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Sample records for wave rf code

  1. A versatile ray-tracing code for studying rf wave propagation in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Y; Decker, J; Morini, L

    2012-01-01

    A new ray-tracing code named C3PO has been developed to study the propagation of arbitrary electromagnetic radio-frequency (rf) waves in magnetized toroidal plasmas. Its structure is designed for maximum flexibility regarding the choice of coordinate system and dielectric model. The versatility of this code makes it particularly suitable for integrated modeling systems. Using a coordinate system that reflects the nested structure of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks, fast and accurate calculations inside the plasma separatrix can be performed using analytical derivatives of a spline-Fourier interpolation of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium. Applications to reverse field pinch magnetic configuration are also included. The effects of 3D perturbations of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium, due to the discreteness of the magnetic coil system or plasma fluctuations in an original quasi-optical approach, are also studied. Using a Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method for solving the set of ordinary differential equations, the ray-tracing code is extensively benchmarked against analytical models and other codes for lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves. (paper)

  2. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K.

    1992-08-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity toning and matching problems

  3. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K.

    1992-01-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity tuning and matching problems. (Author) 8 refs., 10 figs

  4. RF cavity evaluation with the code SUPERFISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Ueda, N.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code SUPERFISH calculates axisymmetric rf fields and is most applicable to re-entrant cavities of an Alvarez linac. Some sample results are shown for the first Alvarez's in NUMATRON project. On the other hand the code can also be effectivily applied to TE modes excited in an RFQ linac when the cavity is approximately considered as positioning at an infinite distance from the symmetry axis. The evaluation was made for several RFQ cavities, models I, II and a test linac named LITL, and useful results for the resonator design were obtained. (author)

  5. Plasma Sprayed Coatings for RF Wave Absorption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nanobashvili, S.; Matějíček, Jiří; Žáček, František; Stöckel, Jan; Chráska, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil

    307-311, - (2002), s. 1334-1338 ISSN 0022-3115 Grant - others: COST (XE) Euratom DV4/04(TWO) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide, thermal spray coatings, fusion materials, RF wave absorption Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2002

  6. Numerical modelisation of RF waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequency for Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edery, D.; Picq, H.; Samain, A.; Gambier, D.J.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the numerical code ALCYON developed to compute the RF field structure in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The code handles fundamental and second harmonic heating while the mode conversion onto modes of decreasing wavelength is simulated by a selective power absorption on slow waves when their wavelength reaches the mesh size

  7. Theoretical investigation of a travelling-wave rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.

    1991-12-01

    A travelling-wave type rf gun (TW gun) is investigated theoretically. Analytical formulae concerning energy gain, energy spread, and transverse emittance are derived. After showing the corresponding formulae for the standing-wave rf gun (SW gun), comparisons are made between the two types of rf gun. Finally, some numerical results are calculated to demonstrate further the behaviours of the TW gun, and to compare with those from analytical formulae. (author) 11 refs.; 27 figs

  8. Lage-area planar RF plasma productions by surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, S.

    1994-01-01

    Large-area rf plasmas are confirmed to be produced by means of RF discharges inside a large-area dielectric tube. The plasma space is 73 cm x 176 cm and 2.5 cm. The plasma is thought to be produced by an odd plasma-surface wave (PSW ο ) in case of using large-area electrodes and by an even plasma-surface wave (PSW ο ) in case of without the electrodes. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  9. Particle tracking code of simulating global RF feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.

    1991-09-01

    It is well known in the ''control community'' that a good feedback controller design is deeply rooted in the physics of the system. For example, when accelerating the beam we must keep several parameters under control so that the beam travels within the confined space. Important parameters include the frequency and phase of the rf signal, the dipole field, and the cavity voltage. Because errors in these parameters will progressively mislead the beam from its projected path in the tube, feedback loops are used to correct the behavior. Since the feedback loop feeds energy to the system, it changes the overall behavior of the system and may drive it to instability. Various types of controllers are used to stabilize the feedback loop. Integrating the beam physics with the feedback controllers allows us to carefully analyze the beam behavior. This will not only guarantee optimal performance but will also significantly enhance the ability of the beam control engineer to deal effectively with the interaction of various feedback loops. Motivated by this theme, we developed a simple one-particle tracking code to simulate particle behavior with feedback controllers. In order to achieve our fundamental objective, we can ask some key questions: What are the input and output parameters? How can they be applied to the practical machine? How can one interface the rf system dynamics such as the transfer characteristics of the rf cavities and phasing between the cavities? Answers to these questions can be found by considering a simple case of a single cavity with one particle, tracking it turn-by-turn with appropriate initial conditions, then introducing constraints on crucial parameters. Critical parameters are rf frequency, phase, and amplitude once the dipole field has been given. These are arranged in the tracking code so that we can interface the feedback system controlling them

  10. A continuous wave RF vacuum window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, R.

    1999-09-01

    An essential part of an ICRF system to be used in fusion reactor is the RF window. This is fitted in a coaxial transmission line. It forms a vacuum and tritium boundary between the antenna, situated inside the machine, and the transmission line, which feeds it. A double window is required with a vacuum inter-space. The dielectric, which forms the vacuum boundary, must be brazed into its housing. The window must be of a robust construction, and capable of withstanding both axial and radial loads. The vacuum boundaries should be thick walled in order act as a suitable tritium barrier. A further requirement is that the window is capable of continuous operation. The design of such a window is presented below. A half scale prototype has been manufactured, which has successfully completed RF, vacuum, and mechanical testing at JET, but has no water cooling, which is a requirement for continuous operation. The design presented here is for a window to match the existing 30 Ω main transmission lines at JET. It employs two opposed ceramic dielectric cones with a much increased angle of incidence compared with existing JET windows. The housing is machined from titanium. Small corona rings are used, and the tracking distance along the ceramic surface is large. The geometry minimizes the peak electric field strength. The design uses substantial pre-stressing during manufacture, to produce a compressive stress field throughout the dielectric material. Significant tensile stresses in the ceramic, and therefore the possibility of fracture due to applied thermal and mechanical loading, are eliminated in this way. A full-scale actively cooled RF window using this basic design should be capable of continuous use at 50 kV in the 20 - 90 MHz range. A half scale, inertially cooled prototype window has been designed, built and tested successfully at JET to 48 kV for up to 20 seconds. The prototype uses alumina for the dielectric, whereas beryllia is more appropriate for continuous

  11. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  12. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  13. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (''port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation

  14. Dilute: A code for studying beam evolution under rf noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, H.; Ellison, J.A.; Schiesser, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    Longitudinal beam dynamics under rf noise has been modeled by Dome, Krinsky, and Wang using a diffusion-in-action PDE. If the primary interest is the evolution of the beam in action, it is much simpler to integrate the model PDE than to undertake tracking simulations. Here we describe the code that we developed to solve the model PDE using the numerical Method of Lines. Features of the code include (1) computation of the distribution in action for the initial beam from a Gaussian or user-supplied distribution in longitudinal phase space, (2) computation of the diffusion coefficient for white noise or from a user-supplied spectral density for non-white noise, (3) discretization of the model PDE using finite-difference or Galerkin finite-element approximations with a uniform or non-uniform grid, and (4) integration of the system of ODEs in time by the solver RKF45 or a user-supplied ODE solver

  15. Effect of discrete RF spectrum on fast wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Takashi; Yoshioka, Ken; Sugihara, Masayoshi

    1987-08-01

    Effect of discrete RF spectrum has been studied for the fast wave current drive with the ion cyclotron range of frequency. Driven current and power densities decrease in this spectrum than in the continuous spectrum. However, there is a possibility to have the mechanism which allows electrons outside the resonance region to interact with the fast wave, taking into account the electron trapping by discrete RF spectrum. In the case of neglecting the electron trapping effect, driven current and power densities decrease up to 0.6 - 0.8 of those which are obtained for the continuous spectrum for the FER (Fusion Experimental Reactor). However, their driven current and power densities can be almost doubled in their magnitude for the discrete spectrum by taking into account the trapping effect. (author)

  16. RF Wave Simulation Using the MFEM Open Source FEM Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillerman, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Green, D. L.; Kolev, T.

    2016-10-01

    A new plasma wave simulation environment based on the finite element method is presented. MFEM, a scalable open-source FEM library, is used as the basis for this capability. MFEM allows for assembling an FEM matrix of arbitrarily high order in a parallel computing environment. A 3D frequency domain RF physics layer was implemented using a python wrapper for MFEM and a cold collisional plasma model was ported. This physics layer allows for defining the plasma RF wave simulation model without user knowledge of the FEM weak-form formulation. A graphical user interface is built on πScope, a python-based scientific workbench, such that a user can build a model definition file interactively. Benchmark cases have been ported to this new environment, with results being consistent with those obtained using COMSOL multiphysics, GENRAY, and TORIC/TORLH spectral solvers. This work is a first step in bringing to bear the sophisticated computational tool suite that MFEM provides (e.g., adaptive mesh refinement, solver suite, element types) to the linear plasma-wave interaction problem, and within more complicated integrated workflows, such as coupling with core spectral solver, or incorporating additional physics such as an RF sheath potential model or kinetic effects. USDoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  17. RFSYS: an inventory code for RF system parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treadwell, E.A.

    1983-03-01

    RFSYS is a program which maintains an inventory of rf system parameters associated with the 200 MeV Linear Accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The program, written by Elliott Treadwell, of the Linac group, offers five modes of operation: (1) Allocates memory space for additional rf systems (data arrays). (2) Prints a total or partial list of old tube parameters on an ADM-3 terminal. (3) Changes tube data stored in the master array. If the number of systems increases, this mode permits the user to enter new data. (4) Computes the average time of operation for a given tube and system. (5) Stops program execution. There is an exit option, (a) create one output data file or (b) create three output files, one of which contains column headers and coded comments. All output files are stored on the CYBER-175 disc, and eventually on high density (6250 B.P.I.) magnetic tapes. This arrangement eliminates the necessity for online data buffers

  18. Influence of Plasma Pressure Fluctuation on RF Wave Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhiwei; Bao Weimin; Li Xiaoping; Liu Donglin; Zhou Hui

    2016-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations in the plasma sheath from spacecraft reentry affect radio-frequency (RF) wave propagation. The influence of these fluctuations on wave propagation and wave properties is studied using methods derived by synthesizing the compressible turbulent flow theory, plasma theory, and electromagnetic wave theory. We study these influences on wave propagation at GPS and Ka frequencies during typical reentry by adopting stratified modeling. We analyzed the variations in reflection and transmission properties induced by pressure fluctuations. Our results show that, at the GPS frequency, if the waves are not totally reflected then the pressure fluctuations can remarkably affect reflection, transmission, and absorption properties. In extreme situations, the fluctuations can even cause blackout. At the Ka frequency, the influences are obvious when the waves are not totally transmitted. The influences are more pronounced at the GPS frequency than at the Ka frequency. This suggests that the latter can mitigate blackout by reducing both the reflection and the absorption of waves, as well as the influences of plasma fluctuations on wave propagation. Given that communication links with the reentry vehicles are susceptible to plasma pressure fluctuations, the influences on link budgets should be taken into consideration. (paper)

  19. rf traveling-wave electron gun for photoinjectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Mattia; Citterio, Alessandro; Craievich, Paolo; Reiche, Sven; Stingelin, Lukas; Zennaro, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    The design of a photoinjector, in particular that of the electron source, is of central importance for free electron laser (FEL) machines where a high beam brightness is required. In comparison to standard designs, an rf traveling-wave photocathode gun can provide a more rigid beam with a higher brightness and a shorter pulse. This is illustrated by applying a specific optimization procedure to the SwissFEL photoinjector, for which a brightness improvement up to a factor 3 could be achieved together with a double gun output energy compared to the reference setup foreseeing a state-of-the-art S-band rf standing-wave gun. The higher brightness is mainly given by a (at least) double peak current at the exit of the gun which brings benefits for both the beam dynamics in the linac and the efficiency of the FEL process. The gun design foresees an innovative coaxial rf coupling at both ends of the structure which allows a solenoid with integrated bucking coil to be placed around the cathode in order to provide the necessary focusing right after emission.

  20. rf traveling-wave electron gun for photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Schaer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a photoinjector, in particular that of the electron source, is of central importance for free electron laser (FEL machines where a high beam brightness is required. In comparison to standard designs, an rf traveling-wave photocathode gun can provide a more rigid beam with a higher brightness and a shorter pulse. This is illustrated by applying a specific optimization procedure to the SwissFEL photoinjector, for which a brightness improvement up to a factor 3 could be achieved together with a double gun output energy compared to the reference setup foreseeing a state-of-the-art S-band rf standing-wave gun. The higher brightness is mainly given by a (at least double peak current at the exit of the gun which brings benefits for both the beam dynamics in the linac and the efficiency of the FEL process. The gun design foresees an innovative coaxial rf coupling at both ends of the structure which allows a solenoid with integrated bucking coil to be placed around the cathode in order to provide the necessary focusing right after emission.

  1. Handbook of RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave components

    CERN Document Server

    Smolskiy, Sergey M; Kochemasov, Victor N

    2012-01-01

    This unique and comprehensive resource offers you a detailed treatment of the operations principles, key parameters, and specific characteristics of active and passive RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave components. The book covers both linear and nonlinear components that are used in a wide range of application areas, from communications and information sciences, to avionics, space, and military engineering. This practical book presents descriptions and clear examples and of the best materials and products used in the field, including laminates, prepregs, substrates; microstrip, coaxial and wa

  2. RF electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ferrite polymer composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosoudil, Rastislav; Usakova, Marianna; Franek, Jaroslav; Slama, Jozef; Olah, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The frequency dispersion of complex initial (relative) permeability (μ * =μ ' -jμ ' ') and the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of composite materials based on NiZn sintered ferrite and a polyvinylchloride (PVC) polymer matrix have been studied in frequency range from 1MHz to 1GHz. The complex permeability of the composites was found to increase as the ferrite content increased, and was characterized by frequency dispersion localized above 50MHz. The variation of return loss (RL) of single-layer RF absorbers using the prepared composite materials has been investigated as a function of frequency, ferrite content and the thickness of the absorbers

  3. Localization of rf breakdowns in a standing wave cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faya Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available At SLAC, a five-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  4. On the Performance of Millimeter Wave-based RF-FSO Multi-hop and Mesh Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2017-09-22

    This paper studies the performance of multi-hop and mesh networks composed of millimeter wave-based radio frequency (RF) and free-space optical (FSO) links. The results are obtained in cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ). Using the central limit theorem as well as other state-of-the-art approximation schemes, we derive closed-form expressions for the networks’ outage probability and ergodic achievable rates. We also evaluate the effect of various parameters such as power amplifiers efficiency, number of antennas as well as different coherence times of the RF and the FSO links on the system performance. Finally, we determine the minimum number of the transmit antennas in the RF link such that the same rate is supported in the RF- and the FSO-based hops. The results show the efficiency of the RF-FSO setups in different conditions. Moreover, HARQ can effectively improve the outage probability/energy efficiency, and compensate for the effect of hardware impairments in RF-FSO networks. For common parameter settings of the RF-FSO dual-hop networks, outage probability of 10−4 and code rate of 3 nats-per-channel-use, the implementation of HARQ with a maximum of 2 and 3 retransmissions reduces the required power, compared to cases with open-loop communication, by 13 and 17 dB, respectively.

  5. Travelling Wave Structure of an SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The RF cavities for acceleration of particles in the SPS have a travelling-wave structure. They operate at a fixed frequency of 200 MHz (h = 4620). With a quality factor of Q = 100, the bandwidth covers the small frequency swing for the acceleration of protons from as low as 10 GeV to the top energy of 450 GeV. Later on, for the acceleration of ions, with a larger frequency swing, turn-to-turn phase jumps did the trick. Two cavities, each consisting of 5 tank sections, were installed in long straight section 3. Each cavity is driven by a power amplifier of 750 kW CW (1 MW pulsed). Another 2 cavities were added later on. See also 7411033 and 7802190.

  6. Surface acoustic wave coding for orthogonal frequency coded devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malocha, Donald (Inventor); Kozlovski, Nikolai (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and systems for coding SAW OFC devices to mitigate code collisions in a wireless multi-tag system. Each device producing plural stepped frequencies as an OFC signal with a chip offset delay to increase code diversity. A method for assigning a different OCF to each device includes using a matrix based on the number of OFCs needed and the number chips per code, populating each matrix cell with OFC chip, and assigning the codes from the matrix to the devices. The asynchronous passive multi-tag system includes plural surface acoustic wave devices each producing a different OFC signal having the same number of chips and including a chip offset time delay, an algorithm for assigning OFCs to each device, and a transceiver to transmit an interrogation signal and receive OFC signals in response with minimal code collisions during transmission.

  7. An adjustable RF tuning element for microwave, millimeter wave, and submillimeter wave integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubecke, Victor M.; Mcgrath, William R.; Rutledge, David B.

    1991-01-01

    Planar RF circuits are used in a wide range of applications from 1 GHz to 300 GHz, including radar, communications, commercial RF test instruments, and remote sensing radiometers. These circuits, however, provide only fixed tuning elements. This lack of adjustability puts severe demands on circuit design procedures and materials parameters. We have developed a novel tuning element which can be incorporated into the design of a planar circuit in order to allow active, post-fabrication tuning by varying the electrical length of a coplanar strip transmission line. It consists of a series of thin plates which can slide in unison along the transmission line, and the size and spacing of the plates are designed to provide a large reflection of RF power over a useful frequency bandwidth. Tests of this structure at 1 GHz to 3 Ghz showed that it produced a reflection coefficient greater than 0.90 over a 20 percent bandwidth. A 2 GHz circuit incorporating this tuning element was also tested to demonstrate practical tuning ranges. This structure can be fabricated for frequencies as high as 1000 GHz using existing micromachining techniques. Many commercial applications can benefit from this micromechanical RF tuning element, as it will aid in extending microwave integrated circuit technology into the high millimeter wave and submillimeter wave bands by easing constraints on circuit technology.

  8. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  9. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-12-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  10. Plasma Turbulence Suppression and Transport Barrier Formation by Externally Driven RF Waves in Spherical Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.C.; Komoshvili, K.

    2002-01-01

    Turbulent transport of heat and particles is the principle obstacle confronting controlled fusion today. Thus, we investigate quantitatively the suppression of turbulence and formation of transport barriers in spherical tokamaks by sheared electric fields generated by externally driven radio-frequency (RF) waves, in the frequency range o)A n o] < o)ci (e)A and o)ci are the Alfven and ion cyclotron frequencies). This investigation consists of the solution of the full-wave equation for a spherical tokamak in the presence of externally driven fast waves and the evaluation of the power dissipation by the mode-converted Alfven waves. This in turn, provides a radial flow shear responsible for the suppression of plasma turbulence. Thus, a strongly non-linear equation for the radial sheared electric field is solved, the turbulent transport suppression rate is evaluated and compared with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability increment. For illustration, the case of START-like device (Sykes 2000) is treated. Thus, (i) the exact D-shape cross-section is considered; (ii) additional kinetic (including Landau damping) and particle trapping effects are added to the resistive two-fluid dielectric tensor operator; (iii) a finite extension antenna located on the low-field-side of the plasma is considered; (iv) a rigorous 2.5 finite elements numerical code (Sewell 1993) is used; and (v) the turbulence and transport barrier generated as a result of wave-plasma interaction is evaluated

  11. Low power RF measurements of travelling wave type linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Sivananda; Wanmode, Yashwant; Bhisikar, A.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in the development of travelling wave (TW) type linear accelerator for irradiation of industrial and agricultural products. TW accelerator designed for 2π/3 mode to operate at frequency of 2856 MHz. It consists of input coupler, buncher cells, regular cells and output coupler. Low power measurement of this structure includes measurement of resonant frequency of the cells for different resonant modes and quality factor, tuning of input-output coupler and measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Steele's non-resonant perturbation technique has been used for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field in the structure. Kyhl's method has been used for the tuning of input-output coupler. Computer based automated bead pull set-up has been developed for measurement of phase advance per cell and electric field profile in the structure. All the codes are written in Python for interfacing of Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) , stepper motor with computer. These codes also automate the measurement process. This paper describes the test set- up for measurement and results of measurement of travelling wave type linear accelerating structure. (author)

  12. On the performance of millimeter wave-based RF-FSO links with HARQ feedback

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2016-12-24

    This paper studies the performance of hybrid radio-frequency (RF) and free-space optical (FSO) links in the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ). Considering millimeter wave (mmwave) characteristics in the RF link and pointing errors in the FSO link, we derive closed-form expressions for the message decoding probabilities as well as the throughput and the outage probability of the RF-FSO setups. We also evaluate the effect of various parameters such as power amplifiers efficiency, different transmission techniques in the FSO link, pointing errors in the FSO link as well as different coherence times/symbol rates of the RF and the FSO links on the throughput and outage probability. The results show the efficiency of the RF-FSO links in different conditions. Moreover, the HARQ can effectively improve the outage probability/energy efficiency, and compensate the effect of hardware impairments in RF-FSO links.

  13. RF heating and current drive on NSTX with high harmonic fast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, P.M.; Swain, D.W.; Rosenberg, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    NSTX is a small aspect ratio tokamak (R = 0.85 m, a = 0.65 m). The High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) system is a 30 MHz, 12-element array capable of launching both symmetric and directional wave spectra for plasma heating and non-inductive current drive. It has delivered up to 6 MW for short pulses and has routinely operated at ∼3 MW for 100-400 ms pulses. Results include strong, centrally-peaked electron heating in both D and He plasmas for both high and low phase velocity spectra. H-modes were obtained with application of HHFW power alone, with stored energy doubling after the L-H transition. Beta poloidal as large as unity has been obtained with significant fractions (0.4) of bootstrap current. Differences in the loop voltage are observed depending on whether the array is phased to drive current in the co- or counter-current directions. A fast ion tail with energies extending up to 140 keV has been observed when HHFW interacts with 80 keV neutral beams; neutron rate and lost ion measurements, as well as modeling, indicate significant power absorption by the fast ions. Radial rf power deposition and driven current profiles have been calculated with ray tracing and kinetic full-wave codes and compared with measurements. (author)

  14. PZT-on-silicon RF-MEMS Lamb wave resonators and filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yagubizade, H.

    2013-01-01

    Lamb-wave piezoelectric RF-MEMS resonators have demonstrated promising performance, such as low motional impedance and high Q-factor. Lamb-wave resonators are still in the perfectioning state and therefore there is a great demand for further understanding of various issues such as reducing the

  15. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  16. BRICTEST: a code for charge breeding simulations in RF quadrupolar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variale, V.; Claudione, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the SPES project (Study for Production of Exotic Species), funded by Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare (INFN) at the Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro (LNL) (Padua) for Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) production, an R and D experiment of a charge breeder device, called BRIC (BReeding Ion Charge), is in progress at LNL. BRIC is an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) type ion charge state breeder in which a radio frequency (RF) quadrupolar field has been superimposed in the trapped ion region to introduce a selective containment with the aim of increasing the wanted ion trapping efficiency. A code that studies the motion and the ion charge state evolution in the trap region of the BRIC device has been recently developed in the Bari INFN section. That code has the aim of showing if, in the presence of an axial magnetic field and electron beam space charge force, the RF quadrupole field can still give a selective ion containment in the EBIS trap region. The code, furthermore, should allow choosing the RF quadrupole parameters to optimize the ion charge containment efficiency. In this paper the main feature of the code, named BRICTEST, and the simulation test will be presented and shortly discussed

  17. Identification of waves by RF magnetic probes during lower hybrid wave injection experiments on the TST-2 spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinya, Takahiro; Ejiri, Akira; Takase, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    RF magnetic probes can be used to measure not only the wavevector, but also the polarization of waves in plasmas. A 5-channel RF magnetic probe (5ch-RFMP) was installed in the TST-2 spherical tokamak and the waves were studied in detail during lower hybrid wave injection experiments. From the polarization measurements, the poloidal RF magnetic field is found to be dominant. In addition to polarization, components of k perpendicular to the major radial direction were obtained from phase differences among the five channels. The radial wavenumber was obtained by scanning the radial position of the 5ch-RFMP on a shot by shot basis. The measured wavevector and polarization in the plasma edge region were consistent with those calculated from the wave equation for the slow wave branch. While the waves with small and large k ∥ were excited by the antenna, only the small k ∥ component was measured by the 5ch-RFMP; this suggests that the waves with larger k ∥ were absorbed by the plasma. (author)

  18. RF generated currents in a magnetized plasma using a slow wave structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, B.R.; Cheo, B.R.; Kuo, S.P.; Tang, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    The generation of a dc current in a plasma by using RF waves is of importance for the operation of steadystate toroidal devices. An experimental investigation in the use of unidirectional, low frequency RF waves to drive currents has been made. Instead of using a natural plasma wave a slow wave guiding structure is used along the entire length of the plasma. When the RF wave is injected an increase in ionization and T/sub e/, and hence the background current is observed. However, the change depends on wave direction: The +k/sub z/ excitation yields a much larger electron current compared with the -k/sub z/ excitation indicating a net wave driven current. The measured modification in electron density and T/sub e/ is independent of wave direction. The current with a standing wave excitation generally falls at the average of the travelling wave (+ or - k/sub z/) driven currents. The net wave driven current is proportional to the feed power at approx. = 10 mA/kW. No saturation of the current is observed with feed powers up to 1 kW. Since the exciting structure is only 1 wavelength long, its k/sub z/ spectrum is relatively broad and hence no sharp resonances are observed as various plasma parameters and B/sub O/ are changed. There is no measurable difference between the power absorbed by the load resistors and the input power to the slow wave structure. Thus the current is driven by the wave field exclamation E exclamation 2 rather than the power absorbed in the plasma. The theoretical background and the physical mechanism is presented

  19. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T,; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths ({approximately}300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell {pi}-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure.

  20. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T.; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths (∼300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell π-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure

  1. Design of traveling wave windows for the PEP-II RF coupling network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroll, N.M.; Ng, C.K.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, M.

    1995-05-01

    The waveguide windows in the PEP-II RF coupling network have to withstand high power of 500 kW. Traveling wave windows have lower power dissipation than conventional self-matched windows, thus rendering the possibility of less stringent mechanical design. The traveling wave behavior is achieved by providing a reflecting iris on each side of the window, and depending on the configuration of the irises, traveling wave windows are characterized as inductive or capacitive types. A numerical design procedure using MAFIA has been developed for traveling wave windows. The relative advantages of inductive and capacitive windows are discussed. Furthermore, the issues of bandwidth and multipactoring are also addressed

  2. Traveling wave tube oscillator/amplifier with superconducting rf circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasper, L.J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a device comprising: an electron gun for producing an electron beam; a collector for collecting the electron beam; a vacuum housing surrounding the electron beam and having an integral slow wave circuit, the circuit being made from superconducting ceramic material; means for maintaining the temperature of the superconducting ceramic below its critical temperature; means for extracting an output signal from the slow wave circuit; means for creating a magnetic field within the vacuum housing so that interaction between the electron beam and the slow wave circuit produces the output signal

  3. RF wave simulation for cold edge plasmas using the MFEM library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Kolev, T.; Stowell, M.

    2017-10-01

    A newly developed generic electro-magnetic (EM) simulation tool for modeling RF wave propagation in SOL plasmas is presented. The primary motivation of this development is to extend the domain partitioning approach for incorporating arbitrarily shaped SOL plasmas and antenna to the TORIC core ICRF solver, which was previously demonstrated in the 2D geometry [S. Shiraiwa, et. al., "HISTORIC: extending core ICRF wave simulation to include realistic SOL plasmas", Nucl. Fusion in press], to larger and more complicated simulations by including a 3D realistic antenna and integrating RF rectified sheath potential model. Such an extension requires a scalable high fidelity 3D edge plasma wave simulation. We used the MFEM [http://mfem.org], open source scalable C++ finite element method library, and developed a Python wrapper for MFEM (PyMFEM), and then a radio frequency (RF) wave physics module in Python. This approach allows for building a physics layer rapidly, while separating the physics implementation being apart from the numerical FEM implementation. An interactive modeling interface was built on pScope [S Shiraiwa, et. al. Fusion Eng. Des. 112, 835] to work with an RF simulation model in a complicated geometry.

  4. Excitation of surface waves and electrostatic fields by a RF (radiofrequency systems) wave in a plasma sheath with current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Tapia, C.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown in a one-dimensional model that when a current in a plasma sheath is present, the excitation of surface waves and electrostatic fields by a RF wave is possible in the sheath. This phenomena depends strongly on the joint action of Miller's and driven forces. It is also shown that the action of these forces are carried out at different characteristic times when the wave front travels through the plasma sheath. The influence of the current, in the steady limit, is taken into account by a small functional variation of the density perturbations and generated electrostatic field. (Author)

  5. Infrastructure for the design and fabrication of MEMS for RF/microwave and millimeter wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerguizian, Vahe; Rafaf, Mustapha

    2004-08-01

    This article describes and provides valuable information for companies and universities with strategies to start fabricating MEMS for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave applications. The present work shows the infrastructure developed for RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS platforms, which helps the identification, evaluation and selection of design tools and fabrication foundries taking into account packaging and testing. The selected and implemented simple infrastructure models, based on surface and bulk micromachining, yield inexpensive and innovative approaches for distributed choices of MEMS operating tools. With different educational or industrial institution needs, these models may be modified for specific resource changes using a careful analyzed iteration process. The inputs of the project are evaluation selection criteria and information sources such as financial, technical, availability, accessibility, simplicity, versatility and practical considerations. The outputs of the project are the selection of different MEMS design tools or software (solid modeling, electrostatic/electromagnetic and others, compatible with existing standard RF/Microwave design tools) and different MEMS manufacturing foundries. Typical RF/Microwave and millimeter wave MEMS solutions are introduced on the platform during the evaluation and development phases of the project for the validation of realistic results and operational decision making choices. The encountered challenges during the investigation and the development steps are identified and the dynamic behavior of the infrastructure is emphasized. The inputs (resources) and the outputs (demonstrated solutions) are presented in tables and flow chart mode diagrams.

  6. An investigation of r.f. travelling wave current drive using the model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous experimental investigations in the use of travelling r.f. waves to drive steady toroidal currents in a toroidal plasma have shown that I t , the amount of current driven, is strongly dependent on the ratio of the static toroidal magnetic field B z , to the strength of the r.f. magnetic field B ω . This dependence is characterised by an initial increase and subsequent decrease of I t when B t /B ω increases. It is shown that this observed behaviour is entirely consistent with the behaviour predicted by the current drive model. Results from numerical computations using the model show good quantitative agreement with the published experimental results

  7. Autopsy on an RF-Processed X-band Travelling Wave Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to locate the cause(s) of high electric-field breakdown in x-band accelerating structures, we have cleanly-autopsied (no debris added by post-operation structure disassembly) an RF-processed structure. Macroscopic localization provided operationally by RF reflected wave analysis and acoustic sensor pickup was used to connect breakdowns to autopsied crater damage areas. Surprisingly, the microscopic analyses showed breakdown craters in areas of low electric field. High currents induced by the magnetic field on sharp corners of the input coupler appears responsible for the extreme breakdown damage observed

  8. Poloidal plasma rotation in the presence of RF waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyssow, B.; Liu, Caigen

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that one of the consequences of strong RF heating is the deformation of the equilibrium distribution function that induces a change in plasma transport and plasma rotation. The poloidal plasma rotation during RF wave heating in tokamaks is investigated using a moment approach. A set of closed, self-consistent transport and rotation equations is derived and reduced to a single equation for the poloidal particle flux. The formulas are sufficiently general to apply to heating schemes that can be represented by a quasilinear operator. (author)

  9. RF Coupler Design for the TRIUMF ISAC-II Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Poirier, R L; Harmer, P; Laxdal, R E; Mitra, A K; Sekatchev, I; Waraich, B; Zvyagintsev, V

    2004-01-01

    An RF Coupler for the ISAC-II medium beta (β=0.058 and 0.071) superconducting quarter wave resonators was designed and tested at TRIUMF. The main goal of this development was to achieve stable operation of superconducting cavities at high acceleration gradients and low thermal load to the helium refrigeration system. The cavities will operate at 6 MV/m acceleration gradient in overcoupled mode at a forward power 200 W at 106 MHz. The overcoupling provides ±20 Hz cavity bandwidth, which improves the stability of the RF control system for fast helium pressure fluctuations, microphonics and environmental noise. Choice of materials, cooling with liquid nitrogen, aluminum nitride RF window and thermal shields insure a small thermal load on the helium refrigeration system by the Coupler. An RF finger contact which causedμdust in the coupler housing was eliminated without any degradation of the coupler performance. RF and thermal calculations, design and test results on the coupler are p...

  10. Electromagnetic surface waves for large-area RF plasma productions between large-area planar electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, S.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, large-area plasma production has been tested by means of a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency (RF) discharge between a pair of large-area planar electrodes, approximately 0.5 m x 1.4 m, as one of the semiconductor technologies for fabrication of large-area amorphous silicon solar cells in the ''Sunshine Project'' of the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology in Japan. We also confirmed long plasma production between a pair of long electrodes. In this paper, normal electromagnetic (EM) waves propagating in a region between a planar waveguide with one plasma and two dielectric layers are analyzed in order to study the feasibility of large-area plasma productions by EM wave-discharges between a pair of large-area RF electrodes larger than the half-wavelength of RF wave. In conclusion, plasmas higher than an electron plasma frequency will be produced by an odd TMoo surface mode. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs

  11. Fast wave experiments in LAPD: RF sheaths, convective cells and density modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T. A.; van Compernolle, B.; Martin, M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; van Eester, D.; Crombe, K.; Perkins, R.; Lau, C.; Martin, E.; Caughman, J.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    An overview is presented of recent work on ICRF physics at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LAPD has typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B 1000 G. A new high-power ( 150 kW) RF system and fast wave antenna have been developed for LAPD. The source runs at a frequency of 2.4 MHz, corresponding to 1 - 7fci , depending on plasma parameters. Evidence of rectified RF sheaths is seen in large increases ( 10Te) in the plasma potential on field lines connected to the antenna. The rectified potential scales linearly with antenna current. The rectified RF sheaths set up convective cells of local E × B flows, measured indirectly by potential measurements, and measured directly with Mach probes. At high antenna powers substantial modifications of the density profile were observed. The plasma density profile initially exhibits transient low frequency oscillations (10 kHz). The amplitude of the fast wave fields in the core plasma is modulated at the same low frequency, suggesting fast wave coupling is affected by the density rearrangement. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, supported jointly by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  12. A Multi Mega Watt Continuous Wave RF Window for Particle Accelerator Applications. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vguyen-Tuong, V.

    2004-01-01

    In this analysis the proposed 10MW window design is free of multipacting on the ceramic surface for the full power range, both in the traveling wave and full reflection mode. Near 7MW and 8MW in the traveling wave mode, multipacting might show up on the outer conductor of the matching section. These multipacting barriers are however very soft and are expected to be easily eliminated by regular RF processing. The multipacting analysis can identify early design problems while it is unable to provide certainty in design success and testing of window designs is the only certain measure of freedom from multipacting

  13. Application of wavelets to image coding in an rf-link communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, C. S. J.; Conners, Gary H.; Muczynski, Joe

    1995-04-01

    The joint University of Rochester/Rochester Institute of Technology `Center for Electronic Imaging Systems' (CEIS) is designed to focus on research problems of interest to industrial sponsors, especially the Rochester Imaging Consortium. Compression of tactical images for transmission over an rf link is an example of this type of research project which is being worked on in collaboration with one of the CEIS sponsors, Harris Corporation/RF Communications. The Harris digital video imagery transmission system (DVITS) is designed to fulfill the need to transmit secure imagery between unwired locations at real-time rates. DVITS specializes in transmission systems for users who rely on hf equipment operating at the low end of the frequency spectrum. However, the inherently low bandwidth of hf combined with transmission characteristics such as fading and dropout severely restrict the effective throughput. The problem at designing a system such as DVITS is particularly challenging because of bandwidth and signal/noise limitations, and because of the dynamic nature of the operational environment. In this paper, a novel application of wavelets in tactical image coding is proposed to replace the current DCT compression algorithm in the DVITS system. THe effects of channel noise on the received image are determined and various design strategies combining image segmentation, compression, and error correction are described.

  14. Two dimensional code for modeling of high ione cyclotron harmonic fast wave heating and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grekov, D.; Kasilov, S.; Kernbichler, W.

    2016-01-01

    A two dimensional numerical code for computation of the electromagnetic field of a fast magnetosonic wave in a tokamak at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency has been developed. The code computes the finite difference solution of Maxwell equations for separate toroidal harmonics making use of the toroidal symmetry of tokamak plasmas. The proper boundary conditions are prescribed at the realistic tokamak vessel. The currents in the RF antenna are specified externally and then used in Ampere law. The main poloidal tokamak magnetic field and the ''kinetic'' part of the dielectric permeability tensor are treated iteratively. The code has been verified against known analytical solutions and first calculations of current drive in the spherical torus are presented.

  15. Sheared electric field-induced suppression of edge turbulence using externally driven R.F. waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, G.G.; Diamond, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    Here the authors propose a novel method for active control and suppression of edge turbulence by sheared ExB flows driven by externally launched RF waves. The theory developed addresses the problem of open-quotes flow driveclose quotes, which is somewhat analogous to the problem of plasma current drive. As originally demonstrated for the case of spontaneously driven flows, a net difference in the gradient of the fluid and magnetic Reynolds' stresses produced by radially propagating waves can drive the plasma flow. For the prototypical case of the Alfven wave flow drive considered here, ρ 0 r v θ > - r B θ > is proportional to k perpendicular 2 ρ s 2 in the case of the kinetic Alfven wave, and [(ηk perpendicular 2 -vk perpendicular 2 )/ω] 2 in the case of resistive MHD. Both results reflect the dependence of flow drive on the net stress imbalance. The shear layer width is determined by the waves evanescence length (determined by dissipation) that sets the stress gradient scale length, while the direction of the flow is determined by the poloidal orientation of the launched waves. In particular, it should be noted that both positive and negative E r may be driven, so that enhanced confinement need not be accompanied by impurity accumulation, as commonly encountered in spontaneous H-modes. The efficiency is determined by the criterion that the radial electric field shear be large enough to suppress turbulence. For typical TEXT parameters, and unity efficiency, 300 kW of absorbed power is needed to suppress turbulence over 3 cm radially. For DIII-D, 300 kW over 4 cm is needed. Also, direct transport losses induced by RF have been shown to be small. Extensions of the theory to ICRF are underway and are discussed. They also discuss the analogous problem of current drive using kinetic Alfven waves. 2 refs

  16. RF Performance of Layer-Structured Broadband Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Sakakibara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low profile and simple configuration are advantageous for RF module in passive millimeter-wave imaging system. High sensitivity over broad operation bandwidth is also necessary to detect right information from weak signal. We propose a broadband layer-structured module with low profile, simple structure, and ease of manufacture. This module is composed of a lens antenna and a detector module that consists of a detector circuit and a broadband microstrip-to-waveguide transition. The module forms a layer structure as a printed substrate with detector circuit is fixed between two metal plates with horn antennas and back-short waveguides. We developed a broadband passive millimeter-wave imaging module composed of a lens antenna and a detector module in this work. The gain and the antenna efficiency were measured, and the broadband operation was observed for the lens antenna. For the detector module, peak sensitivity was 8100 V/W. Furthermore, the detector module recognized a difference in the absorber’s temperature. The designs of the lens antenna and the detector module are presented and the RF performances of these components are reported. Finally, passive millimeter-wave imaging of a car, a human, and a metal plate in clothes is demonstrated in this paper.

  17. Iterative Addition of Kinetic Effects to Cold Plasma RF Wave Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David; Berry, Lee; RF-SciDAC Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The hot nature of fusion plasmas requires a wave vector dependent conductivity tensor for accurate calculation of wave heating and current drive. Traditional methods for calculating the linear, kinetic full-wave plasma response rely on a spectral method such that the wave vector dependent conductivity fits naturally within the numerical method. These methods have seen much success for application to the well-confined core plasma of tokamaks. However, quantitative prediction of high power RF antenna designs for fusion applications has meant a requirement of resolving the geometric details of the antenna and other plasma facing surfaces for which the Fourier spectral method is ill-suited. An approach to enabling the addition of kinetic effects to the more versatile finite-difference and finite-element cold-plasma full-wave solvers was presented by where an operator-split iterative method was outlined. Here we expand on this approach, examine convergence and present a simplified kinetic current estimator for rapidly updating the right-hand side of the wave equation with kinetic corrections. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  18. Suppressing RF breakdown of powerful backward wave oscillator by field redistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An over mode method for suppressing the RF breakdown on metal surface of resonant reflector cavity in powerful backward wave oscillator is investigated. It is found that the electric field is redistributed and electron emission is restrained with an over longitudinal mode cavity. Compared with the general device, a frequency band of about 5 times wider and a power capacity of at least 1.7 times greater are obtained. The results were verified in an X-band high power microwave generation experiment with the output power near 4 gigawatt.

  19. High field side launch of RF waves: A new approach to reactor actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lin, Y.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Vieira, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Launching radio frequency (RF) waves from the high field side (HFS) of a tokamak offers significant advantages over low field side (LFS) launch with respect to both wave physics and plasma material interactions (PMI). For lower hybrid (LH) waves, the higher magnetic field opens the window between wave accessibility (n∥≡c k∥/ω >√{1 -ωpi 2/ω2+ωpe 2/ωce 2 }+ωp e/|ωc e| ) and the condition for strong electron Landau damping (n∥˜√{30 /Te } with Te in keV), allowing LH waves from the HFS to penetrate into the core of a burning plasma, while waves launched from the LFS are restricted to the periphery of the plasma. The lower n∥ of waves absorbed at higher Te yields a higher current drive efficiency as well. In the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), HFS launch allows for direct access to the mode conversion layer where mode converted waves absorb strongly on thermal electrons and ions, thus avoiding the generation of energetic minority ion tails. The absence of turbulent heat and particle fluxes on the HFS, particularly in double null configuration, makes it the ideal location to minimize PMI damage to the antenna structure. The quiescent SOL also eliminates the need to couple LH waves across a long distance to the separatrix, as the antenna can be located close to plasma without risking damage to the structure. Improved impurity screening on the HFS will help eliminate the long-standing issues of high Z impurity accumulation with ICRF. Looking toward a fusion reactor, the HFS is the only possible location for a plasma-facing RF antenna that will survive long-term. By integrating the antenna into the blanket module it is possible to improve the tritium breeding ratio compared with an antenna occupying an equatorial port plug. Blanket modules will require remote handling of numerous cooling pipes and electrical connections, and the addition of transmission lines will not substantially increase the level of complexity. The obvious engineering

  20. A low-level rf control system for a quarter-wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwon; Hwang, Churlkew

    2012-06-01

    A low-level rf control system was designed and built for an rf deflector, which is a quarter wave resonator, and was designed to deflect a secondary electron beam to measure the bunch length of an ion beam. The deflector has a resonance frequency near 88 MHz, its required phase stability is approximately ±1° and its amplitude stability is less than ±1%. The control system consists of analog input and output components and a digital system based on a field-programmable gate array for signal processing. The system is cost effective, while meeting the stability requirements. Some basic properties of the control system were measured. Then, the capability of the rf control was tested using a mechanical vibrator made of a dielectric rod attached to an audio speaker system, which could induce regulated perturbations in the electric fields of the resonator. The control system was flexible so that its parameters could be easily configured to compensate for the disturbance induced in the resonator.

  1. WEC3: Wave Energy Converter Code Comparison Project: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combourieu, Adrien; Lawson, Michael; Babarit, Aurelien; Ruehl, Kelley; Roy, Andre; Costello, Ronan; Laporte Weywada, Pauline; Bailey, Helen

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the recently launched Wave Energy Converter Code Comparison (WEC3) project and present preliminary results from this effort. The objectives of WEC3 are to verify and validate numerical modelling tools that have been developed specifically to simulate wave energy conversion devices and to inform the upcoming IEA OES Annex VI Ocean Energy Modelling Verification and Validation project. WEC3 is divided into two phases. Phase 1 consists of a code-to-code verification and Phase II entails code-to-experiment validation. WEC3 focuses on mid-fidelity codes that simulate WECs using time-domain multibody dynamics methods to model device motions and hydrodynamic coefficients to model hydrodynamic forces. Consequently, high-fidelity numerical modelling tools, such as Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics simulation, and simple frequency domain modelling tools were not included in the WEC3 project.

  2. Acoustic pressure waves induced in human heads by RF pulses from high-field MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2010-04-01

    The current evolution toward greater image resolution from magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanners has prompted the exploration of higher strength magnetic fields and use of higher levels of radio frequencies (RFs). Auditory perception of RF pulses by humans has been reported during MRI with head coils. It has shown that the mechanism of interaction for the auditory effect is caused by an RF pulse-induced thermoelastic pressure wave inside the head. We report a computational study of the intensity and frequency of thermoelastic pressure waves generated by RF pulses in the human head inside high-field MRI and clinical scanners. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) guides limit the local specific absorption rate (SAR) in the body-including the head-to 8 W kg(-1). We present results as functions of SAR and show that for a given SAR the peak acoustic pressures generated in the anatomic head model were essentially the same at 64, 300, and 400 MHz (1.5, 7.0, and 9.4 T). Pressures generated in the anatomic head are comparable to the threshold pressure of 20 mPa for sound perception by humans at the cochlea for 4 W kg(-1). Moreover, results indicate that the peak acoustic pressure in the brain is only 2 to 3 times the auditory threshold at the U.S. FDA guideline of 8 W kg(-1). Even at a high SAR of 20 W kg(-1), where the acoustic pressure in the brain could be more than 7 times the auditory threshold, the sound pressure levels would not be more than 17 db above threshold of perception at the cochlea.

  3. Design and Preparation of RF System for the Lower Hybrid Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Research on VEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ho; Jeong, Seung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Woo; Lee, Byung Je [Kwang Woon University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong Gab; Lee, Hyun Young; Hwang, Yong Seok [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Continuous current drive is one of the key issues for tokamak to be a commercial fusion reactor. As a part of new and efficient current drive concept research by using a Lower Hybrid Fast Wave (LHFW), the experimental study is planned on Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) and a RF system is being developed in collaboration with Kwang Woon University (KWU), Korea Accelerator Plasma Research Association (KAPRA) and Seoul National University (SNU). The LHFW RF system includes UHF band klystron, inter-digital antenna, RF diagnostics and power transmission sub components such as circulator, DC breaker, vacuum feed-thru. The design and preparation status of the RF system will be presented in the meeting in detail. A RF system has been designed and prepared for the experimental study of efficient current drive by using Lower Hybrid Fast Wave. Overall LHFW RF system including diagnostics is designed to deliver about 10 kW in UHF band. And the key hardware components including klystron and antenna are being prepared and designed through the collaboration with KWU, KAPRA and SNU.

  4. RF transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  5. Developmental efforts of RF collinear load for 10 MeV, 6 kW travelling wave Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Harish; Soni, R.K.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Thakurta, A.C.; Wanmode, Y.D.; Pareek, Prashant; Senthil Kumar, S; Shinde, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is developing a 10 MeV, 6 kW Travelling Wave Electron Linac for radiation processing applications. The remnant RF power from the Linac structure is taken out by output RF coupler and absorbed by the waveguide load. RF collinear load is an improved technique for absorption of the remnant RF power. It replaces the output RF coupler, RF window and waveguide load leading to reduction in size of magnetic elements and less transverse beam instabilities. In addition, it uses the remnant RF power to increase the electron beam energy. The collinear load consists of a number of copper cavities coated with microwave absorbing material at inner surfaces and brazed to the Linac structure at the end. Development of the collinear load has been started at RRCAT and a prototype low power collinear load using Kanthal (FeCrAl alloy) coating has been developed. Further works are going on the development of high power collinear load using FeSiAl alloy. The paper describes the development of the Kanthal based prototype low power collinear load as well as the works for the development of FeSiAl alloy based high power collinear load. (author)

  6. Medium and Short Wave RF Energy Harvester for Powering Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Gil, Jesus A; Cortes-Loredo, Agustin; Fabian-Mijangos, Angel; Martinez-Flores, Javier J; Tovar-Padilla, Marco; Cardona-Castro, M Antonia; Morales-Sánchez, Alfredo; Alvarez-Quintana, Jaime

    2018-03-03

    Internet of Things (IoT) is an emerging platform in which every day physical objects provided with unique identifiers are connected to the Internet without requiring human interaction. The possibilities of such a connected world enables new forms of automation to make our lives easier and safer. Evidently, in order to keep billions of these communicating devices powered long-term, a self-sustainable operation is a key point for realization of such a complex network. In this sense, energy-harvesting technologies combined with low power consumption ICs eliminate the need for batteries, removing an obstacle to the success of the IoT. In this work, a Radio Frequency (RF) energy harvester tuned at AM broadcast has been developed for low consumption power devices. The AM signals from ambient are detected via a high-performance antenna-free LC circuit with an efficiency of 3.2%. To maximize energy scavenging, the RF-DC conversion stage is based on a full-wave Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier (CWVM) with efficiency up to 90%. System performance is evaluated by rating the maximum power delivered into the load via its output impedance, which is around 62 μW, although power level seems to be low, it is able to power up low consumption devices such as Leds, portable calculators and weather monitoring stations.

  7. Control of hydrocarbon radicals and film deposition by using an RF Whistler wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, Tetsu; Shoji, Tatsuo; Kadota, Kiyoshi.

    1991-10-01

    Production of hydrocarbon radicals is controlled by using an RF Whistler wave discharge in a low pressure region (∼0.1 Pa). Plasma density of 10 10 - 10 13 cm -3 , electron temperature of 2-20 eV is obtained for the discharge of admixture of Ar and small content of source gases (CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , CO). Spectroscopic measurement indicates that densities of CH and H radicals and deposition rate of amorphous carbon:H film increase with electron density, electron temperature and source gas pressure. The etching effect of H atoms influences on the deposition rate and a high deposition rate (90 μm/hr for CO/Ar discharge) is obtained even in a low neutral pressure discharge. (author)

  8. Characterisation of Low Frequency Gravitational Waves from Dual RF Coaxial-Cable Detector: Fractal Textured Dynamical 3-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have revealed that the Fresnel drag effect is not present in RF coaxial cables, contrary to a previous report. This enables a very sensitive, robust and compact detector, that is 1st order in v / c and using one clock, to detect the dynamical space passing the earth, revealing the sidereal rotation of the earth, together with significant wave / turbulence e ff ects. These are “gravitational waves”, and previously detected by Cahill 2006, using an Optical-Fibre – RF Coaxial Cable Detector, and Cahill 2009, using a preliminary version of the Dual RF Coaxial Cable Detector. The gravitational waves have a 1 / f spectrum, implying a fractal structure to the textured dynamical 3- space.

  9. Sequential modelling of ICRF wave near RF fields and asymptotic RF sheaths description for AUG ICRF antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquot Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of simulations is performed with RAPLICASOL and SSWICH to compare two AUG ICRF antennas. RAPLICASOL outputs have been used as input to SSWICH-SW for the AUG ICRF antennas. Using parallel electric field maps and the scattering matrix produced by RAPLICASOL, SSWICH-SW, reduced to its asymptotic part, is able to produce a 2D radial/poloidal map of the DC plasma potential accounting for the antenna input settings (total power, power balance, phasing. Two models of antennas are compared: 2-strap antenna vs 3-strap antenna. The 2D DC potential structures are correlated to structures of the parallel electric field map for different phasing and power balance. The overall DC plasma potential on the 3-strap antenna is lower due to better global RF currents compensation. Spatial proximity between regions of high RF electric field and regions where high DC plasma potentials are observed is an important factor for sheath rectification.

  10. On the Performance of Millimeter Wave-based RF-FSO Multi-hop and Mesh Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz; Svensson, Tommy; Brandt-Pearce, Maite; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the performance of multi-hop and mesh networks composed of millimeter wave-based radio frequency (RF) and free-space optical (FSO) links. The results are obtained in cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ

  11. Controlling Energy Radiations of Electromagnetic Waves via Frequency Coding Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haotian; Liu, Shuo; Wan, Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Dan; Li, Lianlin; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-09-01

    Metamaterials are artificial structures composed of subwavelength unit cells to control electromagnetic (EM) waves. The spatial coding representation of metamaterial has the ability to describe the material in a digital way. The spatial coding metamaterials are typically constructed by unit cells that have similar shapes with fixed functionality. Here, the concept of frequency coding metamaterial is proposed, which achieves different controls of EM energy radiations with a fixed spatial coding pattern when the frequency changes. In this case, not only different phase responses of the unit cells are considered, but also different phase sensitivities are also required. Due to different frequency sensitivities of unit cells, two units with the same phase response at the initial frequency may have different phase responses at higher frequency. To describe the frequency coding property of unit cell, digitalized frequency sensitivity is proposed, in which the units are encoded with digits "0" and "1" to represent the low and high phase sensitivities, respectively. By this merit, two degrees of freedom, spatial coding and frequency coding, are obtained to control the EM energy radiations by a new class of frequency-spatial coding metamaterials. The above concepts and physical phenomena are confirmed by numerical simulations and experiments.

  12. About of the Electrostatic fields excitation theory by a RF wave in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez T, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    In an unidimensional model is shown in the cases of a semi limited plasma and a layer of plasma the excitement mechanism of electrostatic fields for a radiofrequency wave (RF) polarized lineally. This phenomenon depends strongly on the combined action of the Miller force and that of impulsion. It is shown that the action of these forces is carried out in different characteristic times when the front of wave crosses through the plasma. The cases of a semi limited plasma and of a layer of plasma without and with current are analyzed. It is shown that near the frontiers of the plasma where the field is sufficiently big arise oscillations of the width of the field that are slowly muffled in the space in an exponential way. In the cases of a plasma layer its are shown that the processes that arise near the frontier x = L are similar to the processes that arise near the frontier x = 0. The existence of current in the plasma layer leads to the blockade of the excited perturbations in the frontier x = L. (Author)

  13. Design of the RF system for Alfven wave heating and current drive in a TCA/BR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchko, L.; Andrade, M.L.; Ozono, E.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Degaspari, F.T.; Nascimento, I.C.

    1995-01-01

    The advanced RF system for Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive in TCA/BR tokamak is presented. The antenna system is capable of exciting the standing and travelling wave M = -1,N = 1,N =-4,-6 with single helicity and thus provides the possibility to improve Alfven wave plasma heating efficiency in TCA/BR tokamak and to increase input power level up to P ≅ 1 MW, without the uncontrolled density rise which was encountered in previous TCA (Switzerland) experiments. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  14. Terahertz wave manipulation based on multi-bit coding artificial electromagnetic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiu-Sheng; Zhao, Ze-Jiang; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2018-05-01

    A polarization insensitive multi-bit coding artificial electromagnetic surface is proposed for terahertz wave manipulation. The coding artificial electromagnetic surfaces composed of four-arrow-shaped particles with certain coding sequences can generate multi-bit coding in the terahertz frequencies and manipulate the reflected terahertz waves to the numerous directions by using of different coding distributions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our coding artificial electromagnetic surfaces have strong abilities to reduce the radar cross section with polarization insensitive for TE and TM incident terahertz waves as well as linear-polarized and circular-polarized terahertz waves. This work offers an effectively strategy to realize more powerful manipulation of terahertz wave.

  15. On the generation of steady currents in a plasma cylinder using RF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugrass, W.N.

    1980-10-01

    The generation of a steady current in a resistive plasma cylinder by means of a travelling wave magnetic field has been studied using the resistive MHD equations. The nonlinear initial-boundary value problem has been solved using a semi-Lagrangian two dimensional algorithm. The numerical code has been used to simulate the Synchromak experiment of Nagoya University. Hollow d.c. current profiles, similar to the experimental data, have been obtained. A simple analytical argument, of a more general nature, shows that classical resistive diffusion cannot lead to a more uniform current distribution

  16. Design and RF test result of High Power Hybrid Combiner for Helicon Wave Current Drive in KSTAR Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Wi, H. H.; Wang, S. J.; Kwak, J. G. [NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    200 kW RF power will be injected to plasmas through the traveling wave antenna after combining four klystrons output powers using three hybrid combiners. Each klystron produces 60 kW output at the frequency of 500 MHz. RF power combiners commonly used to divide or combine output powers for various rf and microwave applications. It is divided into several types according to the design type such as Wilkinson combiner, radial and quadrature hybrid combiner. We designed high power hybrid combiners using 6-1/8 inch coaxial line. The power combiner has many advantages such as high isolation, low insertion loss and high power handling capability. In this paper design and rf test results of high power combiners will be described. High power combiners using three coaxial hybrid couplers will be utilized for effectively combining of 500 MHz, 200 kW output powers generated by four klystrons. We have designed, fabricated, and tested a 6-1/8 inch coaxial hybrid combiners at 500 MHz for efficiently off-axis Helicon wave current drive in KSTAR. Simulation and test results of high power coaxial hybrid combiners are good agreement.

  17. RF measurements of a traveling-wave muffin-tin accelerating structure at 90 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.; Menegat, A.; Pritzkau, D.P.; Siemann, R.H.

    1997-05-01

    A measuring system at the table-top scale was developed for RF measurements of a muffin-tin accelerating structure operating at 32 times the SLAC frequency (2.856 GHz). Both perturbation and non-perturbation methods are employed to characterize the RF properties of a muffin-tin structure. Conventional bead pull measurements are extended to millimeter wavelengths. Design of the measuring system and preliminary results of RF measurements are presented

  18. Characterisation of Low Frequency Gravitational Waves from Dual RF Coaxial-Cable Detector: Fractal Textured Dynamical 3-Space

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, Reginald T.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments have revealed that the Fresnel drag effect is not present in RF coaxial cables, contrary to a previous report. This enables a very sensitive, robust and compact detector, that is 1st order in v / c and using one clock, to detect the dynamical space passing the earth, revealing the sidereal rotation of the earth, together with significant wave / turbulence e ff ects. These are “gravitational waves”, and previously detected by Cahill ...

  19. RF heating and current drive on NSTX with high harmonic fast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    NSTX is a small aspect ratio tokamak with a large dielectric constant (50-100); under these conditions high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) will readily damp on electrons via Landau damping and TTMP. The HHFW system is a 30 MHz, 12-element array capable of launching both symmetric and directional wave spectra for plasma heating and non-inductive current drive. It has delivered up to 6 MW for short pulses and has routinely operated at ∼3-4 MW for 100-200 ms pulses. Results include strong, centrally-peaked electron heating in both D and He plasmas, for both high and low phase velocity spectra. H-modes were obtained with application of HHFW power alone, with stored energy doubling after the L-H transition. Beta poloidal as large as unity has been obtained with large fractions (0.4) of bootstrap current. A fast ion tail with energies extending up to 140 keV has been observed when HHFW interacts with 80 keV neutral beams; neutron rate and lost ion measurements, as well as modeling, indicate significant power absorption by the fast ions. Radial power deposition profiles are being calculated with ray tracing and kinetic full-wave codes and benchmarked against measurements. (author)

  20. Development of an analysis code for pressure wave propagation, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Sakano, Kosuke; Shindo, Yoshihisa

    1974-11-01

    We analyzed the propagation of the pressure-wave in the piping system of SWAT-1B rig by using SWAC-5 Code. We carried out analyses on the following parts. 1) A straight pipe 2) Branches 3) A piping system The results obtained in these analyses are as follows. 1) The present our model simulates well the straight pipe and the branch with the same diameters. 2) The present our model simulates approximately the branch with the different diameters and the piping system. (auth.)

  1. Nonlinear electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in an rf-plugged inhomogeneous plasma slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikemura, Tsutomu.

    1977-01-01

    A theory based on the fluid and perturbation theories is developed to analytically study a nonlinear electrostatic ion cyclotron wave excited in an rf-plugged inhomogeneous plasma slab by applying a pair of external potentials phi sub(ext)(x,z) = +-PHI 0 cos ω 0 t.exp(-z 2 /2h 2 ) at its boundaries x = +-L. Here, B 0 is applied along the z-axis. The potential forms of the fundamental and the nonlinear second harmonic are found as functions of x, z and t provided the field-free densities vary as exp(-x 2 /2d 2 )(d 2 /h 2 0 ) created by the fundamental potential can approximately be regarded as a dipole field, provided that /1-μ/ 0 2 -ω sub(cl)sup(2))m sub(i)d 2 /(γ sub(i)T sub(i)+Z γ sub(e)T sub(e)). Under the stricter condition μ asymptotically equals 1, a dipole-like electric field can also be excited in the entire region for the case of high density and weak nonlinearity. It is shown that the assumption ω 0 -1 √ γ sub(e)T sub(e)/m sub(e) can lead to the Boltzmann relation for the electron fluid even in inhomogeneous plasmas. Moreover, the density depletion delta N sub(i) obtained here contains a new considerable term proportional to /phi/ 2 , in addition to the usual term proportional to -/delta phi/delta x/ 2 which originates from the ponderomotive force. (auth.)

  2. A full wave code for ion cyclotron waves in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1996-02-01

    The code TORIC solves the finite Larmor radius wave equations in the ion cyclotron frequency range in arbitrary axisymmetric toroidal geometry. The model used describes the compressional and torsional Alfven waves (or, depending on the parallel phase velocity, the kinetic counterpart of the latter), and ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion near the first ion cyclotron harmonic. In the ion response the broadening of the absorption regions due to the finite width of the cyclotron resonance of individual ions in toroidal geometry is taken into account. The parallel component of the wave electric field is evaluated on the same footing as the transverse ones; the response of the electrons includes Landau damping, Transit Time damping and the mixed term. The numerical approach uses a spectral representation of the solution in the poloidal angle θ, and cubic finite elements in the radial variable ψ. Great flexibility is provided in the way ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion are damped when their wavelength becomes comparable with the ion Larmor radius, in the regularization of Alfven resonances, and in the treatment of the outer plasma layers. As an option, we have also implemented the Order Reduction Algorithm, which provides a particularly fast, yet accurate evaluation of the power deposition profiles in toroidal geometry. Thee present report describes the model and its numerical implementation, and provides the information needed to use the code. A few examples illustrating applications of TORIC are also included. (orig.)

  3. The modeling of the RF system performance in TCA/BR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchko, L.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Nascimento, I.; Ozono, E.; Lerche, E.; Degasperi, F.T.; Tuszel, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation of RF Alfven wave heating system that is intended to be used in TCA/BR tokamak are presented. The problem of monochromatic travelling RF field excitation in TCA/BR tokamak is analyzed by means of numerical simulation. The spectrum of the excited Alfven waves is determined using a one-dimensional MHD code. The transient time and AC analysis of the RF generator performance with antenna loading are discussed. (author). 9 refs., 6 figs

  4. Coupling Hydrodynamic and Wave Propagation Codes for Modeling of Seismic Waves recorded at the SPE Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmat, C. S.; Rougier, E.; Delorey, A.; Steedman, D. W.; Bradley, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to bring empirical and theoretical advances to the problem of detection and identification of underground nuclear explosions. For this, the SPE program includes a strong modeling effort based on first principles calculations with the challenge to capture both the source and near-source processes and those taking place later in time as seismic waves propagate within complex 3D geologic environments. In this paper, we report on results of modeling that uses hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus and CASH) coupled with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. For modeling the near source region, we employ a fully-coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) modeling capability with a new continuum-based visco-plastic fracture model for simulation of damage processes, called AZ_Frac. These capabilities produce high-fidelity models of various factors believed to be key in the generation of seismic waves: the explosion dynamics, a weak grout-filled borehole, the surrounding jointed rock, and damage creation and deformations happening around the source and the free surface. SPECFEM3D, based on the Spectral Element Method (SEM) is a direct numerical method for full wave modeling with mathematical accuracy. The coupling interface consists of a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated inside of the hydrodynamic code's domain. Displacement time series at these points are computed using output data from CASH or Abaqus (by interpolation if needed) and fed into the time marching scheme of SPECFEM3D. We will present validation tests with the Sharpe's model and comparisons of waveforms modeled with Rg waves (2-8Hz) that were recorded up to 2 km for SPE. We especially show effects of the local topography, velocity structure and spallation. Our models predict smaller amplitudes of Rg waves for the first five SPE shots compared to pure elastic models such as Denny &Johnson (1991).

  5. Recent RF Experiments and Application of RF Waves to Real-Time Control of Safety Factor Profile in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Isayama, A.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Oikawa, T.; Sakata, S.; Sueoka, M.; Hosoyama, H.; Seki, M.

    2005-01-01

    Two topics of applications of RF waves to current profile control in JT-60U are presented; application of lower-hybrid (LH) waves to safety factor profile control and electron cyclotron (EC) waves to neo-classical tearing mode (NTM) control. A real-time control system of safety factor (q) profile was developed. This system, for the first time, enables 1) real time evaluation of q profile using local magnetic pitch angle measurement by motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic and 2) control of current drive (CD) location (ρCD) by controlling the parallel refractive index N parallel of LH waves through control of phase difference (Δφ) of LH waves between multi-junction launcher modules. The method for real-time q profile evaluation was newly developed, without time-consuming reconstruction of equilibrium, so that the method requires less computational time. Safety factor profile by the real-time calculation agrees well with that by equilibrium reconstruction with MSE. The control system controls ρCD through Δφ in such a way to decrease the largest residual between the real-time evaluated q profile q(r) and its reference profile qref(r). The real-time control system was applied to a positive shear plasma (q(0)∼1). The reference q profile was set to monotonic positive shear profile having qref(0)=1.3. The real-time q profile approached to the qref(r) during application of real-time control, and was sustained for 3s, which was limited by the duration of the injected LH power. Temporal evolution of current profile was consistent with relaxation of inductive electric field induced by theoretical LH driven current. An m/n=3/2 NTM that appeared at βN∼3 was completely stabilized by ECCD applied to a fully-developed NTM. Precise ECCD at NTM island was essential for the stabilization. ECCD that was applied to resonant rational surface (q=3/2) before an NTM onset suppressed appearance of NTM. In order to keep NTM intensity below a level, ECCD before the mode onset was

  6. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-01-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012 © . RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance

  7. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimjaem, S., E-mail: sakhorn.rimjaem@cmu.ac.th [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012{sup ©}. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  8. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  9. Characterization of high-power RF structures using time-domain field codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, C.C.; DeFord, J.F.; Swatloski, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have modeled gyrotron windows and gyrotron amplifier sever structures for TE modes in the 100--150 GHz range and have computed the reflection and transmission characteristics from the field data. Good agreement with frequency domain codes and analytic analysis have been obtained for some simple geometries. We present results for realistic structures with lousy coatings and describe implementation of microwave diagnostics

  10. Development and simulation of RF components for high power millimeter wave gyrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyaslavets, M.; Sato, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Takita, Y.; Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Ohkubo, K.; Hayashi, K.

    1996-11-01

    To test gyrotron RF components, efficient low-power generators for rotating high-order modes of high purity are necessary. Designs of generators for the TE{sub 15,3} mode at 84 GHz and for the TE{sub 31,8} mode at 168 GHz are presented and some preliminary test results are discussed. In addition, Toshiba gyrotron cavities at 168 GHz were analyzed for leakage of RF power in the beam tunnel. To decrease RF power leakage, the declination angle of the cut-off cavity cross section has to be decreased. A TE{sub 15,3} waveguide nonlinear uptaper is analyzed at 84 GHz as well as 168 GHz uptapers. Since the calculated conversion losses are slightly higher than designed value, an optimization of those uptapers may be required. (author)

  11. Characterization of high-power RF structures using time-domain field codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, C.C.; DeFord, J.F.; Swatloski, T.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have modeled gyrotron windows and gyrotron amplifier sever structures for TE modes in the 100-150 GHz range and have computed the reflection and transmission characteristics from the field data. Good agreement with frequency domain codes and analytic analysis have been obtained for some simple geometries. We present results for realistic structures with lossy coatings and describe implementation of microwave diagnostics. (Author) 5 figs., 7 refs

  12. On the performance of millimeter wave-based RF-FSO links with HARQ feedback

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz; Svensson, Tommy; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    and pointing errors in the FSO link, we derive closed-form expressions for the message decoding probabilities as well as the throughput and the outage probability of the RF-FSO setups. We also evaluate the effect of various parameters such as power amplifiers

  13. Flexible manipulation of terahertz wave reflection using polarization insensitive coding metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu-Sheng, Li; Ze-Jiang, Zhao; Jian-Quan, Yao

    2017-11-27

    In order to extend to 3-bit encoding, we propose notched-wheel structures as polarization insensitive coding metasurfaces to control terahertz wave reflection and suppress backward scattering. By using a coding sequence of "00110011…" along x-axis direction and 16 × 16 random coding sequence, we investigate the polarization insensitive properties of the coding metasurfaces. By designing the coding sequences of the basic coding elements, the terahertz wave reflection can be flexibly manipulated. Additionally, radar cross section (RCS) reduction in the backward direction is less than -10dB in a wide band. The present approach can offer application for novel terahertz manipulation devices.

  14. FISIC - a full-wave code to model ion cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.

    1988-08-01

    We present a user manual for the FISIC code which solves the integrodifferential wave equation in the finite Larmor radius approximation in fully toroidal geometry to simulate ICRF heating experiments. The code models the electromagnetic wave field as well as antenna coupling and power deposition profiles in axisymmetric plasmas. (orig.)

  15. Coded acoustic wave sensors and system using time diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for distinguishing between sensors that are to be wirelessly detected is provided. An interrogator device uses different, distinct time delays in the sensing signals when interrogating the sensors. The sensors are provided with different distinct pedestal delays. Sensors that have the same pedestal delay as the delay selected by the interrogator are detected by the interrogator whereas other sensors with different pedestal delays are not sensed. Multiple sensors with a given pedestal delay are provided with different codes so as to be distinguished from one another by the interrogator. The interrogator uses a signal that is transmitted to the sensor and returned by the sensor for combination and integration with the reference signal that has been processed by a function. The sensor may be a surface acoustic wave device having a differential impulse response with a power spectral density consisting of lobes. The power spectral density of the differential response is used to determine the value of the sensed parameter or parameters.

  16. Suppression of beam-excited electron waves by an externally applied RF signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumasa, Osamu; Itatani, Ryohei

    1980-11-01

    Suppression of the beam-excited electron wave in a bounded system is investigated in connection with the beam distribution function. Wave suppression has two different processes depending on whether injected beams are reflected at the other end or not. In the absence of reflected beam electrons, deformation of the beam distribution function is observed in relation to the suppression of the electron wave. However, when beam electrons are reflected, the external wave suppresses the electron wave but distribution function shows no appreciable change. These experimental results show that nonlinear behaviors of beam electrons, namely behaviors of reflected beams, are quite important for wave suppression. By using the method of partial simulation, interaction between two waves in the bounded system including nonlinear motions of beam electrons is studied numerically. Qualitative agreement between experimental and numerical results is obtained. (author)

  17. Generation of ion-acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves in an RF helicon discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A. S.; Markov, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    A study is made of the generation of ion-acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves in a discharge excited in an external magnetic field by an electromagnetic wave in the whistler frequency range (ω LH He , where ω LH = √(ω He ω Hi ) and ω He and ω Hi are the electron and ion gyrofrequencies, respectively). The excitation of acoustic waves is attributed to the decay of a high-frequency hybrid mode forming a plasma waveguide into low-frequency acoustic waves and new high-frequency waves that satisfy both the decay conditions and the waveguide dispersion relations. The excitation of acoustic waves is resonant in character because the conditions for the generation of waveguide modes and for the occurrence of the corresponding nonlinear wave processes should be satisfied simultaneously. An unexpected effect is the generation of magnetoacoustic waves by whistlers. A diagnostic technique is proposed that allows one to determine the thermal electron velocity by analyzing decay conditions and dispersion relations for waves in the discharge channel

  18. E3D, 3-D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.; Schultz, C.; Maddix, D.; Bakowsky, T.; Bent, L.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output. 2 - Methods: The software simulates wave propagation by solving the elasto-dynamic formulation of the full wave equation on a staggered grid. The solution scheme is 4-order accurate in space, 2-order accurate in time

  19. SSS: A code for computing one dimensional shock and detonation wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Chengwei

    1986-01-01

    The one-dimensional hydrodynamic code SSS for shock and detonation wave propagation in inert and reactive media is described. The elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic model and four burn techniques (the Arrhenius law, C-J volume, sharp shock and Forest Fire) are used. There are HOM and JWL options for the state equation of detonation products. Comparing with the SIN code published by LANL, the SSS code has several new options: laser effects, blast waves, diverging and instantaneous detonation waves with arbitrary initiation positions. Two examples are given to compare the SSS and SIN calculations with the experimental data

  20. RF power diagnostics and control on the DIII-D, 4 MW 30--120 MHz fast wave current drive system (FWCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Allen, J.C.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Harris, T.E.

    1995-10-01

    The Fast Wave Current Drive System uses three 2 MW transmitters to drive three antennas inside the DIII-D vacuum vessel. This paper describes the diagnostics for this system. The diagnostics associated with the General Atomics Fast Wave Current Drive System allow the system tuning to be analyzed and modified on a between shot basis. The transmitters can be exactly tuned to match the plasma with only one tuning shot into the plasma. This facilitates maximum rf power utilization

  1. rf conditioning and breakdown analysis of a traveling wave linac with collinear load cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qushan; Hu, Tongning; Qin, Bin; Xiong, Yongqian; Fan, Kuanjun; Pei, Yuanji

    2018-04-01

    Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) has built a compact linac-based terahertz free electron laser (THz-FEL) prototype. In order to achieve compact structure, the linac uses collinear load cells instead of conventional output coupler to absorb remanent power at the end of linac. The new designed structure is confronted with rf breakdown problem after a long time conditioning process, so we tried to figure out the breakdown site in the linac. Without transmitted signal, we propose two methods to analyze the breakdown site mainly based on the forward and the reflected power signals. One method focuses on the time relationship of the two signals while the other focuses on the amplitude. Both the two methods indicate the breakdown events happened at the end of the linac and more likely in the first or the second load cell.

  2. rf conditioning and breakdown analysis of a traveling wave linac with collinear load cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qushan Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST has built a compact linac-based terahertz free electron laser (THz-FEL prototype. In order to achieve compact structure, the linac uses collinear load cells instead of conventional output coupler to absorb remanent power at the end of linac. The new designed structure is confronted with rf breakdown problem after a long time conditioning process, so we tried to figure out the breakdown site in the linac. Without transmitted signal, we propose two methods to analyze the breakdown site mainly based on the forward and the reflected power signals. One method focuses on the time relationship of the two signals while the other focuses on the amplitude. Both the two methods indicate the breakdown events happened at the end of the linac and more likely in the first or the second load cell.

  3. Large-scale transmission-type multifunctional anisotropic coding metasurfaces in millimeter-wave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tie Jun; Wu, Rui Yuan; Wu, Wei; Shi, Chuan Bo; Li, Yun Bo

    2017-10-01

    We propose fast and accurate designs to large-scale and low-profile transmission-type anisotropic coding metasurfaces with multiple functions in the millimeter-wave frequencies based on the antenna-array method. The numerical simulation of an anisotropic coding metasurface with the size of 30λ × 30λ by the proposed method takes only 20 min, which however cannot be realized by commercial software due to huge memory usage in personal computers. To inspect the performance of coding metasurfaces in the millimeter-wave band, the working frequency is chosen as 60 GHz. Based on the convolution operations and holographic theory, the proposed multifunctional anisotropic coding metasurface exhibits different effects excited by y-polarized and x-polarized incidences. This study extends the frequency range of coding metasurfaces, filling the gap between microwave and terahertz bands, and implying promising applications in millimeter-wave communication and imaging.

  4. High-Fidelity RF Gun Simulations with the Parallel 3D Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code Pic3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the first parallel Finite Element 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code, Pic3P, for simulations of RF guns and other space-charge dominated beam-cavity interactions. Pic3P solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations and thus includes space charge, retardation and wakefield effects from first principles. Pic3P uses higher-order Finite Elementmethods on unstructured conformal meshes. A novel scheme for causal adaptive refinement and dynamic load balancing enable unprecedented simulation accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Application to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun is presented.

  5. Review of experiments on current drive in tokamaks by means of RF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooke, W.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results on lower hybrid current drive in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. Pulse lengths of 3.5 seconds and currents above 400 kA have been generated at plasma densities such that the wave frequency is greater than about twice the lower hybrid frequency. Current drive ceases above a critical density, nsub(c). However, nsub(c) increases with wave frequency. So that for f = 4.6 GHz current drive has been seen at n-barsub(e) approx.= 10 14 cm -3 and a density limit has yet to be established. Evidence for a collisional scaling law for current-drive efficiency is summarized. Detailed measurements of bremsstrahlung x-rays show a distribution which is qualitatively similar to that predicted by quasilinear theory. Microwave emission at frequencies less than the plasma frequency may shed light on the current-drive mechanism. Applications of current drive including plasma and current start-up and transformer recharging are discussed. (author)

  6. Development of Scientific Simulation 3D Full Wave ICRF Code for Stellarators and Heating/CD Scenarios Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin V.L.

    2005-08-15

    coupled with each other due to magnetic field inhomogeneity of stellarators in toroidal direction. This is drastically different from axial symmetric plasma of the tokamaks. The inclusion in the problem major radius variation of magnetic field can strongly modify earlier results obtained for the straight helical, especially for high beta plasma, due to location modification of the two ion hybrid resonance layers. For the NCSX, LHD, W7-AS and W7-X like magnetic field topology inclusion in our theory of a major radius inhomogeneity of the magnetic field is a key element for correct description of RF power deposition profiles at all. The theory is developed in a manner that includes tokamaks and magnetic mirrors as the particular cases through general metric tensor (provided by an equilibrium solver) treatment of the wave equations. We describe that newly developed stellarator ICRF 3D full wave code PSTELION, based on theory described in this report. Applications to tokamaks, ITER, stellarators and benchmarking with 2D TORIC and 3D AORSA codes are given in included subreports

  7. Workgroup report: base stations and wireless networks-radiofrequency (RF) exposures and health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valberg, Peter A; van Deventer, T Emilie; Repacholi, Michael H

    2007-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) waves have long been used for different types of information exchange via the air waves--wireless Morse code, radio, television, and wireless telephone (i.e., construction and operation of telephones or telephone systems). Increasingly larger numbers of people rely on mobile telephone technology, and health concerns about the associated RF exposure have been raised, particularly because the mobile phone handset operates in close proximity to the human body, and also because large numbers of base station antennas are required to provide widespread availability of service to large populations. The World Health Organization convened an expert workshop to discuss the current state of cellular-telephone health issues, and this article brings together several of the key points that were addressed. The possibility of RF health effects has been investigated in epidemiology studies of cellular telephone users and workers in RF occupations, in experiments with animals exposed to cell-phone RF, and via biophysical consideration of cell-phone RF electric-field intensity and the effect of RF modulation schemes. As summarized here, these separate avenues of scientific investigation provide little support for adverse health effects arising from RF exposure at levels below current international standards. Moreover, radio and television broadcast waves have exposed populations to RF for > 50 years with little evidence of deleterious health consequences. Despite unavoidable uncertainty, current scientific data are consistent with the conclusion that public exposures to permissible RF levels from mobile telephone and base stations are not likely to adversely affect human health.

  8. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Ng, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching. 35 figs

  9. Speech coding, reconstruction and recognition using acoustics and electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    1998-01-01

    The use of EM radiation in conjunction with simultaneously recorded acoustic speech information enables a complete mathematical coding of acoustic speech. The methods include the forming of a feature vector for each pitch period of voiced speech and the forming of feature vectors for each time frame of unvoiced, as well as for combined voiced and unvoiced speech. The methods include how to deconvolve the speech excitation function from the acoustic speech output to describe the transfer function each time frame. The formation of feature vectors defining all acoustic speech units over well defined time frames can be used for purposes of speech coding, speech compression, speaker identification, language-of-speech identification, speech recognition, speech synthesis, speech translation, speech telephony, and speech teaching.

  10. Synthesizer for decoding a coded short wave length irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The system uses point irradiation source, typically an X-ray emitter, which illuminates a three dimensional object consisting of a set of parallel planes, each of which acts as a source of coded information. The secondary source images are superimposed on a common flat screen. The decoding system comprises an imput light-screen detector, a picture screen amplifier, a beam deflector, on output picture screen, an optical focussing unit including three lenses, a masking unit, an output light screen detector and a video signal reproduction unit of cathode ray tube from, or similar, to create a three dimensional image of the object. (G.C.)

  11. Two-dimensional full-wave code for reflectometry simulations in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, E.; Heuraux, S.; Estrada, T.; Sanchez, J.; Cupido, L.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional full-wave code in the extraordinary mode has been developed to simulate reflectometry in TJ-II. The code allows us to study the measurement capabilities of the future correlation reflectometer that is being installed in TJ-II. The code uses the finite-difference-time-domain technique to solve Maxwell's equations in the presence of density fluctuations. Boundary conditions are implemented by a perfectly matched layer to simulate free propagation. To assure the stability of the code, the current equations are solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Density fluctuation parameters such as fluctuation level, wave numbers, and correlation lengths are extrapolated from those measured at the plasma edge using Langmuir probes. In addition, realistic plasma shape, density profile, magnetic configuration, and experimental setup of TJ-II are included to determine the plasma regimes in which accurate information may be obtained

  12. Applications of the 3-dim ICRH global wave code FISIC and comparison with other models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.; Brambilla, M.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two ICRF heating experiments in ASDEX are presented, using the FISIC code to solve the integrodifferential wave equations in the finite Larmor radius (FLR) approximation model and of ray tracing. The different models show on the whole good agreement; we can however identify a few interesting toroidal effects, in particular on the efficiency of mode conversion and on the propagation of ion Bernstein waves. (author)

  13. Low frequency rf current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-01-01

    An unshielded antenna for rf heating has been developed and tested during this report period. In addition to design specifications being given, some experimental results are presented utilizing: (1) an unprotected Faraday shield, (2) insulating guard limiters, (3) unshielded antenna experiments, (4) method for detecting small rf driven currents, (5) rf fast wave current drive experiments, (6) alfven wave interactions with electrons, and (7) machine conditioning, impurity generation and density control

  14. Workgroup Report: Base Stations and Wireless Networks—Radiofrequency (RF) Exposures and Health Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valberg, Peter A.; van Deventer, T. Emilie; Repacholi, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) waves have long been used for different types of information exchange via the airwaves—wireless Morse code, radio, television, and wireless telephony (i.e., construction and operation of telephones or telephonic systems). Increasingly larger numbers of people rely on mobile telephone technology, and health concerns about the associated RF exposure have been raised, particularly because the mobile phone handset operates in close proximity to the human body, and also because large numbers of base station antennas are required to provide widespread availability of service to large populations. The World Health Organization convened an expert workshop to discuss the current state of cellular-telephone health issues, and this article brings together several of the key points that were addressed. The possibility of RF health effects has been investigated in epidemiology studies of cellular telephone users and workers in RF occupations, in experiments with animals exposed to cell-phone RF, and via biophysical consideration of cell-phone RF electric-field intensity and the effect of RF modulation schemes. As summarized here, these separate avenues of scientific investigation provide little support for adverse health effects arising from RF exposure at levels below current international standards. Moreover, radio and television broadcast waves have exposed populations to RF for > 50 years with little evidence of deleterious health consequences. Despite unavoidable uncertainty, current scientific data are consistent with the conclusion that public exposures to permissible RF levels from mobile telephony and base stations are not likely to adversely affect human health. PMID:17431492

  15. Investigation and Prediction of RF Window Performance in APT Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this report was performed between November 1996 and May 1997 in support of the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The goal was to write and to test computer programs for charged particle orbits in RF fields. The well-documented programs were written in portable form and compiled for standard personal computers for easy distribution to LANL researchers. They will be used in several APT applications including the following. Minimization of multipactor effects in the moderate β superconducting linac cavities under design for the APT accelerator. Investigation of suppression techniques for electron multipactoring in high-power RF feedthroughs. Modeling of the response of electron detectors for the protection of high power RF vacuum windows. In the contract period two new codes, Trak-RF and WaveSim, were completed and several critical benchmark etests were carried out. Trak-RF numerically tracks charged particle orbits in combined electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields. WaveSim determines frequency-domain RF field solutions and provides a key input to Trak-RF. The two-dimensional programs handle planar or cylindrical geometries. They have several unique characteristics

  16. Study on interference between far-IR to mm-wave CSR from consecutive electron bunches at BFEL RF-Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Biao, Z J; Xie Jia Li; Zhang Guo Qing

    2001-01-01

    Coherent bending magnet or undulator radiation due to a train of electron bunches is treated as radiation from a multi-slit diffraction array. Based on this model, we numerically analyse the interference among coherent synchrotron radiation emitted from consecutive bunches in a train of bunches, which are accelerated by a 30-MeV RF-linac at BFEL. Some interesting results are as follows: (1) Rapidly oscillating radiation enhancement due to interbunch interference is overlapped on the single bunch spectrum. (2) It consists of a series of spectrum lines corresponding to harmonics of the RF fundamental. (3) Main maximum positions are determined by the 'diffraction condition'. (4) Total intensity is about the square of the number of bunches participating in interference as single bunch intensity. Experimental design to measure interbunch interference at BFEL with the sub-mm and mm-wave Michelson interferometer is presented.

  17. Performance Analysis of RF-FSO Multi-Hop Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2017-05-12

    We study the performance of multi-hop networks composed of millimeter wave (MMW)-based radio frequency (RF) and free-space optical (FSO) links. The results are obtained in the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ). Taking the MMW characteristics of the RF links into account, we derive closed-form expressions for the network outage probability. We also evaluate the effect of various parameters such as power amplifiers efficiency, number of antennas as well as different coherence times of the RF and the FSO links on the system performance. Finally, we present mappings between the performance of RF- FSO multi-hop networks and the ones using only the RF- or the FSO-based communication, in the sense that with appropriate parameter settings the same outage probability is achieved in these setups. The results show the efficiency of the RF-FSO setups in different conditions. Moreover, the HARQ can effectively improve the outage probability/energy efficiency, and compensate the effect of hardware impairments in RF-FSO networks. For common parameter settings of the RF-FSO dual- hop networks, outage probability 10^{-4} and code rate 3 nats-per-channel-use, the implementation of HARQ with a maximum of 2 and 3 retransmissions reduces the required power, compared to the cases with no HARQ, by 13 and 17 dB, respectively.

  18. RF current distribution and topology of RF sheath potentials in front of ICRF antennae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.; Bremond, S.; Bosia, G.

    2005-01-01

    The 2D (radial/poloidal) spatial topology of RF-induced convective cells developing radially in front of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennae is investigated, in relation to the spatial distribution of RF currents over the metallic structure of the antenna. This is done via a Green's function, determined from the ICRF wave coupling equations, and well-suited to open field lines extending toroidally far away on both sides of the antenna. Using such formalism, combined with a full-wave calculation using the 3D antenna code ICANT (Pecoul S. et al 2000 Comput. Phys. Commun. 146 166-87), two classes of convective cells are analysed. The first one appears in front of phased arrays of straps, and depending on the strap phasing, its topology is interpreted using the poloidal profiles of either the RF current or the RF voltage of the strip line theory. The other class of convective cells is specific to antenna box corners and is evidenced for the first time. Based on such analysis, general design rules are worked out in order to reduce the RF-sheath potentials, which generalize those proposed in the earlier literature, and concrete antenna design options are tested numerically. The merits of aligning all strap centres on the same (tilted) flux tube, and of reducing the antenna box toroidal conductivity in its lower and upper parts, are discussed

  19. Practical RF system design

    CERN Document Server

    Egan, William F

    2003-01-01

    he ultimate practical resource for today's RF system design professionals Radio frequency components and circuits form the backbone of today's mobile and satellite communications networks. Consequently, both practicing and aspiring industry professionals need to be able to solve ever more complex problems of RF design. Blending theoretical rigor with a wealth of practical expertise, Practical RF System Design addresses a variety of complex, real-world problems that system engineers are likely to encounter in today's burgeoning communications industry with solutions that are not easily available in the existing literature. The author, an expert in the field of RF module and system design, provides powerful techniques for analyzing real RF systems, with emphasis on some that are currently not well understood. Combining theoretical results and models with examples, he challenges readers to address such practical issues as: * How standing wave ratio affects system gain * How noise on a local oscillator will affec...

  20. Content-Based Multi-Channel Network Coding Algorithm in the Millimeter-Wave Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wireless technology, the widespread use of 5G is already an irreversible trend, and millimeter-wave sensor networks are becoming more and more common. However, due to the high degree of complexity and bandwidth bottlenecks, the millimeter-wave sensor network still faces numerous problems. In this paper, we propose a novel content-based multi-channel network coding algorithm, which uses the functions of data fusion, multi-channel and network coding to improve the data transmission; the algorithm is referred to as content-based multi-channel network coding (CMNC. The CMNC algorithm provides a fusion-driven model based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S evidence theory to classify the sensor nodes into different classes according to the data content. By using the result of the classification, the CMNC algorithm also provides the channel assignment strategy and uses network coding to further improve the quality of data transmission in the millimeter-wave sensor network. Extensive simulations are carried out and compared to other methods. Our simulation results show that the proposed CMNC algorithm can effectively improve the quality of data transmission and has better performance than the compared methods.

  1. A new code for parameter estimation in searches for gravitational waves from known pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkin, M; Gill, C; Macdonald, E; Woan, G; Veitch, J

    2012-01-01

    We describe the consistency testing of a new code for gravitational wave signal parameter estimation in known pulsar searches. The code uses an implementation of nested sampling to explore the likelihood volume. Using fake signals and simulated noise we compare this to a previous code that calculated the signal parameter posterior distributions on both a grid and using a crude Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We define a new parameterisation of two orientation angles of neutron stars used in the signal model (the initial phase and polarisation angle), which breaks a degeneracy between them and allows more efficient exploration of those parameters. Finally, we briefly describe potential areas for further study and the uses of this code in the future.

  2. Monte Carlo code Serpent calculation of the parameters of the stationary nuclear fission wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Khotyayintsev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available n this work, propagation of the stationary nuclear fission wave was simulated for series of fixed power values using Monte Carlo code Serpent. The wave moved in the axial direction in 5 m long cylindrical core of fast reactor with pure 238U raw fuel. Stationary wave mode arises some period later after the wave ignition and lasts sufficiently long to determine kef with high enough accuracy. The velocity characteristic of the reactor was determined as the dependence of the wave velocity on the neutron multiplication factor. As we have recently shown within a one-group diffusion description, the velocity characteristic is two-valued due to the effect of concentration mechanisms, while thermal feedback affects it only quantitatively. The shape and parameters of the velocity characteristic critically affect feasibility of the reactor design since stationary wave solutions of the lower branch are unstable and do not correspond to any real waves in self-regulated reactor, like CANDLE. In this work calculations were performed without taking into account thermal feedback. They confirm that theoretical dependence correctly describes the shape of the velocity characteristic calculated using the results of the Serpent modeling.

  3. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, κ perpendicular, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the κ perpendicular upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 x 10 19 A m -2 W -1 if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons

  4. Dynamics of r.f. production of Stellarator plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, V.E.; Lysoivan, A.I.; Kasilov, S.V.; Plyusnin, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    The present study investigated numerically the process of r.f. production of plasma in the URAGAN-3M torsatron in the frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency (ω ci ). The dynamics of r.f. plasma build-up at the stages of neutral gas burnout and plasma heating were studied using a zero-dimensional transport code, in which the plasma confinement law was determined by large helical device scaling. Two models for input r.f. power were used. In the first case, the r.f. power absorbed by the electrons was computed by a one-dimensional r.f. code solving Maxwell's boundary problem equations. The mechanisms of electron heating through direct excitation of the slow wave (SW) by antennae as well as the conversion of fast wave (FW) into SW in the vicinity of Alfven resonance (scenario of Alfven heating) were taken into account in the computations. In the second case, an 'ideal' model of r.f. power deposition onto the electrons as a linear function of plasma density was employed. A noticeable difference in plasma production dynamics computed for these two cases was found. Better agreement with experimental data obtained from the URAGAN-3M torsatron was found for the first case resulting from combination of the one-dimensional r.f. and zero-dimensional transport codes. ((orig.))

  5. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  6. SOL RF physics modelling in Europe, in support of ICRF experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colas Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A European project was undertaken to improve the available SOL ICRF physics simulation tools and confront them with measurements. This paper first reviews code upgrades within the project. Using the multi-physics finite element solver COMSOL, the SSWICH code couples RF full-wave propagation with DC plasma biasing over “antenna-scale” 2D (toroidal/radial domains, via non-linear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions (SBCs applied at shaped plasma-facing boundaries. For the different modules and associated SBCs, more elaborate basic research in RF-sheath physics, SOL turbulent transport and applied mathematics, generally over smaller spatial scales, guides code improvement. The available simulation tools were applied to interpret experimental observations on various tokamaks. We focus on robust qualitative results common to several devices: the spatial distribution of RF-induced DC bias; left-right asymmetries over strap power unbalance; parametric dependence and antenna electrical tuning; DC SOL biasing far from the antennas, and RF-induced density modifications. From these results we try to identify the relevant physical ingredients necessary to reproduce the measurements, e.g. accurate radiated field maps from 3D antenna codes, spatial proximity effects from wave evanescence in the near RF field, or DC current transport. Pending issues towards quantitative predictions are also outlined.

  7. Analysis of pressure wave transients and seismic response in LMFBR piping systems using the SHAPS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeuch, W.R.; Wang, C.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents some of the current capabilities of the three-dimensional piping code SHAPS and demonstrates their usefulness in handling analyses encountered in typical LMFBR studies. Several examples demonstrate the utility of the SHAPS code for problems involving fluid-structure interactions and seismic-related events occurring in three-dimensional piping networks. Results of two studies of pressure wave propagation demonstrate the dynamic coupling of pipes and elbows producing global motion and rigorous treatment of physical quantities such as changes in density, pressure, and strain energy. Results of the seismic analysis demonstrate the capability of SHAPS to handle dynamic structural response within a piping network over an extended transient period of several seconds. Variation in dominant stress frequencies and global translational frequencies were easily handled with the code. 4 refs., 10 figs

  8. About of the Electrostatic fields excitation theory by a RF wave in a plasma; Acerca de la teoria de excitacion de campos electrostaticos por una onda de rf en un plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez T, C.R

    1991-01-15

    In an unidimensional model is shown in the cases of a semi limited plasma and a layer of plasma the excitement mechanism of electrostatic fields for a radiofrequency wave (RF) polarized lineally. This phenomenon depends strongly on the combined action of the Miller force and that of impulsion. It is shown that the action of these forces is carried out in different characteristic times when the front of wave crosses through the plasma. The cases of a semi limited plasma and of a layer of plasma without and with current are analyzed. It is shown that near the frontiers of the plasma where the field is sufficiently big arise oscillations of the width of the field that are slowly muffled in the space in an exponential way. In the cases of a plasma layer its are shown that the processes that arise near the frontier x = L are similar to the processes that arise near the frontier x = 0. The existence of current in the plasma layer leads to the blockade of the excited perturbations in the frontier x = L. (Author)

  9. Self-consistent calculation of the effects of RF injection in the HHFW heating regimes on the evolution of fast ions in toroidal plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertelli Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical question for the use of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF heating in the ITER device and beyond is interaction of fast waves with energetic ion populations from neutral beam injection (NBI, fusion reactions, and minority ions accelerated by the RF waves themselves. Several experiments have demonstrated that the interaction between fast waves and fast ions can indeed be strong enough to significantly modify the NB ion population. To model the RF/fast ion interaction and the resulting fast ion distribution, a recent extension of the full wave solver TORIC v.5 that includes non-Maxwellian effects has been combined with the Monte Carlo NUBEAM code through an RF “kick” operator. In this work, we present an initial verification of the NUBEAM RF “kick” operator for high harmonic fast wave (HHFW heating regime in NSTX plasma.

  10. Algorithm for Wave-Particle Resonances in Fluid Codes - Final Report

    CERN Document Server

    Mattor, N

    2000-01-01

    We review the work performed under LDRD ER grant 98-ERD-099. The goal of this work is to write a subroutine for a fluid turbulence code that allows it to incorporate wave-particle resonances (WPR). WPR historically have required a kinetic code, with extra dimensions needed to evolve the phase space distribution function, f(x, v, t). The main results accomplished under this grant have been: (1) Derivation of a nonlinear closure term for 1D electrostatic collisionless fluid; (2) Writing of a 1D electrostatic fluid code, ''es1f,'' with a subroutine to calculate the aforementioned closure term; (3) derivation of several methods to calculate the closure term, including Eulerian, Euler-local, fully local, linearized, and linearized zero-phase-velocity, and implementation of these in es1f; (4) Successful modeling of the Landau damping of an arbitrary Langmuir wave; (5) Successful description of a kinetic two-stream instability up to the point of the first bounce; and (6) a spin-off project which uses a mathematical ...

  11. Algorithm for Wave-Particle Resonances in Fluid Codes - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattor, N.

    2000-01-01

    We review the work performed under LDRD ER grant 98-ERD-099. The goal of this work is to write a subroutine for a fluid turbulence code that allows it to incorporate wave-particle resonances (WPR). WPR historically have required a kinetic code, with extra dimensions needed to evolve the phase space distribution function, f(x, v, t). The main results accomplished under this grant have been: (1) Derivation of a nonlinear closure term for 1D electrostatic collisionless fluid; (2) Writing of a 1D electrostatic fluid code, ''es1f,'' with a subroutine to calculate the aforementioned closure term; (3) derivation of several methods to calculate the closure term, including Eulerian, Euler-local, fully local, linearized, and linearized zero-phase-velocity, and implementation of these in es1f; (4) Successful modeling of the Landau damping of an arbitrary Langmuir wave; (5) Successful description of a kinetic two-stream instability up to the point of the first bounce; and (6) a spin-off project which uses a mathematical technique developed for the closure, known as the Phase Velocity Transform (PVT) to decompose turbulent fluctuations

  12. New aspects of whistler waves driven by an electron beam studied by a 3-D electromagnetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    1994-01-01

    We have restudied electron beam driven whistler waves with a 3-D electromagnetic particle code. The simulation results show electromagnetic whistler wave emissions and electrostatic beam modes like those observed in the Spacelab 2 electron beam experiment. It has been suggested in the past that the spatial bunching of beam electrons associated with the beam mode may directly generate whistler waves. However, the simulation results indicate several inconsistencies with this picture: (1) whistler waves continue to be generated even after the beam mode space charge modulation looses its coherence, (2) the parallel (to the background magnetic field) wavelength of the whistler wave is longer than that of the beam instability, and (3) the parallel phase velocity of the whistler wave is smaller than that of the beam mode. The complex structure of the whistler waves in the vicinity of the beam suggest that the transverse motion (gyration) of the beam and background electrons is also involved in the generation of whistler waves.

  13. A pulse coding and decoding strategy to perform Lamb wave inspections using simultaneously multiple actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Luca; Marzani, Alessandro; Moll, Jochen; Kudela, Paweł; Radzieński, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2017-07-01

    The performance of Lamb wave based monitoring systems, both in terms of diagnosis time and data complexity, can be enhanced by increasing the number of transducers used to actuate simultaneously the guided waves in the inspected medium. However, in case of multiple simultaneously-operated actuators the interference among the excited wave modes within the acquired signals has to be considered for the further processing. To this aim, in this work a code division strategy based on the Warped Frequency Transform is presented. At first, the proposed procedure encodes actuation pulses using Gold sequences. Next, for each considered actuator the acquired signals are compensated from dispersion by cross correlating the warped version of the actuated and received signals. Compensated signals form the base for a final wavenumber imaging meant at emphasizing defects and or anomalies by removing incident wavefield and edge reflections. The proposed strategy is tested numerically, and validated through an experiment in which guided waves are actuated in a plate by four piezoelectric transducers operating simultaneously.

  14. Ion cyclotron emission calculations using a 2D full wave numerical code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Colestock, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Measurement of radiation in the HF band due to cyclotron emission by energetic ions produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic on large devices which are entering the reactor regime of operation. A number of complications make the modelling and interpretation of such measurements difficult using conventional geometrical optics methods. In particular the long wavelength and lack of high directivity of antennas in this frequency regime make observation of a single path across the plasma into a viewing dump impractical. Pickup antennas effectively see the whole plasma and wall reflection effects are important. We have modified our 2D full wave ICRH code 2 to calculate wave fields due to a distribution of energetic ions in tokamak geometry. The radiation is modeled as due to an ensemble of localized source currents distributed in space. The spatial structure of the coherent wave field is then calculated including cyclotron harmonic damping as compared to the usual procedure of incoherently summing powers of individual radiators. This method has the advantage that phase information from localized radiating currents is globally retained so the directivity of the pickup antennas is correctly represented. Also standing waves and wall reflections are automatically included

  15. Benchmark on traveling wave fast reactor with negative reactivity feedback obtained with MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gann, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of computer simulations of traveling wave fast reactor with negative reactivity feedback. The results were obtained using MCNPX code combined with CINDER90 subroutine for depletion calculations. We considered 1-D model of TWR containing 4 m long core made of mixture of 66 at. % 238 U and 34 at. % 10 B. Ignitor made of 235 U was located in the center of the core. Boron was included as imitator of structural in-core materials and coolant. Negative reactivity feedback was adjusted to reactor power of 500 MW. In this case two burning waves originated from the igniter and travel to the ends of the core during the following 40 years; coefficient of utilization of 238 U reached 80 %. Distribution of specific power in traveling wave, isotope concentration of fission products and actinides, neutron flux, fast neutron spectrum, specific activity were calculated. Data of the computer simulation is in qualitative agreement with theoretical results obtained in slow burning wave approximation

  16. Water cooling of RF structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battersby, G.; Zach, M.

    1994-06-01

    We present computer codes for heat transfer in water cooled rf cavities. RF parameters obtained by SUPERFISH or analytically are operated on by a set of codes using PLOTDATA, a command-driven program developed and distributed by TRIUMF [1]. Emphasis is on practical solutions with designer's interactive input during the computations. Results presented in summary printouts and graphs include the temperature, flow, and pressure data. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs

  17. Handbook of RF, Microwave, and Millimeter-Wave Components. Edited by Leonid A. Belov, Sergey M. Smolskiy and Victor N. Kochemasov, Artech House, 2012; 504 pages. Price: £119.00, ISBN 978-1-60807-209-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This unique and comprehensive resource offers you a detailed treatment of the operations principles, key parameters, and specific characteristics of active and passive RF, microwave, and millimeter-wave components. The book covers both linear and nonlinear components that are used in a wide range of application areas, from communications and information sciences, to avionics, space, and military engineering.

  18. RF MEMS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the bare die level the insertion loss, return loss and the isolation ... ing and packaging of a silicon on glass based RF MEMS switch fabricated using DRIE. ..... follows the power law based on the asperity deformation model given by Pattona & ... Surface mount style RF packages (SMX series 580465) from Startedge Corp.

  19. Combined treatment of radiotherapy and local hyperthermia using 8 MHz RF-wave for advanced carcinoma of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu

    1988-01-01

    During the period from January 1983 through September 1986, 13 patients with carcinoma of the breast were treated with local hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy. Six patients were inoperable advanced cases and the other 7 were recurrent cases. Local heat was applied with an 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating equipment, once or twice a week after radiotherapy, for 40 approx. 60 minutes per session. Of the 6 cases with inoperable advanced lesions, 4 achieved CR and the other 2 achieved PRa (80 approx. 100 % regression), and of the 7 cases with local recurrent tumors, 3 achieved CR and the other 4 achieved PRa. As complications of the thermoradiotherapy, grade I-II skin burns were observed in 9 cases, pain around the ribs in 8 cases, mild lassitude in 2 cases, persistent tachycardia in 1 case and acute erosive gastritis in 1 case. It is worth noting that CR was achieved in these huge tumors, which can not be controlled by radiotherapy alone.

  20. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q ext and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes

  1. Foldover, quasi-periodicity, spin-wave instabilities in ultra-thin films subject to RF fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Napoli ' Federico II' , Naples I-80125 (Italy)]. E-mail: mdaquino@unina.it; Bertotti, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Turin (Italy); Serpico, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Napoli ' Federico II' , Naples I-80125 (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [ECE Department and UMIACS, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bonin, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Turin (Italy); Guida, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Napoli ' Federico II' , Naples I-80125 (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    We study magnetization dynamics in a uniaxial ultra-thin ferromagnetic disk subject to spatially uniform microwave external fields. The rotational invariance of the system is such that the only admissible spatially uniform steady states are periodic (P-modes) and quasi-periodic (Q-modes) modes. The stability of P-modes versus spatially uniform and nonuniform perturbations is studied by using spin-wave analysis and the instability diagram for all possible P-modes is computed. The predictions of the spin-wave analysis are compared with micromagnetic simulations.

  2. Formulation of electromagnetic-wave analysis by boundary element method and its application to the analysis of RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washizu, Masao; Tanabe, Yoshio.

    1986-01-01

    In a system handling the electromagnetic waves of large power such as the cavity resonator for a high energy accelerator and the high frequency heater for a nuclear fusion apparatus, the margin in the thermal and mechanical design of a wave guide system cannot be taken large, accordingly, the detailed analysis of electromagnetic waves is required. When the analysis in a general form is carried out, boundary element method may be a useful method of solution. This time, the authors carried out the formulation of steady electromagnetic wave problems by boundary element method, and it was shown that the formulation was able to be carried out under the physically clear boundary condition also in this case, and especially in the case of a perfect conductor system, a very simple form was obtained. In this paper, first, the techniques of formulation in a general case, and next, as a special case, the formulation for a perfect conductor system are described. Taking the analysis of the cavity resonators of cylindrical and rectangular parallelepiped forms as examples, the comparison with the analytical solution was carried out. (Kako, I.)

  3. RF current drive and plasma fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Yves; Decker, Joan; Morini, L; Coda, S

    2011-01-01

    The role played by electron density fluctuations near the plasma edge on rf current drive in tokamaks is assessed quantitatively. For this purpose, a general framework for incorporating density fluctuations in existing modelling tools has been developed. It is valid when rf power absorption takes place far from the fluctuating region of the plasma. The ray-tracing formalism is modified in order to take into account time-dependent perturbations of the density, while the Fokker–Planck solver remains unchanged. The evolution of the electron distribution function in time and space under the competing effects of collisions and quasilinear diffusion by rf waves is determined consistently with the time scale of fluctuations described as a statistical process. Using the ray-tracing code C3PO and the 3D linearized relativistic bounce-averaged Fokker–Planck solver LUKE, the effect of electron density fluctuations on the current driven by the lower hybrid (LH) and the electron cyclotron (EC) waves is estimated quantitatively. A thin fluctuating layer characterized by electron drift wave turbulence at the plasma edge is considered. The effect of fluctuations on the LH wave propagation is equivalent to a random scattering process with a broadening of the poloidal mode spectrum proportional to the level of the perturbation. However, in the multipass regime, the LH current density profile remains sensitive to the ray chaotic behaviour, which is not averaged by fluctuations. The effect of large amplitude fluctuations on the EC driven current is found to be similar to an anomalous radial transport of the fast electrons. The resulting lower current drive efficiency and broader current profile are in better agreement with experimental observations. Finally, applied to the ITER ELMy H-mode regime, the model predicts a significant broadening of the EC driven current density profile with the fluctuation level, which can make the stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode potentially

  4. Combined treatment of radiotherapy and local hyperthermia using 8 MHz RF-wave for advanced carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu

    1988-01-01

    During the period from January 1983 through September 1986, 13 patients with carcinoma of the breast were treated with local hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy. Six patients were inoperable advanced cases and the other 7 were recurrent cases. Local heat was applied with an 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating equipment, once or twice a week after radiotherapy, for 40 ∼ 60 minutes per session. Of the 6 cases with inoperable advanced lesions, 4 achieved CR and the other 2 achieved PRa (80 ∼ 100 % regression), and of the 7 cases with local recurrent tumors, 3 achieved CR and the other 4 achieved PRa. As complications of the thermoradiotherapy, grade I-II skin burns were observed in 9 cases, pain around the ribs in 8 cases, mild lassitude in 2 cases, persistent tachycardia in 1 case and acute erosive gastritis in 1 case. It is worth noting that CR was achieved in these huge tumors, which can not be controlled by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  5. Spectral-Element Seismic Wave Propagation Codes for both Forward Modeling in Complex Media and Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Lefebvre, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present both SPECFEM3D_Cartesian and SPECFEM3D_GLOBE open-source codes, representing high-performance numerical wave solvers simulating seismic wave propagation for local-, regional-, and global-scale application. These codes are suitable for both forward propagation in complex media and tomographic imaging. Both solvers compute highly accurate seismic wave fields using the continuous Galerkin spectral-element method on unstructured meshes. Lateral variations in compressional- and shear-wave speeds, density, as well as 3D attenuation Q models, topography and fluid-solid coupling are all readily included in both codes. For global simulations, effects due to rotation, ellipticity, the oceans, 3D crustal models, and self-gravitation are additionally included. Both packages provide forward and adjoint functionality suitable for adjoint tomography on high-performance computing architectures. We highlight the most recent release of the global version which includes improved performance, simultaneous MPI runs, OpenCL and CUDA support via an automatic source-to-source transformation library (BOAST), parallel I/O readers and writers for databases using ADIOS and seismograms using the recently developed Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) with built-in provenance. This makes our spectral-element solvers current state-of-the-art, open-source community codes for high-performance seismic wave propagation on arbitrarily complex 3D models. Together with these solvers, we provide full-waveform inversion tools to image the Earth's interior at unprecedented resolution.

  6. SiOx Ink-Repellent Layer Deposited by Radio Frequency (RF) Plasmas in Continuous Wave and Pulse Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qiang; Fu Yabo; Pang Hua; Zhang Yuefei; Zhang Guangqiu

    2007-01-01

    Low surface energy layers, proposed application for non-water printing in computer to plate (CTP) technology, are deposited in both continuous wave and pulse radio frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as precursor. It is found that the plasma mode dominates the polymer growth rate and the surface composition. Derived from the spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and combined with printable test it is concluded that concentration of Si in coatings plays an important role for the ink printability and the ink does not adhere on the surface with high silicon concentration

  7. RF pulse compression development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Microscopic investigation of RF surfaces of 3 GHz niobium accelerator cavities following RF processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.; Barnes, P.; Flynn, T.; Kirchgessner, J.; Knobloch, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Sears, J.

    1993-01-01

    RF processing of Superconducting accelerating cavities is achieved through a change in the electron field emission (FE) characteristics of the RF surface. The authors have examined the RF surfaces of several single-cell 3 GHz cavities, following RF processing, in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The RF processing sessions included both High Peak Power (P ≤ 50 kW) pulsed processing, and low power (≤ 20 W) continuous wave processing. The experimental apparatus also included a thermometer array on the cavity outer wall, allowing temperature maps to characterize the emission before and after RF processing gains. Multiple sites have been located in cavities which showed improvements in cavity behavior due to RF processing. Several SEM-located sites can be correlated with changes in thermometer signals, indicating a direct relationship between the surface site and emission reduction due to RF processing. Information gained from the SEM investigations and thermometry are used to enhance the theoretical model of RF processing

  9. Graphene as an active virtually massless top electrode for RF solidly mounted bulk acoustic wave (SMR-BAW) resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Marius; Hoffmann, René; Lebedev, Vadim; Cimalla, Volker; Ambacher, Oliver

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical and electrical losses induced by an electrode material greatly influence the performance of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators. Graphene as a conducting and virtually massless 2D material is a suitable candidate as an alternative electrode material for BAW resonators which reduces electrode induced mechanical losses. In this publication we show that graphene acts as an active top electrode for solidly mounted BAW resonators (BAW-SMR) at 2.1 GHz resonance frequency. Due to a strong decrease of mass loading and its remarkable electronic properties, graphene demonstrates its ability as an ultrathin conductive layer. In our experiments we used an optimized graphene wet transfer on aluminum nitride-based solidly mounted resonator devices. We achieved more than a triplication of the resonator’s quality factor Q and a resonance frequency close to an ‘unloaded’ resonator without metallization. Our results reveal the direct influence of both, the graphene quality and the graphene contacting via metal structures, on the performance characteristic of a BAW resonator. These findings clearly show the potential of graphene in minimizing mechanical losses due to its virtually massless character. Moreover, they highlight the advantages of graphene and other 2D conductive materials for alternative electrodes in electroacoustic resonators for radio frequency applications.

  10. Integration of BST varactors with surface acoustic wave device by film transfer technology for tunable RF filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Hideki; Tanaka, Shuji; Kimura, Tetsuya; Koutsaroff, Ivoyl P; Kadota, Michio; Hashimoto, Ken-ya; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a film transfer process to integrate barium strontium titanate (BST) metal–insulator–metal (MIM) structures with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices on a lithium niobate (LN) substrate. A high-quality BST film grown on a Si substrate above 650 °C was patterned into the MIM structures, and transferred to a LN substrate below 130 °C by Ar-plasma-activated Au–Au bonding and the Si lost wafer process. Simple test SAW devices with the transferred BST variable capacitors (VCs) were fabricated and characterized. The resonance frequency of a one-port SAW resonator with the VC connected in series changed from 999 to 1018 MHz, when a dc bias voltage of 3 V was applied to the VC. Although the observed frequency tuning range was smaller than expected due to the degradation of BST in the process, the experimental result demonstrated that a tunable SAW filter with the transferred BST VCs was feasible. (paper)

  11. Theory and experiments on RF plasma heating, current drive and profile control in TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the main experimental and theoretical achievements related to the study of RF heating and non-inductive current drive and particularly phenomena related to the current density profile control and the potentiality of producing stationary enhanced performance regimes: description of the Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) systems; long pulse coupling performance of the RF systems; observation of the transition to the so-called ''stationary LHEP regime'' in which the (flat) central current density and (peaked) electron temperature profiles are fully decoupled; experiments on ICRF sawtooth stabilization with the combined effect of LHCD modifying the current density profile; diffusion of fast electrons generated by LH waves; ramp-up experiments in which the LH power provided a significant part of the resistive poloidal flux and flux consumption scaling; theory of spectral wave diffusion and multipass absorption; fast wave current drive modelling with the Alcyon full wave code; a reflector LH antenna concept. 18 figs., 48 refs

  12. Guided waves dispersion equations for orthotropic multilayered pipes solved using standard finite elements code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin

    2014-09-01

    The dispersion curves for hollow multilayered cylinders are prerequisites in any practical guided waves application on such structures. The equations for homogeneous isotropic materials have been established more than 120 years ago. The difficulties in finding numerical solutions to analytic expressions remain considerable, especially if the materials are orthotropic visco-elastic as in the composites used for pipes in the last decades. Among other numerical techniques, the semi-analytical finite elements method has proven its capability of solving this problem. Two possibilities exist to model a finite elements eigenvalue problem: a two-dimensional cross-section model of the pipe or a radial segment model, intersecting the layers between the inner and the outer radius of the pipe. The last possibility is here adopted and distinct differential problems are deduced for longitudinal L(0,n), torsional T(0,n) and flexural F(m,n) modes. Eigenvalue problems are deduced for the three modes classes, offering explicit forms of each coefficient for the matrices used in an available general purpose finite elements code. Comparisons with existing solutions for pipes filled with non-linear viscoelastic fluid or visco-elastic coatings as well as for a fully orthotropic hollow cylinder are all proving the reliability and ease of use of this method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fokker-Planck code for the quasi-linear absorption of electron cyclotron waves in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Krivenski, V.

    1986-01-01

    We present the solution of the kinetic equation describing the quasi-linear evolution of the electron momentum distribution function under the influence of the electron cyclotron wave absorption. Coulomb collisions and the dc electric field in a tokamak plasma. The solution of the quasi-linear equation is obtained numerically using a two-dimensional initial value code following an ADI scheme. Most emphasis is given to the full non-linear and self-consistent problem, namely, the wave amplitude is evaluated at any instant and any point in space according to the actual damping. This is necessary since wave damping is a very sensitive function of the slope of the local momentum distribution function because the resonance condition relates the electron momentum to the location of wave energy deposition. (orig.)

  14. rf experiments on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Hooke, W.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of rf experiments are being conducted on PLT in order to explore rf techniques which could improve tokamak performance parameters. Of special importance are the studies of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating, lower hybrid MHD stabilization and electron heating, down-shifted electron cyclotron heating, and fast wave current drive. Ion Bernstein wave heating results at modest power indicate that the particle confinement time could be enhanced relative to that for fast wave heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and neutral beam heating. At these power levels a conclusive determination of energy confinement scaling with power cannot yet be given. Central sawtooth and m = 1 MHD stabilization is being obtained with centrally peaked lower hybrid (LH) current drive and the central electron temperature is peaking to values (approx.5 keV) well outside the bounds of ''profile consistency.'' In this case the electron energy confinement is apparently increased relative to the ohmic value. The production of relativistic electrons via heating at the down-shifted electron cyclotron (EC) frequency is found to be consistent with theoretical predictions and lends support to the use of this method for heating in relatively high magnetic field devices

  15. RF power source for the compact linear collider test facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, G; Brown, Peter; Carron, G; Hanni, R; Mourier, J; Rossat, G; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L; Thorndahl, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility will test and demonstrate many vital components of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider). This paper describes the pulsed RF power source at 2998.55 MHz for the drive-beam accelerator (DBA), which produces a beam with an energy of 150 MeV and a current of 3.5 Amps. Where possible, existing equipment from the LEP preinjector, especially the modulators and klystrons, is being used and upgraded to achieve this goal. A high power RF pulse compression system is used at the output of each klystron, which requires sophisticated RF phase programming on the low level side to achieve the required RF pulse. In addition to the 3 GHz system two pulsed RF sources operating at 1.5 GHz are being built. The first is a wide-band, low power, travelling wave tube (TWT) for the subharmonic buncher (SHB) system that produces a train of "phase coded" subpulses as part of the injector scheme. The second is a high power narrow band system to produce 20 MW RF power to the 1.5 GHz RF deflectors in the delay loop situate...

  16. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, E. M., E-mail: eedlund@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at n{sub φ} = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of n{sub φ} spanning −50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k{sub ||} spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k{sub ||} phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that

  17. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-01-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement

  18. Direct calculation of current drive efficiency in FISIC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Bonoli, P.T.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional RF modeling codes use a parameterization (1) of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. This parameterization assumes a uniform quasi-linear diffusion coefficient and requires a priori knowledge of the wave polarizations. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient from the Kennel-Englemann form with the field polarizations calculated by the full wave code, FISIC (2). Current profiles are calculated using the adjoint formulation (3). Comparisons between the two formulations are presented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  20. Introduction to RF linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.

    1994-01-01

    The basic features of RF linear accelerators are described. The concept of the 'loaded cavity', essential for the synchronism wave-particle, is introduced, and formulae describing the action of electromagnetic fields on the beam are given. The treatment of intense beams is mentioned, and various existing linear accelerators are presented as examples. (orig.)

  1. 2D full-wave simulation of waves in space and tokamak plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Eun-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation results using a 2D full-wave code (FW2D for space and NSTX fusion plasmas are presented. The FW2D code solves the cold plasma wave equations using the finite element method. The wave code has been successfully applied to describe low frequency waves in planetary magnetospheres (i.e., dipole geometry and the results include generation and propagation of externally driven ultra-low frequency waves via mode conversion at Mercury and mode coupling, refraction and reflection of internally driven field-aligned propagating left-handed electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC waves at Earth. In this paper, global structure of linearly polarized EMIC waves is examined and the result shows such resonant wave modes can be localized near the equatorial plane. We also adopt the FW2D code to tokamak geometry and examine radio frequency (RF waves in the scape-off layer (SOL of tokamaks. By adopting the rectangular and limiter boundary, we compare the results with existing AORSA simulations. The FW2D code results for the high harmonic fast wave heating case on NSTX with a rectangular vessel boundary shows excellent agreement with the AORSA code.

  2. 2D full-wave simulation of waves in space and tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Bertelli, Nicola; Johnson, Jay; Valeo, Ernest; Hosea, Joel

    2017-10-01

    Simulation results using a 2D full-wave code (FW2D) for space and NSTX fusion plasmas are presented. The FW2D code solves the cold plasma wave equations using the finite element method. The wave code has been successfully applied to describe low frequency waves in planetary magnetospheres (i.e., dipole geometry) and the results include generation and propagation of externally driven ultra-low frequency waves via mode conversion at Mercury and mode coupling, refraction and reflection of internally driven field-aligned propagating left-handed electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves at Earth. In this paper, global structure of linearly polarized EMIC waves is examined and the result shows such resonant wave modes can be localized near the equatorial plane. We also adopt the FW2D code to tokamak geometry and examine radio frequency (RF) waves in the scape-off layer (SOL) of tokamaks. By adopting the rectangular and limiter boundary, we compare the results with existing AORSA simulations. The FW2D code results for the high harmonic fast wave heating case on NSTX with a rectangular vessel boundary shows excellent agreement with the AORSA code.

  3. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless hydrogen leak...

  4. RF engineering basic concepts: S-parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2011-01-01

    The concept of describing RF circuits in terms of waves is discussed and the S-matrix and related matrices are defined. The signal flow graph (SFG) is introduced as a graphical means to visualize how waves propagate in an RF network. The properties of the most relevant passive RF devices (hybrids, couplers, non-reciprocal elements, etc.) are delineated and the corresponding S-parameters are given. For microwave integrated circuits (MICs) planar transmission lines such as the microstrip line have become very important.

  5. Low complexity source and channel coding for mm-wave hybrid fiber-wireless links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedev, Alexander; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Pang, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    We report on the performance of channel and source coding applied for an experimentally realized hybrid fiber-wireless W-band link. Error control coding performance is presented for a wireless propagation distance of 3 m and 20 km fiber transmission. We report on peak signal-to-noise ratio perfor...

  6. Simulation of guided-wave ultrasound propagation in composite laminates: Benchmark comparisons of numerical codes and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara A C; Wheeler, Kevin R; Hafiychuk, Vasyl N; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Timuçin, Doğan A

    2018-03-01

    Ultrasonic wave methods constitute the leading physical mechanism for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of solid composite materials, such as carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates. Computational models of ultrasonic wave excitation, propagation, and scattering in CFRP composites can be extremely valuable in designing practicable NDE and SHM hardware, software, and methodologies that accomplish the desired accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and coverage. The development and application of ultrasonic simulation approaches for composite materials is an active area of research in the field of NDE. This paper presents comparisons of guided wave simulations for CFRP composites implemented using four different simulation codes: the commercial finite element modeling (FEM) packages ABAQUS, ANSYS, and COMSOL, and a custom code executing the Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT). Benchmark comparisons are made between the simulation tools and both experimental laser Doppler vibrometry data and theoretical dispersion curves. A pristine and a delamination type case (Teflon insert in the experimental specimen) is studied. A summary is given of the accuracy of simulation results and the respective computational performance of the four different simulation tools. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Computation of Acoustic Waves Through Sliding-Zone Interfaces Using an Euler/Navier-Stokes Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of a patched sliding-zone interface on the transmission of acoustic waves is examined for two- and three-dimensional model problems. A simple but general interpolation scheme at the patched boundary passes acoustic waves without distortion, provided that a sufficiently small time step is taken. A guideline is provided for the maximum permissible time step or zone speed that gives an acceptable error introduced by the sliding-zone interface.

  8. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfvén Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Pinsker, R. I.; Wright, J.

    2005-09-01

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfvén wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement.

  9. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses ...

  10. Simulation of TunneLadder traveling-wave tube cold-test characteristics: Implementation of the three-dimensional, electromagnetic circuit analysis code micro-SOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional, electromagnetic circuit analysis code, Micro-SOS, can be used to reduce expensive time-consuming experimental 'cold-testing' of traveling-wave tube (TWT) circuits. The frequency-phase dispersion characteristics and beam interaction impedance of a TunneLadder traveling-wave tube slow-wave structure were simulated using the code. When reasonable dimensional adjustments are made, computer results agree closely with experimental data. Modifications to the circuit geometry that would make the TunneLadder TWT easier to fabricate for higher frequency operation are explored.

  11. Efficient full wave code for the coupling of large multirow multijunction LH grills.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Hillairet, J.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Urban, Jakub; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 116060. ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : lower hybrid waves * coupling * large multirow multijunction grills * tokamak * full-wave Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa7f4f/meta

  12. Interferenceless coded aperture correlation holography-a new technique for recording incoherent digital holograms without two-wave interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, A; Rosen, Joseph

    2017-06-12

    Recording digital holograms without wave interference simplifies the optical systems, increases their power efficiency and avoids complicated aligning procedures. We propose and demonstrate a new technique of digital hologram acquisition without two-wave interference. Incoherent light emitted from an object propagates through a random-like coded phase mask and recorded directly without interference by a digital camera. In the training stage of the system, a point spread hologram (PSH) is first recorded by modulating the light diffracted from a point object by the coded phase masks. At least two different masks should be used to record two different intensity distributions at all possible axial locations. The various recorded patterns at every axial location are superposed in the computer to obtain a complex valued PSH library cataloged to its axial location. Following the training stage, an object is placed within the axial boundaries of the PSH library and the light diffracted from the object is once again modulated by the same phase masks. The intensity patterns are recorded and superposed exactly as the PSH to yield a complex hologram of the object. The object information at any particular plane is reconstructed by a cross-correlation between the complex valued hologram and the appropriate element of the PSH library. The characteristics and the performance of the proposed system were compared with an equivalent regular imaging system.

  13. The Modularized Software Package ASKI - Full Waveform Inversion Based on Waveform Sensitivity Kernels Utilizing External Seismic Wave Propagation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present the modularized software package ASKI which is a flexible and extendable toolbox for seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as sensitivity or resolution analysis operating on the sensitivity matrix. It utilizes established wave propagation codes for solving the forward problem and offers an alternative to the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have typically been written for solving inverse problems. It is available under the GPL at www.rub.de/aski. The Gauss-Newton FWI method for 3D-heterogeneous elastic earth models is based on waveform sensitivity kernels and can be applied to inverse problems at various spatial scales in both Cartesian and spherical geometries. The kernels are derived in the frequency domain from Born scattering theory as the Fréchet derivatives of linearized full waveform data functionals, quantifying the influence of elastic earth model parameters on the particular waveform data values. As an important innovation, we keep two independent spatial descriptions of the earth model - one for solving the forward problem and one representing the inverted model updates. Thereby we account for the independent needs of spatial model resolution of forward and inverse problem, respectively. Due to pre-integration of the kernels over the (in general much coarser) inversion grid, storage requirements for the sensitivity kernels are dramatically reduced.ASKI can be flexibly extended to other forward codes by providing it with specific interface routines that contain knowledge about forward code-specific file formats and auxiliary information provided by the new forward code. In order to sustain flexibility, the ASKI tools must communicate via file output/input, thus large storage capacities need to be accessible in a convenient way. Storing the complete sensitivity matrix to file, however, permits the scientist full manual control over each step in a customized procedure of sensitivity/resolution analysis and full

  14. BBU code development for high-power microwave generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, T.L.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a two-dimensional, time-dependent computer code for the simulation of transverse instabilities in support of relativistic klystron-two beam accelerator research at LLNL. The code addresses transient effects as well as both cumulative and regenerative beam breakup modes. Although designed specifically for the transport of high current (kA) beams through traveling-wave structures, it is applicable to devices consisting of multiple combinations of standing-wave, traveling-wave, and induction accelerator structures. In this paper we compare code simulations to analytical solutions for the case where there is no rf coupling between cavities, to theoretical scaling parameters for coupled cavity structures, and to experimental data involving beam breakup in the two traveling-wave output structure of our microwave generator. (Author) 4 figs., tab., 5 refs

  15. Recent Improvements to the IMPACT-T Parallel Particle Tracking Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, J.; Pogorelov, I.V.; Ryne, R.

    2006-01-01

    The IMPACT-T code is a parallel three-dimensional quasi-static beam dynamics code for modeling high brightness beams in photoinjectors and RF linacs. Developed under the US DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, it includes several key features including a self-consistent calculation of 3D space-charge forces using a shifted and integrated Green function method, multiple energy bins for beams with large energy spread, and models for treating RF standing wave and traveling wave structures. In this paper, we report on recent improvements to the IMPACT-T code including modeling traveling wave structures, short-range transverse and longitudinal wakefields, and longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation through bending magnets

  16. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  17. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm 2 . Probe measurements reveal that within 30 μs an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column

  18. Multi-level RF identification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  19. Directions for rf-controlled intelligent microvalve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Stefan; Varadan, Vijay K.; Abbott, Derek

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the novel concept of a Radio Frequency (RF) controllable microvalve for different medical applications. Wireless communication via a Surface Acoustic Wave Identification-mark (SAW ID-tag) is used to control, drive and locate the microvalve inside the human body. The energy required for these functions is provided by RF pulses, which are transmitted to the valve and back by a reader/transmitter system outside of the body. These RF bursts are converted into Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), which propagate along the piezoelectric actuator material of the microvalve. These waves cause deflections, which are employed to open and close the microvalve. We identified five important areas of application of the microvalve in biomedicine: 1) fertility control; 2) artificial venous valves; 3) flow cytometry; 4) drug delivery and 5) DNA mapping.

  20. Operational Performance and Improvements to the RF Power Sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  1. Operational performance and improvements to the rf power sources for the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    McMonagle, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    The CERN CTF3 facility is being used to test and demonstrate key technical issues for the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study. Pulsed RF power sources are essential elements in this test facility. Klystrons at S-band (29998.55 GHz), in conjunction with pulse compression systems, are used to power the Drive Beam Accelerator (DBA) to achieve an electron beam energy of 150 MeV. The L-Band RF system, includes broadband Travelling Wave Tubes (TWTs) for beam bunching with 'phase coded' sub pulses in the injector and a narrow band high power L-Band klystron powering the transverse 1.5 GHz RF deflector in the Delay Loop immediately after the DBA. This paper describes these different systems and discusses their operational performance.

  2. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  3. Alfven wave experiments in the Phaedrus-T tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Probert, P.; Moroz, P.; Intrator, T.; Breun, R.; Brouchous, D.; Che, H.Y.; DeKock, J.R.; Diebold, D.; Doczy, M.; Fonck, R.; Hershkowitz, N.; Johnson, R.D.; Kishinevsky, M.; McKee, G.; Meyer, J.; Nonn, P.; Oliva, S.P.; Pew, J.; Sorensen, J.; Tanaka, T.; Vukovic, M.; Winz, G.

    1993-01-01

    Heating in the Alfven resonant regime has been demonstrated in the Phaedrus-T tokamak [Fusion Technol. 19, 1327 (1991)]. Electron heating during injection of radio-frequency (rf) power is indicated by a 30%--40% drop in loop voltage and modifications in sawtooth activity. Heating was observed at a frequency ω rf ∼0.7Ω i on axis, using a two-strap fast wave antenna operated at 7 and 9.2 MHz with 180 degree phasing (N parallel ∼100). Numerical modeling with the fast wave code FASTWA [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 417 (1991)] indicates that for Phaedrus-T parameters the kinetic Alfven wave is excited via mode conversion from a surface fast wave at the Alfven resonance and is subsequently damped on electrons

  4. RF characterization and testing of ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jose, Mentes; Singh, G.N. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Girish [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076,India (India); Bhagwat, P.V. [Ion Accelerator Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-01

    RF characterization of rectangular to ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers has been carried out by connecting them back to back. Rectangular waveguide to N type adapters are first calibrated by TRL method and then used for RF measurements. Detailed information is obtained about their RF behavior by measurements and full wave simulations. It is shown that the two transitions can be characterized and tuned for required return loss at design frequency of 352.2 MHz. This opens the possibility of testing and conditioning two transitions together on a test bench. Finally, a RF coupler based on these transitions is coupled to an accelerator cavity. The power coupler is successfully tested up to 200 kW, 352.2 MHz with 0.2% duty cycle.

  5. RF sheaths for arbitrary B field angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James

    2014-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries and accelerate electrons out of the plasma. Sheath effects reduce the efficiency of ICRF heating, cause RF-specific impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and increase the plasma-facing component damage. The rf sheath potential is sensitive to the angle between the B field and the wall, the ion mobility and the ion magnetization. Here, we obtain a numerical solution of the non-neutral rf sheath and magnetic pre-sheath equations (for arbitrary values of these parameters) and attempt to infer the parametric dependences of the Child-Langmuir law. This extends previous work on the magnetized, immobile ion regime. An important question is how the rf sheath voltage distributes itself between sheath and pre-sheath for various B field angles. This will show how generally previous estimates of the rf sheath voltage and capacitance were reasonable, and to improve the RF sheath BC. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  6. Prototype rf cavity for the HISTRAP accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosko, S.W.; Dowling, D.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring designed to both accelerate and decelerate very highly charged very heavy ions for atomic physics research, requires an rf accelerating system to provide /+-/2.5 kV of peak accelerating voltage per turn while tuning through a 13.5:1 frequency range in a fraction of a second. A prototype half-wave, single gap rf cavity with biased ferrite tuning was built and tested over a continuous tuning range of 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. Initial test results establish the feasibility of using ferrite tuning at the required rf power levels. The resonant system is located entirely outside of the accelerator's 15cm ID beam line vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window which serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and the beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line at 300/degree/C

  7. OpenSWPC: an open-source integrated parallel simulation code for modeling seismic wave propagation in 3D heterogeneous viscoelastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Takuto; Takemura, Shunsuke; Furumura, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    We have developed an open-source software package, Open-source Seismic Wave Propagation Code (OpenSWPC), for parallel numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation in 3D and 2D (P-SV and SH) viscoelastic media based on the finite difference method in local-to-regional scales. This code is equipped with a frequency-independent attenuation model based on the generalized Zener body and an efficient perfectly matched layer for absorbing boundary condition. A hybrid-style programming using OpenMP and the Message Passing Interface (MPI) is adopted for efficient parallel computation. OpenSWPC has wide applicability for seismological studies and great portability to allowing excellent performance from PC clusters to supercomputers. Without modifying the code, users can conduct seismic wave propagation simulations using their own velocity structure models and the necessary source representations by specifying them in an input parameter file. The code has various modes for different types of velocity structure model input and different source representations such as single force, moment tensor and plane-wave incidence, which can easily be selected via the input parameters. Widely used binary data formats, the Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) and the Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) are adopted for the input of the heterogeneous structure model and the outputs of the simulation results, so users can easily handle the input/output datasets. All codes are written in Fortran 2003 and are available with detailed documents in a public repository.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  9. RF guns: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travier, C.

    1990-06-01

    Free Electron Lasers and future linear colliders require very bright electron beams. Conventional injectors made of DC guns and RF bunchers have intrinsic limitations. The recently proposed RF guns have already proven their capability to produce bright beams. The necessary effort to improve further these performances and to gain reliability is now undertaken by many laboratories. More than twenty RF gun projects both thermionic and laser-driven are reviewed. Their specific characteristics are outlined and their nominal performances are given

  10. An algorithm for the design and tuning of RF accelerating structures with variable cell lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    An algorithm is proposed for the design of a π mode standing wave buncher structure with variable cell lengths. It employs a two-parameter, multi-step approach for the design of the structure with desired resonant frequency and field flatness. The algorithm, along with analytical scaling laws for the design of the RF power coupling slot, makes it possible to accurately design the structure employing a freely available electromagnetic code like SUPERFISH. To compensate for machining errors, a tuning method has been devised to achieve desired RF parameters for the structure, which has been qualified by the successful tuning of a 7-cell buncher to π mode frequency of 2856 MHz with field flatness algorithm and tuning method have demonstrated the feasibility of developing an S-band accelerating structure for desired RF parameters with a relatively relaxed machining tolerance of ∼ 25 μm. This paper discusses the algorithm for the design and tuning of an RF accelerating structure with variable cell lengths.

  11. Coherence-Multiplexed Optical RF Feeder Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Arjan; Taniman, R.O.; van Etten, Wim

    2007-01-01

    An optical RF feeding system for wireless access is proposed, in which the radio access points are distinguished by means of coherence multiplexing (CM). CM is a rather unknown and potentially inexpensive optical code division multiple access technique, which is particularly suitable for relatively

  12. Measurements of loop antenna loading in RF heating experiments on the KT-5C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Kan; Deng Bihe; Wen Yizhi; Wan Shude; Liu Wandong; Yu Wen; Yu Changxun

    1997-01-01

    A new method to measure the loop antenna loadings in the RF wave heating experiments (IBWH at reasonable RF power with relatively low frequency) on the KT-5C device is presented. The method is characterized by determining the RF current ratio only, so it eases the needs of instruments and simplifies the requirements for calibration and data processing in the experiments

  13. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  14. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-cell Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgashev, Valery A; Higo, Toshiyasu; Nantista, Christopher D; Tantawi, Sami G

    2005-01-01

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials an...

  15. RF and microwave engineering fundamentals of wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Gustrau, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This book provides a fundamental and practical introduction to radio frequency and microwave engineering and physical aspects of wireless communication In this book, the author addresses a wide range of radio-frequency and microwave topics with emphasis on physical aspects including EM and voltage waves, transmission lines, passive circuits, antennas, radio wave propagation. Up-to-date RF design tools like RF circuit simulation, EM simulation and computerized smith charts, are used in various examples to demonstrate how these methods can be applied effectively in RF engineering

  16. Resistivity effects in non-inductive RF current drive via helicity injection by Alfven waves: the case of conventional and small aspect ratio Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.; Komoshvili, K.

    1996-01-01

    Supplementary non-inductive current drive and heating are necessary to bring Tokamak plasmas into the ignition regime. The resonant excitation of shear Alfven waves (SAW) - in the continuum range (CR) or/and in the discrete global Alfven eigenmode spectrum (GAE's) - represents one potential, suitable method for this purpose. Within the framework of ideal MHD, the current drive (CD) via helicity injection in Tokamak plasmas has been considered by Cuperman et al (1996) and Komoshvili et al. (1996). This work is concerned with the investigation of the non-ideal resistive MHD effects on both the excitation of SAW's (CR's and GAE's) and the generation of non-inductive current drive via helicity injection in Tokamak plasmas. The research covers Tokamak aspect ratios ranging between large value cases (R/a = 10) and the very tight value case (R/ a = 1.2). (authors)

  17. EM modeling of RF drive in DTL tank 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2012-01-01

    A 3-D MicroWave Studio model for the RF drive in the LANSCE DTL tank 4 has been built. Both eigensolver and time-domain modeling are used to evaluate maximal fields in the drive module and RF coupling. The LANSCE DTL tank 4 has recently been experiencing RF problems, which may or may not be related to its replaced RF coupler. This situation stimulated a request by Dan Rees to provide EM modeling of the RF drive in the DTL tank 4 (T4). Jim O'Hara provided a CAD model that was imported into the CST Microwave Studio (MWS) and after some modifications became a part of a simplified MWS model of the T4 RF drive. This technical note describes the model and presents simulation results.

  18. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  19. Modelling of radio frequency sheath and fast wave coupling on the realistic ion cyclotron resonant antenna surroundings and the outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L.; Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Després, B.; Heuraux, S.; Faudot, E.; Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Křivská, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.

    2018-03-01

    In order to model the sheath rectification in a realistic geometry over the size of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) antennas, the self-consistent sheaths and waves for ICH (SSWICH) code couples self-consistently the RF wave propagation and the DC SOL biasing via nonlinear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions applied at plasma/wall interfaces. A first version of SSWICH had 2D (toroidal and radial) geometry, rectangular walls either normal or parallel to the confinement magnetic field B 0 and only included the evanescent slow wave (SW) excited parasitically by the ICRH antenna. The main wave for plasma heating, the fast wave (FW) plays no role on the sheath excitation in this version. A new version of the code, 2D SSWICH-full wave, was developed based on the COMSOL software, to accommodate full RF field polarization and shaped walls tilted with respect to B 0 . SSWICH-full wave simulations have shown the mode conversion of FW into SW occurring at the sharp corners where the boundary shape varies rapidly. It has also evidenced ‘far-field’ sheath oscillations appearing at the shaped walls with a relatively long magnetic connection length to the antenna, that are only accessible to the propagating FW. Joint simulation, conducted by SSWICH-full wave within a multi-2D approach excited using the 3D wave coupling code (RAPLICASOL), has recovered the double-hump poloidal structure measured in the experimental temperature and potential maps when only the SW is modelled. The FW contribution on the potential poloidal structure seems to be affected by the 3D effects, which was ignored in the current stage. Finally, SSWICH-full wave simulation revealed the left-right asymmetry that has been observed extensively in the unbalanced strap feeding experiments, suggesting that the spatial proximity effects in RF sheath excitation, studied for SW only previously, is still important in the vicinity of the wave launcher under full wave polarizations.

  20. Rf power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports on RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach will be with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. The author pays close attention to electron- positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. Circular machines, cyclotrons, synchrotrons, etc. have usually not been limited by the RF power available and the machine builders have usually had their RF power source requirements met off the shelf. The main challenge for the RF scientist has been then in the areas of controls. An interesting example of this is in the Conceptual Design Report of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) where the RF system is described in six pages of text in a 700-page report. Also, the cost of that RF system is about one-third of a percent of the project's total cost. The RF system is well within the state of the art and no new power sources need to be developed. All the intellectual effort of the system designer would be devoted to the feedback systems necessary to stabilize beams during storage and acceleration, with the main engineering challenges (and costs) being in the superconducting magnet lattice

  1. RF Energy Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1980-02-01

    The RF Energy Compressor, REC described here, transforms cw rf into periodic pulses using an energy storage cavity, ESC, whose charging is controlled by 180 0 bi-phase modulation, PSK, and external Q switching, βs. Compression efficiency, C/sub e/, of 100% can be approached at any compression factor C/sub f/

  2. High gradient RF breakdown study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Hanna, S.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and UC Davis have been investigating high gradient RF breakdown and its effects on pulse shortening in high energy microwave devices. RF breakdown is a critical issue in the development of high power microwave sources and next generation linear accelerators since it limits the output power of microwave sources and the accelerating gradient of linacs. The motivation of this research is to find methods to increase the breakdown threshold level in X-band structures by reducing dark current. Emphasis is focused on improved materials, surface finish, and cleanliness. The test platform for this research is a traveling wave resonant ring. A 30 MW klystron is employed to provide up to 300 MW of traveling wave power in the ring to trigger breakdown in the cavity. Five TM 01 cavities have previously been tested, each with a different combination of surface polish and/or coating. The onset of breakdown was extended up to 250 MV/m with a TiN surface finish, as compared to 210 MV/m for uncoated OFE copper. Although the TiN coating was helpful in depressing the field emission, the lowest dark current was obtained with a 1 microinch surface finish, single-point diamond-turned cavity

  3. Measurements in Regions of Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction from Mach 3 to 10 for Open and Blind Code Evaluation/Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    34Blind" Code Evaluation/Validation Michael S. Holden, Timothy P. Wadhams, Matthew G. MacLean, Aaron Dufrene CUBRC , Inc March 2013 Final...298 Back (Rev. 8/98) *Fellow, AIAA, Vice President-Hypersonics, CUBRC , 4455 Genesee Street, Buffalo, NY 14225 ** Member, AIAA, Project Engineers... CUBRC , 4455 Genesee Street, Buffalo, NY 14225 This work was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-11-1-0290 MEASUREMENTS IN REGIONS OF SHOCK WAVE

  4. RF MEMS theory, design, and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Rebeiz, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasmall Radio Frequency and Micro-wave Microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMs), such as switches, varactors, and phase shifters, exhibit nearly zero power consumption or loss. For this reason, they are being developed intensively by corporations worldwide for use in telecommunications equipment. This book acquaints readers with the basics of RF MEMs and describes how to design practical circuits and devices with them. The author, an acknowledged expert in the field, presents a range of real-world applications and shares many valuable tricks of the trade.

  5. Neoclassical effects on RF current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, K.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Neoclassical effects on RF current drive which arise because of the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in tokamak devices are analysed. A bounce averaged 2-D Fokker-Planck equation is derived from the drift kinetic equation and is solved numerically. The model features current drive due to a strong RF wave field. The efficiency of current drive by electron cyclotron waves is significantly reduced when the waves are absorbed at the low magnetic field side of a given flux surface, whereas the efficiency remains at the same level as in the homogeneous ideal plasma when the waves are absorbed at the high field side. The efficiency of current drive by fast waves (compressional Alfven waves) with low phase velocity (vsub(parallel)/vsub(th)<1) is significantly degraded by neoclassical effects, no matter where the wave is absorbed, and the applicability of this wave seems, therefore, to be doubtful. (author)

  6. Effect of Energetic Trapped Particles Produced by ICRF Wave Heating on Sawtooth Instability in the DIII-D Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Chu, M. S.; Lao, L. L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Turnbull, A. D.; Jeon, Y. M.; Li, G.; Ren, Q.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of the Porcelli sawtooth model using more realistic numerical models from the ORBIT-RF and GATO codes in DIII-D fast wave heating experiments. Simulation results confirm that the fast wave-induced energetic trapped particles may stabilize the sawtooth instability. The crucial kinetic stabilizing contribution strongly depends on both the experimentally reconstructed magnetic shear at the q = 1 surface and the calculated poloidal beta of energetic trapped particles inside the q = 1 surface

  7. RF current generation near the ion cyclotron frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment has been conducted to measure unipolar currents driven by directional radio frequency waves in a cylindrical plasma mirror machine near the ion cyclotron frequency. The directional waves were launched using a four phase helical coupler which allowed the selection of both azimuthal mode number (m = +1) and direction of wave propagation. Plasma diagnostics include electron density measurements (4 mm microwave interferometer), electron temperature measurements (floating double probe), wave amplitude and coupling measurements (magnetic probes). RF power measurements (RF voltage and current probes) and RF driven plasma current measurements (Rogowski loops and current transformers). End electrodes provided a necessary external return path and an alternate method for measuring the current. Theoretical work includes an analytic approximation to the nonlinear problem of a particle in a traveling wave and computer simulations that extend this result. Nonlinear particle drifts other than trapping were found both with and without the presence of particle collisions

  8. Development of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of high power RF source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K. H.; Lee, K. O.; Shin, H. M.; Chung, I. Y. [KAPRA, Seoul (Korea); Kim, D. I. [Inha University, Incheon (Korea); Noh, S. J. [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Ko, S. K. [Ulsan University, Ulsan (Korea); Lee, H. J. [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea); Choi, W. H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    This study was performed with objective to design and develop the KOMAC proton accelerator RF system. For the development of the high power RF source for CCDTL(coupled cavity drift tube linac), the medium power RF system using the UHF klystron for broadcasting was integrated and with this RF system we obtained the basic design data, operation experience and code-validity test data. Based on the medium power RF system experimental data, the high power RF system for CCDTL was designed and its performed was analyzed. 16 refs., 64 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  9. Pulsed RF Sources for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the workshop on pulsed RF sources for linear colliders. The workshop examined the performance of RF sources for possible future linear colliders. Important sources were presented on new type of klystrons, gyrotrons and gyroklystrons. A number of auxiliary topics were covered, including modulators, pulse compression, power extraction, windows, electron guns and gun codes. The workshop was sponsored by the International Committee for Future Accelerators(ICFA), the U.S. Department of Energy and the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. There were forty one papers presented at the workshop and all forty one have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  10. Modelling of plasma-antenna coupling and non-linear radio frequency wave-plasma-wall interactions in the magnetized plasma device under ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, LingFeng

    2016-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) by waves in 30-80 MHz range is currently used in magnetic fusion plasmas. Excited by phased arrays of current straps at the plasma periphery, these waves exist under two polarizations. The Fast Wave tunnels through the tenuous plasma edge and propagates to its center where it is absorbed. The parasitically emitted Slow Wave only exists close to the launchers. How much power can be coupled to the center with 1 A current on the straps? How do the emitted radiofrequency (RF) near and far fields interact parasitically with the edge plasma via RF sheath rectification at plasma-wall interfaces? To address these two issues simultaneously, in realistic geometry over the size of ICRH antennas, this thesis upgraded and tested the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for ICH (SSWICH) code. SSWICH couples self-consistently RF wave propagation and Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via non-linear RF and DC sheath boundary conditions (SBCs) at plasma/wall interfaces. Its upgrade is full wave and was implemented in two dimensions (toroidal/radial). New SBCs coupling the two polarizations were derived and implemented along shaped walls tilted with respect to the confinement magnetic field. Using this new tool in the absence of SBCs, we studied the impact of a density decaying continuously inside the antenna box and across the Lower Hybrid (LH) resonance. Up to the memory limits of our workstation, the RF fields below the LH resonance changed with the grid size. However the coupled power spectrum hardly evolved and was only weakly affected by the density inside the box. In presence of SBCs, SSWICH-FW simulations have identified the role of the fast wave on RF sheath excitation and reproduced some key experimental observations. SSWICH-FW was finally adapted to conduct the first electromagnetic and RF-sheath 2D simulations of the cylindrical magnetized plasma device ALINE. (author) [fr

  11. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  12. X-Band RF Gun Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  13. Versatile rf controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.

    1985-05-01

    The low level rf system developed for the new Bevatron local injector provides precise control and regulation of the rf phase and amplitude for three 200 MHz linac cavities. The main features of the system are: extensive use of inexpensive, off-the-shelf components, ease of maintenance, and adaptability to a wide range of operation frequencies. The system utilizes separate function, easily removed rf printed circuit cards interconnected via the edge connectors. Control and monitoring are available both locally and through the computer. This paper will describe these features as well as the few component changes that would be required to adapt the techniques to other operating frequencies. 2 refs

  14. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a π mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note (1).

  15. Computational Tools for RF Structure Design

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2004-01-01

    The Finite Differences Method and the Finite Element Method are the two principally employed numerical methods in modern RF field simulation programs. The basic ideas behind these methods are explained, with regard to available simulation programs. We then go through a list of characteristic parameters of RF structures, explaining how they can be calculated using these tools. With the help of these parameters, we introduce the frequency-domain and the time-domain calculations, leading to impedances and wake-fields, respectively. Subsequently, we present some readily available computer programs, which are in use for RF structure design, stressing their distinctive features and limitations. One final example benchmarks the precision of different codes for calculating the eigenfrequency and Q of a simple cavity resonator.

  16. The analysis of Alfven wave current drive and plasma heating in TCABR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchko, L.F.; Lerche, E.A.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Elfimov, A.G.; Nascimento, I.C.; Sa, W.P. de; Sanada, E.; Elizondo, J.I.; Ferreira, A.A.; Saettone, E.A.; Severo, J.H.F.; Bellintani, V.; Usuriaga, O.N.

    2002-01-01

    The results of experiments on Alfven wave current drive and plasma heating in the TCABR tokamak are analyzed with the help of a numerical code for simulation of the diffusion of the toroidal electric field. It permits to find radial distributions of plasma current density and conductivity, which match the experimentally measured total plasma current and loop voltage changes, and thus to study the performance of the RF system during Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive experiments. Regimes with efficient RF power input in TCABR have been analyzed and revealed the possibility of noninductive current generation with magnitudes up to ∼8 kA. The increase of plasma energy content due to RF power input is consistent with the diamagnetic measurements. (author)

  17. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003548.htm Rheumatoid factor (RF) To use the sharing features on this ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  18. RF radiation safety handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, Ronald.

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency radiation can be dangerous in a number of ways. Hazards include electromagnetic compatibility and interference, electro-explosive vapours and devices, and direct effects on the human body. This book is a general introduction to the sources and nature of RF radiation. It describes the ways in which our current knowledge, based on relevant safety standards, can be used to safeguard people from any harmful effects of RF radiation. The book is designed for people responsible for, or concerned with, safety. This target audience will primarily be radio engineers, but includes those skilled in other disciplines including medicine, chemistry or mechanical engineering. The book covers the problems of RF safety management, including the use of measuring instruments and methods, and a review of current safety standards. The implications for RF design engineers are also examined. (Author)

  19. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a superconducting slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first superconducting heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System). The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop superconducting RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the linac has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began developing of superconducting RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. The two divisions collaborate in work on several applications of RF superconductivity, and also in work to develop the technology generally. The present report briefly describes major features of the superconducting heavy-ion linac (very-low-velocity superconducting linac, positive ion injector), proton accelerating structures (superconducting resonant cavities for acceleration of high-current proton and deuteron beams, RF properties of oxide superconductors), and future work. Both divisions expect to continue a variety of studies, frequently in collaboration, to advance the basic technology of RF superconductivity. (N.K.)

  20. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  1. Rf power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs

  2. RF Measurement Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the radiofrequency (RF) and microwave ranges, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this article the fundamentals of the RF signal techniques are discussed. The key element in these front ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as a RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analyses has a ra ther complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown as well as a brief discussion of commonly used noise-measurement techniques. In a further part of this article the operating principles of n...

  3. A PIC-MCC code RFdinity1d for simulation of discharge initiation by ICRF antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripský, M.; Wauters, T.; Lyssoivan, A.; Bobkov, V.; Schneider, P. A.; Stepanov, I.; Douai, D.; Van Eester, D.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Van Schoor, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-12-01

    Discharges produced and sustained by ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves in absence of plasma current will be used on ITER for (ion cyclotron-) wall conditioning (ICWC, Te = 3{-}5 eV, ne 18 m-3 ). In this paper, we present the 1D particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) RFdinity1d for the study the breakdown phase of ICRF discharges, and its dependency on the RF discharge parameters (i) antenna input power P i , (ii) RF frequency f, (iii) shape of the electric field and (iv) the neutral gas pressure pH_2 . The code traces the motion of both electrons and ions in a narrow bundle of magnetic field lines close to the antenna straps. The charged particles are accelerated in the parallel direction with respect to the magnetic field B T by two electric fields: (i) the vacuum RF field of the ICRF antenna E_z^RF and (ii) the electrostatic field E_zP determined by the solution of Poisson’s equation. The electron density evolution in simulations follows exponential increase, {\\dot{n_e} ∼ ν_ion t } . The ionization rate varies with increasing electron density as different mechanisms become important. The charged particles are affected solely by the antenna RF field E_z^RF at low electron density ({ne < 1011} m-3 , {≤ft \\vert E_z^RF \\right \\vert \\gg ≤ft \\vert E_zP \\right \\vert } ). At higher densities, when the electrostatic field E_zP is comparable to the antenna RF field E_z^RF , the ionization frequency reaches the maximum. Plasma oscillations propagating toroidally away from the antenna are observed. The simulated energy distributions of ions and electrons at {ne ∼ 1015} m-3 correspond a power-law Kappa energy distribution. This energy distribution was also observed in NPA measurements at ASDEX Upgrade in ICWC experiments.

  4. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  5. The RF system of FELI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Y.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A.; Abe, H.; Keishi, T.; Bessho, I.; Tomimasu, T.

    1994-01-01

    FELI (Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a Free Electron Laser facility covering from 20 μm (infra red region) to 0.35 μm (ultra violet region), using an S-band linac. The building will be completed in November 1993 and installation of the linac will start in December 1993. The linac consists of a thermoionic 0.5ns-pulse triggered gun, a 714 MHz SHB (subharmonic buncher), a 2856 MHz standing wave type buncher, and 7 ETL (Electrotechnical Laboratory) type accelerating sections. An RF system of the linac for FELs is required of long pulse duration and high stability. S-band klystrons (TOSHIBA E3729) are operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power); 24 μs - 24 MW, 12.5 μs - 34 MW, 0.5 μs - 70 MW. Each klystron modulator has the PFN consisting of 4 parallel networks of 24 capacitors and 24 inductors, and it has a line switch of an optical thyristor stack. These equipments are manufactured now, and an S-band klystron and modulator will be combined to test their performance at the works of NISSIN ELECTRIC Co. in October 1993. (author)

  6. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  7. Comparison Of RF Cavity Transport Models For BBU Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilkyoung; Yunn, Byung; Satogata, Todd; Ahmed, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  8. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-01-01

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities

  9. Conductivity of rf-heated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-05-01

    The electron velocity distribution of rf-heated plasma may be so far from Maxwellian that Spitzer conductivity no longer holds. A new conductivity for such plasmas is derived and the result can be put in a remarkably general form. The new expression should be of great practical value in examining schemes for current ramp-up in tokamaks by means of lower-hybrid or other waves

  10. Trends in RF-structure research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, H.

    1995-01-01

    New trends in RF structure research are presented. The choice is limited to developments as they are required by the next generation of light sources, particle factories and linear colliders. Therefore, emphasis is put on the suppression of higher order modes either in standing or travelling wave resonators and on the development of superconducting cavities. Finally, a brand new development of very high frequency structures with planar geometry suited for fabrication by lithography is mentioned. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. Investigation of RF-enhanced plasma potentials on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoukov, R., E-mail: ochoukov@psfc.mit.edu [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Whyte, D.G.; Brunner, D. [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cziegler, I. [Center for Energy Research, UCSD, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B. [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Myra, J. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue P-5, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Terry, J.; Wukitch, S. [PSFC MIT, NW17, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Radio frequency (RF) sheath rectification is a leading mechanism suspected of causing anomalously high erosion of plasma facing materials in RF-heated plasmas on Alcator C-Mod. An extensive experimental survey of the plasma potential (Φ{sub P}) in RF-heated discharges on C-Mod reveals that significant Φ{sub P} enhancement (>100 V) is found on outboard limiter surfaces, both mapped and not mapped to active RF antennas. Surfaces that magnetically map to active RF antennas show Φ{sub P} enhancement that is, in part, consistent with the recently proposed slow wave rectification mechanism. Surfaces that do not map to active RF antennas also experience significant Φ{sub P} enhancement, which strongly correlates with the local fast wave intensity. In this case, fast wave rectification is a leading candidate mechanism responsible for the observed enhancement.

  12. Investigation of RF-enhanced plasma potentials on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D.G.; Brunner, D.; Cziegler, I.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Myra, J.; Terry, J.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) sheath rectification is a leading mechanism suspected of causing anomalously high erosion of plasma facing materials in RF-heated plasmas on Alcator C-Mod. An extensive experimental survey of the plasma potential (Φ P ) in RF-heated discharges on C-Mod reveals that significant Φ P enhancement (>100 V) is found on outboard limiter surfaces, both mapped and not mapped to active RF antennas. Surfaces that magnetically map to active RF antennas show Φ P enhancement that is, in part, consistent with the recently proposed slow wave rectification mechanism. Surfaces that do not map to active RF antennas also experience significant Φ P enhancement, which strongly correlates with the local fast wave intensity. In this case, fast wave rectification is a leading candidate mechanism responsible for the observed enhancement

  13. Sampling procedures using optical-data and partial wave cross sections in a Monte Carlo code for simulating kilovolt electron and positron transport in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Salvat, F.; Liljequist, D.

    1994-09-01

    The details of a Monte Carlo code for computing the penetration and energy loss of electrons and positrons in solids are described. The code, intended for electrons and positrons with energies from ∼ 100 eV to ∼ 100 keV, is based on the simulation of individual elastic and inelastic collisions. Elastic collisions are simulated using differential cross sections computed by the relativistic partial wave method applied to a muffin-tin Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Slater potential. Inelastic collisions are simulated by means of a model based on optical and photoelectric data, which are extended to the non-zero momentum transfer region by means of somewhat different algorithms for valence electron excitations and inner-shell excitations. This report focuses on the description of detailed formulae and sampling methods. 10 refs, 3 figs, 8 tabs

  14. Electromagnetic simulations of JET ICRF ITER-like antenna with TOPICA and SSWICH asymptotic codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Křivská Alena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-megawatt Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF heating is routinely used in the JET tokamak. To increase the ICRF heating power available from the A2 antennas, the ICRF ITER-Like Antenna (ILA was reinstalled for the 2015 JET ITER-like wall experimental campaign. The application of high levels of ICRF power typically results in increased plasma wall interaction which leads to the observation of enhanced influx of metallic impurities in the plasma edge. It is assumed that the impurity production is mainly driven by the parallel component of the Radio-Frequency (RF antenna electric near-field, E// (parallel to the confinement magnetic field of the tokamak, that is rectified in a thin boundary layer (RF sheath. Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna (TOPICA code was used to compute E// field maps in front of the ILA and between its poloidal limiters in the presence of plasma using measured density profiles and various antenna feedings. E// field maps calculated between the poloidal limiters were used to estimate the poloidal distribution of RF-sheath Direct Current (DC potential in this private region of the ILA and make relative comparison of various antenna electrical settings. For this purpose we used the asymptotic version of the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating Slow-Wave (SSWICH-SW code. These estimations can help to study the formation of RF sheaths around the antenna and even at distant locations (∼3m away.

  15. Modeling accelerator structures and RF components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K., Ng, C.K.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1993-03-01

    Computer modeling has become an integral part of the design and analysis of accelerator structures RF components. Sophisticated 3D codes, powerful workstations and timely theory support all contributed to this development. We will describe our modeling experience with these resources and discuss their impact on ongoing work at SLAC. Specific examples from R ampersand D on a future linear collide and a proposed e + e - storage ring will be included

  16. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrassie, J.S.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

    1999-05-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current

  17. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassie, J. S. de; Baker, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Rice, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  18. Measurements using optic and RF waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Fornel, Frederique

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and technical knowledge for measurements in modern electromagnetism must be vast as our electromagnetic environment covers all frequencies and wavelengths. These measurements must be applied to fields as varied as nanotechnologies, telecommunications, meteorology, geolocalization, radioastronomy, health, biology, etc. In order to cover the multiple facets of the topic, this book sweeps the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from several hertz to terahertz; considers distances ranging from nanometers to light-years in optics; before extending towards the various measurement techniques

  19. The FELIX RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manintveld, P.; Delmee, P.F.M.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Meddens, B.J.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the RF system for the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX) is discussed. The RF system provides the input power for a triode gun (1 GHz, 100 W), a prebuncher (1 GHz, 10 kW), a buncher (3 GHz, 20 MW), and two linacs (3 GHz, 8 MW each). The pulse length in the system is 20 μs. The required electron beam stability imposes the following demands on the RF system: a phase stability better than 0.3 deg for the 1 GHz signals and better than 1 deg for the 3 GHz signals; the amplitude stability has to be better than 1% for the 1 GHz and better than 0.2% for the 3 GHz signals. (author) 3 refs.; 6 figs

  20. RF and feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, D.

    1994-01-01

    The radiofrequency system of the Tau Charm Factory accelerating 10 11 particles per bunch and a circulating current of 0.5 A is presented. In order to produce the very short bunches required, the RF system of TCF must provide a large RF voltage (8 MV) at a frequency in the neighbourhood of 400-500 MHz. It appears very attractive to produce the high voltage required with superconducting cavities, for which wall losses are negligible. A comparison between the sc RF system proposed and a possible copper system run at an average 1 MV/m, shows the clear advantage of sc cavities for TCF. (R.P.). 2 figs,. 1 tab

  1. Development of low emittance high brightness electron beams and rf accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1991-01-01

    The main goals of this project were the construction of an S-band RF photoinjector for the production of a high brightness electron beam, and the development of a new type of RF accelerator structure; the Plane wave transformer. By the end of October 1991 the photoinjector had been built, its RF characteristics had been measured at low power, and an initial test of the gun at high RF power had been done. The Plane Wave Transformer had also been built and tested at lower power. In both cases the results obtained are mostly in agreement with the expected and calculated behavior

  2. Design and modeling of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.L.; Chen, S.C.; Wurtele, J.S.; Temkin, R.; Danly, B.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a high-frequency (17 GHz), high accelerating gradient (250 MV/m) photocathode RF gun is studied with the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. For the parameter regime of interest, i.e. bunch charge smaller than 1 nC and bunch length shorter than 2 ps, space-charge forces and finite bunch length effects are less significant in determining the beam quality than nonlinear RF forces are. The cavity geometry, RF phase for photoemission, cathode size, and current density are being optimized to obtain high quality beams. Preliminary results are presented

  3. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  4. Conventional RF system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a conventional RF system is always complex and must fit the needs of the particular machine for which it is planned. It follows that many different design criteria should be considered and analyzed, thus exceeding the narrow limits of a lecture. For this reason only the fundamental components of an RF system, including the generators, are considered in this short seminar. The most common formulas are simply presented in the text, while their derivations are shown in the appendices to facilitate, if desired, a more advanced level of understanding. (orig.)

  5. Study of probing beam enlargement due to forward-scattering under low wavenumber turbulence using a FDTD full-wave code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, F. da [Associao EURATOM/IST, IPFN-LA, Instituto Superor Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Heuraux, S. [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS-Nancy-Universite, BP70239, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Gusakov, E.; Popov, A. [Ioffe Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Forward-scattering under high level of turbulence or long propagation paths can induce significant effects, as predicted by theory, and impose a signature on the Doppler reflectometry response. Simulations using a FDTD (finite-difference time-domain) full-wave code have confirmed the main dependencies and general behavior described by theory but display a returned RMS power, at moderate amplitudes, half of the one predicted by theory due to the impossibility to reach the numerical requirements needed to describe the small wavenumber spectrum with the wanted accuracy.One justifying factor may be due to the splitting and enlargement of the probing beam. At high turbulence levels, the scattered power returning to the antenna is higher than the predicted by the theory probably due to the scattered zone being closer than the oblique cutoff. This loss of coherence of the wavefront induces a beam spreading, which is also responsible for a diminution of the wavenumber resolution. With a FDTD full-wave code we study the behavior of the probing beam under several amplitude levels of low wavenumber plasma turbulence, using long temporal simulations series to ensure statistical accuracy. (authors)

  6. Wireless RF communication in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Inke; Ricciardi, Lucas; Hall, Leonard; Hansen, Hedley; Varadan, Vijay; Bertram, Chris; Maddocks, Simon; Enderling, Stefan; Saint, David; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek

    2008-02-01

    This paper focuses on wireless transcutaneous RF communication in biomedical applications. It discusses current technology, restrictions and applications and also illustrates possible future developments. It focuses on the application in biotelemetry where the system consists of a transmitter and a receiver with a transmission link in between. The transmitted information can either be a biopotential or a nonelectric value like arterial pressure, respiration, body temperature or pH value. In this paper the use of radio-frequency (RF) communication and identification for those applications is described. Basically, radio-frequency identification or RFID is a technology that is analogous to the working principle of magnetic barcode systems. Unlike magnetic barcodes, passive RFID can be used in extreme climatic conditions—also the tags do not need to be within close proximity of the reader. Our proposed solution is to exploit an exciting new development in making circuits on polymers without the need for battery power. This solution exploits the principle of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a polymer substrate. The SAW device is a set of interdigitated conducting fingers on the polymer substrate. If an appropriate RF signal is sent to the device, the fingers act as microantennas that pick up the signal, and this energy is then converted into acoustic waves that travel across the surface of the polymer substrate. Being a flexible polymer, the acoustic waves cause stresses that can either contract or stretch the material. In our case we mainly focus on an RF controllable microvalve that could ultimately be used for fertility control.

  7. Wireless RF communication in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Inke; Ricciardi, Lucas; Hall, Leonard; Enderling, Stefan; Saint, David; Al-Sarawi, Said; Abbott, Derek; Hansen, Hedley; Varadan, Vijay; Bertram, Chris; Maddocks, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on wireless transcutaneous RF communication in biomedical applications. It discusses current technology, restrictions and applications and also illustrates possible future developments. It focuses on the application in biotelemetry where the system consists of a transmitter and a receiver with a transmission link in between. The transmitted information can either be a biopotential or a nonelectric value like arterial pressure, respiration, body temperature or pH value. In this paper the use of radio-frequency (RF) communication and identification for those applications is described. Basically, radio-frequency identification or RFID is a technology that is analogous to the working principle of magnetic barcode systems. Unlike magnetic barcodes, passive RFID can be used in extreme climatic conditions—also the tags do not need to be within close proximity of the reader. Our proposed solution is to exploit an exciting new development in making circuits on polymers without the need for battery power. This solution exploits the principle of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a polymer substrate. The SAW device is a set of interdigitated conducting fingers on the polymer substrate. If an appropriate RF signal is sent to the device, the fingers act as microantennas that pick up the signal, and this energy is then converted into acoustic waves that travel across the surface of the polymer substrate. Being a flexible polymer, the acoustic waves cause stresses that can either contract or stretch the material. In our case we mainly focus on an RF controllable microvalve that could ultimately be used for fertility control

  8. A new version of the full wave ICRH code FISIC for plasmas with non-circular flux surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, T.

    1988-12-01

    A user's manual for a new version of the FISIC code which is now applicable to arbitrary (toroidal) geometry is presented. It contains a description of the input parameters and quantities as well of all subroutines and a list of all common blocks. (orig.)

  9. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first SC heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerating System), which began regularly scheduled operation in 1978. To date, more than 40,000 hours of bean-on target operating time has been accumulated with ATLAS. The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop SC RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the SC linac has, up to the present, has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. It should be noted that this has been accomplished while at the same time maintaining a vigorous operating schedule in support of the nuclear and atomic physics research programs of the division. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began development of SC RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. This work has included the evaluation of RF properties of high-T c oxide superconductors, both for the above and for other applications. The two divisions collaborated while they worked on several applications of RF SC, and also worked to develop the technology generally. 11 refs., 6 figs

  10. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first SC heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerating System), which began regularly scheduled operation in 1978. To date, more than 40,000 hours of bean-on target operating time has been accumulated with ATLAS. The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop SC RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the SC linac has, up to the present, has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. It should be noted that this has been accomplished while at the same time maintaining a vigorous operating schedule in support of the nuclear and atomic physics research programs of the division. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began development of SC RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. This work has included the evaluation of RF properties of high-{Tc} oxide superconductors, both for the above and for other applications. The two divisions collaborated while they worked on several applications of RF SC, and also worked to develop the technology generally. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Investigating the effect of electron emission pattern on RF gun beam quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabi, A. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B., E-mail: b-shokri@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Velenjak, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-11

    Thermionic radio frequency gun is one of the most promising choices to gain a high quality electron beam, used in the infrared free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation injectors. To study the quality of the beam in a compact electron source, the emission pattern effect on the beam dynamics should be investigated. In the presented work, we developed a 3D simulation code to model the real process of thermionic emission and to investigate the effect of emission pattern, by considering geometrical constraints, on the beam dynamics. According to the results, the electron bunch emittance varies considerably with the emission pattern. Simulation results have been validated via comparison with the well-known simulation codes such as ASTRA simulation code and CST microwave studio, as well as other simulation results in the literature. It was also demonstrated that by using a continuous wave laser beam for heating the cathode, the emission pattern full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transverse emission distribution is proportional to FWHM of the Gaussian profile for the laser beam. Additionally, by using the developed code, the effect of wall structure around the cathode on the back bombardment effect has been studied. According to the results, for a stable operation of the RF gun, one should consider the nose cone in vicinity of the cathode surface to reduce the back-bombardment effect. - Highlights: • We developed a 3D code to simulate the beam dynamics of thermionic RF gun. • Te impact of the emission pattern on the beam dynamic was investigated. • Different emission pattern results different emittance in the gun exit. • Using a nosecone around the cathode adjacent wall reduces back bombardment effect.

  12. The TESLA RF System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-01-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ∼600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components

  13. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system

  14. Beyond the RF photogun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, O.J.; Rozenzweig, J.; Travish, G.

    2003-01-01

    Laser-triggered switching of MV DC voltages enables acceleration gradients an order of magnitude higher than in state-of-the-art RF photoguns. In this way ultra-short, high-brightness electron bunches may be generated without the use of magnetic compression. The evolution of the bunch during the

  15. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, G [Jefferson Lab (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  16. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  17. The relationship between wave and geometrical optics models of coded aperture type x-ray phase contrast imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D; Olivo, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique which may lead to significant advancements in medical imaging. One of the impediments to the clinical implementation of the technique is the general requirement to have an x-ray source of high coherence. The radiation physics group at UCL is currently developing an x-ray phase contrast imaging technique which works with laboratory x-ray sources. Validation of the system requires extensive modelling of relatively large samples of tissue. To aid this, we have undertaken a study of when geometrical optics may be employed to model the system in order to avoid the need to perform a computationally expensive wave optics calculation. In this paper, we derive the relationship between the geometrical and wave optics model for our system imaging an infinite cylinder. From this model we are able to draw conclusions regarding the general applicability of the geometrical optics approximation.

  18. Linear collider RF structure design using ARGUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok Ko

    1991-01-01

    In a linear collider, both the driving system (klystrons) and the accelerating system (linac) consists of RF structures that are inherently three-dimensional. These structures which are responsible for power input/output, have to satisfy many requirements in order that instabilities, beam or RF related, are to be avoided. At the same time, system efficiencies have to be maintained at optimal to minimize cost. Theoretical analysis on these geometrically complex structures are difficult and until recently, numerical solutions have been limited. At SLAC, there has been a continuing and close collaboration among accelerator physicists, engineers and numericists to integrate supercomputing into the design procedure which involves 3-D RF structures. The outcome is very encouraging. Using the 3-D/electromagnetic code ARGUS (developed by SAIC) on the Cray computers at NERSC in conjunction with supporting theories, a wide variety of critical components have been simulated and evaluated. Aside from structures related to the linear collider, the list also includes the RF cavity for the proposed Boson Factory and the anode circuit for the Cross-Field Amplifier, once considered as an alternative to the klystron as a possible power source. This presentation will focus on two specific structures: (1) the klystron output cavity; and (2) the linac input coupler. As the results demonstrate, supercomputing is fast becoming a viable technology that could conceivably replace actual cold-testing in the near future

  19. Thermal and dynamic range characterization of a photonics-based RF amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noque, D. F.; Borges, R. M.; Muniz, A. L. M.; Bogoni, A.; Cerqueira S., Arismar, Jr.

    2018-05-01

    This work reports a thermal and dynamic range characterization of an ultra-wideband photonics-based RF amplifier for microwave and mm-waves future 5G optical-wireless networks. The proposed technology applies the four-wave mixing nonlinear effect to provide RF amplification in analog and digital radio-over-fiber systems. The experimental analysis from 300 kHz to 50 GHz takes into account different figures of merit, such as RF gain, spurious-free dynamic range and RF output power stability as a function of temperature. The thermal characterization from -10 to +70 °C demonstrates a 27 dB flat photonics-assisted RF gain over the entire frequency range under real operational conditions of a base station for illustrating the feasibility of the photonics-assisted RF amplifier for 5G networks.

  20. A Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck solver for modeling of energetic particle interactions with waves, with application to Helicons in ITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Yuri V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The bounce-average (BA finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP code CQL3D [1,2] now includes the essential physics to describe the RF heating of Finite-Orbit-Width (FOW ions in tokamaks. The FP equation is reformulated in terms of Constants-Of-Motion coordinates, which we select to be particle speed, pitch angle, and major radius on the equatorial plane thus obtaining the distribution function directly at this location. Full-orbit, low collisionality neoclassical radial transport emerges from averaging the local friction and diffusion coefficients along guiding center orbits. Similarly, the BA of local quasilinear RF diffusion terms gives rise to additional radial transport. The local RF electric field components needed for the BA operator are usually obtained by a ray-tracing code, such as GENRAY, or in conjunction with full-wave codes. As a new, practical application, the CQL3D-FOW version is used for simulation of alpha-particle heating by high-harmonic waves in ITER. Coupling of high harmonic or helicon fast waves power to electrons is a promising current drive (CD scenario for high beta plasmas. However, the efficiency of current drive can be diminished by parasitic channeling of RF power into fast ions, such as alphas, through finite Larmor-radius effects. We investigate possibilities to reduce the fast ion heating in CD scenarios.

  1. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, Chandra M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications

  2. The role of natural E-region plasma turbulence in the enhanced absorption of HF radio waves in the auroral ionosphere:Implications for RF heating of the auroral electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Robinson

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical processes which affect the absorption of radio waves passing through the auroral E-region when Farley-Buneman irregularities are present are examined. In particular, the question of whether or not it is legitimate to include the anomalous wave-enhanced collision frequency, which has been used successfully to account for the heating effects of Farley-Buneman waves in the auroral E-region, in the usual expression for the radio-wave absorption coefficient is addressed. Effects also considered are those due to wave coupling between electromagnetic waves and high-frequency electrostatic waves in the presence of Farley-Buneman irregularities. The implications for radio-wave heating of the auroral electrojet of these processes are also discussed. In particular, a new theoretical model for calculating the effects of high-power radio-wave heating on the electron temperature in an electrojet containing Farley-Buneman turbulence is presented.

  3. The role of natural E-region plasma turbulence in the enhanced absorption of HF radio waves in the auroral ionosphere:Implications for RF heating of the auroral electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Robinson

    Full Text Available Physical processes which affect the absorption of radio waves passing through the auroral E-region when Farley-Buneman irregularities are present are examined. In particular, the question of whether or not it is legitimate to include the anomalous wave-enhanced collision frequency, which has been used successfully to account for the heating effects of Farley-Buneman waves in the auroral E-region, in the usual expression for the radio-wave absorption coefficient is addressed. Effects also considered are those due to wave coupling between electromagnetic waves and high-frequency electrostatic waves in the presence of Farley-Buneman irregularities. The implications for radio-wave heating of the auroral electrojet of these processes are also discussed. In particular, a new theoretical model for calculating the effects of high-power radio-wave heating on the electron temperature in an electrojet containing Farley-Buneman turbulence is presented.

  4. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made

  5. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  6. Racetrack microtron rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs

  7. RF Gun Optimization Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-01-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation

  8. Pulsed rf operation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.; Cornacchia, M.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a very low final amplifier output impedance, always associated with class A operation, requires a very large power waste in the final tube. The recently suggested pulsed rf operation, while saving a large amount of power, increases the inherent final amplifier non linearity. A method is presented for avoiding the large signal non linear analysis and it is shown how each component of the beam induced voltage depends upon all the beam harmonics via some coupling coefficients which are evaluated

  9. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  10. Microwave and RF engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sorrentino, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    An essential text for both students and professionals, combining detailed theory with clear practical guidance This outstanding book explores a large spectrum of topics within microwave and radio frequency (RF) engineering, encompassing electromagnetic theory, microwave circuits and components. It provides thorough descriptions of the most common microwave test instruments and advises on semiconductor device modelling. With examples taken from the authors' own experience, this book also covers:network and signal theory;electronic technology with guided electromagnetic pr

  11. PEP-II RF cavity revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Folwell, N.; Hodgson, J.; Ko, K.; McCandless, B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed

  12. Theory, analysis and design of RF interferometric sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Cam

    2012-01-01

    Theory, Analysis and Design of RF Interferometric Sensors presents the theory, analysis and design of RF interferometric sensors. RF interferometric sensors are attractive for various sensing applications that require every fine resolution and accuracy as well as fast speed. The book also presents two millimeter-wave interferometric sensors realized using RF integrated circuits. The developed millimeter-wave homodyne sensor shows sub-millimeter resolution in the order of 0.05 mm without correction for the non-linear phase response of the sensor's quadrature mixer. The designed millimeter-wave double-channel homodyne sensor provides a resolution of only 0.01 mm, or 1/840th of the operating wavelength, and can inherently suppress the non-linearity of the sensor's quadrature mixer. The experimental results of displacement and velocity measurement are presented as a way to demonstrate the sensing ability of the RF interferometry and to illustrate its many possible applications in sensing. The book is succinct, ye...

  13. Absorption efficiency and heating kinetics of nanoparticles in the RF range for selective nanotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letfullin, Renat R; Letfullin, Alla R; George, Thomas F

    2015-02-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) waves have an excellent ability to penetrate into the human body, giving a great opportunity to activate/heat nanoparticles delivered inside the body as a contrast agent for diagnosis and treatment purposes. However the heating of nanoparticles in the RF range of the spectrum is controversial in the research community because of the low power load of RF waves and low absorption of nanoparticles in the RF range. This study uses a phenomenological approach to estimate the absorption efficiency of metal and dielectric nanoparticles in the RF range through a study of heating kinetics of those particles in radio wave field. We also discuss the specific features of heating kinetics of nanoparticles, such as a short time scale for heating and cooling of nanoparticles in a liquid biological environment, and the effect of the radiation field structure on the heating kinetics by single-pulse and multipulse RF radiation. In this study a phenomenological approach was applied to estimate the absorption efficiency of radiofrequency radiation (RF) by metal and dielectric nanoparticles. Such nanoparticles can be designed and used for therapeutic purposes, like for localized heating and to activate nanoparticles by RF. The authors also discuss the differences in heating kinetics using single-pulse and multi-pulse RF radiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-consistent non-linear description of radio-frequency wave propagation and of the edge of a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A correct understanding of the interactions between the edge plasma and the ion cyclotron (IC) waves (40-80 MHz) is needed to inject reliably large amount of power required for self-sustainable fusion plasmas. These thesis objectives were to model separately, with Comsol Multiphysics, but in compatible approaches the wave coupling and the radio-frequency (RF) sheath formation to anticipate development of a single code combining both. Modelling of fast wave coupling requires a detailed description of the antenna (2D or 3D) and of the plasma environment by a full wave approach for a cold plasma. Absorption of outgoing waves is emulated by perfectly matched layers, rendered compatible with a plasma dielectric tensor. Experimental trends for the coupling resistance of the antennas of Tore Supra are qualitatively reproduced but the coupling efficiency is overestimated. In parallel a novel self-consistent description, including RF sheaths, of the interplay between the cold wave propagation and DC biasing of the magnetized edge plasma of a tokamak was developed with the minimum set of physics ingredients. For Tore Supra antenna cases, the code coupled with TOPICA allowed to unveil qualitatively some unexpected observations on the latest design of Tore Supra Faraday screens whose electrical design was supposed to minimize RF sheaths. From simulations, a DC (Direct Current) current transport appears necessary to explain the radial structures of measurements. Cantilevered bars have been identified as the design element in the antenna structure enhancing the plasma potential. (author) [fr

  15. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombé, K., E-mail: Kristel.Crombe@UGent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Moritz, J. [YIJL, UMR7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  16. A numerical study of emittance growths in RF guns

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, K; Sobajima, M; Kitagaki, J; Ohnishi, M; Toku, H; Yoshikawa, K

    1999-01-01

    A beam with greatly reduced emittance is required for further improvements of FELs, in particular, for FELs of shorter wavelengths, and of narrower bandwidths. From this viewpoint, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6-cell S-band photocathode RF gun performance characteristics were calculated, first in order to evaluate what may contribute to the emittance growths in photocathode RF guns. We developed an RF gun to produce an electron beam with an extremely low emittance, by using a 2-D simulation code. It is found that, by optimizing the laser injection phase, the drive laser spot radius and the cavity shape around the laser spot, the beam emittance by the 1.6-cell RF gun can be greatly reduced to 2.1 pi mm mrad, from the previous 4.4 pi mm mrad of the original shape.

  17. Electron Beam Energy Compensation by Controlling RF Pulse Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, T; Kusukame, K; Masuda, K; Nakai, Y; Ohgaki, H; Yamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, K; Zen, H

    2005-01-01

    We have studied on improvement of electron beam macropulse properties from a thermionic RF gun. Though a thermionic RF gun has many salient features, there is a serious problem that back-bombardment effect worsens quality of the beam. To reduce beam energy degradation by this effect, we tried to feed non-flat RF power into the gun. As a result, we successfully obtained about 1.5 times longer macropulse and two times larger total charge per macropulse. On the other hand, we calculated transient evolution of RF power considering non-constant beam loading. The beam loading is evaluated from time evolution of cathode temperature, by use of one dimensional heat conduction model and electron trajectories' calculations by a particle simulation code. Then we found good agreement between the experimental and calculation results. Furthermore, with the same way, we studied the electron beam output dependence on the cathode radius.

  18. Modelling RF-plasma interaction in ECR ion sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascali David

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes three-dimensional self-consistent numerical simulations of wave propagation in magnetoplasmas of Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS. Numerical results can give useful information on the distribution of the absorbed RF power and/or efficiency of RF heating, especially in the case of alternative schemes such as mode-conversion based heating scenarios. Ray-tracing approximation is allowed only for small wavelength compared to the system scale lengths: as a consequence, full-wave solutions of Maxwell-Vlasov equation must be taken into account in compact and strongly inhomogeneous ECRIS plasmas. This contribution presents a multi-scale temporal domains approach for simultaneously including RF dynamics and plasma kinetics in a “cold-plasma”, and some perspectives for “hot-plasma” implementation. The presented results rely with the attempt to establish a modal-conversion scenario of OXB-type in double frequency heating inside an ECRIS testbench.

  19. Performance Analysis of RF-FSO Multi-Hop Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz; Svensson, Tommy; Brandt-Pearce, Maite; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    We study the performance of multi-hop networks composed of millimeter wave (MMW)-based radio frequency (RF) and free-space optical (FSO) links. The results are obtained in the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ). Taking

  20. Fluxon interaction with external rf radiation in Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivshar, Yuri S.; Olsen, Ole H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1993-01-01

    . It is shown that due to excitation of a standing linear wave by the driving force, the fluxon motion is strongly influenced by a periodic (averaged) potential similar to the Peierls-Nabarro potential in a discrete chain. This effective potential decreases in the direction of the boundary where the external rf...

  1. RF and microwave coupled-line circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Mongia, R K; Bhartia, P; Hong, J; Gupta, K C

    2007-01-01

    This extensively revised edition of the 1999 Artech House classic, RF and Microwave Coupled-Line Circuits, offers you a thoroughly up-to-date understanding of coupled line fundamentals, explaining their applications in designing microwave and millimeter-wave components used in today's communications, microwave, and radar systems. The Second Edition includes a wealth of new material, particularly relating to applications. You find brand new discussions on a novel simple design technique for multilayer coupled circuits, high pass filters using coupled lines, software packages used for filter des

  2. RF linacs for FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are twenty rf linac-driven Free Electron Lasers (FELs) existing or under construction throughout the world and proposals for several more. A number of these FELs have recently been established as facilities to produce coherent optical beams for materials and biomedical research. Both short pulse low duty factor and long pulse high duty factor linac-driven FELs will be discussed. Accelerator issues that influence the performance of an FEL as a scientific instrument will be indicated. (Author) 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  3. RF impedance measurement calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references

  4. RF-heating of plasma in the frequency domain of the ion cyclotron harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahnekamp, H.G.; Stampa, A.; Tuczek, H.; Laeuter, R.; Wulf, H.O.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on rf-heating of plasmas in the frequency domain of the ion cyclotron harmonics are reported. The rf-power is coupled to the magneto-acoustic wave for frequencies between ωsub(ci) and 5ωsub(ci). The measurements indicate that the damping of the pump wave is mainly due to the excitation of turbulence, whereas direct resonance at 2ωsub(ci) seems to be of minor importance

  5. The RF system for FELI linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Y.; Abe, S.; Keishi, T.; Tomimasu, T.

    1995-01-01

    FELI (Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a Free Electron Laser facility covering from 20μm (infra red region) to 0.35μm (ultra violet region), using as S-band linac. The linac consists of a thermoionic 0.5ns-pulse triggered gun, a 714-MHz SHB (subharmonic buncher), a 2856-MHz standing wave type buncher, and seven ETL (Electro-technical Laboratory) type accelerating sections. An RF system of the linac for FELs is required of long pulse duration and high stability. Two S-band klystrons (TOSHIBA E3729) are operated in three pulse operation modes (pulse width and peak RF power): 24μs-24MW, 12.5μs-34MW, 0.5μs-70MW. Each klystron modulator has a PFN consisting of 4 parallel networks of 24 capacitors and 24 variable inductors, and it has a line switch of an optical thyristor stack. An S-band klystron and its modulator were combined to test their performance at the works of NISSIN ELECTRIC Co. in December 1993. These equipments were installed at FELI in January 1994. The design and experimental results of the RF system are summarized in this paper. (author)

  6. Criteria for vacuum breakdown in rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.; Faehl, R.J.; Kadish, A.; Thode, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    A new high-voltage scaling based on Kilpatrick's criterion is presented that suggests that voltages more than twice the Kilpatrick limit can be obtained with identical initial conditions of vacuum and surface cleanliness. The calculations are based on the experimentally observed decrease in secondary electron emission with increasing ion-impact energy above 100 keV. A generalized secondary-emission package has been developed to simulate actual cavity dynamics in conjunction with our 2 1/2-dimensional fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code CEMIT. The results are discussed with application to the suppression of vacuum breakdown in rf accelerator devices

  7. Calculation of rf fields in axisymmetric cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashita, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A new code, PISCES, has been developed for calculating a complete set of rf electromagnetic modes in an axisymmetric cavity. The finite-element method is used with up to third-order shape functions. Although two components are enough to express these modes, three components are used as unknown variables to take advantage of the symmetry of the element matrix. The unknowns are taken to be either the electric field components or the magnetic field components. The zero-divergence condition will be satisfied by the shape function within each element

  8. PEP-II RF feedback system simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tighe, R [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A model containing the fundamental impedance of the PEP-II cavity along with the longitudinal beam dynamics and RF feedback system components is in use. It is prepared in a format allowing time-domain as well as frequency-domain analysis and full graphics capability. Matlab and Simulink are control system design and analysis programs (widely available) with many built-in tools. The model allows the use of compiled C-code modules for compute intensive portions. We desire to represent as nearly as possible the components of the feedback system including all delays, sample rates and applicable nonlinearities. (author)

  9. Simulation of proton RF capture in the AGS Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiari, F.Z.; Luccio, A.U.; Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    RF capture of the proton beam in the AGS Booster has been simulated with the longitudinal phase-space tracking code ESME. Results show that a capture in excess of 95% can be achieved with multiturn injection of a chopped beam

  10. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q 0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons

  11. Accurate modeling of complete functional RF blocks: CHAMELEON RF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H.H.J.M.; Niehof, J.; Schilders, W.H.A.; Ciuprina, G.; Ioan, D.

    2007-01-01

    Next-generation nano-scale RF-IC designs have an unprecedented complexity and performance that will inevitably lead to costly re-spins and loss of market opportunities. In order to cope with this, the aim of the European Framework 6 CHAMELEON RF project is to develop methodologies and prototype

  12. The Spallation Neutron Source RF Reference System

    CERN Document Server

    Piller, Maurice; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Ma, Hengjie

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) RF Reference System includes the master oscillator (MO), local oscillator(LO) distribution, and Reference RF distribution systems. Coherent low noise Reference RF signals provide the ability to control the phase relationships between the fields in the front-end and linear accelerator (linac) RF cavity structures. The SNS RF Reference System requirements, implementation details, and performance are discussed.

  13. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.

    2006-01-01

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM 01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects

  14. Fast wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities

  15. Modeling an emittance-dominated elliptical sheet beam with a 212-dimensional particle-in-cell code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    2005-01-01

    Modeling a 3-dimensional (3-D) elliptical beam with a 212-D particle-in-cell (PIC) code requires a reduction in the beam parameters. The 212-D PIC code can only model the center slice of the sheet beam, but that can still provide useful information about the beam transport and distribution evolution, even if the beam is emittance dominated. The reduction of beam parameters and resulting interpretation of the simulation is straightforward, but not trivial. In this paper, we describe the beam parameter reduction and emittance issues related to the initial beam distribution. As a numerical example, we use the case of a sheet beam designed for use with a planar traveling-wave amplifier for high power generator for RF ranging from 95 to 300GHz [Carlsten et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33 (2005) 85]. These numerical techniques also apply to modeling high-energy elliptical bunches in RF accelerators

  16. Microwave and RF vacuum electronic power sources

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Richard G

    2018-01-01

    Do you design and build vacuum electron devices, or work with the systems that use them? Quickly develop a solid understanding of how these devices work with this authoritative guide, written by an author with over fifty years of experience in the field. Rigorous in its approach, it focuses on the theory and design of commercially significant types of gridded, linear-beam, crossed-field and fast-wave tubes. Essential components such as waveguides, resonators, slow-wave structures, electron guns, beams, magnets and collectors are also covered, as well as the integration and reliable operation of devices in microwave and RF systems. Complex mathematical analysis is kept to a minimum, and Mathcad worksheets supporting the book online aid understanding of key concepts and connect the theory with practice. Including coverage of primary sources and current research trends, this is essential reading for researchers, practitioners and graduate students working on vacuum electron devices.

  17. Fast Wave Transmission Measurements on Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, J.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Takase, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.

    1997-11-01

    Data are presented from an array of single-turn loop probes newly installed on the inner wall of C-Mod, directly opposite one of the two fast-wave antennas. The 8-loop array extends 32^circ in the toroidal direction at the midplane and can distinguish electromagnetic from electrostatic modes. Data are acquired by 1GHz digitizer, spectrum analyzer, and RF detector circuit. Phase measurements during different heating scenarios show evidence of both standing and travelling waves. The measurement of toroidal mode number N_tor (conserved under the assumption of axisymmetry) is used to guide the toroidal full-wave code TORIC(Brambilla, M., IPP Report 5/66, February 1996). Amplitude measurements show modulation both by Type III ELMs and sawteeth; the observed sawtooth modulation may be interpreted as due to changes in central absorption. The amplitude of tildeB_tor measured at the inner wall is compared to the prediction of TORIC.

  18. Circuit design for RF transceivers

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaerts, Domine; Vaucher, Cicero S

    2007-01-01

    Second edition of this successful 2001 RF Circuit Design book, has been updated, latest technology reviews have been added as well as several actual case studies. Due to the authors being active in industry as well as academia, this should prove to be an essential guide on RF Transceiver Design for students and engineers.

  19. RF-Station control crate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzekom, M.G. van; Es, J.T. van.

    1992-01-01

    This report gives a description of the electronic control-system for the RF-station of AmPS. The electronics form the connection between the computer-system and the hardware of the RF-station. Only the elements of the systems which are not described in the other NIKHEF-reports are here discussed in detail. (author). 7 figs

  20. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizarro, João P. S., E-mail: bizarro@ipfn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  1. Investigation of MIM Diodes for RF Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    zero bias condition as well as the possibility of realizing them through printing makes them attractive for (Radio Frequency) RF applications. However, MIM diodes have not been explored much for RF applications. One reason preventing their widespread RF

  2. Refurbishments of RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baelde, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the activities of the R.F. System group during the years 1995-1996 in the frame of the refurbishment of the control system at GANIL accelerator. Modifications concerning the following sub-assemblies are mentioned: 1. voltage standards; 2. link card between the step by step motor control and the local control systems; 3. polarization system; 4. computer software for different operations. Also reported is the installation of ECR 4 source for the CO2. In this period the R2 Regrouping system has been installed, tested and put into operation. Several problems concerning the mechanical installation of the coupling loop and other problems related to the electronics operation were solved. The results obtained with the THI machine are presented

  3. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  4. Full-wave Simulations of LH Wave Propagation in Toroidal Plasma with non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, E.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Bonoli, P.T.; Wright, J.C.; Brambilla, M.

    2007-01-01

    The generation of energetic tails in the electron distribution function is intrinsic to lower-hybrid (LH) heating and current drive in weakly collisional magnetically confined plasma. The effects of these deformations on the RF deposition profile have previously been examined within the ray approximation. Recently, the calculation of full-wave propagation of LH waves in a thermal plasma has been accomplished using an adaptation of the TORIC code. Here, initial results are presented from TORIC simulations of LH propagation in a toroidal plasma with non-thermal electrons. The required efficient computation of the hot plasma dielectric tensor is accomplished using a technique previously demonstrated in full-wave simulations of ICRF propagation in plasma with non-thermal ions

  5. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  6. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation

  7. A new equilibrium theory for rf discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2011-10-01

    Two problems often encountered in RF discharges are 1) anomalous skin depth and 2) anomalous electron diffusion across magnetic fields B. Both effects can be explained if the discharges are not unusually long or short. The Simon short-circuit effect then allows the electrons to follow the Boltzmann relation even across B. Once Maxwellian electrons are assumed, a remarkable result can be obtained for radial profiles of density, potential, and ion drift velocity toward the cylindrical wall. In suitably normalized units, these profiles take on a universal shape for all discharges, regardless of B. The velocity profile naturally reaches the Bohm velocity at the wall (= sheath edge). Our code EQM solves for the radial profiles of plasma and neutral density including neutral depletion. All radial dependences are taken into account exactly, and no assumption of a presheath is necessary. To get the profile of Te requires energy balance in the specific discharge. We have done this for helicon discharges described by the HELIC code. Iteration between EQM and HELIC yields all profiles and also the absolute density for given RF power. Now at Univ. of Padua, Padua, Italy.

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies of a planar inductive coupled rf plasma source as the driver in simulator facility (ISTAPHM) of interactions of waves with the edge plasma on tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanei, V.; Nasrabadi, M. N.; Chin, O.-H.; Jayapalan, K. K.

    2017-11-01

    This research aims to design and build a planar inductive coupled RF plasma source device which is the driver of the simulator project (ISTAPHM) of the interactions between ICRF Antenna and Plasma on tokamak by using the AMPICP model. For this purpose, a theoretical derivation of the distribution of the RF magnetic field in the plasma-filled reactor chamber is presented. An experimental investigation of the field distributions is described and Langmuir measurements are developed numerically. A comparison of theory and experiment provides an evaluation of plasma parameters in the planar ICP reactor. The objective of this study is to characterize the plasma produced by the source alone. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature, electron-ion collision frequency, particle fluxes and their velocities, stochastic frequency, skin depth and electron energy distribution functions) as function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is currently produced only by the planar ICP. The exact goal of these experiments is that the produced plasma by external source can exist as a plasma representative of the edge of tokamaks.

  9. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, D.

    1997-01-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning

  10. Modeling high-power RF accelerator cavities with SPICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical interactions between RF accelerator cavities and high-power beams can be treated on personal computers using a lumped circuit element model and the SPICE circuit analysis code. Applications include studies of wake potentials, two-beam accelerators, microwave sources, and transverse mode damping. This report describes the construction of analogs for TM mn0 modes and the creation of SPICE input for cylindrical cavities. The models were used to study continuous generation of kA electron beam pulses from a vacuum cavity driven by a high-power RF source

  11. SQIF Arrays as RF Sensors (Briefing Charts)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yukon, Stanford P

    2007-01-01

    ... (Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter) arrays may be employed as sensitive RF sensors. RF SQIF arrays fabricated with high Tc Josephson junctions can be cooled with small Sterling microcoolers...

  12. rhoCentralRfFoam: An OpenFOAM solver for high speed chemically active flows - Simulation of planar detonations -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Marcantoni, L. F.; Tamagno, J.; Elaskar, S.

    2017-10-01

    A new solver developed within the framework of OpenFOAM 2.3.0, called rhoCentralRfFoam which can be interpreted like an evolution of rhoCentralFoam, is presented. Its use, performing numerical simulations on initiation and propagation of planar detonation waves in combustible mixtures H2-Air and H2-O2-Ar, is described. Unsteady one dimensional (1D) Euler equations coupled with sources to take into account chemical activity, are numerically solved using the Kurganov, Noelle and Petrova second order scheme in a domain discretized with finite volumes. The computational code can work with any number of species and its corresponding reactions, but here it was tested with 13 chemically active species (one species inert), and 33 elementary reactions. A gaseous igniter which acts like a shock-tube driver, and powerful enough to generate a strong shock capable of triggering exothermic chemical reactions in fuel mixtures, is used to start planar detonations. The following main aspects of planar detonations are here, treated: induction time of combustible mixtures cited above and required mesh resolutions; convergence of overdriven detonations to Chapman-Jouguet states; detonation structure (ZND model); and the use of reflected shocks to determine induction times experimentally. The rhoCentralRfFoam code was verified comparing numerical results and it was validated, through analytical results and experimental data.

  13. Cell Phone RF Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article in "Physics Today," Meredith and Redish emphasized the need to make introductory physics courses beneficial for life sciences majors. In this study, a lab activity is proposed to measure the intensity of electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones and connect these measurements to various standards, biological…

  14. SPEAR 2 RF SYSTEM LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The design and performance of higher order mode (HOM) dampers for the SPEAR 2 RF system is presented. The SPEAR beam had experienced occasional periods of instability due to transverse oscillations which were driven by HOMs in the RF cavities. A substantial fraction of this RF energy was coupled out of the cavity into the waveguide connecting the cavity to the klystron. This waveguide was modified by adding a stub of smaller cross section, terminated by a ferrite tile load, to the system. Design considerations of the load, and its effect on HOMs and beam stability will be discussed

  15. High power RF systems for LEHIPA of ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Rao, B.V.R.; Mishra, J.K.; Patel, Niranjan; Gupta, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) has generated a huge interest for various reasons. In India, as a part of accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS) program, a normal conducting, low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA) of energy 20 MeV and beam current of 30 mA is being developed in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). LEHIPA comprises of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source (50 KeV), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator (3 MeV) and Drift tube Linac (DTL) 1 and 2 (10 MeV and 20 MeV respectively). As per the accelerator physics design, RFQ requires nearly 530 kW RF power while each of DTL need 900 kW. Each accelerating cavity will be driven by a one- megawatt (CW) klystron based high power RF (HPRF) system at 352.21 MHz. Three such RF systems will be developed. The RF system has been designed around five cavity klystron tube TH2089F (Thales make) capable of delivering 1 MW continuous wave power at 352.21 MHz. The klystron has a gain of 40 dB and efficiency around 62 %. Each of the RF system comprises of a low power solid state driver (∼ 100 W), klystron tube, harmonic filter, directional coupler, Y-junction circulator (AFT make), RF load and WR2300 wave guide based RF transmission line each of 1 MW capacity. It also includes other subsystems like bias supplies (high voltage (HV) and low voltage (LV)), HV interface system, interlock and protection circuits, dedicated low conductivity water-cooling, pulsing circuitry/mechanisms etc. WR 2300 based RF transmission line transmits and feeds the RE power from klystron source to respective accelerating cavity. This transmission line starts from second port of the circulator and consists of straight sections, full height to half height transition, magic Tee, termination load at the centre of magic tee, half height sections, directional couplers and RE windows. For X-ray shielding, klystron will be housed in a lead (3 mm) based shielded cage. This system set up has a

  16. Codes maintained by the LAACG [Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group] at the NMFECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, R.; Barts, T.

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group (LAACG) maintains two groups of design codes at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC). These codes, principally electromagnetic field solvers, are used for the analysis and design of electromagnetic components for accelerators, e.g., magnets, rf structures, pickups, etc. In this paper, the status and future of the installed codes will be discussed with emphasis on an experimental version of one set of codes, POISSON/SUPERFISH

  17. Revisiting the Anomalous rf Field Penetration into a Warm Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Polomarov, Oleg V.; Theodosiou, Constantine E.

    2005-01-01

    Radio-frequency [rf] waves do not penetrate into a plasma and are damped within it. The electric field of the wave and plasma current are concentrated near the plasma boundary in a skin layer. Electrons can transport the plasma current away from the skin layer due to their thermal motion. As a result, the width of the skin layer increases when electron temperature effects are taken into account. This phenomenon is called anomalous skin effect. The anomalous penetration of the rf electric field occurs not only for transversely propagating to the plasma boundary wave (inductively coupled plasmas) but also for the wave propagating along the plasma boundary (capacitively coupled plasmas). Such anomalous penetration of the rf field modifies the structure of the capacitive sheath. Recent advances in the nonlinear, non-local theory of the capacitive sheath are reported. It is shown that separating the electric field profile into exponential and non-exponential parts yields an efficient qualitative and quantitative description of the anomalous skin effect in both inductively and capacitively coupled plasma

  18. Fast wave heating experiments in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies on ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, M; Shepard, T D; Goulding, R H [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); and others

    1992-07-01

    Fast wave heating experiments in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were performed on target plasmas produced by 350 kW of electron cyclotron heating at 53 GHz and also by neutral beam injection in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). Various heating regimes were investigated in the frequency range between 9.2 MHz and 28.8 MHz with magnetic fields of 0.95 T and 1.9 T on axis. The nominal pulse lengths of up to 200 kW RF power were in the range between 100 and 400 ms. Data from spectroscopy, loading measurements, and edge RF and Langmuir probes were used to characterize the RF induced effects on the ATF plasma. In the hydrogen minority regime at low plasma density, large suprathermal ion tails were observed with a neutral particle analyser. At high density (n-bar{sub e} {>=} 5.0 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) substantial increases in antenna loading were observed, but ICRF power was insufficient to produce definitive heating results. A two-dimensional RF heating code, ORION, and a Fokker-Planck code, RFTRANS, were used to simulate these experiments. A simulation of future high power, higher density experiments in ATF indicates improved bulk heating results due to the improved loading and more efficient thermalization of the minority tail. (author). 29 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs.

  19. Embedded software for the CEBAF RF Control Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, G.; Ashkenazi, I.; West, C.; Morgan, B.

    1991-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator control system employs a distributed computer strategy. As part of this strategy, the RF control sub-system uses 342 RF Control Modules, one for each of four warm section beam forming cavities (i.e., choppers, buncher, capture) and 338 superconducting accelerating cavities. Each control module has its own microprocessor, which provides local intelligence to automatically control over 100 parameters, while keeping the user interface simple. The microprocessor controls analog and digital I/O, including the phase and gradient section, high power amplifier (HPA), and interlocks. Presently, the embedded code is used to commission the 14 RF control modules in the injector. This paper describes the operational experience of this complex real-time control system

  20. Numerical design of an rf-coupling Iris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaki, H.

    1991-07-01

    For an rf coupler of an rf system in high-quality transmission an analytical method may be applied to treat the design problem, if a coupling hole between cavities or waveguides is small enough. However, in most cases of accelerator engineering the dimensions of the coupling slots are not so small compared with the size of a cavity and a waveguide. Numerical design of rf coupling slots for a few cases is tried basically according to Henke's method using an equivalent circuit to treat the matching of microwave components, but taking account of beam loading expressed by the coupling coefficient β. The MAFIA code has been applied for the design. (R.P.) 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  1. RF superconductivity at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) is a 4 GeV continuous beam electron accelerator being constructed to perform nuclear physics research. Construction began in February 1987 and initial operation is scheduled for February 1994. The present report describes its prototyping, problems/solutions, further development, facilities, design status, production and upgrade potential. The accelerator is 1.4 km in circumference, and has a race-track shape. It is of the recirculated linear accelerator type, and employs a total of five passes. Two linacs on opposite sides of the race-track each provide 400 MeV per pass. Beams of various energies are transported by separated arcs at each end of the straight sections to provide the recirculation. There are 4 recirculation arcs at the injector end, and 5 arcs at the other end. The full energy beam is routed by an RF separator to between one and three end stations, as desired, on a bucket-by-bucket basis. The average output beam current is 200 microamperes. Acceleration is provided by 338 superconducting cavities, which are arranged in pairs, each of which is enclosed in a helium vessel and suspended inside a vacuum jacket without ends. (N.K.)

  2. Effect of RF Parameters on Breakdown Limits in High-Vacuum X-Band Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2003-01-01

    RF breakdown is one of the major factors determining performance of high power rf components and rf sources. RF breakdown limits working power and produces irreversible surface damage. The breakdown limit depends on the rf circuit, structure geometry, and rf frequency. It is also a function of the input power, pulse width, and surface electric and magnetic fields. In this paper we discuss multi-megawatt operation of X-band rf structures at pulse width on the order of one microsecond. These structures are used in rf systems of high gradient accelerators. Recent experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have explored the functional dependence of breakdown limit on input power and pulse width. The experimental data covered accelerating structures and waveguides. Another breakdown limit of accelerating structures was associated with high magnetic fields found in waveguide-to-structure couplers. To understand and quantify these limits we simulated 3D structures with the electrodynamics code Ansoft HFSS and the Particle-In-Cell code MAGIC3D. Results of these simulations together with experimental data will be discussed in this paper

  3. RF MEMS: status of the industry and roadmaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaud, Jeremie; Wicht, Henning

    2005-01-01

    Microsystems for Radio Frequency applications, known as RF MEMS, have entered the commercialization phase in 2003. Bulk Acoustic Wave filters are already produced in series and first commercial samples of switches are available. On the other hand, reliability and packaging problems are still a major hurdle especially for switches and tunable capacitors. Will RF MEMS hold their promise to be one of the future major businesses for MEMS? The presentation will give an overview on RF MEMS applications and market players. WTC will highlight technical challenges that still have to be solved to open mass markets such as mobile telephony and WLAN. WTC will also present applications of RF MEMS and opportunities in niche markets with high added value like military and space applications. WTC will provide a regional analysis and compare R&D focus and public funding situation in North America, Europe and Asia. Finally, WTC will present an updated product roadmap market forecast for RF MEMS devices for the 2004-2008 time period.

  4. Low Level RF System for Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasz Plawski; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; J. Hovater; Thomas Powers

    2003-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) has been upgraded to test and commission SNS and CEBAF Energy Upgrade cryomodules. Part of the upgrade was to modernize the superconducting cavity instrumentation and control. We have designed a VXI based RF control system exclusively for the production testing of superconducting cavities. The RF system can be configured to work either in Phase Locked Loop (PLL) or Self Excited Loop (SEL) mode. It can be used to drive either SNS 805 MHz or CEBAF Energy Upgrade 1497 MHz superconducting cavities and can be operated in pulsed or continuous wave (CW) mode. The base design consists of RF-analog and digital sections. The RF-analog section includes a Voltage Control Oscillator (VCO), phase detector, IandQ modulator and ''low phase shift'' limiter. The digital section controls the analog section and includes ADC, FPGA, and DAC . We will discuss the design of the RF system and how it relates to the support of cavity testing

  5. Collision broadened resonance localization in tokamaks excited with ICRF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbel, G.D.; McCoy, M.G.

    1985-08-01

    Advanced wave models used to evaluate ICRH in tokamaks typically use warm plasma theory and allow inhomogeneity in one dimension. The authors have developed a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck quasilinear computational model which evolves the population of particles on more realistic orbits. Each wave-particle resonance has its own specific interaction amplitude within any given volume element. These data need only be generated once, and appropriately stored for efficient retrieval. The wave-particle resonant interaction then serves as a mechanism by which the diffusion of particle populations can proceed among neighboring orbits. Collisions affect the absorption of rf energy by two quite distinct processes: In addition to the usual relaxation towards the Maxwellian distribution creating velocity gradients which drive quasilinear diffusion, collisions also affect the wave-particle resonance through the mechanism of gyro-phase diffusion. The local specific spectral energy absorption rate is directly calculable once the orbit geometry and populations are determined. The code is constructed in such fashion as to accommodate wave propagation models which provide the wave spectral energy density on a poloidal cross-section. Information provided by the calculation includes the local absorption properties of the medium which can then be exploited to evolve the wave field

  6. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  7. Fabrication and tests and RF control of the superconducting resonators of the Saclay heavy ion LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, B.; Coret, M.; Fouan, J.P.; Girard, J.; Girma, J.L.; Leconte, P.; Lussignol, Y.; Moreau, R.; Passerieux, J.P.; Ramstein, G.; Wartski, L.

    1987-01-01

    Two types of niobium superconducting resonators used in the Saclay linac are discussed. The outer cylinder and RF ports are identical for the two designs, but internal structures are different: full wave helix with three gaps behavior; or half wave with two gaps behavior. All cavities (34 full wave, 16 half) were tested for field and mounted in the machine cryostats. Cavity fabrication and performance are summarized. Vibration tests and Rf control are described. It is argued that helix resonators can overcome problems due to vibration. The very low lock out time percentage measured in an acceleration test with 21 cavities supports this confidence

  8. Review of laser-induced fluorescence methods for measuring rf- and microwave electric fields in discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilenko, V.; Oks, E.

    1994-01-01

    Development of methods for measuring rf- or μ-wave electric fields E(t) = E 0 cosωt in discharge plasmas is of a great practical importance. First, these are fields used for producing rf- or μ-wave discharges. Second, the fields E(t) may represent electromagnetic waves penetrating into a plasma from the outside. This paper reviews methods for diagnostics of the fields E(t) in low temperature plasmas based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Compared to emission (passive) methods, LIF-methods have a higher sensitivity as well as higher spatial and temporal resolutions. Underlying physical effects may be highlighted by an example of LIF of hydrogen atoms in a plasma. After a presentation of the underlying physical principles, the review focuses on key experiments where these principles were implemented for measurements of rf- and μ-wave electric fields in various discharges

  9. Stroboscopic topographies on iron borate crystal in 9.6 MHz rf magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Takaya; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kikuta, Seishi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of magnetoacoustic wave on the crystal deformation was studied by stroboscopic double crystal X-ray topography. The acoustic wave was excited by the rf magnetic field, which was synchronized with synchrotron radiation X-ray pulse. In measured rocking curves of FeBO 3 (4 4 4) reflection, we observed, for the first time, that the application of rf magnetic field (|H rf | max >8.4 Oe) brought about the extreme narrowing of full width at half maximum (FWHM). Recorded topographs showed that the narrowing of FWHM was due to the magnetoacoustic standing wave which is excited in FeBO 3 crystal. In our experiments, the influence of additional static magnetic field on the magnetoacoustic standing wave of FeBO 3 crystal was investigated too

  10. The New RF Control System for the CERN SPS Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Marty, H; Molendijk, J C; Pilchen, Y; Wehrle, U; Weierud, F

    1996-01-01

    The old SPS RF control system designed in 1972 has been replaced completely, i.e. both hardware and software. The new system has to control both RF equipment conceived during the last 23 years and future (modern) equipment. Using information analysis methods, we derived a model of an RF command and designed a data base accordingly (ORACLE®). Information from this data base is used for command generation and processing and also for archiving settings. The advantage is purely generic software, i.e. the same computer code is used for switching on an RF amplifier, as for setting a frequency synthesizer. New equipment is added very simply by entering new records in the data base. Additional features include a reservation scheme whereby a user can take private control of any piece of equipment, a reporting facility notifying the user of the simultaneous control activity by other users on RF equipment, and a capability scheme assigning a level of expertise to each user restricting action on the equipment.

  11. RF-plasma interactions in the antenna near fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colestock, P.; Greene, G.J.; Hosea, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Stevens, J.E.; Ono, M.; Wilson, J.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); D' Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R. (Lodestar Research Corp., Boulder, CO (USA)); Lehrman, I.S. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA))

    1990-04-01

    An assessment is made of the various linear and nonlinear mechanisms that are likely to play a role in the near-field of Faraday shielded inductive antennas commonly used in ICRF heating experiments. A number of low-level, but potentially important, RF loss mechanisms have been proposed as candidates to explain the observed surface phenomena and impurity production associated with ICRF. These range from edge heating via linear processes, such as surface wave or Bernstein wave generation to a variety of nonlinear phenomena including parametric decay and RF-driven sheath effects. The various proposed mechanisms will be examined in this work in terms of the available experimental data and an evaluation will be made of the scaling of these phenomena to higher density and temperature plasmas. (orig.).

  12. Traveling wave accelerating structures with a large phase advance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramonov, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    The cells RF parameters for the well known Disk Loaded Waveguide (DLW) are considered in higher pass bands of TM01 wave, providing operating phase advance between 180 o - 1230 o per cell. With an appropriate shape optimization and some additional elements proposed traveling wave structures with such large phase advance overlap the classical first band DLW in RF efficiency. Examples of proposed structures together with RF and dispersion properties are presented.

  13. Photoemission starting of induction rf-driven multicusp ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, D.S.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Ponce, D.M.; Young, A.T.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that pulsed and continuous wave, rf-driven hydrogen discharges can be started with photoemission. The extracted H - current from a photoemission-started plasma has been investigated and does not differ significantly from that of a filament-started plasma. The minimum pressure for photoemissive starting was found to be higher than that of filament starting, 17 mTorr compared to 7 mTorr, respectively, in this particular configuration. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Ferruleless coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube cold-test characteristics simulated with micro-SOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Dana L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional, electromagnetic circuit analysis code, Micro-SOS, can be used to reduce expensive and time consuming experimental 'cold-testing' of traveling-wave tube (TWT) circuits. The frequency-phase dispersion and beam interaction impedance characteristics of a ferruleless coupled-cavity traveling-wave tube slow-wave circuit were simulated using the code. Computer results agree closely with experimental data. Variations in the cavity geometry dimensions of period length and gap-to-period ratio were modeled. These variations can be used in velocity taper designs to reduce the radiofrequency (RF) phase velocity in synchronism with the decelerating electron beam. Such circuit designs can result in enhanced TWT power and efficiency.

  15. 3-D electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical simulation of a RF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Launay, F

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D thermo-mechanical study of the edge of entrance blade of IPHI's RFQ was conducted by means of I-DEAS code. The aim is to compare the temperatures reached, the constraints, and the deformations calculated on the basis of RF power density stored on the blade obtained by means of two different electromagnetic computational codes, SOPRANO and MAFIA.

  16. Modeling and design of an X-band rf photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Marsh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A design for an X-band rf photoinjector that was developed jointly by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is presented. The photoinjector is based around a 5.59 cell rf gun that has state-of-the-art features including: elliptical contoured irises; improved mode separation; an optimized initial half cell length; a racetrack input coupler; and coupling that balances pulsed heating with cavity fill time. Radio-frequency and beam dynamics modeling have been done using a combination of codes including PARMELA, HFSS, IMPACT-T, ASTRA, and the ACE3P suite of codes developed at SLAC. The impact of lower gradient operation, magnet misalignment, solenoid multipole errors, beam offset, mode beating, wakefields, and beam line symmetry have been analyzed and are described. Fabrication and testing plans at both LLNL and SLAC are discussed.

  17. Beam dynamics studies of a 30 MeV RF linac for neutron production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B.; Krishnagopal, S.; Acharya, S.

    2018-02-01

    Design of a 30 MeV, 10 Amp RF linac as neutron source has been carried out by means of ASTRA simulation code. Here we discuss details of design simulations for three different cases i.e Thermionic , DC and RF photocathode guns and compare them as injectors to a 30 MeV RF linac for n-ToF production. A detailed study on choice of input parameters of the beam from point of view of transmission efficiency and beam quality at the output have been described. We found that thermionic gun isn't suitable for this application. Both DC and RF photocathode gun can be used. RF photocathode gun would be of better performance.

  18. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  19. RF Group Annual Report 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Betz, M; Brunner, O; Baudrenghien, P; Calaga, R; Caspers, F; Ciapala, E; Chambrillon, J; Damerau, H; Doebert, S; Federmann, S; Findlay, A; Gerigk, F; Hancock, S; Höfle, W; Jensen, E; Junginger, T; Liao, K; McMonagle, G; Montesinos, E; Mastoridis, T; Paoluzzi, M; Riddone, G; Rossi, C; Schirm, K; Schwerg, N; Shaposhnikova, E; Syratchev, I; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Völlinger, C; Vretenar, M; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    The highest priority for the RF group in 2011 was to contribute to a successful physics run of the LHC. This comprises operation of the superconducting 400 MHz accelerating system (ACS) and the transverse damper (ADT) of the LHC itself, but also all the individual links of the injector chain upstream of the LHC – Linac2, the PSB, the PS and the SPS – don’t forget that it is RF in all these accelerators that truly accelerates! A large variety of RF systems had to operate reliably, often near their limit. New tricks had to be found and implemented to go beyond limits; not to forget the equally demanding operation with Pb ions using in addition Linac3 and LEIR. But also other physics users required the full attention of the RF group: CNGS required in 2011 beams with very short, intense bunches, AD required reliable deceleration and cooling of anti-protons, Isolde the post-acceleration of radioactive isotopes in Rex, just to name a few. In addition to the supply of beams for physics, the RF group has a num...

  20. Global analysis of ICRF wave coupling on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Bremond, S.; Colas, L.

    2003-01-01

    The Tore Supra tokamak is equipped with a multi-megawatt ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) system for heating and current drive. The coupling of the fast wave to the plasma, characterized by the distributed coupling resistance along the radiating straps, is a crucial issue in order to launch large RF powers. Many factors can have an effect on ICRF wave coupling. Quantitative prediction from theoretical modelling requires the knowledge of the local inhomogeneous plasma density profile in front of the antenna for running sophisticated antenna codes. In this work, we have rather followed a 'global' approach, based on Tore Supra experimental results, for the parametric study of the coupling resistance. From a large data base covering seven experimental campaigns (∼2250 shots), a scaling law of the coupling resistance including the main parameters of the plasma and of the antenna configuration is established. This approach is found to be reliable for the analysis of coupling in the different scenarios: He/D 2 gas filling, gas/pellets for plasma fuelling, plasma leaning on inner wall/low field side limiter, limiter/ergodic divertor configuration, minority heating/direct electron heating. From one scenario to another, a significant variation of the coefficients of the scaling law is found. The study of these variations allows to get some insight on the main physical mechanisms which influence the ICRF wave coupling in a tokamak operation, such as the wall conditioning and recycling conditions, RF sheaths or frequency. (author)

  1. Simulation of plasma loading of high-pressure RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; Samulyak, R.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.

    2018-01-01

    Muon beam-induced plasma loading of radio-frequency (RF) cavities filled with high pressure hydrogen gas with 1% dry air dopant has been studied via numerical simulations. The electromagnetic code SPACE, that resolves relevant atomic physics processes, including ionization by the muon beam, electron attachment to dopant molecules, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, has been used. Simulations studies have been performed in the range of parameters typical for practical muon cooling channels.

  2. Simulation of plasma loading of high-pressure RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Computational Science Initiative; Samulyak, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Computational Science Initiative; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Statistics; Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freemire, B. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2018-01-11

    Muon beam-induced plasma loading of radio-frequency (RF) cavities filled with high pressure hydrogen gas with 1% dry air dopant has been studied via numerical simulations. The electromagnetic code SPACE, that resolves relevant atomic physics processes, including ionization by the muon beam, electron attachment to dopant molecules, and electron-ion and ion-ion recombination, has been used. Simulations studies have also been performed in the range of parameters typical for practical muon cooling channels.

  3. Rf system specifications for a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Eaton, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear accelerator contains many systems; however, the most complex and costly is the RF system. The goal of an RF system is usually simply stated as maintaining the phase and amplitude of the RF signal within a given tolerance to accelerate the charged particle beam. An RF system that drives a linear accelerator needs a complete system specification, which should contain specifications for all the subsystems (i.e., high-power RF, low-level RF, RF generation/distribution, and automation control). This paper defines a format for the specifications of these subsystems and discusses each RF subsystem independently to provide a comprehensive understanding of the function of each subsystem. This paper concludes with an example of a specification spreadsheet allowing one to input the specifications of a subsystem. Thus, some fundamental parameters (i.e., the cost and size) of the RF system can be determined

  4. Development and Performance Analysis of a Photonics-Assisted RF Converter for 5G Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ramon Maia; Muniz, André Luiz Marques; Sodré Junior, Arismar Cerqueira

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a simple, ultra-wideband and tunable radiofrequency (RF) converter for 5G cellular networks. The proposed optoelectronic device performs broadband photonics-assisted upconversion and downconversion using a single optical modulator. Experimental results demonstrate RF conversion from DC to millimeter waves, including 28 and 38 GHz that are potential frequency bands for 5G applications. Narrow linewidth and low phase noise characteristics are observed in all generated RF carriers. An experimental digital performance analysis using different modulation schemes illustrates the applicability of the proposed photonics-based device in reconfigurable optical wireless communications.

  5. Outgassing studies of lower hybrid antenna module during CW high RF power injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Brossaud, J.; Berger-By, G.; Bibet, Ph.; Poli, S.; Rey, G.; Tonon, G.; Seki, M.; Obara, K.; Maebara, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, T.; Nagashima, T.

    1994-01-01

    Outgassing, induced by very long RF waves injection (up to 6000s) at high power density, is studied with a module, able to be used for a lower hybrid frequency antenna. A large outgassing data base is provided by 75 shots cumulating 27 hours of RF injection. Outgassing rate is documented after different thermal pre-treatments, and in various conditions of cooling, RF power level. Relevant parameters are identified and values of outgassing rates are given in order to design pumping system for a large antenna. (author) 4 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy: An alternative to laser-rf double resonance for ion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.; Dinneen, T.; Mansour, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy is presented as an alternative to laser-rf double resonance for obtaining high-precision measurements in ion beams. By use of a single-phase modulated laser beam to derive the two required fields, the laser--ion-beam alignment is significantly simplified. In addition, this method is especially useful in the low-frequency regime where the laser-rf double-resonance method encounters difficulties due to modifications of the ion-beam velocity distribution. These modifications, which result from interaction with the traveling rf wave used to induce magnetic dipole transitions, are observed and quantitatively modeled

  7. Approximate Integrals of rf-driven Particle Motion in Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin, I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    For a particle moving in nonuniform magnetic field under the action of an rf wave, ponderomotive effects result from rf-driven oscillations nonlinearly coupled with Larmor rotation. Using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism, we show how, despite this coupling, two independent integrals of the particle motion are approximately conserved. Those are the magnetic moment of free Larmor rotation and the quasi-energy of the guiding center motion parallel to the magnetic field. Under the assumption of non-resonant interaction of the particle with the rf field, these integrals represent adiabatic invariants of the particle motion

  8. Code Cactus; Code Cactus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajeau, M; Nguyen, L T; Saunier, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-09-01

    This code handles the following problems: -1) Analysis of thermal experiments on a water loop at high or low pressure; steady state or transient behavior; -2) Analysis of thermal and hydrodynamic behavior of water-cooled and moderated reactors, at either high or low pressure, with boiling permitted; fuel elements are assumed to be flat plates: - Flowrate in parallel channels coupled or not by conduction across plates, with conditions of pressure drops or flowrate, variable or not with respect to time is given; the power can be coupled to reactor kinetics calculation or supplied by the code user. The code, containing a schematic representation of safety rod behavior, is a one dimensional, multi-channel code, and has as its complement (FLID), a one-channel, two-dimensional code. (authors) [French] Ce code permet de traiter les problemes ci-dessous: 1. Depouillement d'essais thermiques sur boucle a eau, haute ou basse pression, en regime permanent ou transitoire; 2. Etudes thermiques et hydrauliques de reacteurs a eau, a plaques, a haute ou basse pression, ebullition permise: - repartition entre canaux paralleles, couples on non par conduction a travers plaques, pour des conditions de debit ou de pertes de charge imposees, variables ou non dans le temps; - la puissance peut etre couplee a la neutronique et une representation schematique des actions de securite est prevue. Ce code (Cactus) a une dimension d'espace et plusieurs canaux, a pour complement Flid qui traite l'etude d'un seul canal a deux dimensions. (auteurs)

  9. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  10. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R ampersand D effort here at SLAC

  11. Blind Signal Classification via Spare Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-10

    Blind Signal Classification via Sparse Coding Youngjune Gwon MIT Lincoln Laboratory gyj@ll.mit.edu Siamak Dastangoo MIT Lincoln Laboratory sia...achieve blind signal classification with no prior knowledge about signals (e.g., MCS, pulse shaping) in an arbitrary RF channel. Since modulated RF...classification method. Our results indicate that we can separate different classes of digitally modulated signals from blind sampling with 70.3% recall and 24.6

  12. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziomek, C.D.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Bowling, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feed forward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrix x software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system

  13. RF Loads for Energy Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, S; Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Different conceptional designs for RF high power loads are presented. One concept implies the use of solid state rectifier modules for direct RF to DC conversion with efficiencies beyond 80%. In addition, robust metallic low-Q resonant structures, capable of operating at high temperatures (>150 ◦C) are discussed. Another design deals with a very high temperature (up to 800 ◦C) air cooled load using a ceramic foam block inside a metal enclosure. This porous ceramic block is the microwave absorber and is not brazed to the metallic enclosure.

  14. rf reference line for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1979-03-01

    A rf phase reference line in 6 segments around the 2200 meter circumference PEP storage ring is described. Each segment of the reference line is phase stabilized by its own independent feedback system, which uses an amplitude modulated reflection from the end of each line. The modulation is kept small and decoupled from the next segment to avoid crosstalk and significant modulation of the rf drive signal. An error evaluation of the system is made. The technical implementation and prototype performance are described. Prototype tests indicate that the phase error around the ring can be held below 1 degree with this relatively simple system

  15. rf reference line for PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, H.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1979-03-01

    A rf phase reference line in 6 segments around the 2200 meter circumference PEP storage ring is described. Each segment of the reference line is phase stabilized by its own independent feedback system, which uses an amplitude modulated reflection from the end of each line. The modulation is kept small and decoupled from the next segment to avoid crosstalk and significant modulation of the rf drive signal. An error evaluation of the system is made. The technical implementation and prototype performance are described. Prototype tests indicate that the phase error around the ring can be held below 1 degree with this relatively simple system.

  16. Special MAFIA postprocessors for the analysis of RF structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browman, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes three stand-alone programs that use the electromagnetic fields generated by the MAFIA 2.04 codes to analyze radio-frequency (RF) cavities. Illustrations are provided that show how these codes are used to analyze the effect of the coupling slots on the electric and magnetic fields of the linacs for the APLE Prototype Experiment (APEX) and the Advanced Free-Electron Laser (AFEL); verify the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem for a high-energy deflecting cavity proposed for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project; and study the effectiveness of that deflecting cavity. (Author) 10 refs., 4 figs

  17. Special MAFIA postprocessors for the analysis of rf structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browman, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes three stand-alone programs that use the electromagnetic fields generated by the MAFIA 2.04 codes to analyze radio-frequency (RF) cavities. Illustrations are provided that show how these codes are used to (1) analyze the effect of the coupling slots on the electric and magnetic fields of the linacs for the APLE Prototype Experiment (APEX) and the Advanced Free-Electron Laser (AFEL), (2) verify the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem for a high-energy deflecting cavity proposed for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project, and (3) study the effectiveness of that deflecting cavity

  18. Experimental study of the interaction between RF antennas and the edge plasma of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubic, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Antennas operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) provide a useful tool for plasma heating in many tokamaks and are foreseen to play an important role in ITER. However, in addition to the desired heating in the core plasma, spurious interactions with the plasma edge and material boundary are known to occur. Many of these deleterious effects are caused by the formation of radio-frequency (RF) sheaths. The aim of this thesis is to study, mainly experimentally, scrape-off layer (SOL) modifications caused by RF sheaths effects by means of Langmuir probes that are magnetically connected to a powered ICRH antenna. Effects of the two types of Faraday screens' operation on RF-induced SOL modifications are studied for different plasma and antenna configurations - scans of strap power ratio imbalance, injected power and SOL density. In addition to experimental work, the influence of RF sheaths on retarding field analyzer (RFA) measurements of sheath potential is investigated with one-dimensional particle-in-cell code. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the RFA is able to measure reliably the sheath potential only for ion plasma frequencies ω π similar to RF cyclotron frequency ω rf , while for the real SOL conditions (ω π ≥ ω rf ), when the RFA is magnetically connected to RF region, it is strongly underestimated. An alternative method to investigate RF sheaths effects is proposed by using broadening of the ion distribution function as an evidence of the RF electric fields in the sheath. RFA measurements in Tore Supra indicate that RF potentials do indeed propagate from the antenna 12 m along magnetic field lines. (author) [fr

  19. Combinatorial neural codes from a mathematical coding theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Carina; Itskov, Vladimir; Morrison, Katherine; Roth, Zachary; Walker, Judy L

    2013-07-01

    Shannon's seminal 1948 work gave rise to two distinct areas of research: information theory and mathematical coding theory. While information theory has had a strong influence on theoretical neuroscience, ideas from mathematical coding theory have received considerably less attention. Here we take a new look at combinatorial neural codes from a mathematical coding theory perspective, examining the error correction capabilities of familiar receptive field codes (RF codes). We find, perhaps surprisingly, that the high levels of redundancy present in these codes do not support accurate error correction, although the error-correcting performance of receptive field codes catches up to that of random comparison codes when a small tolerance to error is introduced. However, receptive field codes are good at reflecting distances between represented stimuli, while the random comparison codes are not. We suggest that a compromise in error-correcting capability may be a necessary price to pay for a neural code whose structure serves not only error correction, but must also reflect relationships between stimuli.

  20. Development and energization of IOT based RF amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, A.; Som, S.; Raj, P.R.; Manna, S.K.; Ghosh, S.; Seth, S.; Thakurta, S.; Thakur, S.K.; Saha, S.; Panda, U.S.

    2013-01-01

    A 704 MHz IOT based CW RF amplifier has been developed in VECC. It can also be used with proper tuning to power cavity modules operating at 650 MHz in high energy high intensity proton linear accelerator proposed to be built for ADSS/SNS programme in India and Project-X at Fermilab, USA. This IOT based amplifier provides up to 60 kW continuous wave RF power at 700 MHz. It required various power supplies, LCW cooling and forced air cooling for its operation. The auxiliary power supplies like Grid, Filament and Ion-pump, are floated and mounted on an isolated frame, i.e., HV deck. The mains inputs are electrically isolated by means of isolation transformer. Also, a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based interlocks along with high voltage collector power supply has been designed and developed for the safe operation of the RF amplifier. This paper discusses about various developments and energization of the IOT based RF amplifier with high power dummy load. (author)

  1. Eighth CW and High Average Power RF Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the next Continuous Wave and High Average RF Power Workshop, CWRF2014, to take place at Hotel NH Trieste, Trieste, Italy from 13 to 16 May, 2014. This is the eighth in the CWRF workshop series and will be hosted by Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A. (www.elettra.eu). CWRF2014 will provide an opportunity for designers and users of CW and high average power RF systems to meet and interact in a convivial environment to share experiences and ideas on applications which utilize high-power klystrons, gridded tubes, combined solid-state architectures, high-voltage power supplies, high-voltage modulators, high-power combiners, circulators, cavities, power couplers and tuners. New ideas for high-power RF system upgrades and novel ways of RF power generation and distribution will also be discussed. CWRF2014 sessions will start on Tuesday morning and will conclude on Friday lunchtime. A visit to Elettra and FERMI will be organized during the workshop. ORGANIZING COMMITTEE (OC): Al...

  2. Evaluation of gamma ray durability and its application of shielded RF tags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraura, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kunio; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Sakurai, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the RF (Radio Frequency) tag with radiation shield is developed and its gamma ray durability is evaluated. RFID (RF Identification) is a radio-wave-based identification technology that can be used for various items. RF tags find use in many applications, including item tracing, access control, etc. RF tags can be classified as active RF tags, which have inbuilt voltaic cells, and passive RF tags without these cells. Passive RF tags, known for their low price and durability, are used in various fields. For instance, they are used for equipment maintenance in factories and thermal power plants. Several frequencies are used for RF tags. Further, RF tagging on the UHF (Ultra High Frequency) frequencies allows a communication range of approximately 10 m, and thus, remote reading is possible. When used in radiation environments such as in nuclear power plants, remote reading can contribute to the reduction of radiation exposure. However, because semiconductors are the primary elements used in the manufacture of RF tags, they can be damaged by radiation, and operational errors can occur. Therefore, this technology has not been used in environments affected by relatively high radiation levels. Therefore, in nuclear power plants, the use of RF tags is limited in areas of low radiation levels. In our study, we develop and manufacture a new RF tag with a radiation shield cover that provides error correction functionality. It is expected that radiation shielded RF tags will improve the radiation-proof feature, and its application range will be expanded. Using the radiation-proof RF tag, we have conducted radiation durability tests. These tests are of two types: one using low energy gamma ray, and the other using high-energy gamma ray. Experimental results are then analyzed. The number of applications for radiation shielded RF tags is considerably increasing, because it can be used in various radiation environments other than nuclear power plants as well, such as

  3. Emittance growth in rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    As the space-charge limit is approached, the current that can be accelerated in an rf linac and the output emittance that can be expected are discussed. The role of the envelope equations to estimate limits is outlined. The results of numerical experiments to explore general properties of emittance growth are given

  4. Field emission in RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Electron field emission limits the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities. It is shown how and why it is an important problem. The phenomenology of field emission is then described, both in DC and RF regimes. Merits of a few plausible 'remedies' to field emission are discussed. (author)

  5. Modern technologies in rf superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengeler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The development and application of superconducting rf cavities in particle accelerators is a fine example of advanced technology and of close cooperation with industry. This contribution examines the theoretical and present-day practical limitations of sc cavities and describes some advanced technologies needed for their large scale applications. (orig.)

  6. Broadband direct RF digitization receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the trade-offs involved in designing direct RF digitization receivers for the radio frequency and digital signal processing domains.  A system-level framework is developed, quantifying the relevant impairments of the signal processing chain, through a comprehensive system-level analysis.  Special focus is given to noise analysis (thermal noise, quantization noise, saturation noise, signal-dependent noise), broadband non-linear distortion analysis, including the impact of the sampling strategy (low-pass, band-pass), analysis of time-interleaved ADC channel mismatches, sampling clock purity and digital channel selection. The system-level framework described is applied to the design of a cable multi-channel RF direct digitization receiver. An optimum RF signal conditioning, and some algorithms (automatic gain control loop, RF front-end amplitude equalization control loop) are used to relax the requirements of a 2.7GHz 11-bit ADC. A two-chip implementation is presented, using BiCMOS and 65nm...

  7. MOSFET Degradation Under RF Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the degradation of MOS transistors under RF stress. Hot-carrier degradation, negative-bias temperature instability, and gate dielectric breakdown are investigated. The findings are compared to established voltage- and field-driven models. The experimental results indicate that the

  8. The LHC Low Level RF

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  9. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking

  10. RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, H.; Otake, Y.; Naito, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yoshioka, M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF gun using laser-triggered photocathode has many advantages as an injector of the linear colliders since it can generate a low emittance and high current pulsed beam. The experimental facility for the RF gun, such as an RF system, a laser system and a photocathode have been fabricated to study the fundamental characteristics. The dynamics of the RF gun has also studied by the 1D sheet beam model. (author)

  11. Fast-wave power flow along SOL field lines in NSTX and the associated power deposition profile across the SOL in front of the antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R.J.; Bell, R.E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J.C.; Jaworski, M.A.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Kramer, G.J.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C.K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Scotti, F.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T.K.; Green, D.L.; McLean, A.; Ryan, P.M.; Jaeger, E.F.; Sabbagh, S.

    2013-01-01

    Fast-wave heating and current drive efficiencies can be reduced by a number of processes in the vicinity of the antenna and in the scrape-off layer (SOL). On NSTX from around 25% to more than 60% of the high-harmonic fast-wave power can be lost to the SOL regions, and a large part of this lost power flows along SOL magnetic field lines and is deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling. We show that field-line mapping matches the location of heat deposition on the lower divertor, albeit with a portion of the heat outside of the predictions. The field-line mapping can then be used to partially reconstruct the profile of lost fast-wave power at the midplane in front of the antenna, and the losses peak close to the last closed flux surface as well as the antenna. This profile suggests a radial standing-wave pattern formed by fast-wave propagation in the SOL, and this hypothesis will be tested on NSTX-U. RF codes must reproduce these results so that such codes can be used to understand this edge loss and to minimize RF heat deposition and erosion in the divertor region on ITER. (paper)

  12. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies

  13. Discussion of high brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of high-brightness rf linacs are outlined, showing the breadth and complexity of the technology and indicating that synergism with advancements in other areas is important. Areas of technology reviewed include ion sources, injectors, rf accelerator structures, beam dynamics, rf power, and automatic control

  14. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines

  15. RF phase distribution systems at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, R.K.; Schwarz, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Modern large linear accelerators require RF distribution systems with minimal phase drifts and errors. Through the use of existing RF coaxial waveguides, and additional installation of phase reference cables and monitoring equipment, stable RF distribution for the SLC has been achieved. This paper discusses the design and performance of SLAC systems, and some design considerations for future colliders. 6 refs., 4 figs

  16. Linear collider RF: Introduction and summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    The relation of acceleration gradient with RF frequency is examined, and approximate general RF power requirements are derived. Considerations of efficiency and cost are discussed. RF Sources, presented at the conference, are reviewed. Overall efficiencies of the linear collider proposals are compared. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  17. Fast wave and electron cyclotron current drive in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Austin, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The non-inductive current drive from directional fast Alfven and electron cyclotron waves was measured in the DIII-D tokamak in order to demonstrate these forms of radiofrequency (RF) current drive and to compare the measured efficiencies with theoretical expectations. The fast wave frequency was 8 times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma centre, while the electron cyclotron wave was at twice the electron cyclotron frequency. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For steady current discharges, an analysis of the loop voltage revealed up to 195 kA of a non-inductive current (out of 310 kA) during combined electron cyclotron and fast wave injection, with a maximum of 110 kA of FWCD and 80 kA of ECCD achieved (not simultaneously). The peakedness of the current profile increased with RF current drive, indicating that the driven current was centrally localized. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with the central electron temperature as expected; however, the FWCD was severely degraded in low current discharges owing to incomplete fast wave absorption. The measured FWCD agreed with the predictions of a ray tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modelling along with multiple pass absorption. Enhancement of the second harmonic ECCD efficiency by the toroidal electric field was observed experimentally. The measured ECCD was in good agreement with Fokker-Planck code predictions. (author). 41 refs, 13 figs, 1 tab

  18. rf impedance of the accelerating beam gap and its significance to the TRIUMF rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.

    1979-03-01

    The rf system at TRIUMF is now operating with the highest Q, the lowest rf leakage into the beam gap, the best voltage stability, and the lowest resonator strongback temperatures ever measured since it was first put into operation. This paper describes the calculation of the rf impedance of the beam gap and its correlation to the rf problems encountered, which eventually led to modifications to the flux guides and resonator tips to accomplish the improved operation of the rf system

  19. Estimation of RF energy absorbed in the brain from mobile phones in the Interphone Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsier, N; Bowman, J D; Deltour, I; Figuerola, J; Mann, S; Moissonnier, M; Taki, M; Vecchia, P; Villegas, R; Vrijheid, M; Wake, K; Wiart, J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to develop an estimate of a radio frequency (RF) dose as the amount of mobile phone RF energy absorbed at the location of a brain tumour, for use in the Interphone Epidemiological Study. Methods We systematically evaluated and quantified all the main parameters thought to influence the amount of specific RF energy absorbed in the brain from mobile telephone use. For this, we identified the likely important determinants of RF specific energy absorption rate during protocol and questionnaire design, we collected information from study subjects, network operators and laboratories involved in specific energy absorption rate measurements and we studied potential modifiers of phone output through the use of software-modified phones. Data collected were analysed to assess the relative importance of the different factors, leading to the development of an algorithm to evaluate the total cumulative specific RF energy (in joules per kilogram), or dose, absorbed at a particular location in the brain. This algorithm was applied to Interphone Study subjects in five countries. Results The main determinants of total cumulative specific RF energy from mobile phones were communication system and frequency band, location in the brain and amount and duration of mobile phone use. Though there was substantial agreement between categorisation of subjects by cumulative specific RF energy and cumulative call time, misclassification was non-negligible, particularly at higher frequency bands. Factors such as adaptive power control (except in Code Division Multiple Access networks), discontinuous transmission and conditions of phone use were found to have a relatively minor influence on total cumulative specific RF energy. Conclusions While amount and duration of use are important determinants of RF dose in the brain, their impact can be substantially modified by communication system, frequency band and location in the brain. It is important to take

  20. Estimation of RF energy absorbed in the brain from mobile phones in the Interphone Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardis, E; Varsier, N; Bowman, J D; Deltour, I; Figuerola, J; Mann, S; Moissonnier, M; Taki, M; Vecchia, P; Villegas, R; Vrijheid, M; Wake, K; Wiart, J

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an estimate of a radio frequency (RF) dose as the amount of mobile phone RF energy absorbed at the location of a brain tumour, for use in the Interphone Epidemiological Study. We systematically evaluated and quantified all the main parameters thought to influence the amount of specific RF energy absorbed in the brain from mobile telephone use. For this, we identified the likely important determinants of RF specific energy absorption rate during protocol and questionnaire design, we collected information from study subjects, network operators and laboratories involved in specific energy absorption rate measurements and we studied potential modifiers of phone output through the use of software-modified phones. Data collected were analysed to assess the relative importance of the different factors, leading to the development of an algorithm to evaluate the total cumulative specific RF energy (in joules per kilogram), or dose, absorbed at a particular location in the brain. This algorithm was applied to Interphone Study subjects in five countries. The main determinants of total cumulative specific RF energy from mobile phones were communication system and frequency band, location in the brain and amount and duration of mobile phone use. Though there was substantial agreement between categorisation of subjects by cumulative specific RF energy and cumulative call time, misclassification was non-negligible, particularly at higher frequency bands. Factors such as adaptive power control (except in Code Division Multiple Access networks), discontinuous transmission and conditions of phone use were found to have a relatively minor influence on total cumulative specific RF energy. While amount and duration of use are important determinants of RF dose in the brain, their impact can be substantially modified by communication system, frequency band and location in the brain. It is important to take these into account in analyses of risk

  1. RF modeling of the ITER-relevant lower hybrid antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Belo, J.; Marfisi, L.; Artaud, J.F.; Bae, Y.S.; Berger-By, G.; Bernard, J.M.; Cara, Ph.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Decker, J.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Garcia, J.; Garibaldi, P.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hoang, G.T.

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the EFDA task HCD-08-03-01, a 5 GHz Lower Hybrid system which should be able to deliver 20 MW CW on ITER and sustain the expected high heat fluxes has been reviewed. The design and overall dimensions of the key RF elements of the launcher and its subsystem has been updated from the 2001 design in collaboration with ITER organization. Modeling of the LH wave propagation and absorption into the plasma shows that the optimal parallel index must be chosen between 1.9 and 2.0 for the ITER steady-state scenario. The present study has been made with n || = 2.0 but can be adapted for n || = 1.9. Individual components have been studied separately giving confidence on the global RF design of the whole antenna.

  2. Short-Period RF Undulator for a SASE Nanometer source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is described towards development of a RF undulator with a period < 1 cm, an undulator parameter K of the order of unity, and a gap greater than 2.25 mm. The application for the undulator is for a SASE source to produce 1 nm wavelength radiation using a low energy electron beam in the range 1-2 GeV. Particle orbit calculations in a conventional standing-wave resonator configuration show that the presence of a co-propagating component of RF field can cause deleterious motion for the undulating electrons that can seriously degrade their radiation spectrum. To obviate this problem, resonator designs were devised in which only the counter-propagating field components interact with the particles. Two resonator configurations with the same undulator parameter K = 0.4 have been devised and are described in this report.

  3. RF emittance in a low energy electron linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaye Hajari, Sh.; Haghtalab, S.; Shaker, H.; Kelisani, M. Dayyani

    2018-04-01

    Transverse beam dynamics of an 8 MeV low current (10 mA) S-band traveling wave electron linear accelerator has been studied and optimized. The main issue is to limit the beam emittance, mainly induced by the transverse RF forces. The linac is being constructed at Institute for Research in Fundamental Science (IPM), Tehran Iran Labeled as Iran's First Linac, nearly all components of this accelerator are designed and constructed within the country. This paper discusses the RF coupler induced field asymmetry and the corresponding emittance at different focusing levels, introduces a detailed beam dynamics design of a solenoid focusing channel aiming to reduce the emittance growth and studies the solenoid misalignment tolerances. In addition it has been demonstrated that a prebuncher cavity with appropriate parameters can help improving the beam quality in the transverse plane.

  4. Continued development of modeling tools and theory for RF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Mission Research Corporation (MRC) is pleased to present the Department of Energy (DOE) with its renewal proposal to the Continued Development of Modeling Tools and Theory for RF Heating program. The objective of the program is to continue and extend the earlier work done by the proposed principal investigator in the field of modeling (Radio Frequency) RF heating experiments in the large tokamak fusion experiments, particularly the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) device located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). An integral part of this work is the investigation and, in some cases, resolution of theoretical issues which pertain to accurate modeling. MRC is nearing the successful completion of the specified tasks of the Continued Development of Modeling Tools and Theory for RF Heating project. The following tasks are either completed or nearing completion. (1) Anisotropic temperature and rotation upgrades; (2) Modeling for relativistic ECRH; (3) Further documentation of SHOOT and SPRUCE. As a result of the progress achieved under this project, MRC has been urged to continue this effort. Specifically, during the performance of this project two topics were identified by PPPL personnel as new applications of the existing RF modeling tools. These two topics concern (a) future fast-wave current drive experiments on the large tokamaks including TFTR and (c) the interpretation of existing and future RF probe data from TFTR. To address each of these topics requires some modification or enhancement of the existing modeling tools, and the first topic requires resolution of certain theoretical issues to produce self-consistent results. This work falls within the scope of the original project and is more suited to the project's renewal than to the initiation of a new project

  5. Stochastic cooling with a double rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jie.

    1992-01-01

    Stochastic cooling for a bunched beam of hadrons stored in an accelerator with a double rf system of two different frequencies has been investigated. The double rf system broadens the spread in synchrotron-oscillation frequency of the particles when they mostly oscillate near the center of the rf bucket. Compared with the ease of a single rf system, the reduction rates of the bunch dimensions are significantly increased. When the rf voltage is raised, the reduction rate, instead of decreasing linearly, now is independent of the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. On the other hand, the spread in synchrotron-oscillation frequency becomes small with the double rf system, if the longitudinal oscillation amplitudes of the particles are comparable to the dimension of the rf bucket. Consequently, stochastic cooling is less effective when the bunch area is close to the bucket area

  6. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb 3 Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb 3 Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown

  7. PEP-II RF Cavity Revisited (LCC-0032)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmer, R.

    2004-03-23

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed.

  8. Very long pulse high-RF power test of a lower hybrid frequency antenna module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goniche, M; Brossaud, J; Barral, C; Berger-By, G; Bibet, Ph; Poli, S; Rey, G; Tonon, G [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d` Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Seki, M; Obara, K [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; and others

    1994-03-01

    Outgassing, induced by very long RF waves injection at high power density was studied in a module, able to be used for a lower hybrid frequency antenna. Good RF properties of the module are reported, however, resonance phenomena with strong absorption of RF power (15%) was observed at high temperature (T>400 deg C). A large outgassing data base is provided by the 75 shots cumulating 27 hours of RF injection. The comparison with previous experiments (Tore Supra and TdV prototype modules) confirm the effect of baking and results are consistent. Outgassing increases exponentially with -1/T, and a desorption model with an activation energy Ed {approx} 0.35 eV fits the data up to 400 deg C. In order to design vacuum pumping system for large lower hybrid frequency antenna, outgassing rates are given for different working temperatures. (author). 11 refs., 55 figs.

  9. Very long pulse high-RF power test of a lower hybrid frequency antenna module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goniche, M.; Brossaud, J.; Barral, C.; Berger-By, G.; Bibet, Ph.; Poli, S.; Rey, G.; Tonon, G.; Seki, M.; Obara, K.

    1994-03-01

    Outgassing, induced by very long RF waves injection at high power density was studied in a module, able to be used for a lower hybrid frequency antenna. Good RF properties of the module are reported, however, resonance phenomena with strong absorption of RF power (15%) was observed at high temperature (T>400 deg C). A large outgassing data base is provided by the 75 shots cumulating 27 hours of RF injection. The comparison with previous experiments (Tore Supra and TdV prototype modules) confirm the effect of baking and results are consistent. Outgassing increases exponentially with -1/T, and a desorption model with an activation energy Ed ∼ 0.35 eV fits the data up to 400 deg C. In order to design vacuum pumping system for large lower hybrid frequency antenna, outgassing rates are given for different working temperatures. (author). 11 refs., 55 figs

  10. Rf System for the NLCTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R.W.; Gold, S.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Hoag, H.A.; Holmes, S.G.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an X-Band RF system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator. The RF system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned and damped detuned accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLEDII energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. Correct phasing between the two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly aligning the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored with special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation of the sub-systems and their components are briefly presented.

  11. Low jitter RF distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  12. Oak Ridge rf Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; McCurdy, H.C.; McManamy, T.J.; Moeller, J.A.; Ryan, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rf Test Facility (RFTF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a national facility for the testing and evaluation of steady-state, high-power (approx.1.0-MW) ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components. The facility consists of a vacuum vessel and two fully tested superconducting development magnets from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program. These are arranged as a simple mirror with a mirror ratio of 4.8. The axial centerline distance between magnet throat centers is 112 cm. The vacuum vessel cavity has a large port (74 by 163 cm) and a test volume adequate for testing prototypic launchers for Doublet III-D (DIII-D), Tore Supra, and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Attached to the internal vessel walls are water-cooled panels for removing the injected rf power. The magnets are capable of generating a steady-state field of approx.3 T on axis in the magnet throats. Steady-state plasmas are generated in the facility by cyclotron resonance breakdown using a dedicated 200-kW, 28-GHz gyrotron. Available rf sources cover a frequency range of 2 to 200 MHz at 1.5 kW and 3 to 18 MHz at 200 kW, with several sources at intermediate parameters. Available in July 1986 will be a >1.0-MW, cw source spanning 40 to 80 MHz. 5 figs

  13. MulRF: a software package for phylogenetic analysis using multi-copy gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ruchi; Fernández-Baca, David; Burleigh, John Gordon

    2015-02-01

    MulRF is a platform-independent software package for phylogenetic analysis using multi-copy gene trees. It seeks the species tree that minimizes the Robinson-Foulds (RF) distance to the input trees using a generalization of the RF distance to multi-labeled trees. The underlying generic tree distance measure and fast running time make MulRF useful for inferring phylogenies from large collections of gene trees, in which multiple evolutionary processes as well as phylogenetic error may contribute to gene tree discord. MulRF implements several features for customizing the species tree search and assessing the results, and it provides a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) with tree visualization. The species tree search is implemented in C++ and the GUI in Java Swing. MulRF's executable as well as sample datasets and manual are available at http://genome.cs.iastate.edu/CBL/MulRF/, and the source code is available at https://github.com/ruchiherself/MulRFRepo. ruchic@ufl.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-12-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year.

  15. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year

  16. Fast-wave current drive modelling for large non-circular tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Swain, D.W.; Ehst, D.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that a key element in the development of an attractive tokamak reactor, and in the successful achievement of the mission of ITER, is the development of an efficient steady-state current drive technique. Fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies hold the promise to drive steady-state currents with the required efficiency and to effectively heat the plasma to ignition. Advantages over other heating and current drive techniques include low cost per watt and the ability to penetrate to the center of high-density plasmas. The primary issues that must be resolved are: can an antenna array be designed to radiate the required spectrum of waves and have adequate coupling properties? Will the rf power be efficiently absorbed by electrons in the desired velocity range without unacceptable parasitic damping by fuel ions or α particles? What will the efficiency of current drive be when toroidal effects such as trapped particles are included? Can a practical rf system be designed and integrated into the device? We have addressed these issues by performing extensive calculations with ORION, a 2-D code, and the ray tracing code RAYS, which calculate wave propagation, absorption and current drive in tokamak geometry, and with RIP, a 2-D code that self-consistently calculates current drive with MHD equilibrium. An important figure of merit in this context is the integrated, normalized current drive efficiency. The calculations that we present here emphasize the ITER device. We consider a low-frequency scenario such that no ion resonances appear in the machine, and a high-frequency scenario such that the deuterium second harmonic resonance is just outside the plasma and the tritium second harmonic is in the plasma, midway between the magnetic axis and the inside edge. In both cases electron currents are driven by combined TTMP and Landau damping of the fast waves

  17. Multi-cell disk-and-ring tapered structure for compact RF linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A.V.; Boucher, S.; Kutsaev, S. [RadiaBeam Systems LLC, 1713 Stewart Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404, US (United States); Hartzell, J. [RadiaBeam Technologies, LLC, 1717 Stewart Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404, US (United States); Savin, E. [RadiaBeam Technologies, LLC, 1717 Stewart Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404, US (United States); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-11

    A tubular disk-and-ring, tapered accelerating structure for small electron linacs and MicroLinacs is considered. It consists of metal and dielectric elements inserted into a metallic tube to eliminate multi-cell, multi-step brazing. The structure enables a wide range of phase velocities (including non-relativistic), a wide bandwidth allowing large number of cells (for standing wave mode) or short filling time (for traveling wave mode), combination of compensated and purely π-mode cells, alternative periodic focusing built-in to the RF structure (the disks), and combining of RF and vacuum windows. RF and accelerating performance of such a long structure having up to four dozens cells is analyzed. Some of beam dynamics, thermal, and vacuum aspects of the structure and MicroLinac performance are considered as well.

  18. Multi-cell disk-and-ring tapered structure for compact RF linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.V.; Boucher, S.; Kutsaev, S.; Hartzell, J.; Savin, E.

    2016-01-01

    A tubular disk-and-ring, tapered accelerating structure for small electron linacs and MicroLinacs is considered. It consists of metal and dielectric elements inserted into a metallic tube to eliminate multi-cell, multi-step brazing. The structure enables a wide range of phase velocities (including non-relativistic), a wide bandwidth allowing large number of cells (for standing wave mode) or short filling time (for traveling wave mode), combination of compensated and purely π-mode cells, alternative periodic focusing built-in to the RF structure (the disks), and combining of RF and vacuum windows. RF and accelerating performance of such a long structure having up to four dozens cells is analyzed. Some of beam dynamics, thermal, and vacuum aspects of the structure and MicroLinac performance are considered as well.

  19. Mechanical design of 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity for RHIC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, C.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Chang, X.; McIntyre, G.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wu, Q.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Cavity operating at 4.4K is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator with beam transmission along the centerline. This cavity will increase collision luminosity by providing a large longitudinal bucket for stored bunches of RHIC ion beam. The major components of this assembly are the niobium cavity with the mechanical tuner, its titanium helium vessel and vacuum cryostat, the support system, and the ports for HOM and fundamental dampers. The cavity and its helium vessel must meet equivalent safety with the ASME pressure vessel code and it must not be sensitive to frequency shift due to pressure fluctuations from the helium supply system. Frequency tuning achieved by a two stage mechanical tuner is required to meet performance parameters. This tuner mechanism pushes and pulls the tuning plate in the gap of niobium cavity. The tuner mechanism has two separate drive systems to provide both coarse and fine tuning capabilities. This paper discusses the design detail and how the design requirements are met.

  20. Design of RF structures for a superconducting proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, Rajni; Roy, Shweta; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main components of the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) programme in India is a 1 GeV, high intensity CW proton accelerator that will be superconducting after the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), i.e. after 3 MeV. The superconducting linac will consist of various superconducting structures like Half Wave Resonators, Spoke Resonators and elliptical cavities, operating at RF frequencies of 162.5 MHz, 325 MHz and 650 MHz. The paper will discuss the optimization of the electromagnetic design of the various superconducting structures. (author)

  1. Phase synchronization of multiple klystrons in RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The first LEDA RF system includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz, continuous wave, klystrons driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). A phase control loop is necessary for each individual klystron in order to guarantee the phase matching of these klystrons. To meet this objective, they propose adaptive PI controllers which are based on simple adaptive control. These controllers guarantee not only phase matching but also amplitude matching

  2. Impact of electron trapping on RF current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Engelmann, F.

    1987-01-01

    The impact of the presence of trapped electrons on noninductive current drive by RF waves in tokamak plasmas is investigated. The appropriate response function, allowing to express the current drive efficiency J/P by a simple analytical formula, has been derived. The approach displays the reasons for the degradation of the current drive efficiency away from the plasma axis in the case of methods relying on the diffusion of electrons in the velocity component perpendicular to the confining magnetic field. It is shown that this degradation is appreciable even for large resonant parallel velocities. (author) [pt

  3. Beam induced rf cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Wang, J.M.

    1998-10-01

    The authors calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ω r of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω ο . The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(hω ο t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting rf cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kinds of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  4. RF and microwave microelectronics packaging II

    CERN Document Server

    Sturdivant, Rick

    2017-01-01

    Reviews RF, microwave, and microelectronics assembly process, quality control, and failure analysis Bridges the gap between low cost commercial and hi-res RF/Microwave packaging technologies Engages in an in-depth discussion of challenges in packaging and assembly of advanced high-power amplifiers This book presents the latest developments in packaging for high-frequency electronics. It is a companion volume to “RF and Microwave Microelectronics Packaging” (2010) and covers the latest developments in thermal management, electrical/RF/thermal-mechanical designs and simulations, packaging and processing methods, and other RF and microwave packaging topics. Chapters provide detailed coverage of phased arrays, T/R modules, 3D transitions, high thermal conductivity materials, carbon nanotubes and graphene advanced materials, and chip size packaging for RF MEMS. It appeals to practicing engineers in the electronic packaging and high-frequency electronics domain, and to academic researchers interested in underst...

  5. Lasers for RF guns: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, laser driven RF guns have matured from a device under development to a proven source for high brightness and low emittance electron beams. The reliability of the electron beam from these sources is dictated by the laser system that drives it. In addition, capabilities of the laser systems play a vital role in the design of the electron source for future machines such as the TESLA and NLC. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for discussing the design criteria for the laser systems so that the reliability of the existing sources could be improved and the future machines could be serviced. The Workshop brought together experts in RF Guns, accelerators, and lasers, from both the commercial and academic community. Most of the presentations, discussions and conclusions at the workshop are included in these proceedings. The contents are divided into three sections, Section I contains the invited talks that outline the requirements of the RF Guns and the capabilities of the laser systems to meet these requirements. Section II includes most of the papers presented in the poster session. These papers describe various laser systems used with electron guns, schemes to modify the laser beam profile to optimize the electron bunch, and computer simulations of electron trajectories. Section III contains the summaries of the working groups. As the summary section indicates, with sufficient feed back systems, the electron gun could be made to operate reliably with minimum downtime, using commercial lasers currently available. The design of laser systems for future colliders depend critically on the choice of the cathode m the gun and its efficiency. Tentative designs of laser systems for the TESLA test facility and LCLS had been drawn assuming a copper cathode. Using a more efficient cathode will ease the energy requirement of the laser and simplify the design. The individual papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  6. Physics of codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.; Jones, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The title given this paper is a bit presumptuous, since one can hardly expect to cover the physics incorporated into all the codes already written and currently being written. The authors focus on those codes which have been found to be particularly useful in the analysis and design of linacs. At that the authors will be a bit parochial and discuss primarily those codes used for the design of radio-frequency (rf) linacs, although the discussions of TRANSPORT and MARYLIE have little to do with the time structures of the beams being analyzed. The plan of this paper is first to describe rather simply the concepts of emittance and brightness, then to describe rather briefly each of the codes TRANSPORT, PARMTEQ, TBCI, MARYLIE, and ISIS, indicating what physics is and is not included in each of them. It is expected that the vast majority of what is covered will apply equally well to protons and electrons (and other particles). This material is intended to be tutorial in nature and can in no way be expected to be exhaustive. 31 references, 4 figures

  7. On the frequency scalings of RF guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.C.; Chen, S.C.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A frequency scaling law for RF guns is derived from the normalized Vlasov-Maxwell equations. It shows that higher frequency RF guns can generate higher brightness beams under the assumption that the accelerating gradient and all beam and structure parameters are scaled with the RF frequency. Numerical simulation results using MAGIC confirm the scaling law. A discussion of the range of applicability of the law is presented. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Analog techniques in CEBAF's RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional RF technology. Diode related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF RF control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. RF signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  9. Analog techniques in CEBAF'S RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional rf technology. Diode-related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF rf control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. Rf signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  10. Selfconsistent RF driven and bootstrap currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This important problem selfconsistent calculations of the bootstrap current with RF, taking into account possible synergistic effects, is addressed for the case of lower hybrid (LH) and electron cyclotron (EC) current drive by numerically solving the electron drift kinetic equation. Calculations are performed using a new, fast, and fully implicit code which solves the 3-D relativistic Fokker-Planck equation with quasilinear diffusion. These calculations take into account the perturbations to the electron distribution due to radial drifts induced by magnetic field gradient and curvature. While the synergism between bootstrap and LH-driven current does not seem to exceed 15%, it can reach 30-40% with the EC-driven current for some plasma parameters. In addition, considerable current can be generated by judiciously using ECCD with the Okhawa effect. This is in contrast to the usual ECCD which tries to avoid it. A detailed analysis of the numerical results is presented using a simplified analytical model which incorporates the underlying physical processes. (author)

  11. Influence of radiofrequency-electromagnetic waves from 3rd-generation cellular phones on fertilization and embryo development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Okutsu, Miho; Suganuma, Ryota; Komiya, Hiromi; Nakatani-Enomoto, Setsu; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Tateno, Hiroyuki; Fujimori, Keiya

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3rd-generation (3G) cellular phone radiofrequency-electromagnetic wave (RF-EMW) exposure on fertilization and embryogenesis in mice. Oocytes and spermatozoa were exposed to 3G cellular phone RF-EMWs, 1.95 GHz wideband code division multiple access, at a specific absorption rate of 2 mW/g for 60 min, or to sham exposure. After RF-EMW exposure, in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection were performed. Rates of fertilization, embryogenesis (8-cell embryo, blastocyst), and chromosome aberration were compared between the combined spermatozoa and oocyte groups: both exposed, both non-exposed, one exposed, and the other non-exposed. Rates of fertilization, embryogenesis, and blastocyst formation did not change significantly across the four groups. Considering that the degree of exposure in the present study was ≥100 times greater than daily exposure of human spermatozoa and even greater than daily exposure of oocytes, the present results indicate safety of RF-EMW exposure in humans. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:466-473, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Phased-array antenna system for electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive experiments in QUEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kalinnikova, E.I.

    2010-11-01

    The phased-array antenna system for Electron Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive (EBWH/CD) experiments has been developed in the QUEST. The antenna was designed to excite a pure O-mode wave in the oblique injection for the EBWH/CD experiments, and was tested at a low power level. The measured two orthogonal fields were in excellent agreements with the fields evaluated by a developed Kirchhoff code. The heat load and thermal stress in CW 200 kW operation were analyzed with finite element codes. The phased array has been fast scanned [∼10 4 degree/s] to control the incident polarization and angle to follow time evolutions of the plasma current and density. The RF startup and sustainment experiments were conducted using the developed antenna system. The plasma current (< ∼15 kA) with an aspect ratio of 1.5 was started up and sustained by only RF injection. The long pulse discharge of 10 kA was attained for 40 s with the 30 kW injection. (author)

  13. Design for the National RF Test Facility at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual and preliminary engineering design for the National RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed. The facility will comprise a single mirror configuration embodying two superconducting development coils from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program on either side of a cavity designed for full-scale antenna testing. The coils are capable of generating a 1.2-T field at the axial midpoint between the coils separated by 1.0 m. The vacuum vessel will be a stainless steel, water-cooled structure having an 85-cm-radius central cavity. The facility will have the use of a number of continuous wave (cw), radio-frequency (rf) sources at levels including 600 kW at 80 MHz and 100 kW at 28 GHz. Several plasma sources will provide a wide range of plasma environments, including densities as high as approx. 5 x 10 13 cm -3 and temperatures on the order of approx. 10 eV. Furthermore, a wide range of diagnostics will be available to the experimenter for accurate appraisal of rf testing

  14. RF-cavity for the X-ray generator NESTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Gvozd, A.M.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Chernov, K.N.; Ostreyko, G.N.; Sedlyarov, I.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology 225 MeV electron storage ring NESTOR is under development. The paper describes the design and parameters of a 700 MHz cavity that has been fabricated at BINP for the NESTOR RF-system. Now the low-power and vacuum tests of the cavity are under way at BINP. We present here the results of 3D simulations of the cavity with ANSYS code. The problem of multibunch instabilities in NESTOR is also discussed

  15. Dynamic modelling of tearing mode stabilization by RF current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Zabiego, M.; Gianakon, T.A.; Garbet, X.; Bernabei, S.

    1998-01-01

    The theory of tearing mode stabilization in toroidal plasmas by RF-driven currents that are modulated in phase with the island rotation is investigated. A time scale analysis of the phenomena involved indicates that transient effects, such as finite time response of the driven currents, island rotation during the power pulses, and the inductive response of the plasma, are intrinsically important. A dynamic model of such effects is developed, based on a 3-D Fokker-Planck code coupled to both the electric field diffusion and the island evolution equations. Extensive applications to both Electron Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid current drive in ITER are presented. (author)

  16. RF front-end world class designs

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Janine

    2009-01-01

    All the design and development inspiration and direction a harware engineer needs in one blockbuster book! Janine Love site editor for RF Design Line,columnist, and author has selected the very best RF design material from the Newnes portfolio and has compiled it into this volume. The result is a book covering the gamut of RF front end design from antenna and filter design fundamentals to optimized layout techniques with a strong pragmatic emphasis. In addition to specific design techniques and practices, this book also discusses various approaches to solving RF front end design problems and h

  17. High power RF transmission line component development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I.

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant ε=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  18. High power RF transmission line component development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Bae, Y. D.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J.; Gu, S. H.; Yang, J. R.; Hahm, Y. S.; Oh, G. S.; Lee, J. R.; Lee, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kang, M. S.; Oh, S. H.; Lee, W.I

    1999-12-01

    We developed the liquid stub and phase shifter which are the key high RF power transmission line components. They show reliable operation characteristics and increased insulation capability, and reduced the size by using liquid (silicon oil, dielectric constant {epsilon}=2.72) instead of gas for insulating dielectric material. They do not have finger stock for the electric contact so the local temperature rise due to irregular contact and RF breakdown due to scratch in conductor are prevented. They can be utilized in broadcasting, radar facility which require high RF power transmission. Moreover, they are key components in RF heating system for fusion reactor. (author)

  19. Reflector stack optimization for Bulk Acoustic Wave resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Sumy

    2011-01-01

    Thin-film bulk-acoustic-wave (BAW) devices are used for RF selectivity in mobile communication system and other wireless applications. Currently, the conventional RF filters are getting replaced by BAW filters in all major cell phone standards. In this thesis, we study solidly mounted BAW resonators

  20. Simulation 3D electromagnetique et thermomecanique d'une cavite RF

    CERN Document Server

    Launay, F

    2003-01-01

    Une etude thermomecanique 3D de l'extremite de lame a l'entree du RFQ d'IPHI a ete menee avec le code I-DEAS. Le but est de comparer les temperatures atteintes, les contraintes et les deformations calculees a partir des densites de puissance RF deposee sur la lame obtenues a partir de deux codes de calcul electromagnetique differents: SOPRANO et MAFIA

  1. Fast wave current drive in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Forest, C.B.; Freeman, R.L.; Gohil, P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.-R.

    1995-02-01

    The non-inductive current drive from fast Alfven waves launched by a directional four-element antenna was measured in the DIII-D tokamak. The fast wave frequency (60 MHz) was eight times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma center. An array of rf pickup loops at several locations around the torus was used to verify the directivity of the four-element antenna. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For discharges with steady plasma current, up to 110 kA of FWCD was inferred from an analysis of the loop voltage, with a maximum non-inductive current (FWCD, ECCD, and bootstrap) of 195 out of 310 kA. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with central electron temperature. For low current discharges, the FWCD efficiency was degraded due to incomplete fast wave damping. The experimental FWCD was found to agree with predictions from the CURRAY ray-tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modeling along with multiple pass damping

  2. Preparations for Upgrading the RF Systems of the PS Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Simon; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The accelerators of the LHC injector chain need to be upgraded to provide the HL-LHC beams. The PS Booster, the first synchrotron in the LHC injection chain, uses three different RF systems (first, second and up to tenth harmonic) in each of its four rings. As part of the LHC Injector Upgrade the current ferrite RF systems will be replaced with broadband Finemet cavities, increasing the flexibility of the RF system. A Finemet test cavity has been installed in Ring 4 to investigate its effect on machine performance, especially beam stability, during extensive experimental studies. Due to large space charge impedance Landau damping is lost through most of the cycle in single harmonic operation, but is recovered when using the second harmonic and controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up. This paper compares beam parameters during acceleration with and without the Finemet test cavity. Comparisons were made using beam measurements and simulations with the BLonD code based on a full PS Booster impedance model. Thi...

  3. RF Power Generation in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, O C; Valuch, D

    2003-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be captured and then accelerated to their final energies of 2 x 7 TeV by two identical 400 MHz RF systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell super-conducting (SC) cavity. Four klystrons are powered by a 100 kV, 40A AC/DC power converter, previously used for the operation of the LEP klystrons. A five-gap thyratron crowbar protects the four klystrons in each of these units. The technical specification and measured performance of the various high-power elements are discussed. These include the 400MHz/300kW klystrons with emphasis on their group delay and the three-port circulators, which have to cope with peak reflected power levels up to twice the simultaneously applied incident power of 300 kW. In addition, a novel ferrite loaded waveguide absorber, used as termination for port No...

  4. Fungicidal Effects of Plasma and Radio-Wave Pre-treatments on Seeds of Grain Crops and Legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Irina; Azharonok, Viktor; Shik, Alexander; Antoniuk, Alexandra; Terletskaya, Natalia

    An influence of RF plasma and RF electromagnetic field pre-treatments on level of fungal infection of some important agricultural plants has been studied. It is shown that pre-sowing plasma and radio-wave seeds treatments contribute to their germination enhancement and plant productivity improvement owing to stimulative and fungicidal effect of plasma and RF electromagnetic field irradiation.

  5. Program POD; A computer code to calculate nuclear elastic scattering cross sections with the optical model and neutron inelastic scattering cross sections by the distorted-wave born approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Akira; Kunieda, Satoshi; Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Shibata, Keiichi; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Fukahori, Tokio; Katakura, Jun-ichi

    2005-07-01

    The computer code, POD, was developed to calculate angle-differential cross sections and analyzing powers for shape-elastic scattering for collisions of neutron or light ions with target nucleus. The cross sections are computed with the optical model. Angle-differential cross sections for neutron inelastic scattering can also be calculated with the distorted-wave Born approximation. The optical model potential parameters are the most essential inputs for those model computations. In this program, the cross sections and analyzing powers are obtained by using the existing local or global parameters. The parameters can also be inputted by users. In this report, the theoretical formulas, the computational methods, and the input parameters are explained. The sample inputs and outputs are also presented. (author)

  6. Direct RF modulation transmitter, sampling clock frequency setting method for direct RF modulation transmitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a direct RF modulation transmitter capable of satisfying a radiation level regulation even without providing a SAW filter. SOLUTION: A direct RF modulation transmitter includes: digital/RF converters 105, 106 to which an I digital baseband signal, a Q digital

  7. Direct RF modulation transmitter, sampling clock frequency setting method for direct RF modulation transmitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukuda, Shuichi; Nauta, Bram

    2014-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a direct RF modulation transmitter capable of satisfying a radiation level regulation even without providing a SAW filter. SOLUTION: A direct RF modulation transmitter includes: digital/RF converters 105, 106 to which an I digital baseband signal, a Q digital

  8. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as γ = 0.4 x 10 18 T eo (keV) [A/m 2 W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with dear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. There is some experimental evidence for fast wave absorption by energetic beam ions at high cyclotron harmonic resonances

  9. A divide-down RF source generation system for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Lenkszus, F.; Laird, R.

    1997-01-01

    A divide-down rf source system has been designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory to provide harmonically-related and phase-locked rf source signals between the APS 352-MHz storage ring and booster synchrotron rf systems and the 9.77-MHz and 117-MHz positron accumulator ring rf systems. The design provides rapid switching capability back to individual rf synthesizers for each one. The system also contains a digital bucket phase shifter for injection bucket selection. Input 352-MHz rf from a master synthesizer is supplied to a VXI-based ECL divider board which produces 117-MHz and 9.77-MHz square-wave outputs. These outputs are passed through low-pass filters to produce pure signals at the required fundamental frequencies. These signals, plus signals at the same frequencies from independent synthesizers, are fed to an interface chassis where source selection is made via local/remote control of coaxial relays. This chassis also produces buffered outputs at each frequency for monitoring and synchronization of ancillary equipment

  10. Application of new simulation algorithms for modeling rf diagnostics of electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Traveling wave rf diagnostics of electron cloud build-up show promise as a non-destructive technique for measuring plasma density and the efficacy of mitigation techniques. However, it is very difficult to derive an absolute measure of plasma density from experimental measurements for a variety of technical reasons. Detailed numerical simulations are vital in order to understand experimental data, and have successfully modeled build-up. Such simulations are limited in their ability to reproduce experimental data due to the large separation of scales inherent to the problem. Namely, one must resolve both rf frequencies in the GHz range, as well as the plasma modulation frequency of tens of MHz, while running for very long simulations times, on the order of microseconds. The application of new numerical simulation techniques allow us to bridge the simulation scales in this problem and produce spectra that can be directly compared to experiments. The first method is to use a plasma dielectric model to measure plasma-induced phase shifts in the rf wave. The dielectric is modulated at a low frequency, simulating the effects of multiple bunch crossings. This allows simulations to be performed without kinetic particles representing the plasma, which both speeds up the simulations as well as reduces numerical noise from interpolation of particle charge and currents onto the computational grid. Secondly we utilize a port boundary condition model to simultaneously absorb rf at the simulation boundaries, and to launch the rf into the simulation. This method improves the accuracy of simulations by restricting rf frequencies better than adding an external (finite) current source to drive rf, and absorbing layers at the boundaries. We also explore the effects of non-uniform plasma densities on the simulated spectra.

  11. High power tests of X-band RF windows at KEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otake, Yuji [Earthquake Research Inst., Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Tokumoto, Shuichi; Kazakov, Sergei Yu.; Odagiri, Junichi; Mizuno, Hajime

    1997-04-01

    Various RF windows comprising a short pill-box, a long pill-box, a TW (traveling wave)-mode and three TE11-mode horn types have been developed for an X-band high-power pulse klystron with two output windows for JLC (Japan Linear Collider). The output RF power of the klystron is designed to be 130 MW with the 800 ns pulse duration. Since this X-band klystron has two output windows, the maximum RF power of the window must be over 85 MW. The design principle for the windows is to reduce the RF-power density and/or the electric-field strength at the ceramic part compared with that of an ordinary pill-box-type window. Their reduction is effective to increase the handling RF power of the window. To confirm that the difference among the electric-field strengths depends on their RF structures, High-power tests of the above-mentioned windows were successfully carried out using a traveling-wave resonator (TWR) for the horns and the TW-mode type and, installing them directly to klystron output waveguides for the short and long pill-box type. Based upon the operation experience of S-band windows, two kinds of ceramic materials were used for these tests. The TE11-mode 1/2{lambda}g-1 window was tested up to the RF peak-power of 84 MW with the 700 ns pulse duration in the TWR. (J.P.N)

  12. Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanadham, C; Jayaprakash, D; Mishra, R L

    2003-01-01

    Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave copper R.F resonators, have been taken up in our laboratory, An ultra high vacuum system was made for this purpose. Niobium exhibits superconducting properties at liquid Helium temperature. A uniform coating of about 1.5 mu m of niobium on the internal surfaces of the copper resonant cavities is desired. Power dissipation in the resonators can be greatly reduced by making the internal surfaces of the R.F cavity super conducting. (author)

  13. Basic toroidal Effects on Alfven Wave Current in Small Aspect Ratio Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burma, C.; Cuperman, S.; Komoshvili, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Alfven wave current drive (AWCD) in small aspect ratio Tokamaks is properly calculated, with consideration of the basic toroidicity effects present in (i) the dielectric tensor-operator (involving the strongly toroidal equilibrium profiles), (ii) the structure of the r.f. fields obtained as a solution of the wave equation (through Maxwell's equations' toroidal operators as well as the conversion rate and conversion layer location, depending also on the equilibrium profiles) and (iii) the formulation of the AWCD (which, besides its dependence on the r.f. fields - affected by toroidicity as mentioned at points (i) and (ii) - also requires the equilibrium-magnetic-surface averaging of non-resonant forces involved). Thus, we consider consistent equilibrium profiles with neo-classical conductivity corresponding to an ohmic START-like discharge; use a resistive (anisotropic) MHD dielectric tensor-operator Edith practically no limitations, adequate to describe the plasma response in the pre-heated stage ; solve numerically the 2(1/2)D full- wave equation by the aid of an advanced finite element code developed in; and evaluate the AWCD by the aid of the recently proposed, quite general formulation holding in the case of strongly toroidal fusion devices and including contributions due to helicity injection, momentum transfer and plasma Bow. A general discussion of the results obtained in this work is presented

  14. Low frequency RF heating of plasmas in a toroidal stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovato, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of transit-time magnetic pumping and Alfven wave heating have been done in the Proto-Cleo stellarator. Both plasma heating and plasma confinement have been investigated. A traveling wave was launched around the Proto-Cleo l = 2, 6 field period stellarator to attempt transit-time magnetic pumping of a pulsed electron beam moving along the magnetic field lines. An apparent loss of the beam was seen when the transit-time magnetic pumping was applied. A random walk diffusion of the beam electrons with a step size determined by the radial EXB drift due to the poloidal electric field agrees well with the experimental results. Alfven wave heating was applied to plasmas in the Proto-Cleo l = 3, 7 field period stellarator. Global excitation of Alfven waves was accomplished by exciting an electrostatically shielded helical winding corresponding to a q = 3 rational field line with a pulsed, high-power RF source. Theoretical analysis of this helical wave launcher predicted effective energy absorption in the Proto-Cleo gun-produced plasma

  15. Coding Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Burderi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of decipherability conditions for codes weaker than Unique Decipherability (UD, we introduce the notion of coding partition. Such a notion generalizes that of UD code and, for codes that are not UD, allows to recover the ``unique decipherability" at the level of the classes of the partition. By tacking into account the natural order between the partitions, we define the characteristic partition of a code X as the finest coding partition of X. This leads to introduce the canonical decomposition of a code in at most one unambiguouscomponent and other (if any totally ambiguouscomponents. In the case the code is finite, we give an algorithm for computing its canonical partition. This, in particular, allows to decide whether a given partition of a finite code X is a coding partition. This last problem is then approached in the case the code is a rational set. We prove its decidability under the hypothesis that the partition contains a finite number of classes and each class is a rational set. Moreover we conjecture that the canonical partition satisfies such a hypothesis. Finally we consider also some relationships between coding partitions and varieties of codes.

  16. Development of SMM wave laser scattering apparatus for the measurements of waves and turbulences in the tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.; Hamada, Y.; Yamashita, T.; Ikeda, M.; Nakamura, M.

    1980-01-01

    The SMM wave laser scattering apparatus has been developed for the measurement of the waves and turbulences in the plasma. This apparatus will help greatly to clarify the physics of RF heating of the tokamak plasma. The present status of main parts of the apparatus, the SMM wave laser and the Schottky barrier diode mixer for the heterodyne receiver, are described. (author)

  17. 17th International Conference on RF Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Laxdal, Robert E.; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    RF superconductivity is the key technology of accelerators for particle physics, nuclear physics and light sources. SRF 2015 covered the latest advances in the science, technology, and applications of superconducting RF. There was also an industrial exhibit during the conference with the key vendors in the community available to discuss their capabilities and products.

  18. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the 70...

  19. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF safety...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable devices...

  1. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to the...

  2. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-01-01

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed

  3. Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lax, J.; Lindner, A.; Richter, R.; Ridgeway, W.

    1991-01-01

    With the assistance of the DOE In-house Energy Management Program, the Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier systems have been successfully upgraded to reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This recently completed project removed the energy-inefficient plate voltage modulator circuits that were used in conjunction with the final stage RF amplifiers. Construction, design, and operating parameters are described in detail

  4. Plasma edge cooling during RF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckewer, S.; Hawryluk, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A new approach to prevent the influx of high-Z impurities into the core of a tokamak discharge by using RF power to modify the edge plasma temperature profile is presented. This concept is based on spectroscopic measurements on PLT during ohmic heating and ATC during RF heating. A one dimensional impurity transport model is used to interpret the ATC results

  5. Coupling of RF antennas to large volume helicon plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Large volume helicon plasma sources are of particular interest for large scale semiconductor processing, high power plasma propulsion and recently plasma-material interaction under fusion conditions. This work is devoted to studying the coupling of four typical RF antennas to helicon plasma with infinite length and diameter of 0.5 m, and exploring its frequency dependence in the range of 13.56-70 MHz for coupling optimization. It is found that loop antenna is more efficient than half helix, Boswell and Nagoya III antennas for power absorption; radially parabolic density profile overwhelms Gaussian density profile in terms of antenna coupling for low-density plasma, but the superiority reverses for high-density plasma. Increasing the driving frequency results in power absorption more near plasma edge, but the overall power absorption increases with frequency. Perpendicular stream plots of wave magnetic field, wave electric field and perturbed current are also presented. This work can serve as an important reference for the experimental design of large volume helicon plasma source with high RF power.

  6. Electron pulse shaping in the FELIX RF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weits, H.H.; Geer, C.A.J. van der; Oepts, D.; Meer, A.F.G. van der

    1999-01-01

    The FELIX free-electron laser uses short pulses of relativistic electrons produced by an RF accelerator. The design target for the duration of these electron bunches was around 3 ps. In experiments we observed that the bunches emit coherently enhanced spontaneous emission (CSE) when they travel through an undulator. It was demonstrated that the power level of the CSE critically depends on the settings of the accelerator. In this article we seek to explain these observations by studying the length and shape of the electron bunches as a function of the settings of the accelerator. A particle-tracking model was used to simulate the acceleration and transport processes. These include bunch compression in a 14-cell travelling wave buncher cavity, acceleration in a travelling wave linear accelerator, and passage through a (dispersive) chicane structure. The effect of the phase setting of the RF accelerating field with respect to the arrival time of the electron bunch in each accelerator structure was studied. The parameter range of the simulations is related to that of an actual free-electron laser experiment using these bunches. We find that, for specific settings of the accelerating system, electron pulses with a length of 350 μm FWHM (1 ps) are produced. The charge in the bunch rises steeply within a distance of 25 μm. This bunch shape explains the high level of coherently enhanced spontaneous emission observed in the FELIX laser. (author)

  7. RF Rectification on LAPD and NSTX: the relationship between rectified currents and potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. J.; Carter, T.; Caughman, J. B.; van Compernolle, B.; Gekelman, W.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Lau, C.; Martin, E. H.; Pribyl, P.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    RF rectification is a sheath phenomenon important in the fusion community for impurity injection, hot spot formation on plasma-facing components, modifications of the scrape-off layer, and as a far-field sink of wave power. The latter is of particular concern for the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), where a substantial fraction of the fast-wave power is lost to the divertor along scrape-off layer field lines. To assess the relationship between rectified currents and rectified voltages, detailed experiments have been performed on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). An electron current is measured flowing out of the antenna and into the limiters, consistent with RF rectification with a higher RF potential at the antenna. The scaling of this current with RF power will be presented. The limiters are also floated to inhibit this DC current; the impact of this change on plasma-potential and wave-field measurements will be shown. Comparison to data from divertor probes in NSTX will be made. These experiments on a flexible mid-sized experiment will provide insight and guidance into the effects of ICRF on the edge plasma in larger fusion experiments. Funded by the DOE OFES (DE-FC02-07ER54918 and DE-AC02-09CH11466), NSF (NSF- PHY 1036140), and the Univ. of California (12-LR- 237124).

  8. Tunable Q-Factor RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Kazakevitch, Gregory [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    Intense neutrino beam is a unique probe for researching beyond the standard model. Fermilab is the main institution to produce the most powerful and widespectrum neutrino beam. From that respective, a radiation robust beam diagnostic system is a critical element in order to maintain the quality of the neutrino beam. Within this context, a novel radiation-resistive beam profile monitor based on a gasfilled RF cavity is proposed. The goal of this measurement is to study a tunable Qfactor RF cavity to determine the accuracy of the RF signal as a function of the quality factor. Specifically, measurement error of the Q-factor in the RF calibration is investigated. Then, the RF system will be improved to minimize signal error.

  9. Pulsed rf systems for large storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1979-03-01

    The possibility is considered that by using a pulsed rf system a substantial reduction can be made in the rf power requirement for the next generation of large storage rings. For a ring with a sufficiently large circumference, the time between bunch passages, T/sub b/, can exceed the cavity filling time, T/sub f/. As the ratio T/sub b//T/sub f/ increases, it is clear that at some point the average power requirement can be reduced by pulsing the rf to the cavities. In this mode of operation, the rf power is turned on a filling time or so before the arrival of a bunch and is switched off again at the time of bunch passage. There is no rf energy in the accelerating structure, and hence no power dissipation, for most of the period between bunches

  10. High power RF oscillator with Marx generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Izumi

    1980-01-01

    A method to maintain RF oscillation by using many Marx generators was proposed and studied experimentally. Many charging circuits were connected to an oscillator circuit, and successive pulsed charging was made. This successive charging amplified and maintained the RF oscillation. The use of vacuum gaps and high power silicon diodes improved the characteristics of RF current cut-off of the circuit. The efficiency of the pulsed charging from Marx generators to a condenser was theoretically investigated. The theoretical result showed the maximum efficiency of 0.98. The practical efficiency obtained by using a proposed circuit with a high power oscillator was in the range 0.50 to 0.56. The obtained effective output power of the RF pulses was 11 MW. The maximum holding time of the RF pulses was about 21 microsecond. (Kato, T.)

  11. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper

  12. JET ({sup 3}He)-D scenarios relying on RF heating: survey of selected recent experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eester, D; Lerche, E; Andrew, Y; Biewer, T M; Casati, A; Crombe, K; De la Luna, E; Ericsson, G; Felton, R; Giacomelli, L; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N; Hellesen, C; Hjalmarsson, A; Joffrin, E; Kaellne, J; Kiptily, V; Lomas, P; Mantica, P; Marinoni, A [JET-EFDA Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2009-04-15

    Recent JET experiments have been devoted to the study of ({sup 3}He)-D plasmas involving radio frequency (RF) heating. This paper starts by discussing the RF heating efficiency theoretically expected in such plasmas, covering both relevant aspects of wave and of particle dynamics. Then it gives a concise summary of the main conclusions drawn from recent experiments that were either focusing on studying RF heating physics aspects or that were adopting RF heating as a tool to study plasma behavior. Depending on the minority concentration chosen, different physical phenomena are observed. At very low concentration (X[{sup 3}He] < 1%), energetic tails are formed which trigger MHD activity and result in loss of fast particles. Alfven cascades were observed and gamma ray tomography indirectly shows the impact of sawtooth crashes on the fast particle orbits. Low concentration (X[{sup 3}He] < 10%) favors minority heating while for X[{sup 3}He] >> 10% electron mode conversion damping becomes dominant. Evidence for the Fuchs et al standing wave effect (Fuchs et al 1995 Phys. Plasmas 2 1637-47) on the absorption is presented. RF induced deuterium tails were observed in mode conversion experiments with large X[{sup 3}He] ({approx}18%). As tentative modeling shows, the formation of these tails can be explained as a consequence of wave power absorption by neutral beam particles that efficiently interact with the waves well away from the cold D cyclotron resonance position as a result of their substantial Doppler shift. As both ion and electron RF power deposition profiles in ({sup 3}He)-D plasmas are fairly narrow-giving rise to localized heat sources-the RF heating method is an ideal tool for performing transport studies. Various of the experiments discussed here were done in plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs). ITBs are identified as regions with locally reduced diffusivity, where poloidal spinning up of the plasma is observed. The present know-how on the role of

  13. Electron runaway in rf discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1992-10-01

    The critical electric field is computed as a function of pressure and starting energy for electrons to run away to high energies in moderate pressure discharges. The runaway conditions depend critically on the shape of the elastic cross section vs. energy curve. Computations are made for H, H 2 , and He gases, and it is shown that runaway occurs much more readily in atomic hydrogen than in the other gases. The values of the runaway fields are larger than would normally occur in dc discharges, where large voltages would lead to arc formation. However, in rf discharges such electric fields can be sustained over times long compared to electron transit times but short compared to ion transit times. (author)

  14. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM 210 mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities

  15. RF field measurements in the vicinity of an ICRF antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Intrator, T.; Roberts, D.; Hershkowitz, N.; Tataronis, J.; Grossmann, W.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the rf fields near an ICRF antenna installed in the central cell of the Phaedrus-B tandem mirror have been made, both in vacuum and in the presence of plasma. The antenna is a Faraday shielded partial turn loop. The front surface of the Faraday shield is composed of cylindrical elements in an arrangement similar to the Faraday shield design employed on TFTR. The antenna is run at relatively low power levels, in the 3.5-10 MHz frequency range. Two other ICRF systems in the phaedrus-B central cell sustain and heat the plasma at the 400 KW level. The vacuum field measurements are compared with the predictions of the ARGUS code, which models details of the Faraday shield structure. Fields in the plasma are modelled by the ANTENA code. Particle currents collected by the Faraday shield during plasma operation are also observed

  16. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  17. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao, E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-03-21

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  18. Fast digital feedback control systems for accelerator RF system using FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagduwal, Pritam Singh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Tiwari, Nitesh; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback control system plays important role for proper injection and acceleration of beam in particle accelerators by providing the required amplitude and phase stability of RF fields in accelerating structures. Advancement in the field of digital technology enables us to develop fast digital feedback control system for RF applications. Digital Low Level RF (LLRF) system offers the inherent advantages of Digital System like flexibility, adaptability, good repeatability and reduced long time drift errors compared to analog system. To implement the feedback control algorithm, I/Q control scheme is used. By properly sampling the down converted IF signal using fast ADC we get accurate feedback signal and also eliminates the need of two separate detectors for amplitude and phase detection. Controller is implemented in Vertex-4 FPGA. Codes for control algorithms which controls the amplitude and phase in all four quadrants with good accuracy are written in the VHDL. I/Q modulator works as common actuator for both amplitude and phase correction. Synchronization between RF, LO and ADC clock is indispensable and has been achieved by deriving the clock and LO signal from RF signal itself. Control system has been successfully tested in lab with phase and amplitude stability better then ±1% and ±1° respectively. High frequency RF signal is down converted to IF using the super heterodyne technique. Super heterodyne principal not only brings the RF signal to the Low IF frequency at which it can be easily processed but also enables us to use the same hardware and software for other RF frequencies with some minor modification. (author)

  19. State-Of High Brightness RF Photo-Injector Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Massimo; Clendenin, Jym; Palmer, Dennis; Rosenzweig, James; Serafini, Luca

    2000-04-01

    The art of designing optimized high brightness electron RF Photo-Injectors has moved in the last decade from a cut and try procedure, guided by experimental experience and time consuming particle tracking simulations, up to a fast parameter space scanning, guided by recent analytical results and a fast running semi-analytical code, so to reach the optimum operating point which corresponds to maximum beam brightness. Scaling laws and the theory of invariant envelope provide to the designers excellent tools for a first parameters choice and the code HOMDYN, based on a multi-slice envelope description of the beam dynamics, is tailored to describe the space charge dominated dynamics of laminar beams in presence of time dependent space charge forces, giving rise to a very fast modeling capability for photo-injectors design. We report in this talk the results of a recent beam dynamics study, motivated by the need to redesign the LCLS photoinjector. During this work a new effective working point for a split RF photoinjector has been discovered by means of the previous mentioned approach. By a proper choice of rf gun and solenoid parameters, the emittance evolution shows a double minimum behavior in the drifting region. If the booster is located where the relative emittance maximum and the envelope waist occur, the second emittance minimum can be shifted at the booster exit and frozen at a very low level (0.3 mm-mrad for a 1 nC flat top bunch), to the extent that the invariant envelope matching conditions are satisfied.

  20. Progress in the Study of RF Heating and Stabilization on HANBIT Mirror Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, M.; Bak, J.G.; Choh, K.; Choi, J.H.; Choi, J.W.; England, A.C.; Hong, J.S.; Jhang, H.G.; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, S.S.; Ko, W.H.; Lee, D.K.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, S.G.; Lee, H.G.; Lho, T.; Na, H.K.; Park, B.H.; Park, M.K.; Seo, D.C.; Seo, S.H.; Yeom, J.H.; Yoo, S.J.; You, K.I.; Yoon, J.S.; Yoon, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    The HANBIT device is a simple mirror-type device of which the length, radius, and magnetic field are about 5 m, 0.18 m, and 0.1-0.3 T, respectively, in the central cell. In HANBIT, two antenna systems are used for the plasma production, heating, and MHD stabilization; one is the slot antenna located near the center region with the maximum power of 500 kW and the typical frequency of 3.5 MHz, and the other DHT antenna located near the mirror throat with the maximum power of 100 kW and the frequency of 3.75 MHz. Recent experimental studies in HANBIT indicate that the slot antenna system can produce stable, high-density plasmas in apparently two different regimes; one is the fast wave regime with the ratio w/Wci∼2 and the other is the slow wave regime with w< Wci, where w and Wci are the RF and ion cyclotron resonance frequencies, respectively. The possible stabilization mechanism appears to be the ponderomotive force by the fast wave in the regime of w/Wci∼2, while the RF side-band coupling force by the slow wave in the regime of w< Wci. A clear excitation of the flute-type, interchange modes with the axial mode number n=0 is observed when the RF power is not enough for the stabilization, particularly, in the slow wave regime. Here, we report the results of these experimental and theoretical studies on the RF heating and stabilization processes by the slot antenna in HANBIT. In addition, we introduce briefly the results of the other on-going research works in HANBIT, which include the beach-wave ion heating experiment using DHT antenna, the pre-ionization experiment using the thermal electron cathode or ECH, and the analysis of plasma-wall interaction and neutral transport

  1. Impedance matching of pillbox-type RF windows and direct measurement of the ceramic relative dielectric constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki.ao@j-parc.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), J-PARC Center, Accelerator Division, 2-4, Shirakara Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Asano, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), J-PARC Center, Accelerator Division, 2-4, Shirakara Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Naito, Fujio [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ouchi, Nobuo; Tamura, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), J-PARC Center, Accelerator Division, 2-4, Shirakara Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takata, Koji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-02-11

    Impedance matching of RF windows that minimizes the RF reflection is necessary to prevent localized standing waves between an RF window and a cavity, which may cause thermal and/or multipactoring issues. It has been observed that the impedance matching condition of the pillbox-type RF window, checked by voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) measurement, depends on the manufacturing lot of the window ceramic disk made of 95% purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The present report proposes new procedures for impedance matching as follows: (i) The relative dielectric constant of the ceramic window is directly measured using the resonant frequency of a cavity made by temporarily combining the pillbox part of the RF window and two short-circuiting plates. (ii) The dimensions of the pillbox section including the ceramic disk are fixed on the basis of the measured relative dielectric constant. To confirm this procedure, three RF windows were fabricated using the same type of ceramic material, and successful impedance matching of these windows was performed (VSWR<1.05). The measured results also suggest that the relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing density and that the impedance matching condition is mainly affected by variations of the relative dielectric constant due to shrinkage of the alumina during sintering. -- Highlights: • We measured the relative dielectric constant of an RF window ceramic directly. • We used the circular TE011-mode frequency of the pillbox part of an RF window itself. • The dimensions of the pillbox part were fixed on the basis of the measurement result. • Three RF windows were fabricated, and VSWR <1.05 for these windows was performed. • The relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing ceramic density.

  2. Impedance matching of pillbox-type RF windows and direct measurement of the ceramic relative dielectric constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao, Hiroyuki; Asano, Hiroyuki; Naito, Fujio; Ouchi, Nobuo; Tamura, Jun; Takata, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Impedance matching of RF windows that minimizes the RF reflection is necessary to prevent localized standing waves between an RF window and a cavity, which may cause thermal and/or multipactoring issues. It has been observed that the impedance matching condition of the pillbox-type RF window, checked by voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) measurement, depends on the manufacturing lot of the window ceramic disk made of 95% purity Al 2 O 3 . The present report proposes new procedures for impedance matching as follows: (i) The relative dielectric constant of the ceramic window is directly measured using the resonant frequency of a cavity made by temporarily combining the pillbox part of the RF window and two short-circuiting plates. (ii) The dimensions of the pillbox section including the ceramic disk are fixed on the basis of the measured relative dielectric constant. To confirm this procedure, three RF windows were fabricated using the same type of ceramic material, and successful impedance matching of these windows was performed (VSWR<1.05). The measured results also suggest that the relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing density and that the impedance matching condition is mainly affected by variations of the relative dielectric constant due to shrinkage of the alumina during sintering. -- Highlights: • We measured the relative dielectric constant of an RF window ceramic directly. • We used the circular TE011-mode frequency of the pillbox part of an RF window itself. • The dimensions of the pillbox part were fixed on the basis of the measurement result. • Three RF windows were fabricated, and VSWR <1.05 for these windows was performed. • The relative dielectric constant increases linearly with increasing ceramic density

  3. MIMIC For Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuit Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seashore, C. R.

    1987-09-01

    A significant program is currently underway in the U.S. to investigate, develop and produce a variety of GaAs analog circuits for use in microwave and millimeter wave sensors and systems. This represents a "new wave" of RF technology which promises to significantly change system engineering thinking relative to RF Architectures. At millimeter wave frequencies, we look forward to a relatively high level of critical component integration based on MESFET and HEMT device implementations. These designs will spawn more compact RF front ends with colocated antenna/transceiver functions and innovative packaging concepts which will survive and function in a typical military operational environment which includes challenging temperature, shock and special handling requirements.

  4. Coded aperture subreflector array for high resolution radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jonathan J.; Herrault, Florian; Kona, Keerti; Virbila, Gabriel; McGuire, Chuck; Wetzel, Mike; Fung, Helen; Prophet, Eric

    2017-05-01

    HRL Laboratories has been developing a new approach for high resolution radar imaging on stationary platforms. High angular resolution is achieved by operating at 235 GHz and using a scalable tile phased array architecture that has the potential to realize thousands of elements at an affordable cost. HRL utilizes aperture coding techniques to minimize the size and complexity of the RF electronics needed for beamforming, and wafer level fabrication and integration allow tiles containing 1024 elements to be manufactured with reasonable costs. This paper describes the results of an initial feasibility study for HRL's Coded Aperture Subreflector Array (CASA) approach for a 1024 element micromachined antenna array with integrated single-bit phase shifters. Two candidate electronic device technologies were evaluated over the 170 - 260 GHz range, GaN HEMT transistors and GaAs Schottky diodes. Array structures utilizing silicon micromachining and die bonding were evaluated for etch and alignment accuracy. Finally, the overall array efficiency was estimated to be about 37% (not including spillover losses) using full wave array simulations and measured device performance, which is a reasonable value at 235 GHz. Based on the measured data we selected GaN HEMT devices operated passively with 0V drain bias due to their extremely low DC power dissipation.

  5. The effects of electromagnetic space-charge fields in RF photocathode guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.S.; Hess, M.

    2010-01-01

    In high-brightness rf photocathode guns, the effects of space-charge are important for electron bunches with high bunch charge. In an effort to accurately simulate the effects of these space-charge fields without the presence of numerical grid dispersion, a Green's function based code called IRPSS (Indiana Rf Photocathode Source Simulator) was developed. In this paper, we show the results of numerical simulations of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator photocathode gun using IRPSS, and compare them with the results of an electrostatic Green's function version of IRPSS.

  6. High-power RF window design for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, M.; Hodgson, J.; Ng, C.; Schwarz, H.; Skarpaas, K.; Kroll, N.; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the design of RF windows to transmit up to 500 kW CW to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. RF analysis of the windows using high-frequency simulation codes are described. These provide information about the power loss distribution in the ceramic and tim matching properties of the structure. Finite-element analyses of the resulting temperature distribution and thermal stresses are presented. Fabrication methods including a proposed scheme to compensate for thermal expansion s are discussed and hardware tests to validate this approach are described. The effects of surface coatings (intentional and otherwise) and the application of air cooling are considered

  7. Beam dynamics simulations in the photo-cathode RF gun for the CLIC test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, P.; Rinolfi, L.

    1992-01-01

    The CERN CLIC Test Facility (CTF) uses an RF gun with a laser driven photo-cathode in order to generate electron pulses of high charge (≥10 nC) and short duration (≤20 ps). The RF gun consists of a 3 GHz 1 + 1/2 cell cavity based on the design originally proposed at BNL which minimizes the non-linearities in the transverse field. The beam dynamics in the cavity is simulated by means of the multiparticle tracking code PARMELA. The results are compared to previous simulations as well as to the first experimental data. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  8. Analysis of emittance compensation and simulation results to photo-cathode RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    LiuShengGuang

    2002-01-01

    The emittance compensation technology will be used on the photo-cathode RF gun for Shanghai SDUV-FEL. The space charge force and its effect on electron beam transverse emittance in RF gun is studied, the principle of emittance compensation in phase-space is discussed. The authors have designed a compensation solenoid and calculated its magnetic field distribution. Its performance has been studied by the code PARMELA. A simulation result indicates that the normalized transverse RMS emittance for electron beam of 1.5 nC is 1.612 pi mm centre dot mrad, electron energy E = 5.71 MeV

  9. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. III. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS FROM SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: a quasi-periodic modulation by prompt post-shock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic effects in combination with detailed neutrino transport are shown to be essential for quantitative predictions of the GW frequency evolution and energy spectrum, because they determine the structure of the PNS surface layer and its characteristic g-mode frequency. Burst-like high-frequency activity phases, correlated with sudden luminosity increase and spectral hardening of electron (anti-)neutrino emission for some 10 ms, are discovered as new features after the onset of the explosion. They correspond to intermittent episodes of anisotropic accretion by the PNS in the case of fallback SNe. We find stronger signals for more massive progenitors with large accretion rates. The typical frequencies are higher for massive PNSs, though the time-integrated spectrum also strongly depends on the model dynamics.

  10. Design and Calibration of an RF Actuator for Low-Level RF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zheqiao; Hong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    X-ray free electron laser (FEL) machines like the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC require high-quality electron beams to generate X-ray lasers for various experiments. Digital low-level RF (LLRF) systems are widely used to control the high-power RF klystrons to provide a highly stable RF field in accelerator structures for beam acceleration. Feedback and feedforward controllers are implemented in LLRF systems to stabilize or adjust the phase and amplitude of the RF field. To achieve the RF stability and the accuracy of the phase and amplitude adjustment, low-noise and highly linear RF actuators are required. Aiming for the upgrade of the S-band Linac at SLAC, an RF actuator is designed with an I/Qmodulator driven by two digital-to-analog converters (DAC) for the digital LLRF systems. A direct upconversion scheme is selected for RF actuation, and an on-line calibration algorithm is developed to compensate the RF reference leakage and the imbalance errors in the I/Q modulator, which may cause significant phase and amplitude actuation errors. This paper presents the requirements on the RF actuator, the design of the hardware, the calibration algorithm, and the implementation in firmware and software and the test results at LCLS.

  11. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Forest, C.B.; Ikezi, H.; Prater, R.; Baity, F.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Jaeger, E.F.; Kim, K.W.; Lee, J.H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Murakami, M.; ONeill, R.C.; Porkolab, M.; Rhodes, T.L.; Swain, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as γ=0.4x10 18 T e0 (keV) [A/m 2 W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with clear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. Voltage uniformity study in large-area reactors for RF plasma deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansonnens, L.; Pletzer, A.; Magni, D.; Howling, A.A.; Hollenstein, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Schmitt, J.P.M. [Balzers Process Systems, Palaiseau (France)

    1996-09-01

    Non-uniform voltage distribution across the electrode area results in inhomogeneous thin-film RF plasma deposition in large area reactors. In this work, a two-dimensional analytic model for the calculation of the voltage distribution across the electrode area is presented. The results of this model are in good agreement with measurements performed without plasma at 13.56 MHz and 70 MHz in a large area reactor. The principal voltage inhomogeneities are caused by logarithmic singularities in the vicinity of RF connections and not by standing waves. These singularities are only described by a two-dimensional model and cannot be intuitively predicted by analogy to a one-dimensional case. Plasma light emission measurements and thickness homogeneity studies of a-Si:H films show that the plasma reproduces these voltage inhomogeneities. Improvement of the voltage uniformity is investigated by changing the number and position of the RF connections. (author) 13 figs., 20 refs.

  13. Design Concepts for RF-DC Conversion in Particle Accelerator Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F; Grudiev, A; Sapotta, H

    2010-01-01

    In many particle accelerators considerable amounts of RF power reaching the megawatt level are converted into heat in dummy loads. After an overview of RF power in the range 200 MHz to 1 GHz dissipated at CERN we discuss several developments that have come up in the past using vacuum tube technology for RF-DC conversion. Amongst those the developments of the cyclotron wave converter CWC appears most suitable. With the availability of powerful Schottky diodes the solid state converter aspect has to be addressed as well. One of the biggest problems of Schottky diode based structures is the junction capacity. GaAs and GaN Schottky diodes show a significant reduction of this junction capacity as compared to silicon. Small rectenna type converter units which have been already developed for microwave powered helicopters can be used in waveguides or with coaxial power dividers.

  14. The Bohm criterion for rf discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, P.M.; Goedheer, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The well-known dc Bohm criterion is extended to rf discharges. Both low- (ω rf much-lt ω pi ) and high-(ω pi much-lt ω rf ) frequency regimes are considered. For low frequencies, the dc Bohm criterion holds. This criterion states that the initial energy of the ions entering the sheath must exceed a limit in order to obtain a stable sheath. For high frequencies, a modified limit is derived, which is somewhat lower than that of the dc Bohm criterion. The resulting ion current density in a high-frequency sheath is only a few percent lower than that for the dc case

  15. RF Control System Upgrade at CAMD

    CERN Document Server

    Suller, Victor P; Jines, Paul; Launey, Daren

    2005-01-01

    A description is given of the new control system for the RF system of the CAMD light source. The new design being implemented brings all RF signals into the data acquisition system via a modular, custom made, RF detector and renders the amplitude and tune control loops in the VME computer. On line calculations ensure monitoring of proper operation and display the information to the user in an efficient way. In addition, an advanced load impedance monitoring diagnostic has been implemented, being displayed as a Smith Chart, which is based on the system used at the SRS in Daresbury, England.

  16. Bunch Compression Stability Dependence on RF Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Limberg, T

    2005-01-01

    In present designs for FEL's with high electron peak currents and short bunch lengths, higher harmonic RF systems are often used to optimize the final longitudinal charge distributions. This opens degrees of freedom for the choice of RF phases and amplitudes to achieve the necessary peak current with a reasonable longitudinal bunch shape. It had been found empirically that different working points result in different tolerances for phases and amplitudes. We give an analytical expression for the sensitivity of the compression factor on phase and amplitude jitter for a bunch compression scheme involving two RF systems and two magnetic chicanes as well numerical results for the case of the European XFEL.

  17. rf coupler technology for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) oscillations at critical frequencies have successfully provided a means to convey power to fusion plasmas due to the electrical-magnetic properties of the plasma. While large rf systems to couple power to the plasma have been designed, built, and tested, the main link to the plasma, the coupler, is still in an evolutionary stage of development. Design and fabrication of optimal antennas for fusion applications are complicated by incomplete characterizations of the harsh plasma environment and of coupling mechanisms. A brief description of rf coupler technology required for plasma conditions is presented along with an assessment of the status and goals of coupler development

  18. Practical guide to RF-MEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Iannacci, Jacopo

    2013-01-01

    Closes the gap between hardcore-theoretical and purely experimental RF-MEMS books. The book covers, from a practical viewpoint, the most critical steps that have to be taken in order to develop novel RF-MEMS device concepts. Prototypical RF-MEMS devices, both including lumped components and complex networks, are presented at the beginning of the book as reference examples, and these are then discussed from different perspectives with regard to design, simulation, packaging, testing, and post-fabrication modeling. Theoretical concepts are introduced when necessary to complement the practical

  19. Longitudinal beam dynamics with rf noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Cogburn, R.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Dome-Krinsky-Wang (DKW) diffusion-inaction theory for rf-noise-induced emittance dilution is reviewed and related to recent work on the approximation of stochastic processes by Markov processes. An accurate and efficient numerical procedure is developed to integrate the diffusion equation of the DKW theory. Tracking simulations are undertaken to check the validity of the theory in the parameter range of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and to provide additional information. The study of effects of rf noise is applied to two problems of interest at the SSC: (1) determination of noise tolerance levels in the rf system, and (2) feasibility of beam extraction using crystal channeling

  20. Enhanced Passive RF-DC Converter Circuit Efficiency for Low RF Energy Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaour, Issam; Fakhfakh, Ahmed; Kanoun, Olfa

    2017-03-09

    For radio frequency energy transmission, the conversion efficiency of the receiver is decisive not only for reducing sending power, but also for enabling energy transmission over long and variable distances. In this contribution, we present a passive RF-DC converter for energy harvesting at ultra-low input power at 868 MHz. The novel converter consists of a reactive matching circuit and a combined voltage multiplier and rectifier. The stored energy in the input inductor and capacitance, during the negative wave, is conveyed to the output capacitance during the positive one. Although Dickson and Villard topologies have principally comparable efficiency for multi-stage voltage multipliers, the Dickson topology reaches a better efficiency within the novel ultra-low input power converter concept. At the output stage, a low-pass filter is introduced to reduce ripple at high frequencies in order to realize a stable DC signal. The proposed rectifier enables harvesting energy at even a low input power from -40 dBm for a resistive load of 50 kΩ. It realizes a significant improvement in comparison with state of the art solutions.

  1. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, K.

    1995-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.)

  2. KSTAR RF heating system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, J. G.; Kim, S. K.; Hwang, C. K. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    Design, high-voltage test, and installation of 6 MW ICRF heating system for KSTAR is completed. The antenna demonstrated satisfactory standoff at high voltages up to 41 kV for 300 sec. The result indicates good power handling capabilities of the antenna as high as 10 MW/m2. This power density is equivalent to RF power coupling of 6 MW into a 4 {omega}/m target plasma, and is typical of advanced tokamak heating scenarios. In addition, vacuum feed through, DC break, and liquid stub developed for 300 sec operation are installed, as well as a 2 MW, 30-60MHz transmitter. The transmitter successfully produced output powers of 600 kW continuously, 1.5{approx}1.8 MW for 300 sec, and 2 MW for 100 msec or shorter pulses. A realtime control system based on DSP and EPICS is developed, installed, and tested on the ICRF system. Initial results from feasibility study indicate that the present antenna and the transmission lines could allow load-resilient operation on KSTAR. Until the KSTAR tokamak start to produce plasmas in 2008, however, hands-on operational experiences are obtained from participating in ICRF heating experiments at ASDEX and DIII-D tokamaks arranged through international cooperation.

  3. The CEBAF RF separator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Arnold, G.; Fugitt, J.; Harwood, L.; Kazimi, R.; Lahti, G.; Mammosser, J.; Nelson, R.; Piller, C.; Turlington, L.

    1996-01-01

    The 4 GeV CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is arranged in a five-pass racetrack configuration, with two superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. The 1497 MHz continuous electron beam is composed of three interlaced variable-intensity 499 MHz beams that can be independently directed from any of the five passes to any of the three experimental halls. Beam extraction is made possible by a system of nine warm sub-harmonic separator cavities capable of delivering a 100 urad kick to any pass at a maximum machine energy of 6 GeV. Each separator cavity is a half-wavelength, two cell design with a high transverse shunt impedance and a small transverse dimension. The cavities are powered by 1 kW solid state amplifiers operating at 499 MHz. Cavity phase and gradient control are provided through a modified version of the same control module used for the CEBAF SRF cavity controls. The system has recently been tested while delivering beam to Hall C. In this paper we present a description of the RF separator system and recent test results with beam. (author)

  4. Development of multi-channel high power rectangular RF window for LHCD system employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P K; Ambulkar, K K; Parmar, P R; Virani, C G; Thakur, A L; Joshi, L M; Nangru, S C

    2010-01-01

    A 3.7 GHz., 120 kW (pulsed), lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system is employed to drive non-inductive plasma current in ADITYA tokamak. The rf power is coupled to the plasma through grill antenna and is placed in vacuum environment. A vacuum break between the pressurized transmission line and the grill antenna is achieved with the help of a multi (eight) channel rectangular RF vacuum window. The phasing between adjacent channels of 8-channel window (arranged in two rows) is important for launching lower hybrid waves and each channel should have independent vacuum window so that phase information is retained. The geometrical parameter of the grill antenna, like periodicity (9mm), channel dimensions (cross sectional dimension of 76mm x 7mm), etc. is to be maintained. These design constraint demanded a development of a multi channel rectangular RF vacuum window. To handle rf losses and thermal effects, high temperature vacuum brazing techniques is desired. Based on the above requirements we have successfully developed a multi channel rectangular rf vacuum window employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique. During the development process we could optimize the chemical processing parameters, brazing process parameters, jigs and fixtures for high temperature brazing and leak testing, etc. Finally the window is tested for low power rf performance using VNA. In this paper we would present the development of the said window in detail along with its mechanical, vacuum and rf performances.

  5. Development of multi-channel high power rectangular RF window for LHCD system employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, P K; Ambulkar, K K; Parmar, P R; Virani, C G; Thakur, A L [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Joshi, L M; Nangru, S C, E-mail: pramod@ipr.res.i [Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani, Rajasthan 333 031 (India)

    2010-02-01

    A 3.7 GHz., 120 kW (pulsed), lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system is employed to drive non-inductive plasma current in ADITYA tokamak. The rf power is coupled to the plasma through grill antenna and is placed in vacuum environment. A vacuum break between the pressurized transmission line and the grill antenna is achieved with the help of a multi (eight) channel rectangular RF vacuum window. The phasing between adjacent channels of 8-channel window (arranged in two rows) is important for launching lower hybrid waves and each channel should have independent vacuum window so that phase information is retained. The geometrical parameter of the grill antenna, like periodicity (9mm), channel dimensions (cross sectional dimension of 76mm x 7mm), etc. is to be maintained. These design constraint demanded a development of a multi channel rectangular RF vacuum window. To handle rf losses and thermal effects, high temperature vacuum brazing techniques is desired. Based on the above requirements we have successfully developed a multi channel rectangular rf vacuum window employing high temperature vacuum brazing technique. During the development process we could optimize the chemical processing parameters, brazing process parameters, jigs and fixtures for high temperature brazing and leak testing, etc. Finally the window is tested for low power rf performance using VNA. In this paper we would present the development of the said window in detail along with its mechanical, vacuum and rf performances.

  6. Modular open RF architecture: extending VICTORY to RF systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melber, Adam; Dirner, Jason; Johnson, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency products spanning multiple functions have become increasingly critical to the warfighter. Military use of the electromagnetic spectrum now includes communications, electronic warfare (EW), intelligence, and mission command systems. Due to the urgent needs of counterinsurgency operations, various quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) have been fielded to enhance warfighter capability. Although these QRCs were highly successfully in their respective missions, they were designed independently resulting in significant challenges when integrated on a common platform. This paper discusses how the Modular Open RF Architecture (MORA) addresses these challenges by defining an open architecture for multifunction missions that decomposes monolithic radio systems into high-level components with welldefined functions and interfaces. The functional decomposition maximizes hardware sharing while minimizing added complexity and cost due to modularization. MORA achieves significant size, weight and power (SWaP) savings by allowing hardware such as power amplifiers and antennas to be shared across systems. By separating signal conditioning from the processing that implements the actual radio application, MORA exposes previously inaccessible architecture points, providing system integrators with the flexibility to insert third-party capabilities to address technical challenges and emerging requirements. MORA leverages the Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/EW Interoperability (VICTORY) framework. This paper concludes by discussing how MORA, VICTORY and other standards such as OpenVPX are being leveraged by the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC) to define a converged architecture enabling rapid technology insertion, interoperability and reduced SWaP.

  7. New developments in RF power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    The most challenging rf source requirements for high-energy accelerators presently being studied or designed come from the various electron-positron linear collider studies. All of these studies except TESLA (the superconducting entry in the field) have specified rf sources with much higher peak powers than any existing tubes at comparable high frequencies. While circular machines do not, in general, require high peak power, the very high luminosity electron-positron rings presently being designed as B factories require prodigious total average rf power. In this age of energy conservation, this puts a high priority on high efficiency for the rf sources. Both modulating anodes and depressed collectors are being investigated in the quest for high efficiency at varying output powers

  8. RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    RF accelerating unit installed in the PSB ring between two bending magnets. Cool air from a heat exchanger is injected into the four cavities from the central feeder and the hot air recirculated via the lateral ducts.

  9. ORIC RF system: preparation for HHIRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosko, S.W.; Rylander, J.D.; Schulze, G.K.

    1977-01-01

    The integration of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) into the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) requires several rf system modifications to permit injection of ion beams from the 25 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator into ORIC. A new dee eliminates structural interference with the injected beam path and provides an opportunity to improve the mechanical stability of the resonator and to reduce rf voltage gradients in areas susceptible to sparking. Space for structural improvements is realized by reducing the ion beam aperture from 4.8 cm to 2.4 cm. The complexity of the original ORIC rf power system was substantially reduced. A new broadband solid state driver amplifier between the frequency synthesizer and the main power amplifier eliminates most circuit tuning and permits the use of a new simplified dee rf voltage regulator loop. Most of the remaining instrumentation and control circuitry is TTL compatible and will eventually tie to the ORIC computer control system through a CAMAC interface

  10. Superconducting RF for energy-recovery linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepe, M.; Knobloch, J.

    2006-01-01

    Since superconducting RF for particle accelerators made its first appearance in the 1970s, it has found highly successful application in a variety of machines. Recent progress in this technology has made so-called Energy-Recovery Linacs (ERLs)-originally proposed in 1965-feasible, and interest in this type of machine has increased enormously. A superconducting linac is the driving heart of ERLs, and emittance preservation and cost efficiency is of utmost importance. The resulting challenges for the superconducting cavity technology and RF field control are manifold. In March 2005 the first international workshop on ERLs was held at Newport News, VA, to explore the potential of ERLs and to discuss machine-physics and technology challenges and their solutions. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in superconducting RF and RF control for ERLs, and summarizes the discussions of the SRF working group on this technology during the ERL2005 workshop

  11. Speaking Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff

    Speaking Code begins by invoking the “Hello World” convention used by programmers when learning a new language, helping to establish the interplay of text and code that runs through the book. Interweaving the voice of critical writing from the humanities with the tradition of computing and software...

  12. Feasibility Study for High Power RF – Energy Recovery in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    When dealing with particle accelerators, especially in systems with travelling wave structures and low beam loading, a substantial amount of RF power is dissipated in 50Ω termination loads. For the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at Cern this is 69 % of the incident RF power or about 1 MW. Different ideas, making use of that otherwise dissipated power, are presented and their feasibility is reviewed. The most feasible one, utilizing an array of semiconductor based RF/DC modules, is used to create a design concept for energy recovery in the SPS. The modules are required to operate at high power, high efficiency and with low harmonic radiation. Besides the actual RF rectifier, they contain additional components to ensure a graceful degradation of the overall system. Different rectifier architectures and semiconductor devices are compared and the most suitable ones are chosen. Two prototype devices were built and operated with up to 400 W of pulsed RF power. Broadband measurements – capturing all harmonics up ...

  13. Beam Dynamics Simulation of Photocathode RF Electron Gun at the PBP-CMU Linac Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buakor, K.; Rimjaem, S.

    2017-09-01

    Photocathode radio-frequency (RF) electron guns are widely used at many particle accelerator laboratories due to high quality of produced electron beams. By using a short-pulse laser to induce the photoemission process, the electrons are emitted with low energy spread. Moreover, the photocathode RF guns are not suffered from the electron back bombardment effect, which can cause the limited electron current and accelerated energy. In this research, we aim to develop the photocathode RF gun for the linac-based THz radiation source. Its design is based on the existing gun at the PBP-CMU Linac Laboratory. The gun consists of a one and a half cell S-band standing-wave RF cavities with a maximum electric field of about 60 MV/m at the centre of the full cell. We study the beam dynamics of electrons traveling through the electromagnetic field inside the RF gun by using the particle tracking program ASTRA. The laser properties i.e. transverse size and injecting phase are optimized to obtain low transverse emittance. In addition, the solenoid magnet is applied for beam focusing and emittance compensation. The proper solenoid magnetic field is then investigated to find the optimum value for proper emittance conservation condition.

  14. CAT/RF Simulation Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-11

    IVSS-2003-MAS-7 CAT /RF Simulation Lessons Learned Christopher Mocnik Vetronics Technology Area, RDECOM TARDEC Tim Lee DCS Corporation...developed a re- configurable Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) simulation for the Crew integration and Automation Test bed ( CAT ) and Robotics Follower (RF...Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) experiments. This simulation was developed as a component of the Embedded Simulation System (ESS) of the CAT

  15. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-01-01

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  16. A no-load RF calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  17. Impedance matching network systems using stub-lines of 20 kW CW RF amplifier for SKKUCY-9 compact cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Song, Ho Seung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Cong, Truong Van; Kim, Hui Su; Yeon, Yeong Heum; Lee, Yong seok; Chai, Jong Seo

    2015-01-01

    The SKKUCY-9 is a compact cyclotron for radioactive isotopes (RI) production of positron emission tomography (PET). Charged particles such as H-ions are accelerated azimuthally within a high intensity electric field (E-field) generated from a radio frequency (RF) system in cyclotron. A high power RF signal is transmitted from an RF amplifier to an RF resonating cavity. The RF system of the SKKUCY-9 operates in continuous wave (CW) mode. If an ion beam were accelerated in the cyclotron, the vacuum level and permittivity would be changed because of beam loading. It causes an impedance shift of the RF resonating cavity. This impedance mismatch generates reflected power that decreases the RF transmitting power. To prevent this situation, an impedance matching system is necessary. This paper describes the impedance matching system of a 20 kW RF amplifier in an SKKUCY-9 compact cyclotron. The impedance matching circuit was designed using both an input stage and output stage, which are divided between the cathode and anode in a vacuum tube that is used as an amplifying device. The equivalent circuit of the matching system is made of passive elements. The characteristic results of designed circuit were calculated using a Smith chart. In assembling, the inductors were replaced by movable stub-line structures. The dimensions of the stub-line structures were optimized with equations and the measurement results. The experiment was performed to find the result values of matching circuit impedance and RF power amplitude

  18. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, J.; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance

  19. RF measurements I: signal receiving techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2011-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the RF and microwave range, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this paper the fundamentals of the RF-signal sampling technique, which has found widespread applications in 'digital' oscilloscopes and sampling scopes, are discussed. The key element in these front-ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as an RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front-end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analysers has a rather complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown. A brief discussion of commonly used noise measurement techniq...

  20. Superconducting RF activities at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Padamsee, H.; Rubin, D.; Sears, J.; Shu, Q.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper outlines the RF superconductivity research and development work that has taken place at Cornell Laboratory of Nuclear Studies over the past years. The work that has been performed since the last RF superconductivity workshop is emphasized together with a discussion of the direction of future efforts. Past work is summarized first, focusing on research and development activities in the area of RF superconductivity. Superconducting TeV linear collider is then discussed focusing on the application of superconducting RF to a future TeV linear collider. Linear collider structure development is then described centering on the development of a simpler (thereby cheaper) structure for a TeV linear collider. B-factory with superconducting RF is outlined focusing on the formulation of a conceptual design for a B-factory. B-factory structure development is discussed in relation to the advancement in the capability of SC cavities to carry beam currents of several amperes necessary for a high luminosity storage ring. High gradients are discussed as the key to the realization of a high energy superconducting linac or a superconducting RF B-factory. (N.K.)