synthetic tests have shown that the subtle scattering of elastic waves off mantle plumes makes the plumes an ideal target for FWI [1]. We hope that this new model presents a fresh high-resolution image of sub-African geodynamic structure, and helps advance the debate regarding the causative mechanisms of its surface

  1. The optimized gradient method for full waveform inversion and its spectral implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2016-03-28

    At the heart of the full waveform inversion (FWI) implementation is wavefield extrapolation, and specifically its accuracy and cost. To obtain accurate, dispersion free wavefields, the extrapolation for modelling is often expensive. Combining an efficient extrapolation with a novel gradient preconditioning can render an FWI implementation that efficiently converges to an accurate model. We, specifically, recast the extrapolation part of the inversion in terms of its spectral components for both data and gradient calculation. This admits dispersion free wavefields even at large extrapolation time steps, which improves the efficiency of the inversion. An alternative spectral representation of the depth axis in terms of sine functions allows us to impose a free surface boundary condition, which reflects our medium boundaries more accurately. Using a newly derived perfectly matched layer formulation for this spectral implementation, we can define a finite model with absorbing boundaries. In order to reduce the nonlinearity in FWI, we propose a multiscale conditioning of the objective function through combining the different directional components of the gradient to optimally update the velocity. Through solving a simple optimization problem, it specifically admits the smoothest approximate update while guaranteeing its ascending direction. An application to the Marmousi model demonstrates the capability of the proposed approach and justifies our assertions with respect to cost and convergence.

  2. Time-domain full waveform inversion using the gradient preconditioning based on transmitted waves energy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiao-bo

    2017-06-01

    The gradient preconditioning approach based on seismic wave energy can effectively avoid the huge storage consumption in the gradient preconditioning algorithms based on Hessian matrices in time-domain full waveform inversion (FWI), but the accuracy is affected by the energy of reflected waves when strong reflectors are present in velocity model. To address this problem, we propose a gradient preconditioning method, which scales the gradient based on the energy of the “approximated transmitted wavefield” simulated by the nonreflecting acoustic wave equation. The method does not require computing or storing the Hessian matrix or its inverse. Furthermore, it can effectively eliminate the effects caused by geometric diffusion and non-uniformity illumination on gradient. The results of model experiments confirm that the time-domain FWI using the gradient preconditioning based on transmitted waves energy can achieve higher inversion precision for high-velocity body and the deep strata below when compared with using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic waves energy.

  3. Multi-stage full waveform inversion strategy for 2D elastic VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-08-19

    One of the most important issues in the multi-parametric full waveform inversion (FWI) is to find an optimal parameterization, which helps us recover the subsurface anisotropic parameters as well as seismic velocities, with minimal tradeoff. As a result, we analyze three different parameterizations for elastic VTI media in terms of the influence of the S-waves on the gradient direction for c13, the spatial coverage of gradient direction and the degree of trade-offs between the parameters. Based on the dependency results, we design a multi-stage elastic VTI FWI strategy to enhance both the spatial coverage of the FWI and the robustness to the trade-offs among the parameters as well as FWI for the c13 structure.

  4. Gradient for the acoustic VTI full waveform inversion based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2015-08-19

    The instantaneous traveltime is able to reduce the non-linearity of full waveform inversion (FWI) that originates from the wrapping of the phase. However, the adjoint state method in this case requires a total of 5 modeling calculations to compute the gradient. Also, considering the larger modeling cost for anisotropic wavefield extrapolation and the necessity to use a line-search algorithm to estimate a step length that depends on the parameters scale, we propose to calculate the gradient based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels. We, specifically, use the sensitivity kernels computed using dynamic ray-tracing to build the gradient. The resulting update is computed using a matrix decomposition and accordingly the computational cost is reduced. We consider a simple example where an anomaly is embedded into a constant background medium and we compute the update for the VTI wave equation parameterized using vh, η and ε.

  5. Resolution Limits of Migration and Linearized Waveform Inversion Images in a Lossy Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Dutta, Gaurav; Li, Jing

    2017-03-01

    The vertical- and horizontal-resolution limits Δxlossy and Δzlossy of poststack migration and linearized waveform inversion images are derived for lossy data in the far-field approximation. Unlike the horizontal resolution limit Δx∝λz/L in a lossless medium which linearly worsens in depth z, Δxlossy∝z2/QL worsens quadratically with depth for a medium with small Q values. Here, Q is the quality factor, λ is the effective wavelength, L is the recording aperture, and loss in the resolution formulas is accounted for by replacing λ with z/Q. In contrast, the lossy vertical-resolution limit Δzlossy only worsens linearly in depth compared to Δz∝λ for a lossless medium. For both the causal and acausal Q models, the resolution limits are linearly proportional to 1/Q for small Q. These theoretical predictions are validated with migration images computed from lossy data.

  6. An introduction to this special section: Full-waveform inversion and the way forward

    KAUST Repository

    Guitton, Antoine

    2013-09-01

    Lost in the endless valleys and hills of the full-waveform inversion (FWI) misfit functional, we tend to stop and wonder: Are we heading in the right direction? Are we in the right valley? Or within a bigger context, is FWI the way to go? The practice of updating an Earth model and generating synthetic data from it that we can compare to the field data is an appealing concept. If the two data sets (the modeled and field) match, using some measure of misfit, we might have found a good Earth model. This process depends on our ability to fully replicate (simulate) the physics of wave propagation inside the Earth. In principle, our field data carry information from every point in the Earth, but these data are also constrained by the geometry of seismic acquisition.

  7. Study on orthorhombic parameters for 3D elastic full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-08-21

    For a better understanding of the influence of the parameterizations on the multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) for 3D elastic orthorhombic media, we analyze the virtual sources for each cij parameter. Because the virtual sources for cij parameters can be regarded as bases of the virtual sources for other parameterizations, the insights developed here explains many of the scattering phenomena of the different parameters. The resulting radiation patterns provide insights on which parameter set is the best in the multi-parameter FWI for 3D elastic orthorhombic media. In this study, we analyze the virtual source for each cij parameter as a linear combination of several moment tensors. After that, we analyze the strain fields deformed by incident waves as momenta of the virtual source and their influences on sensitivity kernels of each cij parameter.

  8. Source mechanism of small long-period events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005 using template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Shearer, Peter M.; Haney, Matthew M.; Waite, Gregory P.; Moran, Seth C.; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2015-09-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity, observed at volcanoes worldwide, is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption. Cyclic LP "drumbeating" was the characteristic seismicity accompanying the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), WA. However, together with the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP "subevents"), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. The signal-to-noise ratios of the individual events are too low to produce reliable waveform inversion results, but the events are repetitive and can be stacked. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005 using a master event to detect 822 network triggers. We stack waveforms for 359 high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism points to the volumetric oscillation (˜10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (˜30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice, perhaps supplied from snow melt.

  9. Source mechanism of small long-period events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005 using template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Shearer, Peter M.; Haney, Matthew M.; Waite, Gregory P.; Moran, Seth C.; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity, observed at volcanoes worldwide, is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption. Cyclic LP “drumbeating” was the characteristic seismicity accompanying the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), WA. However, together with the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP “subevents”), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. The signal-to-noise ratios of the individual events are too low to produce reliable waveform-inversion results, but the events are repetitive and can be stacked. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005 using a master event to detect 822 network triggers. We stack waveforms for 359 high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism pointsto the volumetric oscillation (~10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (~30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice, perhaps supplied from snow melt.

  10. Monte Carlo full-waveform inversion of crosshole GPR data using multiple-point geostatistical a priori information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordua, Knud Skou; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We present a general Monte Carlo full-waveform inversion strategy that integrates a priori information described by geostatistical algorithms with Bayesian inverse problem theory. The extended Metropolis algorithm can be used to sample the a posteriori probability density of highly nonlinear......) Based on a posteriori realizations, complicated statistical questions can be answered, such as the probability of connectivity across a layer. (3) Complex a priori information can be included through geostatistical algorithms. These benefits, however, require more computing resources than traditional...

  11. Evaluation of Multi-Scale Full Waveform Inversion with Marine Vertical Cable Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aifei Bian; Zhihui Zou; Hua-Wei Zhou; Jin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Seismic illumination plays an important role in subsurface imaging. A better image can be expected either through optimizing acquisition geometry or introducing more advanced seismic mi-gration and/or tomographic inversion methods involving illumination compensation. Vertical cable survey is a potential replacement of traditional marine seismic survey for its flexibility and data quality. Conventional vertical cable data processing requires separation of primaries and multiples before mi-gration. We proposed to use multi-scale full waveform inversion (FWI) to improve illumination cover-age of vertical cable survey. A deep water velocity model is built to test the capability of multi-scale FWI in detecting low velocity anomalies below seabed. Synthetic results show that multi-scale FWI is an effective model building tool in deep-water exploration. Geometry optimization through target ori-ented illumination analysis and multi-scale FWI may help to mitigate the risks of vertical cable survey. The combination of multi-scale FWI, low-frequency data and multi-vertical-cable acquisition system may provide both high resolution and high fidelity subsurface models.

  12. Sensitivity analysis for elastic full-waveform inversion in VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Kamath, Nishant

    2014-08-05

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) is generally nonunique, and the results are strongly influenced by the geometry of the experiment and the type of recorded data. Studying the sensitivity of different subsets of data to the model parameters may help in choosing an optimal acquisition design, inversion workflow, and parameterization. Here, we derive the Fréchet kernel for FWI of multicomponent data from a 2D VTI (tranversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) medium. The kernel is obtained by linearizing the elastic wave equation using the Born approximation and employing the asymptotic Green\\'s function. The amplitude of the kernel (‘radiation pattern’) yields the angle-dependent energy scattered by a perturbation in a certain model parameter. The perturbations are described in terms of the P- and S-wave vertical velocities and the P-wave normal-moveout and horizontal velocities. The background medium is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic, which allows us to obtain simple expressions for the radiation patterns corresonding to all four velocities. These patterns help explain the FWI results for multicomponent transmission data generated for Gaussian anomalies in the Thomsen parameters inserted into a homogeneous VTI medium.

  13. Multiscale viscoacoustic waveform inversion with the second generation wavelet transform and adaptive time-space domain finite-difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhiming; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Qunshan

    2014-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) has the potential to provide preferable subsurface model parameters. The main barrier of its applications to real seismic data is heavy computational amount. Numerical modelling methods are involved in both forward modelling and backpropagation of wavefield residuals, which spend most of computational time in FWI. We develop a time-space domain finite-difference (FD) method and adaptive variable-length spatial operator scheme in numerical simulation of viscoacoustic equation and extend them into the viscoacoustic FWI. Compared with conventional FD methods, different operator lengths are adopted for different velocities and quality factors, which can reduce the amount of computation without reducing accuracy. Inversion algorithms also play a significant role in FWI. In conventional single-scale methods, it is likely to converge to local minimums especially when the initial model is far from the real model. To tackle the problem, we introduce the second generation wavelet transform to implement the multiscale FWI. Compared to other multiscale methods, our method has advantages of ease of implementation and better time-frequency local analysis ability. The L2 norm is widely used in FWI and gives invalid model estimates when the data is contaminated with strong non-uniform noises. We apply the L1-norm and the Huber-norm criteria in the time-domain FWI to improve its antinoise ability. Our strategies have been successfully applied in synthetic experiments to both onshore and offshore reflection seismic data. The results of the viscoacoustic Marmousi example indicate that our new FWI scheme consumes smaller computer resources. In addition, the viscoacoustic Overthrust example shows its better convergence and more reasonable velocity and quality factor structures. All these results demonstrate that our method can improve inversion accuracy and computational efficiency of FWI.

  14. Efficient 2D and 3D multiparameters frequency-domain full waveform inversion (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virieux, J.; Operto, S.; Ribodetti, A.; Ben Hadj Ali, H.; Brossier, R.; Etienne, V.; Gholami, Y.; Hu, G.; Jia, Y.; Pageot, D.; Prieux, V.

    2010-12-01

    With the tremendous increase of the computational power provided by large-scale distributed-memory platforms and the development of dense 3D multi-component wide-aperture/wide-azimuth surveys, full waveform inversion (FWI) introduced in geophysics by Albert Tarantola has become a re-emerging technique to build high-resolution velocity models of the subsurface. Because of the cost of the forward modeling and the high dimensionality of the model space, full waveform inversion is actually a local optimization problem, the aim of which is the minimization of the misfit between the recorded and modeled seismic wavefields. Among all possible minimization criteria, the L1 norm provides the most robust and easy-to-tune criterion. With such criterion, white noise in all seismograms with outliers does not prevent the convergence to the nearly same minimum as for noise-free data. The frequency formulation of the FWI allows coarse sampling of the frequencies data over few frequencies for the reconstruction of the medium when wide-aperture geometries are considered. A preconditioned quasi-Newton L-BFGS modified algorithm provides scaled gradients of the misfit function for each class of parameters. The gradient is computed by the adjoint-state method where the forward field is stored in the core memory of the computer while computing the backpropagation of residuals for cross-correlation at each point of the medium, thanks to the frequency-domain approach. We are using a sequential multiscale hierarchical inversion algorithm with two nested levels of data preconditioning with respect to frequency and first-arrival time. We are able to reconstruct both Vp and Vs velocity structures in various offshore and onshore environments various configurations of crustal investigation where both body waves (and surface) waves are progressively included in the inversion scheme. Solving the forward problem for 2D geometry could be efficiently performed in frequency by using a direct solver

  15. Robust joint full-waveform inversion of time-lapse seismic data sets with total-variation regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Maharramov, Musa

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique for reconstructing subsurface velocity model changes from time-lapse seismic survey data using full-waveform inversion (FWI). The technique is based on simultaneously inverting multiple survey vintages, with model difference regularization using the total variation (TV) seminorm. We compare the new TV-regularized time-lapse FWI with the $L_2$-regularized joint inversion proposed in our earlier work, using synthetic data sets that exhibit survey repeatability issues. The results demonstrate clear advantages of the proposed TV-regularized joint inversion over alternatives methods for recovering production-induced model changes that are due to both fluid substitution and geomechanical effects.

  16. Iterative Multiparameter Elastic Waveform Inversion Using Prestack Time Imaging and Kirchhoff approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaniani, Hassan

    This thesis proposes a "standard strategy" for iterative inversion of elastic properties from the seismic reflection data. The term "standard" refers to the current hands-on commercial techniques that are used for the seismic imaging and inverse problem. The method is established to reduce the computation time associated with elastic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) methods. It makes use of AVO analysis, prestack time migration and corresponding forward modeling in an iterative scheme. The main objective is to describe the iterative inversion procedure used in seismic reflection data using simplified mathematical expression and their numerical applications. The frame work of the inversion is similar to (FWI) method but with less computational costs. The reduction of computational costs depends on the data conditioning (with or without multiple data), the level of the complexity of geological model and acquisition condition such as Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Many processing methods consider multiple events as noise and remove it from the data. This is the motivation for reducing the computational cost associated with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) forward modeling and Reverse Time Migration (RTM)-based techniques. Therefore, a one-way solution of the wave equation for inversion is implemented. While less computationally intensive depth imaging methods are available by iterative coupling of ray theory and the Born approximation, it is shown that we can further reduce the cost of inversion by dropping the cost of ray tracing for traveltime estimation in a way similar to standard Prestack Time Migration (PSTM) and the corresponding forward modeling. This requires the model to have smooth lateral variations in elastic properties, so that the traveltime of the scatterpoints can be approximated by a Double Square Root (DSR) equation. To represent a more realistic and stable solution of the inverse problem, while considering the phase of supercritical angles, the

  17. ASKI: A modular toolbox for scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion and sensitivity analysis utilizing external forward codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Schumacher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing computational resources, the development of new numerically demanding methods and software for imaging Earth’s interior remains of high interest in Earth sciences. Here, we give a description from a user’s and programmer’s perspective of the highly modular, flexible and extendable software package ASKI–Analysis of Sensitivity and Kernel Inversion–recently developed for iterative scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion. In ASKI, the three fundamental steps of solving the seismic forward problem, computing waveform sensitivity kernels and deriving a model update are solved by independent software programs that interact via file output/input only. Furthermore, the spatial discretizations of the model space used for solving the seismic forward problem and for deriving model updates, respectively, are kept completely independent. For this reason, ASKI does not contain a specific forward solver but instead provides a general interface to established community wave propagation codes. Moreover, the third fundamental step of deriving a model update can be repeated at relatively low costs applying different kinds of model regularization or re-selecting/weighting the inverted dataset without need to re-solve the forward problem or re-compute the kernels. Additionally, ASKI offers the user sensitivity and resolution analysis tools based on the full sensitivity matrix and allows to compose customized workflows in a consistent computational environment. ASKI is written in modern Fortran and Python, it is well documented and freely available under terms of the GNU General Public License (http://www.rub.de/aski.

  18. Seismic waveform inversion and imaging of deepwater glacial sedimentary fans in the northern Norwegian-Greenland Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libak, Audun; Poor Moghaddam, Peyman; Minakov, Alexander; Ruud, Bent Ole; Keers, Henk; Mjelde, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    In this poster we show results from 2D acoustic pre-stack depth migration and full waveform inversion using multichannel seismic data, complemented by coincident travel-time tomography of wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer data. The study area is located within the deep ocean basin in the northeastern parts of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. This area was affected by intense Quaternary glacial sedimentation in the Storfjorden and Bjørnøya Fans and formation of submarine mega-slides. The seismic source used for the data acquisition consisted of an array of six airguns, and the wavefield was recorded by a 3-km-long 240-channel streamer. After some initial processing, pre-stack depth migration and waveform inversion was performed in order to obtain an image the glacial sedimentary package. The background velocity model was obtained from travel time tomography on the coincident ocean bottom seismometer data. We first show inversion results for a test model which is based on the our knowledge of the geology of the area. We then show the inversion results on the real data. One of the main differences between the test inversion and the real data inversion is the inknown source wavelet in the latter case. We show how the source wavelet affects the inversion results and how to properly take the source wavelet into account.

  19. A recipe for practical full-waveform inversion in orthorhombic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-09-06

    Multi parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) usually suffers from the inherent tradeoffin the multi parameter nature of the model space. In orthorhombic anisotropy, such tradeoffis magnified by the large number of parameters involved in representing the elastic or even the acoustic approximation of such a medium. However, using a new parameterization with distinctive scattering features, we can condition FWI to invert for the parameters the data are sensitive to at different stages, scales, and locations in the model. Specifically, with a combination made up of a velocity and particular dimensionless ratios of the elastic coefficients, the scattering potential of the anisotropic parameters have stationary scattering radiation patterns as a function of the type of anisotropy. With our new parametrization, the data is mainly sensitive to the scattering potential of 4 parameters: the horizontal velocity in the x direction, x, which provides scattering mainly near zero offset in the x vertical plane, εd, which is the ratio of the horizontal velocity squared in the x and x direction, and δ3 describing the anellipticity in the horizontal plane. Since, with this parametrization, the radiation pattern for the horizontal velocity and ε is azimuth independent, we can perform an initial VTI inversion for these two parameters, and then use the other two parameters to fit the azimuth variation in the data. This can be done at the reservoir level or any region of the model. Including the transmission from reflections, the migration velocity analysis (MVA) component, into the picture, the multi azimuth surface seismic data are mainly sensitive to the long wavelength components of uh, δ3, and εd through the diving waves, and η1, ηd, and δ3, in the transmission to or from reflectors (especially, in the presence of large offsets). They are also sensitive to the short wavelength component of uh and ε.

  20. Recovering physical property information from subduction plate boundaries using 3D full-waveform seismic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of subduction margin seismogenesis has been revolutionised in the last couple of decades with the discovery that the size of the seismogenic zone may not be controlled simply by temperature and a broad spectrum of seismic behaviour exists from stick-slip to stable sliding. Laboratory and numerical experiments suggest that physical properties, particularly fluid pressure may play an important role in controlling the seismic behaviour of subduction margins. Although drilling can provide information on physical properties along subduction thrust faults at point locations at relatively shallow depths, correlations between physical properties and seismic velocity using rock physics relationships are required to resolve physical properties along the margin and down-dip. Therefore, high resolution seismic velocity models are key to recovering physical property information at subduction plate boundaries away from drill sites. 3D Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique pioneered by the oil industry to obtain high-resolution high-fidelity models of physical properties in the sub-surface. 3D FWI involves the inversion of low-frequency (>2 to noise and inverted the windowed transmitted arrivals only. We also ran a suite of resolution tests across the model. The results show that 3D FWI of conventionally collected 3D seismic data across the Muroto Basin would be capable of resolving variations in P-wave velocity along the décollement of the order of half the seismic wavelength at the plate boundary. This is a significant improvement on conventional travel-time tomography which resolves to the Fresnel width. In this presentation we will also postulate on the optimal 3D FWI experiment design for the next generation of 3D seismic surveys across subduction margins as a guide for those embarking on new data collection.

  1. A review on the systematic formulation of 3-D multiparameter full waveform inversion in viscoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengliang; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Virieux, Jean

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study 3-D multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) in viscoelastic media based on the generalized Maxwell/Zener body including arbitrary number of attenuation mechanisms. We present a frequency-domain energy analysis to establish the stability condition of a full anisotropic viscoelastic system, according to zero-valued boundary condition and the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle: the real-valued stiffness matrix becomes a complex-valued one in Fourier domain when seismic attenuation is taken into account. We develop a least-squares optimization approach to linearly relate the quality factor with the anelastic coefficients by estimating a set of constants which are independent of the spatial coordinates, which supplies an explicit incorporation of the parameter Q in the general viscoelastic wave equation. By introducing the Lagrangian multipliers into the matrix expression of the wave equation with implicit time integration, we build a systematic formulation of multiparameter FWI for full anisotropic viscoelastic wave equation, while the equivalent form of the state and adjoint equation with explicit time integration is available to be resolved efficiently. In particular, this formulation lays the foundation for the inversion of the parameter Q in the time domain with full anisotropic viscoelastic properties. In the 3-D isotropic viscoelastic settings, the anelastic coefficients and the quality factors using bulk and shear moduli parametrization can be related to the counterparts using P and S velocity. Gradients with respect to any other parameter of interest can be found by chain rule. Pioneering numerical validations as well as the real applications of this most generic framework will be carried out to disclose the potential of viscoelastic FWI when adequate high-performance computing resources and the field data are available.

  2. From tomography to full-waveform inversion with a single objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-02-17

    In full-waveform inversion (FWI), a gradient-based update of the velocity model requires an initial velocity that produces synthetic data that are within a half-cycle, everywhere, from the field data. Such initial velocity models are usually extracted from migration velocity analysis or traveltime tomography, among other means, and are not guaranteed to adhere to the FWI requirements for an initial velocity model. As such, we evaluated an objective function based on the misfit in the instantaneous traveltime between the observed and modeled data. This phase-based attribute of the wavefield, along with its phase unwrapping characteristics, provided a frequency-dependent traveltime function that was easy to use and quantify, especially compared to conventional phase representation. With a strong Laplace damping of the modeled, potentially low-frequency, data along the time axis, this attribute admitted a first-arrival traveltime that could be compared with picked ones from the observed data, such as in wave equation tomography (WET). As we relax the damping on the synthetic and observed data, the objective function measures the misfit in the phase, however unwrapped. It, thus, provided a single objective function for a natural transition from WET to FWI. A Marmousi example demonstrated the effectiveness of the approach.

  3. Resolution limits of migration and linearized waveform inversion images in a lossy medium

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-03-10

    The vertical-and horizontal-resolution limits Delta x(lossy) and Delta z(lossy) of post-stack migration and linearized waveform inversion images are derived for lossy data in the far-field approximation. Unlike the horizontal resolution limit Delta x proportional to lambda z/L in a lossless medium which linearly worsens in depth z, Delta x(lossy) proportional to z(2)/QL worsens quadratically with depth for a medium with small Q values. Here, Q is the quality factor, lambda is the effective wavelength, L is the recording aperture, and loss in the resolution formulae is accounted for by replacing lambda with z/Q. In contrast, the lossy vertical-resolution limit Delta z(lossy) only worsens linearly in depth compared to Delta z proportional to lambda for a lossless medium. For both the causal and acausal Q models, the resolution limits are linearly proportional to 1/Q for small Q. These theoretical predictions are validated with migration images computed from lossy data.

  4. Full waveform inversion based on the optimized gradient and its spectral implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2014-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) despite it\\'s potential suffers from the ability to converge to the desired solution due to the high nonlinearity of the objective function at conventional seismic frequencies. Even if frequencies necessary for the convergence are available, the high number of iterations required to approach a solution renders FWI as very expensive (especially in 3D). A spectral implementation in which the wavefields are extrapolated and gradients are calculated in the wavenumber domain allows for a cleaner more efficient implementation (no finite difference dispersion errors). In addition, we use not only an up and down going wavefield decomposition of the gradient to access the smooth background update, but also a right and left propagation decomposition to allow us to do that for large dips. To insure that the extracted smooth component of the gradient has the right decent direction, we solve an optimization problem to search for the smoothest component that provides a negative (decent) gradient. Application to the Marmousi model shows that this approach works well with linear increasing initial velocity model and data with frequencies above 2Hz.

  5. Optimal Full Waveform Inversion Strategy in Azimuthally Rotated Elastic Orthorhombic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2017-05-26

    The elastic orthorhombic assumption is one of the most practical Earth models that takes into account the horizontal anisotropic layering and vertical fracture network. In this model, the rotation angle of the vertical planes of symmetry is a crucial parameter needed to increase the convergence of an anisotropic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as to provide the fracture geometry along azimuthal direction. As an initial step, we investigate the possibility of recovering the azimuth angle via FWI, which may offer high-resolution information. We first utilize our new parameterization with deviation parameters, which provides the opportunity for multi-stage FWI. Based on the radiation patterns and gradient directions of each parameter, we show that the azimuth angle mainly affects the parameters that have azimuth-dependent radiation patterns, so that we can hierarchically build up the subsurface model from isotropic to VTI to azimuthally rotated orthorhombic models with less trade-offs. From the numerical example for a synthetic 3D model, we expect that both a deviation parameter and the azimuth angle can be recovered in the last stage of FWI with minimum trade-offs.

  6. Quantitative Monitoring for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Using Double-Difference Waveform Inversion with Spatially-Variant Total-Variation Regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Zhigang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Double-difference waveform inversion is a promising tool for quantitative monitoring for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The method uses time-lapse seismic data to jointly inverts for reservoir changes. Due to the ill-posedness of waveform inversion, it is a great challenge to obtain reservoir changes accurately and efficiently, particularly when using timelapse seismic reflection data. To improve reconstruction, we develop a spatially-variant total-variation regularization scheme into double-difference waveform inversion to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness. The new regularization scheme employs different regularization parameters in different regions of the model to obtain an optimal regularization in each area. We compare the results obtained using a spatially-variant parameter with those obtained using a constant regularization parameter. Utilizing a spatially-variant regularization scheme, the target monitoring regions are well reconstructed and the image noise is significantly reduced outside the monitoring regions. Our numerical examples demonstrate that the spatially-variant total-variation regularization scheme provides the flexibility to regularize local regions based on the a priori spatial information without increasing computational costs and the computer memory requirement.

  7. Crosshole Tomography, Waveform Inversion, and Anisotropy: A Combined Approach Using Simulated Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, M.; Pratt, R. G.; Kamei, R.; McDowell, G.

    2012-12-01

    Crosshole seismic tomography has been used by Vale to provide geophysical images of mineralized massive sulfides in the Eastern Deeps deposit at Voisey's Bay, Labrador, Canada. To date, these data have been processed using traveltime tomography, and we seek to improve the resolution of these images by applying acoustic Waveform Tomography. Due to the computational cost of acoustic waveform modelling, local descent algorithms are employed in Waveform Tomography; due to non-linearity an initial model is required which predicts first-arrival traveltimes to within a half-cycle of the lowest frequency used. Because seismic velocity anisotropy can be significant in hardrock settings, the initial model must quantify the anisotropy in order to meet the half-cycle criterion. In our case study, significant velocity contrasts between the target massive sulfides and the surrounding country rock led to difficulties in generating an accurate anisotropy model through traveltime tomography, and our starting model for Waveform Tomography failed the half-cycle criterion at large offsets. We formulate a new, semi-global approach for finding the best-fit 1-D elliptical anisotropy model using simulated annealing. Through random perturbations to Thompson's ɛ parameter, we explore the L2 norm of the frequency-domain phase residuals in the space of potential anisotropy models: If a perturbation decreases the residuals, it is always accepted, but if a perturbation increases the residuals, it is accepted with the probability P = exp(-(Ei-E)/T). This is the Metropolis criterion, where Ei is the value of the residuals at the current iteration, E is the value of the residuals for the previously accepted model, and T is a probability control parameter, which is decreased over the course of the simulation via a preselected cooling schedule. Convergence to the global minimum of the residuals is guaranteed only for infinitely slow cooling, but in practice good results are obtained from a variety

  8. Sensitivity and inversion of full seismic waveforms in stratified porous medium; Sensibilite et inversion de formes d'ondes completes en milieu poreux stratifie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, L. de

    2007-12-15

    Characterization of porous media parameters, and particularly the porosity, permeability and fluid properties are very useful in many applications (hydrologic, natural hazards or oil industry). The aim of my research is to evaluate the possibility to determine these properties from the full seismic wave fields. First, I am interested in the useful parameters and the specific properties of the seismic waves in the poro-elastic theory, often called Biot (1956) theory. I then compute seismic waves propagation in fluid saturated stratified porous media with a reflectivity method coupled with the discrete wavenumber integration method. I first used this modeling to study the possibilities to determine the carbon dioxide concentration and localization thanks to the reflected P-waves in the case of the deep geological storage of Sleipner (North Sea). The sensitivity of the seismic response to the poro-elastic parameters are then generalized by the analytical computation of the Frechet derivatives which are expressed in terms of the Green's functions of the unperturbed medium. The numerical tests show that the porosity and the consolidation are the main parameters to invert. The sensitivity operators are then introduced in a inversion algorithm based on iterative modeling of the full waveform. The classical algorithm of generalized least-square inverse problem is solved by the quasi-Newton technique (Tarantola, 1984). The inversion of synthetic data show that we can invert for the porosity and the fluid and solid parameters (densities and mechanical modulus, or volume rate of fluid and mineral) can be correctly rebuilt if the other parameters are well known. However, the strong seismic coupling of the porous parameters leads to difficulties to invert simultaneously for several parameters. One way to get round these difficulties is to use additional information and invert for one single parameter for the fluid properties (saturating rate) or for the lithology. An other

  9. Bayesian Tsunami-Waveform Inversion and Tsunami-Source Uncertainty Estimation for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, J.; Hossen, M. J.; Cummins, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    This paper develops a Bayesian inversion to infer spatio-temporal parameters of the tsunami source (sea surface) due to megathrust earthquakes. To date, tsunami-source parameter uncertainties are poorly studied. In particular, the effects of parametrization choices (e.g., discretisation, finite rupture velocity, dispersion) on uncertainties have not been quantified. This approach is based on a trans-dimensional self-parametrization of the sea surface, avoids regularization, and provides rigorous uncertainty estimation that accounts for model-selection ambiguity associated with the source discretisation. The sea surface is parametrized using self-adapting irregular grids which match the local resolving power of the data and provide parsimonious solutions for complex source characteristics. Finite and spatially variable rupture velocity fields are addressed by obtaining causal delay times from the Eikonal equation. Data are considered from ocean-bottom pressure and coastal wave gauges. Data predictions are based on Green-function libraries computed from ocean-basin scale tsunami models for cases that include/exclude dispersion effects. Green functions are computed for elementary waves of Gaussian shape and grid spacing which is below the resolution of the data. The inversion is applied to tsunami waveforms from the great Mw=9.0 2011 Tohoku-Oki (Japan) earthquake. Posterior results show a strongly elongated tsunami source along the Japan trench, as obtained in previous studies. However, we find that the tsunami data is fit with a source that is generally simpler than obtained in other studies, with a maximum amplitude less than 5 m. In addition, the data are sensitive to the spatial variability of rupture velocity and require a kinematic source model to obtain satisfactory fits which is consistent with other work employing linear multiple time-window parametrizations.

  10. Geological structure guided well log interpolation for high-fidelity full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangkang; Chen, Hanming; Xiang, Kui; Chen, Xiaohong

    2016-11-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a promising technique for inverting a high-resolution subsurface velocity model. The success of FWI highly depends on a fairly well initial velocity model. We propose a method for building a good initial velocity model that can be put into the FWI framework for inverting a nearly perfect velocity structure. We use a well log interpolated velocity model as a high-fidelity initial model for the subsequent FWI. The interpolation problem is solved via a least-squares method with a geological structural regularization. In order to obtain the geological structure of subsurface reflectors, an initial reverse time migration (RTM) with a fairly realistic initial velocity model is conducted, and the local slope of subsurface structure is roughly calculated from the RTM image. The well log interpolated initial velocity model can be very close to the true velocity while containing a small velocity anomaly or oversmoothing caused by the imperfect velocity interpolation. The anomaly and oversmoothing effect can be compensated during the subsequent FWI iterations. We use a relatively simple-layered model and the more complicated Marmousi velocity model to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach. We start from a very smooth velocity model and obtain a nearly perfect FWI result which is much better than the traditional FWI result without the velocity interpolation. The migrated images from the RTM method using different velocity models are also compared to further confirm the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Regarding the field deployment, we suggest that future drilling of exploration wells can be seismic-oriented, which can help fully utilize the information of well logs for building initial subsurface velocity model and will facilitate a wide application of the proposed methodology.

  11. Optimizing measurement geometry for seismic near-surface full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuber, André; Manukyan, Edgar; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-09-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an increasingly popular tool for analysing seismic data. Current practise is to record seismic data sets that are suitable for reflection processing, that is, a very dense spatial sampling and a high fold are required. Using tools from optimized experimental design (ED), we demonstrate that such a dense sampling is not necessary for FWI purposes. With a simple noise-free acoustic example, we show that only a few suitably selected source positions are required for computing high-quality images. A second, more extensive study includes elastic FWI with noise-contaminated data and free-surface boundary conditions on a typical near-surface setup, where surface waves play a crucial role. The study reveals that it is sufficient to employ a receiver spacing in the order of the minimum shear wavelength expected. Furthermore, we show that horizontally oriented sources and multicomponent receivers are the preferred option for 2-D elastic FWI, and we found that with a small amount of carefully selected source positions, similarly good results can be achieved, as if as many sources as receivers would have been employed. For the sake of simplicity, we assume in our simulations that the full data information content is available, but data pre-processing and the presence of coloured noise may impose restrictions. Our ED procedure requires an a priori subsurface model as input, but tests indicate that a relatively crude approximation to the true model is adequate. A further pre-requisite of our ED algorithm is that a suitable inversion strategy exists that accounts for the non-linearity of the FWI problem. Here, we assume that such a strategy is available. For the sake of simplicity, we consider only 2-D FWI experiments in this study, but our ED algorithm is sufficiently general and flexible, such that it can be adapted to other configurations, such as crosshole, vertical seismic profiling or 3-D surface setups, also including larger scale

  12. Zephyr: Open-source Parallel Seismic Waveform Inversion in an Integrated Python-based Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithyman, B. R.; Pratt, R. G.; Hadden, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic Full-Waveform Inversion (FWI) is an advanced method to reconstruct wave properties of materials in the Earth from a series of seismic measurements. These methods have been developed by researchers since the late 1980s, and now see significant interest from the seismic exploration industry. As researchers move towards implementing advanced numerical modelling (e.g., 3D, multi-component, anisotropic and visco-elastic physics), it is desirable to make use of a modular approach, minimizing the effort developing a new set of tools for each new numerical problem. SimPEG (http://simpeg.xyz) is an open source project aimed at constructing a general framework to enable geophysical inversion in various domains. In this abstract we describe Zephyr (https://github.com/bsmithyman/zephyr), which is a coupled research project focused on parallel FWI in the seismic context. The software is built on top of Python, Numpy and IPython, which enables very flexible testing and implementation of new features. Zephyr is an open source project, and is released freely to enable reproducible research. We currently implement a parallel, distributed seismic forward modelling approach that solves the 2.5D (two-and-one-half dimensional) viscoacoustic Helmholtz equation at a range modelling frequencies, generating forward solutions for a given source behaviour, and gradient solutions for a given set of observed data. Solutions are computed in a distributed manner on a set of heterogeneous workers. The researcher's frontend computer may be separated from the worker cluster by a network link to enable full support for computation on remote clusters from individual workstations or laptops. The present codebase introduces a numerical discretization equivalent to that used by FULLWV, a well-known seismic FWI research codebase. This makes it straightforward to compare results from Zephyr directly with FULLWV. The flexibility introduced by the use of a Python programming environment makes

  13. Monitoring of applied stress in concrete using ultrasonic full-waveform comparison techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Ali; Schumacher, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasonic testing is a non-destructive approach commonly used to evaluate concrete structures. A challenge with concrete is that it is heterogeneous, which causes multiple wave scattering resulting in longer and more complex wave paths. The recorded ultrasonic waveform can be divided into two portions: the coherent (or early) and the diffuse (or Coda) portion. While conventional methods only use the coherent portion, e.g. the first wave arrival to determine the wave velocity, we are interested in the entire waveform, i.e. until the wave amplitude is completely dampened out. The objective of this study was to determine what portion of the signal is most sensitive to applied stress and the associated formation and propagation of cracks. For this purpose, the squared Pearson correlation coefficient, R2 was used, which provides a measure for the strength of the linear relationship (or similarity) between a reference waveform under no stress and a waveform recorded at a certain level of applied stress. Additionally, a signal energy-based filter was developed and used to detect signals that captured acoustic emissions generated during the loading process. The experimental work for this study consisted of an active monitoring approach by employing a pitch-catch setup with two ultrasonic transducers, one transmitter and one receiver, that were attached to (nullset) 152 x 305 mm concrete cylinder specimens, which were loaded monotonically to failure. Our results show that applied stress correlates well with the R2 with remarkable sensitivity to small applied stresses. Also, the relationship between R2 and applied stress is linear for an applied stress that is less than 50% of the ultimate stress.

  14. A combined full wave equation tomography - full waveform inversion and its application to 12 km long streamer data from offshore western Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Singh, S. C.; Ghosal, D.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an emerging technique to determine fine-scale subsurface velocity structure. However, it requires a good starting velocity model, which is generally obtained using travel time tomography, to converge to a global minimum. Furthermore, the computing cost of full waveform inversion could be very high. In order to converge to a global solution, we have developed a combined full wave equation tomography (WET) and full waveform inversion (FWI) where the large and medium scale velocity is determined using full wave equation tomography first and then the fine-scale elastic parameters are inverted using full waveform inversion. WET and FWI both utilize full wavefield modeling, but differ on the definition of objective functions: WET aims to minimize L2-norm of cross-correlation synthetic and observed data, which is mainly sensitive to travel times, while FWI aims to optimize the L2-norm full waveform misfit, which is sensitive to both amplitudes and travel times of arrivals. Adjoint method is used to calculate the gradient for both methods efficiently. To compensate the energy loss due to wave propagation in the adjoint calculation and geometric limitation of survey, we apply an approximate Hessian preconditioning to the gradient. Further more, to stabilize WET, we precondition the time delay measures observed from cross-relation with maximum cross-correlation coefficients and perform tomographic model regularization to avoid local minimum. By exploring the band-limited feature of seismic wavefield, WET can provide better resolution than ray-based travel time tomography, and hence better suited for the FWI to converge to the true model, which provides very fine detail P and S-wave velocity. Both WET and WFI are based on the solution of full elastic wave equation and hence can model all types of wave present data. In order to reduce the computation cost and to invert seismic refraction arrivals first, we downward continue the streamer data

  15. Combined Inversion of Broadband and Short‐Period Waveform Data for Regional Moment Tensors: A Case Study in the Alborz Mountains, Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donner, Stefanie; Krüger, Frank; Rössler, Dirk;

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we suggest a novel approach for the retrieval of regional moment tensors for earthquakes with small to moderate magnitudes. The first modification is the combined inversion of broadband and short‐period waveform data. The broadband waveforms are inverted in a frequency range suitab...

  16. High resolution imaging of lithospheric structures beneath the Pyrenees by full waveform inversion of shortperiod teleseismic P waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Monteiller, Vadim; Durochat, Clément

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the deployment of permanent and temporary broadband arrays, coverage and data quality have dramatically improved in the last decade, especially for regional-scale studies. In addition, owing to the progress of high-performance resources and numerical simulation techniques, waveform inversion approaches nowadays become a viable alternative to classical asymptotic ray based tomographic approaches. Exploiting full waveforms in seismic tomography requires an efficient and precise method to solve the elastic wave equation in 3D inhomogeneous media. Since resolution of waveform inversion is limited by the seismic wavelength as well as the wavefield sampling density, it is crucial to exploit short-period teleseismic waves recorded by dense regional arrays. However, modeling the propagation of short-period body waves in heterogeneous media is still very challenging, even on the largest modern supercomputers. For this reason, we have developed a hybrid method that couples a global wave propagation method in a 1D Earth to a 3D spectral-element method in a regional domain. This hybrid method restricts the costly 3D computations to inside the regional domain, which dramatically decreases the computational cost, allows us to compute teleseismic wavefields down to 1s period, thus accounting for the complexities that affect the propagation of seismic waves in the regional domain. We present the first application of this new waveform inversion approach to broadband data coming from two dense transects deployed during the PYROPE experiment across the Pyrenees mountains. We obtain the first high-resolution lithospheric section of compressional and shear velocities across an orogenic belt. The tomographic model provides clear evidence for the under-thrusting of the thinned Iberian crust beneath the European plate and for the important role of rift-inherited mantle structures during the formation of the Pyrenees.

  17. Probabilistic waveform inversion for 22 earthquake moment tensors in Hungary: new constraints on the tectonic stress pattern inside the Pannonian basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wéber, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    We have successfully estimated the full moment tensors of 22 local earthquakes with local magnitude ranging from 1.2 to 4.8 that occurred in the Hungarian part of the Pannonian basin between 1995 and 2014. We used a probabilistic waveform inversion procedure that takes into account the effects of the random noise contained in the seismograms, the uncertainty of the hypocentre determined from arrival times and the inaccurate knowledge of the velocity structure, while estimating the error affecting the derived focal parameters. The applied probabilistic approach maps the posterior probability density functions (PPDFs) for both the hypocentral coordinates and the moment tensor components. The final estimates are given by the maximum likelihood points of the PPDFs, while solution uncertainties are presented by histogram plots. The estimated uncertainties in the moment tensor components are plotted on the focal sphere in such a way, that the significance of the double couple (DC), the compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) and the isotropic (ISO) parts of the source can be assessed. We have shown that the applied waveform inversion method is equally suitable to recover the source mechanism for low-magnitude events using short-period local waveforms as well as for moderate-size earthquakes using long-period seismograms. The non-DC components of the retrieved focal mechanisms are statistically insignificant for all the analysed earthquakes. The negligible amount of the ISO component implies the tectonic nature of the investigated events. The moment tensor solutions reported by other agencies for five of the ML > 4 earthquakes studied in this paper are very similar to those calculated by the applied waveform inversion algorithm. We have found only strike-slip and thrust faulting events, giving further support to the hypothesis that the Pannonian basin is currently experiencing a compressional regime of deformation. The orientations of the obtained focal mechanisms are in

  18. Three-dimensional elastic full waveform inversion using seismic data from the Sleipner area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raknes, Espen Birger; Arntsen, Børge; Weibull, Wiktor

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the application of 3-D isotropic elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) to a field data set from the Sleipner area in the North sea. The field data set consists of a narrow azimuth marine towed streamer survey. The limited maximum offset of less than 2000 m poses strong challenges for the FWI technique, due to the lack of wide-angle wave phenomena, particularly for the deeper sediments. In addition, the lack of information about shear waves implies that only the P-wave velocities can be estimated with some confidence. In this work, the P-wave velocities are inverted using FWI, whereas the S-wave velocities and densities are coupled to the P-wave velocities using empirical relationships. To check the validity of this work flow, a synthetic sensitivity analysis inspired by a well log from the area is performed. In this analysis the difference between acoustic and elastic FWI is also compared. The conclusion from the sensitivity analysis is that, as long as the empirical relationships are not too far away from the true relationships, the elastic FWI is able to resolve the subsurface parameters within an acceptable error margin. Furthermore, the acoustic approximation fails due to the large differences between the elastic and acoustic reflection and transmission coefficients, meaning that elastic FWI is necessary for resolving the parameters satisfactorily. Acoustic and elastic FWI are performed for the field data. The results of the field data example show that elastic FWI produces an elastic model which accurately simulates the observed data, whereas the acoustic FWI produces an acoustic model that includes artefacts, particularly in the upper part close to the sea bottom. Elastic FWI is therefore favourable for short offset seismic streamer data. The estimated elastic P-wave velocity models were used to depth migrate the data. The depth migrated images show improved resolution and continuity compared to those migrated using a model

  19. Next-generation seismic experiments: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, three-dimensional, full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rebecca; Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael

    2016-04-01

    There are many outstanding plate-tectonic scale questions that require us to know information about sub-surface physical properties, for example ascertaining the geometry and location of magma chambers and estimating the effective stress along plate boundary faults. These important scientific targets are often too deep, impractical and expensive for extensive academic drilling. Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has recently become feasible in three dimensions, and has been widely adopted by the oil and gas industry to image reservoir-scale targets at shallow-to-moderate depths. In this presentation we explore the potential for 3-D FWI, when combined with appropriate marine seismic acquisition, to recover high-resolution high-fidelity P-wave velocity models for sub-sedimentary targets within the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle. Using existing geological and geophysical models, we construct P-wave velocity models over three potential sub-sedimentary targets: the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat and its associated crustal magmatic system, the downgoing oceanic plate beneath the Nankai subduction margin, and the oceanic crust-uppermost mantle beneath the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We use these models to generate realistic multi-azimuth 3-D synthetic seismic data, and attempt to invert these data to recover the original models. We explore the resolution and accuracy, sensitivity to noise and acquisition geometry, ability to invert elastic data using acoustic inversion codes, and the trade-off between low frequencies and starting velocity model accuracy. We will show that FWI applied to multi-azimuth, refracted, wide-angle, low-frequency data can resolve features in the deep crust and uppermost mantle on scales that are significantly better than can be achieved by any other geophysical technique, and that these results can be obtained using relatively small numbers (60-90) of ocean-bottom receivers combined

  20. Remote estimation of the hydraulic properties of a sand using full-waveform integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, off-ground GPR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambot, S.; Slob, E.; Rhebergen, J.B.; Lopera, O.; Jadoon, K.Z.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-01-01

    We used integrated hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, proximal ground penetrating radar (GPR) data to remotely infer the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties of a laboratory sand during an infiltration event. The inversion procedure involved full-waveform modeling of the radar signal and one

  1. 3D elastic full-waveform inversion for OBC data using the P-wave excitation amplitude

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Ju-Won

    2017-08-17

    We suggest a fast and efficient 3D elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) algorithm based on the excitation amplitude (maximum energy arrival) of the P-wave in the source wavefield. It evaluates the gradient direction significantly faster than its conventional counterpart. In addition, it removes the long-wavelength artifacts from the gradient, which are often originated from SS correlation process. From these advantages, the excitation approach offers faster convergence not only for the S wave velocity, but also for the entire process of multi-parameter inversion, compared to the conventional FWI. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated through the synthetic Marmousi and a real OBC data from North Sea.

  2. Characterization of moderate ash-and-gas explosions at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, from infrasound waveform inversion and thermal infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, S. De; Lamb, O. D.; Lamur, A.; Hornby, A. J.; Aulock, F. W.; Chigna, G.; Lavallée, Y.; Rietbrock, A.

    2016-06-01

    The rapid discharge of gas and rock fragments during volcanic eruptions generates acoustic infrasound. Here we present results from the inversion of infrasound signals associated with small and moderate gas-and-ash explosions at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, to retrieve the time history of mass eruption rate at the vent. Acoustic waveform inversion is complemented by analyses of thermal infrared imagery to constrain the volume and rise dynamics of the eruption plume. Finally, we combine results from the two methods in order to assess the bulk density of the erupted mixture, constrain the timing of the transition from a momentum-driven jet to a buoyant plume, and to evaluate the relative volume fractions of ash and gas during the initial thrust phase. Our results demonstrate that eruptive plumes associated with small-to-moderate size explosions at Santiaguito only carry minor fractions of ash, suggesting that these events may not involve extensive magma fragmentation in the conduit.

  3. Quantitative Inversion of Seismic Fault Zone Waveforms in the Rupture Zone of the 1992 Landers Earthquake for Structural Properties at Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Michael, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    Waveform modeling of seismic fault zone (FZ) trapped waves has the potential for providing a high-resolution imaging of seismic velocities, seismic attenuation, FZ width, and structural continuity at depth. From a digital waveform data set generated by 238 aftershocks of the 1992 Landers earthquake [William Lee, per. com., '99], we identified 60 events with good candidate trapped waves. Each event was recorded by 33 three-component, short-period (2 Hz), L-22 seismometers, 22 of which on a line crossing the surface rupture zone of the mainshock. Locations of 102 events out of the 238 aftershocks are given in the catalog of Richards-Dinger and Shearer [JGR, '00]. These include 16 events generating candidate trapped waves. A plane-wave fitting technique is applied to estimate the back-azimuth angle of the unlocated events that produce candidate trapped waves. The source-receiver distance for these events is estimated from the S - P travel time. Of the 60 candidate trapped waves, about 75% are generated by events with locations close to the FZ, while the reminder are likely produced by events at considerable distance from the fault. The latter observation is compatible with 3D numerical calculations of Igel et al. [Pageoph, '01]. The FZ waveforms with candidate trapped waves are modeled with a genetic inversion algorithm (GIA) that maximizes the correlation between observed and synthetic waveforms [Michael and Ben-Zion, ms. in preparation, '01]. The synthetic seismograms are generated with a two-dimensional analytical solution for a scalar wavefield in a layered vertical FZ between two quarter-spaces [Ben-Zion and Aki, BSSA,'90; Ben-Zion, JGR, '98]. Our previous results showed that the GIA is able to provide very good fits for Landers FZ waveforms with a model consisting of a single uniform FZ layer in a half space. However, it is possible to get equally good fits for a wide range of parameters. This is due to significant trade-offs among FZ width, propagation distance

  4. Exploring the limits of waveform correlation event detection as applied to three earthquake aftershock sequences.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resor, Megan E.; Carr, Dorthe Bame; Young, Christopher John

    2010-05-01

    addition, the Waveform Correlation Detector and Self Scanner identified significant numbers of new events that were not in either the EDR or regional catalogs, showing a lowering of the detection threshold. We extended our analysis to study the effect of distance on correlation results by applying the analysis tools to multiple stations along a transect of nearly constant azimuth when possible. We expected the number of events found via correlation would drop off as roughly 1/r2, where r is the distance from mainshock to station. However, we found that regional geological conditions influenced the performance of a given station more than distance. For example, for one sequence we clustered 25% of events at the nearest station to the mainshock (34 km), while our performance dropped to 2% at a station 550 km distant. However, we matched our best performance (25% clustering) at a station 198 km distant.

  5. Source parameters for 11 earthquakes in the Tien Shan, central Asia, determined by P and SH waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael R.; Mccaffrey, Robert; Molnar, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The style and the distribution of faulting occurring today in the Tien Shan region were studied, by digitizing long-period World-Wide Standard Seismograph Network P and SH waveforms of 11 of the largest Tien Shan earthquakes between 1965 and 1982 and then using a least squares inversion routine to constrain their fault plane solutions and depths. The results of the examination indicate that north-south shortening is presently occurring in the Tien Shan, with the formation of basement uplifts flanked by moderately dipping thrust faults. The present-day tectonics of the Tien Shan seem to be analogous to those of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah during the Laramide orogeny in Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary time.

  6. Visco-acoustic transmission waveform inversion of velocity structure in space-frequency domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guihua Long; Xiaofan Li; Meigen Zhang; Tong Zhu

    2009-01-01

    According to the least square criterion of minimizing the misfit between modeled and observed data, this paper provides a preconditioned gradient method to invert the visco-acoustic velocity structure on the basis of using sparse matrix LU factorization technique to directly solve the visco-acoustic wave forward problem in space-frequency domain. Numerical results obtained in an inclusion model inversion and a layered homogeneous model inversion demonstrate that different scale media have their own frequency responses, and the strategy of using low-frequency inverted result as the starting model in the high-frequency inversion can greatly reduce the non-uniqueness of their solutions. It can also be observed in the experi-ments that the fast convergence of the algorithm can be achieved by using diagonal elements of Hessian matrix as the pre-conditioned operator, which fully incorporates the advantage of quadratic convergence of Gauss-Newton method.

  7. Centroid–moment tensor inversions using high-rate GPS waveforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Toole, T.B.; Valentine, A.P.; Woodhouse, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Displacement time-series recorded by Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are a new type of near-field waveformobservation of the seismic source.We have developed an inversion method which enables the recovery of an earthquake’s mechanism and centroid coordinates from such data. Our approach is

  8. Fine-scale thermohaline ocean structure retrieved with 2-D prestack full-waveform inversion of multichannel seismic data: Application to the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, D.; Sallarès, V.; Biescas, B.; Ranero, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of 2-D time-domain, adjoint-state acoustic full-waveform inversion (FWI) to retrieve high-resolution models of ocean physical parameters such as sound speed, temperature and salinity. The proposed method is first described and then applied to prestack multichannel seismic (MCS) data acquired in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberia) in 2007 in the framework of the Geophysical Oceanography project. The inversion strategy flow includes specifically designed data preconditioning for acoustic noise reduction, followed by the inversion of sound speed in the shotgather domain. We show that the final sound speed model has a horizontal resolution of ˜ 70 m, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the initial model constructed with coincident eXpendable Bathy Thermograph (XBT) data, and close to the theoretical resolution of O(λ). Temperature (T) and salinity (S) are retrieved with the same lateral resolution as sound speed by combining the inverted sound speed model with the thermodynamic equation of seawater and a local, depth-dependent T-S relation derived from regional conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) measurements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) database. The comparison of the inverted T and S models with XBT and CTD casts deployed simultaneously to the MCS acquisition shows that the thermohaline contrasts are resolved with an accuracy of 0.18oC for temperature and 0.08 PSU for salinity. The combination of oceanographic and MCS data into a common, pseudo-automatic inversion scheme allows to quantitatively resolve submeso-scale features that ought to be incorporated into larger-scale ocean models of oceans structure and circulation.

  9. Forward and inverse problems in fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This Minireview summarizes the recent efforts to solve forward and inverse problems as they occur in different branches of fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics. As for the forward problem, the main focus is on the numerical treatment of induction processes, including self-excitation of magnetic fields in non-spherical domains and/or under the influence of non-homogeneous material parameters. As an important application of the developed numerical schemes, the functioning of the von-K\\'...

  10. Seismotectonics at the junction of the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate, in light of the 1990 Hualien earthquake and the near-field waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hou-Sheng; Mozziconacci, Laetitia; Chang, Emmy T. Y.; Huang, Bor-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    In eastern Taiwan, the Longitudinal Valley (LV) is the suture zone separating the Eurasian plate (EUP) to the West from the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) to the East. The northern tip of the LV (near Hualien city) is the junction point where the collision evolve northward to a subduction of the PSP under the EUP. As a result, a high seismic activity is observed. Based on the CWB (Central Weather Bureau, Taiwan) earthquake catalog, four distinct seismic clusters can be observed in this area since 1990. We restrict our effort to the cluster caused by a doublet events of 1990 with two moderate-large earthquakes. The first shock of these doublet occurred on 13rd December with ML 6.5. Seventeen hours later and 15 km to the southeast occurred the second shock of ML 6.7. A campaign seismic network of 15 short-period stations - the Hualien Temporary Seismic Network (HTSN) was deployed during 2 months to detect the aftershocks of the doublet. By applying the near-field waveform inversion to the HTSN records, we can retrieve the focal mechanism solutions (FMS) from 50 aftershocks of local magnitude ranging from 2.5 to 5.0. A modified version of the program "FMNEAR" is adopted in this study, which has been proven to be efficient to retrieve FMS for small-to-moderate earthquakes with a limited number of stations. In practice, the near-field waveforms, were processed by band-pass filter between 0.52 and 1.2 Hz. Synthetic waveforms are built from the discrete wave number method of Bouchon (1981). The inversion is done by grid searches on the FMS parameters while the rake is inverted, the best result gives the lowest waveform misfit. The waveform adjustment are improved by depth optimization and a specific 1D velocity model for each station. Focal depths of events are in average 10km deeper than the depth determined by the island-wide seismic stations that suffered from the lack of stations to the east due to the ocean. The FMS of the 50 aftershocks can be classified into three

  11. Gauss-Newton Method Full Waveform Inversion Based on GPU Acceleration%基于GPU加速的高斯牛顿法全波形反演

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓哲; 黄慧明; 杨艳

    2016-01-01

    The Gauss-Newton method for seismic full waveform inversion is extensive computational and time-consuming. The fast parallel platform of CUDA is applied to speed up the program on graphics processing unit (GPU). The time consuming parts of Gauss-Newton method full waveform inversion are waveform forward modeling and matrix multiplication, and they all meet the requirements of parallelism in the algorithm. For the acceleration of the wave forward modeling, we study and implement the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method based on CUDA platform; and for matrix multiplication, CUBLAS library with strong ability of calculation is directly used. Implementing the code of different model size on Personal Computer (PC) with GTX650ti GPU to test the speedups, the test shows that the GPU-based code is 10-30 times faster than the CPU-based code and it will perform faster when the model size is bigger. Numerical test of the Overthrust velocity model indicates the time cost is never a question to Guass-Newton method full waveform inversion.%针对高斯牛顿法地震全波形反演计算量大、计算速度慢的问题,采用图形处理器(GPU)对其加速。高斯牛顿法全波形反演耗时主要集中在波形正演模拟和矩阵乘法计算两个方面,而波形正演算法和矩阵乘法计算在算法特性上都满足并行性的要求。对于波形正演模拟的加速,研究并实现了基于CUDA平台的时域有限差分(FDTD)正演算法。对于矩阵乘法的加速,直接使用计算能力很强的CUB⁃LAS库来完成计算。在台式PC上对不同模型大小的反演区域做合成数据反演,所用显卡型号为GTX650ti,程序速度提升10~30倍,且随着模型增大,程序的加速比将进一步提高。二维Overthrust截取模型反演算例表明时间成本已经不再是影响高斯牛顿法全波形反演发展的主要问题。

  12. An inversion of site response and Lg attenuation using Lg waveform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xin-yun; CHEN Yun-tai

    2007-01-01

    Based on spectral ratio method, a joint inversion method was used to obtain parameters of Lg wave attenuation and site response. The inversion method allows simple and direct (two-parameter) determination of Lg wave attenuation and site response from sparse spectral data, which are not affected by radiation pattern factor and different response of same instrument after geometrical spreading. The method was used successfully for estimating site response of stations of Zhejiang Seismic Network and measuring Lg wave attenuation. The study is based on 20 earthquakes occurred in northeast of Taiwan with magnitude Ms5.0~6.7 and 960 seismic wave records from 16 stations in Zhejiang area from 2002 to 2005. The parameters of site response and Lg attenuation were calculated with a frequency interval of 0.2 Hz in the range of 0.5 Hz to 10 Hz. Lg wave attenuation coefficient corresponding to U-D,E-W and N-S components are γ(f)=0.00175f0.43485, γ(f)=0.00145f0.48467 and γ(f)=0.0021f0.41241, respectively.It is found that the site response is component-independent. It is also found that the site response of QIY station is significant above the frequency of 1.5 Hz, and that the site response of NIB station is low for most frequency

  13. Three dimensional shear wave velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in South China Sea and its adjacent regions by surface waveform inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We assembled approximately 328 seismic records. The data set wasfrom 4 digitally recording long-period and broadband stations of CDSN. We carried out the inversion based on the partitioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large-scale optimization problem into a number of independent small-scale problems. We adopted surface waveform inversion with an equal block (2°′2°) discretization in order to acquire the images of shear velocity structure at different depths (from surface to 430 km) in the crust and upper-mantle. The resolution of all these anomalies has been established with 2check-board2 resolution tests. These results show significant difference in velocity, lithosphere and asthenosphere structure between South China Sea and its adjacent regions.

  14. Some algorithmic issues in full-waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiller, Vadim; Beller, Stephen; Nolet, Guust; Operto, Stephane; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Paul, Anne; Virieux, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The current development of dense seismic arrays and high performance computing make feasible today application of full-waveform inversion (FWI) on teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. In teleseismic configuration, the source is to first-order a plane-wave that impinges the base of the lithospheric target located below the receiver array. In this setting, FWI aims to exploit not only the forward-scattered waves propagating up to the receiver but also second-order arrivals that are back-scattered from the free-surface and the reflectors before their recordings on the surface. FWI requires using full-wave methods modeling such as finite-difference or finite-element methods. In this framework, careful design of FWI algorithms is topical to mitigate as much as possible the computational burden of multi-source full-waveform modeling. In this presentation, we review some key specifications that might be considered for versatile FWI implementation. An abstraction level between the forward and inverse problems that allows for the interfacing of different modeling engines with the inversion. This requires the subsurface meshings that are used to perform seismic modeling and update the subsurface models during inversion to be fully independent through some back-and-forth projection processes. The subsurface parameterization should be carefully chosen during multi-parameter FWI as it controls the trade-off between parameters of different nature. A versatile FWI algorithm should be designed such that different subsurface parameterizations for the model update can be easily implemented. The gradient of the misfit function should be computed as easily as possible with the adjoint-state method in parallel environment. This first requires the gradient to be independent to the discretization method that is used to perform seismic modeling. Second, the incident and adjoint wavefields should be computed with the same numerical scheme, even if the forward problem

  15. Waveform modeling and inversion of ambient noise cross-correlation functions in a coastal ocean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoqin; Brown, Michael G; Godin, Oleg A

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical studies have shown that cross-correlation functions (CFs) of time series of ambient noise measured at two locations yield approximations to the Green's functions (GFs) that describe propagation between those locations. Specifically, CFs are estimates of weighted GFs. In this paper, it is demonstrated that measured CFs in the 20-70 Hz band can be accurately modeled as weighted GFs using ambient noise data collected in the Florida Straits at ∼100 m depth with horizontal separations of 5 and 10 km. Two weighting functions are employed. These account for (1) the dipole radiation pattern produced by a near-surface source, and (2) coherence loss of surface-reflecting energy in time-averaged CFs resulting from tidal fluctuations. After describing the relationship between CFs and GFs, the inverse problem is considered and is shown to result in an environmental model for which agreement between computed and simulated CFs is good.

  16. Forward and inverse problems in fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, Andre; Stefani, Frank; Wondrak, Thomas; Xu, Mingtian

    2013-03-01

    This minireview summarizes the recent efforts to solve forward and inverse problems as they occur in different branches of fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics. For the forward problem, the main focus is on the numerical treatment of induction processes, including self-excitation of magnetic fields in non-spherical domains and/or under the influence of non-homogeneous material parameters. As an important application of the developed numerical schemes, the functioning of the von-Kármán-sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment is shown to depend crucially on the presence of soft-iron impellers. As for the inverse problem, the main focus is on the mathematical background and some initial practical applications of contactless inductive flow tomography (CIFT), in which flow induced magnetic field perturbations are utilized to reconstruct the velocity field. The promises of CIFT for flow field monitoring in the continuous casting of steel are substantiated by results obtained at a test rig with a low-melting liquid metal. While CIFT is presently restricted to flows with low magnetic Reynolds numbers, some selected problems from non-linear inverse dynamo theory, with possible applications to geo- and astrophysics, are also discussed.

  17. Multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion method of ultrasound waveform tomography using pulse data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongxiang; Azuma, Takashi; Qu, Xiaolei; Takagi, Shu

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we construct a multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion (CSI) method using pulse data in the time domain. CSI is a frequency-domain inversion method for ultrasound waveform tomography that does not require the forward solver through the process of reconstruction. Several prior researches show that the CSI method has a good performance of convergence and accuracy in the low-center-frequency situation. In contrast, utilizing the high-center-frequency data leads to a high-resolution reconstruction but slow convergence on large numbers of grid. Our objective is to take full advantage of all low frequency components from pulse data with the high-center-frequency data measured by the diagnostic device. First we process the raw data in the frequency domain. Then multi-frequency accelerating strategy helps restart CSI in the current frequency using the last iteration result obtained from the lower frequency component. The merit of multi- frequency accelerating strategy is that computational burden decreases at the first few iterations. Because the low frequency component of dataset computes on the coarse grid with assuming a fixed number of points per wavelength. In the numerical test, the pulse data were generated by the K-wave simulator and have been processed to meet the computation of the CSI method. We investigate the performance of the multi-frequency and single-frequency reconstructions and conclude that the multi-frequency accelerating strategy significantly enhances the quality of the reconstructed image and simultaneously reduces the average computational time for any iteration step.

  18. A parameterization study for elastic VTI Full Waveform Inversion of hydrophone components: synthetic and North Sea field data examples

    KAUST Repository

    Guitton, Antoine

    2017-08-15

    Choosing the right parameterization to describe a transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) allows us to match the scattering potential of these parameters to the available data in a way that avoids potential tradeoff and focus on the parameters to which the data are sensitive. For 2-D elastic full waveform inversion in VTI media of pressure components and for data with a reasonable range of offsets (as with those found in conventional streamer data acquisition systems), assuming that we have a kinematically accurate NMO velocity (vnmo) and anellipticity parameter η (or horizontal velocity, vh) obtained from tomographic methods, a parameterization in terms of horizontal velocity vh, η and ε is preferred to the more conventional parameterization in terms of vh, δ and ε. In the vh, η, ε parameterization and for reasonable scattering angles (<60o), ε acts as a “garbage collector” and absorbs most of the amplitude discrepancies; between modeled and observed data, more so when density ρ and shear-wave velocity vs are not inverted for (a standard practice with streamer data). On the contrary, in the vv, δ, ε parameterization, ε is mostly sensitive to large scattering angles, leaving vv exposed to strong leakages from ρ mainly. There assertions will be demonstrated on the synthetic Marmousi II as well as a North Sea OBC dataset, where inverting for the horizontal velocity rather than the vertical velocity yields more accurate models and migrated images.

  19. Forward and inverse problems in fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Wondrak, Thomas; Xu, Mingtian

    2012-01-01

    This Minireview summarizes the recent efforts to solve forward and inverse problems as they occur in different branches of fundamental and applied magnetohydrodynamics. As for the forward problem, the main focus is on the numerical treatment of induction processes, including self-excitation of magnetic fields in non-spherical domains and/or under the influence of non-homogeneous material parameters. As an important application of the developed numerical schemes, the functioning of the von-K\\'{a}rm\\'{a}n-sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment is shown to depend crucially on the presence of soft-iron impellers. As for the inverse problem, the main focus is on the mathematical background and some first practical applications of the Contactless Inductive Flow Tomography (CIFT), in which flow induced magnetic field perturbations are utilized for the reconstruction of the velocity field. The promises of CIFT for flow field monitoring in the continuous casting of steel are substantiated by results obtained at a test rig wit...

  20. Focal mechanisms and moment magnitudes of micro-earthquakes in central Brazil by waveform inversion with quality assessment and inference of the local stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Juraci; Barros, Lucas Vieira; Zahradník, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    This paper documents an investigation on the use of full waveform inversion to retrieve focal mechanisms of 11 micro-earthquakes (Mw 0.8 to 1.4). The events represent aftershocks of a 5.0 mb earthquake that occurred on October 8, 2010 close to the city of Mara Rosa in the state of Goiás, Brazil. The main contribution of the work lies in demonstrating the feasibility of waveform inversion of such weak events. The inversion was made possible thanks to recordings available at 8 temporary seismic stations in epicentral distances of less than 8 km, at which waveforms can be successfully modeled at relatively high frequencies (1.5-2.0 Hz). On average, the fault-plane solutions obtained are in agreement with a composite focal mechanism previously calculated from first-motion polarities. They also agree with the fault geometry inferred from precise relocation of the Mara Rosa aftershock sequence. The focal mechanisms provide an estimate of the local stress field. This paper serves as a pilot study for similar investigations in intraplate regions where the stress-field investigations are difficult due to rare earthquake occurrences, and where weak events must be studied with a detailed quality assessment.

  1. Time-domain seismic modeling in viscoelastic media for full waveform inversion on heterogeneous computing platforms with OpenCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Giroux, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) aims at recovering the elastic parameters of the Earth by matching recordings of the ground motion with the direct solution of the wave equation. Modeling the wave propagation for realistic scenarios is computationally intensive, which limits the applicability of FWI. The current hardware evolution brings increasing parallel computing power that can speed up the computations in FWI. However, to take advantage of the diversity of parallel architectures presently available, new programming approaches are required. In this work, we explore the use of OpenCL to develop a portable code that can take advantage of the many parallel processor architectures now available. We present a program called SeisCL for 2D and 3D viscoelastic FWI in the time domain. The code computes the forward and adjoint wavefields using finite-difference and outputs the gradient of the misfit function given by the adjoint state method. To demonstrate the code portability on different architectures, the performance of SeisCL is tested on three different devices: Intel CPUs, NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon PHI. Results show that the use of GPUs with OpenCL can speed up the computations by nearly two orders of magnitudes over a single threaded application on the CPU. Although OpenCL allows code portability, we show that some device-specific optimization is still required to get the best performance out of a specific architecture. Using OpenCL in conjunction with MPI allows the domain decomposition of large models on several devices located on different nodes of a cluster. For large enough models, the speedup of the domain decomposition varies quasi-linearly with the number of devices. Finally, we investigate two different approaches to compute the gradient by the adjoint state method and show the significant advantages of using OpenCL for FWI.

  2. Comparison of seismic waveform inversion results for the rupture history of a finite fault: application to the 1986 North Palm Springs, California, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.

    1989-01-01

    The July 8, 1986, North Palm Strings earthquake is used as a basis for comparison of several different approaches to the solution for the rupture history of a finite fault. The inversion of different waveform data is considered; both teleseismic P waveforms and local strong ground motion records. Linear parametrizations for slip amplitude are compared with nonlinear parametrizations for both slip amplitude and rupture time. Inversions using both synthetic and empirical Green's functions are considered. In general, accurate Green's functions are more readily calculable for the teleseismic problem where simple ray theory and flat-layered velocity structures are usually sufficient. However, uncertainties in the variation in t* with frequency most limit the resolution of teleseismic inversions. A set of empirical Green's functions that are well recorded at teleseismic distances could avoid the uncertainties in attenuation. In the inversion of strong motion data, the accurate calculation of propagation path effects other than attenuation effects is the limiting factor in the resolution of source parameters. -from Author

  3. Moment Tensor Inversions Using Waveforms from Taiwan Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP): A Case Study of 22 October 1999 Taiwan Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K.; Chi, W.; Gung, Y.; Chiu, H.

    2010-12-01

    We inverted Taiwan strong motion waveforms for the source mechanisms of the 22 October 1999 earthquake sequence to investigate seismogenic structure of Meishan fault system in Taiwan. In 1906, an earthquake of magnitude 7.1 shocked the Meishan area, and inflicted severe damages. Similar event might cause even greater damages due to the modern dense population in this region. However, detailed seismogenic structures in this region are still under debate, particularly whether the fault system contains right-lateral or left-lateral strike-slip fault is still not clear. The 22 October 1999 earthquake sequence in this region was recorded by a very dense strong-motion network, thus provided an unprecedented opportunity to study regional seismogenic structures. Here we modeled the waveforms using a moment tensor inverse procedure developed by Douglas Dreger of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory. We have tested different 1D velocity models and found Rau and Wu’s model performs well in deriving reliable moment tensor solutions. We have compared our results with available, but limited, moment tensor solutions derived from broadband seismic waveforms for this sequence and found that it is possible to derive reliable moment tensor solutions using strong motion waveforms, at least in this case. We found an NE-SW trending fault system, which are consistent with shallow structures imaged by published seismic profiles. The derived moment tensor catalog sheds lights on the seismogenic structures at depth in this region, which can be useful for seismic hazard studies.

  4. Rupture process of the 2016 Wharton Basin strike-slip faulting earthquake estimated from joint inversion of teleseismic and tsunami waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Satake, Kenji; Harada, Tomoya

    2017-05-01

    The 2016 Wharton Basin strike-slip faulting earthquake generated a small tsunami that was clearly recorded at deep ocean stations. Teleseismic inversions were made on four different nodal planes suggested by Global Centroid Moment Tensor and W-phase solutions. Tsunami waveforms computed for the north-south striking westward dipping plane were most similar to the observations. With this fault plane, joint inversions of teleseismic and tsunami waveforms were used to estimate the kinematic rupture process. The weights of teleseismic and tsunami waveforms were found to make both data sets equally contribute to the solution. Misfit analysis of both data sets favored a rupture model with rupture front speed of 2.0 km/s. The seismic moment was estimated to be 7.69 × 1020 Nm (Mw 7.9), most of it was released within 30 s and it peaked at 15 s. Subfaults with slip larger than 5 m were located from near surface to 30 km depth.

  5. Time-domain full waveform inversion using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic wave energy: Application to the South China Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mengxuan, Zhong

    2017-06-01

    The gradient preconditioning algorithms based on Hessian matrices in time-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) are widely used now, but consume a lot of memory and do not fit the FWI of large models or actual seismic data well. To avoid the huge storage consumption, the gradient preconditioning approach based on seismic wave energy has been proposed it simulates the “approximated wave field” with the acoustic wave equation and uses the energy of the simulated wavefield to precondition the gradient. The method does not require computing and storing the Hessian matrix or its inverse and can effectively eliminate the effect caused by geometric diffusion and uneven illumination on gradient. The result of experiments in this article with field data from South China Sea confirms that the time-domain FWI using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic wave energy (GPWE) can achieve higher inversion accuracy for the deep high-velocity model and its underlying strata.

  6. Iterative electromagnetic Born inversion applied to earth conductivity imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This thesis investigates the use of a fast imaging technique to deduce the spatial conductivity distribution in the earth from low frequency (< 1 MHz), cross well electromagnetic (EM) measurements. The theory embodied in this work is the extension of previous strategies and is based on the Born series approximation to solve both the forward and inverse problem. Nonlinear integral equations are employed to derive the series expansion which accounts for the scattered magnetic fields that are generated by inhomogeneities embedded in either a homogenous or a layered earth. A sinusoidally oscillating, vertically oriented magnetic dipole is employed as a source, and it is assumed that the scattering bodies are azimuthally symmetric about the source dipole axis. The use of this model geometry reduces the 3-D vector problem to a more manageable 2-D scalar form. The validity of the cross well EM method is tested by applying the imaging scheme to two sets of field data. Images of the data collected at the Devine, Texas test site show excellent correlation with the well logs. Unfortunately there is a drift error present in the data that limits the accuracy of the results. A more complete set of data collected at the Richmond field station in Richmond, California demonstrates that cross well EM can be successfully employed to monitor the position of an injected mass of salt water. Both the data and the resulting images clearly indicate the plume migrates toward the north-northwest. The plausibility of these conclusions is verified by applying the imaging code to synthetic data generated by a 3-D sheet model.

  7. Single-station and single-event marsquake location and inversion for structure using synthetic Martian waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A.; van Driel, M.; Böse, M.; Giardini, D.; Ceylan, S.; Yan, J.; Clinton, J.; Euchner, F.; Lognonné, P.; Murdoch, N.; Mimoun, D.; Panning, M.; Knapmeyer, M.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2016-09-01

    In anticipation of the upcoming InSight mission, which is expected to deploy a single seismic station on the Martian surface in November 2018, we describe a methodology that enables locating marsquakes and obtaining information on the interior structure of Mars. The method works sequentially and is illustrated using single representative 3-component seismograms from two separate events: a relatively large teleseismic event (Mw5.1) and a small-to-moderate-sized regional event (Mw3.8). Location and origin time of the event is determined probabilistically from observations of Rayleigh waves and body-wave arrivals. From the recording of surface waves, averaged fundamental-mode group velocity dispersion data can be extracted and, in combination with body-wave arrival picks, inverted for crust and mantle structure. In the absence of Martian seismic data, we performed full waveform computations using a spectral element method (AxiSEM) to compute seismograms down to a period of 1 s. The model (radial profiles of density, P- and S-wave-speed, and attenuation) used for this purpose is constructed on the basis of an average Martian mantle composition and model areotherm using thermodynamic principles, mineral physics data, and viscoelastic modeling. Noise was added to the synthetic seismic data using an up-to-date noise model that considers a whole series of possible noise sources generated in instrument and lander, including wind-, thermal-, and pressure-induced effects and electromagnetic noise. The examples studied here, which are based on the assumption of spherical symmetry, show that we are able to determine epicentral distance and origin time to accuracies of ∼ 0.5-1° and ± 3-6 s, respectively. For the events and the particular noise level chosen, information on Rayleigh-wave group velocity dispersion in the period range ∼ 14-48 s (Mw5.1) and ∼ 14-34 s (Mw3.8) could be determined. Stochastic inversion of dispersion data in combination with body-wave travel time

  8. Filter back—projection technique applied to Abel inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangShano-En; LiuZhong-Li; 等

    1997-01-01

    The inverse Abel transform is applicable to optically thin plasma with cylindrical symmetry,which is often encountered in plasma physics and inertial(or magnetic)confinemant fusion.The filter back-projection technique is modified,and then a new method of inverse Abel transform is presented.

  9. A method for the joint inversion of geodetic and seismic waveform data using ABIC: application to the 1997 Manyi, Tibet, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funning, Gareth J.; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Yagi, Yuji; Parsons, Barry

    2014-03-01

    Geodetic imaging data and seismic waveform data have complementary strengths when considering the modelling of earthquakes. The former, particularly modern space geodetic techniques such as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), permit high spatial density of observation and thus fine resolution of the spatial pattern of fault slip; the latter provide precise and accurate timing information, and thus the ability to resolve how that fault slip varies over time. In order to harness these complementary strengths, we propose a method through which the two data types can be combined in a joint inverse model for the evolution of slip on a specified fault geometry. We present here a derivation of Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) for the joint inversion of multiple data sets that explicitly deals with the problem of objectively estimating the relative weighting between data sets, as well as the optimal influence of model smoothness constraints in space and time. We demonstrate our ABIC inversion scheme by inverting InSAR displacements and teleseismic waveform data for the 1997 Manyi, Tibet, earthquake. We test, using a simplified fault geometry, three cases-InSAR data inverted alone, vertical component teleseismic broad-band waveform data inverted alone and a joint inversion of both data sets. The InSAR-only model and seismic-only model differ significantly in the distribution of slip on the fault plane that they predict. The joint-inversion model, however, has not only a similar distribution of slip and fit to the InSAR data in the InSAR-only model, suggesting that those data provide the stronger control on the pattern of slip, but is also able to fit the seismic data at a minimal degradation of fit when compared with the seismic-only model. The rupture history of the preferred, joint-inversion model, indicates bilateral rupture for the first 20 s of the earthquake, followed by a further 25 s of westward unilateral rupture afterwards, with slip

  10. Advanced stored waveform inverse Fourier transform technique for a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshenko, V M; Cotter, R J

    1996-01-01

    The stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) technique is used for broadband excitation of ions in an ion-trap mass spectrometer to perform mass-selective accumulation, isolation, and fragmentation of peptide ions formed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. Unit mass resolution is achieved for isolation of ions in the range of m/z up to 1300 using a two-step isolation technique with stretched-in-time narrow band SWIFT pulses at the second stage. The effect of 'stretched-in-time' waveforms is similar to that observed previously for mass-scan-rate reduction. The asymmetry phenomenon resulting from the stretched ion-trap electrode geometry is observed during application of normal and time-reversed waveforms and is similar to the asymmetry effects observed for forward and reverse mass scans in the resonance ejection mode. Mass-selective accumulation of ions from multiple laser shots was accomplished using a method described earlier that involves increasing the trapping voltage during ion introduction for more efficient trapping of ions.

  11. A Survey on Inverse Problems for Applied Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce inversion-based engineering applications and to investigate some of the important ones from mathematical point of view. To do this we employ acoustic, electromagnetic, and elastic waves for presenting different types of inverse problems. More specifically, we first study location, shape, and boundary parameter reconstruction algorithms for the inaccessible targets in acoustics. The inverse problems for the time-dependent differential equations of isotropic and anisotropic elasticity are reviewed in the following section of the paper. These problems were the objects of the study by many authors in the last several decades. The physical interpretations for almost all of these problems are given, and the geophysical applications for some of them are described. In our last section, an introduction with many links into the literature is given for modern algorithms which combine techniques from classical inverse problems with stochastic tools into ensemble methods both for data assimilation as well as for forecasting.

  12. Bayesian Inference Applied to the Electromagnetic Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, D M; Wood, C C; Schmidt, David M.; George, John S.

    1998-01-01

    We present a new approach to the electromagnetic inverse problem that explicitly addresses the ambiguity associated with its ill-posed character. Rather than calculating a single ``best'' solution according to some criterion, our approach produces a large number of likely solutions that both fit the data and any prior information that is used. While the range of the different likely results is representative of the ambiguity in the inverse problem even with prior information present, features that are common across a large number of the different solutions can be identified and are associated with a high degree of probability. This approach is implemented and quantified within the formalism of Bayesian inference which combines prior information with that from measurement in a common framework using a single measure. To demonstrate this approach, a general neural activation model is constructed that includes a variable number of extended regions of activation and can incorporate a great deal of prior informati...

  13. Inversion method applied to the rotation curves of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Caicedo, L. A.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Sanabria-Gómez, J. D.

    2017-07-01

    We used simulated annealing, Montecarlo and genetic algorithm methods for matching both numerical data of density and velocity profiles in some low surface brigthness galaxies with theoretical models of Boehmer-Harko, Navarro-Frenk-White and Pseudo Isothermal Profiles for galaxies with dark matter halos. We found that Navarro-Frenk-White model does not fit at all in contrast with the other two models which fit very well. Inversion methods have been widely used in various branches of science including astrophysics (Charbonneau 1995, ApJS, 101, 309). In this work we have used three different parametric inversion methods (MonteCarlo, Genetic Algorithm and Simmulated Annealing) in order to determine the best fit of the observed data of the density and velocity profiles of a set of low surface brigthness galaxies (De Block et al. 2001, ApJ, 122, 2396) with three models of galaxies containing dark mattter. The parameters adjusted by the inversion methods were the central density and a characteristic distance in the Boehmer-Harko BH (Boehmer & Harko 2007, JCAP, 6, 25), Navarro-Frenk-White NFW (Navarro et al. 2007, ApJ, 490, 493) and Pseudo Isothermal Profile PI (Robles & Matos 2012, MNRAS, 422, 282). The results obtained showed that the BH and PI Profile dark matter galaxies fit very well for both the density and the velocity profiles, in contrast the NFW model did not make good adjustments to the profiles in any analized galaxy.

  14. Deformation field validation and inversion applied to adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Olteanu, Luiza A M; Madani, Indira; Duprez, Fréderic; Berwouts, Dieter; Speleers, Bruno; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-08-07

    Development and implementation of chronological and anti-chronological adaptive dose accumulation strategies in adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. An algorithm based on Newton iterations was implemented to efficiently compute inverse deformation fields (DFs). Four verification steps were performed to ensure a valid dose propagation: intra-cell folding detection finds zero or negative Jacobian determinants in the input DF; inter-cell folding detection is implemented on the resolution of the output DF; a region growing algorithm detects undefined values in the output DF; DF domains can be composed and displayed on the CT data. In 2011, one patient with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer selected from a three phase adaptive DPBN study was used to illustrate the algorithms implemented for adaptive chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation. The patient received three (18)F-FDG-PET/CTs prior to each treatment phase and one CT after finalizing treatment. Contour propagation and DF generation between two consecutive CTs was performed in Atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS). Deformable image registration based dose accumulations were performed on CT1 and CT4. Dose propagation was done using combinations of DFs or their inversions. We have implemented a chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation algorithm based on DF inversion. Algorithms were designed and implemented to detect cell folding.

  15. Deformation field validation and inversion applied to adaptive radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Olteanu, Luiza A. M.; Madani, Indira; Duprez, Fréderic; Berwouts, Dieter; Speleers, Bruno; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-08-01

    Development and implementation of chronological and anti-chronological adaptive dose accumulation strategies in adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. An algorithm based on Newton iterations was implemented to efficiently compute inverse deformation fields (DFs). Four verification steps were performed to ensure a valid dose propagation: intra-cell folding detection finds zero or negative Jacobian determinants in the input DF; inter-cell folding detection is implemented on the resolution of the output DF; a region growing algorithm detects undefined values in the output DF; DF domains can be composed and displayed on the CT data. In 2011, one patient with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer selected from a three phase adaptive DPBN study was used to illustrate the algorithms implemented for adaptive chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation. The patient received three 18F-FDG-PET/CTs prior to each treatment phase and one CT after finalizing treatment. Contour propagation and DF generation between two consecutive CTs was performed in Atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS). Deformable image registration based dose accumulations were performed on CT1 and CT4. Dose propagation was done using combinations of DFs or their inversions. We have implemented a chronological and anti-chronological dose accumulation algorithm based on DF inversion. Algorithms were designed and implemented to detect cell folding.

  16. Two-dimensional permittivity and conductivity imaging by full waveform inversion of multioffset GPR data: a frequency-domain quasi-Newton approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoué, F.; Brossier, R.; Métivier, L.; Garambois, S.; Virieux, J.

    2014-04-01

    Full waveform inversion of ground-penetrating radar data is an emerging technique for the quantitative, high-resolution imaging of the near subsurface. Here, we present a 2-D frequency-domain full waveform inversion for the simultaneous reconstruction of the dielectric permittivity and of the electrical conductivity. The inverse problem is solved with a quasi-Newton optimization scheme, where the influence of the Hessian is approximated by the L-BFGS-B algorithm. This formulation can be considered to be fully multiparameter since it enables to update permittivity and conductivity values within the same descent step, provided we define scales of measurement through a reference permittivity, a reference conductivity, and an additional scaling factor. Numerical experiments on a benchmark from the literature demonstrate that the inversion is very sensitive to the parameter scaling, despite the consideration of the approximated Hessian that should correct for parameter dimensionalities. A proper scaling should respect the natural sensitivity of the misfit function and give priority to the parameter that has the most impact on the data (the permittivity, in our case). We also investigate the behaviour of the inversion with respect to frequency sampling, considering the selected frequencies either simultaneously or sequentially. As the relative imprint of permittivity and conductivity in the data varies with frequency, the simultaneous reconstruction of both parameters takes a significant benefit from broad frequency bandwidth data, so that simultaneous or cumulative strategies should be favoured. We illustrate our scaling approach with a realistic synthetic example for the imaging of a complex subsurface from on-ground multioffset data. Considering data acquired only from the ground surface increases the ill-posedness of the inverse problem and leads to a strong indetermination of the less-constrained conductivity parameters. A Tikhonov regularization can prevent the

  17. A Hybrid Waveform Inversion Scheme for the Determination of Locations and Moment Tensors of the Microseismic Events and the uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Droujinine, A.; Shen, P.

    2011-12-01

    In this research, we developed a new hybrid waveform inversion scheme to determine the hypocenters, origin times and moment tensors of the microseismic events induced by hydraulic fracturing. To overcome the nonlinearity in the determination of the hypocenter and origin time of a microseismic event, we perform a global search for the hypocenter (x,y,z) and origin time (t0) in a gridded four-dimensional model space, and at each grid point of the four-dimensional model space, we perform a linear inversion for the moment tensor components (M11, M22, M33, M12, M13, M23) in a six-dimensional model subspace. By this two-step approach, we find a global estimate optimum solution in the four- plus six-dimensional total model space. Then we further perform a nonlinear, gradient-based inversion for a better hypocenter and origin time of the microseismic event starting from the global estimate optimum solution. The linear inversion for the moment tensor can also be performed at each iteration of the nonlinear inversion for the hypocenter and origin time. In the grid-linear-nonlinear hybrid approach, we avoid being trapped in the local minima in the inverse problem while reducing the computational cost. The Green's functions between a monitored regions and receivers are computed by the elastic wave reciprocity. We also have performed a systematic study of the uncertainty, resolution and sensitivity of the method and found that it has superior performance in determining the hypocenter and origin time of a microseismic event over the traditional travel time methods, while being able to deliver the focal mechanism solution for the event as well. The method is tested on a dataset from a hydraulic fracturing practice in an oil reservoir.

  18. Final Technical Report for "Applied Mathematics Research: Simulation Based Optimization and Application to Electromagnetic Inverse Problems"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Eldad

    2014-03-17

    The focus of research was: Developing adaptive mesh for the solution of Maxwell's equations; Developing a parallel framework for time dependent inverse Maxwell's equations; Developing multilevel methods for optimization problems with inequal- ity constraints; A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in the 0th frequency (DC resistivity); A new inversion code for inverse Maxwell's equations in low frequency regime. Although the research concentrated on electromagnetic forward and in- verse problems the results of the research was applied to the problem of image registration.

  19. Salvus: A flexible high-performance and open-source package for waveform modelling and inversion from laboratory to global scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Michael; Boehm, Christian; van Driel, Martin; Krischer, Lion; May, Dave; Rietmann, Max; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Recent years have been witness to the application of waveform inversion to new and exciting domains, ranging from non-destructive testing to global seismology. Often, each new application brings with it novel wave propagation physics, spatial and temporal discretizations, and models of variable complexity. Adapting existing software to these novel applications often requires a significant investment of time, and acts as a barrier to progress. To combat these problems we introduce Salvus, a software package designed to solve large-scale full-waveform inverse problems, with a focus on both flexibility and performance. Currently based on an abstract implementation of high order finite (spectral) elements, we have built Salvus to work on unstructured quad/hex meshes in both 2 or 3 dimensions, with support for P1-P3 bases on triangles and tetrahedra. A diverse (and expanding) collection of wave propagation physics are supported (i.e. viscoelastic, coupled solid-fluid). With a focus on the inverse problem, functionality is provided to ease integration with internal and external optimization libraries. Additionally, a python-based meshing package is included to simplify the generation and manipulation of regional to global scale Earth models (quad/hex), with interfaces available to external mesh generators for complex engineering-scale applications (quad/hex/tri/tet). Finally, to ensure that the code remains accurate and maintainable, we build upon software libraries such as PETSc and Eigen, and follow modern software design and testing protocols. Salvus bridges the gap between research and production codes with a design based on C++ template mixins and Python wrappers that separates the physical equations from the numerical core. This allows domain scientists to add new equations using a high-level interface, without having to worry about optimized implementation details. Our goal in this presentation is to introduce the code, show several examples across the scales, and

  20. A flux pumping method applied to the magnetization of YBCO superconducting coils: frequency, amplitude and waveform characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lin; Matsuda, Koichi; Lecrevisse, Thibault; Iwasa, Yukikazu; Coombs, Tim

    2016-04-01

    This letter presents a flux pumping method and the results gained when it was used to magnetize a range of different YBCO coils. The pumping device consists of an iron magnetic circuit with eight copper coils which apply a traveling magnetic field to the superconductor. The copper poles are arranged vertically with an air gap length of 1 mm and the iron cores are made of laminated electric steel plates to minimize eddy-current losses. We have used this arrangement to investigate the best possible pumping result when parameters such as frequency, amplitude and waveform are varied. We have successfully pumped current into the superconducting coil up to a value of 90% of I c and achieved a resultant magnetic field of 1.5 T.

  1. Canonically Transformed Detectors Applied to the Classical Inverse Scattering Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, C; Torres, J M

    2005-01-01

    The concept of measurement in classical scattering is interpreted as an overlap of a particle packet with some area in phase space that describes the detector. Considering that usually we record the passage of particles at some point in space, a common detector is described e.g. for one-dimensional systems as a narrow strip in phase space. We generalize this concept allowing this strip to be transformed by some, possibly non-linear, canonical transformation, introducing thus a canonically transformed detector. We show such detectors to be useful in the context of the inverse scattering problem in situations where recently discovered scattering echoes could not be seen without their help. More relevant applications in quantum systems are suggested.

  2. Canonically Transformed Detectors Applied to the Classical Inverse Scattering Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C.; Seligman, T. H.; Torres, J. M.

    The concept of measurement in classical scattering is interpreted as an overlap of a particle packet with some area in phase space that describes the detector. Considering that usually we record the passage of particles at some point in space, a common detector is described e.g. for one-dimensional systems as a narrow strip in phase space. We generalize this concept allowing this strip to be transformed by some, possibly non-linear, canonical transformation, introducing thus a canonically transformed detector. We show such detectors to be useful in the context of the inverse scattering problem in situations where recently discovered scattering echoes could not be seen without their help. More relevant applications in quantum systems are suggested.

  3. Systematic difference between first-motion and waveform-inversion solutions for shallow offshore earthquakes due to a low-angle dipping slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Shiomi, Katsuhiko; Kimura, Takeshi; Saito, Tatsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Systematic difference between first-motion and waveform-inversion solutions for shallow offshore earthquakes was examined by using the seismograms of the 2016 Off Mie ( Mw 5.8) earthquake occurred at a depth of 14 km southeast off of the Kii peninsula, central Japan. Observed seismograms illustrated first arrivals with an apparent velocity of 7.2 km/s, which is faster than crustal P waves. The apparent velocity and polarization pattern of the first arrivals were reproduced by a finite-difference method simulation incorporating the three-dimensional Philippine Sea slab. The first arrivals consist of P waves radiated downward from the source, passing the oceanic Moho as head waves. Thus, a first-motion analysis, assuming a one-dimensional structure, causes incorrect estimations of the focal mechanisms and hypocenter depths, which tend to be deeper than the actual ones. Our result possibly indicates that the seismicity above the oceanic Moho was underestimated in the previous catalogs.

  4. `Inverse Crime' and Model Integrity in Lightcurve Inversion applied to unresolved Space Object Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Laura S.; Subbarao, Kamesh

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a case wherein the selection of models when producing synthetic light curves affects the estimation of the size of unresolved space objects. Through this case, "inverse crime" (using the same model for the generation of synthetic data and data inversion), is illustrated. This is done by using two models to produce the synthetic light curve and later invert it. It is shown here that the choice of model indeed affects the estimation of the shape/size parameters. When a higher fidelity model (henceforth the one that results in the smallest error residuals after the crime is committed) is used to both create, and invert the light curve model the estimates of the shape/size parameters are significantly better than those obtained when a lower fidelity model (in comparison) is implemented for the estimation. It is therefore of utmost importance to consider the choice of models when producing synthetic data, which later will be inverted, as the results might be misleadingly optimistic.

  5. An iterative method for 2D inverse scattering problems by alternating reconstruction of medium properties and wavefields: theory and application to the inversion of elastic waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuti, G.; Gisolf, A.

    2017-03-01

    We study a reconstruction algorithm for the general inverse scattering problem based on the estimate of not only medium properties, as in more conventional approaches, but also wavefields propagating inside the computational domain. This extended set of unknowns is justified as a way to prevent local minimum stagnation, which is a common issue for standard methods. At each iteration of the algorithm, (i) the model parameters are obtained by solution of a convex problem, formulated from a special bilinear relationship of the data with respect to properties and wavefields (where the wavefield is kept fixed), and (ii) a better estimate of the wavefield is calculated, based on the previously reconstructed properties. The resulting scheme is computationally convenient since step (i) can greatly benefit from parallelization and the wavefield update (ii) requires modeling only in the known background model, which can be sped up considerably by factorization-based direct methods. The inversion method is successfully tested on synthetic elastic datasets.

  6. Nature of the proto-décollement in the 2010 Mentawai tsunami earthquake rupture zone from full waveform inversion of seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huot, Gabriel; Singh, Satish

    2017-04-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, three great interplate earthquakes (Mw > 8.0) occurred in the Sumatran subduction zone. Although the 2004 Mw 9.2 Sumatra-Adaman earthquake generated a destructive tsunami, the 2005 Mw 8.6 Sumatra and 2007 Mw 8.4 Nias-Simeulue earthquakes did not. However, the 2010 Mw 7.9 Mentawai earthquake generated an unexpectedly powerful tsunami, and was interpreted as a tsunami earthquake. Although the mechanism of larger tsunami generation is not fully understood, rupture of the subduction front, supposed to be aseismic, is inferred to be the cause. In order to assess the tsunami risk in the locked zone of the Mentawai region, north of the 2007 rupture zone, seismic data were recorded in 2009 by CGG, using a 15-km-long streamer. Seismic line CGGV20, designed to cross the 2007 rupture zone, also crossed the southern part of the 2010 rupture zone. We combined downward continuation, traveltime tomography and full waveform inversion on this 15-km-long streamer and low frequency seismic data. The downward continuation makes it possible to extrapolate the streamer seismic reflection data as it was recorded 200 m above the seafloor at more than 5 km depth. The resolution of the velocity model obtained by traveltime tomography was increased, particularly in the shallow subsurface compared to the conventional method. A reliable velocity model was obtained to use as starting model for the full waveform inversion. The velocity inversion results and the porosity computation highlight a low velocity (˜ 1500 m/s), high porosity (˜ 70%) layer, corresponding to a high amplitude reverse polarity reflector in pelagic sediments, interpreted as a proto-décollement. The up-dip limit of the seismogenic zone might be located at the toe of the accretionary wedge, where the porosity drops to 23% into the décollement. The décollement might allow frontal rupture, which could propagate along active landward and seaward-vergent thrust faults, generating a

  7. PREFACE: First International Congress of the International Association of Inverse Problems (IPIA): Applied Inverse Problems 2007: Theoretical and Computational Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Gunther

    2008-07-01

    This volume represents the proceedings of the fourth Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) international conference and the first congress of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which was held in Vancouver, Canada, June 25 29, 2007. The organizing committee was formed by Uri Ascher, University of British Columbia, Richard Froese, University of British Columbia, Gary Margrave, University of Calgary, and Gunther Uhlmann, University of Washington, chair. The conference was part of the activities of the Pacific Institute of Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) Collaborative Research Group on inverse problems (http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/collaborative-research-groups/past-crgs). This event was also supported by grants from NSF and MITACS. Inverse Problems (IP) are problems where causes for a desired or an observed effect are to be determined. They lie at the heart of scientific inquiry and technological development. The enormous increase in computing power and the development of powerful algorithms have made it possible to apply the techniques of IP to real-world problems of growing complexity. Applications include a number of medical as well as other imaging techniques, location of oil and mineral deposits in the earth's substructure, creation of astrophysical images from telescope data, finding cracks and interfaces within materials, shape optimization, model identification in growth processes and, more recently, modelling in the life sciences. The series of Applied Inverse Problems (AIP) Conferences aims to provide a primary international forum for academic and industrial researchers working on all aspects of inverse problems, such as mathematical modelling, functional analytic methods, computational approaches, numerical algorithms etc. The steering committee of the AIP conferences consists of Heinz Engl (Johannes Kepler Universität, Austria), Joyce McLaughlin (RPI, USA), William Rundell (Texas A&M, USA), Erkki Somersalo (Helsinki University of Technology

  8. Crustal velocity structure and earthquake processes of Garhwal-Kumaun Himalaya: Constraints from regional waveform inversion and array beam modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Sanjay S.; Paul, Ajay; Cesca, Simone; Kamal; Kriegerowski, Marius; Mahesh, P.; Gupta, Sandeep

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand present day earthquake kinematics at the Indian plate boundary, we analyse seismic broadband data recorded between 2007 and 2015 by the regional network in the Garhwal-Kumaun region, northwest Himalaya. We first estimate a local 1-D velocity model for the computation of reliable Green's functions, based on 2837 P-wave and 2680 S-wave arrivals from 251 well located earthquakes. The resulting 1-D crustal structure yields a 4-layer velocity model down to the depths of 20 km. A fifth homogeneous layer extends down to 46 km, constraining the Moho using travel-time distance curve method. We then employ a multistep moment tensor (MT) inversion algorithm to infer seismic moment tensors of 11 moderate earthquakes with Mw magnitude in the range 4.0-5.0. The method provides a fast MT inversion for future monitoring of local seismicity, since Green's functions database has been prepared. To further support the moment tensor solutions, we additionally model P phase beams at seismic arrays at teleseismic distances. The MT inversion result reveals the presence of dominant thrust fault kinematics persisting along the Himalayan belt. Shallow low and high angle thrust faulting is the dominating mechanism in the Garhwal-Kumaun Himalaya. The centroid depths for these moderate earthquakes are shallow between 1 and 12 km. The beam modeling result confirm hypocentral depth estimates between 1 and 7 km. The updated seismicity, constrained source mechanism and depth results indicate typical setting of duplexes above the mid crustal ramp where slip is confirmed along out-of-sequence thrusting. The involvement of Tons thrust sheet in out-of-sequence thrusting indicate Tons thrust to be the principal active thrust at shallow depth in the Himalayan region. Our results thus support the critical taper wedge theory, where we infer the microseismicity cluster as a result of intense activity within the Lesser Himalayan Duplex (LHD) system.

  9. Aftershock mechanisms from the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake: detailed analysis using full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietbrock, A.; Hicks, S. P.; Chagas, B.; Detzel, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    slip style can be highly variable across the megathrust, with implications for fault processes such as postseismic fluid release. We also perform 3-D full waveform forward simulation using the spectral element code, SPECFEM3D, to understand the sensitivity of our moment tensor solutions with respect to 3-D velocity structure.

  10. Slip distribution of the 2013 Mw 8.0 Santa Cruz Islands earthquake by tsunami waveforms inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabrizio; Molinari, Irene; Lorito, Stefano; Piatanesi, Alessio

    2014-05-01

    On February 6, 2013 a Mw8.0 interplate earthquake occurred in the Santa Cruz Islands region. The epicenter is located near a complex section of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary, where a short segment of dominantly strike-slip plate motion links the Solomon Trench to the New Hebrides Trench. In this region, the Australia plate subducts beneath the Pacific plate with a convergence rate of ~9cm/yr. This earthquake generated a tsunami that struck the city of Lata and several villages located on the main island, Nendo, near the epicenter. The tsunami has been distinctly recorded by 5 DART buoys located in the Pacific ocean. In this work we present the slip distribution of the earthquake obtained by inverting the tsunami signals recorded by the DART buoys. In order to honour the complex geometry of the subducting plate, we use a fault model that accounts for the variability of the strike and dip angles along the slipping surface. We use the Green's function approach and a simulated annealing technique to solve the inverse problem. Synthetic checkerboard tests indicate that the azimuthal coverage of the available DART stations is sufficient to retrieve the main features of the rupture process with a minimum subfault area of about 20x20 km. We retrieve the slip distribution of the Santa Cruz Island earthquake that, at the first order, is consistent with previous slip models obtained by using teleseismic data.

  11. Next-generation seismic experiments - II: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, 3-D, full-waveform inversion of sparse field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Arnoux, Gillean; Hooft, Emilie; Toomey, Douglas; VanderBeek, Brandon; Wilcock, William

    2016-02-01

    3-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has been widely adopted by the oil and gas industry to obtain high-fidelity models of P-wave velocity that lead to improvements in migrated images of the reservoir. Most industrial applications of 3-D FWI model the acoustic wavefield, often account for the kinematic effect of anisotropy, and focus on matching the low-frequency component of the early arriving refractions that are most sensitive to P-wave velocity structure. Here, we have adopted the same approach in an application of 3-D acoustic, anisotropic FWI to an ocean-bottom-seismometer (OBS) field data set acquired across the Endeavour oceanic spreading centre in the northeastern Pacific. Starting models for P-wave velocity and anisotropy were obtained from traveltime tomography; during FWI, velocity is updated whereas anisotropy is kept fixed. We demonstrate that, for the Endeavour field data set, 3-D FWI is able to recover fine-scale velocity structure with a resolution that is 2-4 times better than conventional traveltime tomography. Quality assurance procedures have been employed to monitor each step of the workflow; these are time consuming but critical to the development of a successful inversion strategy. Finally, a suite of checkerboard tests has been performed which shows that the full potential resolution of FWI can be obtained if we acquire a 3-D survey with a slightly denser shot and receiver spacing than is usual for an academic experiment. We anticipate that this exciting development will encourage future seismic investigations of earth science targets that would benefit from the superior resolution offered by 3-D FWI.

  12. Full Elastic Waveform Search Engine for Near Surface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    For processing land seismic data, the near-surface problem is often very complex and may severely affect our capability to image the subsurface. The current state-of-the-art technology for near surface imaging is the early arrival waveform inversion that solves an acoustic wave-equation problem. However, fitting land seismic data with acoustic wavefield is sometimes invalid. On the other hand, performing elastic waveform inversion is very time-consuming. Similar to a web search engine, we develop a full elastic waveform search engine that includes a large database with synthetic elastic waveforms accounting for a wide range of interval velocity models in the CMP domain. With each CMP gather of real data as an entry, the search engine applies Multiple-Randomized K-Dimensional (MRKD) tree method to find approximate best matches to the entry in about a second. Interpolation of the velocity models at CMP positions creates 2D or 3D Vp, Vs, and density models for the near surface area. The method does not just return one solution; it gives a series of best matches in a solution space. Therefore, the results can help us to examine the resolution and nonuniqueness of the final solution. Further, this full waveform search method can avoid the issues of initial model and cycle skipping that the method of full waveform inversion is difficult to deal with.

  13. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari basin: Full waveform inversion.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    potentially significant role in climate change (Gu et al., 2011), seafloor stability (Brown et al., 2006), and energy security (Boswell and Collett, 2011). Gas hydrates detection in offshore continental margins is generally guided by a bottom simulating... of eastern continental margin of India (Figure 1). We apply FWI in the frequency domain. The domain choice is driven by a) efficiency in forward modeling (Marfurt, 1984), and b) the possibility of a multiscale implementation (Sirgue and Pratt, 2004) which...

  14. Contribution of 3D inversion of Electrical Resistivity Tomography data applied to volcanic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for geological structures imaging. Such structures can present complex characteristics that conventional 2D inversion processes cannot perfectly integrate. Here we present a new 3D inversion algorithm named EResI, firstly developed for levee investigation, and presently applied to the study of a complex lava dome (the Puy de Dôme volcano, France). EResI algorithm is based on a conventional regularized Gauss-Newton inversion scheme and a 3D non-structured discretization of the model (double grid method based on tetrahedrons). This discretization allows to accurately model the topography of investigated structure (without a mesh deformation procedure) and also permits a precise location of the electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that a complete 3D unstructured discretization limits the number of inversion cells and is better adapted to the resolution capacity of tomography than a structured discretization. This study shows that a 3D inversion with a non-structured parametrization has some advantages compared to classical 2D inversions. The first advantage comes from the fact that a 2D inversion leads to artefacts due to 3D effects (3D topography, 3D internal resistivity). The second advantage comes from the fact that the capacity to experimentally align electrodes along an axis (for 2D surveys) depends on the constrains on the field (topography...). In this case, a 2D assumption induced by 2.5D inversion software prevents its capacity to model electrodes outside this axis leading to artefacts in the inversion result. The last limitation comes from the use of mesh deformation techniques used to accurately model the topography in 2D softwares. This technique used for structured discretization (Res2dinv) is prohibed for strong topography (>60 %) and leads to a small computational errors. A wide geophysical survey was carried out

  15. Detailed seismic velocity of the incoming subducting sediments in the 2004 great Sumatra earthquake rupture zone from full waveform inversion of long offset seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanfang; Singh, Satish C.

    2017-04-01

    The nature of incoming sediments defines the locking mechanism on the megathrust, and the development and evolution of the accretionary wedge. Here we present results from seismic full waveform inversion of 12 km long offset seismic reflection data within the trench in the 2004 Sumatra earthquake rupture zone area that provide detailed quantitative information on the incoming oceanic sediments and the trench-fill sediments. The thickness of sediments in this area is 3-4 km, and P wave velocity is as much as 4.5 km/s just above the oceanic crust, suggesting the presence of silica-rich highly compacted and lithified sediments leading to a strong coupling up to the subduction front. We also find an 70-80 m thick low-velocity layer, capped by a high-velocity layer, at 0.8 km above the subducting plate. This low-velocity layer, previously identified as high-amplitude negative polarity reflection, could have porosity of up to 30% containing overpressured fluids, which could act as a protodécollement seaward from the accretionary prism and décollement beneath the forearc. This weak protodécollement combined with the high-velocity indurated sediments above the basement possibly facilitated the rupture propagating up to the front during the 2004 earthquake and enhancing the tsunami. We also find another low-velocity layer within the sediments that may act as a secondary décollement observed offshore central Sumatra, forming bivergent pop-up structures and acting as a conveyer belt in preserving these pop-up structures in the forearc region.

  16. Effects of Conjugate Gradient Methods and Step-Length Formulas on the Multiscale Full Waveform Inversion in Time Domain: Numerical Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youshan; Teng, Jiwen; Xu, Tao; Badal, José; Liu, Qinya; Zhou, Bing

    2017-05-01

    We carry out full waveform inversion (FWI) in time domain based on an alternative frequency-band selection strategy that allows us to implement the method with success. This strategy aims at decomposing the seismic data within partially overlapped frequency intervals by carrying out a concatenated treatment of the wavelet to largely avoid redundant frequency information to adapt to wavelength or wavenumber coverage. A pertinent numerical test proves the effectiveness of this strategy. Based on this strategy, we comparatively analyze the effects of update parameters for the nonlinear conjugate gradient (CG) method and step-length formulas on the multiscale FWI through several numerical tests. The investigations of up to eight versions of the nonlinear CG method with and without Gaussian white noise make clear that the HS (Hestenes and Stiefel in J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect 5:409-436, 1952), CD (Fletcher in Practical methods of optimization vol. 1: unconstrained optimization, Wiley, New York, 1987), and PRP (Polak and Ribière in Revue Francaise Informat Recherche Opertionelle, 3e Année 16:35-43, 1969; Polyak in USSR Comput Math Math Phys 9:94-112, 1969) versions are more efficient among the eight versions, while the DY (Dai and Yuan in SIAM J Optim 10:177-182, 1999) version always yields inaccurate result, because it overestimates the deeper parts of the model. The application of FWI algorithms using distinct step-length formulas, such as the direct method ( Direct), the parabolic search method ( Search), and the two-point quadratic interpolation method ( Interp), proves that the Interp is more efficient for noise-free data, while the Direct is more efficient for Gaussian white noise data. In contrast, the Search is less efficient because of its slow convergence. In general, the three step-length formulas are robust or partly insensitive to Gaussian white noise and the complexity of the model. When the initial velocity model deviates far from the real model or the

  17. 高分辨率的频率空间域声波全波形速度反演-理论模型%High resolution acoustic wave full waveform velocity inversion in frequency space domain-theoretical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖建平; 刘和秀; 王华忠; 彭叶辉; 杨天春; 王齐仁

    2011-01-01

    使用最速下降法进行二维频率空间域声波波动方程全波形速度反演,讨论了如何快速实现高精度的二维频率空间域声波波动方程全波形速度反演.多尺度的思想耦合在反演框架中.把非线性问题化为逐步线性问题是我们关注的焦点,目的是把整个非线性反演的黑匣子转化成为每一步可控的过程,尽可能得到想要的反演解.仅仅使用3个离散的频率,每个频率迭代10次,对广角Marmousi模型进行地面地震声波全波形速度反演,反演得到高分辨率、高精度的速度,为全波形反演实际资料奠定了很好的基础.%We use the steepest descent method based on two-dimensional frequency space domain acoustic wave equation for full waveform velocity inversion, discuss how to quickly realize high precision two-dimensional frequency domain full waveform velocity inversion. Multi-scale criterial is coupling in the inversion framework. The nonlinear problem changes into gradually linear problem is our focus. The purpose is the whole nonlinear inverse black box into every step of controllable process as far as possible, getting an inversion solution we want. Use only three discrete frequencies, each frequency iterative ten times, we make surface seismic acoustic wave full waveform inversion on extended Marmousi and get a high resolution and high precision imaging of velocity. This gives a good foundation for full waveform inversion on real field data.

  18. A comparison of different NDE signal processing techniques based on waveform entropies applied to long fiber-graphite/epoxy-plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larche, Michael; Prowant, Mathew; Bruillard, Paul; Hagge, Tobias; Fifield, Leonard S.; Hughes, Michael; Sun, Xin

    2017-04-01

    This study compares different approaches for imaging the internal architecture of graphite/epoxy composites using backscattered ultrasound. Two cases are studied. In the first, near-surface defects in a thin graphite/epoxy plates are imaged. The backscattered waveforms were used to produce peak-to-peak, logarithm of signal energy, as well as entropy images of different types. All of the entropy images exhibit better border delineation and defect contrast than either the peak-to-peak or the logarithm of signal energy. The best results are obtained using the joint entropy of the backscattered waveforms with a reference function. Two different references are examined. The first is a reflection of the insonifying pulse from a stainless steel reflector. The second is an approximate optimum obtained from an iterative parametric search. The joint entropy images produced using this reference exhibit three times the contrast obtained in previous studies. These plates were later destructively analyzed to determine size and location of near-surface defects and the results are found to agree with the defect location and shape as indicated by the entropy images. In the second study, images of long carbon fibers (50% by weight) in polypropylene thermoplastic were obtained as a first step toward ultrasonic determination of the distributions of fiber position and orientation.

  19. A Comparison of Different NDE Signal Processing Techniques Based on Waveform Entropies Applied to Long Fiber Graphite/Epoxy Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larche, Michael R.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Bruillard, Paul J.; Hagge, Tobias J.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Hughes, Michael S.; Sun, Xin

    2017-04-19

    This study compares different approaches for imaging the internal architecture of graphite/epoxy composites using backscattered ultrasound. Two cases are studied. In the first, near-surface defects in a thin graphite/epoxy plates are imaged. The same backscattered waveforms were used to produce peak-to-peak, logarithm of signal energy, as well as entropy images of different types. All of the entropy images exhibit better border delineation and defect contrast than the either peak-to-peak or logarithm of signal energy. The best results are obtained using the joint entropy of the backscattered waveforms with a reference function. Two different references are examined. The first is a reflection of the insonifying pulse from a stainless steel reflector. The second is an approximate optimum obtained from an iterative parametric search. The joint entropy images produced using this reference exhibit three times the contrast obtained in previous studies. These plates were later destructively analyzed to determine size and location of near-surface defects and the results found to agree with the defect location and shape as indicated by the entropy images. In the second study, images of long carbon graphite fibers (50% by weight) in polypropylene thermoplastic are obtained as a first step toward ultrasonic determination of the distributions of fiber position and orientation.

  20. Source mechanism of Vulcanian degassing at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, determined from waveform inversions of very long period signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra

    2005-01-01

    The source mechanism of very long period (VLP) signals accompanying volcanic degassing bursts at Popocatépetl is analyzed in the 15–70 s band by minimizing the residual error between data and synthetics calculated for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium. The waveforms of two eruptions (23 April and 23 May 2000) representative of mild Vulcanian activity are well reproduced by our inversion, which takes into account volcano topography. The source centroid is positioned 1500 m below the western perimeter of the summit crater, and the modeled source is composed of a shallow dipping crack (sill with easterly dip of 10°) intersecting a steeply dipping crack (northeast striking dike dipping 83° northwest), whose surface extension bisects the vent. Both cracks undergo a similar sequence of inflation, deflation, and reinflation, reflecting a cycle of pressurization, depressurization, and repressurization within a time interval of 3–5 min. The largest moment release occurs in the sill, showing a maximum volume change of 500–1000 m3, pressure drop of 3–5 MPa, and amplitude of recovered pressure equal to 1.2 times the amplitude of the pressure drop. In contrast, the maximum volume change in the dike is less (200–300 m3), with a corresponding pressure drop of 1–2 MPa and pressure recovery equal to the pressure drop. Accompanying these volumetric sources are single-force components with magnitudes of 108 N, consistent with melt advection in response to pressure transients. The source time histories of the volumetric components of the source indicate that significant mass movement starts within the sill and triggers a mass movement response in the dike within a few seconds. Such source behavior is consistent with the opening of a pathway for escape of pent-up gases from slow pressurization of the sill driven by magma crystallization. The opening of this pathway and associated rapid evacuation of volcanic gases induces the pressure drop. Pressure

  1. Loading applied on prosthetic knee of transfemoral amputee: comparison of inverse dynamics and direct measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, R; Cheze, L; Frossard, L

    2009-11-01

    Inverse dynamics is the most comprehensive method that gives access to the net joint forces and moments during walking. However it is based on assumptions (i.e., rigid segments linked by ideal joints) and it is known to be sensitive to the input data (e.g., kinematic derivatives, positions of joint centres and centre of pressure, inertial parameters). Alternatively, transducers can be used to measure directly the load applied on the residuum of transfemoral amputees. So, the purpose of this study was to compare the forces and moments applied on a prosthetic knee measured directly with the ones calculated by three inverse dynamics computations--corresponding to 3 and 2 segments, and "ground reaction vector technique"--during the gait of one patient. The maximum RMSEs between the estimated and directly measured forces (i.e., 56 N) and moment (i.e., 5 N m) were relatively small. However the dynamic outcomes of the prosthetic components (i.e., absorption of the foot, friction and limit stop of the knee) were only partially assessed with inverse dynamic methods.

  2. Arbitrary waveform generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Maurice; Sugawara, Glen

    1995-02-01

    A system for storing an arbitrary waveform on nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) device and generating an analog signal using the NVRAM device is described. A central processing unit is used to synthesize an arbitrary waveform and create a digital representation of the waveform and transfer the digital representation to a microprocessor which, in turn, writes the digital data into an NVRAM device which has been mapped into a portion of the microprocessor address space. The NVRAM device is removed from address space and placed into an independent waveform generation unit. In the waveform generation unit, an address clock provides an address timing signal and a cycle clock provides a transmit signal. Both signals are applied to an address generator. When both signals are present, the address generator generates and transmits to the NVRAM device a new address for each cycle of the address timing signal. In response to each new address generated, the NVRAM devices provides a digital output which is applied to a digital to analog converter. The converter produces a continuous analog output which is smoothed by a filter to produce the arbitrary waveform.

  3. Applying inversion to construct planar, rational spirals that satisfy two-point G(2) Hermite data

    CERN Document Server

    Kurnosenko, A

    2010-01-01

    A method of two-point G(2) Hermite interpolation with spirals is proposed. To construct a sought for curve, the inversion is applied to an arc of some other spiral. To illustrate the method, inversions of parabola are considered in detail. The resulting curve is 4th degree rational. The method allows the matching of a wide range of boundary conditions, including those which require an inflection. Although not all G(2) Hermite data can be matched with a spiral generated from a parabolic arc, introducing one intermediate G(2) data solves the problem. Expanding the method by involving other spirals arcs is also discussed. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hybrid inversions of CO2 fluxes at regional scale applied to network design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountouris, Panagiotis; Gerbig, Christoph; -Thomas Koch, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Long term observations of atmospheric greenhouse gas measuring stations, located at representative regions over the continent, improve our understanding of greenhouse gas sources and sinks. These mixing ratio measurements can be linked to surface fluxes by atmospheric transport inversions. Within the upcoming years new stations are to be deployed, which requires decision making tools with respect to the location and the density of the network. We are developing a method to assess potential greenhouse gas observing networks in terms of their ability to recover specific target quantities. As target quantities we use CO2 fluxes aggregated to specific spatial and temporal scales. We introduce a high resolution inverse modeling framework, which attempts to combine advantages from pixel based inversions with those of a carbon cycle data assimilation system (CCDAS). The hybrid inversion system consists of the Lagrangian transport model STILT, the diagnostic biosphere model VPRM and a Bayesian inversion scheme. We aim to retrieve the spatiotemporal distribution of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at a high spatial resolution (10 km x 10 km) by inverting for spatially and temporally varying scaling factors for gross ecosystem exchange (GEE) and respiration (R) rather than solving for the fluxes themselves. Thus the state space includes parameters for controlling photosynthesis and respiration, but unlike in a CCDAS it allows for spatial and temporal variations, which can be expressed as NEE(x,y,t) = λG(x,y,t) GEE(x,y,t) + λR(x,y,t) R(x,y,t) . We apply spatially and temporally correlated uncertainties by using error covariance matrices with non-zero off-diagonal elements. Synthetic experiments will test our system and select the optimal a priori error covariance by using different spatial and temporal correlation lengths on the error statistics of the a priori covariance and comparing the optimized fluxes against the 'known truth'. As 'known truth' we use independent fluxes

  5. Rupture process of the main shock of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake with special reference to damaging ground motions: waveform inversion with empirical Green's functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Atsushi; Nagasaka, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the rupture process of the main shock of the Kumamoto earthquake, particularly the generation of strong ground motions in the frequency range relevant to structural damage, was investigated based on the inversion of strong ground motions. Strong-motion records in the near-source region were mainly utilized because the authors were interested in the generation mechanism of damaging ground motions in the near-source region. Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) were applied to avoid uncertainty in the subsurface structure model. Four cases of inversions with different combinations of small events were used to investigate the dependence of the inversion results on the selection of the small events. It was found that the dependence of the final slip distribution and peak slip velocity distribution on the selection of the EGF events is small. The results clearly indicate that a region of significantly large slip and slip velocity existed approximately 15 km northeast of the hypocenter. However, no "asperity" was observed between the hypocenter and Mashiki. Thus, it is not appropriate to conclude that the large-amplitude pulse-like ground motion in Mashiki was generated by the forward-directivity effect associated with the rupture of an asperity. As far as the source effect is concerned, the ground motion in Mashiki cannot be interpreted as the worst case scenario. On the other hand, the rupture of the "asperity" 15 km northeast of the hypocenter should have caused significantly large ground motions in regions close to the asperity. The significant damage of highway bridges in the region can potentially be attributed to the rupture of the asperity. The result of this study was compared with an inversion result obtained from numerical Green's functions for a layered half-space. The two results share the main features in spite of the difference of the Green's functions and stations used. Therefore, it can be concluded that these two source models capture the

  6. A necessary condition for applying MUSIC algorithm in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taehoon; Park, Won-Kwang

    2015-09-01

    Throughout various results of numerical simulations, it is well-known that MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm can be applied in the limited-view inverse scattering problems. However, the application is somehow heuristic. In this contribution, we identify a necessary condition of MUSIC for imaging of collection of small, perfectly conducting cracks. This is based on the fact that MUSIC imaging functional can be represented as an infinite series of Bessel function of integer order of the first kind. Numerical experiments from noisy synthetic data supports our investigation.

  7. Forest Canopy LAI and Vertical FAVD Profile Inversion from Airborne Full-Waveform LiDAR Data Based on a Radiative Transfer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopy leaf area index (LAI is a critical variable for the modeling of climates and ecosystems over both regional and global scales. This paper proposes a physically based method to retrieve LAI and foliage area volume density (FAVD profile directly from full-waveform Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR data using a radiative transfer (RT model. First, a physical interaction model between LiDAR and a forest scene was built on the basis of radiative transfer theories. Next, FAVD profile of each laser shot of full-waveform LiDAR was inverted using the physical model. In addition, the missing LiDAR data, caused by high-density forest and LiDAR system limitations, were filled in based on the inverted FAVD and the ancillary CHM data. Finally, LAI of the study area was retrieved from the inverted FAVD at a 10-m resolution. CHM derived LAI based on the Beer-Lambert law was compared with the LAI derived from full-waveform data. Also, we compared the results with the field measured LAI. The values of correlation coefficient r and RMSE of the estimated LAI were 0.73 and 0.67, respectively. The results indicate that full-waveform LiDAR data is a reliable data source and represent a useful tool for retrieving forest LAI.

  8. The Inverse System Method Applied to the Derivation of Power System Non—linear Control Laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DonghaiLI; XuezhiJIANG; 等

    1997-01-01

    The differential geometric method has been applied to a series of power system non-linear control problems effectively.However a set of differential equations must be solved for obtaining the required diffeomorphic transformation.Therefore the derivation of control laws is very complicated.In fact because of the specificity of power system models the required diffeomorphic transformation may be obtained directly,so it is unnecessary to solve a set of differential equations.In addition inverse system method is equivalent to differential geometric method in reality and not limited to affine nonlinear systems,Its physical meaning is able to be viewed directly and its deduction needs only algebraic operation and derivation,so control laws can be obtained easily and the application to engineering is very convenient.Authors of this paper take steam valving control of power system as a typical case to be studied.It is demonstrated that the control law deduced by inverse system method is just the same as one by differential geometric method.The conclusion will simplify the control law derivations of steam valving,excitation,converter and static var compensator by differential geometric method and may be suited to similar control problems in other areas.

  9. Full-waveform inversion of cross-hole GPR data collected in a strongly heterogeneous chalk reservoir analogue with sharp permittivity and conductivity contrasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Moreau, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Chalk sediments form an important reservoir for groundwater onshore and for hydrocarbons in the Danish sector of the North Sea. Cross-hole Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography is an efficient method to investigate subtle porosity variations in the chalk. Traditional ray-based inversion techn...

  10. Applying coda envelope measurements to local and regional waveforms for stable estimates of magnitude, source spectra and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, R.; Mayeda, K.; Rodgers, A.; Walter, W.

    1999-07-26

    Magnitude estimation forms an integral part in any seismic monitoring endeavor. For monitoring compliance of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, regional seismic discriminants are often functions of magnitude such as m{sub b}:M{sub 0} high-to-low spectral ratios, and nuclear yield estimation. For small-to-moderate magnitude events that cannot be studied by a large regional or global network of stations, there is a need for stable magnitudes that can be obtained from as few as one station. To date, magnitudes based on coda envelopes are by far the most stable because of the coda's averaging properties. Unlike conventional magnitudes which utilize the direct phases such as P (P{sub n}, P{sub g}) or S (S{sub n}, L{sub g}), or M{sub g}, a coda envelope magnitude is not as sensitive to the undesirable effects of source radiation pattern, 3-D path heterogeneity, and constructive/destructive interference near the recording site. The stability of the coda comes from a time-domain measurement made over a large portion of the seismogram thereby averaging over the scattered wavefield. This approach has been applied to earthquakes in the western United States where it was found that a single-station coda magnitude was approximately equivalent to an average over a 64 station network which used only the direct waves such as L{sub g} (Mayeda and Walter, JGR, 1996). In this paper we describe in detail our calibration procedure starting with a broadband recording, correlation with independent moment estimates, formation of narrowband envelopes, coda envelope fitting with synthetics, and finally the resultant moment-rate spectra. Our procedure accounts for all propagation, site, and S-to-coda transfer function effects. The resultant coda-derived moment-rate spectra are then used to estimate seismic moment (M{sub o}), narrowband magnitudes such as m{sub b} or M{sub L}, and total seismic energy. For the eastern Mediterranean region a preliminary study was completed for

  11. Tsunami simulation method initiated from waveforms observed by ocean bottom pressure sensors for real-time tsunami forecast; Applied for 2011 Tohoku Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Yuichiro

    2017-04-01

    After tsunami disaster due to the 2011 Tohoku-oki great earthquake, improvement of the tsunami forecast has been an urgent issue in Japan. National Institute of Disaster Prevention is installing a cable network system of earthquake and tsunami observation (S-NET) at the ocean bottom along the Japan and Kurile trench. This cable system includes 125 pressure sensors (tsunami meters) which are separated by 30 km. Along the Nankai trough, JAMSTEC already installed and operated the cable network system of seismometers and pressure sensors (DONET and DONET2). Those systems are the most dense observation network systems on top of source areas of great underthrust earthquakes in the world. Real-time tsunami forecast has depended on estimation of earthquake parameters, such as epicenter, depth, and magnitude of earthquakes. Recently, tsunami forecast method has been developed using the estimation of tsunami source from tsunami waveforms observed at the ocean bottom pressure sensors. However, when we have many pressure sensors separated by 30km on top of the source area, we do not need to estimate the tsunami source or earthquake source to compute tsunami. Instead, we can initiate a tsunami simulation from those dense tsunami observed data. Observed tsunami height differences with a time interval at the ocean bottom pressure sensors separated by 30 km were used to estimate tsunami height distribution at a particular time. In our new method, tsunami numerical simulation was initiated from those estimated tsunami height distribution. In this paper, the above method is improved and applied for the tsunami generated by the 2011 Tohoku-oki great earthquake. Tsunami source model of the 2011 Tohoku-oki great earthquake estimated using observed tsunami waveforms, coseimic deformation observed by GPS and ocean bottom sensors by Gusman et al. (2012) is used in this study. The ocean surface deformation is computed from the source model and used as an initial condition of tsunami

  12. Source Characteristics of the 2007 Pisco Earthquake (Mw=8.0), Central Peru, Derived From Seismic Waveforms Inversion and Tsunami Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladen, A.; Konca, A. O.; Perfettini, H.; Audin, L.; Tavera, H.; Avouac, J.; Simons, M.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2007-12-01

    We have undertaken a detailed analysis of the source of the 2007 Pisco earthquake based on the modeling of teleseismic and accelerometric records, and taking into account available information on uplift or subsidence along the coastline, as well as run-up heights. Preliminary analysis of the teleseismic P waves, show that the 2007 earthquake was characterized by two distinct sub-events, occurring 60s apart. The inversion of the teleseismic body waves (P and SH) reveals that the first sub-event was located at the hypocenter, and that most of the energy was released by the second patch, in a similar way to the 2001 South Peru earthquake (Mw=8.4). Assuming that the aftershock distribution is a good approximation of the rupture extent (130 km), the duration of the P wave signal bounds the rupture velocity to values below 2 km/s. The small move-out observed between the P wave phases supports this hypothesis, but also limits our ability to clearly resolve between different low rupture velocities. This resolution limitation is also enhanced by the complex geometry of the slab which prevents the correct inversion of the slip history based on a single 2D fault plane. We use earthquake catalogues to better constrain the subduction interface, and consider a multi-plane geometry for our inversion. The directivity of this event confirms the previously identified tendency of large South Peru, and Chile earthquakes to rupture unilateraly to the south.

  13. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied aerodynamic design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1988-01-01

    Several inverse methods have been compared and initial results indicate that differences in results are primarily due to coordinate systems and fuselage representations and not to design procedures. Further, results from a direct-inverse method that includes 3-D wing boundary layer effects, wake curvature, and wake displacement are presented. These results show that boundary layer displacements must be included in the design process for accurate results.

  14. Finite-fault analysis of the 2004 Parkfield, California, earthquake using Pnl waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.

    2008-01-01

    We apply a kinematic finite-fault inversion scheme to Pnl displacement waveforms recorded at 14 regional stations (Δsingle Mw 5.0 aftershock. Slip is modeled on a rectangular fault subdivided into 2×2 km subfaults assuming a constant rupture velocity and a 0.5 sec rise time. A passband filter of 0.1–0.5 Hz is applied to both data and subfault responses prior to waveform inversion. The SGF inversions are performed such that the final seismic moment is consistent with the known magnitude (Mw 6.0) of the earthquake. For these runs, it is difficult to reproduce the entire Pnl waveform due to inaccuracies in the assumed crustal structure. Also, the misfit between observed and predicted vertical waveforms is similar in character for different rupture velocities, indicating that neither the rupture velocity nor the exact position of slip sources along the fault can be uniquely identified. The pattern of coseismic slip, however, compares well with independent source models derived using other data types, indicating that the SGF inversion procedure provides a general first-order estimate of the 2004 Parkfield rupture using the vertical Pnl records. The best-constrained slip model is obtained using the single-aftershock EGF approach. In this case, the waveforms are very well reproduced for both vertical and horizontal components, suggesting that the method provides a powerful tool for estimating the distribution of coseismic slip using the regional Pnl waveforms. The inferred slip model shows a localized patch of high slip (55 cm peak) near the hypocenter and a larger slip area (~50 cm peak) extending between 6 and 20 km to the northwest.

  15. Applying neural networks to the solution of forward and inverse heat conduction problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, S.; Hwang, Y. [Department of Weapon System Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, No. 190, Sanyuan 1st St., Dashi Jen, Taoyuan 33509, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2006-12-15

    This paper employs the continuous-time analogue Hopfield neural network to compute the temperature distribution in forward heat conduction problems and solves inverse heat conduction problems by using a back propagation neural (BPN) network to identify the unknown boundary conditions. The weak generalization capacity of BPN networks is improved by employing the Bayesian regularization algorithm. The feasibility of the proposed method is examined in a series of numerical simulations. The results show that the proposed neural network analysis method successfully solves forward heat conduction problems and is capable of predicting the unknown parameters in inverse problems with an acceptable error. (author)

  16. Non-regularized inversion method from light scattering applied to ferrofluid magnetization curves for magnetic size distribution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijssel, Jos van; Kuipers, Bonny W.M.; Erné, Ben H., E-mail: B.H.Erne@uu.nl

    2014-03-15

    A numerical inversion method known from the analysis of light scattering by colloidal dispersions is now applied to magnetization curves of ferrofluids. The distribution of magnetic particle sizes or dipole moments is determined without assuming that the distribution is unimodal or of a particular shape. The inversion method enforces positive number densities via a non-negative least squares procedure. It is tested successfully on experimental and simulated data for ferrofluid samples with known multimodal size distributions. The created computer program MINORIM is made available on the web. - Highlights: • A method from light scattering is applied to analyze ferrofluid magnetization curves. • A magnetic size distribution is obtained without prior assumption of its shape. • The method is tested successfully on ferrofluids with a known size distribution. • The practical limits of the method are explored with simulated data including noise. • This method is implemented in the program MINORIM, freely available online.

  17. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    An inverse wing design method was developed around an existing transonic wing analysis code. The original analysis code, TAWFIVE, has as its core the numerical potential flow solver, FLO30, developed by Jameson and Caughey. Features of the analysis code include a finite-volume formulation; wing and fuselage fitted, curvilinear grid mesh; and a viscous boundary layer correction that also accounts for viscous wake thickness and curvature. The development of the inverse methods as an extension of previous methods existing for design in Cartesian coordinates is presented. Results are shown for inviscid wing design cases in super-critical flow regimes. The test cases selected also demonstrate the versatility of the design method in designing an entire wing or discontinuous sections of a wing.

  18. Inverse computational feedback optimization imaging applied to time varying changes in a homogeneous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel J; Manwaring, Mark L; Soule, Terence

    2008-01-01

    The technique of inverse computational feedback optimization imaging allows for the imaging of varying tissue without the continuous need of a complex imaging systems such as an MRI or CT. Our method trades complex imaging equipment for computing power. The objective is to use a baseline scan from an imaging system along with finite element method computational software to calculate the physically measurable parameters (such as voltage or temperature). As the physically measurable parameters change the computational model is iteratively run until it matches the measured values. Optimization routines are implemented to accelerate the process of finding the new values. Presented is a computational model demonstrating how the inverse imaging technique would work with a simple homogeneous sample with a circular structure. It demonstrates the ability to locate an object with only a few point measurements. The presented computational model uses swarm optimization techniques to help find the object location from the measured data (which in this case is voltage).

  19. Buried Object Detection by an Inexact Newton Method Applied to Nonlinear Inverse Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Pastorino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to reconstruct buried objects is proposed. It is based on the integral equations of the electromagnetic inverse scattering problem, written in terms of the Green’s function for half-space geometries. The full nonlinearity of the problem is exploited in order to inspect strong scatterers. After discretization of the continuous model, the resulting equations are solved in a regularization sense by means of a two-step inexact Newton algorithm. The capabilities and limitations of the method are evaluated by means of some numerical simulations.

  20. Geoid Recovery using Geophysical Inverse Theory Applied to Satellite to Satellite Tracking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a new method for determination of the geopotential. The analysis is aimed at the GRACE mission. This Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) mission is viewed as a mapping mission The result will be maps of the geoid. The elements of potential theory, celestial mechanics, and Geophysical Inverse Theory are integrated into a computation architecture, and the results of several simulations presented Centimeter accuracy geoids with 50 to 100 km resolution can be recovered with a 30 to 60 day mission.

  1. On decomposing stimulus and response waveforms in event-related potentials recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Gang; Zhang, Jun

    2011-06-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) reflect the brain activities related to specific behavioral events, and are obtained by averaging across many trial repetitions with individual trials aligned to the onset of a specific event, e.g., the onset of stimulus (s-aligned) or the onset of the behavioral response (r-aligned). However, the s-aligned and r-aligned ERP waveforms do not purely reflect, respectively, underlying stimulus (S-) or response (R-) component waveform, due to their cross-contaminations in the recorded ERP waveforms. Zhang [J. Neurosci. Methods, 80, pp. 49-63, 1998] proposed an algorithm to recover the pure S-component waveform and the pure R-component waveform from the s-aligned and r-aligned ERP average waveforms-however, due to the nature of this inverse problem, a direct solution is sensitive to noise that disproportionally affects low-frequency components, hindering the practical implementation of this algorithm. Here, we apply the Wiener deconvolution technique to deal with noise in input data, and investigate a Tikhonov regularization approach to obtain a stable solution that is robust against variances in the sampling of reaction-time distribution (when number of trials is low). Our method is demonstrated using data from a Go/NoGo experiment about image classification and recognition.

  2. Implementation of Artificial Neural Network applied for the solution of inverse kinematics of 2-link serial chain manipulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a method of artificial neural network applied for the solution of inverse kinematics of 2-link serial chain manipulator. The method is multilayer perceptrons neural network has applied. This unsupervised method learns the functional relationship between input (Cartesian space and output (joint space based on a localized adaptation of the mapping, by using the manipulator itself under joint control and adapting the solution based on a comparison between the resulting locations of the manipulator's end effectors in Cartesian space with the desired location. Even when a manipulator is not available; the approach is still valid if the forward kinematic equations are used as a model of the manipulator. The forward kinematic equations always have a unique solution, and the resulting Neural net can be used as a starting point for further refinement when the manipulator does become available. Artificial neural network especially MLP are used to learn the forward and the inverse kinematic equations of two degrees freedom robot arm. A set of some data sets were first generated as per the formula equation for this the input parameter X and Y coordinates in inches. Using these data sets was basis for the training and evaluation or testing the MLP model. Out of the sets data points, maximum were used as training data and some were used for testing for MLP. Backpropagation algorithm was used for training the network and for updating the desired weights. In this work epoch based training method was applied.

  3. Power Series Method applied to Inverse Analysis in Chemical Kinetics Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Sandoval, E.; Mello, A.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Samana, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Power Series Solution Method has been traditionally used to solve Ordinary and Partial Linear Differential Equations. However, despite their usefulness the application of this method has been limited to this particular kind of equations. In this work we use the method of power series to solve nonlinear partial differential equations. The method is applied to solve three versions of nonlinear time-dependent Burgers-Type differential equations in order to demonstrate its scope and applicability.

  4. Simple Waveforms, Simply Described

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first Lazarus Project calculations, it has been frequently noted that binary black hole merger waveforms are 'simple.' In this talk we examine some of the simple features of coalescence and merger waveforms from a variety of binary configurations. We suggest an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This allows a coherent description, of both the inspiral waveforms, derivable from post-Newtonian(PN) calculations, and the numerically determined merger-ringdown. We focus particularly on similarities in the features of various Multipolar waveform components Generated by various systems. The late-time phase evolution of most L these waveform components are accurately described with a sinple analytic fit. We also discuss apparent relationships among phase and amplitude evolution. Taken together with PN information, the features we describe can provide an approximate analytic description full coalescence wavefoRms. complementary to other analytic waveforns approaches.

  5. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H., E-mail: aelsheikh@ices.utexas.edu [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Wheeler, Mary F. [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Hoteit, Ibrahim [Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-02-01

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems.

  6. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  7. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    KAUST Repository

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.

    2014-02-01

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Inverse and direct modeling applied in the estimation of kinetic parameters of BSA adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Curbelo Rodríguez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} The kinetic modeling applied in the parameters estimation of chromatographic adsorption processes is an important tool in the understanding and improvement of these separation systems. In this work, two kinetic models were utilized in the parameters estimation of BSA adsorption. The correlations between the irreversible kinetic model and the reversible kinetic model with the experimental data were carried out using the Linear Driving Force and the Random Restricted Window (R2W method, respectively. From both models was possible to achieve a good fit with the experimental data, obtaining parameters with higher accuracy due to the low residues of the cost function.

  9. Full traveltime inversion in source domain

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a new method of source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI). The objective of this study is automatically building near-surface velocity using the early arrivals of seismic data. This method can generate the inverted velocity that can kinetically best match the reconstructed plane-wave source of early arrivals with true source in source domain. It does not require picking first arrivals for tomography, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based tomographic inversion. Besides, this method does not need estimate the source wavelet, which is a necessity for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. Furthermore, we applied our method on one synthetic dataset; the results show our method could generate a reasonable background velocity even when shingling first arrivals exist and could provide a good initial velocity for the conventional full waveform inversion (FWI).

  10. Unwrapped phase inversion for near surface seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-11-04

    The Phase-wrapping is one of the main obstacles of waveform inversion. We use an inversion algorithm based on the instantaneous-traveltime that overcomes the phase-wrapping problem. With a high damping factor, the frequency-dependent instantaneous-traveltime inversion provides the stability of refraction tomography, with higher resolution results, and no arrival picking involved. We apply the instantaneous-traveltime inversion to the synthetic data generated by the elastic time-domain modeling. The synthetic data is a representative of the near surface seismic data. Although the inversion algorithm is based on the acoustic wave equation, the numerical examples show that the instantaneous-traveltime inversion generates a convergent velocity model, very similar to what we see from traveltime tomography.

  11. The use of forest stand age information in an atmospheric CO2 inversion applied to North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Deng; J.M. Chen; Y. Pan; W. Peters; R. Birdsey; K. McCullough; J. Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric inversions have become an important tool in quantifying carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks and sources at a variety of spatiotemporal scales, but associated large uncertainties restrain the inversion research community from reaching agreement on many important subjects. We enhanced an atmospheric inversion of the CO2...

  12. Unwrapped phase inversion with an exponential damping

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2015-07-28

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the phase wrapping (cycle skipping) problem when the frequency of data is not low enough. Unless we obtain a good initial velocity model, the phase wrapping problem in FWI causes a result corresponding to a local minimum, usually far away from the true solution, especially at depth. Thus, we have developed an inversion algorithm based on a space-domain unwrapped phase, and we also used exponential damping to mitigate the nonlinearity associated with the reflections. We construct the 2D phase residual map, which usually contains the wrapping discontinuities, especially if the model is complex and the frequency is high. We then unwrap the phase map and remove these cycle-based jumps. However, if the phase map has several residues, the unwrapping process becomes very complicated. We apply a strong exponential damping to the wavefield to eliminate much of the residues in the phase map, thus making the unwrapping process simple. We finally invert the unwrapped phases using the back-propagation algorithm to calculate the gradient. We progressively reduce the damping factor to obtain a high-resolution image. Numerical examples determined that the unwrapped phase inversion with a strong exponential damping generated convergent long-wavelength updates without low-frequency information. This model can be used as a good starting model for a subsequent inversion with a reduced damping, eventually leading to conventional waveform inversion.

  13. The Aerodyne Inverse Modeling System (AIMS): Source estimation applied to the FFT 07 experiment and to simulated mobile sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albo, Simón E.; Oluwole, Oluwayemisi O.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.

    2011-10-01

    The Aerodyne Inverse Modeling System was developed to enable location and characterization of hazardous atmospheric releases from dispersion and meteorological data. It combines an automatically-generated tangent-linear of SCIPUFF with a cost function tailored for practical applications and a minimization algorithm that can search for multiple instantaneous or continuous sources without requiring an initial guess. In this work AIMS was applied to estimate the sources in 84 FFT 07 cases that included instantaneous and continuous releases for up to four source locations. FFT 07 was a controlled short-range (˜500 m) dispersion test using 100 digiPIDs evenly distributed over an area of 0.5 × 0.5 km. AIMS estimated sources were in average within 90-150 m of the real sources, with the distances from estimated to real source ranging from 0 to 510 m. AIMS performed better estimating the location of instantaneous sources than of continuous ones. It also performed better for single-source situations than for multiple source scenarios and when 16 sensors were used instead of 4. In addition to using stationary sensors, AIMS also has the capability of processing data from mobile sensors. This was applied using model-generated data in an example of a release in a setting similar to an industrial facility.

  14. Time-dependent phase error correction using digital waveform synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Buskirk, Stephen

    2017-10-10

    The various technologies presented herein relate to correcting a time-dependent phase error generated as part of the formation of a radar waveform. A waveform can be pre-distorted to facilitate correction of an error induced into the waveform by a downstream operation/component in a radar system. For example, amplifier power droop effect can engender a time-dependent phase error in a waveform as part of a radar signal generating operation. The error can be quantified and an according complimentary distortion can be applied to the waveform to facilitate negation of the error during the subsequent processing of the waveform. A time domain correction can be applied by a phase error correction look up table incorporated into a waveform phase generator.

  15. An MSK Radar Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater

  16. Waveform Fingerprinting for Efficient Seismic Signal Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, C. E.; OReilly, O. J.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Cross-correlating an earthquake waveform template with continuous waveform data has proven a powerful approach for detecting events missing from earthquake catalogs. If templates do not exist, it is possible to divide the waveform data into short overlapping time windows, then identify window pairs with similar waveforms. Applying these approaches to earthquake monitoring in seismic networks has tremendous potential to improve the completeness of earthquake catalogs, but because effort scales quadratically with time, it rapidly becomes computationally infeasible. We develop a fingerprinting technique to identify similar waveforms, using only a few compact features of the original data. The concept is similar to human fingerprints, which utilize key diagnostic features to identify people uniquely. Analogous audio-fingerprinting approaches have accurately and efficiently found similar audio clips within large databases; example applications include identifying songs and finding copyrighted content within YouTube videos. In order to fingerprint waveforms, we compute a spectrogram of the time series, and segment it into multiple overlapping windows (spectral images). For each spectral image, we apply a wavelet transform, and retain only the sign of the maximum magnitude wavelet coefficients. This procedure retains just the large-scale structure of the data, providing both robustness to noise and significant dimensionality reduction. Each fingerprint is a high-dimensional, sparse, binary data object that can be stored in a database without significant storage costs. Similar fingerprints within the database are efficiently searched using locality-sensitive hashing. We test this technique on waveform data from the Northern California Seismic Network that contains events not detected in the catalog. We show that this algorithm successfully identifies similar waveforms and detects uncataloged low magnitude events in addition to cataloged events, while running to completion

  17. ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmberger, D; Tromp, J; Rodgers, A

    2007-07-16

    Comprehensive test ban monitoring in terms of location and discrimination has progressed significantly in recent years. However, the characterization of sources and the estimation of low yields remains a particular challenge. As the recent Korean shot demonstrated, we can probably expect to have a small set of teleseismic, far-regional and high-frequency regional data to analyze in estimating the yield of an event. Since stacking helps to bring signals out of the noise, it becomes useful to conduct comparable analyses on neighboring events, earthquakes in this case. If these auxiliary events have accurate moments and source descriptions, we have a means of directly comparing effective source strengths. Although we will rely on modeling codes, 1D, 2D, and 3D, we will also apply a broadband calibration procedure to use longer periods (P>5s) waveform data to calibrate short-period (P between .5 to 2 Hz) and high-frequency (P between 2 to 10 Hz) as path specify station corrections from well-known regional sources. We have expanded our basic Cut-and-Paste (CAP) methodology to include not only timing shifts but also amplitude (f) corrections at recording sites. The name of this method was derived from source inversions that allow timing shifts between 'waveform segments' (or cutting the seismogram up and re-assembling) to correct for crustal variation. For convenience, we will refer to these f-dependent refinements as CAP+ for (SP) and CAP++ for still higher frequency. These methods allow the retrieval of source parameters using only P-waveforms where radiation patterns are obvious as demonstrated in this report and are well suited for explosion P-wave data. The method is easily extended to all distances because it uses Green's function although there may be some changes required in t* to adjust for offsets between local vs. teleseismic distances. In short, we use a mixture of model-dependent and empirical corrections to tackle the path effects. Although

  18. The use of forest stand age information in an atmospheric CO2 inversion applied to North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, F.; Chen, J.M.; Pan, Y.; Peters, W.; Birdsey, R.; McCullough, K.; Xiao, J.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric inversions have become an important tool in quantifying carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks and sources at a variety of spatiotemporal scales, but associated large uncertainties restrain the inversion research community from reaching agreement on many important subjects. We enhanced an atmospheri

  19. Why Waveform Correlation Sometimes Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, J.

    2015-12-01

    Waveform correlation detectors used in explosion monitoring scan noisy geophysical data to test two competing hypotheses: either (1) an amplitude-scaled version of a template waveform is present, or, (2) no signal is present at all. In reality, geophysical wavefields that are monitored for explosion signatures include waveforms produced by non-target sources that are partially correlated with the waveform template. Such signals can falsely trigger correlation detectors, particularly at low thresholds required to monitor for smaller target explosions. This challenge is particularly formidable when monitoring known test sites for seismic disturbances, since uncatalogued natural seismicity is (generally) more prevalent at lower magnitudes, and could be mistaken for small explosions. To address these challenges, we identify real examples in which correlation detectors targeting explosions falsely trigger on both site-proximal earthquakes (Figure 1, below) and microseismic "noise". Motivated by these examples, we quantify performance loss when applying these detectors, and re-evaluate the correlation-detector's hypothesis test. We thereby derive new detectors from more general hypotheses that admit unknown background seismicity, and apply these to real data. From our treatment, we derive "rules of thumb'' for proper template and threshold selection in heavily cluttered signal environments. Last, we answer the question "what is the probability of falsely detecting an earthquake collocated at a test site?", using correlation detectors that include explosion-triggered templates. Figure Top: An eight-channel data stream (black) recorded from an earthquake near a mine. Red markers indicate a detection. Middle: The correlation statistic computed by scanning the template against the data stream at top. The red line indicates the threshold for event declaration, determined by a false-alarm on noise probability constraint, as computed from the signal-absent distribution using

  20. Platform for Postprocessing Waveform-Based NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don

    2008-01-01

    Taking advantage of the similarities that exist among all waveform-based non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods, a common software platform has been developed containing multiple- signal and image-processing techniques for waveforms and images. The NASA NDE Signal and Image Processing software has been developed using the latest versions of LabVIEW, and its associated Advanced Signal Processing and Vision Toolkits. The software is useable on a PC with Windows XP and Windows Vista. The software has been designed with a commercial grade interface in which two main windows, Waveform Window and Image Window, are displayed if the user chooses a waveform file to display. Within these two main windows, most actions are chosen through logically conceived run-time menus. The Waveform Window has plots for both the raw time-domain waves and their frequency- domain transformations (fast Fourier transform and power spectral density). The Image Window shows the C-scan image formed from information of the time-domain waveform (such as peak amplitude) or its frequency-domain transformation at each scan location. The user also has the ability to open an image, or series of images, or a simple set of X-Y paired data set in text format. Each of the Waveform and Image Windows contains menus from which to perform many user actions. An option exists to use raw waves obtained directly from scan, or waves after deconvolution if system wave response is provided. Two types of deconvolution, time-based subtraction or inverse-filter, can be performed to arrive at a deconvolved wave set. Additionally, the menu on the Waveform Window allows preprocessing of waveforms prior to image formation, scaling and display of waveforms, formation of different types of images (including non-standard types such as velocity), gating of portions of waves prior to image formation, and several other miscellaneous and specialized operations. The menu available on the Image Window allows many further image

  1. DSP Based Waveform Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The DSP Based Waveform Generator is used for CSR Control system to control special controlled objects, such as the pulsed power supply for magnets, RF system, injection and extraction synchronization, global CSR synchronization etc. This intelligent controller based on 4800 MIPS DSP and 256M SDRAM technology will supply highly stable and highly accurate reference waveform used by the power supply of magnets. The specifications are as follows:

  2. Arterial waveform analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Stephen A; Pinsky, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The bedside measurement of continuous arterial pressure values from waveform analysis has been routinely available via indwelling arterial catheterization for >50 years. Invasive blood pressure monitoring has been utilized in critically ill patients, in both the operating room and critical care units, to facilitate rapid diagnoses of cardiovascular insufficiency and monitor response to treatments aimed at correcting abnormalities before the consequences of either hypo- or hypertension are seen. Minimally invasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (CO) have gained increased appeal. This has led to the increased interest in arterial waveform analysis to provide this important information, as it is measured continuously in many operating rooms and intensive care units. Arterial waveform analysis also allows for the calculation of many so-called derived parameters intrinsically created by this pulse pressure profile. These include estimates of left ventricular stroke volume (SV), CO, vascular resistance, and during positive-pressure breathing, SV variation, and pulse pressure variation. This article focuses on the principles of arterial waveform analysis and their determinants, components of the arterial system, and arterial pulse contour. It will also address the advantage of measuring real-time CO by the arterial waveform and the benefits to measuring SV variation. Arterial waveform analysis has gained a large interest in the overall assessment and management of the critically ill and those at a risk of hemodynamic deterioration.

  3. High performance liquid chromatography-charged aerosol detection applying an inverse gradient for quantification of rhamnolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Beate; Baune, Matthias; Jungkeit, Janek; Tiso, Till; Blank, Lars M; Hayen, Heiko

    2016-07-15

    A method using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to charged-aerosol detection (HPLC-CAD) was developed for the quantification of rhamnolipid biosurfactants. Qualitative sample composition was determined by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The relative quantification of different derivatives of rhamnolipids including di-rhamnolipids, mono-rhamnolipids, and their precursors 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxy)alkanoic acids (HAAs) differed for two compared LC-MS instruments and revealed instrument dependent responses. Our here reported HPLC-CAD method provides uniform response. An inverse gradient was applied for the absolute quantification of rhamnolipid congeners to account for the detector's dependency on the solvent composition. The CAD produces a uniform response not only for the analytes but also for structurally different (nonvolatile) compounds. It was demonstrated that n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside or deoxycholic acid can be used as alternative standards. The method of HPLC-ultra violet (UV) detection after a derivatization of rhamnolipids and HAAs to their corresponding phenacyl esters confirmed the obtained results but required additional, laborious sample preparation steps. Sensitivity determined as limit of detection and limit of quantification for four mono-rhamnolipids was in the range of 0.3-1.0 and 1.2-2.0μg/mL, respectively, for HPLC-CAD and 0.4 and 1.5μg/mL, respectively, for HPLC-UV. Linearity for HPLC-CAD was at least 0.996 (R(2)) in the calibrated range of about 1-200μg/mL. Hence, the here presented HPLC-CAD method allows absolute quantification of rhamnolipids and derivatives.

  4. A new co-operative inversion strategy via fuzzy clustering technique applied to seismic and magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong Kieu, Duy; Kepic, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical inversion produces very useful images of earth parameters; however, inversion results usually suffer from inherent non-uniqueness: many subsurface models with different structures and parameters can explain the measurements. To reduce the ambiguity, extra information about the earth's structure and physical properties is needed. This prior information can be extracted from geological principles, prior petrophysical information from well logs, and complementary information from other geophysical methods. Any technique used to constrain inversion should be able to integrate the prior information and to guide updating inversion process in terms of the geological model. In this research, we have adopted fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique for this purpose. FCM is a clustering method that allows us to divide the model of physical parameters into a few clusters of representative values that also may relate to geological units based on the similarity of the geophysical properties. This exploits the fact that in many geological environments the earth is comprised of a few distinctive rock units with different physical properties. Therefore FCM can provide a platform to constrain geophysical inversion, and should tend to produce models that are geologically meaningful. FCM was incorporated in both separate and co-operative inversion processing of seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) data with petrophysical constraints. Using petrophysical information through FCM assists the inversion to build a reliable earth model. In this algorithm, FCM plays a role of guider; it uses the prior information to drive the model update process, and also forming an earth model filled with rocks units rather than smooth transitions when the boundary is in doubt. Where petrophysical information from well logs or core measurement is not locally available the cluster petrophysics may be solved for in inversion as well if some knowledge of how many distinctive geological exist. A

  5. Multiscale Stategies in Automatic Image-Domain Waveform Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujin Liu; Zhenchun Li

    2015-01-01

    Multiscale strategies are very important in the successful application of waveform-based velocity inversion. The strategy that sequentially preceeds from long to short scale of velocity model, has been well developed in full waveform inversion (FWI) to solve the local mininum problem. In contrast, it’s not well understood in the image-domain waveform tomography (IWT), which back-projects incoherent waveform components of the common image gather into velocity updates. IWT is less prone to local minimum problem but tends to build long-scale model with low resolution. In order to build both long- and short-scale model by IWT, we discuss several multiscale strategies restricted in the image domain. The strategies include model reparameterization, objective function switching and gradient rescaling. Numerical tests on Marmsousi model and real data demonstrate that our proposed multiscale IWT is effective in buidling velocity model with wide wavenumber spectrum.

  6. High-Voltage, Asymmetric-Waveform Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Duong, Tuan A.; Duong, Vu A.; Kanik, Isik

    2008-01-01

    The shapes of waveforms generated by commercially available analytical separation devices, such as some types of mass spectrometers and differential mobility spectrometers are, in general, inadequate and result in resolution degradation in output spectra. A waveform generator was designed that would be able to circumvent these shortcomings. It is capable of generating an asymmetric waveform, having a peak amplitude as large as 2 kV and frequency of several megahertz, which can be applied to a capacitive load. In the original intended application, the capacitive load would consist of the drift plates in a differential-mobility spectrometer. The main advantage to be gained by developing the proposed generator is that the shape of the waveform is made nearly optimum for various analytical devices requiring asymmetric-waveform such as differential-mobility spectrometers. In addition, this waveform generator could easily be adjusted to modify the waveform in accordance with changed operational requirements for differential-mobility spectrometers. The capacitive nature of the load is an important consideration in the design of the proposed waveform generator. For example, the design provision for shaping the output waveform is based partly on the principle that (1) the potential (V) on a capacitor is given by V=q/C, where C is the capacitance and q is the charge stored in the capacitor; and, hence (2) the rate of increase or decrease of the potential is similarly proportional to the charging or discharging current. The proposed waveform generator would comprise four functional blocks: a sine-wave generator, a buffer, a voltage shifter, and a high-voltage switch (see Figure 1). The sine-wave generator would include a pair of operational amplifiers in a feedback configuration, the parameters of which would be chosen to obtain a sinusoidal timing signal of the desired frequency. The buffer would introduce a slight delay (approximately equal to 20 ns) but would otherwise

  7. Forward and inverse modeling of near-field seismic waveforms from underground nuclear explosions for effective source functions and structure parameters. Final report, 5 September 1986-5 March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, L.J.; Barker, J.S.

    1987-04-05

    It is well established that near-field records of nuclear explosions can be analyzed to obtain detailed information about the seismic source function and its dependence on yield. This information is generally formulated in terms of parametrized models for the RDP and for the test-site crustal structure. In this study, results of forward modeling studies are reviewed to obtain the source and structure parameters for Pahute Mesa. These models fit the observed near-field records well, but there is some question as to how errors in crustal structure might affect seismic-source parameters. Furthermore, there is a general need to be able to develop source-structure models in a consistent, unbiased fashion. To address these issues, a simultaneous inversion was developed for source and structure parameters. In previous reports, the authors discussed the development of the method and applied it to Pahute Mesa data. This report presents an application of an improved technique for inverting for parameters in these types of problems known as the jumping method. A second problem with analysis of near-field records from explosions is that there is some question as to whether crustal materials respond in a linear anelastic or anelastic fashion or whether they have significant nonlinear response because of the high-shear strain levels. Near-field data sets from several nuclear explosions and an earthquake are examined to address this question. It is shown that if nonlinear material response occurs it does not have a large enough effect to have a significant effect on data interpretation.

  8. 1D and 2D Occam's Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data Applied in Volcano-Geothermal Area In Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Elsi; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetotelluric data inversion were conducted to reveal the subsurface resistivity structure beneath the eastern part of a volcano in Central Java, Indonesia. Fifteen magnetotelluric sounding data spanning two lines of investigation were inverted using Occam's inversion scheme. The result depict that there are extensively conductive layer (2-10 ohm meter) below the volcanic overburden. This conductive layer is interpreted as the clay cap resulted from thermal alteration. A higher resistivity layer (10-80 ohm meter) underlies the clay cap and is interpreted as the reservoir whose top boundaries vary between 1000 m above and 2000 m below sea level.

  9. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  10. Determine Earthquake Rupture Directivity Using Taiwan TSMIP Strong Motion Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kaiwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lai, Ying-Ju; Gung, YuanCheng

    2013-04-01

    Inverting seismic waveforms for the finite fault source parameters is important for studying the physics of earthquake rupture processes. It is also significant to image seismogenic structures in urban areas. Here we analyze the finite-source process and test for the causative fault plane using the accelerograms recorded by the Taiwan Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP) stations. The point source parameters for the mainshock and aftershocks were first obtained by complete waveform moment tensor inversions. We then use the seismograms generated by the aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGFs) to retrieve the apparent source time functions (ASTFs) of near-field stations using projected Landweber deconvolution approach. The method for identifying the fault plane relies on the spatial patterns of the apparent source time function durations which depend on the angle between rupture direction and the take-off angle and azimuth of the ray. These derived duration patterns then are compared with the theoretical patterns, which are functions of the following parameters, including focal depth, epicentral distance, average crustal 1D velocity, fault plane attitude, and rupture direction on the fault plane. As a result, the ASTFs derived from EGFs can be used to infer the ruptured fault plane and the rupture direction. Finally we used part of the catalogs to study important seismogenic structures in the area near Chiayi, Taiwan, where a damaging earthquake has occurred about a century ago. The preliminary results show a strike-slip earthquake on 22 October 1999 (Mw 5.6) has ruptured unilaterally toward SSW on a sub-vertical fault. The procedure developed from this study can be applied to other strong motion waveforms recorded from other earthquakes to better understand their kinematic source parameters.

  11. Gradient-Driven Molecule Construction: An Inverse Approach Applied to the Design of Small-Molecule Fixating Catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Weymuth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rational design of molecules and materials usually requires extensive screening of molecular structures for the desired property. The inverse approach to deduce a structure for a predefined property would be highly desirable, but is, unfortunately, not well-defined. However, feasible strategies for such an inverse design process may be successfully developed for specific purposes. We discuss options for calculating 'jacket' potentials that fulfill a predefined target requirement - a concept that we recently introduced [T. Weymuth, M. Reiher, MRS Proceediungs, 2013, 1524, DOI:10.1557/opl.2012.1764]. We consider the case of small-molecule activating transition metal catalysts. As a target requirement we choose the vanishing geometry gradients on all atoms of a subsystem consisting of a metal center binding the small molecule to be activated. The jacket potential can be represented within a full quantum model or by a sequence of approximations of which a field of electrostatic point charges is the simplest. In a...

  12. 改进的远震体波反演震源机制方法%Improvment for Determining Global Waveform Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓东平; 朱良保

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional method to determine source mechanism from inversion of global P waveform, we managed to add S wave to data set, which is guided by waveform theory such as in data processing and weight setting. In order to test the feasiblity and the advancement of our method, we apply our method to LuShan earthquake that occurred on April 20th, 2013. Based on grid searching method, we inverted three kinds of global waveform data sets, which are P waveform, S waveform and P&S joint waveform, independently. Then we analyzed the results from these inversions to compare reliability, which surely confirm the advancement of P&S joint inversion. This study shows that our improvement is remarkable.%针对传统远震P波反演震源机制方法的局限性,在理论指导下将体波的S震相加入反演,合理选择权重值进行P&S联合反演。为了检验方法优化的效果,以2013年4月20日的芦山地震为例,首先分别单独利用P波或S(SH和SV)波进行了震源机制反演,其次用改进后的方法进行联合反演,并对比分析3次反演结果的可靠性。结果表明由于P&S联合反演结合了P、S震相的优点,提高了反演结果的可靠性,方法优化效果明显。

  13. Maximally Flat Waveforms with Finite Number of Harmonics in Class-F Power Amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Juhas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper general solution to the problem of finding maximally flat waveforms with finite number of harmonics (maximally flat trigonometric polynomials is provided. Waveform coefficients are expressed in closed form as functions of harmonic orders. Two special cases of maximally flat waveforms (so-called maximally flat even harmonic and maximally flat odd harmonic waveforms, which proved to play an important role in class-F and inverse class-F power amplifier (PA operations, are also considered. For these two special types of waveforms, coefficients are expressed as functions of two parameters only. Closed form expressions for efficiency and power output capability of class-F and inverse class-F PA operations with maximally flat waveforms are also provided as explicit functions of number of a harmonics.

  14. Fractal Dimension of Voice-Signal Waveforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The fractal dimension is one important parameter that characterizes waveforms. In this paper, we derive a new method to calculate fractal dimension of digital voice-signal waveforms. We show that fractal dimension is an efficient tool for speaker recognition or speech recognition. It can be used to identify different speakers or distinguish speech. We apply our results to Chinese speaker recognition and numerical experiment shows that fractal dimension is an efficient parameter to characterize individual Chinese speakers. We have developed a semiautomatic voiceprint analysis system based on the theory of this paper and former researches.

  15. Adaptive Robust Waveform Selection for Unknown Target Detection in Clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-Lu Wang; Hong-Qiang Wang; Yu-Liang Qin; Yong-Qiang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    @@@A basic assumption of most recently proposed waveform design algorithms is that the target impulse response is a known deterministic function or a stochastic process with a known power spectral density (PSD). However, it is well-known that a target impulse response is neither easily nor accurately obtained; besides it changes sharply with attitude angles. Both of the aforementioned cases complicate the waveform design process. In this paper, an adaptive robust waveform selection method for unknown target detection in clutter is proposed. The target impulse response is considered to be unknown but belongs to a known uncertainty set. An adaptive waveform library is devised by using a signal-to-clutter-plus-noise ratio (SCNR)- based optimal waveform design method. By applying the minimax robust waveform selection method, the optimal robust waveform is selected to ensure the lowest performance bound of the unknown target detection in clutter. Results show that the adaptive waveform library outperforms the predefined linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform library on the SCNR bound.

  16. Applied catastrophic phase inversion: a continuous non-centrifugal phase separation step in biphasic whole-cell biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glonke, Sebastian; Sadowski, Gabriele; Brandenbusch, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Biphasic whole-cell biotransformations are known to be efficient alternatives to common chemical synthesis routes, especially for the production of, e.g. apolar enantiopure organic compounds. They provide high stereoselectivity combined with high product concentrations owing to the presence of an organic phase serving as substrate reservoir and product sink. Industrial implementation suffers from the formation of stable Pickering emulsions caused by the presence of cells. State-of-the-art downstream processing includes inefficient strategies such as excessive centrifugation, use of de-emulsifiers or thermal stress. In contrast, using the catastrophic phase inversion (CPI) phenomenon (sudden switch of emulsion type caused by addition of dispersed phase), Pickering-type emulsions can be destabilized efficiently. Within this work a model system using bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEHP) as organic phase in combination with E. coli, JM101 was successfully separated using a continuous mixer settler setup. Compared to the state-of-the-art centrifugal separations, this process allows complete phase separation with no detectable water content or cells in the organic phase with no utilities/additives required. Furthermore, the concentration of the product is not affected by the separation. It is therefore a simple applicable method that can be used for separation of stable Pickering-type emulsions based on the knowledge of the point of inversion.

  17. Quantum optical waveform conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Kielpinski, D; Wiseman, HM

    2010-01-01

    Currently proposed architectures for long-distance quantum communication rely on networks of quantum processors connected by optical communications channels [1,2]. The key resource for such networks is the entanglement of matter-based quantum systems with quantum optical fields for information transmission. The optical interaction bandwidth of these material systems is a tiny fraction of that available for optical communication, and the temporal shape of the quantum optical output pulse is often poorly suited for long-distance transmission. Here we demonstrate that nonlinear mixing of a quantum light pulse with a spectrally tailored classical field can compress the quantum pulse by more than a factor of 100 and flexibly reshape its temporal waveform, while preserving all quantum properties, including entanglement. Waveform conversion can be used with heralded arrays of quantum light emitters to enable quantum communication at the full data rate of optical telecommunications.

  18. The Fukushima Inverse Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Camara, Marta; Dokmanic, Ivan; Ranieri, Juri; Scheibler, Robin; Vetterli, Martin; STOHL Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Knowing what amount of radioactive material was released from Fukushima in March 2011 and at what time instants is crucial to assess the risk, the pollution, and to understand the scope of the consequences. Moreover, it could be used in forward simulations to obtain accurate maps of deposition. But these data are often not publicly available. We propose to estimate the emission waveforms by solving an inverse problem. Previous approaches have relied on a detailed expert guess of how the relea...

  19. Global and local waveform simulations using the VERCE platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Thomas; Saleh, Rafiq; Spinuso, Alessandro; Gemund, Andre; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Krischner, Lion; Igel, Heiner; Schlichtweg, Horst; Frank, Anton; Michelini, Alberto; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    In recent years the potential to increase resolution of seismic imaging by full waveform inversion has been demonstrated on a range of scales from basin to continental scales. These techniques rely on harnessing the computational power of large supercomputers, and running large parallel codes to simulate the seismic wave field in a three-dimensional geological setting. The VERCE platform is designed to make these full waveform techniques accessible to a far wider spectrum of the seismological community. The platform supports the two widely used spectral element simulation programs SPECFEM3D Cartesian, and SPECFEM3D globe, allowing users to run a wide range of simulations. In the SPECFEM3D Cartesian implementation the user can run waveform simulations on a range of pre-loaded meshes and velocity models for specific areas, or upload their own velocity model and mesh. In the new SPECFEM3D globe implementation, the user will be able to select from a number of continent scale model regions, or perform waveform simulations for the whole earth. Earthquake focal mechanisms can be downloaded within the platform, for example from the GCMT catalogue, or users can upload their own focal mechanism catalogue through the platform. The simulations can be run on a range of European supercomputers in the PRACE network. Once a job has been submitted and run through the platform, the simulated waveforms can be manipulated or downloaded for further analysis. The misfit between the simulated and recorded waveforms can then be calculated through the platform through three interoperable workflows, for raw-data access (FDSN) and caching, pre-processing and finally misfit. The last workflow makes use of the Pyflex analysis software. In addition, the VERCE platform can be used to produce animations of waveform propagation through the velocity model, and synthetic shakemaps. All these data-products are made discoverable and re-usable thanks to the VERCE data and metadata management layer. We

  20. Applying an Inverse Model to Estimate Ammonia Emissions at Cattle Feedlots Using Three Different Observation-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Nash, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately quantifying emissions of ammonia (NH3) from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is vital not only to the livestock industry, but essential to understanding nitrogen cycling along the Front Range of Colorado, USA, where intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, and pristine ecosystems (e.g., Rocky Mtn Nat'l Park) lie within 100-km of each other. Most observation-based techniques for estimating NH3 emissions can be expensive and highly technical. Many methods rely on concentration observations on location, which implicitly depends on weather conditions. A system for sampling NH3 using on-site weather data was developed to allow remote measurement of NH3 in a simple, cost-effective way. These systems use passive diffusive cartridges (Radiello, Sigma-Aldrich) that provide time-averaged concentrations representative of a typical two-week deployment. Cartridge exposure is robotically managed so they are only visible when winds are 1.4 m/s or greater from the direction of the CAFO. These concentration data can be coupled with stability parameters (measured on-site) in a simple inverse model to estimate emissions (FIDES, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures). Few studies have directly compared emissions estimates of NH3 using concentration data obtained from multiple measurement systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, in the summer and autumn of 2014, several conditional sampler systems were deployed at a 25,000-head cattle feedlot concomitant with an open-path infrared laser (GasFinder2, Boreal Laser Inc.) and a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) (G1103, Picarro Inc.) which each measured instantaneous NH3 concentrations. This study will test the sampler technology by first comparing concentration data from the three different methods. In livestock research, it is common to estimate NH3 emissions by using such instantaneous data in a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model (WindTrax, Thunder Beach Sci.) Considering this, NH3 fluxes

  1. Analysis of LFM-waveform Libraries for Cognitive Tracking Maneuvering Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the idea of the waveform agility in cognitive radars,the waveform libraries for maneuvering target tracking are discussed. LFM-waveform libraries are designed according to different combinations of chirp parameters and FrFT rotation angles. By applying the interact multiple model (IMM algorithm in tracking maneuvering targets, transmitted waveform is called real time from the LFM-waveform libraries. The waveforms are selected from the library according to the criterion of maximum mutual information between the current state of knowledge of the model and the measurement. Simulation results show that waveform library containing certain amount LFM-waveforms can improve the performance of cognitive tracking radar.

  2. Spectral Element Moment Tensor Inversions for Earthquakes in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and implemented a Centroid Moment-Tensor (CMT) inversion procedure to determine source parameters for southern California earthquakes. The method is based upon spectral-element simulations of regional seismic wave propagation in a recently developed three-dimensional southern California model. Sensitivity to source parameters is determined by numerically calculating the Fréchet derivatives required for the CMT inversion. We use a combination of waveform and waveform-envelope misfit criteria, and facilitate pure double-couple or zero-trace moment-tensor inversions. The technique is applied to six recent southern California earthquakes: the September~9, 2001, Mw = 4.2 Hollywood event, the October~31, 2001, Mw=4.9 Anza event, the September~3, 2002, Mw = 4.2 Yorba Linda event, the February~22, 2003, Mw = 5.2 Big Bear event and Mw = 4.5 Big Bear aftershock, and the July~15, 2003, Mw =3.8 Lucerne Valley event. Using more than half of the available three-component data at periods of 6~seconds and longer, the focal mechanisms, locations, and magnitudes we obtain are in good agreement with estimates based upon classical body-wave, surface-wave, and first-motion inversions.

  3. TSUFLIND-EnKF inversion model applied to tsunami deposits for estimation of transient flow depth and speed with quantified uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Hui; Weiss, Robert; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Tsunami deposits are recordings of tsunami events that contain information about flow conditions. Deciphering quantitative information from tsunami deposits is especially important for analyzing paleo-tsunami events in which deposits comprise the only leftover physical evidence. The physical meaning of the deciphered quantities depends on the physical assumptions that are applied. The aim of our study is to estimate the characteristics of tsunamis and quantify the errors and uncertainties that inherent within them. To achieve this goal, we apply the TSUFLIND-EnKF inversion model to study the deposition of an idealized deposit created by a single tsunami wave and one real case from 2004 India ocean tsunami. TSUFLIND-EnKF model combines TSUFLIND for the deposition module with the Ensemble Kalman Filtering (EnKF) method. In our modeling, we assume that grain-size distribution and thickness from the idealized deposits at different depths can be used as an observational variable. Our tentative results indicate tha...

  4. Estimation of central aortic pressure waveform features derived from the brachial cuff volume displacement waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmad; Avolio, Alberto P

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in non-invasive estimation of central aortic waveform parameters in the clinical setting. However, controversy has arisen around radial tonometric based systems due to the requirement of a trained operator or lack of ease of use, especially in the clinical environment. A recently developed device utilizes a novel algorithm for brachial cuff based assessment of aortic pressure values and waveform (SphygmoCor XCEL, AtCor Medical). The cuff was inflated to 10 mmHg below an individual's diastolic blood pressure and the brachial volume displacement waveform recorded. The aortic waveform was derived using proprietary digital signal processing and transfer function applied to the recorded waveform. The aortic waveform was also estimated using a validated technique (radial tonometry based assessment, SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical). Measurements were taken in triplicate with each device in 30 people (17 female) aged 22 to 79 years of age. An average for each device for each individual was calculated, and the results from the two devices were compared using regression and Bland-Altman analysis. A high correlation was found between the devices for measures of aortic systolic (R(2)=0.99) and diastolic (R(2)=0.98) pressure. Augmentation index and subendocardial viability ratio both had a between device R(2) value of 0.82. The difference between devices for measured aortic systolic pressure was 0.5±1.8 mmHg, and for augmentation index, 1.8±7.0%. The brachial cuff based approach, with an individualized sub-diastolic cuff pressure, provides an operator independent method of assessing not only systolic pressure, but also aortic waveform features, comparable to existing validated tonometric-based methods.

  5. Electronics via waveform analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Edwin C

    1993-01-01

    The author believes that a good basic understanding of electronics can be achieved by detailed visual analyses of the actual voltage waveforms present in selected circuits. The voltage waveforms included in this text were photographed using a 35-rrun camera in an attempt to make the book more attractive. This book is intended for the use of students with a variety of backgrounds. For this reason considerable material has been placed in the Appendix for those students who find it useful. The Appendix includes many basic electricity and electronic concepts as well as mathematical derivations that are not vital to the understanding of the circuit being discussed in the text at that time. Also some derivations might be so long that, if included in the text, it could affect the concentration of the student on the circuit being studied. The author has tried to make the book comprehensive enough so that a student could use it as a self-study course, providing one has access to adequate laboratory equipment.

  6. A Phase Correction Filter for Waveform Recovery of Compressed Direct-Recorded Ocean Bottom Seismometer Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    14 9. Amplitude spectra of tCe inverse phase filter ......... 16 10. Distorted square wave after inverse...of the phase responses of a perfectA square wave, the distorted output signal, and the final inverse phase filter over the bandwidth 0 to 50 hertz... filter 17 0.5 sec. FIGURE 10. A sketch of the waveform that results from convolving the distorted square wave signal with the inverse phase filter . .. ..p

  7. Assessing Accuracy of Waveform Models against Numerical Relativity Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pürrer, Michael; LVC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We compare currently available phenomenological and effective-one-body inspiral-merger-ringdown models for gravitational waves (GW) emitted from coalescing black hole binaries against a set of numerical relativity waveforms from the SXS collaboration. Simplifications are used in the construction of some waveform models, such as restriction to spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, no inclusion of higher harmonics in the GW radiation, no modeling of eccentricity and the use of effective parameters to describe spin precession. In contrast, NR waveforms provide us with a high fidelity representation of the ``true'' waveform modulo small numerical errors. To focus on systematics we inject NR waveforms into zero noise for early advanced LIGO detector sensitivity at a moderately optimistic signal-to-noise ratio. We discuss where in the parameter space the above modeling assumptions lead to noticeable biases in recovered parameters.

  8. Optimizing defibrillation waveforms for ICDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Mark W; Swerdlow, Charles D

    2007-04-01

    While no simple electrical descriptor provides a good measure of defibrillation efficacy, the waveform parameters that most directly influence defibrillation are voltage and duration. Voltage is a critical parameter for defibrillation because its spatial derivative defines the electrical field that interacts with the heart. Similarly, waveform duration is a critical parameter because the shock interacts with the heart for the duration of the waveform. Shock energy is the most often cited metric of shock strength and an ICD's capacity to defibrillate, but it is not a direct measure of shock effectiveness. Despite the physiological complexities of defibrillation, a simple approach in which the heart is modeled as passive resistor-capacitor (RC) network has proved useful for predicting efficient defibrillation waveforms. The model makes two assumptions: (1) The goal of both a monophasic shock and the first phase of a biphasic shock is to maximize the voltage change in the membrane at the end of the shock for a given stored energy. (2) The goal of the second phase of a biphasic shock is to discharge the membrane back to the zero potential, removing the charge deposited by the first phase. This model predicts that the optimal waveform rises in an exponential upward curve, but such an ascending waveform is difficult to generate efficiently. ICDs use electronically efficient capacitive-discharge waveforms, which require truncation for effective defibrillation. Even with optimal truncation, capacitive-discharge waveforms require more voltage and energy to achieve the same membrane voltage than do square waves and ascending waveforms. In ICDs, the value of the shock output capacitance is a key intermediary in establishing the relationship between stored energy-the key determinant of ICD size-and waveform voltage as a function of time, the key determinant of defibrillation efficacy. The RC model predicts that, for capacitive-discharge waveforms, stored energy is minimized

  9. Third Harmonic Imaging using a Pulse Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The pulse inversion (PI) technique can be utilized to separate and enhance harmonic components of a waveform for tissue harmonic imaging. While most ultrasound systems can perform pulse inversion, only few image the 3rd harmonic component. PI pulse subtraction can isolate and enhance the 3rd...

  10. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  11. Binary black hole waveform extraction at null infinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babiuc, M C [Department of Physics, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755 (United States); Winicour, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Zlochower, Y, E-mail: babiuc@marshall.edu [Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation and School of Mathematical Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    In this paper, we present a work in progress toward an efficient and economical computational module which interfaces between Cauchy and characteristic evolution codes. Our goal is to provide a standardized waveform extraction tool for the numerical relativity community which will allow CCE to be readily applied to a generic Cauchy code. The tool provides a means of unambiguous comparison between the waveforms generated by evolution codes based upon different formulations of the Einstein equations and different numerical approximation.

  12. Direct detection of sharp upper-mantle features with waveform complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, D.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2009-12-01

    A recent technique for processing array data searching for multipathing has been applied to USArray data [Sun and Helmberger, 2009]. A record can be decomposed by S(t) + A×S(t+ΔLR), where S(t) is the synthetics for a reference model. Time separation ΔLR and amplitude ratio A are needed to obtain best cross-correlation between a simulated waveform and data. The travel time of the composite waveform relative to the reference model synthetics is defined as ΔT. A simulated annealing algorithm is used to inverse the parameters of ΔLR, ΔT, and A. Whereas the conventional tomography yields a travel time correction (ΔT), our analysis yields an extra parameter of ΔLR which describe the waveform complexity. With the array, we can construct a mapping of the gradient of ΔLR with complexity patterns. A horizontal structure will introduce the waveform complexity along the distance profile (in-plane multipathing). A azimuthally orientation ΔLR pattern indicates a vertical structure with out-of-plane multipathing. Using such maps generated from artificial data we can easily recognize features produced by downwelling (DW) vs. upwelling (UW) and address their scale lengths. In particular, we find a line of DW's along the Rock Mountain Front which have anomalies similar to those found along the La Ristra line. These ΔLR anomalies are up to 8s, which corresponds to features extending down to the 410 discontinuity with a 6% shear velocity increase. Such features appear to be produced by delamination caused by the sharp lateral temperature gradient [Song and Helmberger, 2007]. The ΔLR patters for the Western US indicates a number of UW's, in which the Yellowstone is particular obvious. The records for events from southwestern and southeastern directions show generally simple waveform across the Yellowstone -Snake River Plain (SRP). For the event from the northeast, the stations along the western edge of SRP show strong waveform distortions, which indicate azimuthally

  13. Waveform Catalog, Extreme Mass Ratio Binary (Capture)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerically-generated gravitational waveforms for circular inspiral into Kerr black holes. These waveforms were developed using Scott Hughes' black hole perturbation...

  14. Full waveform modelling and misfit calculation using the VERCE platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Thomas; Spinuso, Alessandro; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Krischner, Lion; Igel, Heiner; Schwichtenberg, Horst; Frank, Anton; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the increasing resolution of seismic imagining by full waveform inversion has opened new research perspectives and practices. These methods rely on harnessing the computational power of large supercomputers and new storage capabilities, to run large parallel codes to simulate the seismic wave field in three-dimensional geological settings. The VERCE platform is designed to make these full waveform techniques accessible to a far wider spectrum of the seismological community. VERCE empowers a broad base of seismology researchers to harvest the new opportunities provided by well-established high-performance wave simulation codes such as SPECFEM3D. It meets a range of seismic research needs by eliminating the technical difficulties associated with using these codes, allowing users to focus on their research questions. VERCE delivers this power to seismologists through its science gateway, supporting wave simulation codes on each of the provided computing resources. Users can design their waveform simulation scenarios making use of a library of pre-loaded meshes and velocity models, and services for selecting earthquake focal mechanisms, seismic stations and recorded waveforms from existing catalogues, such as the GCMT catalogue, and FDSN data sources. They can also supply their own mesh, velocity model, earthquake catalogue and seismic observations. They can submit the simulations onto different computing resources, where VERCE provides codes that are tuned and supported for those resources. The simulations can currently be run on a range of European supercomputers in the PRACE network, including superMUC at LRZ, GALILEO at CINECA and on selected resources like Drachenfels at SCAI and within the EGI network. The gateway automates and looks after all these stages, but supplies seismologists with a provenance system that allows them to manage a large series of runs, review progress, and explore the results. The platform automates misfit analysis between

  15. Estimation of airway obstruction using oximeter plethysmograph waveform data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Renee' A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Validated measures to assess the severity of airway obstruction in patients with obstructive airway disease are limited. Changes in the pulse oximeter plethysmograph waveform represent fluctuations in arterial flow. Analysis of these fluctuations might be useful clinically if they represent physiologic perturbations resulting from airway obstruction. We tested the hypothesis that the severity of airway obstruction could be estimated using plethysmograph waveform data. Methods Using a closed airway circuit with adjustable inspiratory and expiratory pressure relief valves, airway obstruction was induced in a prospective convenience sample of 31 healthy adult subjects. Maximal change in airway pressure at the mouthpiece was used as a surrogate measure of the degree of obstruction applied. Plethysmograph waveform data and mouthpiece airway pressure were acquired for 60 seconds at increasing levels of inspiratory and expiratory obstruction. At each level of applied obstruction, mean values for maximal change in waveform area under the curve and height as well as maximal change in mouth pressure were calculated for sequential 7.5 second intervals. Correlations of these waveform variables with mouth pressure values were then performed to determine if the magnitude of changes in these variables indicates the severity of airway obstruction. Results There were significant relationships between maximal change in area under the curve (P Conclusion The findings suggest that mathematic interpretation of plethysmograph waveform data may estimate the severity of airway obstruction and be of clinical utility in objective assessment of patients with obstructive airway diseases.

  16. Tectonic Inversion Along the Algerian and Ligurian Margins: On the Insight Provided By Latest Seismic Processing Techniques Applied to Recent and Vintage 2D Offshore Multichannel Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenini, L.; Beslier, M. O.; Sage, F.; Badji, R.; Galibert, P. Y.; Lepretre, A.; Dessa, J. X.; Aidi, C.; Watremez, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies on the Algerian and the North-Ligurian margins in the Western Mediterranean have evidenced inversion-related superficial structures, such as folds and asymmetric sedimentary perched basins whose geometry hints at deep compressive structures dipping towards the continent. Deep seismic imaging of these margins is difficult due to steep slope and superficial multiples, and, in the Mediterranean context, to the highly diffractive Messinian evaporitic series in the basin. During the Algerian-French SPIRAL survey (2009, R/V Atalante), 2D marine multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data were collected along the Algerian Margin using a 4.5 km, 360 channel digital streamer and a 3040 cu. in. air-gun array. An advanced processing workflow has been laid out using Geocluster CGG software, which includes noise attenuation, 2D SRME multiple attenuation, surface consistent deconvolution, Kirchhoff pre-stack time migration. This processing produces satisfactory seismic images of the whole sedimentary cover, and of southward dipping reflectors in the acoustic basement along the central part of the margin offshore Great Kabylia, that are interpreted as inversion-related blind thrusts as part of flat-ramp systems. We applied this successful processing workflow to old 2D marine MCS data acquired on the North-Ligurian Margin (Malis survey, 1995, R/V Le Nadir), using a 2.5 km, 96 channel streamer and a 1140 cu. in. air-gun array. Particular attention was paid to multiple attenuation in adapting our workflow. The resulting reprocessed seismic images, interpreted with a coincident velocity model obtained by wide-angle data tomography, provide (1) enhanced imaging of the sedimentary cover down to the top of the acoustic basement, including the base of the Messinian evaporites and the sub-salt Miocene series, which appear to be tectonized as far as in the mid-basin, and (2) new evidence of deep crustal structures in the margin which the initial processing had failed to

  17. An adaptive joint focal-mechanism inversion method for microseismic data: Application to Aneth CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Huang, L.

    2016-12-01

    A good azimuthal coverage of geophones is essentially important for focal-mechanism inversion of passive seismic data. However, microseismic monitoring for CO2 injection-induced seisimicity using borehole geophones often suffers from a poor azimuthal coverage of geophones, leading to large uncertainties in inversion. The focal mechanisms of microseismic events occurred within a small region are often similar to one another. We develop an adaptive focal-mechanism inversion method to invert microseismic events with similar focal mechanisms. We first classify microseismic events with similar focal mechanisms into clusters, and then invert the events in a cluster with the same focal mechanism simultaneously. Such inversion strategy is capable of improving convergent rate and reducing inversion uncertainty with abundant data from different azimuths. We develop a new double-difference focal-mechanism inversion method to further improve focal-mechanism inversion by minimizing the residual between observed and synthetic waveforms for pairs of microseismic events at adjacent locations. Our new algorithm allows us to constrain the focal mechanisms among events adjacent to one another. We apply our new adaptive joint focal-mechanism inversion method to microseismic data acquired using a borehole geophone string at a CO2 enhanced oil recovery field in Aneth, Utah. We compare our inversion results with those obtained from inverting focal mechanism for each microseismic event independently, demonstrating that our new inversion method greatly reduce the inversion uncertainty caused by the limited azimuthal coverage of borehole geophones.

  18. STRS Compliant FPGA Waveform Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappier, Jennifer; Downey, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard describes a standard for NASA space software defined radios (SDRs). It provides a common framework that can be used to develop and operate a space SDR in a reconfigurable and reprogrammable manner. One goal of the STRS Architecture is to promote waveform reuse among multiple software defined radios. Many space domain waveforms are designed to run in the special signal processing (SSP) hardware. However, the STRS Architecture is currently incomplete in defining a standard for designing waveforms in the SSP hardware. Therefore, the STRS Architecture needs to be extended to encompass waveform development in the SSP hardware. A transmit waveform for space applications was developed to determine ways to extend the STRS Architecture to a field programmable gate array (FPGA). These extensions include a standard hardware abstraction layer for FPGAs and a standard interface between waveform functions running inside a FPGA. Current standards were researched and new standard interfaces were proposed. The implementation of the proposed standard interfaces on a laboratory breadboard SDR will be presented.

  19. Focal waveforms for various source waveforms driving a prolate-spheroidal impulse radiating antenna (IRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunc, Serhat; Baum, Carl E.; Christodoulou, Christos G.; Schamiloglu, Edl; Buchenauer, C. Jerald

    2008-08-01

    Impulse radiating antennas (IRAs) are designed to radiate very fast pulses in a narrow beam with low dispersion and high field amplitude. For this reason they have been used in a variety of applications. IRAs have been developed for use in the transient far-field region using parabolic reflectors. However, in this paper we focus in the near field region and develop the field waveform at the second focus of a prolate-spheroidal IRA. Certain skin cancers can be killed by the application of a high-amplitude electric field pulse. This can be accomplished by either inserting electrodes near the skin cancer or by applying fast, high-electric field pulses without direct contact. We investigate a new manifestation of an IRA, in which we use a prolate spheroid as a reflector instead of a parabolic reflector and focus in the near-field region instead of the far-field region. This technique minimizes skin damage associated with inserting electrodes near the tumor. Analytical and experimental behaviors for the focal waveforms of two and four-feed arm prolate-spheroidal IRAs are explored. With appropriate choice of the driving waveform we maximize the impulse field at the second focus. The focal waveform of a prolate-spheroidal IRA has been explained theoretically and verified experimentally.

  20. Synthetic inversions for density using seismic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Nienke; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Density variations drive mass transport in the Earth from plate tectonics to convection in the mantle and core. Nevertheless, density remains poorly known because most geophysical measurements used to probe the Earth's interior either have little sensitivity to density, suffer from trade-offs or from non-uniqueness. With the ongoing expansion of computational power, it has become possible to accurately model complete seismic wavefields in a 3-D heterogeneous Earth, and to develop waveform inversion techniques that account for complicated wavefield effects. This may help to improve resolution of density. Here, we present a pilot study where we explore the extent to which waveform inversion may be used to better recover density as a separate, independent parameter. We perform numerical simulations in 2-D to investigate under which conditions, and to what extent density anomalies may be recovered in the Earth's mantle. We conclude that density can indeed be constrained by seismic waveforms, mainly as a result of scattering effects at density contrasts. As a consequence, the low-frequency part of the wavefield is the most important for constraining the actual extent of anomalies. While the impact of density heterogeneities on the wavefield is small compared to the effects of velocity variations, it is likely to be detectable in modern regional- to global-scale measurements. We also conclude that the use of gravity data as additional information does not help to further improve the recovery of density anomalies unless strong a priori constraints on the geometry of density variations are applied. This is a result of the inherent physical non-uniqueness of potential-field inverse problems. Finally, in the limited numerical setup that we employ, we find that the initially supplied anomalies in S- and P-velocity models are of minor importance.

  1. Synthetic inversions for density using seismic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Nienke; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Density variations drive mass transport in the Earth from plate tectonics to convection in the mantle and core. Nevertheless, density remains poorly known because most geophysical measurements used to probe the Earth's interior either have little sensitivity to density, suffer from trade-offs or from nonuniqueness. With the ongoing expansion of computational power, it has become possible to accurately model complete seismic wavefields in a 3-D heterogeneous Earth, and to develop waveform inversion techniques that account for complicated wavefield effects. This may help to improve resolution of density. Here we present a pilot study where we explore the extent to which waveform inversion may be used to better recover density as a separate, independent parameter. We perform numerical simulations in 2-D to investigate under which conditions, and to what extent density anomalies may be recovered in the Earth's mantle. We conclude that density can indeed be constrained by seismic waveforms, mainly as a result of scattering effects at density contrasts. As a consequence, the low-frequency part of the wavefield is the most important for constraining the actual extent of anomalies. While the impact of density heterogeneities on the wavefield is small compared to the effects of velocity variations, it is likely to be detectable in modern regional to global scale measurements. We also conclude that the use of gravity data as additional information does not help to further improve the recovery of density anomalies unless strong a priori constraints on the geometry of density variations are applied. This is a result of the inherent physical non-uniqueness of potential-field inverse problems. Finally, in the limited numerical setup that we employ, we find that the initially supplied anomalies in S- and P-velocity models are of minor importance.

  2. Elastic envelope inversion using multicomponent seismic data without low frequency

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Low frequency is a key issue to reduce the nonlinearity of elastic full waveform inversion. Hence, the lack of low frequency in recorded seismic data is one of the most challenging problems in elastic full waveform inversion. Theoretical derivations and numerical analysis are presented in this paper to show that envelope operator can retrieve strong low frequency modulation signal demodulated in multicomponent data, no matter what the frequency bands of the data is. With the be...

  3. The mixing rate of the arterial blood pressure waveform Markov chain is correlated with shock index during hemorrhage in anesthetized swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibuzzaman, Mohammad; Kramer, George C; Galeotti, Loriano; Merrill, Stephen J; Strauss, David G; Scully, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the need for interventions during hemorrhage is complicated due to physiological compensation mechanisms that can stabilize vital signs until a significant amount of blood loss. Physiological systems providing compensation during hemorrhage affect the arterial blood pressure waveform through changes in dynamics and waveform morphology. We investigated the use of Markov chain analysis of the arterial blood pressure waveform to monitor physiological systems changes during hemorrhage. Continuous arterial blood pressure recordings were made on anesthetized swine (N=7) during a 5 min baseline period and during a slow hemorrhage (10 ml/kg over 30 min). Markov chain analysis was applied to 20 sec arterial blood pressure waveform segments with a sliding window. 20 ranges of arterial blood pressure were defined as states and empirical transition probability matrices were determined for each 20 sec segment. The mixing rate (2(nd) largest eigenvalue of the transition probability matrix) was determined for all segments. A change in the mixing rate from baseline estimates was identified during hemorrhage for each animal (median time of 13 min, ~10% estimated blood volume, with minimum and maximum times of 2 and 33 min, respectively). The mixing rate was found to have an inverse correlation with shock index for all 7 animals (median correlation coefficient of -0.95 with minimum and maximum of -0.98 and -0.58, respectively). The Markov chain mixing rate of arterial blood pressure recordings is a novel potential biomarker for monitoring and understanding physiological systems during hemorrhage.

  4. Biomass Estimation for Individual Trees using Waveform LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Kumar, P.; Dutta, D.

    2015-12-01

    Vegetation biomass information is important for many ecological models that include terrestrial vegetation in their simulations. Biomass has strong influences on carbon, water, and nutrient cycles. Traditionally biomass estimation requires intensive, and often destructive, field measurements. However, with advances in technology, airborne LiDAR has become a convenient tool for acquiring such information on a large scale. In this study, we use infrared full waveform LiDAR to estimate biomass information for individual trees in the Sangamon River basin in Illinois, USA. During this process, we also develop automated geolocation calibration algorithms for raw waveform LiDAR data. In the summer of 2014, discrete and waveform LiDAR data were collected over the Sangamon River basin. Field measurements commonly used in biomass equations such as diameter at breast height and total tree height were also taken for four sites across the basin. Using discrete LiDAR data, individual trees are delineated. For each tree, a voxelization methods is applied to all waveforms associated with the tree to result in a pseudo-waveform. By relating biomass extrapolated using field measurements from a training set of trees to waveform metrics for each corresponding tree, we are able to estimate biomass on an individual tree basis. The results can be especially useful as current models increase in resolution.

  5. Direct and inverse neural networks modelling applied to study the influence of the gas diffusion layer properties on PBI-based PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Justo; Canizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Linares, Jose J. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 13004 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piuleac, Ciprian-George; Curteanu, Silvia [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Department of Chemical Engineering, ' ' Gh. Asachi' ' Technical University Iasi Bd. D. Mangeron, No. 71A, 700050 IASI (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    This article shows the application of a very useful mathematical tool, artificial neural networks, to predict the fuel cells results (the value of the tortuosity and the cell voltage, at a given current density, and therefore, the power) on the basis of several properties that define a Gas Diffusion Layer: Teflon content, air permeability, porosity, mean pore size, hydrophobia level. Four neural networks types (multilayer perceptron, generalized feedforward network, modular neural network, and Jordan-Elman neural network) have been applied, with a good fitting between the predicted and the experimental values in the polarization curves. A simple feedforward neural network with one hidden layer proved to be an accurate model with good generalization capability (error about 1% in the validation phase). A procedure based on inverse neural network modelling was able to determine, with small errors, the initial conditions leading to imposed values for characteristics of the fuel cell. In addition, the use of this tool has been proved to be very attractive in order to predict the cell performance, and more interestingly, the influence of the properties of the gas diffusion layer on the cell performance, allowing possible enhancements of this material by changing some of its properties. (author)

  6. 2D seismostratigraphic inversion applied to a thin reservoir characterization; Inversao sismoestratigrafica 2D aplicada a caracterizacao de um reservatorio delgado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Antonio Carlos de Almeida

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to estimate thin reservoir properties even without counting on a good quality and a homogeneous database. Following a regional geological setting, well data such as logs, reports, cores had led to an interpretation of the depositional model in which the sandstone interval is inserted as an filling an incised valley system. This knowledge is essential to provide elements for a final work judgement. The main geological properties were then extracted from logs. The geophysical approach has counted on a 1D modeling of the main well acoustic parameters and a 2D Seismostratigraphic Inversion with a {alpha} priori acoustic impedance, which was able to enhance the frequency content of the original data. After the interpretation of the inverted data, seismic attributes were then extracted. A multivariate statistics was performed in order to establish which correlations between geological and seismic would be carried forward. An Ordinary Kriging was applied to the 2D seismic attributes. The External Drift Kriging was used to derive maps of the geological properties with the constraint of seismic variables. The final geological properties maps are similar in shape and coherent with the depositional model proposed. (author)

  7. An Identification Method of Magnetizing Inrush Current Phenomena by Voltage Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitoh, Tadashi; Takeda, Keiki; Toyama, Atsushi; Maeda, Tatsuhiko

    In this paper, the authors propose a new identification method of the magnetizing inrush current phenomena. In general, the identification is done using with current waveform. However, the saturation of current transformer can't give waveform. Therefore, the authors introduce the identification method using with voltage waveform, in which the saturation of voltage transformer doesn't happen. And then, applying the Aitken's Δ2-process, it is showed that the new identification method gives the exact saturation on/off time.

  8. Monte Carlo waveform inversion and deep continental structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijzert, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of the three dimensional structure of the earth is limited by the uneven distribution of earthquake sources and seismic stations. The distribution of the earthquakes is fixed as most earthquakes occur along the plate boundaries. The use of artificial sources can improve the distribution of

  9. A recipe for practical full waveform inversion in anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-03-28

    In representing the most common (first-order influence, and gravity induced) acoustic anisotropy, transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry direction (VTI) medium, with the P-wave normal moveout velocity, delta, and eta, we obtain a perturbation radiation pattern that has limited tradeoff between the parameters. Since delta is weakly resolvable from the kinematics of wave propagation, we can use it to play the role that density plays in improving the data fit for an imperfect physical model that ignores the elastic nature of the Earth. An FWI scheme that starts from diving waves would benefit from representing the acoustic VTI model with the P-wave horizontal velocity, eta, and epsilon. In this representation, the diving waves will help us first resolve the horizontal velocity, and then reflections, if the nonlinearity is properly handled, could help us resolve eta, while epsilon comes at the end to improve the amplitude fit (instead of the density). The model update wavelength for acoustic anisotropic FWI is very much similar to that experienced for the isotropic case. Copyright © 2014 by the European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers. All rights reserved.

  10. Closed form of optimal current waveform for class-F PA up to fourth harmonic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anamarija Juhas; Ladislav A Novak

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, rigorous analytical derivation of the coefficients of optimal current waveform for class-F power amplifier (PA) up to fourth harmonic (dc, 1st, 2nd and 4th harmonic) is presented. The coefficients of the optimal current waveform along with related maximum attainable efficiency are provided in closed form. The results obtained are also of interest for the inverse class-F, in the case when optimal voltage waveform consists of dc, 1st, 2nd and 4th harmonic.

  11. Krylov-subspace acceleration of time periodic waveform relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, A. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author uses Krylov-subspace techniques to accelerate the convergence of waveform relaxation applied to solving systems of first order time periodic ordinary differential equations. He considers the problem in the frequency domain and presents frequency dependent waveform GMRES (FDWGMRES), a member of a new class of frequency dependent Krylov-subspace techniques. FDWGMRES exhibits many desirable properties, including finite termination independent of the number of timesteps and, for certain problems, a convergence rate which is bounded from above by the convergence rate of GMRES applied to the static matrix problem corresponding to the linear time-invariant ODE.

  12. The Earthquake‐Source Inversion Validation (SIV) Project

    KAUST Repository

    Mai, Paul Martin

    2016-04-27

    Finite-fault earthquake source inversions infer the (time-dependent) displacement on the rupture surface from geophysical data. The resulting earthquake source models document the complexity of the rupture process. However, multiple source models for the same earthquake, obtained by different research teams, often exhibit remarkable dissimilarities. To address the uncertainties in earthquake-source inversion methods and to understand strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches used, the Source Inversion Validation (SIV) project conducts a set of forward-modeling exercises and inversion benchmarks. In this article, we describe the SIV strategy, the initial benchmarks, and current SIV results. Furthermore, we apply statistical tools for quantitative waveform comparison and for investigating source-model (dis)similarities that enable us to rank the solutions, and to identify particularly promising source inversion approaches. All SIV exercises (with related data and descriptions) and statistical comparison tools are available via an online collaboration platform, and we encourage source modelers to use the SIV benchmarks for developing and testing new methods. We envision that the SIV efforts will lead to new developments for tackling the earthquake-source imaging problem.

  13. The Earthquake‐Source Inversion Validation (SIV) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, P. Martin; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Page, Morgan T.; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Asano, Kimiyuki; Causse, Mathieu; Custodio, Susana; Fan, Wenyuan; Festa, Gaetano; Galis, Martin; Gallovic, Frantisek; Imperatori, Walter; Käser, Martin; Malytskyy, Dmytro; Okuwaki, Ryo; Pollitz, Fred; Passone, Luca; Razafindrakoto, Hoby N. T.; Sekiguchi, Haruko; Song, Seok Goo; Somala, Surendra N.; Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Twardzik, Cedric; van Driel, Martin; Vyas, Jagdish C.; Wang, Rongjiang; Yagi, Yuji; Zielke, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Finite‐fault earthquake source inversions infer the (time‐dependent) displacement on the rupture surface from geophysical data. The resulting earthquake source models document the complexity of the rupture process. However, multiple source models for the same earthquake, obtained by different research teams, often exhibit remarkable dissimilarities. To address the uncertainties in earthquake‐source inversion methods and to understand strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches used, the Source Inversion Validation (SIV) project conducts a set of forward‐modeling exercises and inversion benchmarks. In this article, we describe the SIV strategy, the initial benchmarks, and current SIV results. Furthermore, we apply statistical tools for quantitative waveform comparison and for investigating source‐model (dis)similarities that enable us to rank the solutions, and to identify particularly promising source inversion approaches. All SIV exercises (with related data and descriptions) and statistical comparison tools are available via an online collaboration platform, and we encourage source modelers to use the SIV benchmarks for developing and testing new methods. We envision that the SIV efforts will lead to new developments for tackling the earthquake‐source imaging problem.

  14. Quantitative analysis of sensor for pressure waveform measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyan Chu-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arterial pressure waveforms contain important diagnostic and physiological information since their contour depends on a healthy cardiovascular system 1. A sensor was placed at the measured artery and some contact pressure was used to measure the pressure waveform. However, where is the location of the sensor just about enough to detect a complete pressure waveform for the diagnosis? How much contact pressure is needed over the pulse point? These two problems still remain unresolved. Method In this study, we propose a quantitative analysis to evaluate the pressure waveform for locating the position and applying the appropriate force between the sensor and the radial artery. The two-axis mechanism and the modified sensor have been designed to estimate the radial arterial width and detect the contact pressure. The template matching method was used to analyze the pressure waveform. In the X-axis scan, we found that the arterial diameter changed waveform (ADCW and the pressure waveform would change from small to large and then back to small again when the sensor was moved across the radial artery. In the Z-axis scan, we also found that the ADCW and the pressure waveform would change from small to large and then back to small again when the applied contact pressure continuously increased. Results In the X-axis scan, the template correlation coefficients of the left and right boundaries of the radial arterial width were 0.987 ± 0.016 and 0.978 ± 0.028, respectively. In the Z-axis scan, when the excessive contact pressure was more than 100 mm Hg, the template correlation was below 0.983. In applying force, when using the maximum amplitude as the criteria level, the lower contact pressure (r = 0.988 ± 0.004 was better than the higher contact pressure (r = 0.976 ± 0.012. Conclusions Although, the optimal detective position has to be close to the middle of the radial arterial, the pressure waveform also has a good completeness with

  15. Waveform-dependent absorbing metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Rushton, Jeremiah J; Sievenpiper, Daniel F

    2014-01-01

    We present the first use of a waveform-dependent absorbing metasurface for high-power pulsed surface currents. The new type of nonlinear metasurface, composed of circuit elements including diodes, is capable of storing high power pulse energy to dissipate it between pulses, while allowing propagation of small signals. Interestingly, the absorbing performance varies for high power pulses but not for high power continuous waves (CWs), since the capacitors used are fully charged up. Thus, the waveform dependence enables us to distinguish various signal types (i.e. CW or pulse) even at the same frequency, which potentially creates new kinds of microwave technologies and applications.

  16. Arbitrary waveform modulated pulse EPR at 200 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Barnes, Ryan; Han, Songi

    2017-06-01

    We report here on the implementation of arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities at ∼200 GHz into an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) instrument platform operating at 7 T. This is achieved with the integration of a 1 GHz, 2 channel, digital to analog converter (DAC) board that enables the generation of coherent arbitrary waveforms at Ku-band frequencies with 1 ns resolution into an existing architecture of a solid state amplifier multiplier chain (AMC). This allows for the generation of arbitrary phase- and amplitude-modulated waveforms at 200 GHz with >150 mW power. We find that the non-linearity of the AMC poses significant difficulties in generating amplitude-modulated pulses at 200 GHz. We demonstrate that in the power-limited regime of ω1 10 MHz) spin manipulation in incoherent (inversion), as well as coherent (echo formation) experiments. Highlights include the improvement by one order of magnitude in inversion bandwidth compared to that of conventional rectangular pulses, as well as a factor of two in improvement in the refocused echo intensity at 200 GHz.

  17. An MSK Waveform for Radar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a minimum shift keying (MSK) waveform developed for use in radar applications. This waveform is characterized in terms of its spectrum, autocorrelation, and ambiguity function, and is compared with the conventionally used bi-phase coded (BPC) radar signal. It is shown that the MSK waveform has several advantages when compared with the BPC waveform, and is a better candidate for deep-space radar imaging systems such as NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar.

  18. Radar Waveform Design in Active Communications Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Ric A. Romero; Shepherd, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate spectrally adaptive radar transmit waveform design and its effects on an active communication system. We specifically look at waveform design for point targets. The transmit waveform is optimized by accounting for the modulation spectrum of the communication system while trying to efficiently use the remaining spectrum. With the use of spectrally-matched radar waveform, we show that the SER detection performance of the communication system ...

  19. Two-dimensional unwrapped phase inversion with damping and a Gaussian filter

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2014-01-01

    Phase wrapping is one of main causes of the local minima problem in waveform inversion. However, the unwrapping process for 2D phase maps that includes singular points (residues) is complicated and does not guarantee unique solutions. We employ an exponential damping to eliminate the residues in the 2D phase maps, which makes the 2D phase unwrapping process easy and produce a unique solution. A recursive inversion process using the damped unwrapped phase provides an opportunity to invert for smooth background updates first, and higher resolution updates later as we reduce the damping. We also apply a Gaussian filter to the gradient to mitigate the edge artifacts resulting from the narrow shape of the sensitivity kernels at high damping. Numerical examples demonstrate that our unwrapped phase inversion with damping and a Gaussian filter produces good convergent results even for a 3Hz single frequency of Marmousi dataset and with a starting model far from the true model.

  20. An extended version of the discrete Kalman filter applied to a nonlinear inverse heat conduction problem; Version etendue du filtre de Kalman discret appliquee a un probleme inverse de conduction de chaleur non lineaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daouas, N.; Radhouani, M.S. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Dept. de Genie-Energetique, Monastir (Tunisia)

    2000-02-01

    Nonlinear inverse heat conduction problem is resolved by using a formulation of the Kalman filter based on a statistical approach and extended to nonlinear systems. The time evolution of a surface heat flux density is reconstructed from a numerical simulation which allowed us to analyse the influence of some parameters, that condition the running of the filter, on the estimation result. A suitable choice of these parameters, guided by the filter behaviour observations, leads to a solution that remains stable when using noisy data, but that is slightly time-lagged compared to the exact function. This time-lag depends on the location of the interior temperature measurement needed for the inversion and on the model error caused by the approximation of the heat flux with a piece-wide constant function. The application of the extended Kalman filter with real measurements recorded from an experimental set-up, shows that this technique fits the stochastic structure of experimental measurements. The provided results are validated by using the Raynaud's and Bransier's inverse method and are in good agreement with the flux density estimated with this method. (authors)

  1. Generating nonlinear FM chirp waveforms for radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Nonlinear FM waveforms offer a radar matched filter output with inherently low range sidelobes. This yields a 1-2 dB advantage in Signal-to-Noise Ratio over the output of a Linear FM waveform with equivalent sidelobe filtering. This report presents design and implementation techniques for Nonlinear FM waveforms.

  2. Reliability of cortical lesion detection on double inversion recovery MRI applying the MAGNIMS-Criteria in multiple sclerosis patients within a 16-months period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Christian; Ceyrowski, Tim; Broocks, Gabriel; Treffler, Natascha; Sedlacik, Jan; Stürner, Klarissa; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), Double Inversion Recovery (DIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify cortical lesions (CL). We sought to evaluate the reliability of CL detection on DIR longitudinally at multiple subsequent time-points applying the MAGNIMs scoring criteria for CLs. Methods 26 MS patients received a 3T-MRI (Siemens, Skyra) with DIR at 12 time-points (TP) within a 16 months period. Scans were assessed in random order by two different raters. Both raters separately marked all CLs on each scan and total lesion numbers were obtained for each scan-TP and patient. After a retrospective re-evaluation, the number of consensus CLs (conL) was defined as the total number of CLs, which both raters finally agreed on. CLs volumes, relative signal intensities and CLs localizations were determined. Both ratings (conL vs. non-consensus scoring) were compared for further analysis. Results A total number of n = 334 CLs were identified by both raters in 26 MS patients with a first agreement of both raters on 160 out of 334 of the CLs found (κ = 0.48). After the retrospective re-evaluation, consensus agreement increased to 233 out of 334 CL (κ = 0.69). 93.8% of conL were visible in at least 2 consecutive TP. 74.7% of the conL were visible in all 12 consecutive TP. ConL had greater mean lesion volumes and higher mean signal intensities compared to lesions that were only detected by one of the raters (p<0.05). A higher number of CLs in the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobe were identified by both raters than the number of those only identified by one of the raters (p<0.05). Conclusions After a first assessment, slightly less than a half of the CL were considered as reliably detectable on longitudinal DIR images. A retrospective re-evaluation notably increased the consensus agreement. However, this finding is narrowed, considering the fact that retrospective evaluation steps might not be practicable in clinical routine

  3. Phenomenological gravitational waveforms from spinning coalescing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sturani, R; Cadonati, L; Guidi, G M; Healy, J; Shoemaker, D; Vicere', A

    2010-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of the coalescing binary gravitational waveform is crucial for match filtering techniques, which are currently used in the observational searches performed by the LIGO-Virgo collaboration. Following an earlier paper by the same authors we expose the construction of analytical phenomenological waveforms describing the signal sourced by generically spinning binary systems. The gap between the initial inspiral part of the waveform, described by spin-Taylor approximants, and its final ring-down part, described by damped exponentials, is bridged by a phenomenological phase calibrated by comparison with the dominant spherical harmonic mode of a set of waveforms including both numerical and phenomenological waveforms of a different type. All waveforms considered describe equal mass systems with dimension-less spin magnitudes equal to 0.6. The noise-weighted overlap integral between numerical and phenomenological waveforms ranges between 0.93 and 0.98 for a wide span of mass values.

  4. Waveform Synthesizer For Imaging And Ranging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUDLEY, PETER A.; [et al

    2004-11-30

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for quadrature imbalance. An operational procedure filters imbalance effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver; unwanted energies, such as imbalance energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of quadrature imbalance can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  5. Mergers of black-hole binaries with aligned spins: Waveform characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Bernard J; Boggs, William D; McWilliams, Sean T; Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    We conduct a descriptive analysis of the multipolar structure of gravitational-radiation waveforms from equal-mass aligned-spin mergers, following an approach first presented in the complementary context of nonspinning black holes of varying mass ratio [Baker et al., Phys. Rev. D 78:044046 (2008)]. We find that, as with the nonspinning mergers, the dominant waveform mode phases evolve together in lock-step through inspiral and merger, supporting the previous waveform description in terms of an adiabatically rigid rotator driving gravitational-wave emission -- an implicit rotating source (IRS). We further apply the late-time merger-ringdown model for the rotational frequency introduced in Baker et al. (2008), along with an improved amplitude model appropriate for the dominant (2,+/- 2) modes. This provides a quantitative description of the merger-ringdown waveforms, and suggests that the major features of these waveforms can be described with reference only to the intrinsic parameters associated with the state...

  6. Fractal characteristics for binary noise radar waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing C.

    2016-05-01

    Noise radars have many advantages over conventional radars and receive great attentions recently. The performance of a noise radar is determined by its waveforms. Investigating characteristics of noise radar waveforms has significant value for evaluating noise radar performance. In this paper, we use binomial distribution theory to analyze general characteristics of binary phase coded (BPC) noise waveforms. Focusing on aperiodic autocorrelation function, we demonstrate that the probability distributions of sidelobes for a BPC noise waveform depend on the distances of these sidelobes to the mainlobe. The closer a sidelobe to the mainlobe, the higher the probability for this sidelobe to be a maximum sidelobe. We also develop Monte Carlo framework to explore the characteristics that are difficult to investigate analytically. Through Monte Carlo experiments, we reveal the Fractal relationship between the code length and the maximum sidelobe value for BPC waveforms, and propose using fractal dimension to measure noise waveform performance.

  7. Suitability of post-Newtonian/numerical-relativity hybrid waveforms for gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Ilana; Nissanke, Samaya; Pfeiffer, Harald P, E-mail: macdonald@astro.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2011-07-07

    This paper presents a study of the sufficient accuracy of post-Newtonian and numerical relativity waveforms for the most demanding usage case: parameter estimation of strong sources in advanced gravitational wave detectors. For black hole binaries, these detectors require accurate waveform models which can be constructed by fusing an analytical post-Newtonian inspiral waveform with a numerical relativity merger-ringdown waveform. We perform a comprehensive analysis of errors that enter such 'hybrid waveforms'. We find that the post-Newtonian waveform must be aligned with the numerical relativity waveform to exquisite accuracy, about 1/100 of a gravitational wave cycle. Phase errors in the inspiral phase of the numerical relativity simulation must be controlled to {approx}< 0.1 rad. (These numbers apply to moderately optimistic estimates about the number of GW sources; exceptionally strong signals require even smaller errors.) The dominant source of error arises from the inaccuracy of the investigated post-Newtonian Taylor approximants. Using our error criterion, even at 3.5th post-Newtonian order, hybridization has to be performed significantly before the start of the longest currently available numerical waveforms which cover 30 gravitational wave cycles. The current investigation is limited to the equal-mass, zero-spin case and does not take into account calibration errors of the gravitational wave detectors.

  8. 3-D waveform tomography sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, R.

    2014-01-01

    The complications in anisotropic multi-parameter inversion lie in the trade-off between the different anisotropy parameters. We compute the tomographic waveform sensitivity kernels for a VTI acoustic medium perturbation as a tool to investigate this ambiguity between the different parameters. We use dynamic ray tracing to efficiently handle the expensive computational cost for 3-D anisotropic models. Ray tracing provides also the ray direction information necessary for conditioning the sensitivity kernels to handle anisotropy. The NMO velocity and η parameter kernels showed a maximum sensitivity for diving waves which results in a relevant choice of those parameters in wave equation tomography. The δ parameter kernel showed zero sensitivity; therefore it can serve as a secondary parameter to fit the amplitude in the acoustic anisotropic inversion. Considering the limited penetration depth of diving waves, migration velocity analysis based kernels are introduced to fix the depth ambiguity with reflections and compute sensitivity maps in the deeper parts of the model.

  9. Visualization and analysis of lidar waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Richard C.; Metcalf, Jeremy P.

    2017-05-01

    LiDAR waveform analysis is a relatively new activity in the area of laser scanning. The work described here is an exploration of a different approach to visualization and analysis, following the structure that has evolved for the analysis of imaging spectroscopy data (hyperspectral imaging). The waveform data are transformed into 3-dimensional data structures that provide xy position information, and a z-coordinate, which is the digitized waveform. This allows for representation of the data in spatial and waveform space, the extraction of characteristic spectra, and the development of regions of interest. This representation allows for the application of standard spectral classification tools such as the maximum likelihood classifier.

  10. Seismic waveform modeling over cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    With the fast growing computational technologies, numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation achieved huge successes. Obtaining the synthetic waveforms through numerical simulation receives an increasing amount of attention from seismologists. However, computational seismology is a data-intensive research field, and the numerical packages usually come with a steep learning curve. Users are expected to master considerable amount of computer knowledge and data processing skills. Training users to use the numerical packages, correctly access and utilize the computational resources is a troubled task. In addition to that, accessing to HPC is also a common difficulty for many users. To solve these problems, a cloud based solution dedicated on shallow seismic waveform modeling has been developed with the state-of-the-art web technologies. It is a web platform integrating both software and hardware with multilayer architecture: a well designed SQL database serves as the data layer, HPC and dedicated pipeline for it is the business layer. Through this platform, users will no longer need to compile and manipulate various packages on the local machine within local network to perform a simulation. By providing users professional access to the computational code through its interfaces and delivering our computational resources to the users over cloud, users can customize the simulation at expert-level, submit and run the job through it.

  11. Comparison of four inverse modelling systems applied to the estimation of HFC-125, HFC-134a, and SF6 emissions over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Dominik; Arnold, Tim; Henne, Stephan; Manning, Alistair; Thompson, Rona L.; Maione, Michela; O'Doherty, Simon; Reimann, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are used in a range of industrial applications and have largely replaced previously used gases (CFCs and HCFCs). HFCs are not ozone-depleting but have large global warming potentials and are, therefore, reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Here, we use four independent inverse models to estimate European emissions of the two HFCs contributing the most to global warming (HFC-134a and HFC-125) and of SF6 for the year 2011. Using an ensemble of inverse models offers the possibility to better understand systematic uncertainties in inversions. All systems relied on the same measurement time series from Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), Mace Head (Ireland), and Monte Cimone (Italy) and the same a priori estimates of the emissions, but differed in terms of the Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART, NAME), inversion method (Bayesian, extended Kalman filter), treatment of baseline mole fractions, spatial gridding, and a priori uncertainties. The model systems were compared with respect to the ability to reproduce the measurement time series, the spatial distribution of the posterior emissions, uncertainty reductions, and total emissions estimated for selected countries. All systems were able to reproduce the measurement time series very well, with prior correlations between 0.5 and 0.9 and posterior correlations being higher by 0.05 to 0.1. For HFC-125, all models estimated higher emissions from Spain + Portugal than reported to UNFCCC (median higher by 390 %) though with a large scatter between individual estimates. Estimates for Germany (+140 %) and Ireland (+850 %) were also considerably higher than UNFCCC, whereas the estimates for France and the UK were consistent with the national reports. In contrast to HFC-125, HFC-134a emissions from Spain + Portugal were broadly consistent with UNFCCC, and emissions from Germany were only 30 % higher. The data suggest that the UK over-reports its HFC-134a emissions to

  12. Synchronous Generator Model Parameter Estimation Based on Noisy Dynamic Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhausen, Sebastian; Paszek, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have occurred system failures in many power systems all over the world. They have resulted in a lack of power supply to a large number of recipients. To minimize the risk of occurrence of power failures, it is necessary to perform multivariate investigations, including simulations, of power system operating conditions. To conduct reliable simulations, the current base of parameters of the models of generating units, containing the models of synchronous generators, is necessary. In the paper, there is presented a method for parameter estimation of a synchronous generator nonlinear model based on the analysis of selected transient waveforms caused by introducing a disturbance (in the form of a pseudorandom signal) in the generator voltage regulation channel. The parameter estimation was performed by minimizing the objective function defined as a mean square error for deviations between the measurement waveforms and the waveforms calculated based on the generator mathematical model. A hybrid algorithm was used for the minimization of the objective function. In the paper, there is described a filter system used for filtering the noisy measurement waveforms. The calculation results of the model of a 44 kW synchronous generator installed on a laboratory stand of the Institute of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the Silesian University of Technology are also given. The presented estimation method can be successfully applied to parameter estimation of different models of high-power synchronous generators operating in a power system.

  13. Automated microseismic event location using Master-Event Waveform Stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Kriegerowski, Marius; Gammaldi, Sergio; Horalek, Josef; Priolo, Enrico; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Accurate and automated locations of microseismic events are desirable for many seismological and industrial applications. The analysis of microseismicity is particularly challenging because of weak seismic signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. Traditional location approaches rely on automated picking, based on individual seismograms, and make no use of the coherency information between signals at different stations. This strong limitation has been overcome by full-waveform location methods, which exploit the coherency of waveforms at different stations and improve the location robustness even in presence of noise. However, the performance of these methods strongly depend on the accuracy of the adopted velocity model, which is often quite rough; inaccurate models result in large location errors. We present an improved waveform stacking location method based on source-specific station corrections. Our method inherits the advantages of full-waveform location methods while strongly mitigating the dependency on the accuracy of the velocity model. With this approach the influence of an inaccurate velocity model on the results is restricted to the estimation of travel times solely within the seismogenic volume, but not for the entire source-receiver path. We finally successfully applied our new method to a realistic synthetic dataset as well as real data.

  14. Application of Coherence Inversion Method to Shallow Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建成; 曹德欣; 田宗勇

    2001-01-01

    Because of the disturbance of some regular waves, the deformity of reflective wave occurs, making the coherence inversion method unreliable. By using the event time from multi-fold reflective stack the range of model parameters obtained by coherence inversion is limited in coherence inversion. Then by adjusting the initial values of the model parameters to make the waveform from the coherence inversion method be consistent with that from the original reflective gathers, the result of the inversion becomes more reliable. The application of this method in processing the reflective gathers in Songzikou by the Jingjiang River of Hubei demonstrates the efficiency of the method.

  15. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  16. Goldstone Solar System Radar Waveform Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    Due to distances and relative motions among the transmitter, target object, and receiver, the time-base between any transmitted and received signal will undergo distortion. Pre-distortion of the transmitted signal to compensate for this time-base distortion allows reception of an undistorted signal. In most radar applications, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) would be used to store the pre-calculated waveform and then play back this waveform during transmission. The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), however, has transmission durations that exceed the available memory storage of such a device. A waveform generator capable of real-time pre-distortion of a radar waveform to a given time-base distortion function is needed. To pre-distort the transmitted signal, both the baseband radar waveform and the RF carrier must be modified. In the GSSR, this occurs at the up-conversion mixing stage to an intermediate frequency (IF). A programmable oscillator (PO) is used to generate the IF along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the RF carrier. This serves as the IF input to the waveform generator where it is mixed with a baseband radar waveform whose time-base has been distorted to match the given time-base distortion function producing the modulated IF output. An error control feedback loop is used to precisely control the time-base distortion of the baseband waveform, allowing its real-time generation. The waveform generator produces IF modulated radar waveforms whose time-base has been pre-distorted to match a given arbitrary function. The following waveforms are supported: continuous wave (CW), frequency hopped (FH), binary phase code (BPC), and linear frequency modulation (LFM). The waveform generator takes as input an IF with a time varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier. The waveform generator supports interconnection with deep-space network (DSN) timing and frequency standards, and

  17. Waveforms for Active Sensing: Optical Waveform Design and Analysis for Ballistic Imaging Through Turbid Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-04

    Presentation, San - Agustin , FL, September, 2006 Invited Speaker, Peyman Milanfar, International Conference on Image Processing, Atlanta, GA, Oct...Ballistic Imaging Through Turbid Media", S. Farsiu and P. Milanfar, In proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), San ...Invited Speaker, Sina Farsiu, Sony Electronics, San Jose, CA, Feb. 2007 Invited Speaker, Peyman Milanfar Conference on Applied Inverse Problems

  18. Shape coexistence in the "island of inversion": Search for the $0^{+}_{2}$ state in $^{32}$Mg applying a two-neutron transfer reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Blazhev, A A; Nardelli, S; Kruecken, R; Voulot, D; Hadinia, B; Kalkuehler, M; Clement, E; Habs, D; Diriken, J V J; Wady, P T; Angus, L J

    2008-01-01

    We aim to study the structure of neutron-rich nuclei in the "island of inversion" where intruder $\\textit{fp}$-orbitals favouring deformed states compete with the normal spherical $\\textit{sd}$-orbitals. In particular, we search for the spherical 0$^{+}_{2}$ state in $^{32}$Mg which should coexist with the deformed ground state but has not been observed so far. We propose to populate this state by a (t,p) two-neutron transfer reaction with a $^{30}$Mg beam at around 2 MeV/u from REX-ISOLDE impinging on a tritium-loaded Ti target. The $\\gamma$-rays are detected by MINIBALL and the particles by our new set-up of segmented Si detectors. The results will shed new light on the breaking of the shell closure at $\\textit{N}$ = 20 in this region.

  19. North American paleoclimate reconstructions for the Last Glacial Maximum using an inverse modeling through iterative forward modeling approach applied to pollen data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kenji; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    2016-10-01

    The inverse modeling through iterative forward modeling (IMIFM) approach was used to reconstruct Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climates from North American fossil pollen data. The approach was validated using modern pollen data and observed climate data. While the large-scale LGM temperature IMIFM reconstructions are similar to those calculated using conventional statistical approaches, the reconstructions of moisture variables differ between the two approaches. We used two vegetation models, BIOME4 and BIOME5-beta, with the IMIFM approach to evaluate the effects on the LGM climate reconstruction of differences in water use efficiency, carbon use efficiency, and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Although lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations influence pollen-based LGM moisture reconstructions, they do not significantly affect temperature reconstructions over most of North America. This study implies that the LGM climate was very cold but not very much drier than present over North America, which is inconsistent with previous studies.

  20. Analysis of Chaotic Waveforms for Application to Active Sonar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Noise-Reduced Signal. Figure 4-2. Noise Reduction Power Spectra : (a) Power Spectrum of Lorenz Waveform; (b) Gaussian Noise; (c) Signal Plus Noise; and (d...dimension, theoretic entropy and Lyapunov exponent, are also described for completeness even though they are not used in this study. 2.5.1 Correlation...For each lical center, a data covariance matrix is formed using the nearest neighbors. Singular value decomposition ( SVD ) is then applied to the matrix

  1. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  2. Very long-period GPS waveforms. What can GPS bring to Earth seismic velocity models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelevitz, K.; Houlie, N.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Boschi, L.; Giardini, D.; Rothacher, M.

    2014-12-01

    It is now admitted that high rate GPS observations can provide reliable surface displacement waveforms. For long-period (T > 5s) transients, it was shown that GPS and seismometer (STS-1) displacements are in agreement at least for vertical component [Houlié et al., 2011]. We propose here to supplement existing long-period seismic networks with high rate (>= 1Hz) GPS data in order to improve the resolution of global seismic velocity models. We aim at extending the use of GPS measurements beyond the range of STS-1 in the low frequency end (T>1000s). We present the results of the processing of 1Hz GPS records of the Hokkaido, Sumatra and Tohoku earthquakes (25th of September, 2003, Mw = 8.3; 26th of December, 2004, Mw = 8.9; 11th of March, 2011, Mw = 9.1, respectively). 3D waveforms phase time-series have been used to recover the ground motion histories at the GPS sites. Through the better resolution of inversion of the GPS phase observations, we determine displacement waveforms of periods ranging from 30 seconds to 1300 seconds for a selection of sites. We compare inverted GPS waveforms with STS-1 waveforms, superconducting gravity waveforms and synthetic waveforms computed using 3D global wave propagation with SPECFEM. We find that the GPS waveforms are in agreement with the SPECFEM synthetic data and are able to fill the period-gap between the broadband seismometer STS-1 data and the normal mode period range detected by the superconducting gravimeters. References: Houlié, N., G. Occhipinti, T. Blanchard, N. Shapiro, P. Lognonne, and M. Murakami (2011), New approach to detect seismic surface waves in 1Hz-sampled GPS time series, Scientific reports, 1, 44.

  3. Optical arbitrary waveform characterization using linear spectrograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi; Leaird, Daniel E; Long, Christopher M; Boppart, Stephen A; Weiner, Andrew M

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the first application of linear spectrogram methods based on electro-optic phase modulation to characterize optical arbitrary waveforms generated under spectral line-by-line control. This approach offers both superior sensitivity and self-referencing capability for retrieval of periodic high repetition rate optical arbitrary waveforms.

  4. Digital Waveform Generator Basedon FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoucheng Ding

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA of the Cyclone II series was as the core processor of frequency meter and the Quartus II was as the development plat form. This article had designed the fully digital signal generator. It use dall-digital frequency synthesizer technology and FPGA programming implemented the three waveforms: sin wave and square wave and triangle wave. The frequency was adjustable through10- bit phase accumulator and the analog multiplier achieved amplitude modulation. Using 51soft nuclear FPGA wrote a C program and realized the in put control word. The 4 × 4 matrix keyboard inputted frequency or amplitude value and the LCD1602displayedthem. The test results show that the system has high precision, distortion and low.

  5. Interpolation in waveform space: enhancing the accuracy of gravitational waveform families using numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, Kipp; Hanna, Chad; Keppel, Drew; Pfeiffer, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Matched-filtering for the identification of compact object mergers in gravitational-wave antenna data involves the comparison of the data stream to a bank of template gravitational waveforms. Typically the template bank is constructed from phenomenological waveform models since these can be evaluated for an arbitrary choice of physical parameters. Recently it has been proposed that singular value decomposition (SVD) can be used to reduce the number of templates required for detection. As we show here, another benefit of SVD is its removal of biases from the phenomenological templates along with a corresponding improvement in their ability to represent waveform signals obtained from numerical relativity (NR) simulations. Using these ideas, we present a method that calibrates a reduced SVD basis of phenomenological waveforms against NR waveforms in order to construct a new waveform approximant with improved accuracy and faithfulness compared to the original phenomenological model. The new waveform family is giv...

  6. Advanced analysis of complex seismic waveforms to characterize the subsurface Earth structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tianxia

    2011-12-01

    This thesis includes three major parts, (1) Body wave analysis of mantle structure under the Calabria slab, (2) Spatial Average Coherency (SPAC) analysis of microtremor to characterize the subsurface structure in urban areas, and (3) Surface wave dispersion inversion for shear wave velocity structure. Although these three projects apply different techniques and investigate different parts of the Earth, their aims are the same, which is to better understand and characterize the subsurface Earth structure by analyzing complex seismic waveforms that are recorded on the Earth surface. My first project is body wave analysis of mantle structure under the Calabria slab. Its aim is to better understand the subduction structure of the Calabria slab by analyzing seismograms generated by natural earthquakes. The rollback and subduction of the Calabrian Arc beneath the southern Tyrrhenian Sea is a case study of slab morphology and slab-mantle interactions at short spatial scale. I analyzed the seismograms traversing the Calabrian slab and upper mantle wedge under the southern Tyrrhenian Sea through body wave dispersion, scattering and attenuation, which are recorded during the PASSCAL CAT/SCAN experiment. Compressional body waves exhibit dispersion correlating with slab paths, which is high-frequency components arrivals being delayed relative to low-frequency components. Body wave scattering and attenuation are also spatially correlated with slab paths. I used this correlation to estimate the positions of slab boundaries, and further suggested that the observed spatial variation in near-slab attenuation could be ascribed to mantle flow patterns around the slab. My second project is Spatial Average Coherency (SPAC) analysis of microtremors for subsurface structure characterization. Shear-wave velocity (Vs) information in soil and rock has been recognized as a critical parameter for site-specific ground motion prediction study, which is highly necessary for urban areas located

  7. Inversion of TEM data and analysis of the 2D induced magnetic field applied to the aquifers characterization in the Paraná basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realpe Campaña, Julian David; Porsani, Jorge Luís; Bortolozo, Cassiano Antonio; Serejo de Oliveira, Gabriela; Monteiro dos Santos, Fernando Acácio

    2017-03-01

    Results of a TEM profile by using the fixed-loop array and an analysis of the induced magnetic field are presented in this work performed in the northwest region of São Paulo State, Brazil, Paraná Basin. The objectives of this research were to map the sedimentary and crystalline aquifers in the area and analyzing the behavior of the magnetic field by observation of magnetic profiles. TEM measurements in the three spatial components were taken to create magnetic profiles of the induced (secondary) magnetic field. The TEM data were acquired using a fixed transmitter loop of 200 m × 200 m and a 3D coil receiver moving along a profile line of 1000 m. Magnetic profiles of dBz, dBx and dBy components showed symmetrical spatial behavior related with loop geometry. z-component showed a behavior probably related to superparamagnetic effect (SPM). dBz data was used to perform individual 1D inversion for each position and to generate an interpolated pseudo-2D geoelectric profile. The results showed two low resistivity zones: the first shallow, between 10 m and 70 m deep, probably related to the Adamantina Formation (sedimentary aquifer). The second between 200 m and 300 m depth, probably related to a fractured zone filled with water or clay inside the basalt layer of the Serra Geral Formation (crystalline aquifer). These results agree with the well logs information available in the studied region.

  8. Implementation of Pulse Radar Waveform Based on Software Radio Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Dong; Dong Jian; Xiao Shunping

    2015-01-01

    Based on the frequency and phase modulated signal, the authors design some commonly-used pulse radar baseband waveform, such as linear frequency modulated waveform, nonlinear frequency modulated waveform, Costas waveform, Barker coding waveform and multi-phase coded waveform, and the authors compare their performance, such as the peak side lobe ratio, the Rayleigh resolution in time and distance resolution. Then, based on the software radio platform NI PXIe-5644R, the authors design the timin...

  9. Skeletonized Wave Equation Inversion in VTI Media without too much Math

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Shihang

    2017-05-17

    We present a tutorial for skeletonized inversion of pseudo-acoustic anisotropic VTI data. We first invert for the anisotropic models using wave equation traveltime inversion. Here, the skeletonized data are the traveltimes of transmitted and/or reflected arrivals that lead to simpler misfit functions and more robust convergence compared to full waveform inversion. This provides a good starting model for waveform inversion. The effectiveness of this procedure is illustrated with synthetic data examples and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico.

  10. Application of the unwrapped phase inversion to land data without source estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2015-08-19

    Unwrapped phase inversion with a strong damping was developed to solve the phase wrapping problem in frequency-domain waveform inversion. In this study, we apply the unwrapped phase inversion to band-limited real land data, for which the available minimum frequency is quite high. An important issue of the data is a strong ambiguity of source-ignition time (or source shift) shown in a seismogram. A source-estimation approach does not fully address the issue of source shift, since the velocity model and the source wavelet are updated simultaneously and interact with each other. We suggest a source-independent unwrapped phase inversion approach instead of relying on source-estimation from this land data. In the source-independent approach, the phase of the modeled data converges not to the exact phase value of the observed data, but to the relative phase value (or the trend of phases); thus it has the potential to solve the ambiguity of source-ignition time in a seismogram and work better than the source-estimation approach. Numerical examples show the validation of the source-independent unwrapped phase inversion, especially for land field data having an ambiguity in the source-ignition time.

  11. An overview of joint inversion in earthquake source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-10-01

    We reviewed joint inversion studies of the rupture processes of significant earthquakes, using the definition of a joint inversion in earthquake source imaging as a source inversion of multiple kinds of datasets (waveform, geodetic, or tsunami). Yoshida and Koketsu (Geophys J Int 103:355-362, 1990), and Wald and Heaton (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:668-691, 1994) independently initiated joint inversion methods, finding that joint inversion provides more reliable rupture process models than single-dataset inversion, leading to an increase of joint inversion studies. A list of these studies was made using the finite-source rupture model database (Mai and Thingbaijam in Seismol Res Lett 85:1348-1357, 2014). Outstanding issues regarding joint inversion were also discussed.

  12. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  13. Improved retracking algorithm for oceanic altimeter waveforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifeng Bao; Yang Lu; Yong Wang

    2009-01-01

    Over the deep oceans without land/ice interference, the waveforms created by the return altimeter pulse generally follow the ocean model of Brown, and the corresponding range can be properly determined using the result from an onboard tracker. In the case of com-plex altimeter waveforms corrupted due to a variety of reasons, the processor on the satellite cannot properly determine the center of the leading edge, and range observations can be in error. As an efficacious method to improve the precision of those altimeter observations with complex waveforms, waveform retracking is required to reprocess the original returning pulse. Based on basic altimeter theory and the geometric feature of altimeter waveforms, we developed a new altimeter waveform retracker, which is valid for all altimeter wave-forms once there exists a reasonable returning signal. The performances of the existing Beta-5 retracker, threshold retracker, improved threshold retracker, and the new retracker are assessed in the experimental regions (China Seas and its adjacent regions), and the improvements in the accuracy of sea surface height are investigated by the difference between retracked altimeter observations and ref-erenced geoid. The comparisons denote that the new algorithm gives the best performance in both the open ocean and coastal regions. Also, the new retracker presents a uniform performance in the whole test region. Besides, there is a significant improvement in the short-wavelength precision and the spatial resolution of sea surface height after retracking process.

  14. TOF Spectroscopy measurement with waveform Digitizer at TMSR Photoneutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Longxiang; Ma, Yugang; Cao, Xiguang; Cai, Xiangzhou; Chen, Jingen; Zhang, Guilin; Han, Jianlong; Zhang, Guogiang; Hu, Jifeng; Wang, Xiaohe

    2015-01-01

    The Photo-Neutron Source(PNS,phase 1), is an electron linear accelerator (linac) based pulsed neutron facility, combined with TOF technique, was constructed for nuclear data measurement of Thorium Molten Salt Reactor(TMSR) in Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics(SINAP) at JiaDing campus. The TOF detector signal, with the arrive time, pulse shape and pulse hight information, was recorded by a waveform digitizer. Through the pulse-shape discrimination(PSD) between neutrons and gamma-rays and time of Gamma Flash and Neutron signal analyse, the neutron TOF spectrum was deduced with this simple electronics design, and a new DAQ system based on waveform digitizer was used in this test experiment.

  15. Optimal control of photoelectron emission by realistic waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Solanpää, Janne; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental techniques in multicolor waveform synthesis allow the temporal shaping of strong femtosecond laser pulses with applications in the control of quantum mechanical processes in atoms, molecules, and nanostructures. Prediction of the shapes of the optimal waveforms can be done computationally using quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). In this work we bring QOCT to experimental feasibility by providing an optimal control scheme with realistic pulse representation. We apply the technique to optimal control of above-threshold photoelectron emission from a one-dimensional hydrogen atom. By mixing different spectral channels and thus lowering the intensity requirements for individual channels, the resulting optimal pulses can extend the cutoff energies by at least up to 50% and bring up the electron yield by several orders of magnitude. Insights into the electron dynamics for optimized photoelectron emission are obtained with a semiclassical two-step model.

  16. Radar Sensor Networks: Algorithms for Waveform Design and Diversity with Application to ATR with Delay-Doppler Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilian Liang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic target recognition (ATR in target search phase is very challenging because the target range and mobility are not yet perfectly known, which results in delay-Doppler uncertainty. In this paper, we firstly perform some theoretical studies on radar sensor network (RSN design based on linear frequency modulation (LFM waveform: (1 the conditions for waveform coexistence, (2 interferences among waveforms in RSN, (3 waveform diversity in RSN. Then we apply RSN to ATR with delay-Doppler uncertainty and propose maximum-likeihood (ML ATR algorithms for fluctuating targets and nonfluctuating targets. Simulation results show that our RSN vastly reduces the ATR error compared to a single radar system in ATR with delay-Doppler uncertainty. The proposed waveform design and diversity algorithms can also be applied to active RFID sensor networks and underwater acoustic sensor networks.

  17. Periodic, pseudonoise waveforms for multifunction coherent ladar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Matthew P; Duncan, Bradley D

    2010-04-01

    We report the use of periodic, pseudonoise waveforms in a multifunction coherent ladar system. We exploit the Doppler sensitivity of these waveforms, as well as agile processing, to enable diverse ladar functions, including high range resolution imaging, macro-Doppler imaging, synthetic aperture ladar, and range-resolved micro-Doppler imaging. We present analytic expressions and simulations demonstrating the utility of pseudonoise waveforms for each of the ladar modes. We also discuss a laboratory pseudonoise ladar system that was developed to demonstrate range compression and range-resolved micro-Doppler imaging, as well as the phase recovery common to each of the coherent modes.

  18. Optimal pseudorandom pulse position modulation ladar waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluckiger, David U; Boland, Brian F; Marcus, Eran

    2015-03-20

    An algorithm for generating optimal pseudorandom pulse position modulation (PRPPM) waveforms for ladar ranging is presented. Bistatic ladar systems using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes require detection of several pulses in order to generate sufficient target statistics to satisfy some detection decision rule. For targets with large initial range uncertainty, it becomes convenient to transmit a pulse train with large ambiguity range. One solution is to employ a PRPPM waveform. An optimal PRPPM waveform will have minimal sidelobes: equivalent to 1 or 0 counts after the pulse correlation filter (compression). This can be accomplished by generating PRPPM pulse trains with optimal or minimal sidelobe autocorrelation.

  19. Inverse disjuncties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malepaard, J.

    2007-01-01

    Balansschikkingen (of negatief gebonden of-constructies) zijn volgens de in dit artikel ontwikkelde hypothese inverse disjuncties (id's). Het zijn tweeledige zinnen waarvan het eerste lid een verplichte negatieve of minimaliserende constituent bevat en het tweede lid met of begint. Evenals

  20. Third Harmonic Imaging using a Pulse Inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The pulse inversion (PI) technique can be utilized to separate and enhance harmonic components of a waveform for tissue harmonic imaging. While most ultrasound systems can perform pulse inversion, only few image the 3rd harmonic component. PI pulse subtraction can isolate and enhance the 3rd harmonic component for imaging on any ultrasound system capable of PI. PI was used to perform 3rd harmonic Bmode scans of a water-filled wire phantom on an experimental ultrasound system. The 3rd harmonic...

  1. Exergetic and entropic analysis applied to a reverse cycle adsorption machine; Analyses entropique et exergetique appliquees a une machine a cycle inverse a adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labsen Ait, Taleb; Rahal, Boussehain; Feidt, M. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henry Poincare, Lab. d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, LEMTA CNRS UMR 7563, 54 (France)

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, some results of entropic and exergetic analysis applied to typical cycle of an active carbon-methanol pair adsorption refrigerating machine is presented. These results give a review of the influence of operating temperatures and mass transfer in the system on the internal entropy generation and the exergetic balance at each phase of the cycle. The paper give also the time evolution of the external entropy generation due to the thermal contacts of heat exchangers components and sources/sinks of a finite thermal conductances. (author)

  2. Waveform synthesis for imaging and ranging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Dudley, Peter A.; Dubert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2004-12-07

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for quadrature imbalance and Local Oscillator (LO) feed-through. An operational procedure filters imbalance and LO feed-through effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver; unwanted energies, such as LO feed-through and/or imbalance energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of LO feed-through and imbalance can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  3. Robust pulse wave velocity estimation by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a marker of arterial stiffness and may permit continuous, non-invasive, and cuff-less monitoring of blood pressure. Here, robust PWV estimation was sought by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms. In this approach, the system that optimally couples the proximal waveform to the distal waveform is identified, and the time delay of this system is then used to calculate PWV. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, a standard identification technique was applied to non-invasive impedance cardiography and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from six humans subjected to progressive reductions in central blood volume induced by lower body negative pressure. This technique estimated diastolic pressure with an overall root-mean-squared-error of 5.2 mmHg. For comparison, the conventional detection method for estimating PWV yielded a corresponding error of 8.3 mmHg.

  4. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  5. Anisotropic Structure of the Upper Mantle, Imaged with Surface and S Waveform Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2011-12-01

    The rapid recent expansion of global and regional seismic networks has paved the way for a new generation of tomographic models, with significantly improved resolution at global and regional scales. We present a new global model of shear velocity and azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle, down to the base of the transition zone. The model is constrained by an unprecedentedly large waveform dataset collected from over 2000 stations of GSN and affiliates, USArray, VEBSN, CNSN, PASSCAL experiments, and other networks with data available from IRIS, ORFEUS, and GFZ data centers. Applying the accurate and efficient automated multimode inversion of surface- and S-wave forms to this massive dataset, we generated linear constraints on elastic structure within approximate sensitivity volumes between individual source-receiver pairs, with respect to a 3D reference model. The full waveform inversions resulted in more than one million successful fits (one million seismograms), with structural information extracted from both the fundamental and higher modes. The linear equations were then simultaneously solved for a high-resolution, 3D model of shear velocity and azimuthal anisotropy in the upper mantle. In continental domains, clearly identifiable boundaries between different tectonic features such as basins and relic mountain ranges are readily observable, as well as the signature of deep cratonic roots versus juvenile accretionary margins. Both active and fossil subduction zones are marked by slab signatures deep in the upper mantle and extending through the transition zone. In oceanic regions, largest mid-ocean-ridge anomalies indicative of melting terminate at depths of 100-120 km, with evidence for vertical flow in the upper mantle observed through a combination of VSV, VSH, and azimuthal anisotropy. Spatio-temporal evolution (cooling and thickening) of lithosphere away from the spreading ridges matches the signature expected from geodynamic and thermal modeling. The

  6. Doppler waveforms of the hepatic veins in children with diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzun, Hakan [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Konuralp, Duzce 81620 (Turkey); Yazici, Burhan [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konuralp, Duzce 81620 (Turkey)], E-mail: dryazici@yahoo.com; Erdogmus, Besir [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konuralp, Duzce 81620 (Turkey); Kocabay, Kenan [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Konuralp, Duzce 81620 (Turkey); Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Buyukkaya, Ayla; Yazgan, Omer [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konuralp, Duzce 81620 (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fatty infiltration of the liver (FIL) on the Doppler waveform pattern in the hepatic veins of obese children. Methods: In this prospective study, 59 patients with diffuse FIL and 45 normal healthy children who served as control group underwent hepatic vein B-mod and duplex Doppler sonography. The Doppler sonography spectrum of the right hepatic vein was classified into three groups: triphasic waveform, biphasic waveform, and monophasic or flat waveform. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the phasicity of hepatic venous flow between patients and control subjects (p < 0.001). The Doppler flow pattern in the right hepatic vein was triphasic in 28 (47.5%), biphasic in 28 (47.5%), and monophasic in 3 (5%) children with fatty liver, while it was triphasic in 43 (95.6%) and biphasic in 2 (4.4%) control subjects. There was an inverse correlation between the sonographic grade of fatty infiltration of the liver and the phasicity of hepatic venous flow (r = -0.479, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Abnormal right hepatic vein Doppler waveform, biphasic as well as monophasic, can be seen in healthy obese children with diffuse FIL.

  7. Selection of Carrier Waveforms for PWM Inverter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国呈; 屈克庆; 许春雨; 孙承波

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the influence of different carrier waveforms upon the output characteristics of PWM inverter is described in detail. When a triangular carrier waveform is used in hard-switching PWM inverters, harmonics exist in the neighborhood of the output frequency of the inverter output voltage and current due to the dead time. The triangular carrier waveform used in soft-switching PWM inverter will cause difficulties in controlling resonance-trigger time, higher loss in the resonant circuit, and less utilization of the DC bus voltage. If a sawtooth carrier is used in hard-switching PWM inverter, there will be severe distortion in the current waveform. When sawtooth carriers with alternate positive and negative slopes are used in soft-switching PWM inverters, the resonancetrigger time is easy to control, and distortion in the output voltage and current caused by the dead time will not appear.

  8. GRC GSFC TDRSS Waveform Metrics Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.

    2013-01-01

    The report presents software metrics and porting metrics for the GGT Waveform. The porting was from a ground-based COTS SDR, the SDR-3000, to the CoNNeCT JPL SDR. The report does not address any of the Operating Environment (OE) software development, nor the original TDRSS waveform development at GSFC for the COTS SDR. With regard to STRS, the report presents compliance data and lessons learned.

  9. Revealing time-unlocked brain activity from MEG measurements by common waveform estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Takeda

    Full Text Available Brain activities related to cognitive functions, such as attention, occur with unknown and variable delays after stimulus onsets. Recently, we proposed a method (Common Waveform Estimation, CWE that could extract such brain activities from magnetoencephalography (MEG or electroencephalography (EEG measurements. CWE estimates spatiotemporal MEG/EEG patterns occurring with unknown and variable delays, referred to here as unlocked waveforms, without hypotheses about their shapes. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of CWE for cognitive neuroscience. For this purpose, we show procedures to estimate unlocked waveforms using CWE and to examine their role. We applied CWE to the MEG epochs during Go trials of a visual Go/NoGo task. This revealed unlocked waveforms with interesting properties, specifically large alpha oscillations around the temporal areas. To examine the role of the unlocked waveform, we attempted to estimate the strength of the brain activity of the unlocked waveform in various conditions. We made a spatial filter to extract the component reflecting the brain activity of the unlocked waveform, applied this spatial filter to MEG data under different conditions (a passive viewing, a simple reaction time, and Go/NoGo tasks, and calculated the powers of the extracted components. Comparing the powers across these conditions suggests that the unlocked waveforms may reflect the inhibition of the task-irrelevant activities in the temporal regions while the subject attends to the visual stimulus. Our results demonstrate that CWE is a potential tool for revealing new findings of cognitive brain functions without any hypothesis in advance.

  10. A topographic parameter inversion method based on laser altimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ChunMing; ZHANG ShaoDong; CHEN Xi

    2012-01-01

    A topographic parameter inversion method based on laser altimetry is developed in this paper,which can be used to deduce the surface vertical profile and retrieve the topographic parameters within the laser footprints by analyzing and simulating return waveforms.This method comprises three steps.The first step is to build the numerical models for the whole measuring procedure of laser altimetry,construct digital elevation models for surfaces with different topographic parameters,and calculate return waveforms.The second step is to analyze the simulated return waveforms to obtain their characteristics parameters,summarize the effects of the topographic parameter variations on the characteristic parameters of simulated return waveforms,and analyze the observed return waveforms of laser altimeters to acquire their characteristic parameters at the same time.The last step is to match the characteristic parameters of the simulated and observed return waveforms,and deduce the topographic parameters within the laser footprint.This method can be used to retrieve the topographic parameters within the laser footprint from the observed return waveforms of spaceborne laser altimeters and to get knowledge about the surface altitude distribution within the laser footprint other than only getting the height of the surface encountered firstly by the laser beam,which extends laser altimeters' function and makes them more like radars.

  11. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes......, the results are compatible with the data and, at the same time, favor sharp transitions. The focusing strategy can also be used to constrain the 1D solutions laterally, guaranteeing that lateral sharp transitions are retrieved without losing resolution. By means of real and synthetic datasets, sharp...

  12. Georgia Tech Catalog of Gravitational Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Jani, Karan; Clark, James A; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios $q = m_1/m_2 \\le 15$, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have $q \\le 8$. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 even...

  13. Georgia tech catalog of gravitational waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Karan; Healy, James; Clark, James A.; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios q = m 1/m 2 ≤ 15, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have q ≤ 8. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 event and future massive binary black-hole search in LIGO is discussed. The Georgia Tech catalog is publicly available at einstein.gatech.edu/catalog.

  14. Inverse Queries For Multidimensional Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bernecker, Thomas; Kriegel, Hans-Peter; Mamoulis, Nikos; Renz, Matthias; Zhang, Shiming; Züfle, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Traditional spatial queries return, for a given query object $q$, all database objects that satisfy a given predicate, such as epsilon range and $k$-nearest neighbors. This paper defines and studies {\\em inverse} spatial queries, which, given a subset of database objects $Q$ and a query predicate, return all objects which, if used as query objects with the predicate, contain $Q$ in their result. We first show a straightforward solution for answering inverse spatial queries for any query predicate. Then, we propose a filter-and-refinement framework that can be used to improve efficiency. We show how to apply this framework on a variety of inverse queries, using appropriate space pruning strategies. In particular, we propose solutions for inverse epsilon range queries, inverse $k$-nearest neighbor queries, and inverse skyline queries. Our experiments show that our framework is significantly more efficient than naive approaches.

  15. Non-Linear Seismic Velocity Estimation from Multiple Waveform Functionals and Formal Assessment of Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    the study area and locations of two stations DESE and GVD. We show results from full waveform inversion at these two stations in Figures 2 and 3. In...each figure we show data fit, best model, marginal PPD and correlation plots. Note that at station DESE , we obtain good fit to the data and well...on the best fit to surface wave dispersion. The judgment and experience of seismologists who keep a clear eye on their goal is critical, and this

  16. Transdimensional seismic inversion using the Hamiltonian Monte-Carlo approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, M. K.; Biswas, R.

    2014-12-01

    In an inverse problem, the number of model parameters is often a choice dictated by computational convenience. In a transdimensional inverse problem, the number of model parameters is treated as an additional variable that we solve for. The Reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is generally employed for model exploration and uncertainty quantification in such problems. A typical RJMCMC is computationally expensive and therefore, its application has so far been limited to problems with a small number of model parameters, where the forward modeling can be done rapidly. Here we report a practical transdimesional seismic inversion algorithm where the model perturbations are generated according to the birth-death approach. However, we determine the model acceptance by a Hamiltonian approach that introduces a new momentum variable. This results in an update rule that makes use of the gradient information together with the Metropolis criterion. The algorithm can either be used for model exploration (sampling at a constant temperature) or model exploitation using annealing. We apply this technique to 1D waveform inversion problem of seismic reflection data where at each location we make use of several hundred model parameters. Forward modelng is carried out using reflectivity layer matrices in the frequency wavenumber domain and the objective function is evaluated in delaytime-ray parameter domain. Only at a few selected sufrace locations (CMP gathers) we carry out detailed uncertainty analysis ; at all other places we determine the best fit model. We are able to estimate geologically meaningful results that are correlated very well with collocated well logs at a few selected locations. We also explore several proposal distributions diifferent from the standard birth-date appproach for trial model generation that can be computationally fast.

  17. Full waveform tomography for lithospheric imaging: results from a blind test in a realistic crustal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenders, A. J.; Pratt, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive validation of 2-D, frequency-domain, acoustic wave-equation tomography was undertaken in a `blind test', using third-party, realistic, elastic wave-equation data. The synthetic 2-D, wide-angle seismic data were provided prior to a recent workshop on the methods of controlled source seismology; the true model was not revealed to the authors until after the presentation of our waveform tomography results. The original model was specified on a detailed grid with variable P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density and viscoelastic Q-factor structure, designed to simulate a section of continental crust 250 km long and 40 km deep. Synthetic vertical and horizontal component data were available for 51 shot locations (spaced every 5 km), recorded at 2779 receivers (spaced every 90 m), evenly spread along the surface of the model. The data contained energy from 0.2 to 15 Hz. Waveform tomography, a combination of traveltime tomography and 2-D waveform inversion of the early arrivals of the seismic waveforms, was used to recover crustal P-velocity structure from the vertical component data, using data from 51 sources, 1390 receivers and frequencies between 0.8 and 7.0 Hz. The waveform tomography result contained apparent structure at wavelength-scale resolution that was not evident on the traveltime tomography result. The predicted (acoustic) waveforms in the final result matched the original elastic data to a high degree of accuracy. During the workshop, the exact model was revealed; over much of the model the waveform tomography results provided a good correspondence with the true model, from large- to intermediate-(wavelength) scales, with a resolution limit on the order of 1 km. A significant, near-surface low-velocity zone, invisible to traveltime methods, was correctly recovered; the results also provided a high-resolution image of the complex structure of the entire crust, and the depth and nature of the crust-mantle transition. Some inaccuracies were

  18. Rigorous Approach in Investigation of Seismic Structure and Source Characteristicsin Northeast Asia: Hierarchical and Trans-dimensional Bayesian Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustac, M.; Kim, S.; Tkalcic, H.; Rhie, J.; Chen, Y.; Ford, S. R.; Sebastian, N.

    2015-12-01

    Conventional approaches to inverse problems suffer from non-linearity and non-uniqueness in estimations of seismic structures and source properties. Estimated results and associated uncertainties are often biased by applied regularizations and additional constraints, which are commonly introduced to solve such problems. Bayesian methods, however, provide statistically meaningful estimations of models and their uncertainties constrained by data information. In addition, hierarchical and trans-dimensional (trans-D) techniques are inherently implemented in the Bayesian framework to account for involved error statistics and model parameterizations, and, in turn, allow more rigorous estimations of the same. Here, we apply Bayesian methods throughout the entire inference process to estimate seismic structures and source properties in Northeast Asia including east China, the Korean peninsula, and the Japanese islands. Ambient noise analysis is first performed to obtain a base three-dimensional (3-D) heterogeneity model using continuous broadband waveforms from more than 300 stations. As for the tomography of surface wave group and phase velocities in the 5-70 s band, we adopt a hierarchical and trans-D Bayesian inversion method using Voronoi partition. The 3-D heterogeneity model is further improved by joint inversions of teleseismic receiver functions and dispersion data using a newly developed high-efficiency Bayesian technique. The obtained model is subsequently used to prepare 3-D structural Green's functions for the source characterization. A hierarchical Bayesian method for point source inversion using regional complete waveform data is applied to selected events from the region. The seismic structure and source characteristics with rigorously estimated uncertainties from the novel Bayesian methods provide enhanced monitoring and discrimination of seismic events in northeast Asia.

  19. Seismic moment tensor inversion using 3D velocity model and its application to the 2013 Lushan earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lupei; Zhou, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-01

    Source inversion of small-magnitude events such as aftershocks or mine collapses requires use of relatively high frequency seismic waveforms which are strongly affected by small-scale heterogeneities in the crust. In this study, we developed a new inversion method called gCAP3D for determining general moment tensor of a seismic source using Green's functions of 3D models. It inherits the advantageous features of the "Cut-and-Paste" (CAP) method to break a full seismogram into the Pnl and surface-wave segments and to allow time shift between observed and predicted waveforms. It uses grid search for 5 source parameters (relative strengths of the isotropic and compensated-linear-vector-dipole components and the strike, dip, and rake of the double-couple component) that minimize the waveform misfit. The scalar moment is estimated using the ratio of L2 norms of the data and synthetics. Focal depth can also be determined by repeating the inversion at different depths. We applied gCAP3D to the 2013 Ms 7.0 Lushan earthquake and its aftershocks using a 3D crustal-upper mantle velocity model derived from ambient noise tomography in the region. We first relocated the events using the double-difference method. We then used the finite-differences method and reciprocity principle to calculate Green's functions of the 3D model for 20 permanent broadband seismic stations within 200 km from the source region. We obtained moment tensors of the mainshock and 74 aftershocks ranging from Mw 5.2 to 3.4. The results show that the Lushan earthquake is a reverse faulting at a depth of 13-15 km on a plane dipping 40-47° to N46° W. Most of the aftershocks occurred off the main rupture plane and have similar focal mechanisms to the mainshock's, except in the proximity of the mainshock where the aftershocks' focal mechanisms display some variations.

  20. Data mining technique for fast retrieval of similar waveforms in Fusion massive databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT Para Fusion, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es; Pereira, A.; Portas, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT Para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Dormido-Canto, S.; Farias, G.; Dormido, R.; Sanchez, J.; Duro, N. [Departamento de Informatica y Automatica, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Santos, M. [Departamento de Arquitectura de Computadores y Automatica, UCM, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, E. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT Para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Pajares, G. [Departamento de Arquitectura de Computadores y Automatica, UCM, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    Fusion measurement systems generate similar waveforms for reproducible behavior. A major difficulty related to data analysis is the identification, in a rapid and automated way, of a set of discharges with comparable behaviour, i.e. discharges with 'similar' waveforms. Here we introduce a new technique for rapid searching and retrieval of 'similar' signals. The approach consists of building a classification system that avoids traversing the whole database looking for similarities. The classification system diminishes the problem dimensionality (by means of waveform feature extraction) and reduces the searching space to just the most probable 'similar' waveforms (clustering techniques). In the searching procedure, the input waveform is classified in any of the existing clusters. Then, a similarity measure is computed between the input signal and all cluster elements in order to identify the most similar waveforms. The inner product of normalized vectors is used as the similarity measure as it allows the searching process to be independent of signal gain and polarity. This development has been applied recently to TJ-II stellarator databases and has been integrated into its remote participation system.

  1. A Generalized Algorithm Deriving Vegetation Height from ICESat/GLAS Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G. M.; Ni-Meister, W.; Lee, S.

    2010-12-01

    A location-insensitive geometric algorithm for extracting vegetation height from ICESat/GLAS waveform data has recently been developed and validated in a deciduous broadleaf biome with promising results. The current study extends the validation to different biomes using globally-available input data. Airborne lidar was used to evaluate the accuracy of the height algorithm in boreal, chaparral, temperate/deciduous, arctic, and urban settings, in preparation for applying the algorithm globally. The model is dependent on surface slope and on the extent of the transmitted and received waveforms. Different sources of slope information (SRTM, NED, airborne lidar) were compared for their effects on the slope term of the model. Non-vegetated flat surfaces isolated the effect of the transmit waveform, and suggested adjustments to the corresponding term. Accuracy of the waveform extent was found to be dependent on the quality of shots used, and an algorithm for filtering noisy waveforms based on waveform shape was developed. The choice of digital elevation model affected the slope term, and we found that SRTM yielded usable results when compared to NED and small-footprint lidar.

  2. Elastic Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion Using Dynamic Warping and Wave Mode Decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, T.

    2017-05-26

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) provides high-resolution parameter estimation of the subsurface but requires good initial guess of the true model. The traveltime inversion only minimizes traveltime misfits which are more sensitive and linearly related to the low-wavenumber model perturbation. Therefore, building initial P and S wave velocity models for EFWI by using elastic wave-equation reflections traveltime inversion (WERTI) would be effective and robust, especially for the deeper part. In order to distinguish the reflection travletimes of P or S-waves in elastic media, we decompose the surface multicomponent data into vector P- and S-wave seismogram. We utilize the dynamic image warping to extract the reflected P- or S-wave traveltimes. The P-wave velocity are first inverted using P-wave traveltime followed by the S-wave velocity inversion with S-wave traveltime, during which the wave mode decomposition is applied to the gradients calculation. Synthetic example on the Sigbee2A model proves the validity of our method for recovering the long wavelength components of the model.

  3. Design of pulse waveform for waveform division multiple access UWB wireless communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhendong; Wang, Zhirui; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhilu

    2014-01-01

    A new multiple access scheme, Waveform Division Multiple Access (WDMA) based on the orthogonal wavelet function, is presented. After studying the correlation properties of different categories of single wavelet functions, the one with the best correlation property will be chosen as the foundation for combined waveform. In the communication system, each user is assigned to different combined orthogonal waveform. Demonstrated by simulation, combined waveform is more suitable than single wavelet function to be a communication medium in WDMA system. Due to the excellent orthogonality, the bit error rate (BER) of multiuser with combined waveforms is so close to that of single user in a synchronous system. That is to say, the multiple access interference (MAI) is almost eliminated. Furthermore, even in an asynchronous system without multiuser detection after matched filters, the result is still pretty ideal and satisfactory by using the third combination mode that will be mentioned in the study.

  4. 3D Modeling of Iran and Surrounding Areas from Simultaneous Inversion of Multiple Geophysical Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    Nevertheless, it is well known that traditional state-of-the-art inversion techniques suffer from poor resolution and nonuniqueness , especially when a...and to provide adequate starting models for 3D waveform inversion approaches. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank the scientists, engineers , and technicians

  5. WFCatalog: A catalogue for seismological waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Luca; Koymans, Mathijs; Atkinson, Malcolm; Sleeman, Reinoud; Filgueira, Rosa

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports advances in seismic waveform description and discovery leading to a new seismological service and presents the key steps in its design, implementation and adoption. This service, named WFCatalog, which stands for waveform catalogue, accommodates features of seismological waveform data. Therefore, it meets the need for seismologists to be able to select waveform data based on seismic waveform features as well as sensor geolocations and temporal specifications. We describe the collaborative design methods and the technical solution showing the central role of seismic feature catalogues in framing the technical and operational delivery of the new service. Also, we provide an overview of the complex environment wherein this endeavour is scoped and the related challenges discussed. As multi-disciplinary, multi-organisational and global collaboration is necessary to address today's challenges, canonical representations can provide a focus for collaboration and conceptual tools for agreeing directions. Such collaborations can be fostered and formalised by rallying intellectual effort into the design of novel scientific catalogues and the services that support them. This work offers an example of the benefits generated by involving cross-disciplinary skills (e.g. data and domain expertise) from the early stages of design, and by sustaining the engagement with the target community throughout the delivery and deployment process.

  6. SCA Waveform Development for Space Telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Kifle, Multi; Hall, C. Steve; Quinn, Todd M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating and developing suitable reconfigurable radio architectures for future NASA missions. This effort is examining software-based open-architectures for space based transceivers, as well as common hardware platform architectures. The Joint Tactical Radio System's (JTRS) Software Communications Architecture (SCA) is a candidate for the software approach, but may need modifications or adaptations for use in space. An in-house SCA compliant waveform development focuses on increasing understanding of software defined radio architectures and more specifically the JTRS SCA. Space requirements put a premium on size, mass, and power. This waveform development effort is key to evaluating tradeoffs with the SCA for space applications. Existing NASA telemetry links, as well as Space Exploration Initiative scenarios, are the basis for defining the waveform requirements. Modeling and simulations are being developed to determine signal processing requirements associated with a waveform and a mission-specific computational burden. Implementation of the waveform on a laboratory software defined radio platform is proceeding in an iterative fashion. Parallel top-down and bottom-up design approaches are employed.

  7. The Lazarus project: Plunge waveforms from inspiralling black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J.; Brügmann, B.; Campanelli, M.; Lousto, C.; Takahashi, R.

    2001-10-01

    We study the coalescence of binary black holes from the innermost stable circular orbit down to the final single rotating black hole. We use a technique that combines the full numerical approach to solve Einstein equations, applied in the truly nonlinear regime, and linearized perturbation theory around the final distorted single black hole at later times. We thus produce an estimate for the plunge radiation with a non negligible signal lasting for over t~100M, and we obtain estimates of the total gravitational radiated energy and angular momentum during this process, plunging time, and waveforms. .

  8. Wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2011-01-01

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion using a gradient optimization method is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated within the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear with respect to changes in the velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we present a reflection traveltime tomography method based on the wave equation which enjoys a more quasi-linear relationship between the model and the data. A local crosscorrelation of the windowed downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the image point yields the lag time that maximizes the correlation. This lag time represents the reflection traveltime residual that is back-projected into the earth model to update the velocity in the same way as wave-equation transmission traveltime inversion. No travel-time picking is needed and no high-frequency approximation is assumed. The mathematical derivation and the numerical examples are presented to partly demonstrate its efficiency and robustness. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Photonic arbitrary waveform generator based on Taylor synthesis method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shasha; Ding, Yunhong; Dong, Jianji

    2016-01-01

    Arbitrary waveform generation has been widely used in optical communication, radar system and many other applications. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) on chip optical arbitrary waveform generator, which is based on Taylor synthesis method. In our scheme......, a Gaussian pulse is launched to some cascaded microrings to obtain first-, second- and third-order differentiations. By controlling amplitude and phase of the initial pulse and successive differentiations, we can realize an arbitrary waveform generator according to Taylor expansion. We obtain several typical...... waveforms such as square waveform, triangular waveform, flat-top waveform, sawtooth waveform, Gaussian waveform and so on. Unlike other schemes based on Fourier synthesis or frequency-to-time mapping, our scheme is based on Taylor synthesis method. Our scheme does not require any spectral disperser or large...

  10. Photonic arbitrary waveform generator based on Taylor synthesis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shasha; Ding, Yunhong; Dong, Jianji; Yan, Siqi; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-10-17

    Arbitrary waveform generation has been widely used in optical communication, radar system and many other applications. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) on chip optical arbitrary waveform generator, which is based on Taylor synthesis method. In our scheme, a Gaussian pulse is launched to some cascaded microrings to obtain first-, second- and third-order differentiations. By controlling amplitude and phase of the initial pulse and successive differentiations, we can realize an arbitrary waveform generator according to Taylor expansion. We obtain several typical waveforms such as square waveform, triangular waveform, flat-top waveform, sawtooth waveform, Gaussian waveform and so on. Unlike other schemes based on Fourier synthesis or frequency-to-time mapping, our scheme is based on Taylor synthesis method. Our scheme does not require any spectral disperser or large dispersion, which are difficult to fabricate on chip. Our scheme is compact and capable for integration with electronics.

  11. Krylov subspace acceleration of waveform relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, A.; Wu, Deyun [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Standard solution methods for numerically solving time-dependent problems typically begin by discretizing the problem on a uniform time grid and then sequentially solving for successive time points. The initial time discretization imposes a serialization to the solution process and limits parallel speedup to the speedup available from parallelizing the problem at any given time point. This bottleneck can be circumvented by the use of waveform methods in which multiple time-points of the different components of the solution are computed independently. With the waveform approach, a problem is first spatially decomposed and distributed among the processors of a parallel machine. Each processor then solves its own time-dependent subsystem over the entire interval of interest using previous iterates from other processors as inputs. Synchronization and communication between processors take place infrequently, and communication consists of large packets of information - discretized functions of time (i.e., waveforms).

  12. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  13. Waveform information from quantum mechanical entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Scott; Suski, William; Winn, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Although the entropy of a given signal-type waveform is technically zero, it is nonetheless desirable to use entropic measures to quantify the associated information. Several such prescriptions have been advanced in the literature but none are generally successful. Here, we report that the Fourier-conjugated `total entropy' associated with quantum-mechanical probabilistic amplitude functions (PAFs) is a meaningful measure of information in non-probabilistic real waveforms, with either the waveform itself or its (normalized) analytic representation acting in the role of the PAF. Detailed numerical calculations are presented for both adaptations, showing the expected informatic behaviours in a variety of rudimentary scenarios. Particularly noteworthy are the sensitivity to the degree of randomness in a sequence of pulses and potential for detection of weak signals.

  14. Waveform Design for Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerckx, Bruno; Bayguzina, Ekaterina

    2016-12-01

    Far-field Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) has attracted significant attention in recent years. Despite the rapid progress, the emphasis of the research community in the last decade has remained largely concentrated on improving the design of energy harvester (so-called rectenna) and has left aside the effect of transmitter design. In this paper, we study the design of transmit waveform so as to enhance the DC power at the output of the rectenna. We derive a tractable model of the non-linearity of the rectenna and compare with a linear model conventionally used in the literature. We then use those models to design novel multisine waveforms that are adaptive to the channel state information (CSI). Interestingly, while the linear model favours narrowband transmission with all the power allocated to a single frequency, the non-linear model favours a power allocation over multiple frequencies. Through realistic simulations, waveforms designed based on the non-linear model are shown to provide significant gains (in terms of harvested DC power) over those designed based on the linear model and over non-adaptive waveforms. We also compute analytically the theoretical scaling laws of the harvested energy for various waveforms as a function of the number of sinewaves and transmit antennas. Those scaling laws highlight the benefits of CSI knowledge at the transmitter in WPT and of a WPT design based on a non-linear rectenna model over a linear model. Results also motivate the study of a promising architecture relying on large-scale multisine multi-antenna waveforms for WPT. As a final note, results stress the importance of modeling and accounting for the non-linearity of the rectenna in any system design involving wireless power.

  15. Mergers of Black-Hole Binaries with Aligned Spins: Waveform Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.; vanMeter, James R.; Boggs, William D.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    "We apply our gravitational-waveform analysis techniques, first presented in the context of nonspinning black holes of varying mass ratio [1], to the complementary case of equal-mass spinning black-hole binary systems. We find that, as with the nonspinning mergers, the dominant waveform modes phases evolve together in lock-step through inspiral and merger, supporting the previous model of the binary system as an adiabatically rigid rotator driving gravitational-wave emission - an implicit rotating source (IRS). We further apply the late-merger model for the rotational frequency introduced in [1], along with a new mode amplitude model appropriate for the dominant (2, plus or minus 2) modes. We demonstrate that this seven-parameter model performs well in matches with the original numerical waveform for system masses above - 150 solar mass, both when the parameters are freely fit, and when they are almost completely constrained by physical considerations."

  16. Reduction of edge effect on disk electrodes by optimized current waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Boshuo; Petrossians, Artin; Weiland, James D

    2014-08-01

    Rectangular pulses applied to disk electrodes result in high current density at the edges of the disk, which can lead to electrode corrosion and tissue damage. We explored a method for reducing current density and corrosion, by varying the leading edge of the current pulse. Finite-element modeling and mathematical analysis were used to predict an optimal waveform that reduces current density at the edge while also maintaining short pulse duration. An approximation of the optimized waveform was implemented experimentally and applied to platinum disk electrodes. Surface analysis using energy-dispersive spectroscopy showed significant reduction of corrosion on the periphery of these electrodes after pulsing, compared to those pulsed with the control rectangular waveform.

  17. Slip Distribution and Seismic Moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean Earthquakes Inferred from Tsunami Waveforms and Coastal Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yushiro; Satake, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The slip distribution and seismic moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean earthquakes were estimated from tsunami and coastal geodetic data. These two earthquakes generated transoceanic tsunamis, and the waveforms were recorded around the Pacific Ocean. In addition, coseismic coastal uplift and subsidence were measured around the source areas. For the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake, inversion of the tsunami waveforms recorded at nearby coastal tide gauge and Deep Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) stations combined with coastal geodetic data suggest two asperities: a northern one beneath the coast of Constitucion and a southern one around the Arauco Peninsula. The total fault length is approximately 400 km with seismic moment of 1.7 × 1022 Nm (Mw 8.8). The offshore DART tsunami waveforms require fault slips beneath the coasts, but the exact locations are better estimated by coastal geodetic data. The 22 May 1960 earthquake produced very large, ~30 m, slip off Valdivia. Joint inversion of tsunami waveforms, at tide gauge stations in South America, with coastal geodetic and leveling data shows total fault length of ~800 km and seismic moment of 7.2 × 1022 Nm (Mw 9.2). The seismic moment estimated from tsunami or joint inversion is similar to previous estimates from geodetic data, but much smaller than the results from seismic data analysis.

  18. Filter transient response to EEG waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, S; Smith, J R; Azumi, K

    1987-01-01

    The response of two types of linear filters to sinusoidal bursts was calculated to demonstrate how filters can distort EEG waveforms. Results show that the wider the filter bandwidth the less is the distortion, and for a given bandwidth, the higher the filter order the greater the distortion. The response of a linear phase filter was also calculated to demonstrate that this type of filter can also cause waveform distortion, although it is normally less than that caused by Butterworth, Tchebychev and elliptic filters.

  19. High-Energy Optical Parametric Waveform Synthesizer

    OpenAIRE

    Muecke, Oliver D.; Cirmi, G.; Fang, S.; Rossi, G. M.; Chia, Shih-Hsuan; Kärtner, F. X.; Manzoni, C.; Farinello, P.; Cerullo, and G.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the ongoing development of a phase-stable, multi-mJ 3-channel parametric waveform synthesizer generating a 2-octave-wide spectrum (0.52-2.4μm). After two amplification stages, the combined >125-μJ output supports 1.9-fs waveforms. First preliminary FROG-characterization results of the second-stage outputs demonstrate the feasibility to recompress all three channels simultaneously close to the Fourier limit. Energy scaling to ~2 mJ is achieved after three amplification stages. The f...

  20. Principles of waveform diversity and design

    CERN Document Server

    Wicks, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This is the first book to discuss current and future applications of waveform diversity and design in subjects such as radar and sonar, communications systems, passive sensing, and many other technologies. Waveform diversity allows researchers and system designers to optimize electromagnetic and acoustic systems for sensing, communications, electronic warfare or combinations thereof. This book enables solutions to problems, explaining how each system performs its own particular function, as well as how it is affected by other systems and how those other systems may likewise be affected. It is

  1. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  2. Bayesian ISOLA: new tool for automated centroid moment tensor inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vackář, Jiří; Burjánek, Jan; Gallovič, František; Zahradník, Jiří; Clinton, John

    2017-04-01

    Focal mechanisms are important for understanding seismotectonics of a region, and they serve as a basic input for seismic hazard assessment. Usually, the point source approximation and the moment tensor (MT) are used. We have developed a new, fully automated tool for the centroid moment tensor (CMT) inversion in a Bayesian framework. It includes automated data retrieval, data selection where station components with various instrumental disturbances and high signal-to-noise are rejected, and full-waveform inversion in a space-time grid around a provided hypocenter. The method is innovative in the following aspects: (i) The CMT inversion is fully automated, no user interaction is required, although the details of the process can be visually inspected latter on many figures which are automatically plotted.(ii) The automated process includes detection of disturbances based on MouseTrap code, so disturbed recordings do not affect inversion.(iii) A data covariance matrix calculated from pre-event noise yields an automated weighting of the station recordings according to their noise levels and also serves as an automated frequency filter suppressing noisy frequencies.(iv) Bayesian approach is used, so not only the best solution is obtained, but also the posterior probability density function.(v) A space-time grid search effectively combined with the least-squares inversion of moment tensor components speeds up the inversion and allows to obtain more accurate results compared to stochastic methods. The method has been tested on synthetic and observed data. It has been tested by comparison with manually processed moment tensors of all events greater than M≥3 in the Swiss catalogue over 16 years using data available at the Swiss data center (http://arclink.ethz.ch). The quality of the results of the presented automated process is comparable with careful manual processing of data. The software package programmed in Python has been designed to be as versatile as possible in

  3. Unsupervised Approaches for Post-Processing in Computationally Efficient Waveform-Similarity-Based Earthquake Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, K.; Yoon, C. E.; OReilly, O. J.; Beroza, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent improvements in computational efficiency for waveform correlation-based detections achieved by new methods such as Fingerprint and Similarity Thresholding (FAST) promise to allow large-scale blind search for similar waveforms in long-duration continuous seismic data. Waveform similarity search applied to datasets of months to years of continuous seismic data will identify significantly more events than traditional detection methods. With the anticipated increase in number of detections and associated increase in false positives, manual inspection of the detection results will become infeasible. This motivates the need for new approaches to process the output of similarity-based detection. We explore data mining techniques for improved detection post-processing. We approach this by considering similarity-detector output as a sparse similarity graph with candidate events as vertices and similarities as weighted edges. Image processing techniques are leveraged to define candidate events and combine results individually processed at multiple stations. Clustering and graph analysis methods are used to identify groups of similar waveforms and assign a confidence score to candidate detections. Anomaly detection and classification are applied to waveform data for additional false detection removal. A comparison of methods will be presented and their performance will be demonstrated on a suspected induced and non-induced earthquake sequence.

  4. 3D joint inversion using seismic data and marine controlled-source electromagnetic data for evaluating gas hydrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B.; Byun, J.; Seol, S. J.; Jeong, S.; Chung, Y.; Kwon, T.

    2015-12-01

    For many decades, gas hydrates have been received great attention as a potential source of natural gas. Therefore, the detailed information of structures of buried gas hydrates and their concentrations are prerequisite for the production for the gas hydrate as a reliable source of alternate energy. Recently, for this reason, a lot of gas hydrate assessment methods have been proposed by many researchers. However, it is still necessary to establish as new method for the further improvement of the accuracy of the 3D gas hydrate distribution. In this study, we present a 3D joint inversion method that provides superior quantitative information of gas hydrate distributions using 3D seismic data obtained by ocean-bottom cable (OBC) and marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. To verify our inversion method, we first built the general 3D gas hydrate model containing vertical methane-flow pathways. With the described model, we generated synthetic 3D OBC data and marine CSEM data using finite element modeling algorithms, respectively. In the joint inversion process, to obtain the high-resolution volumetric P-wave velocity structure, we applied the 3D full waveform inversion algorithm to the acquired OBC data. After that, the obtained P-wave velocity model is used as the structure constraint to compute cross-gradients with the updated resistivity model in the EM inversion process. Finally, petrophysical relations were applied to estimate volumetric gas hydrate concentrations. The proposed joint inversion process makes possible to obtain more precise quantitative gas hydrate assessment than inversion processes using only seismic or EM data. This technique can be helpful for accurate decision-making in gas hydrate development as well as in their production monitoring.

  5. Increased accuracy in mineral and hydrogeophysical modelling of HTEM data via detailed description of system transfer function and constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viezzoli, Andrea; Christiansen, Anders Vest; Auken, Esben

    , of the low pass filters present in any system, and of waveform repetition. Low pass filters affect the shallow to intermediate part of the model, whereas the waveform repetition the deeper part. Results show how filters and waveform are parameters, like frame altitude, Tx-Rx timing and so on, that need...... to be taken into account and modeled correctly during inversion of HTEM data. We then present an application of this approach on real VTEM data from an exploration survey. The results from constrained inversion of the VTEM, compared with borehole information and with other modeling methodologies, show its...

  6. Moment Tensors and their Uncertainties for M3 Earthquakes in the Geysers, California, from Waveform Modeling and First Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, A.; Dreger, D. S.; Hutchings, L. J.; Johnson, L.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate moment tensor solutions and their uncertainties for magnitude (M) ~3 earthquakes located in the northwest Geysers geothermal field, California. We are exploiting an unusual opportunity where data for M~3 events have been recorded by three different networks and have moment tensor solutions calculated by three different methods. We solve for both deviatoric and full moment tensor solutions. The data sets include local short-period instruments (4.5 Hz) of the 30 stations of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), with which we obtain waveform inversion solutions at relatively high frequencies (i.e., up to 2.5 Hz), and regionally distributed broadband stations operated by the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL), with which are used to provide waveform inversion solutions with data filtered at longer periods (i.e., > 10 sec). We also utilize the LBNL data to obtain moment tensor solutions by fitting the P-wave first motions. The USGS, LBNL, and BSL obtain different event locations, utilize different velocity models, and analyze different frequency bands and wave types (i.e., body waves for LBNL method and primarily surface waves for the BSL analysis). Preliminary results indicate that the BSL and LBNL waveform modeling analyses give similar results in terms of nodal plane characteristics, moment magnitude, and moment tensor decomposition. Analysis of the P-wave first motions recorded by LBNL stations can illuminate complexities in the source processes when compared to waveform moment tensor solutions. We discuss uncertainties in the source inversions that use broadband and/or short-period waveform modeling, and in the source inversions from first motions only. We also combine the different datasets and compare their individual importance as they can help illustrate the complex source processes happening in the Geysers. This study introduces the possibility to interpret the seismic sources as complex processes in which both shear and tensile

  7. Seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath southern Madagascar from teleseismic shear wave splitting analysis and waveform modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M. C.; Rümpker, G.; Tilmann, F.; Yuan, X.; Giese, J.; Rindraharisaona, E. J.

    2016-09-01

    Madagascar occupies a key position in the assembly and breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana. It has been used in numerous geological studies to reconstruct its original position within Gondwana and to derive plate kinematics. Seismological observations in Madagascar to date have been sparse. Using a temporary, dense seismic profile across southern Madagascar, we present the first published study of seismic anisotropy from shear wave splitting analyses of teleseismic phases. The splitting parameters obtained show significant small-scale variation of fast polarization directions and delay times across the profile, with fast polarization rotating from NW in the center to NE in the east and west of the profile. The delay times range between 0.4 and 1.5 s. A joint inversion of waveforms at each station is applied to derive hypothetical one-layer splitting parameters. We use finite-difference, full-waveform modeling to test several hypotheses about the origin and extent of seismic anisotropy. Our observations can be explained by asthenospheric anisotropy with a fast polarization direction of 50°, approximately parallel to the absolute plate motion direction, in combination with blocks of crustal anisotropy. Predictions of seismic anisotropy as inferred from global mantle flow models or global anisotropic surface wave tomography are not in agreement with the observations. Small-scale variations of splitting parameters require significant crustal anisotropy. Considering the complex geology of Madagascar, we interpret the change in fast-axis directions as a 150 km wide zone of ductile deformation in the crust as a result of the intense reworking of lithospheric material during the Pan-African orogeny. This fossil anisotropic pattern is underlain by asthenospheric anisotropy induced by plate motion.

  8. Photonic Arbitrary Waveform Generation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    radar/ lidar , optical communications, and signal processing. Our key achievements are as follows: • Frequency domain based architecture using...and combining the result onto a photodetector . The derivative of the time varying voltage applied to the phase modulator determines the addition... photodetectors would also be warranted. 28 References [1] K. Nosu, “Advanced coherent lightwave technologies,” IEEE Commun. Magn,, vol. 26

  9. Dynamic inversion method based on the time-staggered stereo-modeling scheme and its acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hao; Yang, Dinghui; Wu, Hao

    2016-12-01

    A set of second-order differential equations describing the space-time behaviour of derivatives of displacement with respect to model parameters (i.e. waveform sensitivities) is obtained via taking the derivative of the original wave equations. The dynamic inversion method obtains sensitivities of the seismic displacement field with respect to earth properties directly by solving differential equations for them instead of constructing sensitivities from the displacement field itself. In this study, we have taken a new perspective on the dynamic inversion method and used acceleration approaches to reduce the computational time and memory usage to improve its ability of performing high-resolution imaging. The dynamic inversion method, which can simultaneously use different waves and multicomponent observation data, is appropriate for directly inverting elastic parameters, medium density or wave velocities. Full wavefield information is utilized as much as possible at the expense of a larger amount of calculations. To mitigate the computational burden, two ways are proposed to accelerate the method from a computer-implementation point of view. One is source encoding which uses a linear combination of all shots, and the other is to reduce the amount of calculations on forward modeling. We applied a new finite-difference (FD) method to the dynamic inversion to improve the computational accuracy and speed up the performance. Numerical experiments indicated that the new FD method can effectively suppress the numerical dispersion caused by the discretization of wave equations, resulting in enhanced computational efficiency with less memory cost for seismic modeling and inversion based on the full wave equations. We present some inversion results to demonstrate the validity of this method through both checkerboard and Marmousi models. It shows that this method is also convergent even with big deviations for the initial model. Besides, parallel calculations can be easily

  10. LPI Radar Waveform Recognition Based on Time-Frequency Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Liu, Lutao; Diao, Ming

    2016-10-12

    In this paper, an automatic radar waveform recognition system in a high noise environment is proposed. Signal waveform recognition techniques are widely applied in the field of cognitive radio, spectrum management and radar applications, etc. We devise a system to classify the modulating signals widely used in low probability of intercept (LPI) radar detection systems. The radar signals are divided into eight types of classifications, including linear frequency modulation (LFM), BPSK (Barker code modulation), Costas codes and polyphase codes (comprising Frank, P1, P2, P3 and P4). The classifier is Elman neural network (ENN), and it is a supervised classification based on features extracted from the system. Through the techniques of image filtering, image opening operation, skeleton extraction, principal component analysis (PCA), image binarization algorithm and Pseudo-Zernike moments, etc., the features are extracted from the Choi-Williams time-frequency distribution (CWD) image of the received data. In order to reduce the redundant features and simplify calculation, the features selection algorithm based on mutual information between classes and features vectors are applied. The superiority of the proposed classification system is demonstrated by the simulations and analysis. Simulation results show that the overall ratio of successful recognition (RSR) is 94.7% at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of -2 dB.

  11. LPI Radar Waveform Recognition Based on Time-Frequency Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an automatic radar waveform recognition system in a high noise environment is proposed. Signal waveform recognition techniques are widely applied in the field of cognitive radio, spectrum management and radar applications, etc. We devise a system to classify the modulating signals widely used in low probability of intercept (LPI radar detection systems. The radar signals are divided into eight types of classifications, including linear frequency modulation (LFM, BPSK (Barker code modulation, Costas codes and polyphase codes (comprising Frank, P1, P2, P3 and P4. The classifier is Elman neural network (ENN, and it is a supervised classification based on features extracted from the system. Through the techniques of image filtering, image opening operation, skeleton extraction, principal component analysis (PCA, image binarization algorithm and Pseudo–Zernike moments, etc., the features are extracted from the Choi–Williams time-frequency distribution (CWD image of the received data. In order to reduce the redundant features and simplify calculation, the features selection algorithm based on mutual information between classes and features vectors are applied. The superiority of the proposed classification system is demonstrated by the simulations and analysis. Simulation results show that the overall ratio of successful recognition (RSR is 94.7% at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of −2 dB.

  12. Earthquake source tensor inversion with the gCAP method and 3D Green's functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Zhu, L.; Ross, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We develop and apply a method to invert earthquake seismograms for source properties using a general tensor representation and 3D Green's functions. The method employs (i) a general representation of earthquake potency/moment tensors with double couple (DC), compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD), and isotropic (ISO) components, and (ii) a corresponding generalized CAP (gCap) scheme where the continuous wave trains are broken into Pnl and surface waves (Zhu & Ben-Zion, 2013). For comparison, we also use the waveform inversion method of Zheng & Chen (2012) and Ammon et al. (1998). Sets of 3D Green's functions are calculated on a grid of 1 km3 using the 3-D community velocity model CVM-4 (Kohler et al. 2003). A bootstrap technique is adopted to establish robustness of the inversion results using the gCap method (Ross & Ben-Zion, 2013). Synthetic tests with 1-D and 3-D waveform calculations show that the source tensor inversion procedure is reasonably reliable and robust. As initial application, the method is used to investigate source properties of the March 11, 2013, Mw=4.7 earthquake on the San Jacinto fault using recordings of ~45 stations up to ~0.2Hz. Both the best fitting and most probable solutions include ISO component of ~1% and CLVD component of ~0%. The obtained ISO component, while small, is found to be a non-negligible positive value that can have significant implications for the physics of the failure process. Work on using higher frequency data for this and other earthquakes is in progress.

  13. A New Method of Designing Waveform Codebook

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The codebook search takes much operation quantity in CELP coder. The paper puts forward a new method redesigning the waveform codebook known, and lists the experimental data. It has been proved that the operation complexity and transmission bit rate were decreased by using the new codebook, and the synthesis speech quality was high.

  14. Waveform Selectivity at the Same Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Anzai, Daisuke; Rushton, Jeremiah J.; Gao, Fei; Kim, Sanghoon; Sievenpiper, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties depend on the composition of materials, i.e. either angstrom scales of molecules or, for metamaterials, subwavelength periodic structures. Each material behaves differently in accordance with the frequency of an incoming electromagnetic wave due to the frequency dispersion or the resonance of the periodic structures. This indicates that if the frequency is fixed, the material always responds in the same manner unless it has nonlinearity. However, such nonlinearity is controlled by the magnitude of the incoming wave or other bias. Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish different incoming waves at the same frequency. Here we present a new concept of circuit-based metasurfaces to selectively absorb or transmit specific types of waveforms even at the same frequency. The metasurfaces, integrated with schottky diodes as well as either capacitors or inductors, selectively absorb short or long pulses, respectively. The two types of circuit elements are then combined to absorb or transmit specific waveforms in between. This waveform selectivity gives us another degree of freedom to control electromagnetic waves in various fields including wireless communications, as our simulation reveals that the metasurfaces are capable of varying bit error rates in response to different waveforms. PMID:25866071

  15. Windowing Waveform Relaxation of Initial Value Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-lin Jiang

    2006-01-01

    We present a windowing technique of waveform relaxation for dynamic systems. An effective estimation on window length is derived by an iterative error expression provided here. Relaxation processes can be speeded up if one takes the windowing technique in advance. Numerical experiments are given to further illustrate the theoretical analysis.

  16. Analog circuit design designing waveform processing circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The fourth volume in the set Designing Waveform-Processing Circuits builds on the previous 3 volumes and presents a variety of analog non-amplifier circuits, including voltage references, current sources, filters, hysteresis switches and oscilloscope trigger and sweep circuitry, function generation, absolute-value circuits, and peak detectors.

  17. Processing Waveforms as Trees for Pattern Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    patterns (after Ganong (15]) 5.7 ECG Classification As in the previous example, waveforms were simulated with additive colored gaussian noise. In order to...Principles and Techniques- (AAPG Course Note Series 13), Amer. Assoc. Pet. Geol., Tulsa, OK,p. 86, (1984). [15] W. F. Ganong , Review of Medical Physiology. Lange, Los Altos, CA. pp. 393-408, (1973). /

  18. Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning in Vegetation Studies—A Review of Point Cloud and Waveform Features for Tree Species Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Koenig

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, small-footprint full-waveform airborne laser scanning has become readily available and established for vegetation studies in the fields of forestry, agriculture and urban studies. Independent of the field of application and the derived final product, each study uses features to classify a target object and to assess its characteristics (e.g., tree species. These laser scanning features describe an observable characteristic of the returned laser signal (e.g., signal amplitude or a quantity of an object (e.g., height-width ratio of the tree crown. In particular, studies dealing with tree species classification apply a variety of such features as input. However, an extensive overview, categorization and comparison of features from full-waveform airborne laser scanning and how they relate to specific tree species are still missing. This review identifies frequently used full-waveform airborne laser scanning-based point cloud and waveform features for tree species classification and compares the applied features and their characteristics for specific tree species detection. Furthermore, limiting and influencing factors on feature characteristics and tree classification are discussed with respect to vegetation structure, data acquisition and processing.

  19. Broadband regional waveform modeling to investigate crustal structure and tectonics of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer Lyn

    We use broadband regional waveform modeling of earthquakes in the central Andes to determine seismic properties of the Altiplano crust. Properties of the shear-coupled P-wavetrain (SPL ) from intermediate-depth events provide particularly important information about the structure of the crust. We utilize broadband seismic data recorded at the BANJO and SEDA stations, and synthetic seismograms computed with a reflectivity technique to study the sensitivity of SPL to crustal and upper mantle parameters at regional distances. We find that the long-period SPL-wavetrain is most sensitive to crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios, average crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. A comprehensive grid search method developed to investigate these four parameters suggests that although trade-offs exist between model parameters, models of the Altiplano which provide the best fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by low Poisson's ratios, low average crustal velocity and thick crust. We apply our grid search technique and sensitivity analysis results to model the full waveforms from 6 intermediate-depth and 2 shallow-focus earthquakes recorded at regional distances by BANJO and SEDA stations. Results suggest that the Altiplano crust is much thicker (55--65 km) and slower (5.75--6.25 km/s) than global average values. Low crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios together with the lack of evidence for a high-velocity lower crust suggests a bulk felsic crustal composition, resulting in an overall weak crust. Our results favor a model of crustal thickening involving large-scale tectonic shortening of a predominantly felsic crust. To better understand the mechanics of earthquake rupture along the South American subduction zone, we have analyzed broadband teleseismic P-waves and utilize single- and multi-station inversion techniques to constrain source characteristics for the 12 November 1996 Peru subduction zone earthquake. Aftershock locations, intensity reports

  20. Grid-Based Moment Tensor Inversion Technique by Using 3-D Green's Functions Database: A Demonstration of the 23 October 2004 Taipei Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiann-Jong Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Moment tensor inversion is a routine procedure to obtain information on an earthquake source for moment magnitude and focal mechanism. However, the inversion quality is usually controlled by factors such as knowledge of an earthquake location and the suitability of a 1-D velocity model used. Here we present an improved method to invert the moment tensor solution for local earthquakes. The proposed method differs from routine centroid-moment-tensor inversion of the Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology in three aspects. First, the inversion is repeated in the neighborhood of an earthquake_?s hypocenter on a grid basis. Second, it utilizes Green_?s functions based on a true three-dimensional velocity model. And third, it incorporates most of the input waveforms from strong-motion records. The proposed grid-based moment tensor inversion is applied to a local earthquake that occurred near the Taipei basin on 23 October 2004 to demonstrate its effectiveness and superiority over methods used in previous studies. By using the grid-based moment tensor inversion technique and 3-D Green_?s functions, the earthquake source parameters, including earthquake location, moment magnitude and focal mechanism, are accurately found that are sufficiently consistent with regional ground motion observations up to a frequency of 1.0 Hz. This approach can obtain more precise source parameters for other earthquakes in or near a well-modeled basin and crustal structure.

  1. Doppler flow velocity waveforms in the fetal cardiac outflow tract: Reproducibility of waveform recording and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.L. Groenenberg (Irene); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Reproducibility of flow velocity waveform recording and analysis was studied at fetal cardiac level (ductus arteriosus, pulmonary artery and ascending aorta) in 42 normal pregnancies. The flow velocity parameters studied were the peak systolic velocity (PSV),

  2. High resolution aquifer characterization using crosshole GPR full-waveform tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueting, N.; Vienken, T.; Klotzsche, A.; Van Der Kruk, J.; Vanderborght, J.; Caers, J.; Vereecken, H.; Englert, A.

    2016-12-01

    Limited knowledge about the spatial distribution of aquifer properties typically constrains our ability to predict subsurface flow and transport. Here, we investigate the value of using high resolution full-waveform inversion of cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (GPR) data for aquifer characterization. By stitching together GPR tomograms from multiple adjacent crosshole planes, we are able to image, with a decimeter scale resolution, the dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of an alluvial aquifer along cross-sections of 50 m length and 10 m depth. A logistic regression model is employed to predict the spatial distribution of lithological facies on the basis of the GPR results. Vertical profiles of porosity and hydraulic conductivity from direct-push, flowmeter and grain size data suggest that the GPR predicted facies classification is meaningful with regard to porosity and hydraulic conductivity, even though the distributions of individual facies show some overlap and the absolute hydraulic conductivities from the different methods (direct-push, flowmeter, grain size) differ up to approximately one order of magnitude. Comparison of the GPR predicted facies architecture with tracer test data suggests that the plume splitting observed in a tracer experiment was caused by a hydraulically low-conductive sand layer with a thickness of only a few decimeters. Because this sand layer is identified by GPR full-waveform inversion but not by conventional GPR ray-based inversion we conclude that the improvement in spatial resolution due to full-waveform inversion is crucial to detect small-scale aquifer structures that are highly relevant for solute transport.

  3. Homogenization and implementation of a 3D regional velocity model in Mexico for its application in moment tensor inversion of intermediate-magnitude earthquakes