WorldWideScience

Sample records for wave reflection diffraction

  1. Reflection and diffraction of atomic de Broglie waves by evanescent laser waves. Bare-state method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiaoping; Witte, N.S.; Hollenberg, C.L.; Opat, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two methods are presented for the investigation of the reflection and diffraction of atoms by gratings formed either by standing or travelling evanescent laser waves. Both methods use the bare-state rather than dressed-state picture. One method is based on the Born series, whereas the other is based on the Laplace transformation of the coupled differential equations. The two methods yield the same theoretical expressions for the reflected and diffracted atomic waves in the whole space including the interaction and the asymptotic regions. 1 ref., 1 fig

  2. Exact solution for the reflection and diffraction of atomic de Broglie waves by a travelling evanescent laser wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    The exact solution to the problem of reflection and diffraction of atomic de Broglie waves by a travelling evanescent wave is found starting with a bare-state formulation. The solution for the wavefunctions, the tunnelling losses and the non-adiabatic losses are given exactly in terms of hyper-Bessel functions, and are valid for all detuning and Rabi frequencies, thus generalizing previous approximate methods. Furthermore we give the limiting cases of all amplitudes in the uniform semiclassical limit, which is valid in all regions including near the classical turning points, and in the large and weak coupling cases. Exact results for the zero detuning case are obtained in terms of Bessel functions. We find our uniform semiclassical limit to be closer to the exact result over the full range of parameter values than the previously reported calculations. The current knowledge of hyper-Bessel function properties is reviewed in order to apply this to the physical problems imposed

  3. Inner core boundary topography explored with reflected and diffracted P waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSilva, Susini; Cormier, Vernon F.; Zheng, Yingcai

    2018-03-01

    The existence of topography of the inner core boundary (ICB) can affect the amplitude, phase, and coda of body waves incident on the inner core. By applying pseudospectral and boundary element methods to synthesize compressional waves interacting with the ICB, these effects are predicted and compared with waveform observations in pre-critical, critical, post-critical, and diffraction ranges of the PKiKP wave reflected from the ICB. These data sample overlapping regions of the inner core beneath the circum-Pacific belt and the Eurasian, North American, and Australian continents, but exclude large areas beneath the Pacific and Indian Oceans and the poles. In the pre-critical range, PKiKP waveforms require an upper bound of 2 km at 1-20 km wavelength for any ICB topography. Higher topography sharply reduces PKiKP amplitude and produces time-extended coda not observed in PKiKP waveforms. The existence of topography of this scale smooths over minima and zeros in the pre-critical ICB reflection coefficient predicted from standard earth models. In the range surrounding critical incidence (108-130 °), this upper bound of topography does not strongly affect the amplitude and waveform behavior of PKIKP + PKiKP at 1.5 Hz, which is relatively insensitive to 10-20 km wavelength topography height approaching 5 km. These data, however, have a strong overlap in the regions of the ICB sampled by pre-critical PKiKP that require a 2 km upper bound to topography height. In the diffracted range (>152°), topography as high as 5 km attenuates the peak amplitudes of PKIKP and PKPCdiff by similar amounts, leaving the PKPCdiff/PKIKP amplitude ratio unchanged from that predicted by a smooth ICB. The observed decay of PKPCdiff into the inner core shadow and the PKIKP-PKPCdiff differential travel time are consistent with a flattening of the outer core P velocity gradient near the ICB and iron enrichment at the bottom of the outer core.

  4. Non-diffractive waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E; Recami, Erasmo

    2013-01-01

    This continuation and extension of the successful book ""Localized Waves"" by the same editors brings together leading researchers in non-diffractive waves to cover the most important results in their field and as such is the first to present the current state.The well-balanced presentation of theory and experiments guides readers through the background of different types of non-diffractive waves, their generation, propagation, and possible applications. The authors include a historical account of the development of the field, and cover different types of non-diffractive waves, including Airy

  5. Analysis of X-band radar images for the detection of the reflected and diffracted waves in coastal zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Vicinanza, Diego; Serafino, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The observation of nearshore waves and the knowledge of the sea state parameters can play a crucial role for the safety of harbors and ocean engineering. In the last two decades, different algorithms for the estimation of sea state parameters, surface currents and bathymetry from X-band radar data have been developed and validated [1, 2]. The retrieval of ocean wave parameters such as significant height, period, direction and wavelength of the dominant wave is based on the spectral analysis of data sequences collected by nautical X-band radars [3]. In particular, the reconstruction of the wave motion is carried out through the inversion procedure explained in [1-3], which exploits the dispersion relationship to define a band pass filter used to separate the energy associated with the ocean waves from the background noise. It is worth to note that the shape of such a band pass filter depends upon the value of both the surface currents and bathymetry; in our reconstruction algorithm these parameters are estimated through the (Normalized Scalar Product) procedure [1], which outperforms other existing methods (e.g., the Least Squares) [4]. From the reconstructed wave elevation sequences we can get the directional spectrum that provides useful information (i.e., wavelength, period, direction and amplitude) relevant to the main waves contributing to the wave motion. Of course, in coastal zones a number of diffraction and reflection phenomena can be observed, due to sea-waves impinging obstacles as jetties, breakwaters and boats. In the present paper we want to show the capability to detect reflected and diffracted sea-waves offered by the processing of X-band radar data. Further details relevant to the obtained results will be provided in the full paper and at the conference time. References [1] F. Serafino, C. Lugni, F. Soldovieri, "A novel strategy for the surface current determination from marine X-Band radar data", IEEE Geosci. and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 7, no

  6. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  7. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Donghui; Huang, Mei; Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  8. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Donghui [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Huang, Mei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Wang, Zhijiang, E-mail: wangzj@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Zhang, Feng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  9. Diffractive Optics for Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunkowski, A; Burmeister, O; Clausnitzer, T; Kley, E-B; Tuennermann, A; Danzmann, K; Schnabel, R

    2006-01-01

    All-reflective interferometry based on nano-structured diffraction gratings offers new possibilities for gravitational wave detection. We investigate an all-reflective Fabry-Perot interferometer concept in 2nd order Littrow mount. The input-output relations for such a resonator are derived treating the grating coupler by means of a scattering matrix formalism. A low loss dielectric reflection grating has been designed and manufactured to test the properties of such a grating cavity

  10. Wave reflections from breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, William S.

    1994-01-01

    A new method is presented for estimating the reflection of a random, multi-directional sea from a coastal structure. The technique is applicable to an array of wave gauges of arbitrary geometry deployed seaward of the reflector. An expansion for small oblique wave incidence angles is used to derive an approximate relationship between measured array cross-spectra and a small number of parameters that describe the incident wave properties and the reflectivity of the structure. Model tests with ...

  11. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  12. A scattering approach to sea wave diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L., E-mail: letizia.corradini@unicam.it; Garbuglia, M., E-mail: milena.garbuglia@unicam.it; Maponi, P., E-mail: pierluigi.maponi@unicam.it [University of Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, 62032, Camerino (Italy); Ruggeri, M., E-mail: ru.marco@faggiolatipumps.it [Faggiolati Pumps S.p.A., Z.Ind Sforzacosta, 62100, Macerata (Italy)

    2016-06-08

    This paper intends to show a model for the diffraction of sea waves approaching an OWC device, which converts the sea waves motion into mechanical energy and then electrical energy. This is a preliminary study to the optimisation of the device, in fact the computation of sea waves diffraction around the device allows the estimation of the sea waves energy which enters into the device. The computation of the diffraction phenomenon is the result of a sea waves scattering problem, solved with an integral equation method.

  13. Identifying diffraction effects in measured reflectances

    OpenAIRE

    Holzschuch , Nicolas; Pacanowski , Romain

    2015-01-01

    International audience; There are two different physical models connecting the micro-geometry of a surface and its physical reflectance properties (BRDF). The first, Cook-Torrance, assumes geometrical optics: light is reflected and masked by the micro-facets. In this model, the BRDF depends on the probability distribution of micro-facets normals. The second, Church-Takacs, assumes diffraction by the micro-geometry. In this model, the BRDF depends on the power spectral distribution of the surf...

  14. Shock Wave Diffraction Phenomena around Slotted Splitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of aerospace engineering, the study of the characteristics of vortical flows and their unsteady phenomena finds numerous engineering applications related to improvements in the design of tip devices, enhancement of combustor performance, and control of noise generation. A large amount of work has been carried out in the analysis of the shock wave diffraction around conventional geometries such as sharp and rounded corners, but the employment of splitters with lateral variation has hardly attracted the attention of researchers. The investigation of this phenomenon around two-dimensional wedges has allowed the understanding of the basic physical principles of the flow features. On the other hand, important aspects that appear in the third dimension due to the turbulent nature of the vortices are omitted. The lack of studies that use three-dimensional geometries has motivated the current work to experimentally investigate the evolution of the shock wave diffraction around two splitters with spike-shaped structures for Mach numbers of 1.31 and 1.59. Schlieren photography was used to obtain an insight into the sequential diffraction processes that take place in different planes. Interacting among them, these phenomena generate a complicated turbulent cloud with a vortical arrangement.

  15. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters

    OpenAIRE

    Cady, E.

    2012-01-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly...

  16. Gravitational wave detector on the basis of light diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segizboev, T.I.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method for detection of gravitational waves by means of light diffraction at the first maximum on oscillations in optically transparent matter under effect of gravitational waves is considered. Intensity of light flux scattering on oscillations of elastic rod is calculated. A possibility of using the diffraction method for detection of gravitational waves is disclosed

  17. Quantitative damage imaging using Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Ruan Min; Zhu Wen-Fa; Chai Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the diffraction tomography for quantitative imaging damages of partly through-thickness holes with various shapes in isotropic plates by using converted and non-converted scattered Lamb waves generated numerically. Finite element simulations are carried out to provide the scattered wave data. The validity of the finite element model is confirmed by the comparison of scattering directivity pattern (SDP) of circle blind hole damage between the finite element simulations and the analytical results. The imaging method is based on a theoretical relation between the one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform of the scattered projection and two-dimensional (2D) spatial Fourier transform of the scattering object. A quantitative image of the damage is obtained by carrying out the 2D inverse Fourier transform of the scattering object. The proposed approach employs a circle transducer network containing forward and backward projections, which lead to so-called transmission mode (TMDT) and reflection mode diffraction tomography (RMDT), respectively. The reconstructed results of the two projections for a non-converted S0 scattered mode are investigated to illuminate the influence of the scattering field data. The results show that Lamb wave diffraction tomography using the combination of TMDT and RMDT improves the imaging effect compared with by using only the TMDT or RMDT. The scattered data of the converted A0 mode are also used to assess the performance of the diffraction tomography method. It is found that the circle and elliptical shaped damages can still be reasonably identified from the reconstructed images while the reconstructed results of other complex shaped damages like crisscross rectangles and racecourse are relatively poor. (special topics)

  18. Zeno dynamics in wave-packet diffraction spreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras, Miguel A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Rios Rosas 21, ES-28003 Madrid (Spain); Luis, Alfredo; Gonzalo, Isabel [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, ES-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Angel S. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental-CSIC, Serrano 123, ES-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    We analyze a simple and feasible practical scheme displaying Zeno, anti-Zeno, and inverse-Zeno effects in the observation of wave-packet spreading caused by free evolution. The scheme is valid both in spatial diffraction of classical optical waves and in time diffraction of a quantum wave packet. In the optical realization, diffraction spreading is observed by placing slits between a light source and a light-power detector. We show that the occurrence of Zeno or anti-Zeno effects depends just on the frequency of observations between the source and detector. These effects are seen to be related to the diffraction mode theory in Fabry-Perot resonators.

  19. Experimental method for testing diffraction properties of reflection waveguide holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Kang, Ming-Wu; Wang, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Waveguide holograms' diffraction properties include peak wavelength and diffraction efficiency, which play an important role in determining their display performance. Based on the record and reconstruction theory of reflection waveguide holograms, a novel experimental method for testing diffraction properties is introduced and analyzed in this paper, which uses a plano-convex lens optically contacted to the surface of the substrate plate of the waveguide hologram, so that the diffracted light beam can be easily detected. Then an experiment is implemented. The designed reconstruction wavelength of the test sample is 530 nm, and its diffraction efficiency is 100%. The experimental results are a peak wavelength of 527.7 nm and a diffraction efficiency of 94.1%. It is shown that the tested value corresponds well with the designed value.

  20. Determination of surface tension coefficient of liquids by diffraction of light on capillary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolić, D; Nešić, Lj

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for determining the coefficient of the surface tension of liquids, based on laser light diffraction on capillary waves. Capillary waves of given frequency are created by an exciter needle acting on the surface of liquid and represent a reflective diffraction grating, the constant of which (the wavelength of capillary waves) can be determined based on a known incidence angle of light (grazing angle). We obtain the coefficient of the surface tension of liquids by applying the dispersion relation for capillary waves and analyze the difficulties that arise when setting up and conducting the experiment in detail. (paper)

  1. Nonlinear reflection of shock shear waves in soft elastic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Gianmarco; Coulouvrat, François; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickaël

    2010-02-01

    For fluids, the theoretical investigation of shock wave reflection has a good agreement with experiments when the incident shock Mach number is large. But when it is small, theory predicts that Mach reflections are physically unrealistic, which contradicts experimental evidence. This von Neumann paradox is investigated for shear shock waves in soft elastic solids with theory and simulations. The nonlinear elastic wave equation is approximated by a paraxial wave equation with a cubic nonlinear term. This equation is solved numerically with finite differences and the Godunov scheme. Three reflection regimes are observed. Theory is developed for shock propagation by applying the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and entropic constraints. A characteristic parameter relating diffraction and non-linearity is introduced and its theoretical values are shown to match numerical observations. The numerical solution is then applied to von Neumann reflection, where curved reflected and Mach shocks are observed. Finally, the case of weak von Neumann reflection, where there is no reflected shock, is examined. The smooth but non-monotonic transition between these three reflection regimes, from linear Snell-Descartes to perfect grazing case, provides a solution to the acoustical von Neumann paradox for the shear wave equation. This transition is similar to the quadratic non-linearity in fluids.

  2. Wave Reflection in 3D Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanuttigh, Barbara; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent experiments carried out in wave basin on breakwaters with armour layer of rocks and cubes, this paper examines the dependence of the reflection coefficient on wave directional spreading and obliquity. Results suggest that long-crested and short-crested waves give similar reflectio...

  3. Diffraction of a plane wave on two-dimensional conductive structures and a surface wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, Mikhael V.

    2018-04-01

    We consider the structures type of two-dimensional electron gas in the form of a thin conductive, in particular, graphene films described by tensor conductivity, which are isolated or located on the dielectric layers. The dispersion equation for hybrid modes, as well as scattering parameters. We show that free wave (eigenwaves) problem follow from the problem of diffraction when linking the amplitude of the current of the linear equations are unsolvable, i.e., the determinant of this system is zero. As a particular case the dispersion equation follow from the conditions of matching (with zero reflection coefficient).

  4. Elastic wave diffraction by infinite wedges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradkin, Larissa; Zernov, Victor [Sound Mathematics Ltd., Cambridge CB4 2AS (United Kingdom); Gautesen, Arthur [Mathematics Department, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory (United States); Darmon, Michel, E-mail: l.fradkin@soundmathematics.com [CEA-LIST, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-01-01

    We compare two recently developed semi-analytical approaches to the classical problem of diffraction by an elastic two dimensional wedge, one based on the reciprocity principle and Fourier Transform and another, on the representations of the elastodynamic potentials in the form of Sommerfeld Integrals. At present, in their common region of validity, the approaches are complementary, one working better than the other at some isolated angles of incidence.

  5. Diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave on a dielectric plate of variable density. [Field equatios, diffracted-wave angular distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aivazyan, Yu M; Mergelyan, O S; Poulatov, M P

    1974-01-01

    Aproblem for the diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave on a dielectric plate between two other dielectrics is solved. The dielectric constant of the plate depends periodically on three coordinates. From this solution it is possible to obtain the equations for fields and the angular distribution of diffracted waves for the particular cases of a crystal plate and a dielectric surface fluted in all directions. If the expansion is made in the variable of the electron density in crystals, the results will correspond to the problem for the X-ray diffraction on a crystal lattice, the values of the coefficient ..cap alpha -->..sub(tau) being determined by the lattice parameters.

  6. CFD Analysis of Water Solitary Wave Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Smida

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new numerical wave generation method is used to investigate the head-on collision of two solitary waves. The reflection at vertical wall of a solitary wave is also presented. The originality of this model, based on the Navier-Stokes equations, is the specification of an internal inlet velocity, defined as a source line within the computational domain for the generation of these non linear waves. This model was successfully implemented in the PHOENICS (Parabolic Hyperbolic Or Elliptic Numerical Integration Code Series code. The collision of two counter-propagating solitary waves is similar to the interaction of a soliton with a vertical wall. This wave generation method allows the saving of considerable time for this collision process since the counter-propagating wave is generated directly without reflection at vertical wall. For the collision of two solitary waves, numerical results show that the run-up phenomenon can be well explained, the solution of the maximum wave run-up is almost equal to experimental measurement. The simulated wave profiles during the collision are in good agreement with experimental results. For the reflection at vertical wall, the spatial profiles of the wave at fixed instants show that this problem is equivalent to the collision process.

  7. Light Diffraction by Large Amplitude Ultrasonic Waves in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Laszlo; Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Light diffraction from ultrasound, which can be used to investigate nonlinear acoustic phenomena in liquids, is reported for wave amplitudes larger than that typically reported in the literature. Large amplitude waves result in waveform distortion due to the nonlinearity of the medium that generates harmonics and produces asymmetries in the light diffraction pattern. For standing waves with amplitudes above a threshold value, subharmonics are generated in addition to the harmonics and produce additional diffraction orders of the incident light. With increasing drive amplitude above the threshold a cascade of period-doubling subharmonics are generated, terminating in a region characterized by a random, incoherent (chaotic) diffraction pattern. To explain the experimental results a toy model is introduced, which is derived from traveling wave solutions of the nonlinear wave equation corresponding to the fundamental and second harmonic standing waves. The toy model reduces the nonlinear partial differential equation to a mathematically more tractable nonlinear ordinary differential equation. The model predicts the experimentally observed cascade of period-doubling subharmonics terminating in chaos that occurs with increasing drive amplitudes above the threshold value. The calculated threshold amplitude is consistent with the value estimated from the experimental data.

  8. Limited Diffraction Maps for Pulsed Wave Annular Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure is provided for decomposing the linear field of flat pulsed wave annular arrays into an equivalent set of known limited diffraction Bessel beams. Each Bessel beam propagates with known characteristics, enabling good insight into the propagation of annular fields to be obtained...

  9. Fracture diagnostics with tube wave reflection logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medlin, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the Tube Wave Reflection Log (TWRL) which is acoustic logging method which provides information about the height, location and conductivity of hydraulically induced fractures behind perforated casing. The TWRL tool consists of a transmitter and closely spaced receiver. The transmitter is driven with a short, low frequency tone burst to generate long wavelength tube waves which are little attenuated in unperforated casing. They are partially reflected when they pass perforated intervals communicating with a hydraulically induced fracture. The tool listens for such reflections for 0.1 seconds following each excitation burst. As the tool is moved uphole at logging speed, the transmitter is excited at each foot of depth. VDL displays of the TWRL records provide reflection traces whose projections define the uppermost and lower-most perforations communicating with the fracture. The strength of the reflections depends on the ease of fluid flow into the fracture and thus, is an indicator of fracture conductivity

  10. Flow control for oblique shock wave reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Giepman, R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave-boundary layer interactions are prevalent in many aerospace applications that involve transonic or supersonic flows. Such interactions may lead to boundary layer separation, flow unsteadiness and substantial losses in the total pressure. Flow control techniques can help to mitigate these adverse effects and stabilize the interaction. This thesis focuses on passive flow control techniques for oblique shock wave reflections on flat plates and presents experimental results for both la...

  11. Gravitational wave sources: reflections and echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-11-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves has generated interest in alternatives to the black hole interpretation of sources. A subset of such alternatives involves a prediction of gravitational wave ‘echoes’. We consider two aspects of possible echoes: first, general features of echoes coming from spacetime reflecting conditions. We find that the detailed nature of such echoes does not bear any clear relationship to quasi-normal frequencies. Second, we point out the pitfalls in the analysis of local reflecting ‘walls’ near the horizon of rapidly rotating black holes.

  12. Gravitational wave sources: reflections and echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Richard H; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    The recent detection of gravitational waves has generated interest in alternatives to the black hole interpretation of sources. A subset of such alternatives involves a prediction of gravitational wave ‘echoes’. We consider two aspects of possible echoes: first, general features of echoes coming from spacetime reflecting conditions. We find that the detailed nature of such echoes does not bear any clear relationship to quasi-normal frequencies. Second, we point out the pitfalls in the analysis of local reflecting ‘walls’ near the horizon of rapidly rotating black holes. (paper)

  13. Music decreases aortic stiffness and wave reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Aggelakas, Angelos; Ioakeimidis, Nikolaos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Terentes-Printzios, Dimitrios; Abdelrasoul, Mahmoud; Lazaros, George; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    Music has been related to cardiovascular health and used as adjunct therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease. Aortic stiffness and wave reflections are predictors of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the short-term effect of classical and rock music on arterial stiffness and wave reflections. Twenty healthy individuals (22.5±2.5 years) were studied on three different occasions and listened to a 30-min music track compilation (classical, rock, or no music for the sham procedure). Both classical and rock music resulted in a decrease of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) immediately after the end of music listening (all pclassical or rock music in a more sustained way (nadir by 6.0% and 5.8%, respectively, at time zero post-music listening, all pmusic preference was taken into consideration, both classical and rock music had a more potent effect on PWV in classical aficionados (by 0.20 m/s, p=0.003 and 0.13 m/s, p=0.015, respectively), whereas there was no effect in rock aficionados (all p=NS). Regarding wave reflections, classical music led to a more potent response in classical aficionados (AIx decrease by 9.45%), whereas rock led to a more potent response to rock aficionados (by 10.7%, all pMusic, both classical and rock, decreases aortic stiffness and wave reflections. Effect on aortic stiffness lasts for as long as music is listened to, while classical music has a sustained effect on wave reflections. These findings may have important implications, extending the spectrum of lifestyle modifications that can ameliorate arterial function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Topography Estimation of the Core Mantle Boundary with ScS Reverberations and Diffraction Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, B. E.; Nakata, N.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we use the propagation of global seismic waves to study the Core Mantle Boundary (CMB). We focus on the use of S-wave reflections at the CMB (ScS reverberations) and outer-core diffracted waves. It is difficult imaging the CMB with the ScS wave because the complexity of the structure in the near surface ( 50 km); the complex structure degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of of the ScS. To avoid estimating the structure in the crust, we rely on the concept of seismic interferometry to extract wave propagation through mantle, but not through the crust. Our approach is compute the deconvolution between the ScS (and its reverberation) and direct S waves generated by intermediate to deep earthquakes (>50 km depth). Through this deconvolution, we have the ability to filter out the direct S wave and retrieve the wave field propagating from only the hypocenter to the outer core, but not between the hypocenter to the receiver. After the deconvolution, we can isolate the CMB reflected waves from the complicated wave phenomena because of the near-surface structure. Utilizing intermediate and deep earthquakes is key since we can suppress the near-surface effect from the surface to the hypocenter of the earthquakes. The variation of such waves (e.g., travel-time perturbation and/or wavefield decorrelation) at different receivers and earthquakes provides the information of the topography of the CMB. In order to get a more detailed image of the topography of the CMB we use diffracted seismic waves such as Pdiff , Sdiff, and P'P'. By using two intermediate to deep earthquakes on a great circle path with a station we can extract the wave propagation between the two earthquakes to simplify the waveform, similar to how it is preformed using the ScS wave. We generate more illumination of the CMB by using diffracted waves rather than only using ScS reverberations. The accurate topography of CMB obtained by these deconvolution analyses may provide new insight of the

  15. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction and short-pulse reflection by one-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependence of the Bragg diffraction by one-dimensional photonic crystals and its influence on the short pulse reflection are studied in the framework of the coupled-wave theory. The indicial response of the photonic crystal is calculated and it appears that it presents a time-delay effect with a transient time conditioned by the extinction length. A numerical simulation is presented for a Bragg mirror in the x-ray domain and a pulse envelope modelled by a sine-squared shape. The potential consequences of the time-delay effect in time-dependent optics of short-pulses are emphasized. (paper)

  16. The Uniform geometrical Theory of Diffraction for elastodynamics: Plane wave scattering from a half-plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakou, Audrey Kamta; Darmon, Michel; Fradkin, Larissa; Potel, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Diffraction phenomena studied in electromagnetism, acoustics, and elastodynamics are often modeled using integrals, such as the well-known Sommerfeld integral. The far field asymptotic evaluation of such integrals obtained using the method of steepest descent leads to the classical Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD). It is well known that the method of steepest descent is inapplicable when the integrand's stationary phase point coalesces with its pole, explaining why GTD fails in zones where edge diffracted waves interfere with incident or reflected waves. To overcome this drawback, the Uniform geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) has been developed previously in electromagnetism, based on a ray theory, which is particularly easy to implement. In this paper, UTD is developed for the canonical elastodynamic problem of the scattering of a plane wave by a half-plane. UTD is then compared to another uniform extension of GTD, the Uniform Asymptotic Theory (UAT) of diffraction, based on a more cumbersome ray theory. A good agreement between the two methods is obtained in the far field.

  17. Wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2011-01-01

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion using a gradient optimization method is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated within the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear with respect to changes in the velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we present a reflection traveltime tomography method based on the wave equation which enjoys a more quasi-linear relationship between the model and the data. A local crosscorrelation of the windowed downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the image point yields the lag time that maximizes the correlation. This lag time represents the reflection traveltime residual that is back-projected into the earth model to update the velocity in the same way as wave-equation transmission traveltime inversion. No travel-time picking is needed and no high-frequency approximation is assumed. The mathematical derivation and the numerical examples are presented to partly demonstrate its efficiency and robustness. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  18. Terahertz wave reflective sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hua

    Sensing and imaging technologies using terahertz (THz) radiation have found diverse applications as they approach maturity. Since the burgeoning of this technique in the 1990's, many THz sensing and imaging investigations have been designed and conducted in transmission geometry, which provides sufficient phase and amplitude contrast for the study of the spectral properties of targets in the THz domain. Driven by rising expectations that THz technology will be a potential candidate in the next generation of security screening, remote sensing, biomedical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT), most THz sensing and imaging modalities are being extended to reflection geometry, which offers unique and adaptive solutions, and multi-dimensional information in many real scenarios. This thesis takes an application-focused approach to the advancement of THz wave reflective sensing and imaging systems: The absorption signature of the explosive material hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5triazine (RDX) is measured at 30 m---the longest standoff distance so far attained by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The standoff distance sensing ability of THz-TDS is investigated along with discussions specifying the influences of a variety of factors such as propagation distance, water vapor absorption and collection efficiency. Highly directional THz radiation from four-wave mixing in laser-induced air plasmas is first observed and measured, which provides a potential solution for the atmospheric absorption effect in standoff THz sensing. The simulations of the beam profiles also illuminate the underlying physics behind the interaction of the optical beam with the plasma. THz wave reflective spectroscopic focal-plane imaging is realized the first time. Absorption features of some explosives and related compounds (ERCs) and biochemical materials are identified by using adaptive feature extraction method. Good classification results using multiple pattern recognition methods are

  19. Intensity Distribution of the Three-Wave Diffraction from Dislocation Epitaxial Layers in the Reciprocal Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyutt, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The three-wave X-ray diffraction in strongly disordered epitaxial layers of GaN and ZnO is experimentally investigated. The charts of the intensity distribution in the reciprocal space are plotted in coordinates q θ and q ϕ for the most intensive three-wave combination (1010)/(1011) by means of subsequent θ- and ϕ-scanning. A nontrivial shape of the θ-sections of these contours at a distance from the ϕ center of reflection is revealed; it is different for different samples. For the θ-curves at the center of reflection, we observed a common peak that may be approximated by the Voigt function with a power-low decrease in the intensity at the wings; the decrease law (from-4.5 to-5.0) is found to be considerably greater than that for the similar curves of two-wave diffraction and not depending on the dislocation density and distribution in layers. In some films we observed a coarse-block structure; in addition, it follows from the distribution in the reciprocal space that these blocks are turned with respect to each other around a normal to the surface, which allows us to suggest the existence of low-angle boundaries between them, consisting exclusively of edge dislocations.

  20. Theory of reflection reflection and transmission of electromagnetic, particle and acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lekner, John

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the reflection of electromagnetic and particle waves by interfaces. The interfaces can be sharp or diffuse. The topics of the book contain absorption, inverse problems, anisotropy, pulses and finite beams, rough surfaces, matrix methods, numerical methods,  reflection of particle waves and neutron reflection. Exact general results are presented, followed by long wave reflection, variational theory, reflection amplitude equations of the Riccati type, and reflection of short waves. The Second Edition of the Theory of Reflection is an updated and much enlarged revision of the 1987 monograph. There are new chapters on periodically stratified media, ellipsometry, chiral media, neutron reflection and reflection of acoustic waves. The chapter on anisotropy is much extended, with a complete treatment of the reflection and transmission properties of arbitrarily oriented uniaxial crystals. The book gives a systematic and unified treatment reflection and transmission of electromagnetic and particle...

  1. Semiconductor Quantum Electron Wave Transport, Diffraction, and Interference: Analysis, Device, and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gregory Newell

    Semiconductor device dimensions are rapidly approaching a fundamental limit where drift-diffusion equations and the depletion approximation are no longer valid. In this regime, quantum effects can dominate device response. To increase further device density and speed, new devices must be designed that use these phenomena to positive advantage. In addition, quantum effects provide opportunities for a new class of devices which can perform functions previously unattainable with "conventional" semiconductor devices. This thesis has described research in the analysis of electron wave effects in semiconductors and the development of methods for the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum devices based on these effects. First, an exact set of quantitative analogies are presented which allow the use of well understood optical design and analysis tools for the development of electron wave semiconductor devices. Motivated by these analogies, methods are presented for modeling electron wave grating diffraction using both an exact rigorous coupled-wave analysis and approximate analyses which are useful for grating design. Example electron wave grating switch and multiplexer designs are presented. In analogy to thin-film optics, the design and analysis of electron wave Fabry-Perot interference filters are also discussed. An innovative technique has been developed for testing these (and other) electron wave structures using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). This technique uses a liquid-helium temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform spectroscopy of the electron transmittance as a function of electron energy. Experimental results show that BEEM can resolve even weak quantum effects, such as the reflectivity of a single interface between materials. Finally, methods are discussed for incorporating asymmetric electron wave Fabry-Perot filters into optoelectronic devices. Theoretical and experimental results show that such structures could

  2. Trajectory method in the theory of Laue diffraction of X rays in crystals: II. Effect of total reflection at bending deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of total reflection (switching) of a spherical X-ray wave in the case of Laue diffraction in a crystal with bending deformation is analyzed by the trajectory method. Qualitative analytical description and computation of the spatial structure of the reflected beam for large and small distances between the spherical-wave source and the crystal are performed. The mechanism of much more efficient reflection of an X-ray beam by a deformed crystal in comparison with a perfect crystal is clearly demonstrated. It is also shown that the trajectory method is very convenient for description of the total reflection phenomenon.

  3. Trajectory method in the theory of Laue diffraction of X rays in crystals: II. Effect of total reflection at bending deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohn, V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of total reflection (switching) of a spherical X-ray wave in the case of Laue diffraction in a crystal with bending deformation is analyzed by the trajectory method. Qualitative analytical description and computation of the spatial structure of the reflected beam for large and small distances between the spherical-wave source and the crystal are performed. The mechanism of much more efficient reflection of an X-ray beam by a deformed crystal in comparison with a perfect crystal is clearly demonstrated. It is also shown that the trajectory method is very convenient for description of the total reflection phenomenon

  4. Possibility of gravitational wave detector production on the base of light diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segizboev, T.I.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational wave detector based on the light diffraction is proposed. Under the gravitation wave incidence on an elastic rod standing acoustic oscillations are excited in it, which are then used as a diffraction grating for the light scattering. A detailed mathematical analysis of this detector is given. 1 ref

  5. A new GTD slope diffraction coefficient for plane wave illumination of a wedge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumholt, Michael; Breinbjerg, Olav

    1997-01-01

    Two wedge problems including slope diffraction are solved: one in which the incident field is a non-uniform plane wave, and one in which it is an inhomogeneous plane wave. The two solutions lead to the same GTD slope diffraction coefficient. This coefficient reveals the existence of a coupling...... effect between a transverse magnetic (or transverse electric) incident plane wave and the transverse electric (or transverse magnetic) slope-diffracted field. The coupling effect is not described by the existing GTD slope diffraction coefficient...

  6. Diffractons: Solitary Waves Created by Diffraction in Periodic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.; Quezada de Luna, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A new class of solitary waves arises in the solution of nonlinear wave equations with constant impedance and no dispersive terms. These solitary waves depend on a balance between nonlinearity and a dispersion-like effect due to spatial variation

  7. Arterial wave reflection decreases gradually from supine to upright

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Bogaard, Bas; Westerhof, Berend E; Best, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND. An increase in total peripheral resistance (TPR) usually increases arterial wave reflection. During passive head-up tilt (HUT), however, arterial wave reflection decreases with increasing TPR. This study addressed whether arterial wave reflection gradually decreases during HUT. METHODS....... In 10 healthy volunteers (22-39 years, nine males), we recorded finger arterial pressures in supine position (0°), and 30°and 70°degrees HUT and active standing (90°). Aortic pressure was constructed from the finger pressure signal and hemodynamics were calculated. Arterial wave reflection...... from 0.9 dyn s/cm(5) at 0? to 1.2, 1.4 and 1.4 dyn s/cm(5) at 30°, 70° and 90° (p wave reflection...

  8. X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing-wave study of the lead stearate film structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagov, A. E.; Dyakova, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Kohn, V. G.; Marchenkova, M. A.; Pisarevskiy, Yu. V.; Prosekov, P. A., E-mail: prosekov@crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    A new approach to the study of the structural quality of crystals is proposed. It is based on the use of X-ray standing-wave method without measuring secondary processes and considers the multiwave interaction of diffraction reflections corresponding to different harmonics of the same crystallographic reflection. A theory of multiwave X-ray diffraction is developed to calculate the rocking curves in the X-ray diffraction scheme under consideration for a long-period quasi-one-dimensional crystal. This phase-sensitive method is used to study the structure of a multilayer lead stearate film on a silicon substrate. Some specific structural features are revealed for the surface layer of the thin film, which are most likely due to the tilt of the upper layer molecules with respect to the external normal to the film surface.

  9. Effect of environmental temperature on diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optical elements in Mid-wave infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of environmental temperature change on multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is evaluated from the viewpoint of the diffraction efficiency and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE). As environmental temperature changes, the microstructure heights of MLDOEs expand or contract, and refractive indices of substrate materials also change. Based on the changes in microstructure height and substrate material index with environmental temperature, the theoretical relation between diffraction efficiency of MLDOEs and environmental temperature is deduced. A practical 3-5μm Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) optical system designed with a MLDOE, which made of ZNSE and GE, is discussed to illustrate the influence of environmental temperature change. The result shows that diffraction efficiency reduction is no more than 85% and PIDE reduction is less than 50% when environmental temperature ranges from -20°C to 60°C. According to the calculated diffraction efficiency in different environmental temperatures, the MTF of hybrid optical system is modified and the modified MTF curve is compared with the original MTF curve. Although the hybrid optical system achieved passive athermalization in above environmental temperature range, the modified MTF curve also remarkably decline in environmental temperature extremes after the consideration of diffraction efficiency change of MLDOE. It is indicated that the image quality of hybrid optical system with ZNSE-GE MLDOE is significantly sensitive to environmental temperature change. The analysis result can be used for optical engineering design with MLDOEs in MWIR.

  10. Vector wave diffraction pattern of slits masked by polarizing devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This calls for a systematic study of diffraction properties of different apertures using polarization-sensitive devices. In the present paper, we have studied the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of slits masked by different kinds of polarizing devices which introduce a phase difference between the two orthogonal components of the ...

  11. Measurement of light-cone wave functions by diffractive dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asheri, D. [Tel Aviv Univ., School of Physics and Astronomy, Sackler Faculty of Exact Science (Israel)

    2005-07-01

    The measurement of the pion light-cone wave function is revisited and results for the Gegenbauer coefficients are presented. Measurements of the photon electromagnetic and hadronic wave functions are described and results are presented. (authors)

  12. Effect of end reflections on conversion efficiency of coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Yan; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Wu, Ping; Li, Shuang; Xiong, Xiaolong [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2015-11-07

    This paper theoretically investigates the effect of end reflections on the operation of the coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (CRBWO). It is found that the considerable enhancement of the end reflection at one end increases the conversion efficiency, but excessively large end reflections at both ends weaken the asynchronous wave-beam interaction and thus reduce the conversion efficiency. Perfect reflection at the post end significantly improves the interaction between the electron beam and the asynchronous harmonic so that the conversion efficiency is notably increased. Based on the theoretical research, the diffraction-CRBWO with the generated microwave diffracted and output through the front end of the coaxial slow wave structure cavity is proposed. The post end is conductively closed to provide the perfect reflection. This promotes the amplitude and uniformity of the longitudinal electric field on the beam transmission line and improves the asynchronous wave-beam interaction. In numerical simulations under the diode voltage and current of 450 kV and 5.84 kA, microwave generation with the power of 1.45 GW and the conversion efficiency of 55% are obtained at the frequency of 7.45 GHz.

  13. COMPARATIVE RESEARCH OF VARIOUS METHODS FOR DETERMINING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF AN ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE REFLECTED FROM A SCATTERING DIFFRACTION SCREEN IN THE PROPAGATION OF A RADIO SIGNAL IN THE EARTH-IONOSPHERE CHANNEL IN THE SHORT-WAVE RANGE OF RADIO WAVES WITH USE OF THE EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT OF COHERENT RECEPTION OF A GROUND-BASED MEASURING COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Yu. Belov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of the earth’s surface by remote sensing in the short-wave band can provide quick identification of some characteristics of natural systems. This band range allows one to diagnose subsurface aspects of the earth, as the scattering parameter is affected by irregularities in the dielectric permittivity of subsurface structures. The new method is suggested. This method based on the organization of the monitoring probe may detect changes in these environments, for example, to assess seismic hazard, hazardous natural phenomena, changes ecosystems, as well as some man-made hazards and etc. The problem of measuring and accounting for the scattering power of the earth’s surface in the short-range of radio waves is important for a number of purposes, such as diagnosing properties of the medium, which is of interest for geological, environmental studies. In this paper, we propose a new method for estimating the parameters of incoherent signal/noise ratio. The paper presents the results of comparison of the measurement method from the point of view of their admissible relative analytical errors. A comparative analysis and shows that the analytical (relative accuracy of the determination of this parameter new method on the order exceeds the widely-used standard method. Analysis of admissible relative analytical error of estimation of this parameter allowed to recommend new method instead of standard method

  14. Diffractons: Solitary Waves Created by Diffraction in Periodic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2015-03-31

    A new class of solitary waves arises in the solution of nonlinear wave equations with constant impedance and no dispersive terms. These solitary waves depend on a balance between nonlinearity and a dispersion-like effect due to spatial variation in the sound speed of the medium. A high-order homogenized model confirms this effective dispersive behavior, and its solutions agree well with those obtained by direct simulation of the variable-coefficient system. These waves are observed to be long-time stable, globally attracting solutions that arise in general as solutions to nonlinear wave problems with periodically varying sound speed. They share some properties with known classes of solitary waves but possess important differences as well.

  15. Diffraction of an inhomogeneous plane wave by an impedance wedge in a lossy medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Manara, G

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The diffraction of an inhomogeneous plane wave by an impedance wedge embedded in a lossy medium is analyzed. The rigorous integral representation for the field is asymptotically evaluated in the context of the uniform geometrical theory...

  16. High frequency time modulation of neutrons by LiNbO3 crystals with surface acoustic waves excited under the diffraction condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Granzer, E.; Kikuta, Seishi; Tomimitsu, Hiroshi; Doi, Kenji.

    1985-01-01

    High frequency time modulation of neutrons was investigated by using Y-cut LiNbO 3 crystals with surface acoustic waves excited. A double crystal arrangement of (+, -) parallel setting was used for 030 symmetric Bragg-case reflections. Synchronized standing waves with a resonance frequency of 14.26 MHz were excited on the both crystals. Variation of the diffracted intensity with phase difference between two standing waves was studied. The result showed an intensity change of diffracted neutrons with twice the resonance frequency. (author)

  17. High resolution electron exit wave reconstruction from a diffraction pattern using Gaussian basis decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Kirkland, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    We describe an algorithm to reconstruct the electron exit wave of a weak-phase object from single diffraction pattern. The algorithm uses analytic formulations describing the diffraction intensities through a representation of the object exit wave in a Gaussian basis. The reconstruction is achieved by solving an overdetermined system of non-linear equations using an easily parallelisable global multi-start search with Levenberg-Marquard optimisation and analytic derivatives

  18. Diffraction of love waves by two staggered perfectly weak half-planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, S.; Zaman, F.D.; Sajida Asghar

    1989-01-01

    Love wave travelling in a layer of uniform thickness overlying a half-space is assumed to be incident on two parallel but staggered perfectly weak half-planes lying in the upper layer. The diffracted fields is calculated using the modified Wiener-Hopf technique and contour integration method. The diffracted waves satisfy the dispersion relations appropriate to different regions formed by the perfectly weak half-planes

  19. Study of the rates of dissemination of elastic waves with diffraction transformation of seismic recordings. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, A.N.; Bulatov, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for determining effective velocities in the process of diffraction transformation of seismic waves. It is based on summation with conjugate recordings. Results of the study of velocities are indicated in materials of Sakhalin. A difference is noted in the procedures for computing effective velocities in the OGT method and diffraction transformation.

  20. Manipulating acoustic wave reflection by a nonlinear elastic metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinxin; Gusev, Vitalyi E.; Bertoldi, Katia; Tournat, Vincent

    2018-03-01

    The acoustic wave reflection properties of a nonlinear elastic metasurface, derived from resonant nonlinear elastic elements, are theoretically and numerically studied. The metasurface is composed of a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with quadratic elastic nonlinearity. The possibility of converting, during the reflection process, most of the fundamental incoming wave energy into the second harmonic wave is shown, both theoretically and numerically, by means of a proper design of the nonlinear metasurface. The theoretical results from the harmonic balance method for a monochromatic source are compared with time domain simulations for a wave packet source. This protocol allows analyzing the dynamics of the nonlinear reflection process in the metasurface as well as exploring the limits of the operating frequency bandwidth. The reported methodology can be applied to a wide variety of nonlinear metasurfaces, thus possibly extending the family of exotic nonlinear reflection processes.

  1. Flow control for oblique shock wave reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepman, R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave-boundary layer interactions are prevalent in many aerospace applications that involve transonic or supersonic flows. Such interactions may lead to boundary layer separation, flow unsteadiness and substantial losses in the total pressure. Flow control techniques can help to mitigate these

  2. Projecting non-diffracting waves with intermediate-plane holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Argha; Yevick, Aaron; Blackburn, Lauren C; Kanellakopoulos, Nikitas; Grier, David G

    2018-02-19

    We introduce intermediate-plane holography, which substantially improves the ability of holographic trapping systems to project propagation-invariant modes of light using phase-only diffractive optical elements. Translating the mode-forming hologram to an intermediate plane in the optical train can reduce the need to encode amplitude variations in the field, and therefore complements well-established techniques for encoding complex-valued transfer functions into phase-only holograms. Compared to standard holographic trapping implementations, intermediate-plane holograms greatly improve diffraction efficiency and mode purity of propagation-invariant modes, and so increase their useful non-diffracting range. We demonstrate this technique through experimental realizations of accelerating modes and long-range tractor beams.

  3. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory - General theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    A formal theory is developed for the scattering of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from impenetrable immobile obstacles with given linear, homogeneous, and generally nonlocal boundary conditions of Leontovich (impedance) type for the wave of the obstacle's surface. The theory is modeled on the complete Green's function and the transition (T) operator in time-independent formal scattering theory of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. An expression for the differential scattering cross section for plane electromagnetic waves is derived in terms of certain matrix elements of the T operator for the obstacle.

  4. Hydrodynamic coefficients for water-wave diffraction by spherical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    floating bodies is of great significance in designing these structures. ... due to surge and heave motions are derived by solving the diffraction problem. ... A rigid floating or submerged structure may undergo six degrees of freedom: .... and z directions, i.e. surge and heave motions respectively, and the rotational motion about.

  5. X-ray topography under conditions of monochromatic spherical wave diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristov, V.V.; Polovinkina, V.I.; Ibhikawa, Tetsuya; Kiduta, Seishi.

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray topographic scheme was developed in which there is a large distance between the X-ray source and the specimen. A monochromatic X-ray beam with an angular divergence 6 x 10 - 5 rad obtained by double successive diffraction in the (n 1 , +n 2 ) setting was used. This scheme enables diffraction focusing of a weakly absorbed wave field onto the exit surface of the crystal to be performed. Topographs of a wedge-shaped silicon crystal were obtained. Interference effects such as focusing, anomalous and ordinary Pendelloesung effects peculiar to X-ray spherical wave diffraction were observed in the topographs with high resolution. (author)

  6. THE DECISION OF FORM FOR DIFFRACTIVE STRUCTURES IN THE PROBLEM OF SCATTERING OF RADIO WAVES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Preobrazhensky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of scattering of electromagnetic waves in different diffraction structures. The solution of the scattering problem is based on the method of integral equations. On diagrams of backscattering at various frequencies of the incident wave, the decision about the form of the object is carried out.

  7. Diffraction of love waves by two parallel perfectly weak half planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, S.; Zaman, F.D.; Ayub, M.

    1986-04-01

    We consider the diffraction of Love waves by two parallel perfectly weak half planes in a layer overlying a half space. The problem is formulated in terms of the Wiener-Hopf equations in the transformed plane. The transmitted waves are then calculated using the Wiener-Hopf procedure and inverse transforms. (author)

  8. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  9. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 ) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space-time modulation of an X-ray beam.

  10. Angular beam width of a slit-diffracted wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, Edwin H

    2012-01-01

    Taking magnetostatic surface wave diffraction as an example, this paper theoretically investigates the 2D diffraction pattern arising in the far-field region of a ferrite slab in the case of a plane wave with noncollinear group and phase velocities incident on a wide, arbitrarily oriented slit in an opaque screen. A universal analytical formula for the angular width of a diffracted beam is derived, which is valid for magnetostatic and other types of waves in anisotropic media and structures (including metamaterials) in 2D geometries. It is shown that the angular width of a diffracted beam in an anisotropic medium can not only take values greater or less than λ 0 /D (where λ 0 is the incident wavelength, and D is the slit width), but can also be zero under certain conditions. (methodological notes)

  11. Interaction between lipid monolayers and poloxamer 188: An X-ray reflectivity and diffraction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.H.; Majewski, J.; Ege, C.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism by which poloxamer 188 (P188) seals a damaged cell membrane is examined using the lipid monolayer as a model system. X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction results show that at low nominal lipid density, P188, by physically occupying the available area and phase ...

  12. The high resolution shear wave seismic reflection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.J.; Clark, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents the state-of-the-art of the high resolution S-wave reflection technique. Published and unpublished literature has been reviewed and discussions have been held with experts. Result is to confirm that the proposed theoretical and practical basis for identifying aquifer systems using both P- and S-wave reflections is sound. Knowledge of S-wave velocity and P-wave velocity is a powerful tool for assessing the fluid characteristics of subsurface layers. Material properties and lateral changes in material properties such as change from clay to sand, can be inferred from careful dual evaluation of P and S-wave records. The high resolution S-wave reflection technique has seen its greatest application to date as part of geotechnical studies for building foundations in the Far East. Information from this type of study has been evaluated and will be incorporated in field studies. In particular, useful information regarding S-wave sources, noise suppression and recording procedures will be incorporated within the field studies. Case histories indicate that the best type of site for demonstrating the power of the high resolution S-wave technique will be in unconsolidated soil without excessive structural complexities. More complex sites can form the basis for subsequent research after the basic principles of the technique can be established under relatively uncomplicated conditions

  13. Quantitative Estimation of Transmitted and Reflected Lamb Waves at Discontinuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyung Jin; Sohn, Hoon

    2010-01-01

    For the application of Lamb wave to structural health monitoring(SHM), understanding its physical characteristic and interaction between Lamb wave and defect of the host structure is an important issue. In this study, reflected, transmitted and mode converted Lamb waves at discontinuity of a plate structure were simulated and the amplitude ratios are calculated theoretically using Modal decomposition method. The predicted results were verified comparing with finite element method(FEM) and experimental results simulating attached PZTs. The result shows that the theoretical prediction is close to the FEM and the experimental verification. Moreover, quantitative estimation method was suggested using amplitude ratio of Lamb wave at discontinuity

  14. Self-reflection of intense electromagnetic waves in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewari, D P; Kumar, A; Sharma, J K [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi. Dept. of Physics

    1977-10-01

    A uniform electromagnetic wave of high power density, propagating in a collisional plasma gives rise to a modification in temperature-dependent collision frequency and in turn induces a gradient in the complex refractive index of the medium. A WKB solution of the problem predicts a backward propagating wave on account of the self-induced inhomogeneity. The amplitude of the backward (i.e. reflected) wave increases with increasing power density of the wave. This is a volume nonlinear effect and is appreciable for usually employed power densities.

  15. The reflected amplitude ratio of multilayers and superlattice describe the dynamical diffraction of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, Q.A.; Mangi, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    Calculating the rocking curves of complicated layered structures, such as non-ideal super lattices on perfect crystals are clearly exposed with observed diffraction profile. Recursion formulas for calculating reflected amplitude ratio of multilayer and super lattices have been involved from the Takagi-Taupin differential equation, which describes the dynamical diffraction of X-rays in deformed crystal. The Kinematical theory can computing time only in case of ideal superlattice for which geometric series can be used but the reflectivity must be below 10 % so that multiple reflections can be neglected for a perfect crystal of arbitrary thickness the absorption at the centre of the dynamical reflection is found to be proportional to the square root of the reflectivity. Sputter- deposited periodic multilayers of tungsten and carbon can be considered as an artificial crystal, for which dynamical X-rays diffraction calculations give the result very similar to those of macroscopic optical description in terms of the complex index of refraction and Frensnel relation coefficient. (author)

  16. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    2007-04-01

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B 2 liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B 2 phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation

  17. High resolution shear wave reflection surveying for hydrogeological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.J.; Clark, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The high resolution S-wave method has been developed to be a powerful tool in mapping subsurface lithology and in conducting groundwater investigations. The research has demonstrated that the resolution obtainable using S-waves in a Coastal Plain environment is more than double than that obtained using conventional reflection, which already offers a higher resolution than any other surface method. Where the mapping of thin clay layers functioning as aquitards or thin sand layers functioning as aquifers are critical to the understanding of groundwater flow, S-wave reflections offer unparalleled possibilities for nondestructive exploration. The field experiment at Cooke Crossroads, South Carolina enabled the detection and mapping of beds in the thickness range of one to three feet. The S-wave reflection technique, in combination with conventional P-wave reflection, has potential to directly detect confined and unconfined aquifers. This is a breakthrough technology that still requires additional research before it can be applied on a commercial basis. Aquifer systems were interpreted from the test data at Cooke Crossroads consistent with theoretical model. Additional research is need in assessing the theoretical response of P- and S-waves to subsurface interfaces within unconsolidated sediments of varying moisture content and lithology. More theoretical modeling and in situ testing are needed to bring our knowledge of these phenomena to the level that oil and gas researchers have done for fluids in sandstones

  18. Use of overlapped reflection for determining the retained austenite by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.L.; Gonzalez, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Retainec austenite in high-carbon steels has been determined by means of new computation techniques applied to the processing of X-ray diffraction data. Instead of using the traditional procedure based on the weak (200) reflections of martensite and austenite, intensity measurements of the overlapped (110) peak of martensite and (111) peak of austenite were performed. The separation of the peaks was based on a Pearson VII function, which is capable of describing all diffraction profiles. The accuracy of integrated intensities was then improved with the beneficial effects of higher precision in the calculation of the amount of retained austenite. (author) [pt

  19. Reflection of Alfven waves at an open magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, F.; Kan, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Reflection of an Alfven wave incident on an open magnetopause form the magnetospheric side is examined. An open magnetopause, whose structure is different from the standard rotational discontinuity, is assumed to be a parameterized discontinuity with a nonzero normal field component. When an Alfven wave is incident on the open magnetopause, reflected and transmitted waves are generated. The emanating waves can be analyzed using linearized MHD conservation relations across the magnetopause, together with Snell's law. Under the assumption that the magnetic fields on the two sides of the open magnetopause are coplanar with the normal direction of the magnetopause, the governing equations are solved numerically. The results show that the electric fields of emanating Alfven waves depend mainly on the number density and the magnetic field jumps across the magnetopause. Under conditions representing the open magnetopause, it turns out that the open magnetopause behaves like a near perfect reflector. The corresponding reflection coefficient for the wave electric field can be approximated by R E = E r /E i ∼ -1 as has been deduced by Kan and Sun (1985) based on physical arguments. In other words, the solar wind flow is more or less unchanged by the loading effect of the Alfven wave incident on the magnetopause from the magnetospheric side. Therefore, under the assumptions of the model, the open magnetopause can be viewed as a constant voltage source

  20. Third All-Union Symposium on Wave Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-02

    the field takes the form of cylindrical wave where U=Cos 0 , aCosO , (5) * - angle between the direction to observation point and x axis, and 0. - angle...numerous regions in the cylindrical coordinate systems. In many instances instead of the labor -consuming integration of the squares of eigenfunctions for...Bola, Miklovich, etc. The calculation of contour integrals by integration for the coasts of shear/sections proved to be very labor -consuming, but for

  1. Ultra-low velocity zone heterogeneities at the core-mantle boundary from diffracted PKKPab waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolong; Sun, Xinlei

    2017-08-01

    Diffracted waves around Earth's core could provide important information of the lowermost mantle that other seismic waves may not. We examined PKKPab diffraction waves from 52 earthquakes occurring at the western Pacific region and recorded by USArray to probe the velocity structure along the core-mantle boundary (CMB). These diffracted waves emerge at distances up to 10° past the theoretical cutoff epicentral distance and show comparable amplitudes. We measured the ray parameters of PKKPab diffraction waves by Radon transform analysis that is suitable for large-aperture arrays. These ray parameters show a wide range of values from 4.250 to 4.840 s/deg, suggesting strong lateral heterogeneities in sampling regions at the base of the mantle. We further estimated the P-wave velocity variations by converting these ray parameters and found the CMB regions beneath the northwestern edge of African Anomaly (Ritsma et al. in Science 286:1925-1928, 1999) and southern Sumatra Islands exhibit velocity reductions up to 8.5% relative to PREM. We suggest that these low velocity regions are Ultra-low velocity zones, which may be related to partial melt or iron-enriched solids.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Monitoring non-pseudomorphic epitaxial growth of spinel/perovskite oxide heterostructures by reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, P.; Pfaff, F.; Scheiderer, P.; Sing, M.; Claessen, R. [Physikalisches Institut and Röntgen Center for Complex Material Systems (RCCM), Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2015-02-09

    Pulsed laser deposition of spinel γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on bulk perovskite SrTiO{sub 3} is monitored by high-pressure reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The heteroepitaxial combination of two materials with different crystal structures is found to be inherently accompanied by a strong intensity modulation of bulk diffraction patterns from inelastically scattered electrons, which impedes the observation of RHEED intensity oscillations. Avoiding such electron surface-wave resonance enhancement by de-tuning the RHEED geometry allows for the separate observation of the surface-diffracted specular RHEED signal and thus the real-time monitoring of sub-unit cell two-dimensional layer-by-layer growth. Since these challenges are essentially rooted in the difference between film and substrate crystal structure, our findings are of relevance for the growth of any heterostructure combining oxides with different crystal symmetry and may thus facilitate the search for novel oxide heterointerfaces.

  3. Mutual transformation of light waves by reflection holograms in photorefractive crystals of the 4-bar 3m symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naunyka, V. N.; Shepelevich, V. V., E-mail: vasshep@inbox.ru [Mozyr State Pedagogical University (Belarus)

    2011-05-15

    The mutual transformation of light waves in the case of their simultaneous diffraction from a bulk reflection phase hologram, which was formed in a cubic photorefractive crystal of the 4-bar 3m symmetry class, has been studied. The indicator surfaces of the polarization-optimized values of the relative intensity of the object wave, which make it possible to determine the amplification of this wave for any crystal cut, are constructed. The linear polarization azimuths at which the energy exchange between the light waves reaches a maximum are found numerically for crystals of different cuts.

  4. Arterial wave reflection and subclinical left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Takei, Yasuyoshi; Hasegawa, Takuya; Koshaka, Shun; Palmieri, Vittorio; Elkind, Mitchell Sv; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2011-03-01

    Increased arterial wave reflection is a predictor of cardiovascular events and has been hypothesized to be a cofactor in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Whether increased wave reflection is inversely associated with left-ventricular (LV) systolic function in individuals without heart failure is not clear. Arterial wave reflection and LV systolic function were assessed in 301 participants from the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study using two-dimensional echocardiography and applanation tonometry of the radial artery to derive central arterial waveform by a validated transfer function. Aortic augmentation index (AIx) and wasted energy index (WEi) were used as indices of wave reflection. LV systolic function was measured by LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Mitral annulus peak systolic velocity (Sm), peak longitudinal strain and strain rate were measured. Participants with history of coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, LVEF less than 50% or wall motion abnormalities were excluded. Mean age of the study population was 68.3 ± 10.2 years (64.1% women, 65% hypertensive). LV systolic function by TDI was lower with increasing wave reflection, whereas LVEF was not. In multivariate analysis, TDI parameters of LV longitudinal systolic function were significantly and inversely correlated to AIx and WEi (P values from 0.05 to 0.002). In a community cohort without heart failure and with normal LVEF, an increased arterial wave reflection was associated with subclinical reduction in LV systolic function assessed by novel TDI techniques. Further studies are needed to investigate the prognostic implications of this relationship.

  5. Diffraction of Electromagnetic Waves on a Waveguide Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malykh Mikhail

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, the investigation of the electromagnetic field in an inhomogeneous waveguide doesn’t reduce to the study of two independent boundary value problems for the Helmholtz equation. We show how to rewrite the Helmholtz equations in the “Hamiltonian form” to express the connection between these two problems explicitly. The problem of finding monochromatic waves in an arbitrary waveguide is reduced to an infinite system of ordinary differential equations in a properly constructed Hilbert space. The calculations are performed in the computer algebra system Sage.

  6. Born reflection kernel analysis and wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion in elastic media

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Tengfei

    2017-08-17

    Elastic reflection waveform inversion (ERWI) utilize the reflections to update the low and intermediate wavenumbers in the deeper part of model. However, ERWI suffers from the cycle-skipping problem due to the objective function of waveform residual. Since traveltime information relates to the background model more linearly, we use the traveltime residuals as objective function to update background velocity model using wave equation reflected traveltime inversion (WERTI). The reflection kernel analysis shows that mode decomposition can suppress the artifacts in gradient calculation. We design a two-step inversion strategy, in which PP reflections are firstly used to invert P wave velocity (Vp), followed by S wave velocity (Vs) inversion with PS reflections. P/S separation of multi-component seismograms and spatial wave mode decomposition can reduce the nonlinearity of inversion effectively by selecting suitable P or S wave subsets for hierarchical inversion. Numerical example of Sigsbee2A model validates the effectiveness of the algorithms and strategies for elastic WERTI (E-WERTI).

  7. Switching waves dynamics in optical bistable cavity-free system at femtosecond laser pulse propagation in semiconductor under light diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Egorenkov, Vladimir A.; Loginova, Maria M.

    2018-02-01

    We consider a propagation of laser pulse in a semiconductor under the conditions of an occurrence of optical bistability, which appears due to a nonlinear absorption of the semiconductor. As a result, the domains of high concentration of free charged particles (electrons and ionized donors) occur if an intensity of the incident optical pulse is greater than certain intensity. As it is well-known, that an optical beam must undergo a diffraction on (or reflection from) the domains boundaries. Usually, the beam diffraction along a coordinate of the optical pulse propagation does not take into account by using the slowly varying envelope approximation for the laser pulse interaction with optical bistable element. Therefore, a reflection of the beam from the domains with abrupt boundary does not take into account under computer simulation of the laser pulse propagation. However, the optical beams, reflected from nonhomogeneities caused by the domains of high concentration of free-charged particles, can essentially influence on a formation of switching waves in a semiconductor. We illustrate this statement by computer simulation results provided on the base of nonlinear Schrödinger equation and a set of PDEs, which describe an evolution of the semiconductor characteristics (concentrations of free-charged particles and potential of an electric field strength), and taking into account the longitudinal and transverse diffraction effects.

  8. Energy Relations for Plane Waves Reflected from Moving Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, P.; Gruenberg, Harry

    1967-01-01

    When a plane wave is obliquely incident from vacuum on a semi-infinite moving medium, the energy flow carried by the incident wave, is in general, not carried away by the reflected and transmitted waves. This is only the case when the medium velocity is parallel to its vacuum interface. Otherwise...... there is a net inflow or outflow of electromagnetic energy, which can be accounted for by the change of stored energy in the system, and the work done by the mechanical forces acting on the medium. A detailed energy balance is drawn up for two different media moving normal to their vacuum interfaces: (a...

  9. Verification of the uncertainty principle by using diffraction of light waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, D; Nesic, Lj

    2011-01-01

    We described a simple idea for experimental verification of the uncertainty principle for light waves. We used a single-slit diffraction of a laser beam for measuring the angular width of zero-order diffraction maximum and obtained the corresponding wave number uncertainty. We will assume that the uncertainty in position is the slit width. For the acquisition of the experimental data and their further analysis, we used a computer. Because of its simplicity this experiment is very suitable for demonstration, as well as for a quantitative exercise at universities and final year of high school studies.

  10. Useful Solutions for Plane Wave Diffraction by Dielectric Slabs and Wedges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gennarelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an overview of available uniform asymptotic physical optics solutions for evaluating the plane wave diffraction by some canonical geometries of large interest: dielectric slabs and wedges. Such solutions are based on a physical optics approximation of the electric and magnetic equivalent surface currents in the involved scattering integrals. The resulting diffraction coefficients are expressed in terms of the geometrical optics response of the considered structure and the standard transition function of the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction. Numerical tests and comparisons make evident the effectiveness and reliability of the presented solutions.

  11. Elastic Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion Using Dynamic Warping and Wave Mode Decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, T.

    2017-05-26

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) provides high-resolution parameter estimation of the subsurface but requires good initial guess of the true model. The traveltime inversion only minimizes traveltime misfits which are more sensitive and linearly related to the low-wavenumber model perturbation. Therefore, building initial P and S wave velocity models for EFWI by using elastic wave-equation reflections traveltime inversion (WERTI) would be effective and robust, especially for the deeper part. In order to distinguish the reflection travletimes of P or S-waves in elastic media, we decompose the surface multicomponent data into vector P- and S-wave seismogram. We utilize the dynamic image warping to extract the reflected P- or S-wave traveltimes. The P-wave velocity are first inverted using P-wave traveltime followed by the S-wave velocity inversion with S-wave traveltime, during which the wave mode decomposition is applied to the gradients calculation. Synthetic example on the Sigbee2A model proves the validity of our method for recovering the long wavelength components of the model.

  12. Consideration of Wall Reflection and Diffraction in the Room Acoustic Prediction Using the Phased Beam Tracing Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2007-01-01

    of the applicability of the geometrical methods to mid frequency. Several studies on this method have demonstrated a good possibility to analyze the sound field in an enclosure at mid frequency. In this study, further considerations on wall reflection and diffraction have been investigated. The main suggestions...... of representing the negative real part was discussed. The PBTM result shows a good agreement with the measurement especially in the early part of impulse response and at mid frequency. The new method of ii binaural simulation for the PBTM was suggested. The peculiar feature of frequency domain calculation......The geometrical acoustics methods have been used to simulate the acoustics of rooms at high frequencies whereas the wave based methods have been devoted to calculate the low frequency response. The modified method, so called phased geometrical acoustics technique, was suggested for the extension...

  13. The Intensity of the Light Diffraction by Supersonic Longitudinal Waves in Solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minasyan V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available First, we predict existence of transverse electromagnetic field created by supersonic longitudinal waves in solid. This electromagnetic wave with frequency of ultrasonic field is moved by velocity of supersonic field toward of direction propagation of one. The average Poynting vector of superposition field is calculated by presence of the transverse electromagnetic and the optical fields which in turn provides appearance the diffraction of light.

  14. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': Simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams, in lossy media

    OpenAIRE

    Prego-Borges, Jose' L.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Tavares-Costa, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have arisen significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction (self-healing) property, after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's; while the FWs, a sub-class of theirs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the field longitudinal int...

  15. Diffraction of ultracold fermions by quantized light fields: Standing versus traveling waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiser, D.; Search, C.P.; Meystre, P.

    2005-01-01

    We study the diffraction of quantum-degenerate fermionic atoms off of quantized light fields in an optical cavity. We compare the case of a linear cavity with standing-wave modes to that of a ring cavity with two counterpropagating traveling wave modes. It is found that the dynamics of the atoms strongly depends on the quantization procedure for the cavity field. For standing waves, no correlations develop between the cavity field and the atoms. Consequently, standing-wave Fock states yield the same results as a classical standing wave field while coherent states give rise to a collapse and revivals in the scattering of the atoms. In contrast, for traveling waves the scattering results in quantum entanglement of the radiation field and the atoms. This leads to a collapse and revival of the scattering probability even for Fock states. The Pauli exclusion principle manifests itself as an additional dephasing of the scattering probability

  16. The effects of core-reflected waves on finite fault inversions with teleseismic body wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yunyi; Ni, Sidao; Wei, Shengji; Almeida, Rafael; Zhang, Han

    2017-11-01

    Teleseismic body waves are essential for imaging rupture processes of large earthquakes. Earthquake source parameters are usually characterized by waveform analyses such as finite fault inversions using only turning (direct) P and SH waves without considering the reflected phases from the core-mantle boundary (CMB). However, core-reflected waves such as ScS usually have amplitudes comparable to direct S waves due to the total reflection from the CMB and might interfere with the S waves used for inversion, especially at large epicentral distances for long duration earthquakes. In order to understand how core-reflected waves affect teleseismic body wave inversion results, we develop a procedure named Multitel3 to compute Green's functions that contain turning waves (direct P, pP, sP, direct S, sS and reverberations in the crust) and core-reflected waves (PcP, pPcP, sPcP, ScS, sScS and associated reflected phases from the CMB). This ray-based method can efficiently generate synthetic seismograms for turning and core-reflected waves independently, with the flexibility to take into account the 3-D Earth structure effect on the timing between these phases. The performance of this approach is assessed through a series of numerical inversion tests on synthetic waveforms of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and the 2015 Mw7.8 Nepal earthquake. We also compare this improved method with the turning-wave only inversions and explore the stability of the new procedure when there are uncertainties in a priori information (such as fault geometry and epicentre location) or arrival time of core-reflected phases. Finally, a finite fault inversion of the 2005 Mw8.7 Nias-Simeulue earthquake is carried out using the improved Green's functions. Using enhanced Green's functions yields better inversion results as expected. While the finite source inversion with conventional P and SH waves is able to recover large-scale characteristics of the earthquake source, by adding PcP and ScS phases

  17. Zero-order filter for diffractive focusing of de Broglie matter waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eder, S. D.; Ravn, A. K.; Samelin, B.

    2017-01-01

    The manipulation of neutral atoms and molecules via their de Broglie wave properties, also referred to asde Broglie matter wave optics, is relevant for several fields ranging from fundamental quantum mechanics testsand quantum metrology to measurements of interaction potentials and new imaging...... Broglie matter wave diffractive focusing elements. The zero-order filter makes it possible to measure even at low beam intensities. We present measurements of zero-order filtered, focused, neutral helium beams generated at source stagnation pressures between 11 and 81 bars. We show that for certain...

  18. Four-dimensional integral equations for the MHD diffraction waves in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrova, A.A.; Khizhnyak, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    The superficial analysis of the boundary-value nonstationary problem for Alfven wave has shown the principal possibility of using the method of evolutionary integral equations of non-stationary macroscopic electrodynamical in a case of MHD description of waves in plasma. With the importance of strict mathematical solutions obtained for simple model problems that is the diffraction of one separately taken Alfven wave is that it can be the basis for construction of the approximate solutions of more complex boundary-value problems

  19. Diffraction properties study of reflection volume holographic grating in dispersive photorefractive material under ultra-short pulse readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Yingyan; Liu Deming; Liu Hairong, E-mail: yiyingyan0410@163.com [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Based on the modified Kogelnik diffraction efficiency equation, we study the diffraction intensity spectrum and the total diffraction efficiency of reflection volume holographic gratings in photorefractive media. Taking photorefractive LiNbO{sub 3} crystal as an example, the effect of the grating parameters and the pulse width on the diffraction properties is presented under the influence of crystal material dispersion. Under the combined effects, the diffraction pulse profiles and the total diffraction efficiency are compared with and without crystal material dispersion. The results show that the dispersion will decrease the diffraction intensity. Moreover, when pulse width is smaller or the grating spacing and the grating thickness are larger, the influence of dispersion on diffraction is large. The results of our paper can be used in pulse shaping applications.

  20. New optical scheme for differential measurements of diffraction reflection intensity on X-radiation sliding incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, A.L.; Mas', E.T.

    1989-01-01

    An X-ray optical scheme for differential measurements of X-ray diffraction under sliding incidence conditions is proposed and an attachment design realizng this scheme, using standard equipment, is described. The main feature of the scheme is the following: collimation according to the Bragg angle is carried out for the reflected beam rather than the incident one. Goniometers can be used from DRON, TRS, GS-5 and other spectrometers. The goniometer head carrying the sample is standard, it is a part of the DRON, TRS and DTS. The crystal analyzer is fixed on the attachment. The angular position of the crystal monochromator is controlled by an inductive sensor. The experimental differential curves of X-ray diffraction under conditions of sliding incidence, taken for a silicon crystal having the 111 orientation, are given as well

  1. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α 2 ≃ 2α 1

  2. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Barnard, Dan; Li, Xiongbing

    2015-09-01

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α2 ≃ 2α1.

  3. Reflection-mode x-ray powder diffraction cell for in situ studies of electrochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G.A.; Stewart, K.D.

    2004-01-01

    The design and operation of an electrochemical cell for reflection-mode powder x-ray diffraction experiments are discussed. The cell is designed for the study of electrodes that are used in rechargeable lithium batteries. It is designed for assembly in a glove box so that air-sensitive materials, such as lithium foil electrodes and carbonate-based electrolytes with lithium salts, can be used. The cell uses a beryllium window for x-ray transmission and electrical contact. A simple mechanism for compressing the electrodes is included in the design. Sample results for the cell are shown with a Cu Kα source and a position-sensitive detector

  4. Kinetic treatment of magnetosonic wave reflection by minority gyroresonant ballistic waves in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, A.N.; Brizard, A.J.; Cook, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the minority-ion gyroresonant heating process by a magnetosonic wave in a general magnetic field geometry with one ignorable spatial coordinate can be divided into several steps, each defined in terms of a precise mathematical problem to be solved. In this work, the authors focus their attention on the magnetosonic wave reflection problem in axisymmetric tokamak geometry; the conversion and absorption of the minority-ion gyroresonant ballistic waves are treated elsewhere. In contrast to their previous work, they employ a kinetic model based on the perturbation generating function S for the gyroresonant minority-ions. The bulk plasma response is represented by the perturbation magnetic vector potential A, corresponding to a shielded magnetosonic wave. The set of coupled equations for S and A can be derived from an action principle, which can also be used to derive explicit wave-action conservation laws in ray phase space. The reflection problem is solved in ray phase space by considering three separate steps. In the first step, the incident magnetosonic ray propagates towards the first linear mode conversion region, where action is transferred to the minority-ion gyroresonant ballistic waves. In the second step, the continuum of excited gyroresonant ballistic rays propagate towards the second linear mode conversion region. In the third step, the reflected magnetosonic wave field is excited by linear mode conversion from the minority gyroresonant ballistic rays

  5. Analytical computation of reflection and transmission coefficients for love waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; Vaccari, F.

    1995-09-01

    The computation of the transmission and reflection coefficients is an important step in the construction, if modal summation technique is used, of synthetic seismograms for 2-D or 3-D media. These coupling coefficients for Love waves at a vertical discontinuity are computed analytically. Numerical test for realistic structures show how the energy carried by an incoming mode is redistributed on the various modes existing on both sides of the vertical interface. (author). 15 refs, 8 figs

  6. Diffractive beam shaping, tracking and coupling for wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    techniques to create multiple focal spots that can be coupled into light manipulated WOWs. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to project the necessary phase to generate the multiple coupling light spots. We incorporate a diffractive setup in our Biophotonics Workstation (BWS) and demonstrate......We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). The full strength of this structure-mediated paradigm can be harnessed by addressing multiple WOWs and manipulating them to work in tandem. We propose the use of diffractive...

  7. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R; Keith Roper, D; Forcherio, Gregory T

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer–Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP–PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP–PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner–Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner–Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner–Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs. (paper)

  8. Reflection and absorption of ordinary waves in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croci, R.

    1990-11-01

    This study treats the system of Vlasov and Maxwell equations for the Fourier transform in space and time of a plasma referred to Cartesian coordinates with the coordinate z parallel to the uniform equilibrium magnetic field with the equilibrium plasma density dependent on ηx, where η is a parameter. The k y component of the wave vector is taken equal to zero, whereas k z is different from zero. When the interaction of ordinary and extraordinary waves is neglected, the Fourier transform of the electric field of the ordinary waves obeys a homogeneous integral equation with principal part integrals, which is solved in the case of weak absorption and sufficiently small η (essentially smaller than vacuum wave vector), but without limitations on the ratio of the wavelength to the Larmor radius (the usual approximation being limited to wavelengths much smaller than the Larmor radius). The reflection and transmission coefficients and the total energy absorption are given in this approximation, whereas the energy conservation theorem for the reflection and transmission coefficients in an absorption-free plasma are derived for every value of η without explicit knowledge of the solutions. Finally, a general and compact equation for the eigenvalues which does not require complex analysis and knowledge of all solutions of the dispersion relation is given. (orig.)

  9. Plane wave diffraction by a finite plate with impedance boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Javaid, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have examined a plane wave diffraction problem by a finite plate having different impedance boundaries. The Fourier transforms were used to reduce the governing problem into simultaneous Wiener-Hopf equations which are then solved using the standard Wiener-Hopf procedure. Afterwards the separated and interacted fields were developed asymptotically by using inverse Fourier transform and the modified stationary phase method. Detailed graphical analysis was also made for various physical parameters we were interested in.

  10. Plane wave diffraction by a finite plate with impedance boundary conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rab Nawaz

    Full Text Available In this study we have examined a plane wave diffraction problem by a finite plate having different impedance boundaries. The Fourier transforms were used to reduce the governing problem into simultaneous Wiener-Hopf equations which are then solved using the standard Wiener-Hopf procedure. Afterwards the separated and interacted fields were developed asymptotically by using inverse Fourier transform and the modified stationary phase method. Detailed graphical analysis was also made for various physical parameters we were interested in.

  11. Development of Extended Ray-tracing method including diffraction, polarization and wave decay effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Kota; Kubo, Shin; Dodin, Ilya; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Tsujimura, Toru

    2017-10-01

    Geometrical Optics Ray-tracing is a reasonable numerical analytic approach for describing the Electron Cyclotron resonance Wave (ECW) in slowly varying spatially inhomogeneous plasma. It is well known that the result with this conventional method is adequate in most cases. However, in the case of Helical fusion plasma which has complicated magnetic structure, strong magnetic shear with a large scale length of density can cause a mode coupling of waves outside the last closed flux surface, and complicated absorption structure requires a strong focused wave for ECH. Since conventional Ray Equations to describe ECW do not have any terms to describe the diffraction, polarization and wave decay effects, we can not describe accurately a mode coupling of waves, strong focus waves, behavior of waves in inhomogeneous absorption region and so on. For fundamental solution of these problems, we consider the extension of the Ray-tracing method. Specific process is planned as follows. First, calculate the reference ray by conventional method, and define the local ray-base coordinate system along the reference ray. Then, calculate the evolution of the distributions of amplitude and phase on ray-base coordinate step by step. The progress of our extended method will be presented.

  12. Spatial and spectral image distortions caused by diffraction of an ordinary polarised light beam by an ultrasonic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machikhin, A S; Pozhar, V E [Scientific and Technological Centre of Unique Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-28

    We consider the problem of determining the spatial and spectral image distortions arising from anisotropic diffraction by ultrasonic waves in crystals with ordinary polarised light (o → e). By neglecting the small-birefringence approximation, we obtain analytical solutions that describe the dependence of the diffraction angles and wave mismatch on the acousto-optic (AO) interaction geometry and crystal parameters. The formulas derived allow one to calculate and analyse the magnitude of diffraction-induced spatial and spectral image distortions and to identify the main types of distortions: chromatic compression and trapezoidal deformation. A comparison of the values of these distortions in the diffraction of ordinary and extraordinary polarised light shows that they are almost equal in magnitude and opposite in signs, so that consistent diffraction (o → e → o or e → o → e) in two identical AO cells rotated through 180° in the plane of diffraction can compensate for these distortions. (diffraction of radiation)

  13. New structural studies of liquid crystal by reflectivity and resonant X-ray diffraction; Nouvelles etudes structurales de cristaux liquides par reflectivite et diffraction resonante des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, P

    2007-04-15

    This memory presents three structural studies of smectic Liquid Crystals by reflectivity and resonant diffraction of X-rays. It is divided in five chapters. In the first a short introduction to Liquid Crystals is given. In particular, the smectic phases that are the object of this study are presented. The second chapter is consecrated to the X-ray experimental techniques that were used in this work. The three last chapters present the works on which this thesis can be divided. Chapter three demonstrates on free-standing films of MHPOBC (historic liquid crystal that possesses the antiferroelectric sub-phases) the possibility to extend the technique of resonant X-ray diffraction to liquid crystals without resonant element. In the fourth chapter the structure of the B{sub 2} liquid crystal phase of bent-core molecules (or banana molecules) is elucidated by using resonant X-ray diffraction combined with polarization analysis of the diffracted beam. A model of the polarization of the resonant beam diffracted by four different structures proposed for the B{sub 2} phase is developed in this chapter. In the fifth chapter a smectic binary mixture presenting a very original critical point of phase separation is studied by X-ray reflectivity and optical microscopy. A concentration gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the film seems to be induced by the free-standing film geometry. The results of a simplified model of the system are compatible with this interpretation.

  14. Continuous wave terahertz reflection imaging of human colorectal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-ionizing, and nondestructive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. Fresh excisions of normal colon tissue were obtained from surgeries performed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Reflection measurements of thick sections of colorectal tissues, mounted in an aluminum sample holder, were obtained for both fresh and formalin fixed tissues. The two-dimensional reflection images were acquired by using an optically pumped far-infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz with liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer detector. Using polarizers in the experiment both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance form the samples was collected. Analysis of the images showed the importance of understanding the effects of formalin fixation while determining reflectance level of tissue response. The resulting co- and cross-polarized images of both normal and formalin fixed tissues showed uniform terahertz response over the entire sample area. Initial measurements indicated a co-polarized reflectance of 16%, and a cross-polarized reflectance of 0.55% from fresh excisions of normal colonic tissues.

  15. Reflection of ion acoustic waves by the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.; Kuehl, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The reflection coefficient R for linear monochromatic ion acoustic waves incident on the transonic layer and sheath from the plasma interior is calculated. The treatment differs from previous analyses in that (1) the exact zero-order ion density and velocity profiles for a planar, bounded plasma are used, and the zero-order charge separation is not neglected, and (2) the first-order quantities near the transonic layer are considered in detail, including first-order charge separation, whereby it is found that no coupling to the beam modes exists, and that the functional form of the first-order solution is completely determined. It is shown that the upper bound for Vertical BarRVertical Bar is (1)/(3) . The largest reflection occurs for frequencies which are small compared with the ionization frequency, and generally decreases with increasing frequency. By Fourier superposition, the reflection of a pulse is computed. For a narrow incident pulse, the reflected pulse is greatly distorted and is small compared with the incident pulse. For a broad pulse, the reflected pulse is similar in shape to the incident pulse, and has a magnitude which is approximately (1)/(3) of the incident pulse

  16. Waves reflected by solid wall and wave interaction in vapour bubbly liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, N.H.; Nguyen, V.T.

    2004-01-01

    The vapour bubbly liquids are met in many natural and industrial processes, including in energy equipment. In the nuclear power plants this kind of medium appears in reactor cores (PWR, BWR and etc.), in turbine generators and in heat transfer loops. Due to some circumstances (for example, a hit caused by detonations or strong collisions) the pressure waves can appear in the bubbly liquid medium contained in those facilities. These waves propagate in the mixtures and interact with themselves and with structures. It is important that what will occur during mentioned above processes. The knowledge of this kind processes will be useful for analysing the different sorts of the processes occurred in the energy facilities where the vapor bubbly liquids are used as working or heat transfer medium, like nuclear power plants, and also useful in finding the measures for prevention of unfavourable phenomena (for example, during wave interactions maybe appear too high pressures, which could lead into damages of facilities and etc.) and safety operating the equipment. From the physical point of view, the waves in this kind of medium are interesting that owing to non-linear, dispersion and dissipation effects the wave patterns in them may be diverse and easy altered. In the paper the investigation results of the waves reflected by solid wall or structure of the moderate intensity shock waves, and the behaviour of pressure in the process of wave interaction in some mixtures of liquid with vapour bubbles (of radium ∼1 mm) are presented. (author)

  17. Analysis of Wave Reflection from Wave Energy Converters Installed as Breakwaters in Harbour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanuttigh, B.; Margheritini, Lucia; Gambles, L.

    2009-01-01

    loads on the structure, i.e. better survivability. Nevertheless these devices must comply with the requirements of harbour protection structures and thus cope with problems due to reflection of incoming waves, i.e. dangerous sea states close to harbors entrances and intensified sediment scour, which can...

  18. Diffraction Efficiency Testing of Sinusoidal and Blazed Off-Plane Reflection Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutt, James H.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Marlowe, Hannah; Miles, Drew M.; Peterson, Thomas J.; Deroo, Casey T.; Scholze, Frank; Laubis, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Reflection gratings in the off-plane mount have the potential to enhance the performance of future high resolution soft X-ray spectrometers. Diffraction efficiency can be optimized through the use of blazed grating facets, achieving high-throughput on one side of zero-order. This paper presents the results from a comparison between a grating with a sinusoidally grooved profile and two gratings that have been blazed. The results show that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order; however, the total throughput of the sinusoidal gratings is greater than the blazed gratings, suggesting the method of manufacturing the blazed gratings does not produce precise facets. The blazed gratings were also tested in their Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations to quantify diffraction efficiency sensitivity to rotations about the grating normal. Only a small difference in the energy at which efficiency is maximized between the Littrow and anti-Littrow configurations is seen with a small shift in peak efficiency towards higher energies in the anti-Littrow case. This is due to a decrease in the effective blaze angle in the anti-Littrow mounting. This is supported by PCGrate-SX V6.1 modeling carried out for each blazed grating which predicts similar response trends in the Littrow and anti-Littrow orientations.

  19. Diffraction efficiency of radially-profiled off-plane reflection gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Drew M.; Tutt, James H.; DeRoo, Casey T.; Marlowe, Hannah; Peterson, Thomas J.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Menz, Benedikt; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Laubis, Christian; Scholze, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Future X-ray missions will require gratings with high throughput and high spectral resolution. Blazed off-plane reflection gratings are capable of meeting these demands. A blazed grating profile optimizes grating efficiency, providing higher throughput to one side of zero-order on the arc of diffraction. This paper presents efficiency measurements made in the 0.3 - 1.5 keV energy band at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) BESSY II facility for three holographically-ruled gratings, two of which are blazed. Each blazed grating was tested in both the Littrow configuration and anti-Littrow configuration in order to test the alignment sensitivity of these gratings with regard to throughput. This paper outlines the procedure of the grating experiment performed at BESSY II and discuss the resulting efficiency measurements across various energies. Experimental results are generally consistent with theory and demonstrate that the blaze does increase throughput to one side of zero-order. However, the total efficiency of the non-blazed, sinusoidal grating is greater than that of the blazed gratings, which suggests that the method of manufacturing these blazed profiles fails to produce facets with the desired level of precision. Finally, evidence of a successful blaze implementation from first diffraction results of prototype blazed gratings produce via a new fabrication technique at the University of Iowa are presented.

  20. RASOR: an advanced instrument for soft x-ray reflectivity and diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, T A W; Hase, T P A; Iida, T; Endo, K; Steadman, P; Marshall, A R; Dhesi, S S; van der Laan, G; Hatton, P D

    2010-07-01

    We report the design and construction of a novel soft x-ray diffractometer installed at Diamond Light Source. The beamline endstation RASOR is constructed for general users and designed primarily for the study of single crystal diffraction and thin film reflectivity. The instrument is comprised of a limited three circle (theta, 2theta, and chi) diffractometer with an additional removable rotation (phi) stage. It is equipped with a liquid helium cryostat, and post-scatter polarization analysis. Motorized motions are provided for the precise positioning of the sample onto the diffractometer center of rotation, and for positioning the center of rotation onto the x-ray beam. The functions of the instrument have been tested at Diamond Light Source, and initial test measurements are provided, demonstrating the potential of the instrument.

  1. Reflectivity and diffraction of X rays applied to organic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieutord, Francois

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of organic thin films by using X-ray-based technologies, and more particularly X-ray reflectivity. After some recalls on X ray diffraction, and on the fabrication of Langmuir-Blodgett films, the author shows how, by combining three X-ray-based techniques, it is possible to study a volume structure of a thin film. He describes the technique of measurement by X- ray reflexivity, its experimental implementation, and methods for result interpretation. In the next part, the author reports the study of peculiar interference effects which are noticed in reflexivity on Langmuir-Blodgett films, and then describes the nature of these films by correlating results of X ray reflexivity with direct observations performed by electronic microscopy on replica [fr

  2. Properties of backward electromagnetic waves and negative reflection in ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashkovsky, Anatolii V; Lock, Edwin H

    2006-01-01

    For a backward electromagnetic wave (magnetostatic wave) in a ferrite film, reflection from a perfect mirror formed by the straight edge of the film is investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is found that when the incident wave is collinear (the group velocity vector and the wave vector have opposite directions), negative reflection occurs at any angle of incidence, i.e., the incident and reflected beams are on the same side of the normal to the boundary. It is discovered that a noncollinear backward wave is nonreciprocal in the sense that its energy can be localized both near the surface and in the middle of the film. This property, previously observed only for surface magnetostatic waves, provides both the efficiency of generating and receiving the wave and the possibility of observing the reflected beam. A situation is realized where wave reflection results in two reflected beams. The properties of backward electromagnetic waves propagating in ferrite films are briefly analyzed. (methodological notes)

  3. A boundary element model for diffraction of water waves on varying water depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Sanne

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis a boundary element model for calculating diffraction of water waves on varying water depth is presented. The varying water depth is approximated with a perturbed constant depth in the mild-slope wave equation. By doing this, the domain integral which is a result of the varying depth is no longer a function of the unknown wave potential but only a function of position and the constant depth wave potential. The number of unknowns is the resulting system of equations is thus reduced significantly. The integration procedures in the model are tested very thoroughly and it is found that a combination of analytical integration in the singular region and standard numerical integration outside works very well. The gradient of the wave potential is evaluated successfully using a hypersingular integral equation. Deviations from the analytical solution are only found on the boundary or very close to, but these deviations have no significant influence on the accuracy of the solution. The domain integral is evaluated using the dual reciprocity method. The results are compared with a direct integration of the integral, and the accuracy is quite satisfactory. The problem with irregular frequencies is taken care of by the CBIEM (or CHIEF-method) together with a singular value decomposition technique. This method is simple to implement and works very well. The model is verified using Homma`s island as a test case. The test cases are limited to shallow water since the analytical solution is only valid in this region. Several depth ratios are examined, and it is found that the accuracy of the model increases with increasing wave period and decreasing depth ratio. Short waves, e.g. wind generated waves, can allow depth variations up to approximately 2 before the error exceeds 10%, while long waves can allow larger depth ratios. It is concluded that the perturbation idea is highly usable. A study of (partially) absorbing boundary conditions is also conducted. (EG)

  4. Groundwater exploration in a Quaternary sediment body by shear-wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrung, M.; Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    The detailed investigation of a shallow aquifer structure is the prerequisite for choosing a proper well location for groundwater exploration drilling for human drinking water supply and subsequent managing of the aquifer system. In the case of shallow aquifers of some 10 m in depth, this task is still a challenge for high-resolution geophysical methods, especially in populated areas. In areas of paved surfaces, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics is advantageous compared to conventional P-wave seismic methods. The sediment body of the Alfbach valley within the Vulkaneifel region in Germany, partly covered by the village Gillenfeld, was estimated to have a maximum thickness of nearly 60 m. It lies on top of a complicated basement structure, constituted by an incorporated lava flow near the basement. For the positioning of new well locations, a combination of a SH-wave land streamer receiver system and a small, wheelbarrow-mounted SH-wave source was used for the seismic investigations. This equipment can be easily applied also in residential areas without notable trouble for the inhabitants. The results of the 2.5D profiling show a clear image of the sediment body down to the bedrock with high resolution. Along a 1 km seismic profile, the sediment thickness varies between 20 to more than 60 m in the centre of the valley. The reflection behaviour from the bedrock surface corroborates the hypothesis of a basement structure with distinct topography, including strong dipping events from the flanks of the valley and strong diffractions from subsurface discontinuities. The reflection seismic imaging leads to an estimation of the former shape of the valley and a reconstruction of the flow conditions at the beginning of the sedimentation process.

  5. Control of synchrotron x-ray diffraction by means of standing acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotoyabko, E.; Quintana, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements in quartz crystals of different thickness excited by standing acoustic waves were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. We demonstrated the ability to significantly modify the quartz rocking curves for 20-25 keV x rays by changing the shear wave parameters in the frequency range between 15 and 105 MHz. Dynamic deformation introduced into the crystal lattice by acoustic waves resulted in a remarkable broadening of the rocking curves. The broadening effect strongly depends on the strength of the ultrasound, which can be easily regulated by changing the acoustic amplitude or frequency near the resonance. The maximum rocking curve broadening reached 17 times, which corresponds to the wavelength band, Δλ/λ=4x10 -3 , when used as a monochromator or analyzer for 20-25 keV x rays. The initial rocking curve shape is restored by sweeping the acoustic frequency within a 50-100 kHz range near the resonance. The tunable broadening effect allows effective manipulation of x-ray intensities in time domain. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements under a 19.6 MHz acoustic wave excitation were performed by synchronizing the acoustic wave and x-ray burst periodicity. We used the fact that twice per period the standing wave produces a zero net deformation across the crystal thickness. By introducing an oscillating delay to the acoustic excitation, we were able to effectively change the phase of the acoustic wave relative to the x-ray burst periodicity. The x-ray diffraction intensity was strongly affected by tuning the timing of the x-ray arrivals to the minimum or maximum acoustic deformation. A deep modulation of x rays was observed in a wide frequency range between 0.1 Hz and 1 MHz, which certifies that acoustically excited quartz crystals can potentially be used as slow and fast x-ray modulators with high duty cycle

  6. Viscoelasticity evaluation of rubber by surface reflection of supersonic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Nobuaki; Suga, Takahiro; Furusawa, Hirokazu; Urabe, Shinichi; Kondo, Takeru; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2006-12-22

    The main characteristic of rubber is a viscoelasticity. So it is important to research the characteristic of the viscoelasticity of the high frequency band for the friction between a rubber material and the hard one with roughness, for instance, the tire and the road. As for the measurement of the viscoelasticity of rubber, DMA (dynamic mechanical analysis) is general. However, some problems are pointed out to the measurement of the high frequency band by DMA. Then, we evaluated the viscoelasticity characteristic by the supersonic wave measurement. However, attenuation of rubber is large, and when the viscoelasticity is measured by the supersonic wave therefore, it is inconvenient and limited in a past method by means of bottom reflection. In this report, we tried the viscoelasticity evaluation by the method of using complex surface reflection coefficient and we compared with the friction coefficient under wide-range friction velocity. As a result, some relationships had been found for two properties. We report the result that character of viscoelasticity of rubber was comparable to friction coefficient.

  7. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyunjo, E-mail: hjjeong@wku.ac.kr [Division of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing [School of Traffic and Transportation Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410075 (China); Barnard, Dan [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  8. Water-wave diffraction and radiation by multiple three-dimensional bodies over a mild-slope bottom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •A tool to model wave diffraction and radiation in mild-slope bottoms is proposed. •The tool combines a mild-slope equation model with diffraction transfer matrices. •The tool predictions are verified against analytical solutions for two test problems....

  9. Microbeam high-resolution diffraction and x-ray standing wave methods applied to semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimirov, A; Bilderback, D H; Huang, R; Sirenko, A; Ougazzaden, A

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to conditioning x-ray microbeams for high angular resolution x-ray diffraction and scattering techniques is introduced. We combined focusing optics (one-bounce imaging capillary) and post-focusing collimating optics (miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal) to generate an x-ray microbeam with a size of 10 μm and ultimate angular resolution of 14 μrad. The microbeam was used to analyse the strain in sub-micron thick InGaAsP epitaxial layers grown on an InP(100) substrate by the selective area growth technique in narrow openings between the oxide stripes. For the structures for which the diffraction peaks from the substrate and the film overlap, the x-ray standing wave technique was applied for precise measurements of the strain with a Δd/d resolution of better than 10 -4 . (rapid communication)

  10. On the neutron diffraction in a crystal in the field of a standing laser wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, K.K.; Hayrapetyan, A.G.; Petrosyan, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of high-energy neutron diffraction in a crystal is shown by applying the solution of time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a neutron in the field of a standing laser wave. The scattering picture is examined within the framework of non-stationary S-matrix theory, where the neutron-laser field interaction is considered exactly and the neutron-crystal interaction is considered as a perturbation described by Fermi pseudopotential (Farri representation). The neutron-crystal interaction is elastic, and the neutron-laser field interaction has both inelastic and elastic behaviors which results in the observation of an analogous to the Kapitza-Dirac effect for neutrons. The neutron scattering probability is calculated and the analysis of the results are adduced. Both inelastic and elastic diffraction conditions are obtained and the formation of a 'sublattice' is illustrated in the process of neutron-photon-phonon elastic interaction.

  11. Plane-wave diffraction by periodic structures with artificial anisotropic dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazerooni, Azadeh Semsar; Shahabadi, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    Periodic structures with artificial anisotropic dielectrics are studied. The artificial anisotropic dielectric material in this work is made of two alternating isotropic dielectric layers. By a proper choice of the dielectric constant of the layers, we can realize a uniaxial anisotropic medium with controllable anisotropy. The artificial anisotropic dielectric is then used in periodic structures. For these structures, the optical axis of the artificial dielectric is assumed to be parallel or perpendicular to the period of the structure. Diffraction of plane waves by these structures is analyzed by a fully vectorial rigorous matrix method based on a generalized transmission line (TL) formulation. The propagation constants and field distributions are computed and diffraction properties of such structures are studied to show that, by a proper choice of structural parameters, these periodic structures with artificial anisotropic dielectrics can be used as polarizers or polarizing mirrors

  12. Sound excitation at reflection of two electromagnetic waves from dence semibounded plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livdan, D.O.; Muratov, V.I.; Shuklin, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of two electromagnetic waves reflection by semibounded plasma which is nontransparent for each of these waves is solved. The reflection coefficients are obtained for normally incident waves. It is shown that the moduli of the reflection coefficients differ from the unit and this is due to the interaction of the external raiation with the acoustic wave excited in plasma. The energy flux in plasma is calculated

  13. Development of pneumatic actuator with low-wave reflection characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.; Tsung, T. T.; Jwo, C. S.; Chiang, J. C.

    2010-08-01

    This study aims at the development of a less reflective electromagnetic pneumatic actuator often used in the anechoic chamber. Because a pneumatic actuator on the market is not appropriate for use in such a chamber and a metallic one has high dielectric constant which generates reflective electromagnetic waves to influence test parameters in the chamber. The newly developed pneumatic actuator is made from low dielectric constant plastics with less reflective of electromagnetic. A turbine-type air motor is used to develop the pneumatic actuator and a employ Prony tester is used to run the brake horsepower test for the performance test of pneumatic actuator. Test results indicate that the pneumatic actuator in the minimal starting flow is 17 l/min, and it generates a brake horsepower of 48 mW; in the maximum flow is 26 l/min, it generates a brake horsepower of 108 mW. Therefore, it works with a torque between 0.24 N-m and 0.55 N-m, and such a torque will be sufficient to drive the target button.

  14. Nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating embedded in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, N.; Picó, R. [Instituto de Investigación para la Gestión Integrada de zonas Costeras, Universitat Politècnica de València, Paranimf 1, 46730 Grao de Gandia, València (Spain); Romero-García, V. [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, LAUM UMR CNRS 6613, Av. O. Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Garcia-Raffi, L. M. [Instituto Universitario de Matemática Pura y Aplicada, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 València (Spain); Staliunas, K. [ICREA, Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Colom, 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-11-16

    We report the nonlinear focusing of ultrasonic waves by an axisymmetric diffraction grating immersed in water. In the linear regime, the system presents high focal gain (32 dB), with a narrow beam-width and intense side lobes as it is common in focusing by Fresnel-like lenses. Activating the nonlinearity of the host medium by using high amplitude incident waves, the focusing properties of the lens dramatically change. Theoretical predictions show that the focal gain of the system extraordinary increases in the strongly nonlinear regime (Mach number of 6.1 × 10{sup −4}). Particularly, the harmonic generation is locally activated at the focal spot, and the second harmonic beam is characterized by strongly reduced side-lobes and an excellent beam profile as experiments show in agreement with theory. The results can motivate applications in medical therapy or second harmonic imaging.

  15. Reflected rarefactions, double regular reflection, and mach waves in aluminum and beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, T.

    1975-01-01

    A number of shock techniques which can be used to obtain high-pressure equation-of-state information between the principal Hugoniot and the principal adiabat are illustrated. A rarefaction wave in aluminum shocked to 27.7 GPa [277 kbar] is examined with radiographic techniques and the bulk sound speed is determined. The two stage compression which occurs in a double shock may be attained by colliding two shocks and observing regular reflection. A radiographic method which uses this phenomenon to measure a three-stage compression of aluminum to a density of 4.7 Mg/m 3 and beryllium to a density of 3.1 Mg/m 3 is presented. The results of a Mach reflection experiment in aluminum are found to disagree substantially with the simple three-shock model. A modified model, consistent with observations, is discussed. In all cases the Gruneisen parameter is determined. (U.S.)

  16. Hybrid Numerical-Analytical Scheme for Calculating Elastic Wave Diffraction in Locally Inhomogeneous Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, E. V.; Glushkova, N. V.; Evdokimov, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    Numerical simulation of traveling wave excitation, propagation, and diffraction in structures with local inhomogeneities (obstacles) is computationally expensive due to the need for mesh-based approximation of extended domains with the rigorous account for the radiation conditions at infinity. Therefore, hybrid numerical-analytic approaches are being developed based on the conjugation of a numerical solution in a local vicinity of the obstacle and/or source with an explicit analytic representation in the remaining semi-infinite external domain. However, in standard finite-element software, such a coupling with the external field, moreover, in the case of multimode expansion, is generally not provided. This work proposes a hybrid computational scheme that allows realization of such a conjugation using a standard software. The latter is used to construct a set of numerical solutions used as the basis for the sought solution in the local internal domain. The unknown expansion coefficients on this basis and on normal modes in the semi-infinite external domain are then determined from the conditions of displacement and stress continuity at the boundary between the two domains. We describe the implementation of this approach in the scalar and vector cases. To evaluate the reliability of the results and the efficiency of the algorithm, we compare it with a semianalytic solution to the problem of traveling wave diffraction by a horizontal obstacle, as well as with a finite-element solution obtained for a limited domain artificially restricted using absorbing boundaries. As an example, we consider the incidence of a fundamental antisymmetric Lamb wave onto surface and partially submerged elastic obstacles. It is noted that the proposed hybrid scheme can also be used to determine the eigenfrequencies and eigenforms of resonance scattering, as well as the characteristics of traveling waves in embedded waveguides.

  17. Investigation of Bragg reflections in α NbDsub(x) under hydrostatic pressure by γ ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaschko, O.; Klemencic, R.; Weinzierl, P.; Eder, O.J.

    1978-01-01

    Bragg reflections of NbDsub(x) single crystals in the α phase were studied under hydrostatic pressure using γ ray diffraction. The integrated intensity of the (211) reflection decreases by - 1.5 +- 0.2%/kbar and - 0.7 +- 0.1%/kbar in NbDsub(0.04) and NbDsub(0.02) respectively. The (200), (110) and (222) reflections show no change of intensity under hydrostatic pressure. In a pure Nb crystal no decrease of the intensity of the (211) reflection was found under hydrostatic pressure. (author)

  18. Reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves in planarly stratified media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caviglia, G.

    1999-01-01

    Propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves in planarly stratified multilayers is investigated. Each layer is allowed to be inhomogeneous and the layers are separated by interfaces. The procedure is based on the representation of the electromagnetic field in the basis of the eigenvectors of the matrix characterizing the first-order system. Hence the local reflection and transmission matrices are defined and the corresponding differential equations, in the pertinent space variable are determined. The jump conditions at interfaces are also established. The present model incorporates dissipative materials and the procedure holds without any restrictions to material symmetries. Differential equations appeared in the literature are shown to hold in particular (one-dimensional) cases or to represent homogeneous layers only

  19. Reflective coating optimization for interferometric detectors of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Maria

    2015-05-04

    Brownian fluctuations in the highly reflective test-mass coatings are the dominant noise source, in a frequency band from a few tens to a few hundreds Hz, for Earth-bound detectors of Gravitational Waves. Minimizing such noise is mandatory to increase the visibility distance of these instruments, and eventually reach their quantum-limited sensitivity. Several strategies exist to achieve this goal. Layer thickness and material properties optimization have been proposed and effectively implemented, and are reviewed in this paper, together with other, so far less well developed, options. The former is the simplest option, yielding a sensible noise reduction with limited technological challenges; the latter is more technologically demanding, but is needed for future (cryogenic) detectors.

  20. Big-data reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-10-28

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED images, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the data set are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of a RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of La(x)Ca(1-x)MnO(3) films grown on etched (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the asymmetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

  1. Reflective measurement of water concentration using millimeter wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shijun; Bennett, David; Taylor, Zachary; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-04-01

    THz and millimeter wave technology have shown the potential to become a valuable medical imaging tool because of its sensitivity to water and safe, non-ionizing photon energy. Using the high dielectric constant of water in these frequency bands, reflectionmode THz sensing systems can be employed to measure water content in a target with high sensitivity. This phenomenology may lead to the development of clinical systems to measure the hydration state of biological targets. Such measurements may be useful in fast and convenient diagnosis of conditions whose symptoms can be characterized by changes in water concentration such as skin burns, dehydration, or chemical exposure. To explore millimeter wave sensitivity to hydration, a reflectometry system is constructed to make water concentration measurements at 100 GHz, and the minimum detectable water concentration difference is measured. This system employs a 100 GHz Gunn diode source and Golay cell detector to perform point reflectivity measurements of a wetted polypropylene towel as it dries on a mass balance. A noise limited, minimum detectable concentration difference of less than 0.5% by mass can be detected in water concentrations ranging from 70% to 80%. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect hydration changes caused by many diseases and pathologies and may be useful in the future as a diagnostic tool for the assessment of burns and other surface pathologies.

  2. Exact scattering and diffraction of antiplane shear waves by a vertical edge crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaur, Deng-How

    2010-06-01

    Scattering and diffraction problems of a vertical edge crack connected to the surface of a half space are considered for antiplane shear wave incidence. The method of separation of variables is adopted to derive an exact series solution. The total displacement field is expressed as infinite series containing products of radial and angular Mathieu functions with unknown coefficients. An exact analytical determination of unknown coefficients is carried out by insuring the vanishing of normal stresses on crack faces. Frequency-domain results are given for extremely near, near, and far fields, whereas time-domain ones are for horizontal surface and subsurface motions. Comparisons with published data for the dynamic stress intensity factor show good agreement. The exact analytical nature of proposed solutions can be applied very conveniently and rapidly to high-frequency steady-state cases, enhancing the computation efficiency in transient cases when performing the fast Fourier transform. A sampled set of time slices for underground wave propagation benefits the interpretation of scattering and diffraction phenomena induced by a vertical edge crack.

  3. Far-field divergence of a vectorial plane wave diffracted by a circular aperture from the vectorial structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Guo-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the vectorial structure of an electromagnetic wave, the analytical and concise expressions for the TE and TM terms of a vectorial plane wave diffracted by a circular aperture are derived in the far-field. The expressions of the energy flux distributions of the TE term, the TM term and the diffracted plane wave are also presented. The ratios of the power of the TE and TM terms to that of the diffracted plane wave are examined in the far-field. In addition, the far-field divergence angles of the TE term, the TM term and the diffracted plane wave, which are related to the energy flux distribution, are investigated. The different energy flux distributions of the TE and TM terms result in the discrepancy of their divergence angles. The influences of the linearly polarized angle and the radius of the circular aperture on the far-field divergence angles of the TE term, the TM term and the diffracted plane wave are discussed in detail. This research may promote the recognition of the optical propagation through a circular aperture. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Unmitigated numerical solution to the diffraction term in the parabolic nonlinear ultrasound wave equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, Mojtaba H; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Farjami, Yaghoub; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2013-09-01

    Various numerical algorithms have been developed to solve the Khokhlov-Kuznetsov-Zabolotskaya (KZK) parabolic nonlinear wave equation. In this work, a generalized time-domain numerical algorithm is proposed to solve the diffraction term of the KZK equation. This algorithm solves the transverse Laplacian operator of the KZK equation in three-dimensional (3D) Cartesian coordinates using a finite-difference method based on the five-point implicit backward finite difference and the five-point Crank-Nicolson finite difference discretization techniques. This leads to a more uniform discretization of the Laplacian operator which in turn results in fewer calculation gridding nodes without compromising accuracy in the diffraction term. In addition, a new empirical algorithm based on the LU decomposition technique is proposed to solve the system of linear equations obtained from this discretization. The proposed empirical algorithm improves the calculation speed and memory usage, while the order of computational complexity remains linear in calculation of the diffraction term in the KZK equation. For evaluating the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, two previously published algorithms are used as comparison references: the conventional 2D Texas code and its generalization for 3D geometries. The results show that the accuracy/efficiency performance of the proposed algorithm is comparable with the established time-domain methods.

  5. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reflection and absorption of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma density gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, O.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma is characterized by electrical quasineutrality and the collective behavior. There exists a longitudinal low-frequency wave called an ion-acoustic wave in a plasma. One problem in the experimental study of ion-acoustic waves has been that sometimes they are observed to be reflected from discharge tube walls, and sometimes to be absorbed. Theoretical computation reveals that a velocity gradient produced by a density gradient plays a significant role in the reflection. The velocity gradient produces the subsonic-supersonic transition and long wavelength waves are reflected before reaching the transition while short wavelength waves penetrate over the transition and are absorbed in the supersonic flow plasma

  7. Treadmill walking with load carriage increases aortic pressure wave reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fernando; Oliveira, Nórton L; Pires, Joana; Alves, Alberto J; Oliveira, José

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the effects of treadmill walking with load carriage on derived measures of central pressure and augmentation index in young healthy subjects. Fourteen male subjects (age 31.0 ± 1.0 years) volunteered in this study. Subjects walked 10 minutes on a treadmill at a speed of 5 km/h carrying no load during one session and a load of 10% of their body weight on both upper limbs in two water carboys with handle during the other session. Pulse wave analysis was performed at rest and immediately after exercise in the radial artery of the right upper limb by applanation tonometry. The main result indicates that walking with load carriage sharply increased augmentation index at 75 bpm (-5.5 ± 2.2 to -1.4 ± 2.2% vs. -5.2 ± 2.8 to -5.5 ± 2.1%, p<0.05), and also induced twice as high increments in central pulse pressure (7.4 ± 1.5 vs. 3.1 ± 1.4 mmHg, p<0.05) and peripheral (20.5 ± 2.7 vs. 10.3 ± 2.5 mmHg, p<0.05) and central systolic pressure (14.7 ± 2.1 vs. 7.4 ± 2.0 mmHg, p<0.05). Walking with additional load of 10% of their body weight (aerobic exercise accompanied by upper limb isometric contraction) increases derived measures of central pressure and augmentation index, an index of wave reflection and arterial stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffraction or Reflection? Sketching the Contours of Two Methodologies in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozalek, Vivienne; Zembylas, Michalinos

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, an interest is emerging in a growing body of work on what has become known as "diffractive methodologies" drawing attention to ontological aspects of research. Diffractive methodologies have largely been developed in response to a dissatisfaction with practices of "reflexivity", which are seen to be grounded in…

  9. Variation of wave speed determined by the PU-loop with proximity to a reflection site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Borlotti, Alessandra; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2011-01-01

    Wave speed is directly related to arterial distensibility and is widely used by clinicians to assess arterial stiffness. The PU-loop method for determining wave speed is based on the water hammer equation for flow in flexible tubes and artery using the method of characteristics. This technique determines wave speed using simultaneous measurements of pressure and velocity at a single point. The method shows that during the early part of systole, the relationship between pressure and velocity is generally linear, and the initial slope of the PU-loop is proportional to wave speed. In this work, we designed an in-vitro experiment to investigate the effect of proximity to a reflection site on the wave speed determined by the PU-loop through varying the distance between the measurement and reflection sites. Measurements were made in a flexible tube with a reflection site at the distal end formed by joining the tube to another tube with a different diameter and material properties. Six different flexible tubes were used to generate both positive and negative reflection coefficients of different magnitudes. We found that the wave speed determined by the PU-loop did not change when the measurement site was far from the reflection site but did change as the distance to the reflection site decreased. The calculated wave speed increased with positive reflections and decreased with negative reflections. The magnitude of the change in wave speed at a fixed distance from the reflection site increased with increasing the value of the reflection coefficient.

  10. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory. II - Applications to optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    The theory developed by Hahne (1992) for the diffraction of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from fixed obstacles is briefly summarized and extended. Applications of the theory are considered which comprise, first, a spherical harmonic expansion of the so-called radiation impedance operator in the theory, for a spherical surface, and second, a reconsideration of familiar short-wavelength approximation from the new standpoint, including a derivation of the so-called physical optics method on the basis of quasi-planar approximation to the radiation impedance operator, augmented by the method of stationary phase. The latter includes a rederivation of the geometrical optics approximation for the complete Green's function for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a smooth- and a convex-surfaced perfectly electrically conductive obstacle.

  11. Reflection and transformation of acoustic waves at the interface in superfluid 3He-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekutiya, Sh.E.; Chkhaidze, N.D.

    1997-01-01

    Reflection and transformation of acoustic waves in 3 He-A and 3 He-A 1 are considered for two cases: (1) at the boundary with a solid impermeable wall at an arbitrary angle of incidence of a wave and (2) for normal incidence of waves on the interface between a free liquid and a system of periodic plane-parallel capillaries filling the semi-space. For the first case we have calculated the reflection coefficients of the first and the second sounds and spin and spin-temperature waves as well as the coefficients of transformation of these waves into each other. It is shown that the longitudinal wave undergoes no transformation into other waves, there occurs instead its complete reflection from the solid wall. The angle of incidence at which the energy attenuation coefficient of the first sound is maximum, and the interval of angles corresponding to the attenuation and the total interval reflection of the second sound are estimated. For the second case we have obtained: the coefficients of excitation of the fourth sound and the magneto-acoustic wave by the first and the second sounds; the reflection coefficients for the first and the second sounds and the longitudinal spin wave; the coefficient of transformation of the first sound into the second one and vice versa; the coefficient of reflection of the fourth sound from the capillary system - free liquid interface; the coefficient of excitation of longitudinal spin wave in free helium by the same wave in a capillary

  12. Wave front engineering by means of diffractive optical elements for applications in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Dan; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Cabrini, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Prasciolu, Mauro; Businaro, Luca; Kaulich, Burchard; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2006-05-01

    We present a unified view regarding the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for microscopy applications a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and fabrication of DOE through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular we show applications ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that beside focusing perform also other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of spherical micro beads and for direct trapping and manipulation of biological cells with non-spherical shapes. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gaussian mode conversion, which allows to trap and transfer orbital angular momentum of light to micro particles with high refractive index and to trap and manipulate low index particles. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for DOEs implementation. High resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in X-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field X-ray microscopy.

  13. Second-order wave diffraction by a circular cylinder using scaled boundary finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H; Tao, L

    2010-01-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM) has achieved remarkable success in structural mechanics and fluid mechanics, combing the advantage of both FEM and BEM. Most of the previous works focus on linear problems, in which superposition principle is applicable. However, many physical problems in the real world are nonlinear and are described by nonlinear equations, challenging the application of the existing SBFEM model. A popular idea to solve a nonlinear problem is decomposing the nonlinear equation to a number of linear equations, and then solves them individually. In this paper, second-order wave diffraction by a circular cylinder is solved by SBFEM. By splitting the forcing term into two parts, the physical problem is described as two second-order boundary-value problems with different asymptotic behaviour at infinity. Expressing the velocity potentials as a series of depth-eigenfunctions, both of the 3D boundary-value problems are decomposed to a number of 2D boundary-value sub-problems, which are solved semi-analytically by SBFEM. Only the cylinder boundary is discretised with 1D curved finite-elements on the circumference of the cylinder, while the radial differential equation is solved completely analytically. The method can be extended to solve more complex wave-structure interaction problems resulting in direct engineering applications.

  14. Nonlinear and diffraction effects in propagation of N-waves in randomly inhomogeneous moving media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averiyanov, Mikhail; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Cleveland, Robin O; Khokhlova, Vera

    2011-04-01

    Finite amplitude acoustic wave propagation through atmospheric turbulence is modeled using a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK)-type equation. The equation accounts for the combined effects of nonlinearity, diffraction, absorption, and vectorial inhomogeneities of the medium. A numerical algorithm is developed which uses a shock capturing scheme to reduce the number of temporal grid points. The inhomogeneous medium is modeled using random Fourier modes technique. Propagation of N-waves through the medium produces regions of focusing and defocusing that is consistent with geometrical ray theory. However, differences up to ten wavelengths are observed in the locations of fist foci. Nonlinear effects are shown to enhance local focusing, increase the maximum peak pressure (up to 60%), and decrease the shock rise time (about 30 times). Although the peak pressure increases and the rise time decreases in focal regions, statistical analysis across the entire wavefront at a distance 120 wavelengths from the source indicates that turbulence: decreases the mean time-of-flight by 15% of a pulse duration, decreases the mean peak pressure by 6%, and increases the mean rise time by almost 100%. The peak pressure and the arrival time are primarily governed by large scale inhomogeneities, while the rise time is also sensitive to small scales.

  15. Some simple ideas on x-ray reflection and grazing-incidence diffraction from thin surfactant films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, K.

    1994-01-01

    For Langmuir films of long linear amphiphilic molecules at the air-water interface, grazing-incidence diffraction data resolved in terms of both the horizontal and vertical components of the scattering angle can be evaluated to a fair level of detail by means of a slide rule. Specular reflection ...... data require more sophisticated means although some rules of thumb can be formulated.......For Langmuir films of long linear amphiphilic molecules at the air-water interface, grazing-incidence diffraction data resolved in terms of both the horizontal and vertical components of the scattering angle can be evaluated to a fair level of detail by means of a slide rule. Specular reflection...

  16. Reflection and transmission of full-vector X-waves normally incident on dielectric half spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X-Waves incident normally on a planar interface between two lossless dielectric half-spaces are investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of transmission and reflection is carried out via a straightforward but yet effective method: First, the X-Wave is decomposed into vector Bessel beams via the Bessel-Fourier transform. Then, the reflection and transmission coefficients of the beams are obtained in the spectral domain. Finally, the transmitted and reflected X-Waves are obtained via the inverse Bessel-Fourier transform carried out on the X-wave spectrum weighted with the corresponding coefficient. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. The effect of experimental resolution on crystal reflectivity and secondary extinction in neutron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O.W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1965-01-01

    The reflectivity for neutrons of a plane slab crystal is calculated in the transmission case when the crystal is placed between two Seller collimators. The calculations indicate that the crystal reflectivity, as well as the secondary extinction coefficient, depends signicantly on the angular...... resolution of the collimators. Curves are given for the extinction of the crystal with different crystal and collimator parameters....

  18. Influence of ionization on reflection of solitary waves in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyoti,; Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Ravinder; Dahiya, Raj P.

    2013-01-01

    The reflection of nonlinear solitary waves is studied in a nonuniform, magnetized plasma diffusing from an ionization source along the magnetic field lines. Contribution of the ionization term is included in the continuity equation. The behavior of solitary waves is governed by modified form of Korteweg–de Vries equation (called mKdV equation). In order to investigate the reflection of solitary waves, the mKdV equations for the right and left going waves are derived, and solved by finding new transformations coupled at the point of reflection, for obtaining the expression of reflection coefficient. Contrary to the case of usual inhomogeneous plasma, the present analysis shows that a combination of usual sech 2 structure and tanh structure (called the tail of soliton) arises due to the influence of ionization term. Interestingly, this tailing structure disappears after the reflection of the soliton and hence, the soliton is downshifted prominently

  19. Reflection and Transmission of Acoustic Waves through the Layer of Multifractional Bubbly Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubaidullin Damir Anvarovich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model that determines reflection and transmission of acoustic wave through a medium containing multifractioanl bubbly liquid is presented. For the water-water with bubbles-water model the wave reflection and transmission coefficients are calculated. The influence of the bubble layer thickness on the investigated coefficients is shown. The theory compared with the experiment. It is shown that the theoretical results describe and explain well the available experimental data. It is revealed that the special dispersion and dissipative properties of the layer of bubbly liquid can significantly influence on the reflection and transmission of acoustic waves in multilayer medium

  20. Characteristics of Wave Reflection for Vertical and Slit Caissons with Porous Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hwa Jung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Offshore structures are occasionally located at a relatively deep water region, the outside of breakwater. In this case, these structures may be damaged by the supposition of incident and reflected waves from a vertical breakwater. To prevent the damage, the reflected waves are controlled by installing porous structures at the face of the vertical breakwater. In this study, numerical experiments are carried out to identify the characteristics of wave reflection from the porous structures installing in front of a vertical or slit caisson.

  1. Generating millimeter-wave Bessel beam with orbital angular momentum using reflective-type metasurface inherently integrated with source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yizhu; Yang, Jiawei; Meng, Hongfu; Dou, Wenbin; Hu, Sanming

    2018-04-01

    Metasurfaces, orbital angular momenta (OAM), and non-diffractive Bessel beams have been attracting worldwide research. Combining the benefits of these three promising techniques, this paper proposes a metasurface-based reflective-type approach to generate a first-order Bessel beam carrying OAM. To validate this approach, a millimeter-wave metasurface is analyzed, designed, fabricated, and measured. Experimental results agree well with simulation. Moreover, this reflective-type metasurface, generating a Bessel beam with OAM, is inherently integrated with a planar feeding source in the same single-layer printed circuit board. Therefore, the proposed design features low profile, low cost, easy integration with front-end active circuits, and no alignment error between the feeding source and the metasurface.

  2. Using wave intensity analysis to determine local reflection coefficient in flexible tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2016-09-06

    It has been shown that reflected waves affect the shape and magnitude of the arterial pressure waveform, and that reflected waves have physiological and clinical prognostic values. In general the reflection coefficient is defined as the ratio of the energy of the reflected to the incident wave. Since pressure has the units of energy per unit volume, arterial reflection coefficient are traditionally defined as the ratio of reflected to the incident pressure. We demonstrate that this approach maybe prone to inaccuracies when applied locally. One of the main objectives of this work is to examine the possibility of using wave intensity, which has units of energy flux per unit area, to determine the reflection coefficient. We used an in vitro experimental setting with a single inlet tube joined to a second tube with different properties to form a single reflection site. The second tube was long enough to ensure that reflections from its outlet did not obscure the interactions of the initial wave. We generated an approximately half sinusoidal wave at the inlet of the tube and took measurements of pressure and flow along the tube. We calculated the reflection coefficient using wave intensity (R dI and R dI 0.5 ) and wave energy (R I and R I 0.5 ) as well as the measured pressure (R dP ) and compared these results with the reflection coefficient calculated theoretically based on the mechanical properties of the tubes. The experimental results show that the reflection coefficients determined by all the techniques we studied increased or decreased with distance from the reflection site, depending on the type of reflection. In our experiments, R dP , R dI 0.5 and R I 0.5 are the most reliable parameters to measure the mean reflection coefficient, whilst R dI and R I provide the best measure of the local reflection coefficient, closest to the reflection site. Additional work with bifurcations, tapered tubes and in vivo experiments are needed to further understand, validate the

  3. Born reflection kernel analysis and wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion in elastic media

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Tengfei; Cheng, Jiubing

    2017-01-01

    Elastic reflection waveform inversion (ERWI) utilize the reflections to update the low and intermediate wavenumbers in the deeper part of model. However, ERWI suffers from the cycle-skipping problem due to the objective function of waveform residual

  4. Background velocity inversion by phase along reflection wave paths

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han; Guo, Bowen; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    A background velocity model containing the correct lowwavenumber information is desired for both the quality of the migration image and the success of waveform inversion. We propose to invert for the low-wavenumber part of the velocity model by minimizing the phase difference between predicted and observed reflections. The velocity update is exclusively along the reflection wavepaths and, unlike conventional FWI, not along the reflection ellipses. This allows for reconstructing the smoothly varying parts of the background velocity model. Tests with synthetic data show both the benefits and limitations of this method.

  5. Background velocity inversion by phase along reflection wave paths

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    A background velocity model containing the correct lowwavenumber information is desired for both the quality of the migration image and the success of waveform inversion. We propose to invert for the low-wavenumber part of the velocity model by minimizing the phase difference between predicted and observed reflections. The velocity update is exclusively along the reflection wavepaths and, unlike conventional FWI, not along the reflection ellipses. This allows for reconstructing the smoothly varying parts of the background velocity model. Tests with synthetic data show both the benefits and limitations of this method.

  6. X-Ray Diffraction and Reflectivity Validation of the Depletion Attraction in the Competitive Adsorption of Lung Surfactant and Albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenger, Patric C.; Wu, Guohui; Miller, Chad E.

    2009-01-01

    as on a pristine interface, but with a more compact lattice corresponding to a small increase in the surface pressure. These results confirm that albumin adsorption creates a physical barrier that inhibits LS adsorption, and that PEG in the subphase generates a depletion attraction between the LS aggregates...... to subsequent LS adsorption that can be overcome by the depletion attraction induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in solution. A combination of grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), x-ray reflectivity (XR), and pressure-area isotherms provides molecular-resolution information on the location...

  7. The effect of a non-hermitian crystal potential on the scattering matrix in reflection electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.E.; Josefsson, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    An extension to include general inelastic scattering effects is developed for the case of reflection electron diffraction scattering from surfaces. In this extension of work by Lynch and Moodie, it is shown how the resultant non-Hermitian matrix problem can be recast in a form that is suitable for computation. In particular, a computational method is outlined based on techniques developed by Eberlein for matrix diagonalisation using complex rotations and shears. The resultant methods are applied to the problem of Convergent Beam RHEED. 23 refs., 3 figs

  8. Reflection and transmission of seismic waves under initial stress at the earth's core-mantle boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhendu Dey

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the influence of the initial stress is shown on the reflection and transmission of P waves at the core-mantle boundary. Taking a particular value of the inherent initial stress, the variations of reflection and transmission coefficients with respect to the angle of emergence are represented by graphs. These graphs when compared with those having no initial stress show that the effect of the initial stress is to produce a reflected P and S waves with numerically higher amplitudes but a transmitted P wave with smaller amplitude. A method is also indicated in this paper to calculate the actual value of the initial stress near the core-mantle boundary by measuring the amplitudes of incident and reflected P waves.

  9. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Pang, Genny A.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David Frank

    2013-01-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we

  10. Full-waveform inversion with reflected waves for 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pattnaik, Sonali; Tsvankin, Ilya; Wang, Hui; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Full-waveform inversion in anisotropic media using reflected waves suffers from the strong non-linearity of the objective function and trade-offs between model parameters. Estimating long-wavelength model components by fixing parameter perturbations

  11. Reflection of Lamb waves obliquely incident on the free edge of a plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Sridhar; Demirli, Ramazan

    2013-01-01

    The reflection of obliquely incident symmetric and anti-symmetric Lamb wave modes at the edge of a plate is studied. Both in-plane and Shear-Horizontal (SH) reflected wave modes are spawned by an obliquely incident in-plane Lamb wave mode. Energy reflection coefficients are calculated for the reflected wave modes as a function of frequency and angle of incidence. This is done by using the method of orthogonal mode decomposition and by enforcing traction free conditions at the plate edge using the method of collocation. A PZT sensor network, affixed to an Aluminum plate, is used to experimentally verify the predictions of the analysis. Experimental results provide support for the analytically determined results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Angle-domain Migration Velocity Analysis using Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong; Schuster, Gerard T.; Luo, Yi

    2012-01-01

    way as wave-equation transmission traveltime inversion. The residual movemout analysis in the angle-domain common image gathers provides a robust estimate of the depth residual which is converted to the reflection traveltime residual for the velocity

  13. DISPELLING ILLUSIONS OF REFLECTION: A NEW ANALYSIS OF THE 2007 MAY 19 CORONAL 'WAVE' EVENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.

    2010-01-01

    A new analysis of the 2007 May 19 coronal wave-coronal mass ejection-dimmings event is offered employing base difference extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images. Previous work analyzing the coronal wave associated with this event concluded strongly in favor of purely an MHD wave interpretation for the expanding bright front. This conclusion was based to a significant extent on the identification of multiple reflections of the coronal wave front. The analysis presented here shows that the previously identified 'reflections' are actually optical illusions and result from a misinterpretation of the running difference EUV data. The results of this new multiwavelength analysis indicate that two coronal wave fronts actually developed during the eruption. This new analysis has implications for our understanding of diffuse coronal waves and questions the validity of the analysis and conclusions reached in previous studies.

  14. X-ray reflectivity study of thermal capillary waves on liquid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocko, B.M.; Wu, X.Z.; Sirota, E.B.; Sinha, S.K.; Deutsch, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity measurements have been carried out at the liquid/vapor interface of normal alkanes. The reflectivities over a large temperature range of different chain lengths (C20 and C36) provide a critical test of the various capillary wave models. Our data are most consistent with the hybrid model which allows for a molecular size dependent cutoff q max for the capillary waves and an intrinsic interface width σ 0

  15. Polarization of the interference field during reflection of electromagnetic waves from an intermedia boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulakhov, M. G.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Yakubov, V. P.

    1996-10-01

    It has been shown that a full vector measurement of the total field allows one to uniquely distinguish the incident and reflected waves at each observation point without the use of a spatial difference based on an analysis of the polarization structure of the interference pattern which arises during reflection of electromagnetic waves from an intermedia boundary. We have investigated the stability of these procedures with respect to measurement noise by means of numerical modeling.

  16. Residual stress measurement with focused acoustic waves and direct comparison with X-ray diffraction stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Moran, Thomas J.; Martin, Richard W.; Reibel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The technique of measuring small changes in acoustic wave velocity due to external or internal stress has been used for quantitative determination of residual stress in materials during the last decade. Application of similar methodology with focused acoustic waves leads to residual stress measurement with spatial resolution of a few millimeters to a few microns. The high spatial resolution residual stress measurement required development of new methodologies in both the design of acoustic lenses and the instrumentation for acoustic wave velocity determination. This paper presents two new methodologies developed for the measurement of residual stress with spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The design of new type of acoustic lens for achieving higher spatial resolution in residual stress measurement is introduced. Development of instrumentation for high precision local surface wave velocity measurement will be presented. Residual stresses measured around a crack tip in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V using a focused beam will be compared with X-ray diffraction measurements performed on the same region of the sample. Results of residual stress measurements along a direction perpendicular to the electron beam weld in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V, determined using focused acoustic waves and X-ray diffraction technique, are also presented. The spatial resolution and penetration depth of X-rays and focused acoustic beams with reference to residual stress measurements are discussed

  17. NONLINEAR REFLECTION PROCESS OF LINEARLY POLARIZED, BROADBAND ALFVÉN WAVES IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoda, M.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: shoda@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    Using one-dimensional numerical simulations, we study the elementary process of Alfvén wave reflection in a uniform medium, including nonlinear effects. In the linear regime, Alfvén wave reflection is triggered only by the inhomogeneity of the medium, whereas in the nonlinear regime, it can occur via nonlinear wave–wave interactions. Such nonlinear reflection (backscattering) is typified by decay instability. In most studies of decay instabilities, the initial condition has been a circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In this study we consider a linearly polarized Alfvén wave, which drives density fluctuations by its magnetic pressure force. For generality, we also assume a broadband wave with a red-noise spectrum. In the data analysis, we decompose the fluctuations into characteristic variables using local eigenvectors, thus revealing the behaviors of the individual modes. Different from the circular-polarization case, we find that the wave steepening produces a new energy channel from the parent Alfvén wave to the backscattered one. Such nonlinear reflection explains the observed increasing energy ratio of the sunward to the anti-sunward Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind with distance against the dynamical alignment effect.

  18. Iterative calculation of reflected and transmitted acoustic waves at a rough interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; van den Berg, P.M.; Thijssen, J.M.

    A rigorous iterative technique is described for calculating the acoustic wave reflection and transmission at an irregular interface between two different media. The method is based upon a plane-wave expansion technique in which the acoustic field equations and the radiation condition are satisfied

  19. Reflection of electromagnetic wave from the boundary of the piezoelectric half-space with cubic symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberyan, A. Kh; Garakov, V. G.

    2018-04-01

    A large number of works have been devoted to investigation of the influence of the piezoelectric properties of a material on the propagation of elastic waves [1–3]. Herewith, the quasi-static piezoelasticity model was mainly used. In the problem of an electromagnetic wave reflection from an elastic medium with piezoelectric properties, it is necessary to consider hyperbolic equations [4].

  20. Reflection and transmission of normally incident full-vector X waves on planar interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X waves normally incident on planar half-spaces and slabs are studied. For this purpose, X waves are expanded in terms of weighted vector Bessel beams; this new decomposition and reconstruction method

  1. Reflection of P and SV waves at the free surface of a monoclinic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R.Narasimhan(krishtel emaging)1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The propagation of plane waves in an anisotropic elastic medium possessing monoclinic symmetry is discussed. The expressions for ... Keywords. Anisotropic medium; elastic waves; monoclinic half-space; reflection coefficients. Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. ...... In contrast, for C < 0, the angle of reflec- tion is less than the angle of ...

  2. Reflection and transmission of full-vector X-waves normally incident on dielectric half spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of transmission and reflection is carried out via a straightforward but yet effective method: First, the X-Wave is decomposed into vector Bessel beams via the Bessel-Fourier

  3. Rotating and standing waves in a diffractive nonlinear optical system with delayed feedback under O(2) Hopf bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskiy, S. S.; Razgulin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we study one-dimensional rotating and standing waves in a model of an O(2)-symmetric nonlinear optical system with diffraction and delay in the feedback loop whose dynamics is governed by a system of coupled delayed parabolic equation and linear Schrodinger-type equation. We elaborate a two-step approach: transition to a rotating coordinate system to obtain the profiles of the waves as small parameter expansions and the normal form technique to study their qualitative dynamic behavior and stability. Theoretical results stand in a good agreement with direct computer simulations presented.

  4. Normal Reflection Characteristics of One-Dimensional Unsteady Flow Shock Waves on Rigid Walls from Pulse Discharge in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong shock waves can be generated by pulse discharge in water, and the characteristics due to the shock wave normal reflection from rigid walls have important significance to many fields, such as industrial production and defense construction. This paper investigates the effects of hydrostatic pressures and perturbation of wave source (i.e., charging voltage on normal reflection of one-dimensional unsteady flow shock waves. Basic properties of the incidence and reflection waves were analyzed theoretically and experimentally to identify the reflection mechanisms and hence the influencing factors and characteristics. The results indicated that increased perturbation (i.e., charging voltage leads to increased peak pressure and velocity of the reflected shock wave, whereas increased hydrostatic pressure obviously inhibited superposition of the reflection waves close to the rigid wall. The perturbation of wave source influence on the reflected wave was much lower than that on the incident wave, while the hydrostatic pressure obviously affected both incident and reflection waves. The reflection wave from the rigid wall in water exhibited the characteristics of a weak shock wave, and with increased hydrostatic pressure, these weak shock wave characteristics became more obvious.

  5. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  6. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use...... of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested...... for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements....

  7. Multiple attenuation to reflection seismic data using Radon filter and Wave Equation Multiple Rejection (WEMR) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlangga, Mokhammad Puput [Geophysical Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Ganesha Street no.10 Basic Science B Buliding fl.2-3 Bandung, 40132, West Java Indonesia puput.erlangga@gmail.com (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Separation between signal and noise, incoherent or coherent, is important in seismic data processing. Although we have processed the seismic data, the coherent noise is still mixing with the primary signal. Multiple reflections are a kind of coherent noise. In this research, we processed seismic data to attenuate multiple reflections in the both synthetic and real seismic data of Mentawai. There are several methods to attenuate multiple reflection, one of them is Radon filter method that discriminates between primary reflection and multiple reflection in the τ-p domain based on move out difference between primary reflection and multiple reflection. However, in case where the move out difference is too small, the Radon filter method is not enough to attenuate the multiple reflections. The Radon filter also produces the artifacts on the gathers data. Except the Radon filter method, we also use the Wave Equation Multiple Elimination (WEMR) method to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. The WEMR method can attenuate the long period multiple reflection based on wave equation inversion. Refer to the inversion of wave equation and the magnitude of the seismic wave amplitude that observed on the free surface, we get the water bottom reflectivity which is used to eliminate the multiple reflections. The WEMR method does not depend on the move out difference to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. Therefore, the WEMR method can be applied to the seismic data which has small move out difference as the Mentawai seismic data. The small move out difference on the Mentawai seismic data is caused by the restrictiveness of far offset, which is only 705 meter. We compared the real free multiple stacking data after processing with Radon filter and WEMR process. The conclusion is the WEMR method can more attenuate the long period multiple reflection than the Radon filter method on the real (Mentawai) seismic data.

  8. Transmission and total reflection of subhertz electromagnetic waves at the earth-atmosphere interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of providing for a theoretical background for the study of electromagnetic fields generated by precursory effects of earthquakes, the problem of transmission and total reflection at the earth-atmosphere interface is investigated in detail for a subhertz plane electromagnetic wave incident from the earth's crust. The term ''subhertz'' means 'below 1 Hz'. First, for the special case of normal incidence, the overall power transmission coefficient at the earth-atmosphere interface is found to take a maximum value at a definite frequency f 0 which is inversely proportional to the square of the depth of a virtual hypocenter. A typical value of f 0 falls around 0.01 Hz. For oblique incidence as well, this feature of the overall power transmission coefficient is retained except in the vicinity of the critical angle of incidence for the H-wave. At the critical angle of incidence, the power flow carried by a surface wave along the interface becomes anomalously large for the H-wave. However, over a wide range of angles of incidence greater than the critical angle, the power flow carried by the E-wave exceeds that carried by the H-wave by orders of magnitude. Finally, the energy conservation relations for the incident, reflected, and transmitted waves at the earth-atmosphere interface are discussed. For an incident wave coming from the earth's crust, the interactive power between the incident and reflected waves plays a crucial role for the conservation of energy at the interface.

  9. UV-laser-based longitudinal illuminated diffuser (LID) incorporating diffractive and Lambertian reflectance for the disinfection of beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd

    2010-08-01

    A novel laser beam shaping system was designed to demonstrate the potential of using high power UV laser sources for large scale disinfection of liquids used in the production of food products, such as juices, beer, milk and other beverage types. The design incorporates a patented assembly of optical components including a diffractive beam splitting/shaping element and a faceted pyramidal or conically shaped Lambertian diffuser made from a compression molded PTFE compounds. When properly sintered to an appropriate density, as an example between 1.10 and 1.40 grams per cubic centimeter, the compressed PTFE compounds show a ~99% reflectance at wavelengths ranging from 300 nm to 1500 nm, and a ~98.5% refection of wavelengths from 250 nm to 2000 nm [1]. The unique diffuser configuration also benefits from the fact that the PTFE compounds do not degrade when exposed to ultraviolet radiation as do barium sulfate materials and silver or aluminized mirror coatings [2]. These components are contained within a hermetically sealed quartz tube. Once assembled a laser beam is directed through one end of the tube. This window takes the form of a computer generated diffractive splitter or other diffractive shaper element to split the laser beam into a series of spot beamlets, circular rings or other geometric shapes. As each of the split beamlets or rings cascade downward, they illuminate various points along the tapered PTFE cone or faceted pyramidal form. As they strike the surface they each diffuse in a Lambertian reflectance pattern creating a pseudo-uniform circumferential illuminator along the length of the quartz tube enclosing the assembly. The compact tubular structure termed Longitudinal Illuminated Diffuser (LID) provides a unique UV disinfection source that can be placed within a centrifugal reactor or a pipe based reactor chamber. This paper will review the overall design principle, key component design parameters, preliminary analytic and bench operational testing

  10. Transient reflection and transmission of E polarized electromagnetic waves at boundary surface between air and moving isotropic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yukimasa

    1977-01-01

    The transient reflection and transmission waves of E polarized electromagnetic waves coming into the boundary surface between air and moving isotropic plasma were theoretically investigated. By using the Laplace transformation in the moving system, the formulae of Lorentz and inverse Lorentz transformations concerning electromagnetic field were transformed, thus the transient reflection and transmission waves were obtained. These waves were normalized with the angular frequency of the incident waves, and the variation of the wave form was obtained. Examples of the numerical calculation of reflected waves are shown for the plasma moving in parallel to the boundary surface. (Kato, T.)

  11. A comparative study of diffraction of shallow-water waves by high-level IGN and GN equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B.B. [College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Ertekin, R.C. [Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawai' i, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Duan, W.Y., E-mail: duanwenyangheu@hotmail.com [College of Shipbuilding Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2015-02-15

    This work is on the nonlinear diffraction analysis of shallow-water waves, impinging on submerged obstacles, by two related theories, namely the classical Green–Naghdi (GN) equations and the Irrotational Green–Naghdi (IGN) equations, both sets of equations being at high levels and derived for incompressible and inviscid flows. Recently, the high-level Green–Naghdi equations have been applied to some wave transformation problems. The high-level IGN equations have also been used in the last decade to study certain wave propagation problems. However, past works on these theories used different numerical methods to solve these nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations and at different levels. Moreover, different physical problems have been solved in the past. Therefore, it has not been possible to understand the differences produced by these two sets of theories and their range of applicability so far. We are thus motivated to make a direct comparison of the results produced by these theories by use of the same numerical method to solve physically the same wave diffraction problems. We focus on comparing these two theories by using similar codes; only the equations used are different but other parts of the codes, such as the wave-maker, damping zone, discretion method, matrix solver, etc., are exactly the same. This way, we eliminate many potential sources of differences that could be produced by the solution of different equations. The physical problems include the presence of various submerged obstacles that can be used for example as breakwaters or to represent the continental shelf. A numerical wave tank is created by placing a wavemaker on one end and a wave absorbing beach on the other. The nonlinear and unsteady sets of differential equations are solved by the finite-difference method. The results are compared with different equations as well as with the available experimental data.

  12. Reflection and transmission of ion acoustic waves from a plasma discontinuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.; Alexeff, I.; Bloomberg, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Transmission and reflection coefficients are calculated for an ion acoustic wave incident from the upstream direction upon a plasma discontinuity of width much less than the wavelength. In the limit of an infinitely strong discontinuity there is complete in phase reflection. (U.S.)

  13. Reflection and transmission of normally incident full-vector X waves on planar interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-12-23

    The reflection and transmission of full-vector X waves normally incident on planar half-spaces and slabs are studied. For this purpose, X waves are expanded in terms of weighted vector Bessel beams; this new decomposition and reconstruction method offers a more lucid and intuitive interpretation of the physical phenomena observed upon the reflection or transmission of X waves when compared to the conventional plane-wave decomposition technique. Using the Bessel beam expansion approach, we have characterized changes in the field shape and the intensity distribution of the transmitted and reflected full-vector X waves. We have also identified a novel longitudinal shift, which is observed when a full-vector X wave is transmitted through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition. The results of our studies presented here are valuable in understanding the behavior of full-vector X waves when they are utilized in practical applications in electromagnetics, optics, and photonics, such as trap and tweezer setups, optical lithography, and immaterial probing. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  14. Phase mixing of Alfvén waves in axisymmetric non-reflective magnetic plasma configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, N. S.; Ruderman, M. S.; Shurgalina, E. G.

    2018-02-01

    We study damping of phase-mixed Alfvén waves propagating in non-reflective axisymmetric magnetic plasma configurations. We derive the general equation describing the attenuation of the Alfvén wave amplitude. Then we applied the general theory to a particular case with the exponentially divergent magnetic field lines. The condition that the configuration is non-reflective determines the variation of the plasma density along the magnetic field lines. The density profiles exponentially decreasing with the height are not among non-reflective density profiles. However, we managed to find non-reflective profiles that fairly well approximate exponentially decreasing density. We calculate the variation of the total wave energy flux with the height for various values of shear viscosity. We found that to have a substantial amount of wave energy dissipated at the lower corona, one needs to increase shear viscosity by seven orders of magnitude in comparison with the value given by the classical plasma theory. An important result that we obtained is that the efficiency of the wave damping strongly depends on the density variation with the height. The stronger the density decrease, the weaker the wave damping is. On the basis of this result, we suggested a physical explanation of the phenomenon of the enhanced wave damping in equilibrium configurations with exponentially diverging magnetic field lines.

  15. Alfven Wave Reflection Model of Field-Aligned Currents at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.; Slavin, James

    2010-01-01

    An Alfven Wave Reflection (AWR) model is proposed that provides closure for strong field-aligned currents (FACs) driven by the magnetopause reconnection in the magnetospheres of planets having no significant ionospheric and surface electrical conductance. The model is based on properties of the Alfven waves, generated at high altitudes and reflected from the low-conductivity surface of the planet. When magnetospheric convection is very slow, the incident and reflected Alfven waves propagate along approximately the same path. In this case, the net field-aligned currents will be small. However, as the convection speed increases. the reflected wave is displaced relatively to the incident wave so that the incident and reflected waves no longer compensate each other. In this case, the net field-aligned current may be large despite the lack of significant ionospheric and surface conductivity. Our estimate shows that for typical solar wind conditions at Mercury, the magnitude of Region 1-type FACs in Mercury's magnetosphere may reach hundreds of kilo-Amperes. This AWR model of field-aligned currents may provide a solution to the long-standing problem of the closure of FACs in the Mercury's magnetosphere. c2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the self-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaie, M.; Shokri, B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a high power microwave beam propagating through a gaseous medium, which is ionized in the wave field is investigated. By solving the wave equation, the reflection index of the produced plasma is obtained. It is shown that the cut off condition is different from that of the steady state approximation. The reflection index is less than unity when the plasma density reaches the critical value estimated in the steady state approximation. So, the wave can still propagate through the plasma. By comparing the reflection indexes in the presence and absence of the time delay of the ionization process at different points of the medium, it is shown that it becomes unity much later in the first case. Therefore, the wave propagation takes much more time and consequently the medium is ionized much more.

  17. An evaluation of directional analysis techniques for multidirectional, partially reflected waves .1. numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic, C; Chadwick, A; Helm-Petersen, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    , non-phased locked methods are more appropriate. In this paper, the accuracy of two non-phased locked methods of directional analysis, the maximum likelihood method (MLM) and the Bayesian directional method (BDM) have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical simulations for the case...... of multidirectional waves with partial reflections. It is shown that the results are influenced by the ratio of distance from the reflector (L) to the length of the time series (S) used in the spectral analysis. Both methods are found to be capable of determining the incident and reflective wave fields when US > 0......Recent studies of advanced directional analysis techniques have mainly centred on incident wave fields. In the study of coastal structures, however, partially reflective wave fields are commonly present. In the near structure field, phase locked methods can be successfully applied. In the far field...

  18. Large Blast and Thermal Simulator Reflected Wave Eliminator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    it delays the passage of this wave through the test section until after the test is complete. The required length of extra duct depends on the strength...tube axis, which acts like an additional contraction effect since Se = Sj/[Cqsin(aj)]. Tii extra area is illustrated best by plotting (Se-Ae)/Ac versus...34Simulation de Choc et de Soaffie. Comimpensateur d’Ondes de Detente de Bouche pour tube a Choc de 2400 mm de diametre de Veine. Description, Compte- Renda

  19. Data-based diffraction kernels for surface waves from convolution and correlation processes through active seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Malgorzata; Roux, Philippe; Herrmann, Philippe; Rondeleux, Baptiste; Wathelet, Marc

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the construction of diffraction kernels for surface waves using two-point convolution and/or correlation from land active seismic data recorded in the context of exploration geophysics. The high density of controlled sources and receivers, combined with the application of the reciprocity principle, allows us to retrieve two-dimensional phase-oscillation diffraction kernels (DKs) of surface waves between any two source or receiver points in the medium at each frequency (up to 15 Hz, at least). These DKs are purely data-based as no model calculations and no synthetic data are needed. They naturally emerge from the interference patterns of the recorded wavefields projected on the dense array of sources and/or receivers. The DKs are used to obtain multi-mode dispersion relations of Rayleigh waves, from which near-surface shear velocity can be extracted. Using convolution versus correlation with a grid of active sources is an important step in understanding the physics of the retrieval of surface wave Green's functions. This provides the foundation for future studies based on noise sources or active sources with a sparse spatial distribution.

  20. Arterial wave reflection and aortic valve calcification in an elderly community-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Fusako; Russo, Cesare; Iwata, Shinichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2015-04-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) without stenosis is common in the elderly, is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and may progress to aortic valve stenosis. Arterial stiffness and pulse-wave reflection are important components of proximal aortic hemodynamics, but their relationship with AVC is not established. To investigate the relationship of arterial wave reflection and stiffness with AVC, pulse wave analysis and AVC evaluation by echocardiography were performed in 867 participants from the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions study. Participants were divided into four categories on the basis of the severity and extent of AVC: (1) none or mild focal AVC, (2) mild diffuse AVC, (3) moderate to severe focal AVC, and (4) moderate to severe diffuse AVC. Central blood pressures and pulse pressure, total arterial compliance, augmentation index, and time to wave reflection were assessed using applanation tonometry. Indicators of arterial stiffness and wave reflection were significantly associated with AVC severity, except for central systolic and diastolic pressures and time to reflection. After adjustment for pertinent covariates (age, sex, race/ethnicity, and estimated glomerular filtration rate), only augmentation pressure (P = .02) and augmentation index (P = .002) were associated with the severity of AVC. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that augmentation pressure (odds ratio per mm Hg, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.27; P = .02) and augmentation index (odds ratio per percentage point, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.13; P = .02) were associated with an increased risk for moderate to severe diffuse AVC, even when central blood pressure value was included in the same model. Arterial wave reflection is associated with AVC severity, independent of blood pressure values. Increased contribution of wave reflection to central blood pressure could be involved in the process leading to AVC. Copyright © 2015

  1. A physical model study of the travel times and reflection points of SH-waves reflected from transversely isotropic media with tilted symmetry axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Chung; Chang, Young-Fo; Chang, Chih-Hsiung; Chung, Chia-Lung

    2012-05-01

    In reflection seismology, detailed knowledge of how seismic waves propagate in anisotropic media is important for locating reservoirs accurately. The SH-wave possesses a pure mode polarization which does not convert to P- and SV-waves when reflecting from a horizontal interface, and vice versa. The simplicity of the SH-wave thus provides an easy way to view the details of SH-wave propagation in anisotropic media. In this study, we attempt to inspect the theoretical reflection moveouts of SH-waves reflected from transversely isotropic (TI) layers with tilted symmetry axes and to verify the reflection point, which could be shifted away from the common midpoint (CMP), by numerical calculations and physical modelling. In travel time-offset analyses, the moveout curves of SH-waves reflected from horizontal TI media (TIM) with different tilted angles of symmetry axes are computed by the TI modified hyperbolic equation and Fermat's principle, respectively. It turns out that both the computed moveout curves are similar and fit well to the observed physical data. The reflection points of SH-waves for a CMP gather computed by Fermat's principle show that they are close to the CMP for TIM with the vertical and horizontal symmetry axes, but they shift away from the CMP for the other tilted angles of symmetry axes. The shifts of the reflection points of the SH-waves from the CMP were verified by physical modelling.

  2. Waves and grains reflections on light and learning

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Mark P

    1998-01-01

    Mark Silverman has seen light perform many wonders. From the marvel of seeing inside cloudy liquids as a result of his own cutting-edge research to reproducing and examining an unusual diffraction pattern first witnessed by Isaac Newton 300 years ago, he has studied aspects of light that have inspired and puzzled humans for hundreds of years. In this book, he draws on his many experiences as an optical and atomic physicist--and on his consummate skills as a teacher and writer about the mysteries of physics--to present a remarkable tour of the world of light. He explores theoretical, experimental, and historical themes, showing a keen eye for curious and neglected corners of the study of light and a fascination with the human side of scientific discovery. In the course of the book, he covers such questions as how it is possible to achieve magnifications of a millionfold without a single lens or mirror. He asks what all living things have in common that might one day allow the development of a "life-form scann...

  3. The Use of Microsoft Excel to Illustrate Wave Motion and Fraunhofer Diffraction in First Year Physics Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robinson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an Excel package that can be used to demonstrate physical phenomena in which variables may be automatically adjusted in real-time. This is accomplished by interrogating the system clock through the use of an appropriate macro, and using the clock reading to update the relevant variable. The package has been used for a number of years in first year physics courses to illustrate two phenomena: i waves, including travelling waves, standing waves, the addition of waves and the interference of waves in general, and also Lissajous figures, and ii Fraunhofer diffraction and the effects of varying such quantities as the wavelength of the incoming light, the number of slits, the slit width and the slit separation. A number of illustrative examples, generated by the package and taken from a fist year physics course, are presented graphically. The package, which is available for downloading from the web, may be used interactively by the student and is easily modified by them. The use of Excel has the advantage that it is accessible to a much wider audience than if it were written in, say, Matlab. We envisage that it may be useful for first year university courses in wave motion and optics, and may also be useful in physics courses in the last year of secondary school. The package has been tested under Excel 2003, 2007 and 2010, and runs satisfactorily in all three versions.

  4. A three-microphone acoustic reflection technique using transmitted acoustic waves in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yuki; Huang, Jyongsu; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Kato, Ryo; Higashino, Mari; Shinomiya, Shohei; Kitadate, Shoko; Takahara, Yutaka; Yamaya, Atsuyo; Saito, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kojima, Koji; Oikawa, Taku; Nakagawa, Ken; Tsuchihara, Katsuma; Iguchi, Masaharu; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Mizuno, Shiro; Osanai, Kazuhiro; Toga, Hirohisa

    2013-10-15

    The acoustic reflection technique noninvasively measures airway cross-sectional area vs. distance functions and uses a wave tube with a constant cross-sectional area to separate incidental and reflected waves introduced into the mouth or nostril. The accuracy of estimated cross-sectional areas gets worse in the deeper distances due to the nature of marching algorithms, i.e., errors of the estimated areas in the closer distances accumulate to those in the further distances. Here we present a new technique of acoustic reflection from measuring transmitted acoustic waves in the airway with three microphones and without employing a wave tube. Using miniaturized microphones mounted on a catheter, we estimated reflection coefficients among the microphones and separated incidental and reflected waves. A model study showed that the estimated cross-sectional area vs. distance function was coincident with the conventional two-microphone method, and it did not change with altered cross-sectional areas at the microphone position, although the estimated cross-sectional areas are relative values to that at the microphone position. The pharyngeal cross-sectional areas including retropalatal and retroglossal regions and the closing site during sleep was visualized in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The method can be applicable to larger or smaller bronchi to evaluate the airspace and function in these localized airways.

  5. Two types of nonlinear wave equations for diffractive beams in bubbly liquids with nonuniform bubble number density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    2015-05-01

    This paper theoretically treats the weakly nonlinear propagation of diffracted sound beams in nonuniform bubbly liquids. The spatial distribution of the number density of the bubbles, initially in a quiescent state, is assumed to be a slowly varying function of the spatial coordinates; the amplitude of variation is assumed to be small compared to the mean number density. A previous derivation method of nonlinear wave equations for plane progressive waves in uniform bubbly liquids [Kanagawa, Yano, Watanabe, and Fujikawa (2010). J. Fluid Sci. Technol. 5(3), 351-369] is extended to handle quasi-plane beams in weakly nonuniform bubbly liquids. The diffraction effect is incorporated by adding a relation that scales the circular sound source diameter to the wavelength into the original set of scaling relations composed of nondimensional physical parameters. A set of basic equations for bubbly flows is composed of the averaged equations of mass and momentum, the Keller equation for bubble wall, and supplementary equations. As a result, two types of evolution equations, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including dissipation, diffraction, and nonuniform effects for high-frequency short-wavelength case, and a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation including dispersion and nonuniform effects for low-frequency long-wavelength case, are derived from the basic set.

  6. Phase behavior in diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical formulation of a straight edge diffraction shows a phase difference of π/2 between the incoming and diffracted waves. Experiments using two straight edges do not confirm the π/2 difference but suggest that the incoming wave is in phase with the wave diffracted into the shadowed region of the edge and out of phase by a factor of π with the wave diffracted into the illuminated region. (Author) [pt

  7. Self-exchange of oxygen behind reflected shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bopp, A.F.; Kern, R.D.; Niki, T.; Stack, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of isotopic exchange of equimolar mixtures of 32 O 2 + 36 O 2 dilute in Ne-1% Ar was studied over the temperature range 2625 to 3700 K. the reacting gas was analyzed from the reflected shock zone at 20-μs intervals with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Each experimental product profile obtained was compared to the corresponding computer-simulated profile calculation from an atomic mechanism by using previously published rate constants. It was observed that the growth of the exchange product exceeded that predicted by the atomic mechanism at the lower temperatures of this study. However, these differences diminished as the temperature increased. Static analysis of the gas mixtures investigated revealed that H 2 or D 2 if present were at a level of less than 2.5 ppM. Computer simulation of product profiles demonstrated that this impurity level was insufficient to affect the observed rate of product formation. It is proposed that contributions from molecular channels are operative at the lower temperatures while atomic pathways dominate at the higher temperatures

  8. Bifurcation parameters of a reflected shock wave in cylindrical channels of different roughnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penyazkov, O.; Skilandz, A.

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effect of bifurcation on the induction time in cylindrical shock tubes used for chemical kinetic experiments, one should know the parameters of the bifurcation structure of a reflected shock wave. The dynamics and parameters of the shock wave bifurcation, which are caused by reflected shock wave-boundary layer interactions, are studied experimentally in argon, in air, and in a hydrogen-nitrogen mixture for Mach numbers M = 1.3-3.5 in a 76-mm-diameter shock tube without any ramp. Measurements were taken at a constant gas density behind the reflected shock wave. Over a wide range of experimental conditions, we studied the axial projection of the oblique shock wave and the pressure distribution in the vicinity of the triple Mach configuration at 50, 150, and 250 mm from the endwall, using side-wall schlieren and pressure measurements. Experiments on a polished shock tube and a shock tube with a surface roughness of 20 {μ }m Ra were carried out. The surface roughness was used for initiating small-scale turbulence in the boundary layer behind the incident shock wave. The effect of small-scale turbulence on the homogenization of the transition zone from the laminar to turbulent boundary layer along the shock tube perimeter was assessed, assuming its influence on a subsequent stabilization of the bifurcation structure size versus incident shock wave Mach number, as well as local flow parameters behind the reflected shock wave. The influence of surface roughness on the bifurcation development and pressure fluctuations near the wall, as well as on the Mach number, at which the bifurcation first develops, was analyzed. It was found that even small additional surface roughness can lead to an overshoot in pressure growth by a factor of two, but it can stabilize the bifurcation structure along the shock tube perimeter.

  9. Ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves in anisotropic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every, A G; Maznev, A A

    2010-05-01

    This paper examines the conditions for, and provides examples of, ray splitting in the reflection and refraction of surface acoustic waves (SAW) in elastically anisotropic solids at straight obstacles such as edges, surface breaking cracks, and interfaces between different solids. The concern here is not with the partial scattering of an incident SAW's energy into bulk waves, but with the occurrence of more than one SAW ray in the reflected and/or transmitted wave fields, by analogy with birefringence in optics and mode conversion of bulk elastic waves at interfaces. SAW ray splitting is dependent on the SAW slowness curve possessing concave regions, which within the constraint of wave vector conservation parallel to the obstacle allows multiple outgoing SAW modes for certain directions of incidence and orientation of obstacle. The existence of pseudo-SAW for a given surface provides a further channel for ray splitting. This paper discusses some typical material configurations for which SAW ray splitting occurs. An example is provided of mode conversion entailing backward reflection or negative refraction. Experimental demonstration of ray splitting in the reflection of a laser generated SAW in GaAs(111) is provided. The calculation of SAW mode conversion amplitudes lies outside the scope of this paper.

  10. Long wave-length x-ray diffraction crystal and method of manufacturing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zingaro, W.P.; Sicignano, A.

    1980-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction crystal of the Langemuir-Blodgett type capable of detecting radiation having a wavelength greater than 50 Arystroms and a method of making such a crystal are described. The crystal consists of a pair of alternate monolayers, one a heavy metal soap, and one a light metal soap. Selecting cation pairs with a significant difference in atomic number and dispersing power, such as Pb and Be, Mg, or Ca, increases the effective interplanar distance since the Pb planes cause the predominant x-ray diffraction. (LL)

  11. Generation of neutron standing waves at total reflection of polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Kozhevnikov, S.V.; Radu, F.; Kruijs, R.; Rekveldt, M.Th.

    1999-01-01

    The regime of neutron standing waves at reflection of polarized thermal neutrons from the structure glass/Cu (1000 A Angstrom)/Ti (2000 A Angstrom)/Co (60 A Angstrom)/Ti (300 A Angstrom) in a magnetic field directed at an angle to the sample plane is realized. The intensity of neutrons with a particular spin projection on the external magnetic field direction appears to be a periodic function of the neutron wavelength and the glancing angle of the reflected beam. It is shown that the neutron standing wave regime can be a very sensitive method for the determination of changes in the spatial position of magnetic noncollinear layers. (author)

  12. Flexible manipulation of terahertz wave reflection using polarization insensitive coding metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu-Sheng, Li; Ze-Jiang, Zhao; Jian-Quan, Yao

    2017-11-27

    In order to extend to 3-bit encoding, we propose notched-wheel structures as polarization insensitive coding metasurfaces to control terahertz wave reflection and suppress backward scattering. By using a coding sequence of "00110011…" along x-axis direction and 16 × 16 random coding sequence, we investigate the polarization insensitive properties of the coding metasurfaces. By designing the coding sequences of the basic coding elements, the terahertz wave reflection can be flexibly manipulated. Additionally, radar cross section (RCS) reduction in the backward direction is less than -10dB in a wide band. The present approach can offer application for novel terahertz manipulation devices.

  13. Phase locking in backward-wave oscillators with strong end reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Sinitsyn, O. V.; Rodgers, J.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; Carmel, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The theory of phase-locked oscillations in a backward-wave oscillator with strong end reflections is developed. Numerical results demonstrate that the locking bandwidth of such a device phase-locked by a prebunched electron beam can be twice the bandwidth of a resonator formed by a waveguide with strong end reflections. It is also shown that the device can operate with the efficiency exceeding 50% and that, in some cases, it can exhibit a hysteresis in the process of tuning the signal frequency. The applicability of the results obtained to the experiments with the plasma-assisted backward-wave oscillator currently underway at the University of Maryland is discussed

  14. Specific Features of Destabilization of the Wave Profile During Reflection of an Intense Acoustic Beam from a Soft Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryabin, M. S.; Kasyanov, D. A.; Kurin, V. V.; Garasyov, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    We show that a significant energy redistribution occurs in the spectrum of reflected nonlinear waves, when an intense acoustic beam is reflected from an acoustically soft boundary, which manifests itself at short wave distances from a reflecting boundary. This effect leads to the appearance of extrema in the distributions of the amplitude and intensity of the field of the reflected acoustic beam near the reflecting boundary. The results of physical experiments are confirmed by numerical modeling of the process of transformation of nonlinear waves reflected from an acoustically soft boundary. Numerical modeling was performed by means of the Khokhlov—Zabolotskaya—Kuznetsov (KZK) equation.

  15. Imaging near-subsurface subrosion structures and faults using SH-wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    adjusted in able to measure in the medieval center of Bad Frankenhausen. This required special equipment and configuration due to the densely built-up area, the differing ground conditions and the varying topography. The analysis of the seismic sections revealed structures associated with the continuing subrosion of the Permian deposits. The reflection patterns indicate heterogeneous near-surface geology of lateral and vertical variations in forms of discontinuous reflectors, small-scale fractures and faults. The fractures and faults also serve as additional pathways for the circulating water and the deposits are subsiding along these features, resulting in the formation of depression structures in the near-subsurface. Diffractions in the unmigrated sections indicate voids in the subsurface that develop due to the longtime subrosion processes. Besides these structures, variations of the traveltime, absorption and scattering of the seismic waves induced by the subrosion processes are visible.

  16. Shot- and angle-domain wave-equation traveltime inversion of reflection data: Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2015-05-26

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. To mitigate this problem and avoid the need to fit amplitudes in the data, we have developed a wave-equation method that inverts the traveltimes of reflection events, and so it is less prone to the local minima problem. Instead of a waveform misfit function, the penalty function was a crosscorrelation of the downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the trial image point. The time lag, which maximized the crosscorrelation amplitude, represented the reflection-traveltime residual (RTR) that was back projected along the reflection wavepath to update the velocity. Shot- and angle-domain crosscorrelation functions were introduced to estimate the RTR by semblance analysis and scanning. In theory, only the traveltime information was inverted and there was no need to precisely fit the amplitudes or assume a high-frequency approximation. Results with synthetic data and field records revealed the benefits and limitations of wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion.

  17. Shot- and angle-domain wave-equation traveltime inversion of reflection data: Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong; Luo, Yi; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. To mitigate this problem and avoid the need to fit amplitudes in the data, we have developed a wave-equation method that inverts the traveltimes of reflection events, and so it is less prone to the local minima problem. Instead of a waveform misfit function, the penalty function was a crosscorrelation of the downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the trial image point. The time lag, which maximized the crosscorrelation amplitude, represented the reflection-traveltime residual (RTR) that was back projected along the reflection wavepath to update the velocity. Shot- and angle-domain crosscorrelation functions were introduced to estimate the RTR by semblance analysis and scanning. In theory, only the traveltime information was inverted and there was no need to precisely fit the amplitudes or assume a high-frequency approximation. Results with synthetic data and field records revealed the benefits and limitations of wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion.

  18. Optimal reflection-free complex absorbing potentials for quantum propagation of wave packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemer, Oded; Brisker, Daria; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2005-01-01

    The conditions for optimal reflection-free complex-absorbing potentials (CAPs) are discussed. It is shown that the CAPs as derived from the smooth-exterior-scaling transformation of the Hamiltonian [J. Phys. B 31, 1431 (1998)] serve as optimal reflection-free CAPs (RF CAPs) in wave-packet propagation calculations of open systems. The initial wave packet, Φ(t=0), can be located in the interaction region (as in half collision experiments) where the CAPs have vanished or in the asymptote where V CAP ≠0. As we show, the optimal CAPs can be introduced also in the region where the physical potential has not vanished. The unavoided reflections due to the use of a finite number of grid points (or basis functions) are discussed. A simple way to reduce the 'edge-grid' reflection effect is described

  19. Reflection of equatorial Kelvin waves at eastern ocean boundaries Part I: hypothetical boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soares

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A baroclinic shallow-water model is developed to investigate the effect of the orientation of the eastern ocean boundary on the behavior of equatorial Kelvin waves. The model is formulated in a spherical polar coordinate system and includes dissipation and non-linear terms, effects which have not been previously included in analytical approaches to the problem. Both equatorial and middle latitude response are considered given the large latitudinal extent used in the model. Baroclinic equatorial Kelvin waves of intraseasonal, seasonal and annual periods are introduced into the domain as pulses of finite width. Their subsequent reflection, transmission and dissipation are investigated. It is found that dissipation is very important for the transmission of wave energy along the boundary and for reflections from the boundary. The dissipation was found to be dependent not only on the presence of the coastal Kelvin waves in the domain, but also on the period of these coastal waves. In particular the dissipation increases with wave period. It is also shown that the equatorial β-plane approximation can allow an anomalous generation of Rossby waves at higher latitudes. Nonlinearities generally have a small effect on the solutions, within the confines of this model.Key words. Oceanography: general (equatorial oceanography; numerical modeling · Oceanography: physical (eastern boundary currents

  20. Linear GPR Imaging Based on Electromagnetic Plane-Wave Spectra and Diffraction Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Two linear diffraction-tomography based inversion schemes, referred to as the Fourier transform method (FTM) and the far-field method (FFM), are derived for 3-dimensional fixed-offset GPR imaging of buried objects. The FTM and FFM are obtained by using different asymptotic approximations...

  1. Frequency modulation at a moving material interface and a conservation law for wave number. [acoustic wave reflection and transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstein, G. G.; Gunzburger, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    An integral conservation law for wave numbers is considered. In order to test the validity of the proposed conservation law, a complete solution for the reflection and transmission of an acoustic wave impinging normally on a material interface moving at a constant speed is derived. The agreement between the frequency condition thus deduced from the dynamic equations of motion and the frequency condition derived from the jump condition associated with the integral equation supports the proposed law as a true conservation law. Additional comparisons such as amplitude discontinuities and Snells' law in a moving media further confirm the stated proposition. Results are stated concerning frequency and wave number relations across a shock front as predicted by the proposed conservation law.

  2. Evanescent Acoustic Wave Scattering by Targets and Diffraction by Ripples Graduate Traineeship Award in Ocean Acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osterhoudt, Curtis F; Marston, Philip L

    2007-01-01

    .... The purpose of his research was to improve the understanding of the way that acoustic evanescent waves interact with targets buried in sediments in situations encountered in underwater acoustics...

  3. Diffraction and interference of single de Broglie-wavelets. Deterministic wave mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.

    1993-05-01

    Wavelets are localized nonspreading solutions of massless wave equations which move like massive quantum particles. They form a bridge between classical mechanics of point particles and wave functions of probabilistic quantum mechanics, both of which can be obtained by limiting processes. Here we develop a theory of the propagation of wavelets in the presence of boundaries and derive interference phenomena of quantum theory from the behavior of single events with ''hidden parameters''. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  4. Full Waveform Inversion of Diving & Reflected Waves based on Scale Separation for Velocity and Impedance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, Romain; Zhou, Wei; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is an appealing method for quantitative high-resolution subsurface imaging (Virieux et al., 2009). For crustal-scales exploration from surface seismic, FWI generally succeeds in recovering a broadband of wavenumbers in the shallow part of the targeted medium taking advantage of the broad scattering-angle provided by both reflected and diving waves. In contrast, deeper targets are often only illuminated by short-spread reflections, which favor the reconstruction of the short wavelengths at the expense of the longer ones, leading to a possible notch in the intermediate part of the wavenumber spectrum. To update the velocity macromodel from reflection data, image-domain strategies (e.g., Symes & Carazzone, 1991) aim to maximize a semblance criterion in the migrated domain. Alternatively, recent data-domain strategies (e.g., Xu et al., 2012, Ma & Hale, 2013, Brossier et al., 2014), called Reflection FWI (RFWI), inspired by Chavent et al. (1994), rely on a scale separation between the velocity macromodel and prior knowledge of the reflectivity to emphasize the transmission regime in the sensitivity kernel of the inversion. However, all these strategies focus on reflected waves only, discarding the low-wavenumber information carried out by diving waves. With the current development of very long-offset and wide-azimuth acquisitions, a significant part of the recorded energy is provided by diving waves and subcritical reflections, and high-resolution tomographic methods should take advantage of all types of waves. In this presentation, we will first review the issues of classical FWI when applied to reflected waves and how RFWI is able to retrieve the long wavelength of the model. We then propose a unified formulation of FWI (Zhou et al., 2014) to update the low wavenumbers of the velocity model by the joint inversion of diving and reflected arrivals, while the impedance model is updated thanks to reflected wave only. An alternate inversion of

  5. Magnetospherically reflected chorus waves revealed by ray tracing with CLUSTER data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available This paper is related to the propagation characteristics of a chorus emission recorded simultaneously by the 4 satellites of the CLUSTER mission on 29 October 2001 between 01:00 and 05:00 UT. During this day, the spacecraft (SC 1, 2, and 4 are relatively close to each other but SC3 has been delayed by half an hour. We use the data recorded aboard CLUSTER by the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. Dedicated software processes this spectral matrix in order to determine the wave normal directions relative to the Earth’s magnetic field. This calculation is done for the 4 satellites at different times and different frequencies and allows us to check the directions of these waves. Measurements around the magnetic equator show that the parallel component of the Poynting vector changes its sign when the satellites cross the equator region. It indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from this region which is considered as the source area of these emissions. This is valid for the most intense waves observed on the magnetic and electric power spectrograms. But it is also observed on SC1, SC2, and SC4 that lower intensity waves propagate toward the equator simultaneously with the SC3 intense chorus waves propagating away from the equator. Both waves are at the same frequency. Using the wave normal directions of these waves, a ray tracing study shows that the waves observed by SC1, SC2, and SC4 cross the equatorial plane at the same location as the waves observed by SC3. SC3 which is 30 minutes late observes the waves that originate first from the equator; meanwhile, SC1, SC2, and SC4 observe the same waves that have suffered a Lower Hybrid Resonance (LHR reflection at low altitudes (based on the ray tracing analysis and now return to the equator at a different location with a lower intensity. Similar phenomenon is observed when all SC are on the other side

  6. Magnetospherically reflected chorus waves revealed by ray tracing with CLUSTER data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is related to the propagation characteristics of a chorus emission recorded simultaneously by the 4 satellites of the CLUSTER mission on 29 October 2001 between 01:00 and 05:00 UT. During this day, the spacecraft (SC 1, 2, and 4 are relatively close to each other but SC3 has been delayed by half an hour. We use the data recorded aboard CLUSTER by the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. Dedicated software processes this spectral matrix in order to determine the wave normal directions relative to the Earth’s magnetic field. This calculation is done for the 4 satellites at different times and different frequencies and allows us to check the directions of these waves. Measurements around the magnetic equator show that the parallel component of the Poynting vector changes its sign when the satellites cross the equator region. It indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from this region which is considered as the source area of these emissions. This is valid for the most intense waves observed on the magnetic and electric power spectrograms. But it is also observed on SC1, SC2, and SC4 that lower intensity waves propagate toward the equator simultaneously with the SC3 intense chorus waves propagating away from the equator. Both waves are at the same frequency. Using the wave normal directions of these waves, a ray tracing study shows that the waves observed by SC1, SC2, and SC4 cross the equatorial plane at the same location as the waves observed by SC3. SC3 which is 30 minutes late observes the waves that originate first from the equator; meanwhile, SC1, SC2, and SC4 observe the same waves that have suffered a Lower Hybrid Resonance (LHR reflection at low altitudes (based on the ray tracing analysis and now return to the equator at a different location with a lower intensity. Similar phenomenon is observed when all SC are on the other side

  7. Angle-domain Migration Velocity Analysis using Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2012-11-04

    The main difficulty with an iterative waveform inversion is that it tends to get stuck in a local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly non-linear with respect to changes in the velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we present a reflection traveltime tomography method based on the wave equation which enjoys a more quasi-linear relationship between the model and the data. A local crosscorrelation of the windowed downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the image point yields the lag time that maximizes the correlation. This lag time represents the reflection traveltime residual that is back-projected into the earth model to update the velocity in the same way as wave-equation transmission traveltime inversion. The residual movemout analysis in the angle-domain common image gathers provides a robust estimate of the depth residual which is converted to the reflection traveltime residual for the velocity inversion. We present numerical examples to demonstrate its efficiency in inverting seismic data for complex velocity model.

  8. Diffraction of Elastic Waves in Fluid-Layered Solid Interfaces by an Integral Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Basaldúa-Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present communication, scattering of elastic waves in fluid-layered solid interfaces is studied. The indirect boundary element method is used to deal with this wave propagation phenomenon in 2D fluid-layered solid models. The source is represented by Hankel’s function of second kind and this is always applied in the fluid. Our method is an approximate boundary integral technique which is based upon an integral representation for scattered elastic waves using single-layer boundary sources. This approach is typically called indirect because the sources’ strengths are calculated as an intermediate step. In addition, this formulation is regarded as a realization of Huygens’ principle. The results are presented in frequency and time domains. Various aspects related to the different wave types that emerge from this kind of problems are emphasized. A near interface pulse generates changes in the pressure field and can be registered by receivers located in the fluid. In order to show the accuracy of our method, we validated the results with those obtained by the discrete wave number applied to a fluid-solid interface joining two half-spaces, one fluid and the other an elastic solid.

  9. Probing near-normally propagating bulk acoustic waves using pseudo-reflection geometry Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, L. C.; Andrews, G. T.

    2012-09-01

    Pseudo-reflection geometry Brillouin spectroscopy can be used to probe acoustic wave dispersion approximately along the surface normal of a material system while avoiding the difficulties associated with specularly reflected light encountered in an ideal reflection configuration. As an example of its application, we show analytically that it can be used to determine both the refractive index and bulk acoustic mode velocities of optically-isotropic non-metallic materials and confirm the utility of the approach via a series of experiments on fused quartz, gallium phosphide, water, and porous silicon films.

  10. Epoxy-based broadband anti-reflection coating for millimeter-wave optics

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Darin; Suzuki, Aritoki; Keating, Brian; Krantz, William; Lee, Adrian T.; Quealy, Erin; Richards, Paul L.; Siritanasak, Praween; Walker, William

    2013-01-01

    We have developed epoxy-based, broadband anti-reflection coatings for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics. By using multiple-layer coatings where each layer steps in dielectric constant, we achieved low reflection over a wide bandwidth. We suppressed the reflection from an alumina disk to 10% over fractional bandwidths of 92% and 104% using two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively. The dielectric constants of epoxies were tuned between 2.06 and 7.44 by mixin...

  11. Experimental demonstration of a variable reflectivity signal recycled Michelson interferometer for gravitational wave detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vine, G.; Shaddock, D.; McClelland, D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: One technique of improving the sensitivity of interferometric gravitational wave detectors is to implement a signal mirror. This involves placing a mirror at the output of the Michelson interferometer. The gravitational wave signal is then 'recycled' back into the interferometer where it can coherently add with the gravitational wave signal still being produced. The frequency of the improved sensitivity is dependent on the position of the signal mirror, while the peak height and bandwidth are dependent on the reflectivity of the signal mirror. This is because the signal mirror forms a cavity with the Michelson interferometer and this cavity has a resonant frequency dependent on its length and a bandwidth dependent on its finesse, which are a function of signal mirror position and reflectivity, respectively. Due to the varying and/or unknown nature of the gravitational wave frequencies and wave-forms, it is desirable to be able to control both the peak frequency and bandwidth of the detector. The peak frequency can be easily adjusted by altering the signal mirror position. The bandwidth, however, is fixed with the signal mirror reflectivity. In a long base-line gravitational wave detector it is impractical to swap the signal mirror with one of different reflectivity for a number of reasons, for example, the detector's high vacuum would have to be broken, realignment performed and locking re-acquired. This is addressed by the proposal of two different forms of variable reflectivity signal mirror (VRSM): a Fabry-Perot cavity and a Michelson interferometer. These are analysed and the reasons for choosing to investigate the Michelson VRSM are given. The reasons include the potential for easier control and the smooth variation in reflectivity with arm length difference. The experiment is discussed and the results of the first demonstration of variable reflectivity signal recycling are presented in the form of frequency responses obtained by injecting a second

  12. A hybrid scheme for absorbing edge reflections in numerical modeling of wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an efficient scheme to absorb reflections from the model boundaries in numerical solutions of wave equations. This scheme divides the computational domain into boundary, transition, and inner areas. The wavefields within the inner and boundary areas are computed by the wave equation and the one-way wave equation, respectively. The wavefields within the transition area are determined by a weighted combination of the wavefields computed by the wave equation and the one-way wave equation to obtain a smooth variation from the inner area to the boundary via the transition zone. The results from our finite-difference numerical modeling tests of the 2D acoustic wave equation show that the absorption enforced by this scheme gradually increases with increasing width of the transition area. We obtain equally good performance using pseudospectral and finite-element modeling with the same scheme. Our numerical experiments demonstrate that use of 10 grid points for absorbing edge reflections attains nearly perfect absorption. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  13. A hybrid scheme for absorbing edge reflections in numerical modeling of wave propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2010-03-01

    We propose an efficient scheme to absorb reflections from the model boundaries in numerical solutions of wave equations. This scheme divides the computational domain into boundary, transition, and inner areas. The wavefields within the inner and boundary areas are computed by the wave equation and the one-way wave equation, respectively. The wavefields within the transition area are determined by a weighted combination of the wavefields computed by the wave equation and the one-way wave equation to obtain a smooth variation from the inner area to the boundary via the transition zone. The results from our finite-difference numerical modeling tests of the 2D acoustic wave equation show that the absorption enforced by this scheme gradually increases with increasing width of the transition area. We obtain equally good performance using pseudospectral and finite-element modeling with the same scheme. Our numerical experiments demonstrate that use of 10 grid points for absorbing edge reflections attains nearly perfect absorption. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  14. Experimental investigation of shock wave diffraction over a single- or double-sphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. T.; Wang, T. H.; Hao, L. N.; Huang, B. Q.; Chen, W. J.; Shi, H. H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the unsteady drag produced by the interaction of a shock wave with a single- and a double-sphere model is measured using imbedded accelerometers. The shock wave is generated in a horizontal circular shock tube with an inner diameter of 200 mm. The effect of the shock Mach number and the dimensionless distance between spheres is investigated. The time-history of the drag coefficient is obtained based on Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) band-block filtering and polynomial fitting of the measured acceleration. The measured peak values of the drag coefficient, with the associated uncertainty, are reported.

  15. Self-diffraction oscillations of two-wave mixing in a acrylamide photopolymer film

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, C H; Sung, G Y; Choe, O S; Lee, Y W; Lee, I W

    1999-01-01

    Degenerate two-wave energy-coupling experiments were performed on a thick photopolymer film. It was found that the observed periodic oscillations of the energy couplings between the two pump beams were closely related to mixed gratings of the phase and the absorption gratings and to nonzero spatial phase shifts of the gratings with respect to the intensity interference patterns. A simple theory based on coupled wave theory was developed in conjunction with nonlocal responses of the mixed gratings and was compared with the experimental data.

  16. Arterial stiffness and wave reflection: sex differences and relationship with left ventricular diastolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Palmieri, Vittorio; Homma, Shunichi; Rundek, Tatjana; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2012-08-01

    Increased arterial stiffness and wave reflection have been reported in heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) and in asymptomatic left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, a precursor of HFNEF. It is unclear whether women, who have higher frequency of HFNEF, are more vulnerable than men to the deleterious effects of arterial stiffness on LV diastolic function. We investigated, in a large community-based cohort, whether sex differences exist in the relationship among arterial stiffness, wave reflection, and LV diastolic function. Arterial stiffness and wave reflection were assessed in 983 participants from the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions study using applanation tonometry. The central pulse pressure/stroke volume index, total arterial compliance, pulse pressure amplification, and augmentation index were used as parameters of arterial stiffness and wave reflection. LV diastolic function was evaluated by 2-dimensional echocardiography and tissue-Doppler imaging. Arterial stiffness and wave reflection were greater in women compared with men, independent of body size and heart rate (all Pfunction in both sexes. Further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors attenuated these relationships; however, a higher central pulse pressure/stroke volume index predicted LV diastolic dysfunction in women (odds ratio, 1.54; 95% confidence intervals, 1.03 to 2.30) and men (odds ratio, 2.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.30 to 3.39), independent of other risk factors. In conclusion, in our community-based cohort study, higher arterial stiffness was associated with worse LV diastolic function in men and women. Women's higher arterial stiffness, independent of body size, may contribute to their greater susceptibility to develop HFNEF.

  17. Wave Reflection and Loss Characteristics of an Emerged Quarter Circle Breakwater with Varying Seaside Perforations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binumol, S.; Rao, Subba; Hegde, Arkal Vittal

    2017-09-01

    Breakwaters are one of the most important harbour structures constructed to withstand and dissipate the dynamic energy due to the action of the waves. Due to fast growing need of the universe and advances in technology different types of breakwaters are being developed. Quarter circle breakwater is a new type of breakwater emerged from semi circular breakwater and the first model was developed in Peoples Republic of China (2006). Quarter circle breakwater with perforations posses merits of caisson as well as perforated breakwaters such as low weight, requires less materials, suited for poor soil conditions, easily transported, handled and placed at the site, aesthetically pleasing, cost effective, eco-friendly and stable. Therefore it is necessary to carry out detailed studies on hydrodynamic characteristics to investigate the suitability and applicability of various types of quarter circle breakwaters. The present study investigates the wave reflection and loss characteristics of an emerged seaside perforated quarter circle breakwater of radius 55 cm and with varying ratios of spacing to diameter of perforations, for different water depths and wave conditions. The tests were conducted in the two-dimensional monochromatic wave flume available in Marine Structures laboratory of Department of Applied Mechanics and Hydraulics of National Institute of Technology, Surathkal, Karnataka, India. The results were plotted as non-dimensional graphs and it was observed that the reflection coefficient increases with increase in wave steepness for all values of ratio of height of breakwater structure to water depth. For a constant water depth, wave reflection increases with increase in ratio of spacing to diameter of perforations. It was also found that the loss coefficient decreases with increase in wave steepness for all values of ratio of height of breakwater structure to water depth, and ratio of spacing to diameter of perforations.

  18. Observation of strong reflection of electron waves exiting a ballistic channel at low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Canute I.; Campbell, Jason P.; Ryan, Jason T.; Gundlach, David; Cheung, Kin. P., E-mail: Kin.Cheung@NIST.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8120 (United States); Liu, Changze [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8120 (United States); Institute of Microelectronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Southwick, Richard G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8120 (United States); IBM Research, Albany, NY 12205 (United States); Oates, Anthony S. [Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corporation, Hsinchu 30844, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ru [Institute of Microelectronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Wave scattering by a potential step is a ubiquitous concept. Thus, it is surprising that theoretical treatments of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices, from quantum point contacts to ballistic transistors, assume no reflection even when the potential step is encountered upon exiting the device. Experiments so far seem to support this even if it is not clear why. Here we report clear evidence of coherent reflection when electron wave exits the channel of a nanoscale transistor and when the electron energy is low. The observed behavior is well described by a simple rectangular potential barrier model which the Schrodinger’s equation can be solved exactly. We can explain why reflection is not observed in most situations but cannot be ignored in some important situations. Our experiment also represents a direct measurement of electron injection velocity - a critical quantity in nanoscale transistors that is widely considered not measurable.

  19. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  20. Correlations and fluctuations in reflection coefficients for coherent wave propagation in disordered scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Feng, S.

    1989-01-01

    The relation between the reflection coefficients and the Green's function for a coherent wave propagation in a disordered elastic-scattering medium is derived. The sum rule of the reflection and transmission coefficients corresponding to probability conservation is shown rigorously for an arbitrary scattering potential. The correlation function of the reflection coefficients is then calculated by using a Feynman-diagrammatic approach in the weak-localized multiple-scattering regime (L much-gt l much-gt λ). The result is in agreement with recent experiments on the so-called ''memory effect'' in reflection coefficients. A more general condition under which the memory effect can occur is derived. Differences between the the correlation functions for reflection and that for transmission are discussed

  1. Surface segregation of InGaAs films by the evolution of reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xun; Luo Zi-Jiang; Guo Xiang; Zhang Bi-Chan; Shang Lin-Tao; Zhou Qing; Deng Chao-Yong; Ding Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Surface segregation is studied via the evolution of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns under different values of As 4 BEP for InGaAs films. When the As 4 BEP is set to be zero, the RHEED pattern keeps a 4×3/(n × 3) structure with increasing temperature, and surface segregation takes place until 470 °C. The RHEED pattern develops into a metal-rich (4 × 2) structure as temperature increases to 495 °C. The reason for this is that surface segregation makes the In inside the InGaAs film climb to its surface. With the temperature increasing up to 515 °C, the RHEED pattern turns into a GaAs(2 × 4) structure due to In desorption. While the As 4 BEP comes up to a specific value (1.33 × 10 -4 Pa−1.33 × 10 -3 Pa), the surface temperature can delay the segregation and desorption. We find that As 4 BEP has a big influence on surface desorption, while surface segregation is more strongly dependent on temperature than surface desorption. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  2. Wave Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helm-Petersen, J.; Frigaard, Peter

    1994-01-01

    This report is Aalborg University's first contribution to the MAS2-CT92 project: Full scale dynamic load monitoring of rubble mound breakwaters.......This report is Aalborg University's first contribution to the MAS2-CT92 project: Full scale dynamic load monitoring of rubble mound breakwaters....

  3. FINOSEIS: A new approach to offshore-building foundation soil analysis using high resolution reflection seismic and Scholte-wave dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, Dennis; Wölz, Susanne; Müller, Christof; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2009-05-01

    As part of the FINOSEIS project we present the development of new seismic acquisition and inversion concepts for offshore-building foundation soil analysis. FINOSEIS is a subproject of the FINO3 project, which is aimed at the construction of an offshore research platform based in 28 m water depth, hosting eight research projects dealing with offshore wind energy topics. Our investigations focus on the determination of seismic parameters and structural information of the building plot of FINO3. We infer the shear-wave velocity structure by exploiting the dispersive properties of Scholte-waves and use high resolution 2.5D reflection seismic acquisition to determine seismic stratigraphy in three dimensions. Our work is motivated regarding possible hazards to offshore foundations such as wind parks and the FINO3 platform itself, e.g. permanent mechanical load by wind- and wave-forces possibly leading to an impairment of the soil. We conducted a pre-investigation of the site of the future platform in order to help finding a suitable foundation soil by improving common site investigation methods. In May 2006 we did a survey covering an area of 2 km square employing high resolution 2.5D reflection seismic. Along three 2 km airgun profiles Scholte-waves were recorded with Ocean-Bottom-Seismometers. Spectral analysis of these led to pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity models along the profiles. The reflection seismic area is characterized by glacial stratigraphy and diffractions documented within the penetration range of 30 m. With respect to the topography of the identified horizons as well as to the distribution of diffracting objects, a suitable foundation area for the platform was suggested. The results of the Scholte-wave experiment provide valuable information for further inversion models as well as for the dimensioning of further measurements. We also implemented an inversion strategy using the particle swarm optimization method. The inverted layers of shear-wave velocity

  4. Evolution of ocean wave statistics in shallow water : Refraction and diffraction over seafloor topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.T.; Herbers, T.H.C.; Battjes, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a stochastic model for the evolution of random ocean surface waves in coastal waters with complex seafloor topography. First, we derive a deterministic coupled-mode model based on a forward scattering approximation of the nonlinear mild slope equation; this model describes the evolution

  5. Multi reflection of Lamb wave emission in an acoustic waveguide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-02-27

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid-liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  6. Guided wave imaging of oblique reflecting interfaces in pipes using common-source synthetic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zeqing; Sun, Anyu; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2018-04-01

    Cross-mode-family mode conversion and secondary reflection of guided waves in pipes complicate the processing of guided waves signals, and can cause false detection. In this paper, filters operating in the spectral domain of wavenumber, circumferential order and frequency are designed to suppress the signal components of unwanted mode-family and unwanted traveling direction. Common-source synthetic focusing is used to reconstruct defect images from the guided wave signals. Simulations of the reflections from linear oblique defects and a semicircle defect are separately implemented. Defect images, which are reconstructed from the simulation results under different excitation conditions, are comparatively studied in terms of axial resolution, reflection amplitude, detectable oblique angle and so on. Further, the proposed method is experimentally validated by detecting linear cracks with various oblique angles (10-40°). The proposed method relies on the guided wave signals that are captured during 2-D scanning of a cylindrical area on the pipe. The redundancy of the signals is analyzed to reduce the time-consumption of the scanning process and to enhance the practicability of the proposed method.

  7. MODELING OF REFLECTIVE PROPAGATING SLOW-MODE WAVE IN A FLARING LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131, 94 Å emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km s{sup −1} in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Fe xix line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  8. Wave-guided Optical Waveguides tracked and coupled using dynamic diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro-actuation requ......With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro...... waveguides (WOWs) [2]. As the WOWs are optically trapped and maneuvered in 3D-space, it is important to maintain efficient light-coupling through these free-standing waveguides within their operating volume [3]. We propose the use ofdynamic diffractive techniques to create focal spots that will track...... and couple to the WOWs during full volume operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking...

  9. Femtosecond Electron Wave Packet Propagation and Diffraction: Towards Making the ``Molecular Movie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved electron diffraction harbors great promise for achieving atomic resolution of the fastest chemical processes. The generation of sufficiently short electron pulses to achieve this real time view of a chemical reaction has been limited by problems in maintaining short electron pulses with realistic electron densities to the sample. The propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets in the drift region of a photoelectron gun are investigated with an N-body numerical simulation and mean-field model. This analyis shows that the redistribution of electrons inside the packet, arising from space-charge and dispersion contributions, changes the pulse envelope and leads to the development of a spatially linear axial velocity distribution. These results have been used in the design of femtosecond photoelectron guns with higher time resolution and novel electron-optical methods of pulse characterization that are approaching 100 fs timescales. Time-resolved diffraction studies with electron pulses of approximately 500 femtoseconds have focused on solid-liquid phase transitions under far from equilibrium conditions. This work gives a microscopic description of the melting process and illustrates the promise of atomically resolving transition state processes.

  10. Reflection of Plane Waves in Generalized Thermoelastic Half Space under the Action of Uniform Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narottam Maity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection of longitudinal displacement waves in a generalized thermoelastic half space under the action of uniform magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field is applied in such a direction that the problem can be considered as a two-dimensional one. The discussion is based on the three theories of generalized thermoelasticity: Lord-Shulman (L-S, Green-Lindsay (G-L, and Green-Naghdi (G-N with energy dissipation. We compute the possible wave velocities for different models. Amplitude ratios have been presented. The effects of magnetic field on various subjects of interest are discussed and shown graphically.

  11. White coat hypertension is more risky than prehypertension: important role of arterial wave reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Ting, Chih-Tai; Lakatta, Edward G; Yin, Frank C P; Chou, Pesus; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2013-06-01

    Arterial aging may link cardiovascular risk to white coat hypertension (WCH). The aims of the present study were to investigate the role of arterial aging in the white coat effect, defined as the difference between office and 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressures, and to compare WCH with prehypertension (PH) with respect to target organ damage and long-term cardiovascular mortality. A total of 1257 never-been-treated volunteer subjects from a community-based survey were studied. WCH and PH were defined by office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressures. Left ventricular mass index, carotid intima-media thickness, estimated glomerular filtration rate, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid augmentation index, amplitude of the reflection pressure wave, and 15-year cardiovascular mortality were determined. Subjects with WCH were significantly older and had greater body mass index, blood pressure values, intima-media thickness, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, amplitude of the backward pressure wave, and a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate than PH. Amplitude of the backward pressure wave was the most important independent correlate of the white coat effect in multivariate analysis (model r(2)=0.451; partial r(2)/model r(2)=90.5%). WCH had significantly greater cardiovascular mortality than PH (hazard ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-7.91), after accounting for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, fasting plasma glucose, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio. Further adjustment of the model for amplitude of the backward pressure wave eliminated the statistical significance of the WCH effect. In conclusion, the white coat effect is mainly caused by arterial aging. WCH carries higher risk for cardiovascular mortality than PH, probably via enhanced wave reflections that accompany arterial aging.

  12. Diffraction and diffusion in room acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    Diffraction and diffusion are two phenomena that are both related to the wave nature of sound. Diffraction due to the finite size of reflecting surfaces and the design of single reflectors and reflector arrays are discussed. Diffusion is the result of scattering of sound reflected from surfaces...... that are not plane but curved or irregular. The importance of diffusion has been demonstrated in concert halls. Methods for the design of diffusing surfaces and the development of new types of diffusers are reviewed. Finally, the importance of diffraction and diffusion in room acoustic computer models is discussed....

  13. An investigation of the structure of plasma produced by reflected shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.G.R.; Pugatschew, A.A.

    1979-05-01

    Space and time resolved measurements of electron density and temperature have been made in the reflected-shock plasma produced by a Mach 20 incident shock wave propagating in argon at an initial pressure of 1.5 Torr. The peak electron density was found to decrease away from the reflecting wall in such a way that the plasma was fairly uniform at all times. Close to the reflecting wall (0.2 cm away) the measured peak electron density was close to (i.e. about 20% lower than) the predicted equilibrium value but further away (1.0 cm) it was lower by a factor 4. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Calculations of reflected-shock plasma structure based on incident shock structure are only partially supported by available experimental evidence

  14. In situ observation of low temperature growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) by reflection high energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, Andreas; Fissel, Andreas; Bugiel, Eberhard; Wietler, Tobias F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of the initial stages of epitaxial growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) in situ by RHEED. • Impact of growth temperature on strain evolution for temperatures between 200 °C and 400 °C. • Epitaxy with a high degree of structural perfection already at growth temperature of 200 °C. • Ordered interfacial dislocation networks already at 200 °C. • Tensile strain contribution of Si(1 1 1) 7 × 7-surface reconstruction to strain relaxation process for epitaxial growth of Ge. - Abstract: In this paper we investigate the initial stages of epitaxial growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) and the impact of growth temperature on strain evolution in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) for temperatures between 200 °C and 400 °C. The change in surface morphology from a flat wetting layer to subsequent islanding that is characteristic for Stranski–Krastanov growth is monitored by spot intensity analysis. The corresponding critical layer thickness is determined to 3.1 < d c < 3.4 ML. In situ monitoring of the strain relaxation process reveals a contribution of the Si(1 1 1) 7 × 7-surface reconstruction to the strain relaxation process. High resolution transmission electron microscopy confirms that the Ge islands exhibit a high degree of structural perfection and an ordered interfacial misfit dislocation network already at a growth temperature of 200 °C is established. The temperature dependency of island shape, density and height is characterized by atomic force microscopy and compared to the RHEED investigations.

  15. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Er, Ali Oguz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States); Tang, Jau, E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Research Center for Applied Sciences Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Rentzepis, Peter M., E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-09-07

    Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267 nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ω, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

  16. Diffraction of electromagnetic waves by a metallic bar grating with a defect in dielectric filling of the slits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetova, Lyudmila A.; Prosvirnin, Sergey L.

    2018-04-01

    The problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction by the metallic bar grating with inhomogeneous dielectric filling of each slit between bars has been investigated by using the mode matching technique. The transmission and the inner field distribution have been analyzed for the structure which has a single defect in the periodic filling of slits. Such periodic structures are of particular interest for applications in optics, as they have the ability to concentrate a strong inner electromagnetic field and are characterized by high-Q transmission resonances. We use a simple approach to control the width and location of the stopband of the structure by placing a defect in the periodic filling of the grating slits. As a result, we observe the narrow resonance of transmission in terms of stopband width of the defect-free grating and confinement of strong inner electromagnetic field. By changing the permittivity of the defect layer we can shift the frequency of the resonant transmission.

  17. Full-waveform inversion with reflected waves for 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pattnaik, Sonali

    2016-09-06

    Full-waveform inversion in anisotropic media using reflected waves suffers from the strong non-linearity of the objective function and trade-offs between model parameters. Estimating long-wavelength model components by fixing parameter perturbations, referred to as reflection-waveform inversion (RWI), can mitigate nonlinearity-related inversion issues. Here, we extend RWI to acoustic VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media. To minimize trade-offs between the model parameters, we employ a new hierarchical two-stage approach that operates with the P-wave normal-moveout velocity and anisotropy coefficents ζ and η. First, is estimated using a fixed perturbation in ζ, and then we invert for η by fixing the updated perturbation in . The proposed 2D algorithm is tested on a horizontally layered VTI model.

  18. Reflection of a shock wave from a thermally accommodating wall - Molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiwert, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    Reflection of a plane shock wave from a wall has been simulated on a microscopic scale using a direct simulation Monte Carlo technique of the type developed by Bird. A monatomic gas model representing argon was used to describe the fluid medium and a simple one-parameter accommodation coefficient model was used to describe the gas-surface interaction. The influence of surface accommodation was studied parametrically by varying the accommodation coefficient from zero to one. Results are presented showing the temporal variations of flow field density, and mass, momentum, and energy fluxes to the wall during the shock wave reflection process. The energy flux was used to determine the wall temperature history. Comparisons with experiment are found to be satisfactory where data are available.

  19. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  20. Renal shear wave velocity by acoustic radiation force impulse did not reflect advanced renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tomoaki; Koda, Masahiko; Sugihara, Takaaki; Sugihara, Shinobu; Okamoto, Toshiaki; Miyoshi, Kenichi; Matono, Tomomitsu; Hosho, Keiko; Mae, Yukari; Iyama, Takuji; Fukui, Takeaki; Fukuda, Satoko; Munemura, Chishio; Isomoto, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse is a noninvasive method for evaluating tissue elasticity on ultrasound. Renal shear wave velocity measured by this technique has not been fully investigated in patients with renal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare renal shear wave velocity in end-stage renal disease patients and that in patients without chronic kidney disease and to investigate influencing factors. Renal shear wave velocities were measured in 59 healthy young subjects (control group), 31 subjects without chronic kidney disease (non-CKD group), and 39 end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD group). Each measurement was performed 10 times at both kidneys, and the mean value of eight of 10 measurements, excluding the maximum and minimum values, was compared. Renal shear wave velocity could be measured in all subjects. Renal shear wave velocity in the control group was higher than in the non-CKD group and in the ESRD group, and no difference was found between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group. Age and depth were negatively correlated to the renal shear wave velocity. In multiple regression analysis, age and depth were independent factors for renal shear wave velocity, while renal impairment was not. There was no difference between the non-CKD group and the ESRD group, even when ages were matched and depth was adjusted. Renal shear wave velocity was not associated with advanced renal impairment. However, it reflected alteration of renal aging, and this technique may be useful to detect renal impairment in the earlier stages. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  1. Study on Reflected Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in a Shock Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong Nat’l Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The interaction between a shock wave and a boundary layer causes boundary layer separation, shock train, and in some cases, strong unsteadiness in the flow field. Such a situation is also observed in a shock tube, where the reflected shock wave interacts with the unsteady boundary layer. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the shock train phenomenon in a shock tube. In the present study, numerical studies were conducted using the two-dimensional axisymmetric domain of a shock tube, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved to clarify the flow characteristics of shock train phenomenon inside a shock tube. A detailed wave diagram was developed based on the present computational results, which were validated with existing experimental data.

  2. Observation of neutron standing waves at total reflection by precision gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Gundorin, N.A.; Nikitenko, Yu.V.; Popov, Yu.P.; Cser, L.

    1998-01-01

    Total reflection of polarized neutrons from the layered structure glass/Fe (1000 A Angstrom)/Gd (50 A Angstrom) is investigated by registering neutrons and gamma-quanta from thermal neutron capture. The polarization ratio of gamma counts of neutron beams polarized in and opposite the direction of the magnetic field is measured. The polarization ratio is larger than unity for the neutron wavelengths λ 2.2 A Angstrom. Such behaviour of the wavelength dependence of the gamma-quanta polarization ratio points to the fact that over the surface of the Fe Layer a neutron standing wave caused by the interference of the incident neutron wave and the wave refracted from the magnetized Fe layer is formed

  3. Pulmonary artery pulse pressure and wave reflection in chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and primary pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelain, V; Hervé, P; Lecarpentier, Y; Duroux, P; Simonneau, G; Chemla, D

    2001-03-15

    The purpose of this time-domain study was to compare pulmonary artery (PA) pulse pressure and wave reflection in chronic pulmonary thromboembolism (CPTE) and primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Pulmonary artery pressure waveform analysis provides a simple and accurate estimation of right ventricular afterload in the time-domain. Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and PPH are both responsible for severe pulmonary hypertension. Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and PPH predominantly involve proximal and distal arteries, respectively, and may lead to differences in PA pressure waveform. High-fidelity PA pressure was recorded in 14 patients (7 men/7 women, 46 +/- 14 years) with CPTE (n = 7) and PPH (n = 7). We measured thermodilution cardiac output, mean PA pressure (MPAP), PA pulse pressure (PAPP = systolic - diastolic PAP) and normalized PAPP (nPAPP = PPAP/MPAP). Wave reflection was quantified by measuring Ti, that is, the time between pressure upstroke and the systolic inflection point (Pi), deltaP, that is, the systolic PAP minus Pi difference, and the augmentation index (deltaP/PPAP). At baseline, CPTE and PPH had similar cardiac index (2.4 +/- 0.4 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.5 l/min/m2), mean PAP (59 +/- 9 vs. 59 +/- 10 mm Hg), PPAP (57 +/- 13 vs. 53 +/- 13 mm Hg) and nPPAP (0.97 +/- 0.16 vs. 0.89 +/- 0.13). Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism had shorter Ti (90 +/- 17 vs. 126 +/- 16 ms, p PPAP (0.26 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.09 +/- 0.07, p < 0.01). Our study indicated that: 1) CPTE and PPH with severe pulmonary hypertension had similar PA pulse pressure, and 2) wave reflection is elevated in both groups, and CPTE had increased and anticipated wave reflection as compared with PPH, thus suggesting differences in the pulsatile component of right ventricular afterload.

  4. Internal-wave reflection from uniform slopes: higher harmonics and Coriolis effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gerkema

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Weakly nonlinear reflection of internal waves from uniform slopes produces higher harmonics and mean fields; the expressions are here derived for constant stratification and with Coriolis effects fully included, i.e. the horizontal component of the earth rotation vector (referred to as 'non-traditional'' is taken into account. Uniformity in one of the horizontal directions is assumed. It is shown that solutions can be as readily derived with as without ; hence there is no need to make the so-called Traditional Approximation. Examples of reflecting internal-wave beams are presented for super-inertial, inertial and sub-inertial frequencies. The problem of resonant and non-resonant forcing of the second harmonic is studied for single plane waves; unlike under the Traditional Approximation, the problem of reflection from a horizontal bottom no longer forms a singular case. Non-traditional effects are favourable to resonant forcing at near-tidal rather than near-inertial frequencies, and generally increase the intensity of the second harmonic. Strong stratification tends to suppress non-traditional effects, but a near-total suppression is only attained for high values of stratification that are characteristic of the seasonal thermocline; in most parts of the ocean, non-traditional effects can therefore be expected to be important.

  5. Modeling Transmission and Reflection Mueller Matrices of Dielectric Half-Wave Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatino, Maria; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple analytical model describing multiple reflections in dielectric and optically active waveplates, for both normal and slant incidence, including absorption. We compute from first principles the transmission and reflection Mueller matrices of the waveplate. The model is used to simulate the performance of a Stokes polarimeter for mm-waves, in the framework of current attempts to precisely measure the linear polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We study the spectral response of these optical devices, taking into account band and angle averaging effects and confirm the presence of a much richer spectral dependence than in an ideal phase retarder. We also present the matrix elements for the reflection matrix, which is useful to estimate systematic effects in some polarimeter configurations. The formulas we have derived can be used to quickly simulate the performance of future CMB polarimeters.

  6. Diffraction of SH-waves by topographic features in a layered transversely isotropic half-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Zhenning; Liang, Jianwen; Zhang, Yanju

    2017-01-01

    The scattering of plane SH-waves by topographic features in a layered transversely isotropic (TI) half-space is investigated by using an indirect boundary element method (IBEM). Firstly, the anti-plane dynamic stiffness matrix of the layered TI half-space is established and the free fields are solved by using the direct stiffness method. Then, Green's functions are derived for uniformly distributed loads acting on an inclined line in a layered TI half-space and the scattered fields are constructed with the deduced Green's functions. Finally, the free fields are added to the scattered ones to obtain the global dynamic responses. The method is verified by comparing results with the published isotropic ones. Both the steady-state and transient dynamic responses are evaluated and discussed. Numerical results in the frequency domain show that surface motions for the TI media can be significantly different from those for the isotropic case, which are strongly dependent on the anisotropy property, incident angle and incident frequency. Results in the time domain show that the material anisotropy has important effects on the maximum duration and maximum amplitudes of the time histories.

  7. Shock-wave propagation and reflection in semicrystalline polyethylene: A molecular-level investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M.; O'Connor, Thomas C.; Chantawansri, Tanya L.; Sliozberg, Yelena R.; Sirk, Timothy W.; Yeh, In-Chul; Robbins, Mark O.; Andzelm, Jan W.

    2017-09-01

    Semicrystalline polyethylene (PE) is attractive for a variety of mechanically demanding applications, where shock compression can occur. Although often highly crystalline, PE invariably contains nanoscale amorphous domains that influence shock propagation. Our objective in this work is to study the effects of such domains. To this end, we adopt a novel approach wherein we parametrize a simple continuum-level theory based on the shock impedance from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using this theory, we predict how crystalline/amorphous interfaces attenuate shocks via energy reflection due to the impedance mismatch between the phases. The theory predicts that these interfaces attenuate weak shocks more effectively than strong shocks. We compare the theory to explicit nonequilibrium MD simulations of compressive shocks in semicrystalline PE containing nanometer-scale amorphous regions of varying size, where we analyze the pressure response and reflection of energy. The theory and simulations show good agreement for strong shocks (≥1.0 km /s ), but for weak shocks (shock front. However, the simulations show that when amorphous domains are narrow—with widths comparable to the shock front—reflection is reduced compared to the predictions. We identify several nanoscale mechanisms that reduce the impedance mismatch, and thus reduce reflection, at thin amorphous domains. First, the two-wave elastic-plastic structure of shocks in crystalline PE allows the faster-moving elastic precursor wave to compress small amorphous domains before the plastic wave arrives. Second, confinement between stiff, ordered crystalline domains increases the stiffness and chain ordering in small amorphous regions. Moreover, in terms of stiffness the interfaces are similar in width to the shock front, which may contribute to the underprediction of the theory for weak shocks, where the shock front is widest. We conclude by discussing the significance of these results, namely, how they can

  8. Dynamical theory of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    We present a review of the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction by macroscopic bodies which provides the theoretical basis for the study of neutron optics. We consider both the theory of dispersion, in which it is shown that the coherent wave in the medium satisfies a macroscopic one-body Schroedinger equation, and the theory of reflection, refraction, and diffraction in which the above equation is solved for a number of special cases of interest. The theory is illustrated with the help of experimental results obtained over the past 10 years by a number of new techniques such as neutron gravity refractometry. Pendelloesung interference, and neutron interferometry. (author)

  9. Mapping lithosphere thickness beneath the Southern Caribbean and Venezuela using body wave reflectivity and surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, J.; Niu, F.; Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Caribbean (CAR) and South American (SA) plate boundary in Venezuela is a broad zone of diffuse deformation and faulting. GPS measurements indicate that the CAR is moving approximately 2 cm/yr respect to SA, parallel to the strike slip fault system in the east, but with an oblique convergence component in the west (Weber et al., 2001). Along the central and eastern Venezuela coast, most of the motion is accommodated by both transpression and transtension along the right lateral strike-slip San Sebastian- El Pilar fault system. The main tectonic features of the area include accretionary wedges and coastal thrust belts with their associated foreland basins (e.g. Sierra del Interior and Espino Graben). Southern of the plate boundary is located the Guayana Shield, which is part of the Amazonian Craton, and is an elevated plain consisting of Precambrian rocks. BOLIVAR (Broadband Onshore-Offshore Lithospheric Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles Arc Region) was a multidisciplinary, international investigation to determine the evolution of the CAR-SA plate boundary (Levander et al., 2006) that included a 47 station broadband seismic array to complement the 40 station Venezuelan national array operated by FUNVISIS. The goal of this study is to map out lithosphere thickness across the region in order to understand its role for the various types of deformations observed at surface. We combined surface wave tomography and body wave reflectivity to locate the depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). To generate a coherent 3D reflectivity volume of the study area, we used both P- and S-wave receiver-function data, as well as the ScS reverberation records of two deep earthquakes occurring in South America. We also measured Rayleigh phase velocities in the frequency range of 20-100 s using the two plane-wave method to remove multi-pathing effects (Forsyth and Li, 2005). Finite-frequency kernels were computed for a total of 63 teleseismic events to improve

  10. Backscattered EM-wave manipulation using low cost 1-bit reflective surface at W-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher Al-Nuaimi, Mustafa K.; Hong, Wei; He, Yejun

    2018-04-01

    The design of low cost 1-bit reflective (non-absorptive) surfaces for manipulation of backscattered EM-waves and radar cross section (RCS) reduction at W-band is presented in this article. The presented surface is designed based on the reflection phase cancellation principle. The unit cell used to compose the proposed surface has an obelus (division symbol of short wire and two disks above and below) like shape printed on a grounded dielectric material. Using this unit cell, surfaces that can efficiently manipulate the backscattered RCS pattern by using the proposed obelus-shaped unit cell (as ‘0’ element) and its mirrored unit cell (as ‘1’ element) in one surface with a 180°  ±  35° reflection phase difference between their reflection phases are designed. The proposed surfaces can generate various kinds of backscattered RCS patterns, such as single, three, or four lobes or even a low-level (reduced RCS) diffused reflection pattern when those two unit cells are distributed randomly across the surface aperture. For experimental characterization purposes, a 50  ×  50 mm2 surface is fabricated and measured.

  11. Light reflection from a rough liquid surface including wind-wave effects in a scattering atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, Santo V.; Liew, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and near-IR images of the ocean surface, taken from remote satellites, often contain important information of near-surface or sub-surface processes, which occur on, or over the ocean. Remote measurements of near surface winds, sea surface temperature and salinity, ocean color and underwater bathymetry, all, one way or another, depend on how well we understand sea surface roughness. However, in order to extract useful information from our remote measurements, we need to construct accurate models of the transfer of solar radiation inside the atmosphere as well as, its reflection from the sea surface. To approach this problem, we numerically solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE) by implementing a model for the atmosphere-ocean system. A one-dimensional atmospheric radiation model is solved via the widely known doubling and adding method and the ocean body is treated as a boundary condition to the problem. The ocean surface is modeled as a rough liquid surface which includes wind interaction and wave states, such as wave age. The model can have possible applications to the retrieval of wind and wave states, such as wave age, near a Sun glint region

  12. Reflection of equatorial Kelvin waves at eastern ocean boundaries Part II: Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soares

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of viscosity, non linearities, incident wave period and realistic eastern coastline geometry on energy fluxes are investigated using a shallow water model with a spatial resolution of 1/4 degree in both meridional and zonal directions. Equatorial and mid-latitude responses are considered. It is found that (1 the influence of the coastline geometry and the incident wave period is more important for the westward energy flux than for the poleward flux, and (2 the effect of the inclination of the eastern ocean boundary on the poleward energy flux, for the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, decline as the period of the incident wave increases. Furthermore, the model simulations suggest that the poleward energy fluxes from meridional boundaries give plausible results for motions of seasonal and annual periods. For comparatively shorter periods, a realistic coastline geometry has to be included for more accurate results. It is recommended that any numerical model involving the reflection of baroclinic Rossby waves (of intraseasonal, seasonal or annual periods on the eastern Pacific or Atlantic Oceans, should consider the effect of the coastline geometry in order to improve the accuracy of the results.Key words. Oceanography: general (climate and interannual variability; equatorial oceanography. Oceanography: physical (eastern boundary currents.

  13. Reflection and refraction of elastic waves at a corrugated interface in a bi-material transversely isotropic full-space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shad-Manamen, N.; Eskandari-Ghadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The existing theory for wave propagation through a soil layer are not compatible with the real soil layers because in the theory the layers are flat and the sub-layers are parallel, while in real the soil layers are not flat and they may not be parallel. Thus, wave propagations through a corrugated interface are so important. In this paper, a two dimensional SH-wave propagation through a corrugated interface between two linear transversely isotropic half-spaces is assessed. In order to do this, Lord Rayleigh's method is accepted to express the non-flat surface by a Fourier series. In this way, the amplitude of the reflected and transmitted waves is analytically determined in terms of the incident SH-wave amplitude. It is shown that except for the regular reflected and refracted waves, some irregular reflected and refracted waves are exist, and the amplitudes of these waves vary in terms of the angle and frequency of incident wave, equation of surface, and the material properties of the domains. The numerical computations for some cases of different amplitude/wave-length ratio of the interface are done. This work is an extension of Asano's paper (1960) for a more complicated interface, where more non-zero coefficients are considered in expressing the equation of surface in the form of Fourier series. The analytical results for some simpler case of isotropic domain are collapsed on Asano's results (1960). In addition, the numerical evaluation is in good agreement with Asano's.

  14. Neutron diffraction search for the charge density waves in early rare earth metal deuterides RD/sub 3/ (R = La, Ce)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alikhanov, R A; Buzin, V I; Kulikov, N I [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Davlenij; Kost, M E [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Moscow (USSR); Sikora, W [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (USSR); Smirnov, L S [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (USSR)

    1984-08-01

    The results of neutron diffraction measurements performed on CeDsub(x) near the trihydride composition MeD/sub 3/ at room temperature and on LaDsub(2.9) at liquid nitrogen and room temperatures are presented. Superstructure reflections have been found. The system of additional reflections in lanthanum deuteride is different from that in cerium deuteride. The concentration and temperature boundaries for the transformed phases are reported. The experimental results are discussed on the basis of Kulikov's excitonic dielectric model for metal-to-semiconductor phase transitions. The determination of crystal structures from experimental neutron diffraction patterns is discussed.

  15. REFLECT: a program to integrate the wave equation through a plane stratified plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A program was developed to integrate the wave equation through a plane stratified plasma with a general density distribution. The reflection and transmission of a plane wave are computed as a function of the angle of incidence. The polarization of the electric vector is assumed to be perpendicular to the plane of incidence. The model for absorption by classical inverse bremsstrahlung avoids the improper extrapolation of underdense formulae that are singular at the plasma critical surface. Surprisingly good agreement with the geometric-optics analysis of a linear layer was found. The system of ordinary differential equations is integrated by the variable-step, variable-order Adams method in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Gear package. Parametric studies of the absorption are summarized, and some possibilities for further development of the code are discussed. (auth)

  16. An analytical solution for stationary distribution of photon density in traveling-wave and reflective SOAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totović, A R; Crnjanski, J V; Krstić, M M; Gvozdić, D M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze two semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) structures, traveling-wave and reflective, with the active region made of the bulk material. The model is based on the stationary traveling-wave equations for forward and backward propagating photon densities of the signal and the amplified spontaneous emission, along with the stationary carrier rate equation. We start by introducing linear approximation of the carrier density spatial distribution, which enables us to find solutions for the photon densities in a closed analytical form. An analytical approach ensures a low computational resource occupation and an easy analysis of the parameters influencing the SOA’s response. The comparison of the analytical and numerical results shows high agreement for a wide range of the input optical powers and bias currents. (paper)

  17. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Polom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR, Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a elastic subsurface parameters and (b zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003. The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami

  18. Acute resistance exercise using free weights on aortic wave reflection characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu Lun; Gerhart, Hayden; Mayo, Xián; Kingsley, J Derek

    2018-01-01

    Aortic wave reflection characteristics such as the augmentation index (AIx), wasted left ventricular pressure energy (ΔE w ) and aortic haemodynamics, such as aortic systolic blood pressure (ASBP), strongly predict cardiovascular events. The effects of acute resistance exercise (ARE) using free-weight exercises on these characteristics are unknown. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of acute free-weight resistance exercise on aortic wave reflection characteristics and aortic haemodynamics in resistance-trained individuals. Fifteen young, healthy resistance-trained (9 ± 3 years) individuals performed two randomized sessions consisting of an acute bout of free-weight resistance exercise (ARE) or a quiet control (CON). The ARE consisted of three sets of 10 repetitions at 75% one repetition maximum for squat, bench press and deadlift. In CON, the participants rested in the supine position for 30 min. Measurements were made at baseline before sessions and 10 min after sessions. A two-way ANOVA was used to compare the effects of condition across time. There were no significant interactions for aortic or brachial blood pressures. Compared to rest, there were significant increases in augmentation pressure (rest: 5·7 ± 3·0 mmHg; recovery: 10·4 ± 5·7 mmHg, P = 0·002), AIx (rest: 116·8 ± 4·2%; recovery: 123·2 ± 8·4%, P = 0·002), AIx normalized at 75 bpm (rest: 5·2 ± 7·6%; recovery: 27·3 ± 13·2%, Pfree-weight exercises may have no effect on aortic and brachial blood pressure but may significantly alter aortic wave reflection characteristics. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Acute effects of interval versus continuous endurance training on pulse wave reflection in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Henner; Nussbaumer, Monique; Moor, Christoph; Cordes, Mareike; Schindler, Christian; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the acute and 24-hour (h) effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate continuous training (MCT) on arterial pulse wave reflection, an established marker of arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk. In a randomized cross-over design, 21 young healthy male participants performed a HIIT or a MCT on separate visits. Before and 5 (t5), 20 (t20), 35 (t35), and 50 (t50) minutes after the acute exercise bouts, the crude augmentation index (AIx) and the AIx at a set heart rate (AIx@75) were analysed by applanation tonometry. Starting 1 h post-exercise, both indices were captured over 24-h with an oscillometric monitoring device. AIx did not change significantly after MCT but declined progressively after HIIT, reaching significantly lower values compared to MCT at t35 (P = 0.045) and t50 (P = 0.008). AIx@75 increased after both acute exercise types but was higher after HIIT at t5 (P HIIT (P = 0.007) but not after MCT (P = 0.813). Exercise intensity affects pulse wave reflection, with different time courses for AIx and AIx@75 post-exercise. Although initially higher after HIIT, AIx@75 declines in the 24-h recovery period indicating more favourable effects on pulse wave reflection compared to MCT. This may result in substantial positive chronic training effects on arterial stiffness in health and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diffraction of polarized light on periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukanina, V; Divakov, D; Tyutyunnik, A; Hohlov, A

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures as photonic crystals are widely used in modern laser devices, communication technologies and for creating various beam splitters and filters. Diffraction gratings are applied for creating 3D television sets, DVD and Blu-ray drives and reflective structures (Berkley mirror). It is important to simulate diffraction on such structures to design optical systems with predetermined properties based on photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Methods of simulating diffraction on periodic structures uses theory of Floquet-Bloch and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Current work is dedicated to analysis of photonic band gaps and simulating diffraction on one-dimensional binary diffraction grating using RCWA. The Maxwell's equations for isotropic media and constitutive relations based on the cgs system were used as a model.

  1. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C., E-mail: C.Mateo-Segura@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  2. Analysis of Wave Reflection from Structures with Berms Through an Extensive Database and 2DV Numerical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanuttigh, Barbara; van der Meer, Jentsje W.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses wave reflection from permeable structures with a berm, including reshaping cases. Data are obtained from recent wave flume experiments and from 2DV numerical simulations performed with the COBRAS-UC code. The objectives of this research were to identify the proper representation...

  3. Transition from regular to irregular reflection of cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A.

    2017-11-01

    An analytical model for the evolution of regular reflections of cylindrical converging shock waves over circular-arc obstacles is proposed. The model based on the new (local) parameter, the perceived wedge angle, which substitutes the (global) wedge angle of planar surfaces and accounts for the time-dependent curvature of both the shock and the obstacle at the reflection point, is introduced. The new model compares fairly well with numerical results. Results from numerical simulations of the regular to Mach transition—eventually occurring further downstream along the obstacle—point to the perceived wedge angle as the most significant parameter to identify regular to Mach transitions. Indeed, at the transition point, the value of the perceived wedge angle is between 39° and 42° for all investigated configurations, whereas, e.g., the absolute local wedge angle varies in between 10° and 45° in the same conditions.

  4. Wavefronts, light rays and caustic of a circular wave reflected by an arbitrary smooth curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano-Melchor, Magdalena; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Montiel-Piña, Enrique; Román-Hernández, Edwin; Santiago-Santiago, José Guadalupe; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Rosado, Alfonso; Suárez-Xique, Román

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to obtain expressions for both the wavefront train and the caustic associated with the light rays reflected by an arbitrary smooth curve after being emitted by a point light source located at an arbitrary position in the two-dimensional free space. To this end, we obtain an expression for the k-function associated with the general integral of Stavroudis to the eikonal equation that describes the evolution of the reflected light rays. The caustic is computed by using the definitions of the critical and caustic sets of the two-dimensional map that describes the evolution of an arbitrary wavefront associated with the general integral. The general results are applied to circular and parabolic mirrors. The main motivation to carry out this research is to establish, in future work, the caustic touching theorem in a two-dimensional optical medium and to study the diffraction problem by using the k-function concept. Both problems are important in the computation of the image of an arbitrary object under reflection and refraction

  5. Radio Spectral Imaging of Reflective MHD Waves during the Impulsive Phase of a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S.; Chen, B.; Reeves, K.

    2017-12-01

    We report a new type of coherent radio bursts observed by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in 1-2 GHz during the impulsive phase of a two-ribbon flare on 2014 November 1, which we interpret as MHD waves reflected near the footpoint of flaring loops. In the dynamic spectrum, this burst starts with a positive frequency drift toward higher frequencies until it slows down near its highest-frequency boundary. Then it turns over and drifts toward lower frequencies. The frequency drift rate in its descending and ascending branch is between 50-150 MHz/s, which is much slower than type III radio bursts associated with fast electron beams but close to the well-known intermediate drift bursts, or fiber bursts, which are usually attributed to propagating whistler or Alfvenic waves. Thanks to VLA's unique capability of imaging with spectrometer-like temporal and spectral resolution (50 ms and 2 MHz), we are able to obtain an image of the radio source at every time and frequency in the dynamic spectrum where the burst is present and trace its spatial evolution. From the imaging results, we find that the radio source firstly moves downward toward one of the flaring ribbons before it "bounces off" at the lowest height (corresponding to the turnover frequency in the dynamic spectrum) and moves upward again. The measured speed in projection is at the order of 1-2 Mm/s, which is characteristic of Alfvenic or fast-mode MHD waves in the low corona. We conclude that the radio burst is emitted by trapped nonthermal electrons in the flaring loop carried along by a large-scale MHD wave. The waves are probably launched during the eruption of a magnetic flux rope in the flare impulsive phase.

  6. Monitoring the reflection from an artificial defect in rail track using guided wave ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Philip W.; Taylor, Rebecca M. C.; Long, Craig S.; Ramatlo, Dineo A.

    2018-04-01

    Guided wave ultrasound has the potential to detect relatively large defects in continuously welded rail track at long range. As monitoring can be performed in near real time it would be acceptable to only detect fairly large cracks provided this is achieved prior to complete rail breakage. Heavy haul rail lines are inspected periodically by conventional ultrasound and sections with even relatively small cracks are removed; therefore, no sizable defects are available to demonstrate monitoring in the presence of realistic environmental operating conditions. Instead, we glued a small mass to the rail to simulate reflection from a crack and monitored the guided wave signals as the glue joint deteriorated over time. Data was collected over a two week period on an operational heavy haul line. A piezoelectric transducer mounted under the head of the rail was used in pulse-echo mode to transmit and receive a mode of propagation with energy confined mainly in the head of the rail. The small mass was attached under the head of the rail, at a distance of 375m from the transducer, using a cyanoacrylate glue, which was not expected to remain intact for long. Pre-processing of the collected signals involved rejection of signals containing train noise, averaging, filtering and dispersion compensation. Reflections from aluminothermic welds were used to stretch and scale the signals to reduce the influence of temperature variations. Singular value decomposition and independent component analysis were then applied to the signals with the aim of separating the reflection caused by the artificial defect from the background signal. The performance of these techniques was compared for different time spans. The reflection from the artificial defect showed unanticipated fluctuations.

  7. ALFVEN WAVE REFLECTION AND TURBULENT HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND FROM 1 SOLAR RADIUS TO 1 AU: AN ANALYTICAL TREATMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    2009-01-01

    We study the propagation, reflection, and turbulent dissipation of Alfven waves in coronal holes and the solar wind. We start with the Heinemann-Olbert equations, which describe non-compressive magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in an inhomogeneous medium with a background flow parallel to the background magnetic field. Following the approach of Dmitruk et al., we model the nonlinear terms in these equations using a simple phenomenology for the cascade and dissipation of wave energy and assume that there is much more energy in waves propagating away from the Sun than waves propagating toward the Sun. We then solve the equations analytically for waves with periods of hours and longer to obtain expressions for the wave amplitudes and turbulent heating rate as a function of heliocentric distance. We also develop a second approximate model that includes waves with periods of roughly one minute to one hour, which undergo less reflection than the longer-period waves, and compare our models to observations. Our models generalize the phenomenological model of Dmitruk et al. by accounting for the solar wind velocity, so that the turbulent heating rate can be evaluated from the coronal base out past the Alfven critical point-that is, throughout the region in which most of the heating and acceleration occurs. The simple analytical expressions that we obtain can be used to incorporate Alfven-wave reflection and turbulent heating into fluid models of the solar wind.

  8. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  9. On the tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a slab under frustrated total reflection condition

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition is investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of reflection and transmission at the dielectric interfaces is carried out analytically in a straightforward fashion using vector Bessel beam expansion. Investigation of the fields propagating away from the farther end of the slab (transmitted fields) shows an advanced (superluminal) transmission of the X-Wave peak. Additionally, a similar advanced reflection is also observed. The apparent tunneling of the peak is shown to be due to the phase shift in the fields' spectra and not to be causally related to the incident peak. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. On the tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a slab under frustrated total reflection condition

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    Tunneling of full-vector X-Waves through a dielectric slab under frustrated total reflection condition is investigated. Full-vector X-Waves are obtained by superimposing transverse electric and magnetic polarization components, which are derived from the scalar X-Wave solution. The analysis of reflection and transmission at the dielectric interfaces is carried out analytically in a straightforward fashion using vector Bessel beam expansion. Investigation of the fields propagating away from the farther end of the slab (transmitted fields) shows an advanced (superluminal) transmission of the X-Wave peak. Additionally, a similar advanced reflection is also observed. The apparent tunneling of the peak is shown to be due to the phase shift in the fields\\' spectra and not to be causally related to the incident peak. © 2012 IEEE.

  11. SO-FDTD method and its application to the calculation of electromagnetic wave reflection coefficients of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hongwei; Nanjing Agricultural Univ., Nanjing; Chen Rushan; Zhang Yun

    2006-01-01

    The dielectric property of dispersive media is written as rational polynomial function, the relation between D and E is derived in time domain. It is named shift operator FDTD (SO-FDTD) method. The high accuracy and efficiency of this method is confirmed by computing the reflection coefficients of electromagnetic waves by a collisional plasma slab. The reflection coefficients between plasma and the atmosphere or vacuum can be calculated by using the SO-FDTD method. The result is that the reflection coefficients are affected by plasma thickness, electron numerical density, the distributing orderliness of electron density, and incidence wave frequency. (authors)

  12. The effective reflection of a pulse sequence from a four-wave mirror with thermal nonlinearity under parametric feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, M. S.; Bel'Diugin, I. M.; Zolotarev, M. V.; Kruzhilin, Iu. I.; Krymskii, M. I.

    1989-04-01

    A four-wave mirror with thermal nonlinearity has been experimentally realized with the interaction of corunning waves under parametric feedback with a nonreciprocal element. The effective reflection of a sequence of pulses with duration of about 300 ns from a neodymium-glass laser with maximal reflection coefficients greater than 30 has been demonstrated. The quality of the radiation reflected from the mirror is studied. A significant reduction in the steady-state lasing threshold has been shown with thermal nonlinearity at small angles of the interacting beam convergence, compared to the case of counterrunning convergence.

  13. Evidence of Boundary Reflection of Kelvin and First-Mode Rossby Waves from Topex/Poseidon Sea Level Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Jean-Philippe; Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1996-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level data lead to new opportunities to investigate some theoretical mechanisms suggested to be involved in the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon in the tropical Pacific ocean. In particular, we are interested in studying the western boundary reflection, a process crucial for the delayed action oscillator theory, by using the TOPEX/POSEIDON data from November 1992 to May 1995. We first projected the sea level data onto Kelvin and first-mode Ross waves. Then we estimated the contribution of wind forcing to these waves by using a single baroclinic mode simple wave model forced by the ERS-1 wind data. Wave propagation was clearly observed with amplitudes well explained by the wind forcing in the ocean interior. Evidence of wave reflection was detected at both the western and eastern boundaries of the tropical Pacific ocean. At the eastern boundary, Kelvin waves were seen to reflect as first-mode Rossby waves during the entire period. The reflection efficiency (in terms of wave amplitude) of the South American coasts was estimated to be 80% of that of an infinite meridional wall. At the western boundary, reflection was observed in April-August 1993, in January-June 1994, and, later, in December 1994 to February 1995. Although the general roles of these reflection events in the variability observed in the equatorial Pacific ocean are not clear, the data suggest that the reflections in January-June 1994 have played a role in the onset of the warm conditions observed in late 1994 to early 1995. Indeed, during the January-June 1994 period, as strong downwelling first-mode Rossby waves reflected into downwelling Kelvin waves, easterly wind and cold sea surface temperature anomalies located near the date line weakened and eventually reversed in June-July 1994. The presence of the warm anomalies near the date line then favored convection and westerly wind anomalies that triggered strong downwelling Kelvin waves propagating throughout the basin

  14. Continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy based on the control of cavity reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixin; Ma, Weiguang; Fu, Xiaofang; Tan, Wei; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2013-07-29

    A new type of continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectrometer based on the control of cavity reflection for trace gas detection was designed and evaluated. The technique separated the acquisitions of the ringdown event and the trigger signal to optical switch by detecting the cavity reflection and transmission, respectively. A detailed description of the time sequence of the measurement process was presented. In order to avoid the wrong extraction of ringdown time encountered accidentally in fitting procedure, the laser frequency and cavity length were scanned synchronously. Based on the statistical analysis of measured ringdown times, the frequency normalized minimum detectable absorption in the reflection control mode was 1.7 × 10(-9)cm(-1)Hz(-1/2), which was 5.4 times smaller than that in the transmission control mode. However the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption spectrum was only 3 times improved since the etalon effect existed. Finally, the peak absorption coefficients of the C(2)H(2) transition near 1530.9nm under different pressures showed a good agreement with the theoretical values.

  15. Detailed Analysis of Amplitude and Slope Diffraction Coefficients for knife-edge structure in S-UTD-CH Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eray Arik

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In urban, rural and indoor applications, diffraction mechanism is very important to predict the field strength and calculate the coverage accurately. The diffraction mechanism takes place on NLOS (non-line-of-sight cases like rooftop, vertex, corner, edge and sharp surfaces. S-UTD-CH model computes three type of electromagnetic wave incidence such as direct, reflected and diffracted waves, respectively. As obstacles in diffraction geometry are in the same or closer height, contribution of the diffraction mechanism is dominant. To predict the diffracted fields accurately, amplitude and slope diffraction coefficients and the derivative of these coefficients have to be taken correctly. In this paper, all the derivations about diffraction coefficients are made for knife edge type structures and extensive simulations are performed in order to analyze the amplitude and diffraction coefficients. In plane angle diffraction, contributions of amplitude and slope diffraction coefficient are maxima.

  16. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6.54 revealed by X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forgan, E.M.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Charge density wave (CDW) order appears throughout the underdoped high-temperature cuprate superconductors, but the underlying symmetry breaking and the origin of the CDW remain unclear. We use X-ray diffraction to determine the microscopic structure of the CDWs in an archetypical cuprate YBa2Cu3O6...... oxygen atoms have the largest displacements, perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. Our results allow many electronic properties of the underdoped cuprates to be understood. For instance, the CDWs will lead to local variations in the electronic structure, giving an explicit explanation of density-wave states...

  17. Giant enhancement of reflectance due to the interplay between surface confined wave modes and nonlinear gain in dielectric media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangbum; Kim, Kihong

    2017-12-11

    We study theoretically the interplay between the surface confined wave modes and the linear and nonlinear gain of the dielectric layer in the Otto configuration. The surface confined wave modes, such as surface plasmons or waveguide modes, are excited in the dielectric-metal bilayer by obliquely incident p waves. In the purely linear case, we find that the interplay between linear gain and surface confined wave modes can generate a large reflectance peak with its value much greater than 1. As the linear gain parameter increases, the peak appears at smaller incident angles, and the associated modes also change from surface plasmons to waveguide modes. When the nonlinear gain is turned on, the reflectance shows very strong multistability near the incident angles associated with surface confined wave modes. As the nonlinear gain parameter is varied, the reflectance curve undergoes complicated topological changes and sometimes displays separated closed curves. When the nonlinear gain parameter takes an optimally small value, a giant amplification of the reflectance by three orders of magnitude occurs near the incident angle associated with a waveguide mode. We also find that there exists a range of the incident angle where the wave is dissipated rather than amplified even in the presence of gain. We suggest that this can provide the basis for a possible new technology for thermal control in the subwavelength scale.

  18. A design procedure for an acoustic mirror providing dual reflection of longitudinal and shear waves in Solidly Mounted BAW Resonators (SMRs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Sumy; Jansman, Andreas; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart

    The quality factor of the traditional Solidly Mounted Resonator (SMR) is limited by substrate losses, as the traditionally employed acoustic mirror reflects longitudinal waves but not shear waves. Modern mirrors do reflect both waves, but design rules for such mirrors have not been published so far.

  19. Reflected ray retrieval from radio occultation data using radio holographic filtering of wave fields in ray space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gorbunov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear and non-linear representations of wave fields constitute the basis of modern algorithms for analysis of radio occultation (RO data. Linear representations are implemented by Fourier Integral Operators, which allow for high-resolution retrieval of bending angles. Non-linear representations include Wigner Distribution Function (WDF, which equals the pseudo-density of energy in the ray space. Representations allow for filtering wave fields by suppressing some areas of the ray space and mapping the field back from the transformed space to the initial one. We apply this technique to the retrieval of reflected rays from RO observations. The use of reflected rays may increase the accuracy of the retrieval of the atmospheric refractivity. Reflected rays can be identified by the visual inspection of WDF or spectrogram plots. Numerous examples from COSMIC data indicate that reflections are mostly observed over oceans or snow, in particular over Antarctica. We introduce the reflection index that characterizes the relative intensity of the reflected ray with respect to the direct ray. The index allows for the automatic identification of events with reflections. We use the radio holographic estimate of the errors of the retrieved bending angle profiles of reflected rays. A comparison of indices evaluated for a large base of events including the visual identification of reflections indicated a good agreement with our definition of reflection index.

  20. Reflected ray retrieval from radio occultation data using radio holographic filtering of wave fields in ray space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, Michael E.; Cardellach, Estel; Lauritsen, Kent B.

    2018-03-01

    Linear and non-linear representations of wave fields constitute the basis of modern algorithms for analysis of radio occultation (RO) data. Linear representations are implemented by Fourier Integral Operators, which allow for high-resolution retrieval of bending angles. Non-linear representations include Wigner Distribution Function (WDF), which equals the pseudo-density of energy in the ray space. Representations allow for filtering wave fields by suppressing some areas of the ray space and mapping the field back from the transformed space to the initial one. We apply this technique to the retrieval of reflected rays from RO observations. The use of reflected rays may increase the accuracy of the retrieval of the atmospheric refractivity. Reflected rays can be identified by the visual inspection of WDF or spectrogram plots. Numerous examples from COSMIC data indicate that reflections are mostly observed over oceans or snow, in particular over Antarctica. We introduce the reflection index that characterizes the relative intensity of the reflected ray with respect to the direct ray. The index allows for the automatic identification of events with reflections. We use the radio holographic estimate of the errors of the retrieved bending angle profiles of reflected rays. A comparison of indices evaluated for a large base of events including the visual identification of reflections indicated a good agreement with our definition of reflection index.

  1. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faconti, Luca; Nanino, Elisa; Mills, Charlotte E; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this "excess risk" in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from "risk" to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role.

  2. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N; Yamaguchi, K; Yokota, T; Kiguchi, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Anisotropy has been investigated using S-wave as a technique for detecting fractures. In this study, fundamental experiments were carried out with slightly changing the measuring conditions at a place where anisotropy was expected. This paper describes the fundamental data acquisition of anisotropy analysis using S-wave, and a part of the results. The experiments were conducted on the agricultural road in Yamadera district, Matsuyama-machi, Yamagata Prefecture. Two flat unpaved roads meeting at right angles were used as traverse lines. In this place, several reflection surfaces were certainly detected by P-wave, and anisotropy of S-wave was confirmed from the velocity of refracted wave of S-wave. Data were processed for individual traverse lines meeting at right angles. Firstly, signal sweeping, correlation, and vertical superposition were made. Six kinds of data were prepared, i.e., three-component receiving records of data at 0{degree} of generating direction and three-component receiving records of data at 90{degree} of generating direction. Records of T-component at 0{degree} and R-component at 90{degree} were used for processing of the seismic reflection method. These records would be considered to be data of SH-wave and SV-wave, respectively. 4 figs.

  3. Shot- and angle-domain wave-equation traveltime inversion of reflection data: Synthetic and field data examples

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2015-05-26

    Full-waveform inversion requires the accurate simulation of the dynamics and kinematics of wave propagation. This is difficult in practice because the amplitudes cannot be precisely reproduced for seismic waves in the earth. Wave-equation reflection traveltime tomography (WT) is proposed to avoid this problem by directly inverting the reflection-traveltime residuals without the use of the high-frequency approximation. We inverted synthetic traces and recorded seismic data for the velocity model by WT. Our results demonstrated that the wave-equation solution overcame the high-frequency approximation of ray-based tomography, was largely insensitive to the accurate modeling of amplitudes, and mitigated problems with ambiguous event identification. The synthetic examples illustrated the effectiveness of the WT method in providing a highly resolved estimate of the velocity model. A real data example from the Gulf of Mexico demonstrated these benefits of WT, but also found the limitations in traveltime residual estimation for complex models.

  4. An interferometric and numerical study of pseudo-stationary oblique-shock-wave reflections in sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T. C. J.; Glass, I. I.

    Results are reported from experimental and analytical investigations of real-gas effects in the propagation of shock waves through SF6, a gas with 15 vibrational degrees of freedom. Shock waves with speeds ranging from Mach 1.25-8 were directed toward sharp steel wedges in a hypervelocity shock tube. Mach-Zehnder interferometry was used to obtain shock shape and geometry, isopycnic and density field data. Frozen-gas and equilibrium-gas (EQM) analyses modeling were performed for comparisons with experimental data, which depicted four types of reflection and transitions among them. Transition boundaries were best predicted with EQM treatment. A new criterion was derived for transition between single-Mach and complex-Mach reflection. Regular reflection continued past the boundary line defined by the transition criterion because of boundary layer growth produced on the wedge surface by passage of the shock wave.

  5. Design and implementation of an optimal laser pulse front tilting scheme for ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry with high temporal resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pennacchio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful technique to investigate out-of-equilibrium atomic dynamics in solids with high temporal resolution. When diffraction is performed in reflection geometry, the main limitation is the mismatch in group velocity between the overlapping pump light and the electron probe pulses, which affects the overall temporal resolution of the experiment. A solution already available in the literature involved pulse front tilt of the pump beam at the sample, providing a sub-picosecond time resolution. However, in the reported optical scheme, the tilted pulse is characterized by a temporal chirp of about 1 ps at 1 mm away from the centre of the beam, which limits the investigation of surface dynamics in large crystals. In this paper, we propose an optimal tilting scheme designed for a radio-frequency-compressed ultrafast electron diffraction setup working in reflection geometry with 30 keV electron pulses containing up to 105 electrons/pulse. To characterize our scheme, we performed optical cross-correlation measurements, obtaining an average temporal width of the tilted pulse lower than 250 fs. The calibration of the electron-laser temporal overlap was obtained by monitoring the spatial profile of the electron beam when interacting with the plasma optically induced at the apex of a copper needle (plasma lensing effect. Finally, we report the first time-resolved results obtained on graphite, where the electron-phonon coupling dynamics is observed, showing an overall temporal resolution in the sub-500 fs regime. The successful implementation of this configuration opens the way to directly probe structural dynamics of low-dimensional systems in the sub-picosecond regime, with pulsed electrons.

  6. Gravity Wave Dynamics in a Mesospheric Inversion Layer: 1. Reflection, Trapping, and Instability Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughman, Brian; Wang, Ling; Lund, Thomas S.; Collins, Richard L.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract An anelastic numerical model is employed to explore the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) encountering a mesosphere inversion layer (MIL) having a moderate static stability enhancement and a layer of weaker static stability above. Instabilities occur within the MIL when the GW amplitude approaches that required for GW breaking due to compression of the vertical wavelength accompanying the increasing static stability. Thus, MILs can cause large‐amplitude GWs to yield instabilities and turbulence below the altitude where they would otherwise arise. Smaller‐amplitude GWs encountering a MIL do not lead to instability and turbulence but do exhibit partial reflection and transmission, and the transmission is a smaller fraction of the incident GW when instabilities and turbulence arise within the MIL. Additionally, greater GW transmission occurs for weaker MILs and for GWs having larger vertical wavelengths relative to the MIL depth and for lower GW intrinsic frequencies. These results imply similar dynamics for inversions due to other sources, including the tropopause inversion layer, the high stability capping the polar summer mesopause, and lower frequency GWs or tides having sufficient amplitudes to yield significant variations in stability at large and small vertical scales. MILs also imply much stronger reflections and less coherent GW propagation in environments having significant fine structure in the stability and velocity fields than in environments that are smoothly varying. PMID:29576994

  7. High speed photography for studying the shock wave propagation at high Mach numbers through a reflection nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaytsev, S.G.; Lazareva, E.V.; Mikhailova, A.V.; Nikolaev-Kozlov, V.L.; Chebotareva, E.I.

    1979-01-01

    Propagation of intensive shock waves with a temperature of about 1 eV has been studied in a two-dimensional reflection nozzle mounted at the exit of a shock tube. The Toepler technique has been involved along with the interference scheme with a laser light source allowing the multiple-frame recording to be done. Density distribution in the nozzle as well as the wave pattern occurring at the shock propagation are presented. (author)

  8. CONTRIBUTION OF VELOCITY VORTICES AND FAST SHOCK REFLECTION AND REFRACTION TO THE FORMATION OF EUV WAVES IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongjuan; Liu, Siqing; Gong, Jiancun [Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Ning [School of Tourism and Geography, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan 650031 (China); Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

    2015-06-01

    We numerically study the detailed evolutionary features of the wave-like disturbance and its propagation in the eruption. This work is a follow-up to Wang et al., using significantly upgraded new simulations. We focus on the contribution of the velocity vortices and the fast shock reflection and refraction in the solar corona to the formation of the EUV waves. Following the loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic structure, the flux rope exhibits rapid motions and invokes the fast-mode shock at the front of the rope, which then produces a type II radio burst. The expansion of the fast shock, which is associated with outward motion, takes place in various directions, and the downward expansion shows the reflection and the refraction as a result of the non-uniform background plasma. The reflected component of the fast shock propagates upward and the refracted component propagates downward. As the refracted component reaches the boundary surface, a weak echo is excited. The Moreton wave is invoked as the fast shock touches the bottom boundary, so the Moreton wave lags the type II burst. A secondary echo occurs in the area where reflection of the fast shock encounters the slow-mode shock, and the nearby magnetic field lines are further distorted because of the interaction between the secondary echo and the velocity vortices. Our results indicate that the EUV wave may arise from various processes that are revealed in the new simulations.

  9. REFLECTION OF PROPAGATING SLOW MAGNETO-ACOUSTIC WAVES IN HOT CORONAL LOOPS: MULTI-INSTRUMENT OBSERVATIONS AND NUMERICAL MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Sudip; Banerjee, Dipankar; Pant, Vaibhav [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Yuan, Ding; Fang, Xia; Doorsselaere, Tom Van, E-mail: sudip@iiap.res.in, E-mail: xia.fang@wis.kuleuven.be [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, bus 2400, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-09-10

    Slow MHD waves are important tools for understanding coronal structures and dynamics. In this paper, we report a number of observations from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board HINODE and Solar Dynamic Observatory /Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of reflecting longitudinal waves in hot coronal loops. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind as seen from the XRT and simultaneously with the AIA. The wave appears after a micro-flare occurs at one of the footpoints. We estimate the density and temperature of the loop plasma by performing differential emission measure (DEM) analysis on the AIA image sequence. The estimated speed of propagation is comparable to or lower than the local sound speed, suggesting it to be a propagating slow wave. The intensity perturbation amplitude, in every case, falls very rapidly as the perturbation moves along the loop and eventually vanishes after one or more reflections. To check the consistency of such reflection signatures with the obtained loop parameters, we perform a 2.5D MHD simulation, which uses the parameters obtained from our observation as inputs, and perform forward modeling to synthesize AIA 94 Å images. Analyzing the synthesized images, we obtain the same properties of the observables as for the real observation. From the analysis we conclude that a footpoint heating can generate a slow wave which then reflects back and forth in the coronal loop before fading. Our analysis of the simulated data shows that the main agent for this damping is anisotropic thermal conduction.

  10. Numerical analysis on the absorption, reflection and transmission of radar waves by a uniform magnetized plasma slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Deli; Sun Aiping; Qiu Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    The absorption, reflection, and transmission of radar waves by a uniform and magnetized plasma slab are studied. The effect of various plasma parameters and different values of magnetic field intensity on the absorbed, reflected and transmitted power are discussed. The calculated results show that the effects of magnetic field on the absorbed power as well as the frequency band of resonant absorption are very significant. More than 90% of radar wave power can be absorbed and the resonant absorption band is about 2G Hz

  11. Linear diffraction of light waves on periodically poled domain structures in lithium niobate crystals: collinear, isotropic, and anisotropic geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandarov, S M; Mandel, A E; Akylbaev, T M; Borodin, M V; Savchenkov, E N; Smirnov, S V; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya

    2017-01-01

    The possible variants of experimental observation of light diffraction on periodically poled domain structures (PPDS) in the lithium niobate crystal with 180-degree domain Y-walls are considered. We experimentally investigated isotropic and anisotropic diffraction of coherent light (λ = 655nm) on the PPDS with spatial period Λ = 8.79 μm produced by poling method in a LiNbO 3 : 5% MgO crystal. The central wavelength of irradiation experiencing a collinear diffraction on these PPDS is estimated as λ c = 455 nm. (paper)

  12. The at-wavelength metrology facility for UV- and XUV-reflection and diffraction optics at BESSY-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfers, F.; Bischoff, P.; Eggenstein, F.; Erko, A.; Gaupp, A.; Künstner, S.; Mast, M.; Schmidt, J.-S.; Senf, F.; Siewert, F.; Sokolov, A.; Zeschke, Th.

    2016-01-01

    A technology center for the production of high-precision reflection gratings has been established. Within this project a new optics beamline and a versatile reflectometer for at-wavelength characterization of UV- and XUV-reflection gratings and other (nano-) optical elements has been set up at BESSY-II. The Plane Grating Monochromator beamline operated in collimated light (c-PGM) is equipped with an SX700 monochromator, of which the blazed gratings (600 and 1200 lines mm−1) have been recently exchanged for new ones of improved performance produced in-house. Over the operating range from 10 to 2000 eV this beamline has very high spectral purity achieved by (i) a four-mirror arrangement of different coatings which can be inserted into the beam at different angles and (ii) by absorber filters for high-order suppression. Stray light and scattered radiation is removed efficiently by double sets of in situ exchangeable apertures and slits. By use of in- and off-plane bending-magnet radiation the beamline can be adjusted to either linear or elliptical polarization. One of the main features of a novel 11-axes reflectometer is the possibility to incorporate real life-sized gratings. The samples are adjustable within six degrees of freedom by a newly developed UHV-tripod system carrying a load up to 4 kg, and the reflectivity can be measured between 0 and 90° incidence angle for both s- and p-polarization geometry. This novel powerful metrology facility has gone into operation recently and is now open for external users. First results on optical performance and measurements on multilayer gratings will be presented here. PMID:26698047

  13. Dynamics of 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming event and its impact on cold weather over Eurasia: Role of planetary wave reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Zelin, Cai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander Ivanovich; Wei, Ke

    2016-04-07

    In the present study, we investigate the impact of stratospheric planetary wave reflection on tropospheric weather over Central Eurasia during the 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) event. We analyze EP fluxes and Plumb wave activity fluxes to study the two and three dimensional aspects of wave propagation, respectively. The 2013 SSW event is excited by the combined influence of wavenumber 1 (WN1) and wavenumber 2 (WN2) planetary waves, which makes the event an unusual one and seems to have significant impact on tropospheric weather regime. We observe an extraordinary development of a ridge over the Siberian Tundra and the North Pacific during first development stage (last week of December 2012) and later from the North Atlantic in the second development stage (first week of January 2013), and these waves appear to be responsible for the excitation of the WN2 pattern during the SSW. The wave packets propagated upward and were then reflected back down to central Eurasia due to strong negative wind shear in the upper stratospheric polar jet, caused by the SSW event. Waves that propagated downward led to the formation of a deep trough over Eurasia and brought extreme cold weather over Kazakhstan, the Southern part of Russia and the Northwestern part of China during mid-January 2013.

  14. A gyrokinetic calculation of transmission and reflection of the fast wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashmore-Davies, C.N.; Fuchs, V.; Dendy, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    A full-wave equation has been obtained from the gyrokinetic theory for the fast wave traversing a minority cyclotron resonance [Phys. Fluids B 4, 493 (1992)] with the aid of the fast wave approximation [Phys. Fluids 31, 1614 (1988)]. This theory describes the transmission, reflection, and absorption of the fast wave for arbitrary values of the parallel wave number. For oblique propagation the absorption is due to both ion cyclotron damping by minority ions and mode conversion to the ion Bernstein wave. The results for a 3 He minority in a D plasma indicate that for perpendicular propagation and minority temperatures of a few keV the power lost by the fast wave is all mode converted whereas for minority temperatures ∼100 keV∼30% of the incident power is dissipated by the minority ions due to the gyrokinetic correction. The gyrokinetic correction also results in a significant reduction in the reflection coefficient for low field side incidence when k zLB approx-lt 1 and the minority and hybrid resonances overlap

  15. Inverse scattering theory foundations of tomography with diffracting wavefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying mathematical models employed in reflection and transmission computed tomography using diffracting wavefields (called diffraction tomography) are reviewed and shown to have a rigorous basis in inverse scattering theory. In transmission diffraction tomography the underlying wave model is shown to be the Rytov approximation to the complex phase of the wavefield transmitted by the object being probed while in reflection diffraction tomography the underlying wave model is shown to be the Born approximation to the backscattered wavefield from the object. In both cases the goal of the reconstruction process is the determination of the objects's complex index of refraction as a function of position r/sup →/ and, possibly, the frequency ω of the probing wavefield. By use of these approximations the reconstruction problem for both transmission and reflection diffraction tomography can be cast into the simple and elegant form of linearized inverse scattering theory. Linearized inverse scattering theory is shown to lead directly to generalized projection-slice theorems for both reflection and transmission diffraction tomography that provide a simple mathematical relationship between the object's complex index of refraction (the unknown) and the data (the complex phase of the transmitted wave or the complex amplitude of the reflected wave). The conventional projection-slice theorem of X-ray CT is shown to result from the generalized projection-slice theorem for transmission diffraction tomography in the limit of vanishing wavelength (in the absence of wave effects). Fourier based and back-projection type reconstruction algorithms are shown to be directly derivable from the generalized projection-slice theorems

  16. TURBULENCE IN THE SUB-ALFVENIC SOLAR WIND DRIVEN BY REFLECTION OF LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVEN WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdini, A.; Velli, M.; Buchlin, E.

    2009-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of a turbulent spectrum of Alfven waves driven by reflection off the solar wind density gradients, starting from the coronal base up to 17 solar radii, well beyond the Alfvenic critical point. The background solar wind is assigned and two-dimensional shell models are used to describe nonlinear interactions. We find that the turbulent spectra are influenced by the nature of the reflected waves. Close to the base, these give rise to a flatter and steeper spectrum for the outgoing and reflected waves, respectively. At higher heliocentric distance both spectra evolve toward an asymptotic Kolmogorov spectrum. The turbulent dissipation is found to account for at least half of the heating required to sustain the background imposed solar wind and its shape is found to be determined by the reflection-determined turbulent heating below 1.5 solar radii. Therefore, reflection and reflection-driven turbulence are shown to play a key role in the acceleration of the fast solar wind and origin of the turbulent spectrum found at 0.3 AU in the heliosphere.

  17. Reflection and Transmission of P-Waves in an Intermediate Layer Lying Between Two Semi-infinite Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pooja; Chattopadhyay, Amares; Srivastava, Akanksha; Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    2018-05-01

    With a motivation to gain physical insight of reflection as well as transmission phenomena in frozen (river/ocean) situation for example in Antarctica and other coldest place on Earth, the present article undertakes the analysis of reflection and transmission of a plane wave at the interfaces of layered structured comprised of a water layer of finite thickness sandwiched between an upper half-space constituted of ice and a lower isotropic elastic half-space, which may be useful in geophysical exploration in such conditions. A closed form expression of reflection/transmission coefficients of reflected and transmitted waves has been derived in terms of angles of incidence, propagation vector, displacement vector and elastic constants of the media. Expressions corresponding to the energy partition of various reflected and transmitted waves have also been established analytically. It has been remarkably shown that the law of conservation of energy holds good in the entire reflection and transmission phenomena for different angles of incidence. A numerical examples were performed so to graphically portray the analytical findings. Further the deduced results are validated with the pre-established classical results.

  18. Reflection and Transmission of Plane Electromagnetic Waves by a Geologic Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Electric field and magnetic field reflection and transmission responses generated by a plane wave normally incident onto a finite - thickness geologic layer are mathematically derived and numerically evaluated. A thin layer with enhanced electric current conductivity and/or magnetic permeability is a reasonable geophysical representation of a hydraulic fracture inject ed with a high - contrast proppant pack. Both theory and numerics indicate that backward - and forward - scattered electromagnetic wavefields are potentially observable in a field experiment, despite the extreme thinness of a fracture compared to a typical low - frequency electromagnetic wavelength. The First Born Approximation (FBA) representation of layer scattering, significant for inversion studies, is shown to be accurate for a thin layer with mild medium parameter (i.e., conductivity, permeability, and per mittivity) contrasts with the surrounding homogeneous wholespace. However, FBA scattering theory breaks down for thick layers and strong parameter contrasts. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. This research is conducted under the auspices of CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) SC11/01780.00 between Carbo Ceramics Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories. The author acknowledges former Carbo R&D Vic e - President Mr. Chad Cannan and former SNL Geophysics Department manage r Ms. Amy Halloran for their interest i n and support of this work. Technical discussions with Project Manager and Principal Investigator Dr. Chester J. Weiss of the SNL Geophysics Department greatly benefited this work. Dr. Lewis C. Bartel, formerly with S NL and presently a consultant to Carbo Ceramics, provided many useful and intuitive insights, and

  19. Diffractive optical element-based glossmeter for the on-line measurement of normal reflectance on a printed porous coated paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksman, Antti; Kuivalainen, Kalle; Ta˚G, Carl-Mikael; Juuti, Mikko; Mattila, Rauno; Hietala, Eero; Gane, Patrick A. C.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2011-04-01

    Gloss of a product, such as print gloss, is mainly inspected with conventional white light glossmeters both at laboratory or production facilities. However, problems occur in conventional gloss measurement when the inspected surface is vertically moved in the plane of incidence and reflection or when the measurement area is small or curved. For a partial solution to these problems, we have previously introduced diffractive optical element-based glossmeters (DOGs) for the gloss inspection in laboratories and off-line use. We present a new construction of DOG, termed μDOG 1D, for the one-dimensional on-line print gloss measurement, in the form of the reflectance determination normal to the surface. The function of the glossmeter is demonstrated by laboratory tests and on-line measurements at a heat-set web offset printing machine. It is shown that gloss (i.e., normal reflectance) and minute gloss variation of papers and prints can be measured at the printing line using the glossmeter. This glossmeter is expected to be useful in real-time monitoring of the gloss and surface-specific absorption not only in the printing industry but also in inspection of products in other industrial sectors, such as metal finishing, laminating, paper, and construction materials manufacturing.

  20. Standing surface acoustic waves in LiNbO3 studied by time resolved X-ray diffraction at Petra III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reusch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out time resolved stroboscopic diffraction experiments on standing surface acoustic waves (SAWs of Rayleigh type on a LiNbO3 substrate. A novel timing system has been developed and commissioned at the storage ring Petra III of Desy, allowing for phase locked stroboscopic diffraction experiments applicable to a broad range of timescales and experimental conditions. The combination of atomic structural resolution with temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale allows for the observation of the atomistic displacements for each time (or phase point within the SAW period. A seamless transition between dynamical and kinematic scattering regimes as a function of the instantaneous surface amplitude induced by the standing SAW is observed. The interpretation and control of the experiment, in particular disentangling the diffraction effects (kinematic to dynamical diffraction regime from possible non-linear surface effects is unambiguously enabled by the precise control of phase between the standing SAW and the synchrotron bunches. The example illustrates the great flexibility and universality of the presented timing system, opening up new opportunities for a broad range of time resolved experiments.

  1. Wave packet autocorrelation functions for quantum hard-disk and hard-sphere billiards in the high-energy, diffraction regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussev, Arseni; Dorfman, J R

    2006-07-01

    We consider the time evolution of a wave packet representing a quantum particle moving in a geometrically open billiard that consists of a number of fixed hard-disk or hard-sphere scatterers. Using the technique of multiple collision expansions we provide a first-principle analytical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function for the wave packet in the high-energy diffraction regime, in which the particle's de Broglie wavelength, while being small compared to the size of the scatterers, is large enough to prevent the formation of geometric shadow over distances of the order of the particle's free flight path. The hard-disk or hard-sphere scattering system must be sufficiently dilute in order for this high-energy diffraction regime to be achievable. Apart from the overall exponential decay, the autocorrelation function exhibits a generally complicated sequence of relatively strong peaks corresponding to partial revivals of the wave packet. Both the exponential decay (or escape) rate and the revival peak structure are predominantly determined by the underlying classical dynamics. A relation between the escape rate, and the Lyapunov exponents and Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the counterpart classical system, previously known for hard-disk billiards, is strengthened by generalization to three spatial dimensions. The results of the quantum mechanical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function agree with predictions of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory.

  2. Reflectivity of stimulated back scattering in a homogeneous-slab medium in the case of negligible pump-wave damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, G.S.; Cho, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    As to the backscatter instability which is one of nonlinear three-wave resonant interactions, the reflectivity(r) in the case of homogeneous-slab medium is calculated, assuming all the three wavepackets negligible damping caused by medium. The expression has turned out such that r = tanh 2 KAsub(p)L, where K, Asub(p), and L are the constant coupling coefficient, the constant pump-wave amplitude, and the thickness of the medium engaged in the interaction each. When this result is interpreted in terms of the stimulated Brillouin back-scattering in a so-called underdense plasma in controlled fusion, we find the reflectivity twice as large as that by others in the limit of large pump-wave damping, and unfitting to former experiments in the independence on the incident laser-light intensity. We see the incompatibility rise chiefly from neglecting the damping of pump-wave in the plasma. In contrast to the former results by others in the limit of large pump-wave damping, our result might be regarded as that for cases of negligible pump-wave damping, in general stimulated back-scattering phenomena. (author)

  3. Quadrupole lamp furnace for high temperature (up to 2050 K) synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction studies in air in reflection geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarin, P.; Yoon, W.; Jurkschat, K.; Zschack, P.; Kriven, W. M.

    2006-01-01

    A four-lamp thermal image furnace has been developed to conduct high temperature x-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on oxide ceramic powder samples in air at temperatures ≤2050 K using synchrotron radiation. A refractory crucible made of Pt20%Rh alloy was used as a specimen holder. A material with well characterized lattice expansion properties was used as an internal crystallographic thermometer to determine the specimen temperature and displacement. The performance of the apparatus was verified by measurement of the thermal expansion properties of CeO 2 , MgO, and Pt which were found to be within ±3% of the acceptable values. The advantages, limitations, and important considerations of the instrument developed are discussed

  4. Observation of reflected waves on the SABRE positive polarity inductive adder MITL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuneo, M.E.; Poukey, J.W.; Mendel, C.W.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Hanson, D.L.; Smith, J.R.; Maenchen, J.E.; Wenger, D.F.; Bernard, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    We are studying the coupling of extraction applied-B ion diodes to Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line (MITLs) on the SABRE (Sandia Accelerator and Beam Research Experiment, 6 MV, 300 kA) positive polarity inductive voltage adder. Our goal is to determine conditions under which efficient coupling occurs. The best total power efficiency for an ideal ion diode load (i.e., without parasitic losses) is obtained by maximizing the product of cathode current and gap voltage. MITLs require that the load impedance be undermatched to the self-limited line operating impedance for efficient transfer of power to ion diodes, independent of transit time isolation, and even in the case of multiple cathode system with significant vacuum electron flow. We observe that this undermatched condition results in a reflected wave which decreases the line voltage and gap electron sheath current, and increases the anode and cathode current in a time-dependent way. The MITL diode coupling is determined by the flow impedance at the adder exit. We also show that the flow impedance increases along the extension MITL on SABRE. Experimental measurements of current and peak voltage are compared to analytical models and TWOQUICK 2.5-D PIC code simulations

  5. Spontaneous acoustic emission of a corrugated shock wave in the presence of a reflecting surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouchuk, J.G.; Lopez Cavada, J.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model to study perturbation evolution in the space between a corrugated shock and a piston surface is presented. The conditions for stable oscillation patterns are obtained by looking at the poles of the exact Laplace transform. It is seen that besides the standard D'yakov-Kontorovich (DK) mode of oscillation, the shock surface can exhibit an additional finite set of discrete frequencies, due to the interaction with the piston which reflects sound waves from behind. The additional eigenmodes are excited when the shock is launched at t=0 + . The first eigenmode (the DK mode) is always present, if the Hugoniot curve has the correct slope in the V-p plane. However, the additional frequencies could be excited for strong enough shocks. The predictions of the model are verified for particular cases by studying a van der Waals gas, as in the work of Bates and Montgomery [Phys. Fluids 11, 462 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1180 (2000)]. Only acoustic emission modes are considered

  6. FDTD analysis of reflection of electromagnetic wave from a conductive plane covered with inhomogeneous time-varying plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shaobin; Mo Jinjun; Yuan Naichang

    2003-01-01

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm is applied to study the electro-magnetic reflection of conduction plane covered with inhomogeneous time-varying plasma, homogeneous plasma and inhomogeneous plasma. The collisions frequency of plasma is a function of electron density and plasma temperature. The number density profile follows a parabolic function. A discussion on the effect of various plasma parameters on the reflection coefficient is presented. Under the one-dimensional case, transient electromagnetic propagation through various plasmas has been obtained, and the reflection coefficients of EM wave through various plasma are calculated under different conditions. The results illustrate that a plasma cloaking system can successfully absorb the incident EM wave

  7. Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Embree

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, editorials are written one to two months before publication in the Journal. It was my turn to write this one. I had planned to write the first draft the evening after my clinic on Tuesday, September 11. It didn't get done that night or during the next week. Somehow, the topic that I had originally chosen just didn't seem that important anymore as I, along my friends and colleagues, reflected on the changes that the events of that day were likely to have on our lives.

  8. Recording of X-ray diffraction patterns for the investigation of transient changes in the crystalline structure of materials subjected to the action of shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, F.; Thomer, G.

    An arrangement including a flash X-ray tube and an image intensifier has been designed and built in order to record X-ray diffraction patterns with exposure times of the order of 100nsec. This arrangement allows Laue patterns (polychromatic radiation) as well as powder patterns (copper K(α) radiation) to be recorded. Examples for record are shown. As an application to the investigation of transient changes in crystalline structures, the Debye-Scherrer patterns of potassium chloride undergoing the dynamic action of shock waves were recorded. The first results achieved are discussed [fr

  9. Reflection and trapping of Alfvén waves in the open field lines of a neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Mofiz, U A

    2002-01-01

    We have studied Alfvén wave propagation in the polar cap region of a neutron star at isothermal atmosphere using linear MHD equations. The study demonstrates reflection and trapping of the wave from the steep gradient region of Alfvén speed. The trapping efficiency depends sensitively on a dimensionless parameter $\\beta_{g}$ which is proportional to the mass and inversely proportional to thetemperature of the plasma. A scaling of radius, Schwarzchild radius and acceleration due to gravity of neutron stars of different masses are performed. The effective temperature of hydrostatic equilibrium is also scaled. For a neutron star with mass 1.4 solar mass and radius 10 km the temperature is to be of $10^8$ degree K. The Alfvén wave propagation near the event horizon is investigated. It is found that the wave length of Alfvén wave is shorter near the horizon while it becomes longer away from it. Pulsar wind acceleration by Alfvén wave is also examined. It is found that wave pressure force is predominant for lo...

  10. Composition determination of quaternary GaAsPN layers from single X-ray diffraction measurement of quasi-forbidden (002) reflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilli, J.-M., E-mail: juha-matti.tilli@iki.fi; Jussila, H.; Huhtio, T.; Sopanen, M. [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Yu, K. M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    GaAsPN layers with a thickness of 30 nm were grown on GaP substrates with metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy to study the feasibility of a single X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement for full composition determination of quaternary layer material. The method is based on the peak intensity of a quasi-forbidden (002) reflection, which is shown to vary with changing arsenic content for GaAsPN. The method works for thin films with a wide range of arsenic contents and shows a clear variation in the reflection intensity as a function of changing layer composition. The obtained thicknesses and compositions of the grown layers are compared with accurate reference values obtained by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy combined with nuclear reaction analysis measurements. Based on the comparison, the error in the XRD defined material composition becomes larger with increasing nitrogen content and layer thickness. This suggests that the dominating error source is the deteriorated crystal quality due to the nonsubstitutional incorporation of nitrogen into the crystal lattice and strain relaxation. The results reveal that the method overestimates the arsenic and nitrogen content within error margins of about 0.12 and about 0.025, respectively.

  11. Post-exercise effects on aortic wave reflection derived from wave separation analysis in young- to middle-aged pre-hypertensives and hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, Aletta M E; Woodiwiss, Angela J; Norton, Gavin R

    2016-07-01

    Decreases in brachial blood pressure (BP) may occur for several hours following a bout of exercise. Although aortic backward waves predict cardiovascular damage independent of brachial BP, whether decreases in aortic backward waves also occur post-exercise in young-to-middle-aged hypertensives, the extent to which these changes exceed brachial BP changes, and the best method of identifying these changes is uncertain. We examined aortic function at baseline and 15-min post-exercise in 20 pre-hypertensive or hypertensive men and women (age 45 ± 7 years). Central aortic pressure, forward (Pf) and backward (Pb) wave pressures, the reflection index (RI) and augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) were determined using applanation tonometry, and SphygmoCor software. Decreases in central aortic (p exercise. In addition, decreases in post-exercise (baseline versus post-exercise) Pb (19 ± 4 vs 13 ± 3 mm Hg p aged pre-hypertensive and hypertensive individuals, aortic backward waves decrease post-exercise; this change is not reflected in brachial BP measurements and is poorly indexed by measures of pressure augmentation.

  12. Fundamentals of the physical theory of diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Ufimtsev, Pyotr Ya

    2014-01-01

    A complete presentation of the modern physical theory of diffraction and its applications, by the world's leading authority on the topicExtensive revisions and additions to the first edition yield a second edition that is 492 pages in length, with 122 figuresNew sections examine the nature of polarization coupling, and extend the theory of shadow radiation and reflection to opaque objectsThis book features end-of-chapter problems and a solutions manual for university professors and graduate studentsMATLAB codes presented in appendices allow for quick numeric calculations of diffracted waves

  13. Black Tea Lowers Blood Pressure and Wave Reflections in Fasted and Postprandial Conditions in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomised Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Grassi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period. Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Fat challenge increased wave reflection, which was counteracted by tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Black tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (−3.2 mmHg, p < 0.005 and −2.6 mmHg, p < 0.0001; respectively and prevented BP increase after a fat load (p < 0.0001. Black tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  14. Genetic influence on the relation between exhaled nitric oxide and pulse wave reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Medda, Emanuela; Littvay, Levente; Lazar, Zsofia; Toccaceli, Virgilia; Fagnani, Corrado; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Nisticó, Lorenza; Brescianini, Sonia; Penna, Luana; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Boatta, Emanuele; Zini, Chiara; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Baracchini, Claudio; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Koller, Akos; Osztovits, Janos; Jermendy, Gyorgy; Preda, Istvan; Kiss, Robert Gabor; Karlinger, Kinga; Lannert, Agnes; Horvath, Tamas; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Molnar, Andrea Agnes; Garami, Zsolt; Berczi, Viktor; Horvath, Ildiko

    2013-06-01

    Nitric oxide has an important role in the development of the structure and function of the airways and vessel walls. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) is inversely related to the markers and risk factors of atherosclerosis. We aimed to estimate the relative contribution of genes and shared and non-shared environmental influences to variations and covariation of FE(NO) levels and the marker of elasticity function of arteries. Adult Caucasian twin pairs (n = 117) were recruited in Hungary, Italy and in the United States (83 monozygotic and 34 dizygotic pairs; age: 48 ± 16 SD years). FE(NO) was measured by an electrochemical sensor-based device. Pulse wave reflection (aortic augmentation index, Aix(ao)) was determined by an oscillometric method (Arteriograph). A bivariate Cholesky decomposition model was applied to investigate whether the heritabilities of FE(NO) and Aix(ao) were linked. Genetic effects accounted for 58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 42%, 71%) of the variation in FE(NO) with the remaining 42% (95%CI: 29%, 58%) due to non-shared environmental influences. A modest negative correlation was observed between FE(NO) and Aix(ao) (r = -0.17; 95%CI:-0.32,-0.02). FE(NO) showed a significant negative genetic correlation with Aix(ao) (r(g) = -0.25; 95%CI:-0.46,-0.02). Thus in humans, variations in FE(NO) are explained both by genetic and non-shared environmental effects. Covariance between FE(NO) and Aix(ao) is explained entirely by shared genetic factors. This is consistent with an overlap among the sets of genes involved in the expression of these phenotypes and provides a basis for further genetic studies on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.

  15. Effect of Pressure Gradients on the Initiation of PBX-9502 via Irregular (Mach) Reflection of Low Pressure Curved Shock Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Lawrence Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Phillip Isaac [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    In the instance of multiple fragment impact on cased explosive, isolated curved shocks are generated in the explosive. These curved shocks propagate and may interact and form irregular or Mach reflections along the interaction loci, thereby producing a single shock that may be sufficient to initiate PBX-9501. However, the incident shocks are divergent and their intensity generally decreases as they expand, and the regions behind the Mach stem interaction loci are generally unsupported and allow release waves to rapidly affect the flow. The effects of release waves and divergent shocks may be considered theoretically through a “Shock Change Equation”.

  16. Crystals with an Open Wave-Vector Surface: Peculiarities of Reflection and Possibilities of Designing Flat Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eritsyan, O. S.; Lalayan, A. A.; Arakelyan, O. M.; Papoyan, A. A.; Kostanyan, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of MgF 2 crystal in the frequency range of 200-800 cm -1 at different orientations of the optical axis has been investigated. The experimental data are compared with the calculation results. This comparison confirms that the wave vectors for the extraordinary wave have an open surface. This makes it possible to focus a divergent beam refracted at a flat boundary ori- ented perpendicularly to the optical crystal axis. The focusing effect of a plane-parallel MgF 2 crystal plate is calculated.

  17. High accuracy subwavelength distance measurements: A variable-angle standing-wave total-internal-reflection optical microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynie, A.; Min, T.-J.; Luan, L.; Mu, W.; Ketterson, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an extension of the total-internal-reflection microscopy technique that permits direct in-plane distance measurements with high accuracy (<10 nm) over a wide range of separations. This high position accuracy arises from the creation of a standing evanescent wave and the ability to sweep the nodal positions (intensity minima of the standing wave) in a controlled manner via both the incident angle and the relative phase of the incoming laser beams. Some control over the vertical resolution is available through the ability to scan the incoming angle and with it the evanescent penetration depth.

  18. Space- and time-resolved X-ray diffraction from pinned and sliding charge-density-waves in NbSe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requardt, H.; Nad, F.Ya.; Monceau, P.; Lorenzo, J.E.; Smilgies, D.; Gruebel, G.

    1999-01-01

    We have determined the spatial distribution of the local charge-density-wave (CDW) strain in the sliding state of NbSe 3 . The strain is measured by monitoring the spatially-varying shift q(x) of the CDW satellite wave vector between current contacts. Experiments were carried out at T=90 K in the upper CDW state using high spatial resolution (30-50 μm) X-ray diffraction. Applying direct currents about twice the threshold value, we observe a steep exponential decrease of the shift within a few hundred microns from the contact followed by a linear variation of q in the central section of the sample. This latter regime is attributed to transverse pinning of the CDW dislocation loops (DL), while the exponential regime is controlled by the finite DL nucleation rate. Additional to these data in the stationary state of the sliding CDW, we investigated the relaxation of the CDW strain q(t) upon switching off the current (T=75 K). Using time-resolved high-spatial resolution X-ray diffraction, we observe at 800 μm from the electrode a decay law of the stretched exponential type: q(t)=q 0 exp(-(t/τ) u ), with τ=283 ms and μ=0.37. (orig.)

  19. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  20. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  1. Investigation of sinkhole areas in Germany using 2D shear wave reflection seismics and zero-offset VSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschache, Saskia; Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes pose a serious geohazard for humans and infrastructure in populated areas. The Junior Research Group Subrosion within the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics and the joint project SIMULTAN work on the multi-scale investigation of subrosion processes in the subsurface, which cause natural sinkholes. In two case studies in sinkhole areas of Thuringia in Germany, we applied 2D shear wave reflection seismics using SH-waves with the aim to detect suitable parameters for the characterisation of critical zones. This method has the potential to image near-surface collapse and faulting structures in improved resolution compared to P-wave surveys resulting from the shorter wavelength of shear waves. Additionally, the shear wave velocity field derived by NMO velocity analysis is a basis to calculate further physical parameters, as e.g. the dynamic shear modulus. In both investigation areas, vertical seismic profiles (VSP) were acquired by generating P- and SH-waves (6 component VSP) directly next to a borehole equipped with a 3C downhole sensor. They provide shear and compressional wave velocity profiles, which are used to improve the 2D shear wave velocity field from surface seismics, to perform a depth calibration of the seismic image and to calculate the Vp/Vs ratio. The signals in the VSP data are analysed with respect to changes in polarisation and attenuation with depth and/or azimuth. The VSP data reveal low shear wave velocities of 200-300 m/s in rock layers known to be heavily affected by subrosion and confirm the low velocities calculated from the surface seismic data. A discrepancy of the shear wave velocities is observed in other intervals probably due to unsymmetrical travel paths in the surface seismics. In some VSP data dominant conversion of the direct SH-wave to P-wave is observed that is assumed to be caused by an increased presence of cavities. A potential fault distorting the vertical travel paths was detected by abnormal P-wave first

  2. Manipulatable Andreev reflection due to the interplay between the DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Qi; Yi, Guang-Yu; Han, Yu; Jiang, Cui; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2018-07-01

    We construct one mesoscopic circuit in which one quantum dot couples to one DIII-class topological superconductor and one s-wave superconductor, in addition to its connection with the metallic lead. And then, the Andreev reflection current in the metallic lead is evaluated. It is found that the two kinds of superconductors drive the Andreev reflection in the constructive manner. Next as finite superconducting phase difference is taken into account, the Andreev reflection oscillates in period π/2, and it can be suppressed in the low-energy region if the superconducting phase difference is (n + 1/2) π/2 (n ∈ Integer). Such a result is almost independent of the increase of the intradot Coulomb interaction. Therefore, this structure can assist to realize the manipulation of the Andreev reflection. Also, the result in this work provides useful information for understanding the property of the DIII-class topological superconductor.

  3. X-ray diffraction observations of a charge-density-wave order in superconducting ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.54 single crystals in zero magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, E.; Chang, J.; Hücker, M.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements show that the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.54, with ortho-II oxygen order, has charge-density-wave order in the absence of an applied magnetic field. The dominant wave vector of the charge density wave is qCDW=(0,0.328(2),0.5), with the in-plane component...

  4. SH-wave reflection seismic and VSP as tools for the investigation of sinkhole areas in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja; Tschache, Saskia; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-04-01

    Sinkholes can lead to damage of buildings and infrastructure and they can cause life-threatening situations, if they occur in urban areas. The process behind this phenomenon is called subrosion. Subrosion is the underground leaching of soluble rocks, e.g. anhydrite and gypsum, due to the contact with ground- and meteoric water. Depending on the leached material, and especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. For a better understanding of the subrosion processes a detailed characterization of the resulting structures is necessary. In Germany sinkholes are a problem in many areas. In northern Germany salt and in central and southern Germany sulfate and carbonate deposits are affected by subrosion. The study areas described here are located in Thuringia in central Germany and the underground is characterized by soluble Permian deposits. The occurrence of 20 to 50 sinkholes is reported per year. Two regions, Bad Frankenhausen and Schmalkalden, are investigated, showing a leaning church tower and a sinkhole of 30 m diameter and 20 m depth, respectively. In Bad Frankenhausen four P-wave and 16 SH-wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out, supplemented by three zero-offset VSPs. In Schmalkalden five SH-wave reflection seismic profiles and one zero-offset VSP were acquired. The 2-D seismic sections, in particular the SH-wave profiles, showed known and unknown near-surface faults in the vicinity of sinkholes and depressions. For imaging the near-surface ( 2,5, probably indicating unstable areas due to subrosion. We conclude, that SH-wave reflection seismic offer an important tool for the imaging and characterization of near-surface subrosion structures and the identification of unstable zones, especially in combination with P-wave reflection seismic and zero-offset VSP with P- and S-waves. Presumably there is a connection between the presence of large

  5. Demonstrations of Wave Optics (Interference and Diffraction of Light) for Large Audiences Using a Laser and a Multimedia Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new technique for performing most well-known demonstrations of wave optics. Demonstrations which are normally very hard to show to more than a few people can be presented easily to very large audiences with excellent visibility for everyone. The proposed setup is easy to put together and use and can be very useful for…

  6. General method for eliminating wave reflection in 2D photonic crystal waveguides by introducing extra scatterers based on interference cancellation of waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Ouyang, Zhengbiao

    2018-01-01

    We propose a general method for eliminating the reflection of waves in 2 dimensional photonic crystal waveguides (2D-PCWs), a kind of 2D material, by introducing extra scatterers inside the 2D-PCWs. The intrinsic reflection in 2D-PCWs is compensated by the backward-scattered waves from these scatterers, so that the overall reflection is greatly reduced and the insertion loss is improved accordingly. We first present the basic theory for the compensation method. Then, as a demonstration, we give four examples of extremely-low-reflection and high-transmission 90°bent 2D-PCWs created according to the method proposed. In the four examples, it is demonstrated by plane-wave expansion method and finite-difference time-domain method that the 90°bent 2D-PCWs can have high transmission ratio greater than 90% in a wide range of operating frequency, and the highest transmission ratio can be greater than 99.95% with a return loss higher than 43 dB, better than that in other typical 90°bent 2D-PCWs. With our method, the bent 2D-PCWs can be optimized to obtain high transmission ratio at different operating wavelengths. As a further application of this method, a waveguide-based optical bridge for light crossing is presented, showing an optimum return loss of 46.85 dB, transmission ratio of 99.95%, and isolation rates greater than 41.77 dB. The method proposed provides also a useful way for improving conventional waveguides made of cables, fibers, or metal walls in the optical, infrared, terahertz, and microwave bands.

  7. On nonlinear changes of the reflection coefficient of the fast wave at LH frequencies due to ponderomotive forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1991-09-01

    The nonlinear changes of the reflection coefficient R of fast waves launched by waveguide arrays may be significant even for power densities S in the range of 3 or 4 kW/cm 2 . For the input parameters chosen in the computations, the effects of ponderomotive forces lead to an increase in plasma density in front of the grill , whereas for the slow wave the plasma density always decreases with growing S. For small plasma density in front of the grill, ponderomotive forces thus lead to the decrease of R, whereas for high plasma densities R grows with growing power density S. The heating of the edge plasma by the wave tends to weaken these changes. (Z.S.) 6 figs., 17 refs

  8. Electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    An electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro-optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating is described. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro-optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating. (auth)

  9. Study of Cr/Sc-based multilayer reflecting mirrors using soft x-ray reflectivity and standing wave-enhanced x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meiyi; Burcklen, Catherine; André, Jean-Michel; Guen, Karine Le; Giglia, Angelo; Koshmak, Konstantin; Nannarone, Stefano; Bridou, Françoise; Meltchakov, Evgueni; Rossi, Sébastien de; Delmotte, Franck; Jonnard, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    We study Cr/Sc-based multilayer mirrors designed to work in the water window range using hard and soft x-ray reflectivity as well as x-ray fluorescence enhanced by standing waves. Samples differ by the elemental composition of the stack, the thickness of each layer, and the order of deposition. This paper mainly consists of two parts. In the first part, the optical performances of different Cr/Sc-based multilayers are reported, and in the second part, we extend further the characterization of the structural parameters of the multilayers, which can be extracted by comparing the experimental data with simulations. The methodology is detailed in the case of Cr/B4C/Sc sample for which a three-layer model is used. Structural parameters determined by fitting reflectivity curve are then introduced as fixed parameters to plot the x-ray standing wave curve, to compare with the experiment, and confirm the determined structure of the stack.

  10. First-order reflection/transmission coefficients for unconverted plane P waves in weakly anisotropic media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farra, V.; Pšenčík, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 3 (2010), s. 1443-1454 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0332 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : body waves * seismic anisotropy * wave propagation Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.411, year: 2010

  11. Reflection of P and SV waves at the free surface of a monoclinic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The propagation of plane waves in an anisotropic elastic medium possessing monoclinic symmetry is discussed. The expressions for the phase velocity of qP and qSV waves propagating in the plane of elastic symmetry are obtained in terms of the direction cosines of the propagation vector. It is shown that, in general, ...

  12. Primary and Reflected Compaction Waves in a Foam Rod Due to an Axial Impact by a Small Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Karagiozova

    Full Text Available AbstractThe propagation of compaction waves in a stationary foam block subjected to an impact by a small mass is studied in order to examine the mechanism of compaction within the primary and reflected stress waves. The analysis is focused on aluminium strain rate insensitive foam that exhibits strain hardening under quasistatic compression. A theoretical approach is applied using a uniaxial model of compaction in which the compacted strains, being functions of the velocity variation, are not predefined but are obtained as a part of the solution. The present approach allows one to obtain the strain histories and strain distributions within the primary compaction wave as well as within the reflected wave, which propagates in a media with non-uniform density increasing monotonically in the direction of loading. FE simulations considering aluminium based foam Cymat with density 411.5 kg/m3 are carried out in order to verify the proposed theoretical model. A comparison between the impact velocity attenuation predicted by the present model and classical Rigid Perfectly-Plastic Locking material model for cellular materials is discussed.

  13. Characterization of the Vajont landslide (North-Eastern Italy) by means of reflection and surface wave seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Lorenzo; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the disastrous Vajont rockslide (North-Eastern Italy, October 9, 1963) have been studied in great detail over the past five decades. Nevertheless, the reconstruction of the rockslide dynamics still presents several uncertainties, including those related to the accurate estimation of the actual landslide mass. This work presents the results of a geophysical characterization of the Vajont landslide body in terms of material properties and buried geometry. Both aspects add new information to the existing dataset and will help a better understanding of the rockslide failure mechanisms and dynamics. In addition, some general considerations concerning the intricacies of landslide characterization can be drawn, with due attention to potential pitfalls. The employed techniques are: (i) high resolution P-wave reflection, (ii) high resolution SH-wave reflection, (iii) controlled source surface wave analysis. We adopted as a seismic source a vibrator both for P waves and SH waves, using vertical and horizontal geophones respectively. For the surface wave seismic survey we used a heavy drop-weight source and low frequency receivers. Despite the high noise level caused by the fractured conditions of the large rock body, a common situation in landslide studies, we managed to achieve a satisfying imaging quality of the landslide structure thanks to the large number of active channels, the short receiver interval and the test of appropriate seismic sources. The joint use of different seismic techniques help focus the investigation on the rock mass mechanical properties. Results are in good agreement with the available borehole data, the geological sections and the mechanical properties of the rockmass estimated by other studies. In general the proposed approach is likely to be applicable successfully to similar situations where scattering and other noise sources are a typical bottleneck to geophysical data acquisition on landslide bodies.

  14. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  15. Nonlinear reflection of a spherically divergent N-wave from a plane surface: Optical interferometry measurements in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karzova, M.; Yuldashev, P.; Khokhlova, V.; Ollivier, S.; Blanc-Benon, Ph.

    2015-01-01

    Mach stem is a well-known structure typically observed in the process of strong (acoustic Mach numbers greater than 0.4) step-shock waves reflection from a rigid boundary. However, this phenomenon has been much less studied for weak shocks in nonlinear acoustic fields where Mach numbers are in the range from 0.001 to 0.01 and pressure waveforms have more complicated waveforms than step shocks. The goal of this work was to demonstrate experimentally how nonlinear reflection occurs in air for very weak spherically divergent acoustic spark-generated pulses resembling an N-wave. Measurements of reflection patterns were performed using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A thin laser beam with sub-millimeter cross-section was used to obtain the time resolution of 0.4 µs, which is 6 times higher than the time resolution of the condenser microphones. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed using the inverse Abel transform applied to the phase of the signal measured by the interferometer. The Mach stem formation was observed experimentally as a result of collision of the incident and reflected shock pulses. It was shown that irregular reflection of the pulse occurred in a dynamic way and the length of the Mach stem increased linearly while the pulse propagated along the surface. Since the front shock of the spark-generated pulse was steeper than the rear shock, irregular type of reflection was observed only for the front shock of the pulse while the rear shock reflection occurred in a regular regime

  16. Nonlinear reflection of a spherically divergent N-wave from a plane surface: Optical interferometry measurements in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karzova, M., E-mail: masha@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides et d’Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yuldashev, P.; Khokhlova, V. [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ollivier, S.; Blanc-Benon, Ph. [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides et d’Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France)

    2015-10-28

    Mach stem is a well-known structure typically observed in the process of strong (acoustic Mach numbers greater than 0.4) step-shock waves reflection from a rigid boundary. However, this phenomenon has been much less studied for weak shocks in nonlinear acoustic fields where Mach numbers are in the range from 0.001 to 0.01 and pressure waveforms have more complicated waveforms than step shocks. The goal of this work was to demonstrate experimentally how nonlinear reflection occurs in air for very weak spherically divergent acoustic spark-generated pulses resembling an N-wave. Measurements of reflection patterns were performed using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A thin laser beam with sub-millimeter cross-section was used to obtain the time resolution of 0.4 µs, which is 6 times higher than the time resolution of the condenser microphones. Pressure waveforms were reconstructed using the inverse Abel transform applied to the phase of the signal measured by the interferometer. The Mach stem formation was observed experimentally as a result of collision of the incident and reflected shock pulses. It was shown that irregular reflection of the pulse occurred in a dynamic way and the length of the Mach stem increased linearly while the pulse propagated along the surface. Since the front shock of the spark-generated pulse was steeper than the rear shock, irregular type of reflection was observed only for the front shock of the pulse while the rear shock reflection occurred in a regular regime.

  17. Phase inversion and frequency doubling of reflection high-energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations in the layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhangwen; Guo, Wei; Ji, Dianxiang; Zhang, Tianwei; Gu, Chenyi; Tang, Chao; Gu, Zhengbin; Nie*, Yuefeng; Pan, Xiaoqing

    In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and its intensity oscillations are extremely important for the growth of epitaxial thin films with atomic precision. The RHEED intensity oscillations of complex oxides are, however, rather complicated and a general model is still lacking. Here, we report the unusual phase inversion and frequency doubling of RHEED intensity oscillations observed in the layer-by-layer growth of SrTiO3 using oxide molecular beam epitaxy. In contacts to the common understanding that the maximum(minimum) intensity occurs at SrO(TiO2) termination, respectively, we found that both maximum or minimum intensities can occur at SrO, TiO2, or even incomplete terminations depending on the incident angle of the electron beam, which raises a fundamental question if one can rely on the RHEED intensity oscillations to precisely control the growth of thin films. A general model including surface roughness and termination dependent mean inner potential qualitatively explains the observed phenomena, and provides the answer to the question how to prepare atomically and chemically precise surface/interfaces using RHEED oscillations for complex oxides. We thank National Basic Research Program of China (No. 11574135, 2015CB654901) and the National Thousand-Young-Talents Program.

  18. Packing stress reduction in polymer-lipid monolayers at the air-water interface: An X-ray grazing-incidence diffraction and reflectivity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, T.L.; Majewski, J.; Howes, P.B.; Kjaer, K.; Nahmen, A. von; Lee, K.Y.C.; Ocko, B.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Smith, G.S.

    1999-08-25

    Using synchrotron grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and reflectivity (XR), the authors have determined the in-plane and out-of-plane structure of phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface as a function of hydrophilic lipid headgroup size. Di-stearoyl-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (DSPE) lipid monolayers were systematically modified by chemically grafting hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains of MW = 90 g/mol (2 ethylene oxide, EO, units), MW = 350 g/mol (8 EO units), and MW = 750 g/mol (17 EO units) to the lipid headgroups. The monolayers were studied in the solid phase at a surface pressure of 42 mN/m. At these high lipid packing densities, the PEG chains are submerged in the water subphase. The increased packing stresses from these bulky polymer headgroups distort the unit cell and the in-plane packing modes of the monolayers, leading to large out-of-plane alterations and staggering of the lipid molecules. Surprisingly, a change in the molecular packing of the monolayer toward higher packing densities (lower area per molecule) was observed on increasing the PEG MW to 750 g/mol (17 EO units). This rearrangement of the monolayer structure may be due to a conformational change in the PEG chains.

  19. Formation of InAs/GaAs quantum dots from a subcritical InAs wetting layer: A reflection high-energy electron diffraction and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H. Z.; Usuki, T.; Nakata, Y.; Yokoyama, N.; Sasakura, H.; Muto, S.

    2006-01-01

    InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD's) are formed by postgrowth annealing of an InAs wetting layer thinner than the critical thickness for the transition from two- (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) growth mode. Reflection high energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the QD formation. Based on a mean-field theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 897 (1997)], the time evolution of total QD's volume, first increasing and finally saturating, is well explained by precursors forming during wetting layer growth and converting into nucleated QD's after growth stop. Both the saturation QD's volume and the QD nucleation rate depend exponentially on the InAs coverage. These behaviors and their temperature and InAs growth rate dependences are essentially understandable in the frame of the mean-field theory. Similar analysis to conventional QD growth suggests that the often observed significant mass transport from wetting layer to QD's can be ascribed to the precursors existing before 2D-3D growth mode transition

  20. In situ x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction study of L 1{sub 0} ordering in {sup 57}Fe/Pt multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavendra Reddy, V; Gupta, Ajay; Gome, Anil [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore-452 017 (India); Leitenberger, Wolfram [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, 14469 Potsdam (Germany); Pietsch, U [Physics Department, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)], E-mail: vrreddy@csr.ernet.in, E-mail: varimalla@yahoo.com

    2009-05-06

    In situ high temperature x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements in the energy dispersive mode are used to study the ordered face-centered tetragonal (fct) L 1{sub 0} phase formation in [Fe(19 A)/Pt(25 A)]{sub x 10} multilayers prepared by ion beam sputtering. With the in situ x-ray measurements it is observed that (i) the multilayer structure first transforms to a disordered FePt and subsequently to an ordered fct L 1{sub 0} phase, (ii) the ordered fct L 1{sub 0} FePt peaks start to appear at 320 deg. C annealing, (iii) the activation energy of the interdiffusion is 0.8 eV and (iv) ordered fct FePt grains have preferential out-of-plane texture. The magneto-optical Kerr effect and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopies are used to study the magnetic properties of the as-deposited and 400 deg. C annealed multilayers. The magnetic data for the 400 {sup 0}C annealed sample indicate that the magnetization is at an angle of {approx}50 deg. from the plane of the film.

  1. Stress measurements by multi-reflection grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction method (MGIXD) using different radiation wavelengths and different incident angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciszko, Marianna; Baczmański, Andrzej; Braham, Chedly; Wróbel, Mirosław; Wroński, Sebastian; Cios, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    The presented study introduces the development of the multi-reflection grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction method (MGIXD) for residual stress determination. The proposed new methodology is aimed at obtaining more reliable experimental data and increasing the depth of non-destructive stress determination below the sample surface. To verify proposed method measurements were performed on a classical X-ray diffractometer (Cu Kα radiation) and using synchrotron radiation (three different wavelengths: λ = 1.2527 Å, λ = 1.5419 Å and λ = 1.7512 Å). The Al2017 alloy subjected to three different surface treatments was investigated in this study. The obtained results showed that the proposed development of MGIXD method, in which not only different incident angles but also different wavelengths of X-ray are used, can be successfully applied for residual stress determination, especially when stress gradients are present in the sample.

  2. Interpretation of the distortion of ground-penetrating radar propagated and reflected waves - development of a multi-frequency tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollender, F.

    1999-01-01

    Within the framework of research for waste disposal in deep geological formations, the French agency for nuclear waste management (ANDRA) has to dispose of non-destructive investigation methods to characterize the medium. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) could be used for this purpose in the case of granitic sites. The work presented here deals with this geophysical method. The classical interpretation of GPR data consists in the localization of geological discontinuities by signal amplitude or arrival time analysis. The main objective of our studies is the interpretation of the radar wave distortion (due to propagation and reflection phenomena), not only to localize discontinuities but also to contribute to their identification. Three preliminary studies have been carried out in order to understand on the one hand, the complexity of the electromagnetic phenomena in the geological medium at radar frequency, and on the other hand, the radar equipment constraints. First, the dispersion and the attenuation characterized by a Q variable factor of the GPR waves are shown with the support of dielectric laboratory measurements. A model, which only requires three parameters, is proposed in order to describe this behavior. Second, the radiation patterns of borehole radar antenna are studied. We show that the amplitude and frequency content of the emitted signal are variable versus the emission angle. An analytical method is proposed to study these phenomena. Finally, instrumental drifts of GPR equipment are studied. Emission time, sampling frequency and amplitude fluctuations are described. These elements are taken into account for the processing of propagated signals by tomographic inversion. Medium anisotropy and borehole trajectory errors are inserted in algorithms in order to cancel artifacts which compromised the previous interpretation. A pre-processing method, based on wave separation algorithm, is applied on data in order to increase tomogram resolution. A new

  3. Experiment for 3-component S-wave reflection survey. Part 3; Sanseibun S ha hanshaho no kiso jikken. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, N; Kiguchi, T; Yamaguchi, K [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Yokota, T [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-10-22

    Investigations and discussions were given by using P-S logging on anisotropy of refracted waves in the fundamental experiments conducted in the Matsuyama town, Yamagata Prefecture. In the investigations, S-wave was transmitted into two to three directions at four locations in total: one at the opening of a well with a depth of 100 m and three locations having offset of 50 m from the well opening, and anisotropy of direct waves in the depth direction was investigated. Data were recorded on the ground at the same time by using a 3-component receiver. As a result of the experiment, detection of the anisotropy by means of measurement inside the well was found more difficult than anticipated due to anomaly in the refracted waves, hence no clear velocity anisotropy has been observed. It appears that no azimuth anisotropy exists at depths shallower than at least 24 m. No anisotropy due to incident angles was made clear in the present experiment. Offset recording experienced poor S/N ratio, having made the data analysis difficult. The data for zero offset do not harmonize with the refracted wave analysis on the data derived by using the reflection method, whose cause requires further discussions. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Prediction and measurement of the reflection of the fundamental anti-symmetric Lamb wave from cracks and notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Kao, J-Y; Diligent, O.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of the fundamental antisymmetric Lamb wave (a o ) with cracks and with notches of different depth and width has been investigated both experimentally and by finite element analysis. Excellent agreement between the predictions and the measurements has been obtained. It has been shown that the reflection coefficient is a function of both the notch width to wavelength and notch depth to wavelength ratios. Both the relationship between the reflection coefficient and notch, depth, and the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient, are very different for the a o mode compared to the s o mode which was studied earlier. Physical insight into the reasons for the different behavior is given by examination of the stress fields and opening displacements at the crack or notch

  5. Attenuation of acoustic waves through reflections at the plasma neutral gas interfaces: weakly ionised case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosal, S.K.; Sen, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of transmission of sonic waves through a weakly ionised plasma bounded in each side by a neutral gas medium has been treated by assuming the plasma to be a mixture of two intermingled fluids viz., neutral particle fluid and ion fluid in equilibrium. From a hydrodynamic analysis the wave equation for 'p', the macroscopic pressure perturbation has been obtained and it is shown that two independent wave motions, one due to the neutral particles and the other due to ions are propagated through the plasma with two different phase velocities. Assuming the usual boundary conditions at the interface, the amplitude of the transmitted wave has been calculated in case of weakly ionized plasma; the theory can be utilized for the determination of electron temperature from the measured value of attenuation if the percentage of ionization and collision cross section can be obtained independently. (author)

  6. X-ray diffraction and surface acoustic wave analysis of BST/Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mseddi, Souhir; Hedi Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, Universite de Sfax, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Njeh, Anouar [Unite de Physique, Informatique et Matematiques, Faculte des Sciences de Gafsa, Universite de Gafsa, 2112 Gafsa (Tunisia); Schneider, Dieter [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Material- und Strahltechnologie, Winterbergstrasse 28, 1277 Dresden (Germany); Fuess, Hartmut [Institute of Materials Science, University of Technology, Petersenstr.23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    High dielectric constant and electrostriction property of (Ba, Sr)Ti0{sub 3} (BST) thin films result in an increasing interest for dielectric devices and microwave acoustic resonator. Barium strontium titanate (Ba{sub 0.645}Sr{sub 0.355}TiO{sub 3}) films of about 300 nm thickness are grown on Pt(111)/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates by rf magnetron sputtering deposition techniques. X-ray diffraction is applied for the microstructural characterization. The BST films exhibit a cubic perovskite structure with a dense and smooth surface. A laser acoustic waves (LA-waves) technique is used to generate surface acoustic waves (SAW) propagating in the BST films. Young's modulus E and the Poisson ratio {nu} of TiO{sub 2,} Pt and BST films in different propagation directions are derived from the measured dispersion curves. Estimation of BST elastics constants are served in SAW studies. Impact of stratification process on SAW, propagating along [100] and [110] directions of silicon substrate, has been interpreted on the basis of ordinary differential equation (ODE) and stiffness matrix method (SMM). A good agreement is observed between experimental and calculated dispersion curves. The performed calculations are strongly related to the implemented crystallographic data of each layer. Dispersion curves are found to be sensitive to the SAW propagation direction and the stratification process for the explored frequency ranges 50-250 MHz, even though it corresponds to a wave length clearly higher than the whole films thickness.

  7. Diffraction gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  8. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings working by reflection or by transmission is investigated. The study is performed by generalizing the time-dependent coupled-wave theory previously developed for one-dimensional photonic crystals (André J-M and Jonnard P 2015 J. Opt. 17 085609) and also by extending the Takagi–Taupin approach of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The indicial response is calculated. It presents a time delay with a transient time that is a function of the extinction length for reflection geometry and of the extinction length combined with the thickness of the grating for transmission geometry. (paper)

  9. Dynamical diffraction in periodic multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, V F

    1997-01-01

    Exact reflectivity curves are calculated numerically for various periodic multilayers using the optical matrix method in order to test the dynamical theory of diffraction. The theory is generally valid for values of the bilayer thickness d up to about 100 A. For somewhat larger values of d, where the theory begins to break down, the initial discrepancy is in the phase of the oscillations in the wings of the peaks. For very large values of d, where the first-order Bragg peak approaches the edge of the mirror reflection, two general types of multilayers can be distinguished. In the first (typified in the present work by Ni/Ti), there is a large (30% or more) reduction in the actual value of the critical wave vector for total reflection while, in the second (typified here by Fe/Ge), there is very little reduction (3 % or so). The origin of these two very different types of behavior is explained. It is also shown that, within the dynamical theory of diffraction, the change in the position of the center of the Dar...

  10. Coupling of modal and finite elements methods for the diffraction of guided elastics waves: application to non destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baronian, V.

    2009-11-01

    A typical nondestructive examination based on guided elastic waves can be simulated by considering an elastic 2D (a plate) or 3D (a rod) guide that contains a defect (a crack, a local heterogeneity due to a weld etc.). Our aim is to solve numerically the problem of the scattering by a defect of a mode propagating in a guide. This has been achieved by developing a method that couples i) finite elements in the smallest possible region of the guide that contains the defect, with ii) the modal decomposition of waves outside this region. The main challenge consists in finding the right linking condition of both representations. A decisive tool is the obtaining of an orthogonality relation which makes it possible to project the finite element solution onto guided modes. For this, the problem is formulated in terms of hybrid vectors (displacement/stress) for which a bi-orthogonality relation exists, namely, the Fraser's relation. It is then possible to derive an exact (transparent) condition on the artificial boundaries of the finite element domain; the modal series taken into account being necessarily truncated, transparency is achieved only approximately. Eventually, this boundary condition is integrated in a variational approach (in terms of displacement) in order to develop a finite element method. The transparent boundary condition being expressed in terms of the hybrid vectors, the stress normal to the artificial boundary is introduced as a supplementary unknown, together with a mixed formulation. Both 2D and 3D isotropic guides with free boundary conditions have been considered numerically. Guided modes are computed thanks to an original modeling approach also based on the hybrid (displacement/stress) vectors; interestingly, bi-orthogonality relation expressed in a discrete form is preserved. The code implementing these methods leads to fast computations of the scattering matrix of a defect; once this matrix has been computed at various frequencies, the defect

  11. Coherent reflection from surface gravity water waves during reciprocal acoustic transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiey, Mohsen; Song, Aijun; Smith, Kevin B

    2012-10-01

    During a recent experiment in Kauai, Hawaii, reciprocal transmissions were conducted between two acoustic transceivers mounted on the seafloor at a depth of 100 m. The passage of moving surface wave crests was shown to generate focused and intense coherent acoustic returns, which had increasing or decreasing delay depending on the direction of propagation relative to the direction of surface wave crests. It is shown that a rough surface two-dimensional parabolic equation model with an evolving sea surface can produce qualitative agreement with data for the dynamic surface returns.

  12. How reflected wave fronts dynamically establish Hooke's law in a spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahy, Stephen; O'Riordan, John; O'Sullivan, Colm; Twomey, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A simple benchtop experiment in which a moving cart collides with a fixed spring is described. Force-time and force-distance data recorded during the collision display the transit of compression wave fronts through the spring following impact. These data can be used by students to develop a computational model of the dynamics of this simple mass-spring-sensor system using a simple application of the wave equation and thereby develop an intriguing picture of how a spring realizes Hooke's law approximately in this dynamic physical problem. (paper)

  13. Determining integral density distribution in the mach reflection of shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, A. M.; Golubev, M. P.; Pavlov, A. A.; Pavlov, Al. A.; Khotyanovsky, D. V.; Shmakov, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    We present a method for and results of determination of the field of integral density in the structure of flow corresponding to the Mach interaction of shock waves at Mach number M = 3. The optical diagnostics of flow was performed using an interference technique based on self-adjusting Zernike filters (SA-AVT method). Numerical simulations were carried out using the CFS3D program package for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Quantitative data on the distribution of integral density on the path of probing radiation in one direction of 3D flow transillumination in the region of Mach interaction of shock waves were obtained for the first time.

  14. Silicon supported lipid-DNA thin film structures at varying temperature studied by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and neutron reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenici, F; Castellano, C; Dell'Unto, F; Albinati, A; Congiu, A

    2011-11-01

    Non-viral gene transfection by means of lipid-based nanosystems, such as solid supported lipid assemblies, is often limited due to their lack of stability and the consequent loss of efficiency. Therefore not only a detailed thermo-lyotropic study of these DNA-lipid complexes is necessary to understand their interaction mechanisms, but it can also be considered as a first step in conceiving and developing new transfection biosystems. The aim of our study is a structural characterization of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC)-dimethyl-dioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDAB)-DNA complex at varying temperature using the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD) and neutron reflectivity (NR) techniques. We have shown the formation of a novel thermo-lyotropic structure of DOPC/DDAB thin film self-organized in multi-lamellar planes on (100)-oriented silicon support by spin coating, thus enlightening its ability to include DNA strands. Our NR measurements indicate that the DOPC/DDAB/DNA complex forms temperature-dependent structures. At 65°C and relative humidity of 100% DNA fragments are buried between single lamellar leaflets constituting the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayers. This finding supports the consistency of the hydrophobic interaction model, which implies that the coupling between lipid tails and hypo-hydrated DNA single strands could be the driving force of DNA-lipid complexation. Upon cooling to 25°C, EDXD analysis points out that full-hydrated DOPC-DDAB-DNA can switch in a different metastable complex supposed to be driven by lipid heads-DNA electrostatic interaction. Thermotropic response analysis also clarifies that DOPC has a pivotal role in promoting the formation of our observed thermophylic silicon supported lipids-DNA assembly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation stationariness of triaxial seismic while drilling and detection of reflected wave; Kosei kussaku ni tomonau danseiha no sanjiku kaiseki ni yoru hiteijo hyoka to hanshaha no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T; Asanuma, H; Niitsuma, H [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports a method to detect reflected wave components contained in an elastic wave caused in association with well drilling. Measurement was made on an elastic wave caused in association with well drilling in an experimental field by using a triaxial elastic wave detector disposed in a measurement well. Analyzing the particle motion tracks in the derived elastic wave signals (to derive the main axial direction of a three-dimensional hologram) revealed that oscillation direction of the signals changes non-steadily by time centering around the S-wave oscillation direction. In addition, a sound source position was estimated during the drilling. Existence probability of the S-wave signal in the non-steady continuous signals was estimated by handling the particle motion tracks stochastically. In addition, this existence probability was used as a weighting function for a correlative analysis to detect a reflected wave from directly reaching wave components in the non-steady continuous signals. Thus, improvement in reliability of reflected wave detection was attempted. Effectiveness of this method was endorsed by the field data. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Influence of seismic diffraction for high-resolution imaging: applications in offshore Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Yasir; Ghosh, Deva Prasad; Sum, Chow Weng

    2018-04-01

    Small-scale geological discontinuities are not easy to detect and image in seismic data, as these features represent themselves as diffracted rather than reflected waves. However, the combined reflected and diffracted image contains full wave information and is of great value to an interpreter, for instance enabling the identification of faults, fractures, and surfaces in built-up carbonate. Although diffraction imaging has a resolution below the typical seismic wavelength, if the wavelength is much smaller than the width of the discontinuity then interference effects can be ignored, as they would not play a role in generating the seismic diffractions. In this paper, by means of synthetic examples and real data, the potential of diffraction separation for high-resolution seismic imaging is revealed and choosing the best method for preserving diffraction are discussed. We illustrate the accuracy of separating diffractions using the plane-wave destruction (PWD) and dip frequency filtering (DFF) techniques on data from the Sarawak Basin, a carbonate field. PWD is able to preserve the diffraction more intelligently than DFF, which is proven in the results by the model and real data. The final results illustrate the effectiveness of diffraction separation and possible imaging for high-resolution seismic data of small but significant geological features.

  17. Bow shock specularly reflected ions in the presence of low-frequency electromagnetic waves: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Meziane

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available An energetic ion (E≤40 event observed by the CLUSTER/CIS experiment upstream of the Earth's bow shock is studied in detail. The ion event is observed in association with quasi-monochromatic ULF MHD-like waves, which we show modulate the ion fluxes. According to three statistical bow shock position models, the Cluster spacecrafts are located at ~0.5 Re from the shock and the averaged bow shock θBn0 is about ~30°. The analysis of the three-dimensional angular distribution indicates that ions propagating roughly along the magnetic field direction are observed at the onset of the event. Later on, the angular distribution is gyrophase-bunched and the pitch-angle distribution is peaked at α0~θBn0, consistent with the specular reflection production mechanism. The analysis of the waves shows that they are left-handed in the spacecraft frame of reference (right-handed in the solar wind frame and propagate roughly along the ambient magnetic field; we have found that they are in cyclotron-resonance with the field-aligned beam observed just upstream. Using properties of the waves and particles, we explain the observed particle flux-modulation in the context of θBn changes at the shock caused by the convected ULF waves. We have found that the high count rates coincide with particles leaving the shock when θBn angles are less than ~40°, consistent with the specular reflection hypothesis as the production mechanism of ions.

  18. Reflection of plane waves from free surface of a microstretch elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Department of Mathematics, Jat College, Rohtak 124 001, Haryana, India. e-mail: baljeet−gill@hotmail.com. In the present investigation, it is shown that there exists five basic waves in a ..... in layered media, (New York: McGraw-Hill). Gauthier ...

  19. How Reflected Wave Fronts Dynamically Establish Hooke's Law in a Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Stephen; O'Riordan, John; O'Sullivan, Colm; Twomey, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A simple benchtop experiment in which a moving cart collides with a fixed spring is described. Force-time and force-distance data recorded during the collision display the transit of compression wave fronts through the spring following impact. These data can be used by students to develop a computational model of the dynamics of this simple…

  20. Reflection moveout approximations for P-waves in a moderately anisotropic homogeneous tilted transverse isotropy layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pšenčík, Ivan; Farra, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 5 (2017), C175-C185 ISSN 0016-8033 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05237S Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : VTI media * velocity * seismic waves Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure OBOR OECD: Volcanology Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2016

  1. Molecular beam epitaxial growth mechanism of ZnSe epilayers on (100) GaAs as determined by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, P.; Hommel, D.; Behr, T.; Heinke, H.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany))

    1994-04-14

    The properties of molecular beam epitaxial growth of ZnSe epilayers deposited directly on a GaAs substrate are compared to those grown on a GaAs buffer layer. The superior quality of the latter is confirmed by RHEED, TEM and X-ray diffraction. Based on RHEED oscillation studies, a model explaining the dependence of the ZnSe growth rate on Zn and Se fluxes and the substrate temperature is developed taking into account physisorbed and chemisorbed states. For partially relaxed epilayers, the correlation between the relaxation state and the crystalline mosaicity, as found by high resolution X-ray diffraction, is discussed

  2. Thermal and ghost reflection modeling for a 180-deg. field-of-view long-wave infrared lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weimin; Couture, Michael E.

    2001-03-01

    Optics 1, Inc. has successfully designed and developed a 180 degree(s) field of view long wave infrared lens for USAF/AFRL under SBIR phase I and II funded projects in support of the multi-national Programmable Integrated Ordinance Suite (PIOS) program. In this paper, a procedure is presented on how to evaluate image degradation caused by asymmetric aerodynamic dome heating. In addition, a thermal gradient model is proposed to evaluate degradation caused by axial temperature gradient throughout the entire PIOS lens. Finally, a ghost reflection analysis is demonstrated with non-sequential model.

  3. Second harmonic generation: Effects of the multiple reflections of the fundamental and the second harmonic waves on the Maker fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Gildas; Boisrobert, Christian

    2007-11-01

    The Maker fringes technique is commonly used for the determination of nonlinear optical coefficients. In this article, we present a new formulation of Maker fringes in parallel-surface samples, using boundary conditions taking into account the anisotropy of the crystal, the refractive-index dispersion, and the reflections of the fundamental and the second harmonic waves inside the material. Complete expressions for the generated second harmonic intensity are given for birefringent crystals for the case of no pump depletion. A comparison between theory and experimental results is made, showing the accuracy of our theoretical expressions.

  4. Diode laser in-band pumped, efficient 1645 nm continuous-wave and Q-switched Er:YLuAG lasers with near-diffraction-limited beam quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Yang, SuHui; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-like Er:YLuAG laser rods were tested for continuous-wave (CW) and Q-switched operation. Two narrow-band laser diodes emitting at 1532 nm were used as pump sources. The pump power was confined in the laser rods via total internal reflection. In CW mode, a maximum output power of 7.2 W was measured from a 30 mm long Er:YLuAG laser rod, corresponding to an optical–optical efficiency of 26% and a slope efficiency of 78%. Er:YLuAG and Er:YAG lasers were compared experimentally and exhibited comparable performance, while the measured central wavelength of the Er:YLuAG laser was 1644.75 nm, slightly longer than the central wavelength of the Er:YAG laser in the same experimental circumstances. In Q-switched mode, an output energy of 3.5 mJ was obtained from a 25 mm Er:YLuAG laser rod with a pulse duration of 100 ns and a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz. The pulsed output had near-diffraction-limited beam quality with M 2 values of 1.13 and 1.11 in the x and y directions, respectively. (letter)

  5. Protective effects of flavanol-rich dark chocolate on endothelial function and wave reflection during acute hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Desideri, Giovambattista; Necozione, Stefano; Ruggieri, Fabrizio; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Stornello, Michele; Ferri, Claudio

    2012-09-01

    Nitric oxide plays a pivotal role in regulating vascular tone. Different studies show endothelial function is impaired during hyperglycemia. Dark chocolate increases flow-mediated dilation in healthy and hypertensive subjects with and without glucose intolerance; however, the effect of pretreatment with dark chocolate on endothelial function and other vascular responses to hyperglycemia has not been examined. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of flavanol-rich dark chocolate administration on (1) flow-mediated dilation and wave reflections; (2) blood pressure, endothelin-1 and oxidative stress, before and after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Twelve healthy volunteers (5 males, 28.2±2.7 years) randomly received either 100 g/d dark chocolate or flavanol-free white chocolate for 3 days. After 7 days washout period, volunteers were switched to the other treatment. Flow-mediated dilation, stiffness index, reflection index, peak-to-peak time, blood pressure, endothelin-1 and 8-iso-PGF(2α) were evaluated after each treatment phase and OGTT. Compared with white chocolate, dark chocolate ingestion improved flow-mediated dilation (P=0.03), wave reflections, endothelin-1 and 8-iso-PGF(2α) (Pwave reflections, blood pressure, and endothelin-1 and 8-iso-PGF(2α) increased after OGTT. OGTT causes acute, transient impairment of endothelial function and oxidative stress, which is attenuated by flavanol-rich dark chocolate. These results suggest cocoa flavanols may contribute to vascular health by reducing the postprandial impairment of arterial function associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. Assessment of autonomic nervous system by using empirical mode decomposition-based reflection wave analysis during non-stationary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C C; Hsiao, T C; Kao, S C; Hsu, H Y

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure (ABP) is an important indicator of cardiovascular circulation and presents various intrinsic regulations. It has been found that the intrinsic characteristics of blood vessels can be assessed quantitatively by ABP analysis (called reflection wave analysis (RWA)), but conventional RWA is insufficient for assessment during non-stationary conditions, such as the Valsalva maneuver. Recently, a novel adaptive method called empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was proposed for non-stationary data analysis. This study proposed a RWA algorithm based on EMD (EMD-RWA). A total of 51 subjects participated in this study, including 39 healthy subjects and 12 patients with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. The results showed that EMD-RWA provided a reliable estimation of reflection time in baseline and head-up tilt (HUT). Moreover, the estimated reflection time is able to assess the ANS function non-invasively, both in normal, healthy subjects and in the patients with ANS dysfunction. EMD-RWA provides a new approach for reflection time estimation in non-stationary conditions, and also helps with non-invasive ANS assessment. (paper)

  7. Effects of Defect Size and Number Density on the Transmission and Reflection of Guided Elastic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    localized region, a photoacoustic source generates elastic waves on one side of the damaged region, and then two ultrasound transducers measure the...Panther OPO) operating at 1.55um and with a pulse width of 7ns, a repetition rate of 30Hz and an average power of 65mW. This configuration seems...where the defects are of the same order as the wavelength of the ultrasound , we find ourselves confronted with Mie scattering, which has weaker

  8. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  9. Diffraction theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwkamp, C.J.

    1954-01-01

    A critical review is presented of recent progress in classical diffraction theory. Both scalar and electromagnetic problems are discussed. The report may serve as an introduction to general diffraction theory although the main emphasis is on diffraction by plane obstacles. Various modifications of

  10. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhidkov, A.; Esirkepov, T.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, K.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    An optically-dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other is shown to be an efficient coherent x-ray converter. The resulting velocity of a quasi-plane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection increases with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing an easy tuning the wavelength of x-rays. The x-ray spectra of a converted, lower frequency coherent light change from the monoc...

  11. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A; Esirkepov, T; Fujii, T; Nemoto, K; Koga, J; Bulanov, S V

    2009-11-20

    An optically dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond (approximately 10/30 fs) laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other may become an efficient coherent x-ray converter in accordance with the Semenova-Lampe theory. The resulting velocity of a quasiplane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection changes with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing a tuning of the wavelength of x rays and their bunching. The x-ray spectra after scattering of a lower frequency and long coherent light pulse change from the monochromatic to high order harmoniclike with the duration of the ionizing pulses.

  12. Effects of a strong magnetic field on internal gravity waves: trapping, phase mixing, reflection and dynamical chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Papaloizou, John C. B.

    2018-04-01

    The spectrum of oscillation modes of a star provides information not only about its material properties (e.g. mean density), but also its symmetries. Spherical symmetry can be broken by rotation and/or magnetic fields. It has been postulated that strong magnetic fields in the cores of some red giants are responsible for their anomalously weak dipole mode amplitudes (the "dipole dichotomy" problem), but a detailed understanding of how gravity waves interact with strong fields is thus far lacking. In this work, we attack the problem through a variety of analytical and numerical techniques, applied to a localised region centred on a null line of a confined axisymmetric magnetic field which is approximated as being cylindrically symmetric. We uncover a rich variety of phenomena that manifest when the field strength exceeds a critical value, beyond which the symmetry is drastically broken by the Lorentz force. When this threshold is reached, the spatial structure of the g-modes becomes heavily altered. The dynamics of wave packet propagation transitions from regular to chaotic, which is expected to fundamentally change the organisation of the mode spectrum. In addition, depending on their frequency and the orientation of field lines with respect to the stratification, waves impinging on different parts of the magnetised region are found to undergo either reflection or trapping. Trapping regions provide an avenue for energy loss through Alfvén wave phase mixing. Our results may find application in various astrophysical contexts, including the dipole dichotomy problem, the solar interior, and compact star oscillations.

  13. 5.5 W near-diffraction-limited power from resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.

    2015-01-01

    Five, 8.36 μm-emitting quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) have been monolithically phase-locked in the in-phase array mode via resonant leaky-wave coupling. The structure is fabricated by etch and regrowth which provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array elements and interelement regions. Such high index contrast photonic-crystal (PC) lasers have more than an order of magnitude higher index contrast than PC-distributed feedback lasers previously used for coherent beam combining in QCLs. Absorption loss to metal layers inserted in the interelement regions provides a wide (∼1.0 μm) range in interelement width over which the resonant in-phase mode is strongly favored to lase. Room-temperature, in-phase-mode operation with ∼2.2 kA/cm 2 threshold-current density is obtained from 105 μm-wide aperture devices. The far-field beam pattern has lobewidths 1.65× diffraction limit (D.L.) and 82% of the light in the main lobe, up to 1.8× threshold. Peak pulsed near-D.L. power of 5.5 W is obtained, with 4.5 W emitted in the main lobe. Means of how to increase the device internal efficiency are discussed

  14. A REFLECTION ON THE WAVE OF AMALGAMATIONS IN THE ROMANIAN HEALTH SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina MITU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of New Public Management (NPM and good governance, in the last decade the Romanian public health system has undergone a reform process. One of its consequences is the wave of public hospitals amalgamations that have occurred especially since the adoption of the new health law. Thus, in 2011 the Ministry of Health has made public a list of proposed amalgamations of hospitals (around 25% from total hospitals with beds that existed in that period. The aim of this research is to examine the wave of hospital mergers that occurred in Romania between 2011 and 2012. In particular, the study focuses on the drivers, social impact, typology and purpose of the analysed amalgamations. The study uses primary resources documents and it is based on a content analysis of 25 Government Decisions and Substantiation Notes from 2011 to 2012. An important generalization of the paper is that all the amalgamations from the analysed period are involuntary and are selected on territorial criteria and depending on the distance, the specific health services for the purpose of efficient use of human and material resources in order to enhance public health services. Additionally, the expected social impact of these events is materialized mainly in improving the quality of medical services provided to the population and providing unconditional access to medical services for policyholders. The expected changes include: reduction of staff costs; efficient use of public services; classifying the amalgamated hospitals in a higher category; reduction of management positions; optimizing medical activity in terms of economic efficiency; and achieving a management capable of the best use of existing financial resources.

  15. Free-weight resistance exercise on pulse wave reflection and arterial stiffness between sexes in young, resistance-trained adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, J Derek; Tai, Yu Lun; Mayo, Xian; Glasgow, Alaina; Marshall, Erica

    2017-09-01

    We sought to determine the sex-specific effects of an acute bout of free-weight resistance exercise (RE) on pulse wave reflection (aortic blood pressures, augmentation index (AIx), AIx at 75 bpm (AIx@75), augmentation pressure (AP), time of the reflected wave (Tr), subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR)), and aortic arterial stiffness in resistance-trained individuals. Resistance-trained men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) volunteered to participate in the study. Measurements were taken in the supine position at rest, and 10 minutes after 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% 1-repetition maximum on the squat, bench press, and deadlift. A 2 × 2 × 2 ANOVA was used to analyse the effects of sex (men, women) across condition (RE, control) and time (rest, recovery). There were no differences between sexes across conditions and time. There was no effect of the RE on brachial or aortic blood pressures. There were significant condition × time interactions for AIx (rest: 12.1 ± 7.9%; recovery: 19.9 ± 10.5%, p = .003), AIx@75 (rest: 5.3 ± 7.9%; recovery: 24.5 ± 14.3%, p = .0001), AP (rest: 4.9 ± 2.8 mmHg; recovery: 8.3 ± 6.0 mmHg, p = .004), and aortic arterial stiffness (rest: 5.3 ± 0.6 ms; recovery: 5.9 ± 0.7 ms, p = .02) with significant increases during recovery from the acute RE. There was also a significant condition × time for time of the reflected wave (rest: 150 ± 7 ms; recovery: 147 ± 9 ms, p = .02) and SEVR (rest: 147 ± 17%; recovery: 83 ± 24%, p = .0001) such that they were reduced during recovery from the acute RE compared to the control. These data suggest that an acute bout of RE increases AIx, AIx@75, and aortic arterial stiffness similarly between men and women without significantly altering aortic blood pressures.

  16. High Resolution Vertical Seismic Profile from the Chicxulub IODP/ICDP Expedition 364 Borehole: Wave Speeds and Seismic Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C.; Kofman, R.; Schmitt, D. R.; Lofi, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Christeson, G. L.; Saustrup, S., Sr.; Morgan, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    We acquired a closely-spaced vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Chicxulub K-Pg Impact Crater drilling program borehole to calibrate the existing surface seismic profiles and provide complementary measurements of in situ seismic wave speeds. Downhole seismic records were obtained at spacings ranging from 1.25 m to 5 m along the borehole from 47.5 m to 1325 mwsf (meters wireline below sea floor) (Fig 1a) using a Sercel SlimwaveTM geophone chain (University of Alberta). The seismic source was a 30/30ci Sercel Mini GI airgun (University of Texas), fired a minimum of 5 times per station. Seismic data processing used a combination of a commercial processing package (Schlumberger's VISTA) and MatlabTM codes. The VSP displays detailed reflectivity (Fig. 1a) with the strongest reflection seen at 600 mwsf (280 ms one-way time), geologically corresponding to the sharp contact between the post-impact sediments and the target peak ring rock, thus confirming the pre-drilling interpretations of the seismic profiles. A two-way time trace extracted from the separated up-going wavefield matches the major reflection both in travel time and character. In the granitic rocks that form the peak ring of the Chicxulub impact crater, we observe P-wave velocities of 4000-4500 m/s which are significantly less than the expected values of granitoids ( 6000 m/s) (Fig. 1b). The VSP measured wave speeds are confirmed against downhole sonic logging and in laboratory velocimetry measurements; these data provide additional evidence that the crustal material displaced by the impact experienced a significant amount of damage. Samples and data provided by IODP. Samples can be requested at http://web.iodp.tamu.edu/sdrm after 19 October 2017. Expedition 364 was jointly funded by ECORD, ICDP, and IODP with contributions and logistical support from the Yucatan State Government and UNAM. The downhole seismic chain and wireline system is funded by grants to DRS from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and

  17. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  18. Diffraction through partial identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.

    1981-06-01

    A model of diffraction dissociation is proposed in which the quantum-mechanical interference between the incoming and the outgoing wave determines the cross-section. This interference occurs due to the finite life-time of the excited state. (orig.)

  19. Propagation of Torsional Alfvén Waves from the Photosphere to the Corona: Reflection, Transmission, and Heating in Expanding Flux Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón; Ballester, José Luis, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    It has been proposed that Alfvén waves play an important role in the energy propagation through the solar atmospheric plasma and its heating. Here we theoretically investigate the propagation of torsional Alfvén waves in magnetic flux tubes expanding from the photosphere up to the low corona and explore the reflection, transmission, and dissipation of wave energy. We use a realistic variation of the plasma properties and the magnetic field strength with height. Dissipation by ion–neutral collisions in the chromosphere is included using a multifluid partially ionized plasma model. Considering the stationary state, we assume that the waves are driven below the photosphere and propagate to the corona, while they are partially reflected and damped in the chromosphere and transition region. The results reveal the existence of three different propagation regimes depending on the wave frequency: low frequencies are reflected back to the photosphere, intermediate frequencies are transmitted to the corona, and high frequencies are completely damped in the chromosphere. The frequency of maximum transmissivity depends on the magnetic field expansion rate and the atmospheric model, but is typically in the range of 0.04–0.3 Hz. Magnetic field expansion favors the transmission of waves to the corona and lowers the reflectivity of the chromosphere and transition region compared to the case with a straight field. As a consequence, the chromospheric heating due to ion–neutral dissipation systematically decreases when the expansion rate of the magnetic flux tube increases.

  20. Open-Ended Waveguide Measurement and Numerical Simulation of the Reflectivity of Petri Dish Supported Skin Cell Monolayers in the mm-wave Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneduci, Amerigo; Chidichimo, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Open-ended waveguide reflectometry is a promising tool for permittivity and other material properties calculation at mm-waves (30-300 GHz). Measurement of the reflection coefficient does not require sample manipulation, allowing in vivo and in vitro non destructive studies on cells. Here we used this technique for measuring the power reflection coefficient (reflectivity) of water and Petri dish supported human skin melanoma and keratinocyte cell cultures, in the 53-72 GHz frequency range. The dependence of the reflectivity on polystyrene or glass thickness of the Petri base plate and on the cell layer thickness was analyzed. Permittivity data were then easily retrieved by using a plane wave-dominant mode approach for formulating the reflectivity at the aperture of the flange-mounted open-ended rectangular waveguide probe. Limits and validity of such an approximate approach were analyzed and compared with full-wave near field formulations for which magnitude and phase of the reflection coefficient must be measured and solved using complicated systems of integral equations and extensive numerical calculation. Finally, Petri dish reflectivity measured by the open-ended waveguide method was compared with that numerically simulated under far-field exposure conditions used in a large number of in vitro studies. Such an analysis showed that, under certain conditions, open-ended reflectivity values approach the far field ones.

  1. On the propagation and multiple reflections of a blast wave travelling through a dusty gas in a closed box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Marcello; Drikakis, Dimitris; Kokkinakis, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    This paper concerns the propagation of shock waves in an enclosure filled with dusty gas. The main motivation for this problem is to probe the effect on such dynamics of solid particles dispersed in the fluid medium. This subject, which has attracted so much attention over recent years given its important implications in the study of the structural stability of systems exposed to high-energy internal detonations, is approached here in the framework of a hybrid numerical two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian methodology. In particular, insights are sought by considering a relatively simple archetypal setting corresponding to a shock wave originating from a small spherical region initialized on the basis of available analytic solutions. The response of the system is explored numerically with respect to several parameters, including the blast intensity (via the related value of the initial shock Mach number), the solid mass fraction (mass load), and the particle size (Stokes number). Results are presented in terms of pressure-load diagrams. Beyond practical applications, it is shown that a kaleidoscope of fascinating patterns is produced by the "triadic" relationships among multiple shock reflection events and particle-fluid and particle-wall interaction dynamics. These would be of great interest to researchers and scientists interested in fundamental problems relating to the general theory of pattern formation in complex nonlinear multiphase systems.

  2. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Strong reflection of a series of pulses from a four-wave mirror with thermal nonlinearity under parametric feedback conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, M. S.; Bel'dyugin, Igor'M.; Zolotarev, M. V.; Kruzhilin, Yu I.; Krymskiĭ, M. I.; Oshkin, S. P.; Starkov, G. S.; Umnov, A. F.; Kharchenko, M. A.

    1989-04-01

    A four-wave mirror exhibiting a thermal nonlinearity was used in a study of the interaction of concurrent waves under parametric feedback conditions in the presence of a nonreciprocal element. Strong reflection of a series of pulses of ~ 300 ns duration from a neodymium glass laser was demonstrated: the maximum reflection coefficient was in excess of 30. An analysis was made of the quality of the radiation reflected from this four-mirror parametric feedback system. A considerable reduction was observed in the steady-state threshold for the operation of this mirror with a thermal nonlinearity when the angles of convergence of the interacting beams were small compared with the case of head-on collision of the waves.

  3. Quasi-optical reflective polarimeter for wide millimeter-wave band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Tsuboi, Masato; Kasuga, Takashi

    1998-11-01

    We constructed a new reflective-type polarimeter system at 35 - 250 GHz for the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO). Using the system, we can measure both linear polarization and circular polarization for our needs. The new system has two key points. First is that we can tune the center frequency of the polarimeter in the available frequency range, second is that insertion loss is low (0.15 plus or minus 0.03 dB at 86 GHz). These characteristics extended achievable scientific aims. In this paper, we present the design and the performance of the system. Using the system, we measured linear polarizations of some astronomical objects at 86 GHz, with SiO (nu) equals 0,1 and 2 at J equals 2 - 1 and 29SiO (nu) equals 0 J equals 2 - 1 simultaneously. As a result, the observation revealed SiO (nu) equals 0 J equals 2 - 1 of VY Canis Majoris is highly linearly polarized, the degree of linear polarization is up to 64%, in spite of SiO J equals 2 - 1 (nu) equals 1 is not highly linearly polarized. The highly linearly polarized feature is a strong evidence that 28SiO J equals 2 - 1 transition at the ground vibrational state originate through maser action. This is the first detection of the cosmic maser emission of SiO (nu) equals 0 J equals 2 - 1 transition.

  4. Contribution to diffraction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chako, N.

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  5. Shear-wave seismic reflection imaging and impedance inversion for a near-surface point-bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, N. W.; Morrison, M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Odom, B.; Clift, P. D.; Olson, E.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    Imaging and inversion of SH-waves are useful to detect, map, and quantitatively characterize near-surface point-bar strata. We conduct a horizontally-polarized (SH) reflection survey across and along a near-surface (9 - 40 m) downstream point-bar. We invert for shear-impedance profiles and correlate our interpretation to electrical conductivity (EC) logs in adjacent wells to study the internal architecture and lithology of point-bars. We acquire two common-midpoint (CMP) SH-wave seismic reflection lines at False River (Point Coupee Parish, Louisiana). A 104 m long seismic line (L1) is oriented orthogonal (NW - SE) to point-bar strike. A second line (L2) is 48 m long and set parallel to point-bar strike (NE - SW). Two EC wells lie 33 m apart. Both wells are parallel with respect to the L1 survey and offset from it by 15 m. EC log measurements range from 1 - 25 m depth. Interference of Love-waves prevents seismic imaging at depths less than 9 m. The L1 and L2 data sets are inverted for shear-impedance using a model-based band-limited impedance (BLIMP) algorithm that incorporates a low-frequency velocity model. This model is also used for the depthing processing. The L1 cross-section shows coherent dipping reflection events ( 4 - 7º) from 0.15 - 0.35 s (10 - 40 m). The corresponding shear-impedance profile also reveals coherent and dipping impedance contrasts that grow in magnitude with increasing depth. The L2 cross-section shows comparatively less dip ( 1º) as well as sharper and shallower continuity of reflection events (0.1 - 0.28 s TWT or 9 - 25 m). Depth-converted (TVD) seismic amplitudes and impedance values correlate to near-surface point-bar geology via superposition of log data. The first well (W5) shows distinct EC local maxima (+50 - 70 mS/m) at 14.5 and 15.5 m depth that correlate well with the seismic amplitudes and impedance values from both L1 and L2 data sets. The second well (W7) shows comparatively lower local maxima (+40 - 60 mS/m) but at greater

  6. On revealing the vertical structure of nanoparticle films with elemental resolution: A total external reflection X-ray standing waves study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zargham, Ardalan, E-mail: zargham@ifp.uni-bremen.d [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Schmidt, Thomas; Flege, Jan Ingo; Sauerbrey, Marc; Hildebrand, Radowan [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Roehe, Sarah; Baeumer, Marcus [Applied and Physical Chemistry, University of Bremen, Leobener Str. 2, 28359, Bremen (Germany); Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We present a promising combination of methods to precisely determine the morphology of nanostructures, drawing on the example of monodisperse CoPt{sub 3} nanoparticle films deposited by spin coating and dip coating techniques on functionalized Au substrates. Ex-situ X-ray standing waves in total external reflection combined with X-ray reflectivity measurements were employed to determine element-specific atomic-density distributions in vertical direction.

  7. Borehole radar diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Jung Ho; Yi, Myeong Jong; Chung, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hee Il [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Tomography is widely used as imaging method for determining subsurface structure. Among the reconstruction algorithms for tomographic imaging, travel time tomography is almost applied to imaging subsurface. But isolated small body comparable with the wavelength could not be well recognized by travel time tomography. Other tomographic method are need to improve the imaging process. In the study of this year, diffraction tomography was investigated. The theory for diffraction tomography is based on the 1st-order Born approximation. Multisource holography, which is similar to Kirchihoff migration, is compared with diffraction tomography. To improve 1st-order Born diffraction tomography, two kinds of filter designed from multisource holography and 2-D green function, respectively, applied on the reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested for the numerical modeling data of which algorithm consists of the analytic computation of radar signal in transmitter and receiver regions and 2-D FDM scheme for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media. The air-filled cavity model to show a typical diffraction pattern was applied to diffraction tomography imaging, and the result shows accurate location and area of cavity. But the calculated object function is not well matched the real object function, because the air-filled cavity model is not satisfied week scattered inhomogeneity for 1st born approximation, and the error term is included in estimating source wavelet from received signals. In spite of the object function error, the diffraction tomography assist for interpretation of subsurface as if conducted with travel time tomography. And the fracture model was tested, 1st born diffraction tomographic image is poor because of limited view angle coverage and violation of week scatter assumption, but the filtered image resolve the fracture somewhat better. The tested diffraction tomography image confirms effectiveness of filter for enhancing resolution. (author). 14

  8. Abdominal obesity vs general obesity for identifying arterial stiffness, subclinical atherosclerosis and wave reflection in healthy, diabetics and hypertensive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recio-Rodriguez Jose I

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim was to analyze the relationship between abdominal obesity and general obesity, with subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness and wave reflection in healthy, diabetics and hypertensive subjects. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was made of 305 individuals (diabetics 32.8%, hypertensive subjects 37.0% and healthy individuals 30.2%. Measurements: Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, body fat percentage (BFP and waist/height ratio (WHtR. Arterial stiffness was assessed according to pulse wave velocity (PWV, intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (C-IMT, augmentation index (central and peripheral, ankle-brachial index (ABI, and central and peripheral pulse pressure. Results WC and WHtR showed a positive correlation to PWV and C-IMT in the studied groups. After adjusting for age, gender, high sensitivity c-reactive protein, serum glucose and the presence of diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, antidiabetic drugs, lipid-lowering drugs, and atherosclerotic plaques, it was seen that for every 0.1 point increase in WHtR, and for every cm increase in WC, the PWV increased 0.041 and 0.029 m/sec, and C-IMT increased 0.001 mm and 0.001 mm, respectively. Conclusions The measures of abdominal obesity (WHtR and WC correlates better than BMI and BFP with arterial stiffness evaluated by PWV, and with subclinical atherosclerosis evaluated by C-IMT, independently of the presence of diabetes or hypertension. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01325064

  9. Postprandial effect of dietary fat quantity and quality on arterial stiffness and wave reflection: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is a component of vascular function and an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. There is a lack of conclusive evidence on the effect of a meal rich in monounsaturated fat (MUFA) compared with an isoenergetic meal rich in saturated fat (SFA) on postprandial vascular function and specifically on arterial stiffness. Methods Twenty healthy, non-smoking males (BMI 24 ± 2 kg/m2; age 37.7 ± 14.4 y) participated in this single-blind, randomised, cross-over dietary intervention study. Each subject was randomised to receive a high-fat test-meal (3 MJ; 56 ± 2 g fat) at breakfast on 2 separate occasions, one rich in oleic acid (MUFA-meal) and one rich in palmitic acid (SFA-meal), and the meals were isoenergetic. Blood pressure (BP), arterial stiffness (PWV) and arterial wave reflection (augmentation index, AIx) were measured using applanation tonometry at baseline and every 30 minutes up to 4 hours after the ingestion of the test-meals. Results All subjects completed both arms of the dietary intervention. There was no significant difference in BP parameters, PWV or AIx at baseline between the two treatments (P > 0.05). There was a significant increase in brachial and aortic BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate and PVW (time, P meal although the increase in PWV was no longer significant when adjusted for the increase in MAP. There was no difference in PWV between the two treatments (treatment*time, P > 0.05). There was a significant reduction in AIx (time, P  0.05). There was no difference in AIx between the two treatments (treatment*time, P > 0.05). However, the reduction in heart rate corrected augmentation index (AIx75) was significant when corrected for the increase in MAP (time, P  0.05). Conclusions This study has demonstrated a BP dependent increase in PWV and a decrease in arterial wave reflection in the four hour period in response to a high-fat meal. There was no evidence

  10. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  11. In-phase and anti-phase interference fringes in rocking curves of resonant X-ray dynamical diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negishi, Riichirou; Fukamachi, Tomoe; Yoshizawa, Masami; Hirano, Kenji; Hirano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Takaaki

    2008-01-01

    We have observed the interference fringes that are in phase with each other in the diffracted and transmitted rocking curves of GaAs 200 reflection near the K-absorption edge of As. The fringes are in contrast with the well-known Pendelloesung fringes that are anti-phase with each other in the diffracted and transmitted waves. The origin of the in-phase interference fringe is analyzed to be due to the diffraction only by the imaginary part of the atomic scattering factor. It is also shown that the interference fringes become typical Pendelloesung fringes when the diffraction is caused only by the real part. (author)

  12. Measurement of the Length of Installed Rock Bolt Based on Stress Wave Reflection by Using a Giant Magnetostrictive (GMS) Actuator and a PZT Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Fu, Qingqing; Song, Gangbing

    2017-02-23

    Rock bolts, as a type of reinforcing element, are widely adopted in underground excavations and civil engineering structures. Given the importance of rock bolts, the research outlined in this paper attempts to develop a portable non-destructive evaluation method for assessing the length of installed rock bolts for inspection purposes. Traditionally, piezoelectric elements or hammer impacts were used to perform non-destructive evaluation of rock bolts. However, such methods suffered from many major issues, such as the weak energy generated and the requirement for permanent installation for piezoelectric elements, and the inconsistency of wave generation for hammer impact. In this paper, we proposed a portable device for the non-destructive evaluation of rock bolt conditions based on a giant magnetostrictive (GMS) actuator. The GMS actuator generates enough energy to ensure multiple reflections of the stress waves along the rock bolt and a lead zirconate titantate (PZT) sensor is used to detect the reflected waves. A new integrated procedure that involves correlation analysis, wavelet denoising, and Hilbert transform was proposed to process the multiple reflection signals to determine the length of an installed rock bolt. The experimental results from a lab test and field tests showed that, by analyzing the instant phase of the periodic reflections of the stress wave generated by the GMS transducer, the length of an embedded rock bolt can be accurately determined.

  13. Noninvasive observation of skeletal muscle contraction using near-infrared time-resolved reflectance and diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belau, Markus; Ninck, Markus; Hering, Gernot; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Torricelli, Alessandro; Gisler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a method for noninvasively measuring muscle contraction in vivo, based on near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). The method exploits the information about time-dependent shear motions within the contracting muscle that are contained in the temporal autocorrelation function g(1)(τ,t) of the multiply scattered light field measured as a function of lag time, τ, and time after stimulus, t. The analysis of g(1)(τ,t) measured on the human M. biceps brachii during repetitive electrical stimulation, using optical properties measured with time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, shows that the tissue dynamics giving rise to the speckle fluctuations can be described by a combination of diffusion and shearing. The evolution of the tissue Cauchy strain e(t) shows a strong correlation with the force, indicating that a significant part of the shear observed with DWS is due to muscle contraction. The evolution of the DWS decay time shows quantitative differences between the M. biceps brachii and the M. gastrocnemius, suggesting that DWS allows to discriminate contraction of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  14. Emission of OH* and CO2* during the high-temperature oxidation of acetone in reflected shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereza, A. M.; Smirnov, V. N.; Vlasov, P. A.; Shumova, V. V.; Garmash, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental and kinetic modeling study of the ignition of a stoichiometric mixture of acetone with oxygen diluted by argon was carried out behind reflected shock waves within the temperature range of 1350-1810 K for the total mixture concentration [M 50] ~ 10-5 mol/cm3. Emission signals were recorded simultaneously for three different wavelengths: OH* (λ = 308 nm) and {{{CO}}}2* (λ1 = 365 nm; λ2 = 451 nm). It was revealed that the time it takes to reach the maximum of emission of OH* and {{{CO}}}2* is practically the same over the whole temperature range. At the same time, the emission profiles of {{{CO}}}2* after the maximum was attained, recorded at λ2 = 451 nm, differ noticeably from the profiles recorded at λ1 = 365 nm. For numerical modeling of the emission profiles of OH* and {{{CO}}}2* , the corresponding sets of excitation and quenching reactions available in the literature were used. In the course of our numerical simulations we succeeded in good agreement of our own experimental and simulation results on acetone ignition and the results available in the literature for conditions under consideration.

  15. Accessing the diffracted wavefield by coherent subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Gajewski, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    Diffractions have unique properties which are still rarely exploited in common practice. Aside from containing subwavelength information on the scattering geometry or indicating small-scale structural complexity, they provide superior illumination compared to reflections. While diffraction occurs arguably on all scales and in most realistic media, the respective signatures typically have low amplitudes and are likely to be masked by more prominent wavefield components. It has been widely observed that automated stacking acts as a directional filter favouring the most coherent arrivals. In contrast to other works, which commonly aim at steering the summation operator towards fainter contributions, we utilize this directional selection to coherently approximate the most dominant arrivals and subtract them from the data. Supported by additional filter functions which can be derived from wave front attributes gained during the stacking procedure, this strategy allows for a fully data-driven recovery of faint diffractions and makes them accessible for further processing. A complex single-channel field data example recorded in the Aegean sea near Santorini illustrates that the diffracted background wavefield is surprisingly rich and despite the absence of a high channel count can still be detected and characterized, suggesting a variety of applications in industry and academia.

  16. Crystal Growth of High-Quality Protein Crystals under the Presence of an Alternant Electric Field in Pulse-Wave Mode, and a Strong Magnetic Field with Radio Frequency Pulses Characterized by X-ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Rodríguez-Romero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this research was devoted to investigating the effect of alternate current (AC using four different types of wave modes (pulse-wave at 2 Hz on the crystal growth of lysozyme in solution. The best results, in terms of size and crystal quality, were obtained when protein crystals were grown under the influence of electric fields in a very specific wave mode (“breathing” wave, giving the highest resolution up to 1.34 Å in X-ray diffraction analysis compared with controls and with those crystals grown in gel. In the second part, we evaluated the effect of a strong magnetic field of 16.5 Tesla combined with radiofrequency pulses of 0.43 μs on the crystal growth in gels of tetragonal hen egg white (HEW lysozyme. The lysozyme crystals grown, both in solution applying breathing-wave and in gel under the influence of this strong magnetic field with pulses of radio frequencies, produced the larger-in-size crystals and the highest resolution structures. Data processing and refinement statistics are very good in terms of the resolution, mosaicity and Wilson B factor obtained for each crystal. Besides, electron density maps show well-defined and distinctly separated atoms at several selected tryptophan residues for the crystal grown using the “breathing wave pulses”.

  17. Time and space domain separation of pulsed X-ray beams diffracted from vibrating crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosik, V. L., E-mail: v-nosik@yandex.ru, E-mail: nosik@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics,” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    It is known that a set of additional reflections (satellites) may arise on rocking curves in the case of X-ray diffraction in the Bragg geometry from crystals where high-frequency ultrasonic vibrations are excited. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the pulse wave fields of the satellites and main reflection may be intersected in space (playing the role of pump and probe beams) and in time (forming interference superlattices).

  18. Causal aspects of diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis is directed at a causal description of photon diffraction, which is explained in terms of a wave exerting real forces and providing actual guidance to each quantum of energy. An undulatory PSI wave is associated with each photon, and this wave is assumed to imply more than an informative probability function, so that it actually carries real energy, in much the same way as does an electro-magnetic wave. Whether or not it may be in some way related to the electromagnetic wave is left as a matter of on-going concern. A novel application of the concept of a minimum energy configuration is utilized; that is, a system of energy quanta seeks out relative positions and orientations of least mutual energy, much as an electron seeks its Bohr radius as a position of least mutual energy. Thus the concept implies more a guiding interaction of the PSI waves than an interfering cancellation of these waves. Similar concepts have been suggested by L. de Broglie and D. Bohm

  19. Diffraction dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarbanel, H.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyse the present theoretical situation in the field of diffraction scattering. Two not yet fully answered questions related with a typical diffraction process AB→CD, namely: what is the structure of the transition matrix elements, and what is the structure of the exchange mechanism responsible for the scattering, are formulated and various proposals for answers are reviewed. Interesting general statement that the products (-1)sup(J)P, where J and P are respectively spin and parity, is conserved at each vertex has been discussed. The exchange mechanism in diffractive scattering has been considered using the language of the complex J-plane as the most appropriate. The known facts about the exchange mechanism are recalled and several routs to way out are proposed. The idea to consider the moving pole and associated branch points as like a particle and the associated two and many particle unitarity cuts is described in more details. (S.B.)

  20. Numerical simulation of the temperature, electron density, and electric field distributions near the ionospheric reflection height after turn-on of a powerful HF wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldrew, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    The time variation of the electron temperature profile in the ionosphere following turn-on of a powerful 1-s HF pulse is determined numerically from the energy balance equation. Using this and the equations of motion and continuity for a plasma, the effect of heating and the pondermotive force of a powerful HF wave on the electron density and electric field distributions are determined by numerical simulation. The temperature variation and ponderomotive force modify the density distribution, and this new density distribution, in turn, modifies the electric field distribution of the HF wave. The density deviations grow for a few hundred milliseconds after HF turn-on and then begin to fluctuate in time. At all heights the wave number of the density deviations is approximately twice the wave number of the HF wave. For electric fields near reflection of about 6.0 V/m, the electric field distribution becomes complicated, apparently depending on Bragg scattering of the HF wave from the density deviations. Density impulses propagate away (up and down) from electric field maxima, at the ion thermal velocity, at both turn-on and turn-off of the HF wave

  1. Diffraction attraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'

  2. Diffractive scattering

    CERN Document Server

    De Wolf, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken-x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed.

  3. Diffractive Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.A. de

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken - x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wuesthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed. (author)

  4. Diffraction attraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-03-15

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'.

  5. Classical system underlying a diffracting quantum billiard

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manan Jain

    2018-01-05

    Jan 5, 2018 ... Wave equation; rays; quantum chaos. PACS Nos 03.65.Ge; 05.45.Mt; 42.25.Fx. 1. Introduction. Diffraction [1] is a complex wave phenomenon which manifests classically and quantum mechanically. Among a wide range of systems where diffraction becomes important, there is an interesting situation of.

  6. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  7. Determination of three-dimensional interfacial strain - A novel method of probing interface structure with X-ray Bragg-surface diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, W.-C.; Chu, C.-H.; Chang, H.-C.; Wu, B.-K.; Chen, Y.-R.; Cheng, C.-W.; Chiu, M.-S.; Shen, Y.-C.; Wu, H.-H.; Hung, Y.-S.; Chang, S.-L.; Hong, M.-H.; Tang, M.-T.; Stetsko, Yu.P.

    2007-01-01

    A new X-ray diffraction technique is developed to probe structural variations at the interfaces between epitaxy thin films and single-crystal substrates. The technique utilizes three-wave Bragg-surface diffraction, where a symmetric Bragg reflection and an asymmetric surface reflection are involved. The propagation of the latter along the interfaces conveys structural information about the interfacial region between the substrate and epi-layers. The sample systems of Au/GaAs(001) are subject to the three-wave diffraction investigation using synchrotron radiation. The GaAs three-wave Bragg-surface diffractions (006)/(11-bar3) and (006)/(1-bar1-bar3), are employed. The images of the surface diffracted waves are recorded with an image plate. The obtained images show relative positions of diffraction spots near the image of the interfacial boundary, which give the variation of lattice constant along the surface normal and in-plane directions. With the aid of grazing-incidence diffraction, three-dimensional mapping of strain field at the interfaces is possible. Details about this diffraction technique and the analysis procedures are discussed

  8. Poisson's ratio model derived from P- and S-wave reflection seismic data at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Tanner, David C.; Ziesch, Jennifer; Research Group Protect

    2014-05-01

    Compressional wave (P-wave) reflection seismic field measurements are a standard tool for subsurface exploration. 2-D seismic measurements are often used for overview measurements, but also as near-surface supplement to fill gaps that often exist in 3-D seismic data sets. Such supplementing 2-D measurements are typically simple with respect to field layout. This is an opportunity for the use of shear waves (S-waves). Within the last years, S-waves have become more and more important. One reason is that P- and S-waves are differently sensitive to fluids and pore fill so that the additional S-wave information can be used to enhance lithological studies. Another reason is that S-waves have the advantage of higher spatial resolution. Within the same signal bandwidth they typically have about half the wavelength of P-waves. In near-surface unconsolidated sediments they can even enhance the structural resolution by one order of magnitude. We make use of these capabilities within the PROTECT project. In addition to already existing 2-D P-wave data, we carried out a near surface 2-D S-wave field survey at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, close to Warrnambool, Australia in November 2013. The combined analysis of P-wave and S-wave data is used to construct a Poisson's Ratio 2-D model down to roughly 600 m depth. The Poisson's ratio values along a 1 km long profile at the site are surprisingly high, ranging from 0.47 in the carbonate-dominated near surface to 0.4 at depth. In the literature, average lab measurements of 0.22 for unfissured carbonates and 0.37 for fissured examples have been reported. The high values that we found may indicate areas of rather unconsolidated or fractured material, or enhanced fluid contents, and will be subject of further studies. This work is integrated in a larger workflow towards prediction of CO2 leakage and monitoring strategies for subsurface storage in general. Acknowledgement: This work was sponsored in part by the Australian

  9. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    KAUST Repository

    Stegenburgs, Edgars

    2017-01-08

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  10. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    KAUST Repository

    Stegenburgs, Edgars; Alias, Mohd Sharizal B.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  11. ATTENUATION OF DIFFRACTED MULTIPLES WITH AN APEX-SHIFTED TANGENT-SQUARED RADON TRANSFORM IN IMAGE SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Gabriel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a method to attenuate diffracted multiples with an apex-shifted tangent-squared Radon transform in angle domain common image gathers (ADCIG . Usually, where diffracted multiples are a problem, the wave field propagation is complex and the moveout of primaries and multiples in data space is irregular. The method handles the complexity of the wave field propagation by wave-equation migration provided that migration velocities are reasonably accurate. As a result, the moveout of the multiples is well behaved in the ADCIGs. For 2D data, the apex-shifted tangent-squared Radon transform maps the 2D space image into a 3D space-cube model whose dimensions are depth, curvature and apex-shift distance.
    Well-corrected primaries map to or near the zero curvature plane and specularly-reflected multiples map to or near the zero apex-shift plane. Diffracted multiples map elsewhere in the cube according to their curvature and apex-shift distance. Thus, specularly reflected as well as diffracted multiples can be attenuated simultaneously. This approach is illustrated with a segment of a 2D seismic line over a large salt body in the Gulf of Mexico. It is shown that ignoring the apex shift compromises the attenuation of the diffracted multiples, whereas the approach proposed attenuates both the specularly-reflected and the diffracted multiples without compromising the primaries.

  12. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  13. Powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  14. Simulation study of wave phenomena from the sheath region in single frequency capacitively coupled plasma discharges; field reversals and ion reflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.; Turner, M. M. [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2013-07-15

    Capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) discharges have great significance for industrial applications. Collisionless electron heating in such discharges is important, and sometimes is the dominant mechanism. This heating is usually understood to originate in a stochastic interaction between electrons and the electric fields. However, other mechanisms may also be important. There is evidence of wave emission with a frequency near the electron plasma frequency, i.e., ω{sub pe}, from the sheath region in collisionless capacitive RF discharges. This is the result of a progressive breakdown of quasi-neutrality close to the electron sheath edge. These waves are damped in a few centimeters during their propagation from the sheath towards the bulk plasma. The damping occurs because of the Landau damping or some related mechanism. This research work reports that the emission of waves is associated with a field reversal during the expanding phase of the sheath. Trapping of electrons near to this field reversal region is observed. The amplitude of the wave increases with increasing RF current density amplitude J(tilde sign){sub 0} until some maximum is reached, beyond which the wave diminishes and a new regime appears. In this new regime, the density of the bulk plasma suddenly increases because of ion reflection, which occurs due to the presence of strong field reversal near sheath region. Our calculation shows that these waves are electron plasma waves. These phenomena occur under extreme conditions (i.e., higher J(tilde sign){sub 0} than in typical experiments) for sinusoidal current waveforms, but similar effects may occur with non-sinusoidal pulsed waveforms for conditions of experimental interest, because the rate of change of current is a relevant parameter. The effect of electron elastic collisions on plasma waves is also investigated.

  15. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  16. Frequency Dependencies of the Exchange Spin Wave Reflection Coefficient on a One-Dimensional Magnon Crystal with Complex Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii O. Reshetniak

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. It is shown that the frequency dependencies are periodic, points of full transmission and areas, full of reflection. Decreasing exchange parameter value in interface causes the increase of reflectance coefficient. Changing the material parameters we get the necessary intensity value of the reflection coefficient depending on the frequency at a constant value of the external magnetic field.

  17. Flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave is a sign of proarrhythmic risk and a reflection of action potential triangulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed; Graff, Claus; Kanters, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced triangulation of the cardiac action potential is associated with increased risk of arrhythmic events. It has been suggested that triangulation causes a flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave but the relationship between triangulation, T-wave flattening and onset of arrhythmia ...

  18. Influence of arterial wave reflection on carotid blood pressure and intima-media thickness in older endurance trained men and women with pre-hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Jae, Sae Young; Tomayko, Emily; Ishaque, Muhammad R; Fernhall, Bo; Wilund, Kenneth R

    2009-05-01

    Increased carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) with aging is a significant predictor of mortality. Older endurance trained (ET) individuals have lower carotid artery stiffness but similar carotid IMT when compared to sedentary (SED) age-matched peers. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of arterial wave reflections to carotid hemodynamics and IMT in older ET and SED with pre-hypertension. Subjects consisted of endurance-trained master athletes and age-matched sedentary controls (mean age 67 years). Carotid artery Beta-stiffness index and IMT was assessed with ultrasonography. Carotid pressure and augmented pressure from wave reflections (obtained from pulse contour analysis) was measured with applanation tonometry. Carotid systolic blood pressure (SBP) and IMT were not different between groups (P>0.05). Carotid stiffness was significantly lower in ET versus SED (7.3 +/- 0.8 versus 9.9 +/- 0.6, Phypertension have reduced carotid artery stiffness, but similar carotid SBP and carotid IMT when compared to SED. The lack of change in carotid SBP and IMT in older ET may be related to the inability of chronic exercise training to reduce bradycardia-related augmented pressure from wave reflections with aging.

  19. Shock tubes and waves; Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Symposium, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule, Aachen, Federal Republic of Germany, July 26-31, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenig, Hans

    Topics discussed in this volume include shock wave structure, propagation, and interaction; shocks in condensed matter, dusty gases, and multiphase media; chemical processes and related combustion and detonation phenomena; shock wave reflection, diffraction, and focusing; computational fluid dynamic code development and shock wave application; blast and detonation waves; advanced shock tube technology and measuring technique; and shock wave applications. Papers are presented on dust explosions, the dynamics of shock waves in certain dense gases, studies of condensation kinetics behind incident shock waves, the autoignition mechanism of n-butane behind a reflected shock wave, and a numerical simulation of the focusing process of reflected shock waves. Attention is also given to the equilibrium shock tube flow of real gases, blast waves generated by planar detonations, modern diagnostic methods for high-speed flows, and interaction between induced waves and electric discharge in a very high repetition rate excimer laser.

  20. Geometrical optics and the diffraction phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, Aleksandr V

    2005-01-01

    This note outlines the principles of the geometrical optics of inhomogeneous waves whose description necessitates the use of complex values of the wave vector. Generalizing geometrical optics to inhomogeneous waves permits including in its scope the analysis of the diffraction phenomenon. (methodological notes)

  1. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong; Peng, Pai

    2015-01-01

    . The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a

  2. Determination of the effective transverse coherence of the neutron wave packet as employed in reflectivity investigations of condensed-matter structures. II. Analysis of elastic scattering using energy-gated wave packets with an application to neutron reflection from ruled gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, N. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present a general approach to analyzing elastic scattering for those situations where the incident beam is prepared as an incoherent ensemble of wave packets of a given arbitrary shape. Although wave packets, in general, are not stationary solutions of the Schrödinger equation, the analysis of elastic scattering data treats the scattering as a stationary-state problem. We thus must gate the wave packet, coherently distorting its shape in a manner consistent with the elastic condition. The resulting gated scattering amplitudes (e.g., reflection coefficients) thus are weighted coherent sums of the constituent plane-wave scattering amplitudes, with the weights determined by the shape of the incident wave packet as "filtered" by energy gating. We develop the gating formalism in general and apply it to the problem of neutron scattering from ruled gratings described by Majkrzak et al. in a companion paper. The required exact solution of the associated problem of plane-wave reflection from gratings also is derived.

  3. Structure of epitaxial SrIrO.sub.3./sub. perovskite studied by interference between X-ray waves diffracted by the substrate and the thin film

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, L.; Kriegner, D.; Liu, J.; Frontera, C.; Martí, Xavier; Holý, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, Apr (2017), s. 385-398 ISSN 1600-5767 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13058 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : perovskites * epitaxial layers * X-ray diffraction * interference Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.495, year: 2016

  4. Arterial wave reflections and kidney function decline among persons with preserved estimated glomerular filtration rate: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeffrey J; Katz, Ronit; Chirinos, Julio A; Jacobs, David R; Duprez, Daniel A; Peralta, Carmen A

    2016-05-01

    Differences in arterial wave reflections have been associated with increased risk for heart failure and mortality. Whether these measures are also associated with kidney function decline is not well established. Reflection magnitude (RM, defined as the ratio of the backward wave [Pb] to that of the forward wave [Pf]), augmentation index (AIx), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA) were derived from radial tonometry measures among 5232 participants free of cardiovascular disease who were enrolled in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Kidney function was estimated by creatinine and cystatin C measurements, as well as albumin-to-creatinine ratio. We evaluated the associations of Pb, Pf, RM, AIx, and PPA with annualized estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change and rapid kidney function decline over 5 years, using generalized linear mixed models and logistic regression, respectively. Of the study participants, 48% were male, mean age was 62 years, mean eGFR and median albumin-to-creatinine ratio at baseline were 84 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 5.3 mg/g, respectively. In demographically adjusted models, both Pb and Pf had similarly strong associations with kidney function decline; compared to those in the lowest tertiles, the persons in the highest tertiles of Pb and Pf had a 1.01 and 0.99 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year faster eGFR decline, respectively (P function decline. In conclusion, the reflected and forward wave components were similarly associated with kidney function decline, and these associations were explained by differences in systolic blood pressure. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental observation of acoustic sub-harmonic diffraction by a grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jingfei, E-mail: benjamin.jf.liu@gatech.edu; Declercq, Nico F., E-mail: declercqdepatin@gatech.edu [Laboratory for Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation “LUNE,” Georgia Tech Lorraine, Georgia Tech-CNRS UMI2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2, rue Marconi, Metz 57070 (France)

    2014-06-28

    A diffraction grating is a spatial filter causing sound waves or optical waves to reflect in directions determined by the frequency of the waves and the period of the grating. The classical grating equation is the governing principle that has successfully described the diffraction phenomena caused by gratings. However, in this work, we show experimental observation of the so-called sub-harmonic diffraction in acoustics that cannot be explained by the classical grating equation. Experiments indicate two physical phenomena causing the effect: internal scattering effects within the corrugation causing a phase shift and nonlinear acoustic effects generating new frequencies. This discovery expands our current understanding of the diffraction phenomenon, and it also makes it possible to better design spatial diffraction spectra, such as a rainbow effect in optics with a more complicated color spectrum than a traditional rainbow. The discovery reveals also a possibly new technique to study nonlinear acoustics by exploitation of the natural spatial filtering effect inherent to an acoustic diffraction grating.

  6. High-resolution S-wave reflection survey in a linear depression; Senjo kubochi ni okeru kobunkaino S ha hanshaho tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inazaki, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Sasaki, Y [Kyushu Regional Construction Bureau, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    An attempt was made to apply a method combining the high-resolution S-wave reflection survey with boring to a fault survey at the Kuju town, Oita Prefecture. The investigation area has a linear depression area as small as about 600 m from east to west and about 100 m from north to south surround by mountain slopes. The boundary section with mountain peaks at the north ridge of the depression area is linear, and existence of a southward falling normal fault has been indicated. The seismic investigation has employed an artificial plank hammering method, and the derived data were processed by using the processing software, Vista for Windows. The Bin interval was 25 cm, the S-wave velocity ranged from 100 to 150 m/s, and the spatial resolution was estimated at several ten centimeters or less. The resolution is thought sufficient for assessing the fault location and displacement. The acquired depth cross sections presented distinct structural discontinuity, from which the fault locations were estimated. However, for displacements in the base bed and upper beds, the reflected waves fell into disorder at the faults, having made a detailed assessment difficult. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. What Is Light?. Students' Reflections on the Wave-Particle Duality of Light and the Nature of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Ellen Karoline; Angell, Carl; Vistnes, Arnt Inge; Bungum, Berit

    2018-03-01

    Quantum physics describes light as having both particle and wave properties; however, there is no consensus about how to interpret this duality on an ontological level. This article explores how pre-university physics students, while working with learning material focusing on historical-philosophical aspects of quantum physics, interpreted the wave-particle duality of light and which views they expressed on the nature of physics. A thematic analysis was performed on 133 written responses about the nature of light, given in the beginning of the teaching sequence, and 55 audio-recorded small-group discussions addressing the wave-particle duality, given later in the sequence. Most students initially expressed a wave and particle view of light, but some of these gave an "uncritical duality description", accepting without question the two ontologically different descriptions of light. In the small-group discussions, students expressed more nuanced views. Many tried to reconcile the two descriptions using semi-classical reasoning; others entered into philosophical discussions about the status of the current scientific description of light and expected science to come up with a better model. Some found the wave description of light particularly challenging and lacked a conception of "what is waving". Many seemed to implicitly take a realist view on the description of physical phenomena, contrary with the Copenhagen interpretation which is prevalent in textbooks. Results are discussed in light of different interpretations of quantum physics, and we conclude by arguing for a historical-philosophical perspective as an entry point for upper secondary physics students to explore the development and interpretation of quantum physical concepts.

  8. Grazing incidence diffraction : A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, B [LTPCM, ENSEEG. St. Martin d` Heres. (France)

    1996-09-01

    Different Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) methods for the analysis of thin films and multilayer structures are reviewed in three sections: the reflectivity is developed in the first one, which includes the non-specular diffuse scattering. The second one is devoted to the extremely asymmetric Bragg diffraction and the third one to the in-plane Bragg diffraction. Analytical formulations of the scattered intensities are developed for each geometry, in the framework of the kinetical analysis as well as the dynamical theory. Experimental examples are given to illustrate the quantitative possibility of the GID techniques.

  9. Modeling of the Dynamics of Radio Wave Reflection and Absorption in a Smoothly Ionomogeneous Plasma with Electromagnetically Driven Strong Langmuir Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetov, A. V.

    2018-05-01

    This work was initiated by experiments on studying the self-action of radio waves incident on the ionosphere from a ground-based transmitter at the stage of electromagnetic excitation of Langmuir turbulence (Langmuir effect). The emphasis is on the impact of "self-consistent" collisionless absorption of radio waves by the Langmuir turbulence, which develops when the incident-wave field swells in the resonant region of a smoothly inhomogeneous plasma, on the dynamics of the radio wave reflection. Electrodynamic characteristics of the nonlinear-plasma layer, which has a linear unperturbed profile of the plasma density, with different features of the absorption development are obtained for a high intensity of the incident radiation. Calculations of "soft" and "hard" regimes of the absorption occurrence, as well as hysteresis modes in which the damping switch-on and off thresholds differ several times, are carried out. The algorithms we devised and the results of the study can serve as the basis for a more adequate and more detailed numerical simulation for interpretation of the experimental data obtained at the stage of the Langmuir effect in the ionosphere.

  10. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  11. Diffraction anomalous fine structure using X-ray anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Yuji; Kuwajima, Shuichiro

    1998-01-01

    A use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effects for structure investigation has recently been developed by using synchrotron radiation. One of the interesting method is the observation of anomalous fine structure which arise on diffraction intensity in energy region of incident X-ray at and higher than absorption edge. The phenomenon is so called Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS). DAFS originates in the same physical process an that of EXAFS: namely photoelectric effect at the corresponding atom and the interaction of photoelectron waves between the atom and neighboring atoms. In contrast with EXAFS, the method is available for only the crystalline materials, but shows effective advantages of the structure investigations by a use of diffraction: one is the site selectivity and the other is space selectivity. In the present study, demonstrations of a use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effect for the superstructure determination will be given for the case of PbZrO 3 , then recent trial investigations of DAFS in particular on the superlattice reflections will be introduced. In addition, we discuss about Forbidden Reflection near Edge Diffraction (FRED) which is more recently investigated as a new method of the structure analysis. (author)

  12. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  13. Modifications to 8x8 dynamical theory: Polarizations redefined according to x-ray diffraction convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrander, A.T.; Blasdell, R.C.

    1993-09-01

    Dynamical x-ray diffraction theory can be cast in matrix form. In recent years, an 8x8 matrix theory was developed that treated asymmetric reflections from strained crystals. The polarization of the incident, specularly reflected, reflected diffracted, transmitted diffracted, and transmitted electromagnetic wave fields were all defined as s or p. That is, polarizations were defined with respect to the plane containing the incident beam direction and the surface normal. The authors present modifications of the theory to treat σ and π polarizations for Bragg diffraction from asymmetric planes, that is, for polarizations defined with respect to the plane containing the incident beam direction and the reciprocal lattice vector for Bragg diffraction. They present results of this theory for unstrained crystals in the inclined geometry. In this geometry the incident beam wavevector, the reciprocal lattice vector, and the surface normal are not coplanar. The inclined crystal geometry appears promising for use in a high-heat-load monochromator for undulator radiation at the Advanced Photon Source. As expected, they find a weak π-polarization component in the diffracted beam when the polarization of the incident beam is pure σ

  14. Dispersion of repolarization in canine ventricle and the electrocardiographic T wave: Tp-e interval does not reflect transmural dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opthof, Tobias; Coronel, Ruben; Wilms-Schopman, Francien J. G.; Plotnikov, Alexei N.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R.; Janse, Michiel J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept that the interval between the peak (T(peak)) and the end (T(end)) of the T wave (T(p-e)) is a measure of transmural dispersion of repolarization time is widely accepted but has not been tested rigorously by transmural mapping of the intact heart. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of

  15. Transition operators in acoustic-wave diffraction theory. I - General theory. II - Short-wavelength behavior, dominant singularities of Zk0 and Zk0 exp -1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    A formal theory of the scattering of time-harmonic acoustic scalar waves from impenetrable, immobile obstacles is established. The time-independent formal scattering theory of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, in particular the theory of the complete Green's function and the transition (T) operator, provides the model. The quantum-mechanical approach is modified to allow the treatment of acoustic-wave scattering with imposed boundary conditions of impedance type on the surface (delta-Omega) of an impenetrable obstacle. With k0 as the free-space wavenumber of the signal, a simplified expression is obtained for the k0-dependent T operator for a general case of homogeneous impedance boundary conditions for the acoustic wave on delta-Omega. All the nonelementary operators entering the expression for the T operator are formally simple rational algebraic functions of a certain invertible linear radiation impedance operator which maps any sufficiently well-behaved complex-valued function on delta-Omega into another such function on delta-Omega. In the subsequent study, the short-wavelength and the long-wavelength behavior of the radiation impedance operator and its inverse (the 'radiation admittance' operator) as two-point kernels on a smooth delta-Omega are studied for pairs of points that are close together.

  16. Time-domain Brillouin scattering assisted by diffraction gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Pezeril, Thomas; Chaban, Ievgeniia; Fujita, Kentaro; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2018-02-01

    Absorption of ultrashort laser pulses in a metallic grating deposited on a transparent sample launches coherent compression/dilatation acoustic pulses in directions of different orders of acoustic diffraction. Their propagation is detected by delayed laser pulses, which are also diffracted by the metallic grating, through the measurement of the transient intensity change of the first-order diffracted light. The obtained data contain multiple frequency components, which are interpreted by considering all possible angles for the Brillouin scattering of light achieved through multiplexing of the propagation directions of light and coherent sound by the metallic grating. The emitted acoustic field can be equivalently presented as a superposition of plane inhomogeneous acoustic waves, which constitute an acoustic diffraction grating for the probe light. Thus the obtained results can also be interpreted as a consequence of probe light diffraction by both metallic and acoustic gratings. The realized scheme of time-domain Brillouin scattering with metallic gratings operating in reflection mode provides access to wide range of acoustic frequencies from minimal to maximal possible values in a single experimental optical configuration for the directions of probe light incidence and scattered light detection. This is achieved by monitoring the backward and forward Brillouin scattering processes in parallel. Potential applications include measurements of the acoustic dispersion, simultaneous determination of sound velocity and optical refractive index, and evaluation of samples with a single direction of possible optical access.

  17. Magnetic confinement, Alfven wave reflection, and the origins of X-ray and mass-loss 'dividing lines' for late-type giants and supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; An, C.-H.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple qualitative model for the origin of the coronal and mass-loss dividing lines separating late-type giants and supergiants with and without hot, X-ray-emitting corona, and with and without significant mass loss is discussed. The basic physical effects considered are the necessity of magnetic confinement for hot coronal material on the surface of such stars and the large reflection efficiency for Alfven waves in cool exponential atmospheres. The model assumes that the magnetic field geometry of these stars changes across the observed 'dividing lines' from being mostly closed on the high effective temperature side to being mostly open on the low effective temperature side.

  18. Imaging Shallow Aquitard Breaches with P waves: Results from a Walk-away test and a Reflection Survey at two Sites in Memphis, Tennessee, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, J.; Magnani, M.; Waldron, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of two seismic reflection experiments conducted in the Great Memphis area in April and July 2006. The two experiments consisted in a walk-away test and in the acquisition of a 1 km seismic reflection profile. The acquisition of the seismic data is part of a larger effort aimed at imaging the lateral continuity of the Upper Claiborne confining clay that separates the Memphis aquifer, the region's primary drinking water source, from the upper unconfined aquifer and protects the drinking aquifer from exposure to potential contamination. During the walk-away test, four P-wave sources, a 7.5 kg sledge hammer, a 20 kg weight drop, a 12-gauge Buffalo gun, and a Minivibe source were tested at two sites with the goal of selecting the best P-wave seismic source and acquisition parameters for shallow reflection surveys. Boreholes nearby both sites encountered the Upper Claiborne unit at a depth ranging from 10 m to 40 m. One site is located within a 100-meter length of road median that can be considered an urban environment. The second site is located at Shelby Farms within the City of Memphis yet reflects a rural setting with minimal noise and no subsurface infrastructure. Performing identical walk-away tests at both sites, the results indicate that the energy source selection is site dependent. At the urban site, the energy generated by the weight drop source is more coherent and can be interpreted with more confidence on the recorded data. However the Shelby Farms site the 12-gauge shotgun produced the strongest recorded energy, the highest dominant frequency and the broadest frequency band (6- 110 Hz). Strong attenuations are observed at both sites with a much higher attenuation in the urban road median site, where the near surface materials consisted of gravels, sands, clays, and pebbles. For both sites, surface waves and refractions dominate the seismic recordings. Filtering and gain of the data revealed the presence of shallow reflections related

  19. Fabrication of Terahertz Wave Resonators with Alumina Diamond Photonic Crystals for Frequency Amplification in Water Solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, N; Niki, T; Kirihara, S

    2011-01-01

    Terahertz wave resonators composed of alumina photonic crystals with diamond lattice structures were designed and fabricated by using micro stereolithography. These three dimensional periodic structures can reflect perfectly electromagnetic waves through Bragg diffraction. A micro glass cell including water solutions was put between the photonic crystals as a novel resonance sensor with terahertz frequency range. The localized and amplified waves in the resonators were measured by a spectroscopy, and visualized by theoretical simulations.

  20. Observed travel times for Multiply-reflected ScS waves from a deep-focus earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. ESPISOSA

    1966-06-01

    Full Text Available Tlie deep-focus Argentinean earthquake of December 8
    1962, generated multiply reflected ScS phases which were recorded very
    clearly at stations of the IGY and the TJSC&GS standardized worldwide
    networks and at Canadian stations. The data gathered from this earthquake
    for the multiply-reflected ScS and sScS were used to construct the
    travel times and to extend them to shorter epicentral distances. These
    new data brought to light an error in published travel times for the 2(ScS
    phase.

  1. Dynamical theory of neutron diffraction. [One-body Schroedinger equation, review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, V F [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario. Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1978-10-01

    We present a review of the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction by macroscopic bodies which provides the theoretical basis for the study of neutron optics. We consider both the theory of dispersion, in which it is shown that the coherent wave in the medium satisfies a macroscopic one-body Schroedinger equation, and the theory of reflection, refraction, and diffraction in which the above equation is solved for a number of special cases of interest. The theory is illustrated with the help of experimental results obtained over the past 10 years by a number of new techniques such as neutron gravity refractometry. Pendelloesung interference, and neutron interferometry.

  2. Nonlinear diffraction from a virtual beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, Solomon M.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    We observe experimentally a novel type of nonlinear diffraction in the process of two-wave mixing on a nonlinear quadratic grating.We demonstrate that when the nonlinear grating is illuminated simultaneously by two noncollinear beams, a second-harmonic diffraction pattern is generated by a virtual...... beam propagating along the bisector of the two pump beams. The observed iffraction phenomena is a purely nonlinear effect that has no analogue in linear diffraction...

  3. Doppleron resonances in the diffraction of atoms by an evanescent field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.E.; Hollenberg, L.C.L.; Smith, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    The diffracted intensities of sodium atoms by a standing evanescent light wave near the three doppleron resonance are calculated using a multi-slice technique. This calculation predicts a sharp dip in the reflected intensity of the specular beam for a detuning slightly below resonance. Such phenomena has been observed experimentally and can be understood using the dressed state picture. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  4. Acute Effects of Exercise Mode on Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection in Healthy Young Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris R. Pierce

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This systematic review and meta-analysis quantified the effect of acute exercise mode on arterial stiffness and wave reflection measures including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV, augmentation index (AIx, and heart rate corrected AIx (AIx75.Methods: Using standardized terms, database searches from inception until 2017 identified 45 studies. Eligible studies included acute aerobic and/or resistance exercise in healthy adults, pre- and post-intervention measurements or change values, and described their study design. Data from included studies were analyzed and reported in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and PRISMA guidelines. Meta-analytical data were reported via forest plots using absolute differences with 95% confidence intervals with the random effects model accounting for between-study heterogeneity. Reporting bias was assessed via funnel plots and, individual studies were evaluated for bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. A modified PEDro Scale was applied to appraise methodological concerns inherent to included studies.Results: Acute aerobic exercise failed to change cf-PWV (mean difference: 0.00 ms−1 [95% confidence interval: −0.11, 0.11], p = 0.96, significantly reduced AIx (−4.54% [−7.05, −2.04], p = 0.0004 and significantly increased AIx75 (3.58% [0.56, 6.61], p = 0.02. Contrastingly, acute resistance exercise significantly increased cf-PWV (0.42 ms−1 [0.17, 0.66], p = 0.0008, did not change AIx (1.63% [−3.83, 7.09], p = 0.56, and significantly increased AIx75 (15.02% [8.71, 21.33], p < 0.00001. Significant heterogeneity was evident within all comparisons except cf-PWV following resistance exercise, and several methodological concerns including low applicability of exercise protocols and lack of control intervention were identified.Conclusions: Distinct arterial stiffness and wave reflection responses were identified

  5. Formation of the reflected and refracted s-polarized electromagnetic waves in the Fresnel problem for the boundary vacuum-metamaterial from the viewpoint of molecular optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbukh, B. B.; Averbukh, I. B.

    2016-11-01

    The refraction of a plane s-polarized electromagnetic wave on the vacuum-metamaterial interface is considered. Point particles with electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities are scattering elements of a medium. The medium consists of plane-parallel monolayers of electric or magnetic dipoles or Huygens elements influencing one another. Dipole fields are completely taken into account. The fields inside the medium and the reflected fields are calculated. The extinction theorem is analyzed in detail. The mechanism of rotation of the magnetic field vector during refraction is elucidated. A reason for the absence of the fourth wave propagating from the medium toward the boundary in the conventionally employed boundary conditions is elucidated. It is shown that, under certain conditions, this medium can behave as possessing a unity refractive index or zero refractive index at a preset frequency. In the case of a metamaterial layer of finite thickness shows the output region of the existence of backward waves outside metamaterial layer. It is shown that the refraction of the field in a homogeneous medium after the dielectric corresponds to Fermat's principle, and the interference nature of Fermat's principle is justified.

  6. Wave fronts of electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1982-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous high-density magnetized plasma, the spatial properties of the wave fronts and ray trajectories of electromagnetic ordinary and extraordinary cyclotron harmonic waves are investigated. Those waves which are radiated from a local source are found to have wave fronts which are almost parallel to the magnetic field. Also, the reflective properties of the electromagnetic cyclotron harmonic waves are confirmed

  7. Corner diffraction coefficients for the quarter plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thorkild B.

    1991-01-01

    that the corner current for the right-angled corner, illuminated from a forward direction, consists mainly of two edge waves propagating along the edges forming the corner. Analytical expressions for these edge wave currents are constructed from the numerical results. A corner diffracted field is calculated...

  8. Scattering of ECRF waves by edge density fluctuations and blobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Abhay K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of electron cyclotron waves by density blobs embedded in the edge region of a fusion plasma is studied using a full-wave model. The full-wave theory is a generalization of the usual approach of geometric optics ray scattering by blobs. While the latter allows for only refraction of waves, the former, more general formulation, includes refraction, reflection, and diffraction of waves. Furthermore, the geometric optics, ray tracing, model is limited to blob densities that are slightly different from the background plasma density. Observations in tokamak experiments show that the fluctuating density differs from the background plasma density by 20% or more. Thus, the geometric optics model is not a physically realistic model of scattering of electron cyclotron waves by plasma blobs. The differences between the ray tracing approach and the full-wave approach to scattering are illustrated in this paper.

  9. Explanation and observability of diffraction in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.; Ban, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction in time (DIT) is a fundamental phenomenon in quantum dynamics due to time-dependent obstacles and slits. It is formally analogous to diffraction of light, and is expected to play an increasing role in the design of coherent matter wave sources, as in the atom laser, to analyze time-of-flight information and emission from ultrafast pulsed excitations, and in applications of coherent matter waves in integrated atom-optical circuits. We demonstrate that DIT emerges robustly in quantum waves emitted by an exponentially decaying source and provide a simple explanation of the phenomenon, as an interference of two characteristic velocities. This allows for its controllability and optimization.

  10. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  11. Wave-optical evaluation of interference fringes and wavefront phase in a hard-x-ray beam totally reflected by mirror optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Kazuto; Yamamura, Kazuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Sano, Yasuhisa; Saito, Akira; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Souvorov, Alexei; Yabashi, Makina; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mori, Yuzo

    2005-11-10

    The intensity flatness and wavefront shape in a coherent hard-x-ray beam totally reflected by flat mirrors that have surface bumps modeled by Gaussian functions were investigated by use of a wave-optical simulation code. Simulated results revealed the necessity for peak-to-valley height accuracy of better than 1 nm at a lateral resolution near 0.1 mm to remove high-contrast interference fringes and appreciable wavefront phase errors. Three mirrors that had different surface qualities were tested at the 1 km-long beam line at the SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute. Interference fringes faded when the surface figure was corrected below the subnanometer level to a spatial resolution close to 0.1 mm, as indicated by the simulated results.

  12. Quantitative measurement of phase variation amplitude of ultrasonic diffraction grating based on diffraction spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Meiyan, E-mail: yphantomohive@gmail.com; Zeng, Yingzhi; Huang, Zuohua, E-mail: zuohuah@163.com [Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China)

    2014-09-15

    A new method based on diffraction spectral analysis is proposed for the quantitative measurement of the phase variation amplitude of an ultrasonic diffraction grating. For a traveling wave, the phase variation amplitude of the grating depends on the intensity of the zeroth- and first-order diffraction waves. By contrast, for a standing wave, this amplitude depends on the intensity of the zeroth-, first-, and second-order diffraction waves. The proposed method is verified experimentally. The measured phase variation amplitude ranges from 0 to 2π, with a relative error of approximately 5%. A nearly linear relation exists between the phase variation amplitude and driving voltage. Our proposed method can also be applied to ordinary sinusoidal phase grating.

  13. Transmission of wave energy through an offshore wind turbine farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Johnson, Martin; Sørensen, Ole Rene

    2013-01-01

    condition at infinity. From airborne and Satellite SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) a model has been derived for the change of the water surface friction C) inside and on the lee side of the offshore wind farm. The effects have been implemented in a spectral wind wave model,MIKE21 SW, and a parametric study......The transmission of wave energy passing an offshore wind farm is studied. Three effects that can change the wave field are analysed, which is the A) energy dissipation due to drag resistance, B) wave reflection/diffraction from structures, and C) the effect of a modified wind field inside...... and on the lee side of the wind farm. The drag dissipation, A), is quantified by a quadratic resistance law. The effect of B) is parameterised based on 1st order potential theory. A method to find the amount of reflected and transmitted wave energy is developed based on the panel method WAMIT™ and a radiation...

  14. Photoemission in case of a strongly asymmetric X-ray dinamic diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglov, M.V.; Sazontov, E.A.; Solomin, I.K.

    1985-01-01

    Possibility has been studied of utilizing strongly asymmet-- ric reflections, in particular in case when the reflected wave slips at a small angle along the surface, for investigating the structural violations of the surface crystal layers. Angular dependence extrinsic photoeffect (ADEP) in the region of X-ray incedence angles close to the Bragg diffraction angle was studied in this paper conformably to crystals with a distorted surface layer. Measurements were conducted with ideal germanium crystals using CuKsub(α) radiation reflections (220) and silicon crystals using CrKsub(α) radiation reflections (22O). It is shown that, in investigating deformed surface layers with low thichkness and large variation of interplanar space, as compared to the basic crystal matric, application of strongly asymmetric reflections anables to increase the sensitivity and information content of the method of abnormal ADEP

  15. Diffraction by an immersed elastic wedge

    CERN Document Server

    Croisille, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    This monograph presents the mathematical description and numerical computation of the high-frequency diffracted wave by an immersed elastic wave with normal incidence. The mathematical analysis is based on the explicit description of the principal symbol of the pseudo-differential operator connected with the coupled linear problem elasticity/fluid by the wedge interface. This description is subsequently used to derive an accurate numerical computation of diffraction diagrams for different incoming waves in the fluid, and for different wedge angles. The method can be applied to any problem of coupled waves by a wedge interface. This work is of interest for any researcher concerned with high frequency wave scattering, especially mathematicians, acousticians, engineers.

  16. Effect of diffraction on stimulated Brillouin scattering from a single laser hot spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, V.V.; Rozmus, W.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Capjack, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    A single laser hot spot in an underdense plasma is represented as a focused Gaussian laser beam. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) from such a Gaussian beam with small f/numbers 2-4 has been studied in a three-dimensional slab geometry. It is shown that the SBS reflectivity from a single laser hot spot is much lower than that predicted by a simple three wave coupling model because of the diffraction of the scattered light from the spatially localized ion acoustic wave. SBS gain per one Rayleigh length of the incident laser beam is proposed as a quantitative measure of this effect. Diffraction-limited SBS from a randomized laser beam is also discussed. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Visible light dynamical diffraction in a 1-D photonic crystal-based interferometer with an extremely thin spacer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudnikov, I.R.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of light diffraction in a Fabry–Pérot-like interferometer composed of two 1-D photonic crystals and a nanometer-thick spacer layer are analytically investigated. It is shown that the resonant enhancement of light wave intensity in such a layer is possible because of light dynamical diffraction from the photonic crystals of the interferometer. Numerical simulations of (i) light reflectivity and transmittance curves of the interferometer having an ultra-thin spacer layer (its thickness changes from less than 1 nm to about 10 nm) and (ii) the resonant distribution of the light wave intensity in the vicinity of the layer are performed. Based on the numerical simulations, potentialities for the determination of the structural parameters (e.g., thicknesses and refraction indexes) of ultra-thin spacer films are discussed. A difference is found to appear in resonant intensity enhancements inside the ultra-thin spacer layers between s- and p-polarized light waves.

  18. Waves and Tsunami Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  19. Highly-optimized TWSM software package for seismic diffraction modeling adapted for GPU-cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyatkov, Nikolay; Ayzenberg, Alena; Aizenberg, Arkady

    2015-04-01

    Oil producing companies concern to increase resolution capability of seismic data for complex oil-and-gas bearing deposits connected with salt domes, basalt traps, reefs, lenses, etc. Known methods of seismic wave theory define shape of hydrocarbon accumulation with nonsufficient resolution, since they do not account for multiple diffractions explicitly. We elaborate alternative seismic wave theory in terms of operators of propagation in layers and reflection-transmission at curved interfaces. Approximation of this theory is realized in the seismic frequency range as the Tip-Wave Superposition Method (TWSM). TWSM based on the operator theory allows to evaluate of wavefield in bounded domains/layers with geometrical shadow zones (in nature it can be: salt domes, basalt traps, reefs, lenses, etc.) accounting for so-called cascade diffraction. Cascade diffraction includes edge waves from sharp edges, creeping waves near concave parts of interfaces, waves of the whispering galleries near convex parts of interfaces, etc. The basic algorithm of TWSM package is based on multiplication of large-size matrices (make hundreds of terabytes in size). We use advanced information technologies for effective realization of numerical procedures of the TWSM. In particular, we actively use NVIDIA CUDA technology and GPU accelerators allowing to significantly improve the performance of the TWSM software package, that is important in using it for direct and inverse problems. The accuracy, stability and efficiency of the algorithm are justified by numerical examples with curved interfaces. TWSM package and its separate components can be used in different modeling tasks such as planning of acquisition systems, physical interpretation of laboratory modeling, modeling of individual waves of different types and in some inverse tasks such as imaging in case of laterally inhomogeneous overburden, AVO inversion.

  20. Evidence of Enhanced Subrosion in a Fault Zone and Characterization of Hazard Zones with Elastic Parameters derived from SH-wave reflection Seismics and VSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, S. H.; Tanner, D. C.; Tschache, S.; Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Subrosion, the dissolution of soluble rocks, e.g., sulfate, salt, or carbonate, requires unsaturated water and fluid pathways that enable the water to flow through the subsurface and generate cavities. Over time, different structures can occur that depend on, e.g., rock solubility, flow rate, and overburden type. The two main structures are sinkholes and depressions. To analyze the link between faults, groundwater flow, and soluble rocks, and to determine parameters that are useful to characterize hazard zones, several shear-wave (SH) reflection seismic profiles were surveyed in Thuringia in Germany, where Permian sulfate rocks and salt subcrop close to the surface. From the analysis of the seismic sections we conclude that areas affected by tectonic deformation phases are prone to enhanced subrosion. The deformation of fault blocks leads to the generation of a damage zone with a dense fracture network. This increases the rock permeability and thus serves as a fluid pathway for, e.g., artesian-confined groundwater. The more complex the fault geometry and the more interaction between faults, the more fractures are generated, e.g., in a strike slip-fault zone. The faults also act as barriers for horizontal groundwater flow perpendicular to the fault surfaces and as conduits for groundwater flow along the fault strike. In addition, seismic velocity anomalies and attenuation of seismic waves are observed. Low velocities high attenuation may indicate areas affected by subrosion. Other parameters that characterize the underground stability are the shear modulus and the Vp/Vs ratio. The data revealed zones of low shear modulus high Vp/Vs ratio >2.5, which probably indicate unstable areas due to subrosion. Structural analysis of S-wave seismics is a valuable tool to detect near-surface faults in order to determine whether or not an area is prone to subrosion. The recognition of even small fault blocks can help to better understand the hydrodynamic groundwater conditions

  1. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  2. A review and reassessment of diffraction, scattering, and shadows in electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew J.; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2018-05-01

    The concepts of diffraction and scattering are well known and considered fundamental in optics and other wave phenomena. For any type of wave, one way to define diffraction is the spreading of waves, i.e., no change in the average propagation direction, while scattering is the deflection of waves with a clear change of propagation direction. However, the terms "diffraction" and "scattering" are often used interchangeably, and hence, a clear distinction between the two is difficult to find. This review considers electromagnetic waves and retains the simple definition that diffraction is the spreading of waves but demonstrates that all diffraction patterns are the result of scattering. It is shown that for electromagnetic waves, the "diffracted" wave from an object is the Ewald-Oseen extinction wave in the far-field zone. The intensity distribution of this wave yields what is commonly called the diffraction pattern. Moreover, this is the same Ewald-Oseen wave that cancels the incident wave inside the object and thereafter continues to do so immediately behind the object to create a shadow. If the object is much wider than the beam but has a hole, e.g., a screen with an aperture, the Ewald-Oseen extinction wave creates the shadow behind the screen and the incident light that passes through the aperture creates the diffraction pattern. This point of view also illustrates Babinet's principle. Thus, it is the Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem that binds together diffraction, scattering, and shadows.

  3. Diffraction coherence in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  4. Diffraction efficiency calculations of polarization diffraction gratings with surface relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, D.; Sharlandjiev, P.; Berberova, N.; Blagoeva, B.; Stoykova, E.; Nedelchev, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the optical response of a stack of two diffraction gratings of equal one-dimensional periodicity. The first one is a surface-relief grating structure; the second, a volume polarization grating. This model is based on our experimental results from polarization holographic recordings in azopolymer films. We used films of commercially available azopolymer (poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt]), shortly denoted as PAZO. During the recording process, a polarization grating in the volume of the material and a relief grating on the film surface are formed simultaneously. In order to evaluate numerically the optical response of this “hybrid” diffraction structure, we used the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA). It yields stable numerical solutions of Maxwell’s vector equations using the algebraic eigenvalue method.

  5. Improvement of insertion loss and quality factor of flexural plate-wave-based alpha-fetoprotein biosensor using groove-type reflective grating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chang-Yu; Huang, I.-Yu; Lan, Je-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Conventional flexural plate-wave (FPW) transducers have limited applications in biomedical sensing due to their disadvantages such as high insertion loss and low quality factor. To overcome these shortcomings, we propose a FPW transducer on a low phase velocity insulator membrane (5-μm-thick SiO2) with a novel groove-type reflective grating structure design. Additionally, a cystamine self-assembly monolayer and a glutaraldehyde cross-linking layer are implemented on the backside of the FPW device to immobilize alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) antibody. A FPW-based AFP biosensor with low detection limit (5 ng/mL) can be achieved and used to measure the extreme low concentration of AFP antigen in human serum for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma. The proposed FPW-based AFP biosensor also demonstrates a very high quality factor (206), low insertion loss (-40.854 dB), low operating frequency (6.388 MHz), and high sensing linearity (90.7%).

  6. Kinetics of the Thermal Decomposition of Tetramethylsilane behind the Reflected Shock Waves in a Single Pulse Shock Tube (SPST) and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parandaman, A.; Sudhakar, G.; Rajakumar, B.

    Thermal reactions of Tetramethylsilane (TMS) diluted in argon were studied behind the reflected shock waves in a single-pulse shock tube (SPST) over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K and pressures varied between 10.6 and 22.8 atm. The stable products resulting from the decomposition of TMS were identified and quantified using gas chromatography and also verified with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The major reaction products are methane (CH4) and ethylene (C2H4). The minor reaction products are ethane (C2H6) and propylene (C3H6). The initiation of mechanism in the decomposition of TMS takes plays via the Si-C bond scission by ejecting the methyl radicals (CH3) and trimethylsilyl radicals ((CH3)3Si). The measured temperature dependent rate coefficient for the total decomposition of TMS was to be ktotal = 1.66 ×1015 exp (-64.46/RT) s-1 and for the formation of CH4 reaction channel was to be k = 2.20 × 1014 exp (-60.15/RT) s-1, where the activation energies are given in kcal mol-1. A kinetic scheme containing 17 species and 28 elementary reactions was used for the simulation using chemical kinetic simulator over the temperature range of 1085-1221 K. The agreement between the experimental and simulated results was satisfactory.

  7. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Dennis Eugene [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of 57Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2±0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 11/2 natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  8. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of 57 Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2±0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1 1/2 natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei

  9. Photoacoustic reflection artifact reduction using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound : comparison between plane-wave and element-by-element synthetic backpropagation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, M.; Jaeger, M.; Frenz, M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities constitute a major problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients from the skin and superficial optical absorbers traverse into the tissue and reflect off echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts.

  10. X-ray diffraction characteristics of curved monochromators for sychrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeuf, A.; Rustichelli, F.; Mazkedian, S.; Puliti, P.; Melone, S.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented concerning the diffraction characteristics of curved monochromators for X-ray synchrotron radiation used at the laboratories of Hamburg, Orsay and Stanford. The investigation was performed by extending to the X-ray case a simple model recently developed and fruitfully employed to describe the neutron diffraction properties of curved monochromators. Several diffraction patterns were obtained corresponding to different monochromator materials (Ge, Si) used by the different laboratories, for different reflecting planes (111), (220), asymmetry angles, X-ray wave-lengths (Mo Kα, Cu Kα, Cr Kα) and curvature radii. The results are discussed in physical terms and their implications on the design of curved monochromators for synchrotron radiation are presented. In particular, the study shows that all the monochromators used in the different laboratories should behave practically as perfect crystals and therefore should have a very low integrated reflectivity corresponding to an optimized wavelength passband Δlambda/lambda approximately 10 -4 . The gain that can be obtained by increasing the curvature, by introducing a gradient in the lattice spacing or by any other kind of imperfection is quite limited and much lower than the desirable value. The adopted model can help in obtaining a possible moderate gain in intensity by also taking into consideration other parameters, such as crystal material, reflecting plane, asymmetry of the reflection and X-ray wavelength. (Auth.)

  11. Holographic analysis of diffraction structure factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, S.; Bucher, J.J.; Shuh, D.K.; Fabris, L.; Press, M.J.; West, M.W.; Hussain, Z.; Mannella, N.; Fadley, C.S.; Van Hove, M.A.; Stolte, W.C.

    2002-01-01

    We combine the theory of inside-source/inside-detector x-ray fluorescence holography and Kossel lines/ x ray standing waves in kinematic approximation to directly obtain the phases of the diffraction structure factors. The influence of Kossel lines and standing waves on holography is also discussed. We obtain partial phase determination from experimental data obtaining the sign of the real part of the structure factor for several reciprocal lattice vectors of a vanadium crystal

  12. Resolution limits for wave equation imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2014-08-01

    Formulas are derived for the resolution limits of migration-data kernels associated with diving waves, primary reflections, diffractions, and multiple reflections. They are applicable to images formed by reverse time migration (RTM), least squares migration (LSM), and full waveform inversion (FWI), and suggest a multiscale approach to iterative FWI based on multiscale physics. That is, at the early stages of the inversion, events that only generate low-wavenumber resolution should be emphasized relative to the high-wavenumber resolution events. As the iterations proceed, the higher-resolution events should be emphasized. The formulas also suggest that inverting multiples can provide some low- and intermediate-wavenumber components of the velocity model not available in the primaries. Finally, diffractions can provide twice or better the resolution than specular reflections for comparable depths of the reflector and diffractor. The width of the diffraction-transmission wavepath is approximately λ at the diffractor location for the diffraction-transmission wavepath. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Axial channeling in electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimiya, A.; Lehmpfuhl, G.

    1978-01-01

    Kossel patterns from Silicon and Niobium were obtained with a convergent electron beam. An intensity maximum in the direction of the zone axes [001] and [111] of Nb was interpreted as axial channeling. The intensity distribution in Kossel patterns was calculated by means of the Bloch wave picture of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Particularly zone axis patterns were calculated for different substance-energy combinations and they were compared with experimental observations. The intensity distribution in the calculated Kossel patterns was very sensitive to the model of absorption and it was found that a treatment of the absorption close to the model of Humphreys and Hirsch [Phil. Mag. 18, 115 (1968)] gave the best agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore it is shown which Bloch waves are important for the intensity distribution in the Kossel patterns, how they are absorbed and how they change with energy. (orig.) [de

  14. Elements of seismic imaging and velocity analysis – Forward modeling and diffraction analysis of conventional seismic data from the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    comprises important oil and gas reservoirs. By application of well-established conventional velocity analysis methods and high-quality diffraction imaging techniques, this study aims to increase the resolution and the image quality of the seismic data. In order to analyze seismic wave propagation......-outs and salt delineations, which can be extracted from the diffractions. The potential of diffraction imaging techniques was studied for 2D seismic stacked data from the North Sea. In this approach, the applied plane-wave destruction method was successful in order to suppress the reflections from the stacked....... This improved seismic imaging is demonstrated for a salt structure as well as for Overpressured Shale structures and the Top Chalk of the North Sea....

  15. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Giani, S; Niewiadomski, H; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage...

  16. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.

    2008-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral...

  17. FY 1999 geothermal development promotion study. Report on results of the elastic wave exploitation (reflection method) in No.B-5, Busadake area; 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Danseiha tansa (hanshaho) hokokusho No.B-5 Busadake chiiki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are results of the elastic wave exploitation (reflection method) conducted in the Busadake area in Hokkaido to elucidate the geological and geothermal structures. The elastic wave exploitation used large-size vibrators, an explosive and 4 courses of traverse (total length: 25.675 km, number of vibration-receiving points: 1,031, and number of vibration source points: 342). The data were processed by the standard procedure of the common reflection synthesis method. The acoustic velocity logging data, collected at the structural drillings N10-MD-1 and N10-MD-2, were synthesized to have the reflection seismic records. The existing surface geology, drilling geology and gravity data were compared with the recorded deep sections for the comprehensive discussion, to extract the reflection horizon corresponding to the geological boundary, and investigate the relationships of the discrete lines of deposit structures, unconformity relations and reflection with geological and default structures determined by the data analysis. The study results of the geothermal structures suggest possible formation of the geothermal reservoir deep in the west of the default found by Line-1, based on the observed temperature structures at the drilling N7-SB-1. (NEDO)

  18. Electromagnetic wave matching device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yosuke; Mitsunaka, Yoshika; Hayashi, Ken-ichi; Ito, Yasuyuki.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides an electromagnetic wave matching capable of reducing a cost for the transmission system in a system of using electromagnetic waves for plasma heating of a thermonuclear reactor. Namely, incident electromagnetic waves are reflected by using a plurality of phase correction mirrors. The reflected electromagnetic waves are connected to an external transmission system through an exit. The phase correction mirrors have such a shape to receive a plurality of beam-like electromagnetic waves and output electromagnetic waves by the number different from the number of the received electromagnetic wave beams having a predetermined distribution. Further, at least two of the phase correction mirrors have such a shape to change the phase of the electromagnetic waves beams incident to the reflection surface of the phase correction mirrors by a predetermined amount corresponding to the position of the reflection surface. Then, the cost for transmission system can greatly be reduced. (I.S.)

  19. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier views...... of reflection, rehabilitate them in order to capture broader connotations or move to new ways of regarding reflection that are more in keeping with not only reflective but also emotive, normative and formative views on supervision. The paper presents a critical perspective on supervision that challenge...... the current reflective paradigm I supervision and relate this to emotive, normative and formative views supervision. The paper is relevant for Nordic educational research into the supervision and guidance...

  20. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernik, R J [Daresbury Lab., Warrington, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school.