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Sample records for wave reactor atomic

  1. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl sub 2 , H sub 2 S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd) sub 3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd) sub 3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films re...

  2. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  3. The First Reactor, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allardice, Corbin; And Others

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. Consisting of three sections, it is an account of the development of the first nuclear reactor by a team of scientists led by Enrico Farmi. The first section briefly reviews the early work on nuclear fission and neutron emission, the impact of Einstein's letter to President Roosevelt, the…

  4. The Traveling Wave Reactor: Design and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Gilleland

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The traveling wave reactor (TWR is a once-through reactor that uses in situ breeding to greatly reduce the need for enrichment and reprocessing. Breeding converts incoming subcritical reload fuel into new critical fuel, allowing a breed-burn wave to propagate. The concept works on the basis that breed-burn waves and the fuel move relative to one another. Thus either the fuel or the waves may move relative to the stationary observer. The most practical embodiments of the TWR involve moving the fuel while keeping the nuclear reactions in one place−sometimes referred to as the standing wave reactor (SWR. TWRs can operate with uranium reload fuels including totally depleted uranium, natural uranium, and low-enriched fuel (e.g., 5.5% 235U and below, which ordinarily would not be critical in a fast spectrum. Spent light water reactor (LWR fuel may also serve as TWR reload fuel. In each of these cases, very efficient fuel usage and significant reduction of waste volumes are achieved without the need for reprocessing. The ultimate advantages of the TWR are realized when the reload fuel is depleted uranium, where after the startup period, no enrichment facilities are needed to sustain the first reactor and a chain of successor reactors. TerraPower's conceptual and engineering design and associated technology development activities have been underway since late 2006, with over 50 institutions working in a highly coordinated effort to place the first unit in operation by 2026. This paper summarizes the TWR technology: its development program, its progress, and an analysis of its social and economic benefits.

  5. Nuclear reactor materials at the atomic scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle A. Marquis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available With the renewed interest in nuclear energy, developing new materials able to respond to the stringent requirements of the next-generation fission and future fusion reactors has become a priority. An efficient search for such materials requires detailed knowledge of material behaviour under irradiation, high temperatures and corrosive environments. Minimizing the rates of materials degradation will be possible only if the mechanisms by which it occurs are understood. Atomic-scale experimental probing as well as modelling can provide some answers and help predict in-service behaviour. This article illustrates how this approach has already improved our understanding of precipitation under irradiation, corrosion behaviour, and stress corrosion cracking. It is also now beginning to provide guidance for the development of new alloys.

  6. Breeder Reactors, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Walter, III; Turner, Stanley E.

    The theory of breeder reactors in relationship to a discussion of fission is presented. Different kinds of reactors are characterized by the cooling fluids used, such as liquid metal, gas, and molten salt. The historical development of breeder reactors over the past twenty-five years includes specific examples of reactors. The location and a brief…

  7. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  8. Cold trapped atoms detected with evanescent waves

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelussen, R. A.; van Amerongen, A. H.; Wolschrijn, B. T.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.; Heuvell, H. B. van Linden van den

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the in situ detection of cold 87 Rb atoms near a dielectric surface using the absorption of a weak, resonant evanescent wave. We have used this technique in time of flight experiments determining the density of atoms falling on the surface. A quantitative understanding of the measured curve was obtained using a detailed calculation of the evanescent intensity distribution. We have also used it to detect atoms trapped near the surface in a standing-wave optical dipole potential....

  9. Fluid dynamics of the shock wave reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Robert Kenneth

    2000-10-01

    High commercial incentives have driven conventional olefin production technologies to near their material limits, leaving the possibility of further efficiency improvements only in the development of entirely new techniques. One strategy known as the Shock Wave Reactor, which employs gas dynamic processes to circumvent limitations of conventional reactors, has been demonstrated effective at the University of Washington. Preheated hydrocarbon feedstock and a high enthalpy carrier gas (steam) are supersonically mixed at a temperature below that required for thermal cracking. Temperature recovery is then effected via shock recompression to initiate pyrolysis. The evolution to proof-of-concept and analysis of experiments employing ethane and propane feedstocks are presented. The Shock Wave Reactor's high enthalpy steam and ethane flows severely limit diagnostic capability in the proof-of-concept experiment. Thus, a preliminary blow down supersonic air tunnel of similar geometry has been constructed to investigate recompression stability and (especially) rapid supersonic mixing necessary for successful operation of the Shock Wave Reactor. The mixing capabilities of blade nozzle arrays are therefore studied in the air experiment and compared with analytical models. Mixing is visualized through Schlieren imaging and direct photography of condensation in carbon dioxide injection, and interpretation of visual data is supported by pressure measurement and flow sampling. The influence of convective Mach number is addressed. Additionally, thermal behavior of a blade nozzle array is analyzed for comparison to data obtained in the course of succeeding proof-of-concept experiments. Proof-of-concept is naturally succeeded by interest in industrial adaptation of the Shock Wave Reactor, particularly with regard to issues involving the scaling and refinement of the shock recompression. Hence, an additional, variable geometry air tunnel has been constructed to study the parameter

  10. Energy Wave Model of Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍细如

    2015-01-01

    proton emits energy wave, electron could sits any position away from nucleus, but be the most stable just when it sits at the trough of energy wave, and this position accords with Bohr radius and Schr?dinger equation.

  11. Gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason

    2016-05-01

    The advent of gravitational wave astronomy promises to provide a new window into the universe. Low frequency gravitational waves below 10 Hz are expected to offer rich science opportunities both in astrophysics and cosmology, complementary to signals in LIGO's band. Detector designs based on atom interferometry have a number of advantages over traditional approaches in this band, including the possibility of substantially reduced antenna baseline length in space and high isolation from seismic noise for a terrestrial detector. In particular, atom interferometry based on the clock transition in group II atoms offers tantalizing new possibilities. Such a design is expected to be highly immune to laser frequency noise because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This would allow for a gravitational wave detector with a single linear baseline, potentially offering advantages in cost and design flexibility. In support of these proposals, recent progress in long baseline atom interferometry in a 10-meter drop tower has enabled observation of matter wave interference with atomic wavepacket separations exceeding 50 cm and interferometer durations of more than 2 seconds. This approach can provide ground-based proof-of-concept demonstrations of many of the technical requirements of both terrestrial and satellite gravitational wave detectors.

  12. Discrete wave mechanics: The hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, F T

    1986-08-01

    The quantum mechanical problem of the hydrogen atom is treated by use of a finite difference equation in place of Schrödinger's differential equation. The exact solution leads to a wave vector energy expression that is readily converted to the Bohr-Rydberg formula. (The calculations here reported are limited to spherically symmetric states.) The wave vectors reduce to the familiar solutions of Schrödinger's equation as c --> infinity. The internal consistency and limiting behavior provide support for the view that the equations employed could well constitute an approach to a relativistic formulation of wave mechanics.

  13. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2009-01-01

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification.

  14. An Atomic Gravitational Wave Interferometric Sensor (AGIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Savas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Graham, Peter W.; /SLAC; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rajendran, Surjeet; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-08-01

    We propose two distinct atom interferometer gravitational wave detectors, one terrestrial and another satellite-based, utilizing the core technology of the Stanford 10m atom interferometer presently under construction. Each configuration compares two widely separated atom interferometers run using common lasers. The signal scales with the distance between the interferometers, which can be large since only the light travels over this distance, not the atoms. The terrestrial experiment with baseline {approx} 1 km can operate with strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -19}/{radical}Hz in the 1 Hz-10 Hz band, inaccessible to LIGO, and can detect gravitational waves from solar mass binaries out to megaparsec distances. The satellite experiment with baseline {approx} 1000 km can probe the same frequency spectrum as LISA with comparable strain sensitivity {approx} 10{sup -20}/{radical}Hz. The use of ballistic atoms (instead of mirrors) as inertial test masses improves systematics coming from vibrations, acceleration noise, and significantly reduces spacecraft control requirements. We analyze the backgrounds in this configuration and discuss methods for controlling them to the required levels.

  15. Using Atomic Clocks to Detect Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Atomic clocks have recently reached a fractional timing precision of $<10^{-18}$. We point out that an array of atomic clocks, distributed along the Earth's orbit around the Sun, will have the sensitivity needed to detect the time dilation effect of mHz gravitational waves (GWs), such as those emitted by supermassive black hole binaries at cosmological distances. Simultaneous measurement of clock-rates at different phases of a passing GW provides an attractive alternative to the interferometric detection of temporal variations in distance between test masses separated by less than a GW wavelength, currently envisioned for the eLISA mission.

  16. Observation of Atom-Wave Beats Using a Kerr Modulator for Atom Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, B; Gillot, J; Vigué, J; Gauguet, A; Büchner, M

    2016-02-01

    A phase modulation puts the atom in a coherent superposition of quantum states with different kinetic energies. We have detected the interference of such modulated waves at the output of our atom interferometer, and we have observed beats at the difference of the modulation frequencies and its harmonics, in good agreement with theory. The phase modulations were produced by a Kerr phase modulator, i.e., by the propagation of the atom wave in a time-dependent electric field. An extension of this technique to electron interferometry should open the way to very high temporal resolution in electron microscopy.

  17. Wave mechanics of the hydrogen atom

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, J F

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is a system amenable to an exact treatment within Schroedinger's formulation of quantum mechanics according to coordinates in four systems -- spherical polar, paraboloidal, ellipsoidal and spheroconical coordinates; the latter solution is reported for the first time. Applications of these solutions include angular momenta, a quantitative calculation of the absorption spectrum and accurate plots of surfaces of amplitude functions. The shape of an amplitude function, and even the quantum numbers in a particular set to specify such an individual function, depend on the coordinates in a particular chosen system, and are therefore artefacts of that particular coordinate representation within wave mechanics. All discussion of atomic or molecular properties based on such shapes or quantum numbers therefore lacks general significance

  18. A Scheme of Interferometric Measurement of an Atomic Wave Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-Dong; LIN Yu; ZENG Liang; PAN Qin-Min

    2000-01-01

    A new method to measure an atomic wave function is discussed. It effectively solves the problem of an initially random phase of a travelling-wave laser beam. The relationship between the measured data and the atomic wavefunction is presented, and the wave function's reconstruction procedure is also analyzed.PACS: 03.65. Bz, 03. 75. Dg

  19. Inversion of an Atomic Wave Packet in a Circularly Polarized Electromagnetic Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Gao-Jian

    2001-01-01

    We study behavior of an atomic wave packet in a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave, and particularly calculate the atomic inversion of the wave packet. A general method of calculation is presented. The results are interesting. For example, if the wave packet is very narrow or/and the interaction is very strong, no matter the atom is initially in its ground state or excited state, the atomic inversion approaches zero as time approaches infinity. If the atom is initially in its ground state and excited state with the probability 1/2 respectively, and if the momentum density is an even function, then the atomic inversion equals zero at any time.``

  20. Atom Interferometry for Detection of Gravitational Waves: Progress and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy promises to provide a new window into the universe, collecting information about astrophysical systems and cosmology that is difficult or impossible to acquire by other methods. Detector designs based on atom interferometry offer a number of advantages over traditional approaches, including access to conventionally inaccessible frequency ranges and substantially reduced antenna baselines. Atomic physics techniques also make it possible to build a gravitational wave detector with a single linear baseline, potentially offering advantages in cost and design flexibility. In support of these proposals, recent progress in long baseline atom interferometry has enabled observation of matter wave interference with atomic wavepacket separations exceeding 10 cm and interferometer durations of more than 2 seconds. These results are obtained in a 10-meter drop tower incorporating large momentum transfer atom optics. This approach can provide ground-based proof-of-concept demonstrations of many of the technical requirements of both terrestrial and satellite gravitational wave detectors.

  1. Study of guided wave transmission through complex junction in sodium cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elie, Q.; Le Bourdais, F.; Jezzine, K.; Baronian, V. [Non Destructive Testing Department at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave techniques are seen as suitable candidates for the inspection of welded structures within sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), as the long range propagation of guided waves without amplitude attenuation can overcome the accessibility problem due to the liquid sodium. In the context of the development of the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID), the French Atomic Commission (CEA) investigates non-destructive testing techniques based on guided wave propagation. In this work, guided wave NDT methods are applied to control the integrity of welds located in a junction-type structure welded to the main vessel. The method presented in this paper is based on the analysis of scattering matrices peculiar to each expected defect, and takes advantage of the multi-modal and dispersive characteristics of guided wave generation. In a simulation study, an algorithm developed using the CIVA software is presented. It permits selecting appropriate incident modes to optimize detection and identification of expected flawed configurations. In the second part of this paper, experimental results corresponding to a first validation step of the simulation results are presented. The goal of the experiments is to estimate the effectiveness of the incident mode selection in plates. The results show good agreement between experience and simulation. (authors)

  2. Wave-particle duality in a Raman atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ai-Ai; Yang, Jun; Yan, Shu-Hua; Hu, Qing-Qing; Luo, Yu-Kun; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2015-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the wave-particle duality based on a Raman atom interferometer, via the interaction between the atom and Raman laser, which is similar to the optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wave and which-way information are stored in the atomic internal states. For the φ - π - π/2 type of atom interferometer, we find that the visibility (V) and predictability (P) still satisfy the duality relation, P2 + V2 ≤ 1. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275523) and the Special Research Found for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20134307110009).

  3. Entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, D. S.; Wang, K.; Zhang, W.; Shi, S.; Dong, M. X.; Yu, Y. C.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Shi, B. S.; Guo, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    Establishing a quantum interface between different physical systems is of special importance for developing the practical versatile quantum networks. Entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves is essential for building up Rydberg-based quantum information engineering, which is also helpful to study the dynamics behavior of entanglement under external perturbations. Here, we report on the successful storage of a single photon as a high-lying atomic spin wave in a quantum regime. By storing a K-vector entanglement between a single photon and low-lying spin wave, we experimentally realize the entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves in two separated atomic systems. This makes our experiment a primary demonstration of Rydberg quantum memory of entanglement, representing a primary step toward the construction of a hybrid quantum interface.

  4. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an Atom Interferometry-based gravity wave detector (vs Optical Interferometry). Characterize a high power laser. Use Goddard Space Flight Center Mission...

  5. Coherent matter wave optics on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip.......Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip....

  6. Atomic coherence in nondegenerate four-wave mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo Zhan-Chun; Sun Jiang; Liu Xia; Mi Xin; Yu Zu-He; Jiang Qian; Fu Pan-Ming; Wu Ling-An

    2007-01-01

    Two-photon resonant nondegenerate four-wave mixing (NFWM) with the addition of a coupling field in Ba atomic vapour has been studied. We find that coherence of the atomic level transitions leads to suppression of the NFWM signal, giving rise to a dip with a linewidth that is linearly proportional to the intensity of the coupling field.

  7. Fast Traveling-Wave Reactor of the Channel Type

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, Vitaliy D; Vashchenko, Volodymyr N; Chernezhenko, Sergei A; Kakaev, Andrei A; Pantak, Oksana I

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to solve the technological problems of the TWR based on the technical concept described in our priority of invention reference, which makes it impossible, in particular, for the fuel claddings damaging doses of fast neutrons to excess the ~200 dpa limit. Thus the essence of the technical concept is to provide a given neutron flux at the fuel claddings by setting the appropriate speed of the fuel motion relative to the nuclear burning wave. The basic design of the fast uranium-plutonium nuclear traveling-wave reactor with a softened neutron spectrum is developed, which solves the problem of the radiation resistance of the fuel claddings material.

  8. Resonant mode for gravitational wave detectors based on atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-11-01

    We describe an atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wave packets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes. For instance, a binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to ΩGW˜10-14 for a two-satellite space-based detector.

  9. Ultrarelativistic quasiclassical wave functions in strong laser and atomic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Di Piazza, A

    2014-01-01

    The problem of an ultrarelativistic charge in the presence of an atomic and a plane-wave field is investigated in the quasiclassical regime by including exactly the effects of both background fields. Starting from the quasiclassical Green's function obtained in [Phys. Lett. B \\textbf{717}, 224 (2012)], the corresponding in- and out-wave functions are derived in the experimentally relevant case of the particle initially counterpropagating with respect to the plane wave. The knowledge of these electron wave functions opens the possibility of investigating a variety of problems in strong-field QED, where both the atomic field and the laser field are strong enough to be taken into account exactly from the beginning in the calculations.

  10. Explicitly correlated wave function for a boron atom

    CERN Document Server

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We present results of high-precision calculations for a boron atom's properties using wave functions expanded in the explicitly correlated Gaussian basis. We demonstrate that the well-optimized 8192 basis functions enable a determination of energy levels, ionization potential, and fine and hyperfine splittings in atomic transitions with nearly parts per million precision. The results open a window to a spectroscopic determination of nuclear properties of boron including the charge radius of the proton halo in the $^8$B nucleus.

  11. Extracting Information from the Atom-Laser Wave Function UsingInterferometric Measurement with a Laser Standing-Wave Grating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正东; 武强; 曾亮; 林宇; 朱诗尧

    2001-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atom-laser wave function is performed using an interferometric measurement with a standing-wave grating, and the results of this scheme are studied. The relations between the measurement data and the atomic wave function are also presented. This scheme is quite applicable and effectively avoids the initial random phase problem of the method that employs the laser running wave. The information which is encoded in the atom-laser wave is extracted.

  12. TERRAPOWER, LLC TRAVELING WAVE REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVEL HEJZLAR

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy security is a topic of high importance to many countries throughout the world. Countries with access to vast energy supplies enjoy all of the economic and political benefits that come with controlling a highly sought after commodity. Given the desire to diversify away from fossil fuels due to rising environmental and economic concerns, there are limited technology options available for baseload electricity generation. Further complicating this issue is the desire for energy sources to be sustainable and globally scalable in addition to being economic and environmentally benign. Nuclear energy in its current form meets many but not all of these attributes. In order to address these limitations, TerraPower, LLC has developed the Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR which is a near-term deployable and truly sustainable energy solution that is globally scalable for the indefinite future. The fast neutron spectrum allows up to a ∼30-fold gain in fuel utilization efficiency when compared to conventional light water reactors utilizing enriched fuel. When compared to other fast reactors, TWRs represent the lowest cost alternative to enjoy the energy security benefits of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle without the associated proliferation concerns of chemical reprocessing. On a country level, this represents a significant savings in the energy generation infrastructure for several reasons 1 no reprocessing plants need to be built, 2 a reduced number of enrichment plants need to be built, 3 reduced waste production results in a lower repository capacity requirement and reduced waste transportation costs and 4 less uranium ore needs to be mined or purchased since natural or depleted uranium can be used directly as fuel. With advanced technological development and added cost, TWRs are also capable of reusing both their own used fuel and used fuel from LWRs, thereby eliminating the need for enrichment in the longer term and reducing the overall societal waste

  13. New method for gravitational wave detection with atomic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W; Hogan, Jason M; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2013-04-26

    Laser frequency noise is a dominant noise background for the detection of gravitational waves using long-baseline optical interferometry. Amelioration of this noise requires near simultaneous strain measurements on more than one interferometer baseline, necessitating, for example, more than two satellites for a space-based detector or two interferometer arms for a ground-based detector. We describe a new detection strategy based on recent advances in optical atomic clocks and atom interferometry which can operate at long baselines and which is immune to laser frequency noise. Laser frequency noise is suppressed because the signal arises strictly from the light propagation time between two ensembles of atoms. This new class of sensor allows sensitive gravitational wave detection with only a single baseline. This approach also has practical applications in, for example, the development of ultrasensitive gravimeters and gravity gradiometers.

  14. Future Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, Remi

    2016-01-01

    We present the perspective of using atom interferometry for gravitational wave (GW) detection in the mHz to about 10 Hz frequency band. We focus on light-pulse atom interferometers which have been subject to intense developments in the last 25 years. We calculate the effect of the GW on the atom interferometer and present in details the atomic gradiometer configuration which has retained more attention recently. The principle of such a detector is to use free falling atoms to measure the phase of a laser, which is modified by the GW. We highlight the potential benefits of using atom interferometry compared to optical interferometry as well as the challenges which remain for the realization of an atom interferometry based GW detector. We present some of the important noise sources which are expected in such detectors and strategies to cirucumvent them. Experimental techniques related to cold atom interferometers are briefly explained. We finally present the current progress and projects in this rapidly evolvin...

  15. Suspension of atoms and gravimetry using a pulsed standing wave

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, K J; Sackett, C A

    2009-01-01

    Atoms from an otherwise unconfined 87Rb condensate are shown to be suspended against gravity using repeated reflections from a pulsed optical standing wave. Reflection efficiency was optimized using a triple-pulse sequence that, theoretically, provides accuracies better than 99.9%. Experimentally, up to 100 reflections are observed, leading to dynamical suspension for over 100 ms. The velocity sensitivity of the reflections can be used to determine the local gravitational acceleration. Further, a gravitationally sensitive atom interferometer was implemented using the suspended atoms, with packet coherence maintained for a similar time. These techniques could be useful for the precise measurement of gravity when it is impractical to allow atoms to fall freely over a large distance.

  16. Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    This standard applies to the following types of reactors: shunt reactors, current-limiting reactors including neutral-earthing reactors, damping reactors, tuning (filter) reactors, earthing transformers (neutral couplers), arc-suppression reactors, smoothing reactors, with the exception of the following reactors: small reactors with a rating generally less than 2 kvar single-phase and 10 kvar three-phase, reactors for special purposes such as high-frequency line traps or reactors mounted on rolling stock.

  17. Wave mechanics in quantum phase space: hydrogen atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jun

    2007-01-01

    The rigorous sohutions of the stationary Schr(o)dinger equation for hydrogen atom are solved with the wave-mechanics method within the framework of the quantum phase-space representation established by Torres-Vega and Frederick. The "Fourier-like"projection transformations of wave function from the phase space to position and momentum spaces are extended to three-dimensional systems. The eigenfunctions in general position and momentum spaces could be obtained through the transformations from eigenfunction in the phase space.

  18. Boiling water reactor in a prestressed reinforced concrete vessel for an atomic central heating-and-power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarev, Yu.I.; Sokolov, I.N.; Skvortsov, S.A.; Sidorov, A.M.; Krauze, L.V.

    1978-04-01

    The possibility of using a boiling water reactor in a prestressed reinforced concrete vessel for an atomic central heating-and-power plant (CHPP) was considered, with design features of the reactor intended for a two-purpose plant. A prestressed reinforced concrete vessel and integral arrangement of the primary circuit ensured reliability of the atomic CHPP using various CHPP flowsheets.

  19. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  20. Content-based image hashing using wave atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fang; Leung Hon-Yin; Cheng Lee-Ming; Ji Xiao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that robustness,fragility,and security are three important criteria of image hashing; however how to build a system that can strongly meet these three criteria is still a challenge.In this paper,a content-based image hashing scheme using wave atoms is proposed,which satisfies the above criteria.Compared with traditional transforms like wavelet transform and discrete cosine transform (DCT),wave atom transform is adopted for the sparser expansion and better characteristics of texture feature extraction which shows better performance in both robustness and fragility.In addition,multi-frequency detection is presented to provide an application-defined trade-off.To ensure the security of the proposed approach and its resistance to a chosen-plaintext attack,a randomized pixel modulation based on the Rényi chaotic map is employed,combining with the nonliner wave atom transform.The experimental results reveal that the proposed scheme is robust against content-preserving manipulations and has a good discriminative capability to malicious tampering.

  1. Measurement of Flow Resistance Coefficient of Sodium Valve in Traveling Wave Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV; Ming-yu; WANG; Chong; YU; Hua-jin

    2015-01-01

    Traveling wave reactor(TWR)whose fundamental philosophy is achieving breeding and incineration of 238 U which is in the majority in natural uranium at original location through deepened burnup is a new concept fast reactor.It can effectively enhance utilization rate of uranium resources.TWR has much characteristics,such as

  2. Dynamic Modeling for the Design and Cyclic Operation of an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtisha D. Travis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory-scale atomic layer deposition (ALD reactor system model is derived for alumina deposition using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Model components describing the precursor thermophysical properties, reactor-scale gas-phase dynamics and surface reaction kinetics derived from absolute reaction rate theory are integrated to simulate the complete reactor system. Limit-cycle solutions defining continuous cyclic ALD reactor operation are computed with a fixed point algorithm based on collocation discretization in time, resulting in an unambiguous definition of film growth-per-cycle (gpc. A key finding of this study is that unintended chemical vapor deposition conditions can mask regions of operation that would otherwise correspond to ideal saturating ALD operation. The use of the simulator for assisting in process design decisions is presented.

  3. Velocity selective trapping of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, V Yu

    2013-01-01

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We propose that in a real experiment with cold atomic gas this effect may decrease the velocity distribution of atoms (the field traps the atoms with such specific velocities while all other atoms leave the field)

  4. Matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip for a portable atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. J.; Yu, H.; Gang, S. T.; Kim, J. B.

    2017-05-01

    We constructed a matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip using a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. Using radio-frequency-induced double-well potentials, we were able to coherently split a BEC into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 2.8 to 57 μm. Interference between these two freely expanding BECs was observed, confirming the coherence of the matter-wave beam splitter. We are able to control the distance and the angle between the split BECs by varying the rf-field's amplitude, frequency, or polarization. From the perspective of practical use, our BEC manipulation system is suitable for application to interferometry. It is compact, and by anodic bonding the atom chip to the vacuum cell, the repetition rate is kept high. The portable system occupies a volume of 0.5 m3 and operates at a repetition rate as high as 0.2 Hz using a commercial vacuum product.

  5. Electron Rydberg wave packets in one-dimensional atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supriya Chatterjee; Amitava Choudhuri; Aparna Saha; B Talukdar

    2010-09-01

    An expression for the transition probability or form factor in one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by short half-cycle pulse was constructed. In applicative contexts, our expression was found to be more useful than the corresponding result given by Landau and Lifshitz. Using the new expression for the form factor, the motion of a localized quantum wave packet was studied with particular emphasis on its revival and super-revival properties. Closed form analytical expressions were derived for expectation values of the position and momentum operators that characterized the widths of the position and momentum distributions. Transient phase-space localization of the wave packet produced by the application of a single impulsive kick was explicitly demonstrated. The undulation of the uncertainty product as a function of time was studied in order to visualize how the motion of the wave packet in its classical trajectory spreads throughout the orbit and the system becomes nonclassical. The process, however, repeats itself such that the atom undergoes a free evolution from a classical, to a nonclassical, and back to a classical state.

  6. Atomic coherence effects in four-wave mixing process of a ladder-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-05-16

    We investigate the effects of atomic coherence on four-wave mixing (FWM), with respect to the transition routes between the hyperfine states in the 5S1/2-5P3/2-5D5/2 transition of 87Rb atoms. By comparing the FWM spectra with the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra of the hyperfine states, we confirm that the FWM process is significantly influenced by both ladder-type and V-type two-photon coherences. From the observed FWM signal of each hyperfine structure, we clarify the role of two-photon coherence in the FWM process under EIT, double-resonance optical pumping (DROP), and two-photon absorption (TPA) conditions in a ladder-type atomic system, which is dependent on the open degree of the hyperfine states, the laser intensity, and the laser frequency detuning.

  7. Evanescent light-matter Interactions in Atomic Cladding Wave Guides

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2012-01-01

    Alkali vapors, and in particular rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light non-linear optics3 and quantum computation. Additionally, the technology of alkali vapors plays a major role in realizing myriad industrial applications including for example atomic clocks magentometers8 and optical frequency stabilization. Lately, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimeter-size alkali vapor cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for non-linear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) compatible platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light vapor interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light matter interactions in an atomic cladding wave guide (ACWG), consisting of CMOS ...

  8. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. Also we demonstrate that modulated field can not only trap, but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensebmble having wide initial velocity and energy distribution. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while trapped atoms have narrow energy distribution

  9. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  10. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  11. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  12. Photo-Ionization of Hydrogen Atom in a Circularly Polarized Standing Electromagnetic Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-Tao; ZHANG Qi-Ren; WANG Wan-Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Applying time-independent non-perturbative formalism to the photo-ionization of hydrogen atom immersed in a strong circularly polarized standing electromagnetic wave, we calculate the shift of energy levels and the distortion of wave functions for the hydrogen atom, the ionization cross section induced by the standing wave, and the angular distribution of photoelectrons and obtain some interesting results.

  13. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  14. Formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets in the field of two standing light waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, MA; Petropavlovsky, SV; Fedorov, MV; Schleich, WP; Yakovlev, VP

    2005-01-01

    The formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets produced in the interaction of a beam of two-level atoms with two standing light waves polarised in the same plane is considered. The mechanism providing a dispersionless particle dynamics is the balance of two processes: a rapid deca

  15. Coexistence of three-wave, four-wave, and five-wave mixing processes in a superconducting artificial atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Chao; Ge, Guo-Qin; Zhang, Hai-Yang

    2015-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of multiwave mixing in a driven superconducting quantum qubit (artificial atom) with a cyclic Ξ-type three-level structure. We first show that three-wave mixing (3WM), four-wave mixing (4WM), and five-wave mixing (5WM) processes can coexist in the microwave regime in such an artificial system due to the absence of selection rules. Because of electromagnetically induced transparency suppression of linear absorption in a standard Ξ-type configuration, the generated 4WM is enhanced greatly and its efficiency can be as high as 0.1% for only a single artificial atom. We also show that Autler-Townes splitting occurs in the 3WM and 5WM spectra and quantum interference has a significant impact on the total signal intensity being a coherent superposition of these two signals.

  16. Matter-wave beam splitter on an atom chip for a portable atom-interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S J; Gang, S T; Kim, J B

    2016-01-01

    We construct a matter-wave beam splitter using 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip. Through the use of radio-frequency-induced double-well potentials, we were able to split a BEC into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 2.8 {\\mu}m to 57 {\\mu}m. Interference between these two freely expanding BECs has been observed. By varying the rf-field amplitude, frequency, or polarization, we investigate behaviors of the beam-splitter. From the perspective of practical use, our BEC manipulation system is suitable for application to interferometry since it is compact and the repetition rate is high due to the anodic bonded atom chip on the vacuum cell. The portable system occupies a volume of 0.5 m3 and operates at a repetition rate as high as ~0.2 Hz.

  17. Atoms in the counter-propagating frequency-modulated waves: splitting, cooling, confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Victor I.; Kornilovska, Nataliya V.

    2017-09-01

    We show that the counter-propagating frequency-modulated (FM) waves of the same intensity can split an orthogonal atomic beam into two beams. We calculate the temperature of the atomic ensemble for the case when the atoms are grouped around zero velocity in the direction of the waves propagation. The high-intensity laser radiation with a properly chosen carrier frequency can form a one-dimensional trap for atoms. We carry out the numerical simulation of the atomic motion (two-level model of the atom-field interaction) using parameters appropriate for sodium atoms and show that sub-Doppler cooling can be reached. We suppose that such a cooling is partly based on the cooling without spontaneous emission in polychromatic waves [H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 77, 061401 (2008)]. We calculate the state of the atom in the field by the Monte Carlo wave-function method and describe its mechanical motion by the classical mechanics.

  18. Determination of the neutral oxygen atom density in a plasma reactor loaded with metal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: miran.mozetic@ijs.si

    2009-08-15

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms was determined during processing of metal samples in a plasma reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex tube with an inner diameter of 11 cm and a length of 30 cm. Plasma was created by an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power up to 500 W. The O density was measured at the edge of the glass tube with a copper fiber optics catalytic probe. The O atom density in the empty tube depended on pressure and was between 4 and 7 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. The maximum O density was at a pressure of about 150 Pa, while the dissociation fraction of O{sub 2} molecules was maximal at the lowest pressure and decreased with increasing pressure. At about 300 Pa it dropped below 10%. The measurements were repeated in the chamber loaded with different metallic samples. In these cases, the density of oxygen atoms was lower than that in the empty chamber. The results were explained by a drain of O atoms caused by heterogeneous recombination on the samples.

  19. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  20. Traveling Wave Reactor and Condition of Existence of Nuclear Burning Soliton-Like Wave in Neutron-Multiplying Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I. Saulenko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical fundamentals of traveling wave reactor are considered. We show that the condition of existence of nuclear burning soliton-like wave in a neutron-multiplying medium is determined in general by two conditions. The first condition (necessary is determined by relationship between the equilibrium concentration and critical concentration of active (fissionable isotope that is a consequence of the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization condition. The second condition (sufficient is set by the so-called Wigner quantum statistics, or more accurately, by a statistics of the Gaussian simplectic ensembles with respect to the parameter that describes the squared width of burning wave front of nuclear fuel active component.

  1. Trapping of Atoms by the Counter-Propagating Stochastic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, Victor I

    2016-01-01

    We show that the field of counter-propagating stochastic light waves, one of which repeats the other, can form an one-dimension trap for atoms. The confinement of an ensemble of atoms in the trap and their simultaneous cooling can be achieved without using auxiliary fields. The temperature of the atomic ensemble depends on the autocorrelation time of the waves, their intensity and the detuning of the carrier frequency of the waves from the atomic transition frequency. The numerical simulation is carried out for sodium atoms.

  2. Reactor concepts for atomic layer deposition on agitated particles: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longrie, Delphine, E-mail: delphine.longrie@asm.com; Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.detavernier@ugent.be [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-01-15

    The number of possible applications for nanoparticles has strongly increased in the last decade. For many applications, nanoparticles with different surface and bulk properties are necessary. A popular surface modification technique is coating the particle surface with a nanometer thick layer. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is known as a reliable method for depositing ultrathin and conformal coatings. In this article, agitation or fluidization of the particles is necessary for performing ALD on (nano)particles. The principles of gas fluidization of particles will be outlined, and a classification of the gas fluidization behavior of particles based on their size and density will be given. Following different reactor concepts that have been designed to conformally coat (nano)particles with ALD will be described, and a concise overview will be presented of the work that has been performed with each of them ending with a concept reactor for performing spatial ALD on fluidized particles.

  3. Simplified dynamic simulation of a traveling wave nuclear reactor; Simulacion dinamica simplificada de un reactor nuclear de onda viajera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez M, H.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Francois, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec 62550, Morelos (Mexico); Lopez S, R., E-mail: heribertosanchez7@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    In this work the nuclear fuel burn wave in a fast traveling wave reactor (TWR) is presented, using the reduced model of the neutron diffusion equation, considering only the axial component, and the equations of the transuranic dynamics of U-Pu and a radionuclide of Pu. Two critical zones of the reactor are considered, one enriched with U-Pu called ignition zone and the other impoverished zone or of U-238, named breeding zone. Occupying Na as refrigerant within TWR, and Fe as structural material; both are present in the ignition and breeding zones. Considering as a fissile material the Pu, since by neutron capture the U is transformed into Pu, thus increasing the quantity of Pu more than that of U; in this way the fuel burn stability with the wave dynamics is understood. The calculation of the results was approached numerically to determine the temporal space evolution of the neutron flux in this system and of the main isotopes involved in the burning process. (Author)

  4. High sensitive detection of high-order partial wave scattering in photoassociation of ultralcold atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yu-Qing; Ma Jie; Wu Ji-Zhou; Zhang Yi-Chi; Zhao Yan-Ting; Wang Li-Rong; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    We report on the observation of enhanced high-order partial wave scattering from atom-atom interaction via changing the temperature of a magneto-optical trap in the process of photoassociation. The high-order scattering partial wave is directly manifested through the large signal amplitude of the rovibrational resonance levels of trap-loss spectroscopy from photoassociation.

  5. The s-wave repulsion and deeply bound pionic atoms: fact and fancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2003-06-01

    Fits to a large data set of pionic atoms show that the 'missing' s-wave repulsion is accounted for when a density dependence suggested recently by Weise is included in the isovector term of the s-wave pion optical potential. The importance of using large data sets is demonstrated and the role of deeply bound pionic atom states is discussed.

  6. Ex situ themo-catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors using a traveling wave microwave reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microwave heating offers a number of advantages over conventional heating methods, such as, rapid and volumetric heating, precise temperature control, energy efficiency and lower temperature gradient. In this article we demonstrate the use of 2450 MHz microwave traveling wave reactor to heat the cat...

  7. Analysis of Nanometer Structure for Chromium Atoms in Gauss Standing Laser Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua; XIONG Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The equation of motion of two-level chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is discussed and the distribution of chromium atoms is given under different transverse velocity conditions.The results show that the focusing position of atoms will be affected by the transverse velocity of atoms.Based on the four-order Runge-Kutta method,the locus of chromium atoms in Gauss standing laser wave is simulated.The three-dimensional characteristics of nanometer structures are stimulated under perfect and emanative conditions.

  8. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  9. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  10. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  11. Search for light scalar dark matter with atomic gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Hogan, Jason M; Rajendran, Surjeet; Van Tilburg, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We show that gravitational wave detectors based on a type of atom interferometry are sensitive to ultralight scalar dark matter. Such dark matter can cause temporal oscillations in fundamental constants with a frequency set by the dark matter mass, and amplitude determined by the local dark matter density. The result is a modulation of atomic transition energies. This signal is ideally suited to a type of gravitational wave detector that compares two spatially separated atom interferometers referenced by a common laser. Such a detector can improve on current searches for electron-mass or electric-charge modulus dark matter by up to 10 orders of magnitude in coupling, in a frequency band complementary to that of other proposals. It demonstrates that this class of atomic sensors is qualitatively different from other gravitational wave detectors, including those based on laser interferometry. By using atomic-clock-like interferometers, laser noise is mitigated with only a single baseline. These atomic sensors ca...

  12. Resonance-Radiation Force Exerted by a Circularly Polarized Light on an Atomic Wave Packet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yong-Hua; ZENG Gao-Jian; LI Jin-Hui

    2006-01-01

    We study the behaviour of an atomic wave packet in a circularly polarized light, and especially give the calculation of the radiative force exerted by the circularly polarized light on the atomic wave packet under the resonance condition. A general method of the calculation is presented and the result is interesting. For example, under the condition that the wave packet is very narrow or/and the interaction is very strong, no matter whether the atom is initially in its ground state or excited state, as time approaches to infinity, the resonance-radiation force exerted by the light on the atom approaches to zero. If the atom is initially in its ground state and excited state with the probability 1/2 respectively, and if the momentum density is a even function, then the resonance-radiation force exerted by the light on the atom is equal to zero.

  13. Influence of Atomic Motion on a Microlaser in an Optical Standing-Wave Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬涛; 冯勋立; 张文琦; 徐至展

    2002-01-01

    We study the microlaser in an optical standing-wave cavity injected with two-level atoms. The results have shown the obvious infIuence of atomic centre-of-mass motion on the microlaser, such as the photon distribution, the linewidth and the frequency shift. It was found that when the momentum of atoms is comparable to that of photons, the influence of atomic motion is dominated and the number of photons in the microlaser can be greatly enhanced, owing to part of the atomic kinetic energy being transferred to the resonator. This work provides a comparison of the related studies on the atomic motion under special assumptions.

  14. Atom Interferometry for detection of Gravity Waves-a Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atom interferometers are more sensitive to inertial effects. This is because atoms in their inertial frame are ideal test masses for detection of gravity effects...

  15. Dynamics of Periodic Waves in Bose-Einstein Condensate with Time-Dependent Atomic Scattering Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-Mei

    2007-01-01

    Evolution of periodic waves and solitary waves in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with time-dependent atomic scattering length in an expulsive parabolic potential is studied. Based on the mapping deformation method, we successfully obtain periodic wave solutions and solitary wave solutions, including the bright and dark soliton solutions. The results in this paper include some in the literatures [Plys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 050402 and Chin. Phys. Lett. 22(2005) 1855].

  16. Study of Atomization of a Water Jet by High-Intensity Aerial Ultrasonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Youichi

    2001-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the atomization of a water jet by aerially radiating it with high-intensity ultrasonic waves. A sound source that enables the linear generation of high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves (frequency: approximately 20 kHz) is combined with a cylindrical reflection plate in order to create a standing-wave sound field. An attempt has been made to atomize a water jet of 1 mm diameter by passing it through the above sound field at a velocity of approximately 30 m/s. It has been clarified that nodes of sound pressure in the standing-wave sound field are effective for the atomization of a water jet. In addition, the atomizing phenomenon of a water jet has been observed precisely. The relation between the intensity of sound waves required for atomization and the radiation duration has also been clarified. Even the radiation of sound waves for only 2 ms atomizes water. This suggests that a very fast water jet at 300-500 m/s might be atomized.

  17. Hyperbolic partial differential equations populations, reactors, tides and waves theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1983-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations, Volume 1: Population, Reactors, Tides and Waves: Theory and Applications covers three general areas of hyperbolic partial differential equation applications. These areas include problems related to the McKendrick/Von Foerster population equations, other hyperbolic form equations, and the numerical solution.This text is composed of 15 chapters and begins with surveys of age specific population interactions, populations models of diffusion, nonlinear age dependent population growth with harvesting, local and global stability for the nonlinear renewal eq

  18. Atomic and dislocation dynamics simulations of plastic deformation in reactor pressure vessel steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Ghiath; Domain, Christophe; Queyreau, Sylvain; Naamane, Sanae; Devincre, Benoit

    2009-11-01

    The collective behavior of dislocations in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel involves dislocation properties on different phenomenological scales. In the multiscale approach, adopted in this work, we use atomic simulations to provide input data for larger scale simulations. We show in this paper how first-principles calculations can be used to describe the Peierls potential of screw dislocations, allowing for the validation of the empirical interatomic potential used in molecular dynamics simulations. The latter are used to compute the velocity of dislocations as a function of the applied stress and the temperature. The mobility laws obtained in this way are employed in dislocation dynamics simulations in order to predict properties of plastic flow, namely dislocation-dislocation interactions and dislocation interactions with carbides at low and high temperature.

  19. Atomic and dislocation dynamics simulations of plastic deformation in reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnet, Ghiath, E-mail: ghiathmonnet@yahoo.f [EDF-R and D, MMC, Avenue des Renardieres, 77818 Moret sur Loing (France); Domain, Christophe; Queyreau, Sylvain; Naamane, Sanae [EDF-R and D, MMC, Avenue des Renardieres, 77818 Moret sur Loing (France); Devincre, Benoit [LEM, CNRS-ONERA, 29 av. de la division Leclerc, 92130 Chatillon (France)

    2009-11-15

    The collective behavior of dislocations in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel involves dislocation properties on different phenomenological scales. In the multiscale approach, adopted in this work, we use atomic simulations to provide input data for larger scale simulations. We show in this paper how first-principles calculations can be used to describe the Peierls potential of screw dislocations, allowing for the validation of the empirical interatomic potential used in molecular dynamics simulations. The latter are used to compute the velocity of dislocations as a function of the applied stress and the temperature. The mobility laws obtained in this way are employed in dislocation dynamics simulations in order to predict properties of plastic flow, namely dislocation-dislocation interactions and dislocation interactions with carbides at low and high temperature.

  20. Conformal nanocoating of zirconia nanoparticles by atomic layer deposition in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Luis F; George, Steven M; Weimer, Alan W

    2005-07-01

    Primary zirconia nanoparticles were conformally coated with alumina ultrathin films using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor. Alternating doses of trimethylaluminium and water vapour were performed to deposit Al(2)O(3) nanolayers on the surface of 26 nm zirconia nanoparticles. Transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was performed ex situ. Bulk Al(2)O(3) vibrational modes were observed for coated particles after 50 and 70 cycles. Coated nanoparticles were also examined with transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Analysis revealed highly conformal and uniform alumina nanofilms throughout the surface of zirconia nanoparticles. The particle size distribution and surface area of the nanoparticles are not affected by the coating process. Primary nanoparticles are coated individually despite their high aggregation tendency during fluidization. The dynamic aggregation behaviour of zirconia nanoparticles in the fluidized bed plays a key role in the individual coating of nanoparticles.

  1. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgan, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wong, T G [SANTA CLARA U; Madison, D H [MISSOURI U

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  2. Optical precursor with four-wave mixing and storage based on a cold-atom ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Jiang, Yun Kun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-03-06

    We observed optical precursors in four-wave mixing based on a cold-atom gas. Optical precursors appear at the edges of pulses of the generated optical field, and propagate through the atomic medium without absorption. Theoretical analysis suggests that these precursors correspond to high-frequency components of the signal pulse, which means the atoms cannot respond quickly to rapid changes in the electromagnetic field. In contrast, the low-frequency signal components are absorbed by the atoms during transmission. We also showed experimentally that the backward precursor can be stored using a Raman transition of the atomic ensemble and retrieved later.

  3. High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Processes: High Pressure Operations, New Reactor Designs, and Novel Metal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, MoatazBellah Mahmoud

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase nano-coating process that deposits very uniform and conformal thin film materials with sub-angstrom level thickness control on various substrates. These unique properties made ALD a platform technology for numerous products and applications. However, most of these applications are limited to the lab scale due to the low process throughput relative to the other deposition techniques, which hinders its industrial adoption. In addition to the low throughput, the process development for certain applications usually faces other obstacles, such as: a required new processing mode (e.g., batch vs continuous) or process conditions (e.g., low temperature), absence of an appropriate reactor design for a specific substrate and sometimes the lack of a suitable chemistry. This dissertation studies different aspects of ALD process development for prospect applications in the semiconductor, textiles, and battery industries, as well as novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The investigation of a high pressure, low temperature ALD process for metal oxides deposition using multiple process chemistry revealed the vital importance of the gas velocity over the substrate to achieve fast depositions at these challenging processing conditions. Also in this work, two unique high throughput ALD reactor designs are reported. The first is a continuous roll-to-roll ALD reactor for ultra-fast coatings on porous, flexible substrates with very high surface area. While the second reactor is an ALD delivery head that allows for in loco ALD coatings that can be executed under ambient conditions (even outdoors) on large surfaces while still maintaining very high deposition rates. As a proof of concept, part of a parked automobile window was coated using the ALD delivery head. Another process development shown herein is the improvement achieved in the selective synthesis of organic-inorganic materials using an ALD based process called sequential vapor

  4. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianlong, Gao; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario; Tosi, M. P.; Campo, V. L., Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern.

  5. Dynamics of spontaneous radiation of atoms scattered by a resonance standing light wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, MV; Efremov, MA; Yakovlev, VP; Schleich, WP

    2003-01-01

    The scattering of atoms by a resonance standing light wave is considered under conditions when the lower of two resonance levels is metastable, while the upper level rapidly decays due to mainly spontaneous radiative transitions to the nonresonance levels of an atom. The diffraction scattering regim

  6. Effects of ion-atom collisions on the propagation and damping of ion-acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; D'Angelo, N.; Jensen, Vagn Orla;

    1968-01-01

    Experiments are described on ion-acoustic wave propagation and damping in alkali plasmas of various degrees of ionization. An increase of the ratio Te/Ti from 1 to approximately 3-4, caused by ion-atom collisions, results in a decrease of the (Landau) damping of the waves. At high gas pressure and....../or low wave frequency a "fluid" picture adequately describes the experimental results....

  7. Photoionization of neutral atoms by X waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert A.; Seipt, Daniel; Beerwerth, Randolf; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to plane waves, twisted or vortex beams have a complex spatial structure. Both their intensity and energy flow vary within the wave front. Beyond that, polychromatic vortex beams, such as X waves, have a spatially dependent energy distribution. We propose a method to measure this (local) energy spectrum. The method is based on the measurement of the energy distribution of photoelectrons from alkali-metal atoms. On the basis of our fully relativistic calculations, we argue that even ensembles of atoms can be used to probe the local energy spectrum of short twisted pulses.

  8. Observation of atomic speckle and Hanbury Brown-Twiss correlations in guided matter waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, R G; Hodgman, S S; Manning, A G; Johnsson, M T; Baldwin, K G H; Truscott, A G

    2011-01-01

    Speckle patterns produced by multiple independent light sources are a manifestation of the coherence of the light field. Second-order correlations exhibited in phenomena such as photon bunching, termed the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect, are a measure of quantum coherence. Here we observe for the first time atomic speckle produced by atoms transmitted through an optical waveguide, and link this to second-order correlations of the atomic arrival times. We show that multimode matter-wave guiding, which is directly analogous to multimode light guiding in optical fibres, produces a speckled transverse intensity pattern and atom bunching, whereas single-mode guiding of atoms that are output-coupled from a Bose-Einstein condensate yields a smooth intensity profile and a second-order correlation value of unity. Both first- and second-order coherence are important for applications requiring a fully coherent atomic source, such as squeezed-atom interferometry.

  9. A Gravitational Wave Detector Based on an Atom Interferometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational waves are tiny perturbations in the curvature of space-time that arise from accelerating masses – according to Einstein’s general...

  10. Generation of multipartite continuous-variable entanglement via atomic spin wave: Heisenberg-Langevin approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xihua; Shang, Jie; Xue, Bolin; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Min

    2014-05-19

    We conduct theoretical studies on the effects of various parameters on generation of multipartite continuous-variable entanglement via atomic spin wave induced by the strong coupling and probe fields in the Λ-type electromagnetically induced transparency configuration in a realistic atomic ensemble by using the Heisenberg-Langevin formalism. It is shown that the increase of the atomic density and/or Rabi frequencies of the scattering fields, as well as the decrease of the coherence decay rate of the lower doublet would strengthen the degree of multipartite entanglement. This provides a clear evidence that the creation of multicolor multipartite entangled narrow-band fields to any desired number with a long correlation time can be achieved conveniently by using atomic spin wave in an atomic ensemble with large optical depth, which may find interesting applications in quantum information processing and quantum networks.

  11. Atom-interferometric gravitational-wave detection using heterodyne laser links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a gravitational-wave detection method based on heterodyne laser links and light-pulse atom interferometry that enables high sensitivity gravitational-wave detection in the 0.1-mHz to 1-Hz frequency band using a single, long (>108 m), detector baseline. The detection baseline in previous atom-based proposals was constrained by the need for a reference laser to remain collimated over the optical propagation path between two satellites. Here we circumvent this requirement by employing a strong local oscillator laser near each atom ensemble that is phase referenced or phase locked to the reference laser beam. Longer baselines offer a number of potential advantages, including enhanced sensitivity, simplified atom optics, and reduced atomic source flux requirements.

  12. Atomic layer deposition on porous powders with in situ gravimetric monitoring in a modular fixed bed reactor setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strempel, V. E.; Naumann d'Alnoncourt, R.; Driess, M.; Rosowski, F.

    2017-07-01

    A modular setup for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on high-surface powder substrates in fixed bed reactors with a gravimetric in situ monitoring was developed. The design and operation are described in detail. An integrated magnetically suspended balance records mass changes during ALD. The highly versatile setup consists of three modular main units: a dosing unit, a reactor unit, and a downstream unit. The reactor unit includes the balance, a large fixed bed reactor, and a quartz crystal microbalance. The dosing unit is equipped with a complex manifold to deliver gases and gaseous reagents including three different ALD precursors, five oxidizing or reducing agents, and two purge gas lines. The system employs reactor temperatures and pressures in the range of 25-600 °C and 10-3 to 1 bar, respectively. Typically, powder batches between 100 mg and 50 g can be coated. The capabilities of the setup are demonstrated by coating mesoporous SiO2 powder with a thin AlOx (submono) layer using three cycles with trimethylaluminium and H2O. The self-limiting nature of the deposition has been verified with the in situ gravimetric monitoring and full saturation curves are presented. The process parameters were used for a scale-up in a large fixed bed reactor. The samples were analyzed with established analytics such as X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  13. Stationary rotary force waves on the liquid-air core interface of a swirl atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, J. J.; Cooper, D.; Yule, A. J.; Nasr, G. G.

    2016-10-01

    A one-dimensional wave equation, applicable to the waves on the surface of the air-core of a swirl atomizer is derived analytically, by analogy to the similar one-dimensional wave equation derivation for shallow-water gravity waves. In addition an analogy to the flow of water over a weir is used to produce an analytical derivation of the flow over the lip of the outlet of a swirl atomizer using the principle of maximum flow. The principle of maximum flow is substantiated by reference to continuity of the discharge in the direction of streaming. For shallow-water gravity waves, the phase velocity is the same expression as for the critical velocity over the weir. Similarly, in the present work, the wave phase velocity on the surface of the air-core is shown to be the same expression as for the critical velocity for the flow at the outlet. In addition, this wave phase velocity is shown to be the square root of the product of the radial acceleration and the liquid thickness, as analogous with the wave phase velocity for shallow water gravity waves, which is the square root of the product of the acceleration due to gravity and the water depth. The work revisits the weirs and flumes work of Binnie et al. but using a different methodology. The results corroborate with the work of Binnie. High speed video, Laser Doppler Anemometry and deflected laser beam experimental work has been carried out on an oversize Perspex (Plexiglas) swirl atomizer. Three distinctive types of waves were detected: helical striations, low amplitude random ripples and low frequency stationary waves. It is the latter wave type that is considered further in this article. The experimentally observed waves appear to be stationary upon the axially moving flow. The mathematical analysis allows for the possibility of a negative value for the phase velocity expression. Therefore the critical velocity and the wave phase velocity do indeed lead to stationary waves in the atomizer. A quantitative comparison

  14. Vacuum Rabi Oscillation of an Atom without Rotating-Wave Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fa-Qiang; LIU Wei-Ci; LIANG Rui-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ We have investigated vacuum Rabi oscillation of an atom coupled with single-mode cavity field exactly, and compared the results with that of the Jaynes-Cummings (J-C) model.The results show that for resonant case, there is no Rabi oscillation for an atom.For small detuning and weak coupling case, the probability for the atom in excited state oscillates against time with different frequencies and amplitudes from that of the J-C model.It exhibits that the counter-rotating wave interaction could significantly effect the dynamic hehaviour of the atom, even under the condition in which the RWA is considered to be justified.

  15. Atom-atom excitation in shock waves in argon-oxygen mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, Hiromichi; Kawamura, Masahiko

    1987-05-01

    The slope constants of the excitational cross-section for atom-atom and atom-electron collisions were generally considered and that for the oxygen atom-atom collision S/sub 0-0/ was determined to be 3.14 x 10/sup -19/ cm/sup 2//eV. Using the newly determined value of S/sub 0-0/, the calculation of the ionizing shock structure of argon-oxygen mixture was made at shock Mach number M/sub S/ = 17.1 and the initial pressure P/sub 1/ = 2.85 Torr. From the comparison of the calculated value of relaxation length with the experimental one, it was proved that the experimental result can be explained well by the present determined value of S/sub 0-0/.

  16. A discussion on the double wave theory and its applications to description of radiation atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The double wave theory (DWT), sometimes called the“non_statistical quantum mechanics” by its proposer, describes the state of each single particle in an ensemble with two wave functions which have a parameter corresponding to the particle. However the basic postulates of the DWT show that this theory can hardly describe any quantum rules of the microscopic world. In the double wave descriptions, the wave feature of the behavior of microscopic particles and the discontinuity characteristic of energy almost disappear. The discussions on several problems of the radiation atoms made by the DWT's proposer on the basis of this theory are either mathematically incorrect or inconsistent with experiments and the usual theory.

  17. Plan and procedures for rapid inventory taking at the Research Institute for Atomic Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalygin, V.; Gorobets, A.; Karlov, S. [Research Inst. for Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation); Suda, S.C.; Bonner, M.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Satkowiak, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A major element of a system for nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) is to take the physical inventory of the nuclear material periodically. Physical inventory taking (PIT) includes ensuring that all nuclear material on inventory is included in the facility records and that the measured content of items or containers corresponds to the recorded values. A preliminary step to the conduct of the PIT is application of rapid inventory procedures that serve to provide the benchmark for the inventory, e.g., by identifying if any items are missing and also, if any unrecorded items are present. The Rapid Inventory approach is being implemented by the Research Institute for Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Russia, as one of the first steps in the program to enhance nuclear materials safeguards at the site. This effort is being conducted under the US-Russian Cooperative Program on Nuclear Materials Protection. Control And Accounting (MPC and A), with assistance provided by specialists from US Department of Energy National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the features of the existing physical inventory system at RIAR, discusses the upgrades being introduced, and provides some observations on the technology transfer process with regard to the safeguards program.

  18. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas-solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al2O3 films on spherical SiO2 NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  19. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas–solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on spherical SiO{sub 2} NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. Matter-wave interferometry in a double well on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumm, Thorsten; Hofferberth, S.; Andersson, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    Matter-wave interference experiments enable us to study matter at its most basic, quantum level and form the basis of high-precision sensors for applications such as inertial and gravitational field sensing. Success in both of these pursuits requires the development of atom-optical elements...... that can manipulate matter waves at the same time as preserving their coherence and phase. Here, we present an integrated interferometer based on a simple, coherent matter-wave beam splitter constructed on an atom chip. Through the use of radio-frequency-induced adiabatic double-well potentials, we...... demonstrate the splitting of Bose-Einstein condensates into two clouds separated by distances ranging from 3 to 80 μm, enabling access to both tunnelling and isolated regimes. Moreover, by analysing the interference patterns formed by combining two clouds of ultracold atoms originating from a single...

  1. Carrier-wave Rabi-flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, M F; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-04-10

    We present a theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2π and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.

  2. Carrier-wave Rabi flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-01-01

    We present the first theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2$\\pi$ and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These new characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.

  3. Transverse azimuthal dephasing of vortex spin wave in a hot atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Shuai; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Dong, Ming-Xin; Liu, Shi-Long; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-01-01

    Optical fields with orbital angular momentum (OAM) interact with medium have many remarkable properties with its unique azimuthal phase, showing many potential applications in high capacity information processing, high precision measurement etc. The dephasing mechanics of optical fields with OAM in an interface between light and matter plays a vital role in many areas of physics. In this work, we study the transverse azimuthal dephasing of OAM spin wave in a hot atomic gas via OAM storage. The transverse azimuthal phase difference between the control and probe beams is mapped onto the spin wave, which essentially results in dephasing of atomic spin wave. The dephasing of OAM spin wave can be controlled by the parameters of OAM topological charge and beam waist. Our results are helpful for studying OAM light interaction with matter, maybe hold a promise in OAM-based quantum information processing.

  4. Influence of separating distance between atomic sensors for gravitational wave detection

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    We consider a recent scheme of gravitational wave detection using atomic interferometers as inertial sensors, and reinvestigate its configuration using the concept of sensitivity functions. We show that such configuration can suppress noise without influencing the gravitational wave signal. But the suppression is insufficient for the direct observation of gravitational wave signals, so we analyse the behaviour of the different noises influencing the detection scheme. As a novel method, we study the relations between the measurement sensitivity and the distance between two interferometers, and find that the results derived from vibration noise and laser frequency noise are in stark contrast to that derived from the shot noise, which is significant for the configuration design of gravitational wave detectors using atomic interferometers.

  5. Les Houches Summer School of Theoretical Physics : Session 72, Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Westbrook, C; David, F; Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    2001-01-01

    Progress in atomic physics has been so vigorous during the past decade that one is hard pressed to follow all the new developments. In the early 1990s the first atom interferometers opened a new field in which we have been able to use the wave nature of atoms to probe fundamental quantum me chanics questions as well as to make precision measurements. Coming fast on the heels of this development was the demonstration of Bose Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapors which intensified research interest in studying the wave nature of matter, especially in a domain in which "macro scopic" quantum effects (vortices, stimulated scattering of atomic beams) are visible. At the same time there has been much progress in our understanding of the behavior of waves (notably electromagnetic) in complex media, both periodic and disordered. An obvious topic of speculation and probably of future research is whether any new insight or applications will develop if one examines the behavior of de Broglie waves in ana...

  6. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  7. Unconventional Density Wave and Superfluidity in Cold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    fillings between quarter and half, with on-site and 16 30 nearest-neighbor repulsion [26]. Its application to the coupled quarter-filled ladders with...result that Majorana fermions can be generated as a zero-energy mode in the excitation spectrum of a half-quantum vortex in a (p + ip)-wave superconductor ...spin populations have been studied in electronic mate- rials, such as magnetic-field-induced organic superconductors [63, 64]. Mixtures of different

  8. Localized atomic basis set in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Vanin, Marco; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    representation. The possibility to switch seamlessly between the two representations implies that simulations employing the local basis can be fine tuned at the end of the calculation by switching to the grid, thereby combining the strength of the two representations for optimal performance. The implementation...... is tested by calculating atomization energies and equilibrium bulk properties of a variety of molecules and solids, comparing to the grid results. Finally, it is demonstrated how a grid-quality structure optimization can be performed with significantly reduced computational effort by switching between...

  9. Cooling and trapping of three-level atoms in a bichromatic standing wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, H.; Cai, T.; Bigelow, N. P.; Grove, T. T.; Gould, P. L.

    1995-02-01

    We show that a three-level atom in the cascade configuration can be stably trapped and cooled in one dimension by an intense bichromatic standing wave. At the two-photon resonance, rectified dipole forces result in a deep potential well which can be used to localize the atoms in space. In the vicinity of the rectified potential minimum, the spatial dependence of the dressed state energies can lead to a velocity dependence of the force which produces damping of the atomic motion. Consideration of the heating effects of momentum diffusion indicates that cooling and stable trapping at low temperatures is possible in such a bichromatic field.

  10. Evolution of spin-dependent atomic wave packets in a harmonic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Ling-Hua; Liu Min; Kong Ling-Bo; Chen Ai-Xi; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated theoretically the evolution of spin-dependent atomic wave packets in a harmonic magnetic trapping potential. For a Bose-condensed gas, which undergoes a Mott insulator transition and a spin-dependent transport, the atomic wavefunction can be described by an entangled single-atom state. Due to the confinement of the -harmonic potential, the density distributions exhibit periodic decay and revival, which is different from the case of free expansion after switching off the combined harmonic and optical lattice potential.

  11. High field side launch of RF waves: A new approach to reactor actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lin, Y.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Vieira, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Launching radio frequency (RF) waves from the high field side (HFS) of a tokamak offers significant advantages over low field side (LFS) launch with respect to both wave physics and plasma material interactions (PMI). For lower hybrid (LH) waves, the higher magnetic field opens the window between wave accessibility (n∥≡c k∥/ω >√{1 -ωpi 2/ω2+ωpe 2/ωce 2 }+ωp e/|ωc e| ) and the condition for strong electron Landau damping (n∥˜√{30 /Te } with Te in keV), allowing LH waves from the HFS to penetrate into the core of a burning plasma, while waves launched from the LFS are restricted to the periphery of the plasma. The lower n∥ of waves absorbed at higher Te yields a higher current drive efficiency as well. In the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), HFS launch allows for direct access to the mode conversion layer where mode converted waves absorb strongly on thermal electrons and ions, thus avoiding the generation of energetic minority ion tails. The absence of turbulent heat and particle fluxes on the HFS, particularly in double null configuration, makes it the ideal location to minimize PMI damage to the antenna structure. The quiescent SOL also eliminates the need to couple LH waves across a long distance to the separatrix, as the antenna can be located close to plasma without risking damage to the structure. Improved impurity screening on the HFS will help eliminate the long-standing issues of high Z impurity accumulation with ICRF. Looking toward a fusion reactor, the HFS is the only possible location for a plasma-facing RF antenna that will survive long-term. By integrating the antenna into the blanket module it is possible to improve the tritium breeding ratio compared with an antenna occupying an equatorial port plug. Blanket modules will require remote handling of numerous cooling pipes and electrical connections, and the addition of transmission lines will not substantially increase the level of complexity. The obvious engineering

  12. Wave-packet treatment of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Yat-Long; Chu, M.C.; Xu, Jianyi [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Shatin (China); Tsui, Ka Ming [University of Tokyo, RCCN, ICRR, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Wong, Chan Fai [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-06-15

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 σ confidence level. (orig.)

  13. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  14. px+ipy superfluid from s-wave interactions of fermionic cold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Lutchyn, Roman M; Das Sarma, S

    2008-10-17

    Two-dimensional (p(x)+ip(y)) superfluids or superconductors offer a playground for studying intriguing physics such as quantum teleportation, non-Abelian statistics, and topological quantum computation. Creating such a superfluid in cold fermionic atom optical traps using p-wave Feshbach resonance is turning out to be challenging. Here we propose a method to create a p(x)+ip(y) superfluid directly from an s-wave interaction making use of a topological Berry phase, which can be artificially generated. We discuss ways to detect the spontaneous Hall mass current, which acts as a diagnostic for the chiral p-wave superfluid.

  15. Towards Relativistic Atomic Physics and Post-Minkowskian Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lusanna, Luca

    2009-01-01

    A review is given of the formulation of relativistic atomic theory, in which there is an explicit realization of the Poincare' generators, both in the inertial and in the non-inertial rest-frame instant form of dynamics in Minkowski space-time. This implies the need to solve the problem of the relativistic center of mass of an isolated system and to describe the transitions from different conventions for clock synchronization, namely for the identifications of instantaneous 3-spaces, as gauge transformations. These problems, stemming from the Lorentz signature of space-time, are a source of non-locality, which induces a spatial non-separability in relativistic quantum mechanics, with implications for relativistic entanglement. Then the classical system of charged particles plus the electro-magnetic field is studied in the framework of ADM canonical tetrad gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times admitting the ADM Poincare' group at spatial infinity, which allows to get the general relativistic extens...

  16. Adiabatic asymmetric scattering of atoms in the field of a standing wave

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, M V; Ishkhanyan, A M

    2015-01-01

    A model of the asymmetric coherent scattering process (caused by initial atomic wave-packet splitting in the momentum space) taking place at the large detuning and adiabatic course of interaction for an effective two-state system interacting with a standing wave of laser radiation is discussed. We show that the same form of initial wave-packet splitting may lead to different, in general, diffraction patterns for opposite, adiabatic and resonant, regimes of the standing-wave scattering. We show that the scattering of the Gaussian wave packet in the adiabatic case presents refraction (a limiting form of the asymmetric scattering) in contrast to the bi-refringence (the limiting case of the high-order narrowed scattering) occurring in the resonant scattering.

  17. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images based on wave atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongzhao; Liu, Gangjun; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique, which is based on low-coherence interferometry. OCT images suffer from speckle noise, which reduces image contrast. A shrinkage filter based on wave atoms transform is proposed for speckle reduction in OCT images. Wave atoms transform is a new multiscale geometric analysis tool that offers sparser expansion and better representation for images containing oscillatory patterns and textures than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Cycle spinning-based technology is introduced to avoid visual artifacts, such as Gibbs-like phenomenon, and to develop a translation invariant wave atoms denoising scheme. The speckle suppression degree in the denoised images is controlled by an adjustable parameter that determines the threshold in the wave atoms domain. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively remove the speckle noise and improve the OCT image quality. The signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, average equivalent number of looks, and cross-correlation (XCOR) values are obtained, and the results are also compared with the wavelet and curvelet thresholding techniques. PMID:24825507

  18. Intrinsic Resolution of Molecular Electronic Wave Functions and Energies in Terms of Quasi-atoms and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Aaron C; Schmidt, Michael W; Gordon, Mark S; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2017-02-09

    A general intrinsic energy resolution has been formulated for strongly correlated wave functions in the full molecular valence space and its subspaces. The information regarding the quasi-atomic organization of the molecular electronic structure is extracted from the molecular wave function without introducing any additional postulated model state wave functions. To this end, the molecular wave function is expressed in terms of quasi-atomic molecular orbitals, which maximize the overlap between subspaces of the molecular orbital space and the free-atom orbital spaces. As a result, the molecular wave function becomes the superposition of a wave function representing the juxtaposed nonbonded quasi-atoms and a wave function describing the interatomic electron migrations that create bonds through electron sharing. The juxtaposed nonbonded quasi-atoms are shown to consist of entangled quasi-atomic states from different atoms. The binding energy is resolved as a sum of contributions that are due to quasi-atom formation, quasiclassical electrostatic interactions, and interatomic interferences caused by electron sharing. The contributions are further resolved according to orbital interactions. The various transformations that generate the analysis are determined by criteria that are independent of the working orbital basis used for calculating the molecular wave function. The theoretical formulation of the resolution is quantitatively validated by an application to the C2 molecule.

  19. Controlled rephasing of single spin-waves in a quantum memory based on cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Heinze, Georg; Cristiani, Matteo; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Quantum Photonics With Solids; Atoms Team

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memories for light allow a reversible transfer of quantum information between photons and long lived matter quantum bits. In atomic ensembles, this information is commonly stored in the form of single collective spin excitations (spin-waves). In this work we demonstrate that we can actively control the dephasing of the spin-waves created in a quantum memory based on a cold Rb87 atomic ensemble. The control is provided by an external magnetic field gradient, which induces an inhomogeneous broadening of the atomic hyperfine levels. We show that acting on this gradient allows to control the dephasing of individual spin-waves and to induce later a rephasing. The spin-waves are then mapped into single photons, and we demonstrate experimentally that the active rephasing preserves the sub-Poissonian statistics of the retrieved photons. Finally we show that this rephasing control enables the creation and storage of multiple spin-waves in different temporal modes, which can be selectively readout. This is an important step towards the implementation of a functional temporally multiplexed quantum memory for quantum repeaters. We acknowledge support from the ERC starting grant, the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, the Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, and the International PhD- fellowship program ``la Caixa''-Severo Ochoa @ICFO.

  20. A Resonant Mode for Gravitational Wave Detectors based on Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wavepackets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes without changing hardware. For instance, a new binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to $\\Omega_\\text{GW} ...

  1. Design and Fabrication of a Chip-based Continuous-wave Atom Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Power, E P; Vanderelzen, B; Herrera-Fierro, P; Murphy, R; Yalisove, S M; Raithel, G

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for a continuous-wave (CW) atom laser on a chip and describe the process used to fabricate the device. Our design aims to integrate quadrupole magnetic guiding of ground state Rb atoms with continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling to create a continuous Bose-Einstein condensate; out-coupled atoms from the condensate should realize a CW atom laser. We choose a geometry with three wires embedded in a spiral pattern in a silicon subtrate. The guide features an integrated solenoid to mitigate spin-flip losses and provide a tailored longitudinal magnetic field. Our design also includes multiple options for atom interferometry: accomodations are in place for laser-generated atom Fabry-Perot and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, and a pair of atomic beam X-splitters is incorporated for an all-magnetic atom Mach-Zehnder setup. We demonstrate the techniques necessary to fabricate our device using existing micro- and nano-scale fabrication equipment, and discuss future options for modified desi...

  2. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoye, Robert L. Z., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Muñoz-Rojas, David [LMGP, University Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, F-3800 Grenoble (France); Nelson, Shelby F. [Kodak Research Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York 14650 (United States); Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Roozeboom, Fred [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, Eindhoven, 5600 MB (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  3. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Z. Hoye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  4. Low-temperature water reactor for the district heating atomic power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skvortsov, S.A.; Sokolov, I.N.; Krauze, L.V.; Nikiporetz, Yu.G.; Philimonov, Y.V.

    1978-04-01

    A natural convection low-pressure water reactor can be utilized as a source of district heating. This provides inherent safety factors under conditions requiring emergency core cooling. The reactor pressure vessel is contained within a prestressed concrete shell, both of which are designed to withstand accident overpressure. This also results in a relatively thin-walled reactor vessel that can be fabricated on-site. The overall safety and economy of such a system merits further consideration as a system for providing low-temperature nuclear heat for district heating.

  5. Measuring the Gouy Phase of Matter Waves using Singular Atom Optics with Spinor BECs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Justin T.; Hansen, Azure; Murphree, Joseph D.; Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    The Gouy phase is a propagation-dependent geometric phase found in confined waves as they propagate through a focus. Although it has been observed and studied extensively both in scalar and vector optical beams as well as in electron vortex beams, it has not yet been directly observed in ultracold matter waves. The Schrödinger equation has the same form as the paraxial wave equation from electromagnetism; expansion of a BEC upon release from a trap has the same mathematical form as a beam propagating away from a focus. We employ and extend this analogy between coherent optical beams and coherent matter waves to include spin angular momentum (polarization), which enables us measure the matter wave Gouy phase using coreless vortex spin textures in spinor BECs. Because the Gouy phase is dependent on the orbital angular momentum of the wave, the vortex and core states acquire different Gouy phase shifts. Parameters that are sensitive to the relative phase such as two-dimensional maps of the Stokes parameters rotate during evolution due to this phase difference. Using atom-optic polarimetry we can access the evolution of the atomic Stokes parameters and observe this rotation.

  6. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  7. Comparison of atom interferometers and light interferometers as space-based gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G; Thorpe, J I

    2012-05-25

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational-wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, noninertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g., multiple-arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and, in principle, favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  8. Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  9. Acoustic omni meta-atom for decoupled access to all octants of a wave parameter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sukmo; Cho, Choonlae; Jeong, Jun-ho; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    The common behaviour of a wave is determined by wave parameters of its medium, which are generally associated with the characteristic oscillations of its corresponding elementary particles. In the context of metamaterials, the decoupled excitation of these fundamental oscillations would provide an ideal platform for top–down and reconfigurable access to the entire constitutive parameter space; however, this has remained as a conceivable problem that must be accomplished, after being pointed out by Pendry. Here by focusing on acoustic metamaterials, we achieve the decoupling of density ρ, modulus B−1 and bianisotropy ξ, by separating the paths of particle momentum to conform to the characteristic oscillations of each macroscopic wave parameter. Independent access to all octants of wave parameter space (ρ, B−1, ξ)=(+/−,+/−,+/−) is thus realized using a single platform that we call an omni meta-atom; as a building block that achieves top–down access to the target properties of metamaterials. PMID:27687689

  10. Convective wave front locking for a reaction-diffusion system in a conical flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuptsov, P.V.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Knudsen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    We consider reaction-diffusion instabilities in a flow reactor whose cross-section slowly expands with increasing longitudinal coordinate (cone shaped reactor). Due to deceleration of the flow in this reactor, the instability is convective near the inlet to the reactor and absolute at the downstr...

  11. Superradiant cascade emissions in an atomic ensemble via four-wave mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, H.H., E-mail: sappyjen@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    We investigate superradiant cascade emissions from an atomic ensemble driven by two-color classical fields. The correlated pair of photons (signal and idler) is generated by adiabatically driving the system with large-detuned light fields via four-wave mixing. The signal photon from the upper transition of the diamond-type atomic levels is followed by the idler one which can be superradiant due to light-induced dipole–dipole interactions. We then calculate the cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) of the idler photon, which is a cumulative effect of interaction energy. We study its dependence on a cylindrical geometry, a conventional setup in cold atom experiments, and estimate the maximum CLS which can be significant and observable. Manipulating the CLS of cascade emissions enables frequency qubits that provide alternative robust elements in quantum network. - Highlights: • Superradiance from a cascade atomic transition. • Correlated photon pair generation via four-wave mixing. • Dynamical light–matter couplings in a phased symmetrical state. • Cooperative Lamb shift in a cylindrical atomic ensemble.

  12. Analysis of Radiation Damage in Light Water Reactors: Comparison of Cluster Analysis Methods for the Analysis of Atom Probe Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jonathan M; DaCosta, Gérald; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Weekes, Hannah; Radiguet, Bertrand; Styman, Paul D; Vurpillot, Francois; Pareige, Cristelle; Etienne, Auriane; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas; Malerba, Lorenzo; Pareige, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes the formation of nanoscale microstructural features (termed radiation damage), which affect the mechanical properties of the vessel. A key tool for characterizing these nanoscale features is atom probe tomography (APT), due to its high spatial resolution and the ability to identify different chemical species in three dimensions. Microstructural observations using APT can underpin development of a mechanistic understanding of defect formation. However, with atom probe analyses there are currently multiple methods for analyzing the data. This can result in inconsistencies between results obtained from different researchers and unnecessary scatter when combining data from multiple sources. This makes interpretation of results more complex and calibration of radiation damage models challenging. In this work simulations of a range of different microstructures are used to directly compare different cluster analysis algorithms and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

  13. Relative-intensity squeezing at audio frequencies using four-wave mixing in an atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    McCormick, C F; Lett, P D; Marino, A M

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of four-wave mixing in hot atomic vapor to generate up to -7.1 dB of measured relative-intensity squeezing. Due to its intrinsic simplicity, our system is strongly decoupled from environmental noise, and we observe more than -4 dB of squeezing down to frequencies as low as 5 kHz. This robust source of narrowband squeezed light may be useful for a variety of applications, such as coupling to atomic ensembles and enhancing the sensitivity of photothermal spectroscopy.

  14. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo type rephasing of the dipole moments a...

  15. Distorted wave theories for dressed-ion-atom collisions with GSZ projectile potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Fainstein, P D, E-mail: monti@ifir-conicet.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-10-14

    The continuum distorted wave and the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state approximations for electron emission in ion-atom collisions are generalized to the case of dressed projectiles. The interaction between the dressed projectile and the active electron is represented by the analytic Green-Sellin-Zachor (GSZ) potential. Doubly differential cross sections as a function of the emitted electron energy and angle are computed. The region of the binary encounter peak is analysed in detail. Interference structures appear in agreement with the experimental data and are interpreted as arising from the coherent interference between short- and long-range scattering amplitudes.

  16. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  17. Development of neutronic models with KANEXT for a reactor of traveling wave; Desarrollo de modelos neutronicos con KANEXT para un reactor de onda viajera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez S, R. C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingeniera, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Becker, M., E-mail: rcarlosls@yahoo.com.mx [Institut fur Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Problems with the computation time in a based code on the Monte Carlo method, they conduct to explore the option of the deterministic codes to be able to develop a model of robust reactor of traveling wave, and where short term results are obtained to carry out experimentation work to the moment to study an assemblies exchange scheme as method of fuel administration. KANEXT is a versatile and reliable code, developed in Germany that has satisfied our development necessities until the moment. In this article is described the KANEXT operation, and like it was implemented to develop a preliminary model of reactor core of traveling wave with operation way of stationary wave. The results obtained until the moment, as for the neutrons multiplication factor and the isotopic balance, are encouraging and they lead to refine the model removing completely the axial covering. The adoption of deterministic codes has allowed carrying out tests of complete core in a conventional computer in question of only hours; this will be valuable in the next stage of the research, where developing a re situate scheme of fuel assemblies will involve a great quantity of sprints. (Author)

  18. Statistical analysis of thermospheric gravity waves from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Fabry-Perot Interferometers at KEOPS (Sweden, Sodankylä (Finland, and Svalbard (Norway, have been analysed for gravity wave activity on all the clear nights from 2000 to 2006. A total of 249 nights were available from KEOPS, 133 from Sodankylä and 185 from the Svalbard FPI. A Lomb-Scargle analysis was performed on each of these nights to identify the periods of any wave activity during the night. Comparisons between many nights of data allow the general characteristics of the waves that are present in the high latitude upper thermosphere to be determined. Comparisons were made between the different parameters: the atomic oxygen intensities, the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and for each parameter the distribution of frequencies of the waves was determined. No dependence on the number of waves on geomagnetic activity levels, or position in the solar cycle, was found. All the FPIs have had different detectors at various times, producing different time resolutions of the data, so comparisons between the different years, and between data from different sites, showed how the time resolution determines which waves are observed. In addition to the cutoff due to the Nyquist frequency, poor resolution observations significantly reduce the number of short-period waves (<1 h period that may be detected with confidence. The length of the dataset, which is usually determined by the length of the night, was the main factor influencing the number of long period waves (>5 h detected. Comparisons between the number of gravity waves detected at KEOPS and Sodankylä over all the seasons showed a similar proportion of waves to the number of nights used for both sites, as expected since the two sites are at similar latitudes and therefore locations with respect to the auroral oval, confirming this as a likely source region. Svalbard showed fewer waves with short periods than KEOPS data for a season when both had the same time resolution data

  19. Wave-atoms-based multipurpose scheme via perceptual image hashing and watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Fu, Qi-Kai; Cheng, Lee-Ming

    2012-09-20

    This paper presents a novel multipurpose scheme for content-based image authentication and copyright protection using a perceptual image hashing and watermarking strategy based on a wave atom transform. The wave atom transform is expected to outperform other transforms because it gains sparser expansion and better representation for texture than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Images are decomposed into multiscale bands with a number of tilings using the wave atom transform. Perceptual hashes are then extracted from the features of tiling in the third scale band for the purpose of content-based authentication; simultaneously, part of the selected hashes are designed as watermarks, which are embedded into the original images for the purpose of copyright protection. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme shows great performance in content-based authentication by distinguishing the maliciously attacked images from the nonmaliciously attacked images. Moreover, watermarks extracted from the proposed scheme also achieve high robustness against common malicious and nonmalicious image-processing attacks, which provides excellent copyright protection for images.

  20. Hydrogen atom wave function and eigen energy in the Rindler space

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom eigenstate energy and wave function in the Rindler space. The probability distribution is tilted because the electric field of the nucleus is no longer spherically symmetric. The hydrogen atom therefore cannot be treated exactly in the same way as what it is in an inertial frame. We also find that if the external force accelerates only the nucleus and then the nucleus accelerates its surrounding electrons through electromagnetic force, the electrons can tunnel through the local energy gap and split the hydrogen atom into an ion. This is similar to what one expects from the Stark effect. However, the critical acceleration is about $3\\times 10^{22} m/s^2$. It is well beyond the gravitational acceleration on a regular star surface.

  1. Hydrogen atom wave function and eigen energy in the Rindler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang

    2016-10-01

    We study the hydrogen atom eigenstate energy and wave function in the Rindler space. The probability distribution is tilted because the electric field of the nucleus is no longer spherically symmetric. The hydrogen atom therefore cannot be treated exactly in the same way as what it is in an inertial frame. We also find that if the external force accelerates only the nucleus and then the nucleus accelerates its surrounding electrons through electromagnetic force, the electrons can tunnel through the local energy gap and split the hydrogen atom into an ion. This is similar to what one expects from the Stark effect. However, the critical acceleration is about 3 ×1022 m /s2. It is well beyond the gravitational acceleration on a regular star surface.

  2. Non-Markovian dynamics in pulsed and continuous wave atom lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Breuer, H P; Kappler, B; Petruccione, F

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of atom lasers with a continuous output coupler based on two-photon Raman transitions is investigated. With the help of the time-convolutionless projection operator technique the quantum master equations for pulsed and continuous wave (cw) atom lasers are derived. In the case of the pulsed atom laser the power of the time-convolutionless projection operator technique is demonstrated through comparison with the exact solution. It is shown that in an intermediate coupling regime where the Born-Markov approximation fails the results of this algorithm agree with the exact solution. To study the dynamics of a continuous wave atom laser a pump mechanism is included in the model. Whereas the pump mechanism is treated within the Born-Markov approximation, the output coupling leads to non-Markovian effects. The solution of the master equation resulting from the time-convolutionless projection operator technique exhibits strong oscillations in the occupation number of the Bose-Einstein condensate. These os...

  3. Size Effects on Surface Elastic Waves in a Semi-Infinite Medium with Atomic Defect Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates small-scale effects on the Rayleigh-type surface wave propagation in an isotopic elastic half-space upon laser irradiation. Based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics, the basic equations of wave motion and laser-induced atomic defect dynamics are derived. Dispersion equation that governs the Rayleigh surface waves in the considered medium is derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients which characterize surface waves are obtained. It is shown that if the generation rate is above the critical value, due to concentration-elastic instability, nanometer sized ordered concentration-strain structures on the surface or volume of solids arise. The spatial scale of these structures is proportional to the characteristic length of defect-atom interaction and increases with the increase of the temperature of the medium. The critical value of the pump parameter is directly proportional to recombination rate and inversely proportional to deformational potentials of defects.

  4. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Mikael; Usmani, Imam; Amari, Atia; Lauritzen, Björn; Walther, Andreas; Simon, Christoph; Sangouard, Nicolas; Minár, Jirí; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas; Kröll, Stefan

    2010-01-29

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light, the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo-type rephasing of the dipole moments and directional retrieval of the light. This combination of photon-echo and spin-wave storage allows us to store submicrosecond (450 ns) pulses for up to 20 mus. The scheme has a high potential for storing multiple temporal modes in the single-photon regime, which is an important resource for future long-distance quantum communication based on quantum repeaters.

  5. Entanglement of light-shift compensated atomic spin waves with telecom light

    CERN Document Server

    Dudin, Y O; Zhao, R; Blumoff, J Z; Kennedy, T A B; Kuzmich, A

    2010-01-01

    Entanglement of a 795 nm light polarization qubit and an atomic Rb spin wave qubit for a storage time of 0.1 s is observed by measuring the violation of Bell's inequality (S = 2.65 \\pm 0.12). Long qubit storage times are achieved by pinning the spin wave in a 1064 nm wavelength optical lattice, with a magic-valued magnetic field superposed to eliminate lattice-induced dephasing. Four-wave mixing in a cold Rb gas is employed to perform light qubit conversion between near infra red (795 nm) and telecom (1367 nm) wavelengths, and after propagation in a telecom fiber, to invert the conversion process. Observed Bell inequality violation (S = 2.66 \\pm 0.09), at 10 ms storage, confirms preservation of memory/light entanglement through the two stages of light qubit frequency conversion.

  6. Pairwise entanglement and readout of atomic-ensemble and optical wave-packet modes in traveling-wave Raman interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    We analyze quantum entanglement of Stokes light and atomic electronic polarization excited during single-pass, linear-regime, stimulated Raman scattering in terms of optical wave-packet modes and atomic-ensemble spatial modes. The output of this process is confirmed to be decomposable into multiple discrete, bosonic mode pairs, each pair undergoing independent evolution into a two-mode squeezed state. For this we extend the Bloch-Messiah reduction theorem, previously known for discrete linear systems (S. L. Braunstein, Phys. Rev. A, vol. 71, 055801 (2005)). We present typical mode functions in the case of one-dimensional scattering in an atomic vapor. We find that in the absence of dispersion, one mode pair dominates the process, leading to a simple interpretation of entanglement in this continuous-variable system. However, many mode pairs are excited in the presence of dispersion-induced temporal walkoff of the Stokes, as witnessed by the photon-count statistics. We also consider the readout of the stored at...

  7. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, V. L., E-mail: vdov@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute,' (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) {>=} 2 and q(a) {>=} 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure {beta}{sub N} > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  8. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, V. L.

    2013-02-01

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) ≥ 2 and q( a) ≥ 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure β N > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  9. Self-stabilizing Performance Analysis of Traveling Wave Reactor%行波堆自稳特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刚直; 柯国土

    2014-01-01

    Traveling wave reactor (TWR ) is an innovative conceptual fast reactor , w hich takes with once through breeding-burning mode and includes ignition and propa-gation regions .TWR’s operation comprises stages of ignition start-up ,wave forming , stable propagation of wave and lifetime extinguishing etc .TWR response to perturba-tion of reactor fuel component change in ignition and propagation stages was investigated in the paper . T he results indicate that T WR has a good self-stabilizing performance under small perturbation .%行波堆是一种采用“边增殖边焚烧”一体化模式的革新概念快堆,由点火区和增殖区组成,主要工作过程包括点火启动、行波形成、波稳定传播和寿期熄灭等阶段。本文通过理论分析和数值模拟相结合的方式对行波堆在点火和稳定传播阶段受扰动后的响应进行研究,结果表明行波在微小扰动下具有自稳特性。

  10. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  11. Analytical study of four-wave mixing with large atomic coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Korsunsky, E A; Marangos, J P; Bergmann, K

    2002-01-01

    Four-wave mixing in resonant atomic vapors based on maximum coherence induced by Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) is investigated theoretically. We show the advantages of a coupling scheme involving maximum coherence and demonstrate how a large atomic coherence between a ground and an highly excited state can be prepared by SCRAP. Full analytic solutions of the field propagation problem taking into account pump field depletion are derived. The solutions are obtained with the help of an Hamiltonian approach which in the adiabatic limit permits to reduce the full set of Maxwell-Bloch equations to simple canonical equations of Hamiltonian mechanics for the field variables. It is found that the conversion efficiency reached is largely enhanced if the phase mismatch induced by linear refraction is compensated. A detailed analysis of the phase matching conditions shows, however, that the phase mismatch contribution from the Kerr effect cannot be compensated simultaneously with linear refraction contrib...

  12. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size,fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm.The influence of laser power on deposition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW,the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW,but with laser power increase,equal to 50 mW,the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  13. Simulation of Chromium Atom Deposition Pattern in a Gaussain Laser Standing Wave with Different Laser Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; ZHU Bao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of a neutral chromium atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field is discussed by using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The deposition pattern of neutral chromium atoms in a laser standing wave with different laser power is discussed and the simulation result shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a nanometer stripe is 115nm and the contrast is 2.5:1 with laser power 3.93mW; the FWHM is 0.Snm and the contrast is 27:1 with laser power 16mW, the optimal laser power; but with laser power increasing to 50mW, the nanometer structure forms multi-crests and the quality worsens quickly with increasing laser power.

  14. Influence of laser power on deposition of the chromium atomic beam in laser standing wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG WenTao; ZHU BaoHua; ZHANG BaoWu; LI TongBao

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional deposition of collimated Cr atomic beam focused by a near-resonant Gaussian standing-laser field with wavelength of 425.55 nm is examined from particle-optics approach by using an adaptive step size, fourth-order Runge-Kutta type algorithm. The influence of laser power on depo-sition of atoms in laser standing wave is discussed and the simulative result shows that the FWHM of nanometer stripe is 102 nm and contrast is 2:1 with laser power equal to 3 mW, the FWHM is 1.2 nm and contrast is 32:1 with laser power equal to 16 mW, but with laser power increase, equal to 50 mW, the nonmeter structure forms the multi-crests and exacerbates.

  15. Photoionization microscopy of the lithium atom: Wave-function imaging of quasibound and continuum Stark states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.; Harb, M. M.; Ollagnier, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Barillot, T.; Lépine, F.; Bordas, C.

    2016-07-01

    Photoionization of an atom in the presence of a uniform static electric field provides the unique opportunity to expand and visualize the atomic wave function at a macroscopic scale. In a number of seminal publications dating back to the 1980s, Fabrikant, Demkov, Kondratovich, and Ostrovsky showed that this goal could be achieved by projecting slow (meV) photoionized electrons onto a position-sensitive detector and underlined the distinction between continuum and resonant contributions. The uncovering of resonant signatures was achieved fairly recently in experiments on the nonhydrogenic lithium atoms [Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 183001 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.183001. The purpose of the present article is the general description of these findings, with emphasis on the various manifestations of resonant character. From this point of view, lithium has been chosen as an illustrative example between the two limiting cases of hydrogen, where resonance effects are more easily identified, and heavy atoms like xenon, where resonant effects were not observed.

  16. Two-atom energy spectrum in a harmonic trap near a Feshbach resonance at higher partial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Liang, Yi; Bhaduri, Rajat K.

    2009-09-01

    Two atoms in an optical lattice may be made to interact strongly at higher partial waves near a Feshbach resonance. These atoms, under appropriate constraints, could be bosonic or fermionic. The universal l=2 energy spectrum for such a system, with a caveat, is presented in this paper and checked with the spectrum obtained by direct numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation. The results reported here extend those of Yip for p -wave resonance [S.-K. Yip, Phys. Rev. A 78, 013612 (2008)], while exploring the limitations of a universal expression for the spectrum for the higher partial waves.

  17. Observation of four-wave mixing in caesium atoms using a noncycling transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Rong; Ma Jie; Zhao Jian-Ming; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the generation of four-wave mixing (FWM) signal using a noncycling transition of caesium atoms is investigated when the pumping laser is locked to the transition 6S1/2F = 4 → 6P3/2F' = 4, and meanwhile the probe frequency is scanned across the 6S1/2F = 4 → 6P3/2 transition. The efficiency of the four-wave mixing signal as a function of the intensity of the pumping beams and the detuning of the pumping beams is also studied. In order to increase the detection efficiency, a repumping laser which is resonant with 6S1/2F = 3 → 6P3/2F' = 4 transition is used. A theoretical model is also introduced, and the theoretical results are in qualitative agreement with experimental ones.

  18. Partial Wave Cross Sections for Collisions between Helium Atoms and Hydrogen Halide Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Chun-Ri; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    The close-coupling method is utilized to calculate partial cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of He atoms with HX (X=F, Cl, Br) molecule based on the CCSD (T) potential energy surfaces obtained in the previous research. The calculation is performed at the incident energy of 200 me V. The rationality of our results has been confirmed by comparison with the available theoretical results. The tendency of the elastic and inelastic rotational excitation partial wave cross sections varying with the reduced mass of the three systems is obtained.

  19. Atom-field entanglement in the Jaynes Cummings model without rotating wave approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mirzaee; M. Batavani

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a structure for obtaining the exact eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the Jaynes–Cummings model (JCM) without the rotating wave approximation (RWA). We study the evolution of the system in the strong coupling region using the time evolution operator without RWA. The entanglement of the system without RWA is investigated using the Von Neumann entropy as an entanglement measure. It is interesting that in the weak coupling regime, the population of the atomic levels and Von Neumann entropy without RWA model shows a good agreement with the RWA whereas in strong coupling domain, the results of these two models are quite different.

  20. Shock wave propagation in semi-crystalline polyethylene: An atomic-scale investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M.; O'Connor, Thomas C.; Yeh, In-Chul; Chantawansri, Tanya L.; Sirk, Timothy W.; Robbins, Mark O.; Andzelm, Jan W.

    Highly oriented polyethylene (PE) fibers are used in protection applications, therefore elucidation of their response under high strain-rate impact events is vital. Although PE fibers can have high crystallinity (>95%), they also contain defects such as amorphous domains. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate shock propagation through crystalline, amorphous, and semi-crystalline PE. We generate compressive shock waves of varying strength, quantify their dynamics, and characterize their effect on material properties at the atomic scale. In the semi-crystalline PE model, the differing density and molecular order of amorphous PE and crystalline PE result in differing shock impedances, which causes reflection and refraction of shock waves at interfaces between the phases. We quantify the properties (e.g. pressure, velocity) of the reflected and refracted waves, which differ from those of the incident wave, and compare with results from impedance matching. We also examine the reflection, absorption, and transmission of energy at the crystalline-amorphous interface. Depending on shock strength, amorphous defects can dissipate shock energy, which attenuates the shock and leads to effects such as localized heating.

  1. Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-11-17

    Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in

  2. Quantum correlations by four-wave-mixing in atomic vapor. Theory and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Glorieux, Quentin

    2011-01-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally the generation of quantum correlations in the continuous variable regime by way of four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. Two theoretical approaches have been developed. On one side, we study the four-wave mixing under the "classical" non-linear optics point of view. In such a way we obtain the evolution equation for an ideal linear amplifier in a {\\chi}^(3) medium. On the other side, we present a microscopic model with 4 levels in the double-{\\Lambda} configuration to calculate the {\\chi}^(3) coefficient in a atomic vapor dressed with a laser. This calculation allows us to derive the spectra of intensity noise for interesting parameters. The experimental part of this work describes the demonstration of this effect on the D1 line of rubidium 85. We present a measurement of relative intensity squeezing as high as -9.2dB below the standard quantum limit, and an original regime where quantum correlations have been measured without amplification.These results have b...

  3. Finite nuclear size and Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states

    CERN Document Server

    Milstein, A I; Terekhov, I S

    2003-01-01

    We consider corrections to the Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states due to the finite nuclear size (FNS). In other words, these are radiative corrections to the atomic isotop shift related to FNS. It is shown that the structure of the corrections is qualitatively different from that for s-wave states. The perturbation theory expansion for the relative correction for a $p_{1/2}$-state starts from $\\alpha\\ln(1/Z\\alpha)$-term, while for $s_{1/2}$-states it starts from $Z\\alpha^2$ term. Here $\\alpha$ is the fine structure constant and $Z$ is the nuclear charge. In the present work we calculate the $\\alpha$-terms for $2p$-states, the result for $2p_{1/2}$-state reads $(8\\alpha/9\\pi)[\\ln(1/(Z\\alpha)^2)+0.710]$. Even more interesting are $p_{3/2}$-states. In this case the ``correction'' is by several orders of magnitude larger than the ``leading'' FNS shift.

  4. The importance of being atomic: Ecological invasions as random walks instead of waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reluga, Timothy C

    2016-12-01

    Invasions are one of the most easily identified spatial phenomena in ecology, and have inspired a rich variety of theories for ecologists' and naturalists' consideration. However, a number of arguments over the sensitivities of invasion rates to stochasticity, density-dependence, dimension, and discreteness persist in the literature. The standard mathematical approach to invasions is based on Fisher's analysis of traveling waves solutions for the spread of an advantageous allele. In this paper, we exploit an alternative theory based on Ellner's premise that species invasions are best interpreted not as waves, but as random walks, and that the discreteness of living organisms is fundamentally important. Using a density-dependent invasion model in a stationary environment with indivisible (atomic) individuals where reproduction and dispersal are stochastic and independent, we show 4 key properties of Ellner's invasions previously suggested by simulation analysis: (1) greater spatial dispersal stochasticity quickens invasions, (2) greater demographic stochasticity slows invasions, (3) negative density-dependence slows invasions, and (4) greater temporal dispersal stochasticity quickens invasions. We prove the first three results by using generating functions and stochastic-dominance methods to rank furthest-forward dispersal distributions. The fourth result is proven in the special case of atomless theory, but remains an open conjecture in atomic theory. In addition, we explain why, unlike atomless invasions, an infinitely wide atomic invasion in two-dimensions can travel faster than a finite-width invasion and a one-dimensional invasion. The paper concludes with a classification of invasion dynamics based on dispersal kernel tails.

  5. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  6. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear ultrasonic pressure wave propagation in a cavitating bubbly liquid inside a sonochemical reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Hakan; Popov, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the acoustic wave propagation in bubbly liquid inside a pilot sonochemical reactor which aims to produce antibacterial medical textile fabrics by coating the textile with ZnO or CuO nanoparticles. Computational models on acoustic propagation are developed in order to aid the design procedures. The acoustic pressure wave propagation in the sonoreactor is simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a meshless numerical method. The paper implements both the state-of-the-art linear model and a nonlinear wave propagation model recently introduced by Louisnard (2012), and presents a novel iterative solution procedure for the nonlinear propagation model which can be implemented using any numerical method and/or programming tool. Comparative results regarding both the linear and the nonlinear wave propagation are shown. Effects of bubble size distribution and bubble volume fraction on the acoustic wave propagation are discussed in detail. The simulations demonstrate that the nonlinear model successfully captures the realistic spatial distribution of the cavitation zones and the associated acoustic pressure amplitudes.

  7. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  8. Dicke-Narrowing Spectroscopy of Doubly Dressed Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Singly Dressed Four-Wave-Mixing in a Confined Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuan-Yuan; BAI Jin-Wao; LI-Li; ZHANG Wei-Feng; LI Chang-Biao; NIE Zhi-Qiang; GAN Chen-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    Dicke-narrowing effect appears both in doubly dressed electromagnetically induced transparency and singly dressed four-wave-mixing lines due to the contribution of slow atoms resulting from de-excited effects of atom-wall collision and transient behaviour of atoms in a confined system. A robust recipe for high resolution spectroscopy of electromagnetically induced transparency dressed by two fields and four-wave-mixing lines comparable with the cold atoms is achievable in a thin vapour cell in experiments.

  9. Enhanced harmonic generation and wave-mixing via two-color multiphoton excitation of atoms/molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, H K; Mkrtchian, G F

    2016-01-01

    We consider harmonics generation and wave-mixing by two-color multi photon resonant excitation of three-level atoms/molecules in strong laser fields. The coherent part of the spectra corresponding to multicolor harmonics generation is investigated. The obtained analytical results on the basis of generalized rotating wave approximation are in a good agreement with numerical calculations. The results applied to the hydrogen atom and homonuclear diatomic molecular ion show that one can achieve efficient generation of moderately high multicolor harmonics via multiphoton resonant excitation by appropriate laser pulses.

  10. Progress in the Use of Isotopes: The Atomic Triad - Reactors, Radioisotopes and Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, W. F.

    1958-08-04

    Recent years have seen a substantial growth in the use of isotopes in medicine, agriculture, and industry: up to the minute information on the production and use of isotopes in the U.S. is presented. The application of radioisotopes to industrial processes and manufacturing operations has expanded more rapidly than any one except its most ardent advocates expected. New uses and new users are numerous. The adoption by industry of low level counting techniques which make possible the use of carbon-14 and tritium in the control of industrial processes and in certain exploratory and research problems is perhaps most promising of current developments. The latest information on savings to industry will be presented. The medical application of isotopes has continued to develop at a rapid pace. The current trend appears to be in the direction of improvements in technique and the substitution of more effective isotopes for those presently in use. Potential and actual benefits accruing from the use of isotopes in agriculture are reviewed. The various methods of production of radioisotopes are discussed. Not only the present methods but also interesting new possibilities are covered. Although isotopes are but one of the many peaceful uses of the atom, it is the first to pay its way. (auth)

  11. Evolution of the wave function of an atom hit by a photon in a three-grating interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenovic, Dusan; Bozic, Mirjana [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Sanz, Angel S [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Davidovic, Milena [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: arsenovic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: bozic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: milena@grf.bg.ac.yu

    2009-07-15

    In 1995, Chapman et al (1995 Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 2783) showed experimentally that the interference contrast in a three-grating atom interferometer does not vanish in the presence of scattering events with photons, as required by the complementarity principle. In this work, we present an analytical study of this experiment by determining the evolution of an atom's wave function along the three-grating Mach-Zehnder interferometer under the assumption that the atom is hit by a photon after passing through the first grating. The consideration of a transverse wave function in momentum representation is essential in this study. As is shown, the number of atoms transmitted through the third grating is given by a simple periodic function of the lateral shift along this grating, both in the absence and in the presence of photon scattering. Moreover, the relative contrast (laser on/laser off) is shown to be a simple analytical function of the ratio d{sub p}/{lambda}{sub i}, where d{sub p} is the distance between atomic paths at the scattering locus and {lambda} {sub i} the scattered photon wavelength. We argue that this dependence, being in agreement with experimental results, can be considered as showing compatibility between the wave and corpuscle properties of atoms.

  12. Complex wave-interference phenomena: From the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pier A Mello

    2001-02-01

    Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past in the context of nuclear physics, discusses the problem in terms of a prompt and an equilibrated component: it incorporates the average value of the scattering matrix to account for the prompt processes and satisfies the requirements of flux conservation, causality and ergodicity. The main application of the model is the analysis of electronic transport through ballistic mesoscopic cavities: it describes well the results from the numerical solutions of the Schrödinger equation for two-dimensional cavities.

  13. Tunneling wave packets of atoms from intense elliptically polarized fields in natural geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Li, Min; Liu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yunquan

    2017-02-01

    We study strong-field tunneling of atoms in intense elliptically polarized laser fields in natural tunneling geometry. We obtain the temporal- and spatial-dependent tunneling ionization rates, the transverse and longitudinal momentum distributions, and the position distributions of the tunnel exit in parabolic coordinates. The tunneling electron wave packets at the tunnel exit are three dimensionally characterized for both momentum and spatial distributions. The conjunction between the tunneling point and the classical propagation of the widely used semiclassical model are naturally connected. We further calculate the ellipticity-dependent photoelectron momentum distributions on the detector, which are validated by comparison with the exact results through numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The theory clarifies crucial questions about strong-field tunneling ionization, which has important implications for the attoclock with elliptical or circular fields, photoelectron holography, molecular orbital imaging, etc.

  14. From quantum turbulence to statistical atom optics: new perspectives in speckle matter wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, P E S; Telles, G D; Impens, F; Kaiser, R; Bagnato, V S

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Turbulence, the chaotic configuration of tangled quantized vortex lines, can be analyzed from the matter wave perspective in instead of the traditional fluid perspective. We report the observation of a remarkable similarity in between the dynamics of a freely expanding turbulent Bose-Einstein condensate and the propagation of an optical speckle pattern. Both follow very similar basic propagation characteristics. The second-order correlation is calculated and the typical correlation length of the two phenomena is used to substantiate the observations. The analogy between an expanding turbulent atomic condensate and a traveling optical speckle creates exciting prospects to investigate disordered quantum matter including the possibilities of a 3D speckle matter field.

  15. Output Rate of Atomic Four-Wave Mixing in Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; LI Wei-Bing; PENG Ju-Cun

    2004-01-01

    In this letter, following the proposal of Heurich et al. [Phys. Rev. A63 (2001) 033605], we analyze and discuss output rate of atomic four-wave mixing in the two-component Bose-Einstein condensate under the condition of the steady state. The results show that the magnitude of the signal beam increases with the increase of the intensity of the probe beam, up to a saturated value, then it decreases as the probe beam increases. The influence of the interaction range on the signal beam is also predicted. In particular, it is worth while pointing out that in contrast to the previous solutions, our obtained analytical solutions are of very simple and explicit forms, which open the door for further investigating the related physical mechanisms.

  16. Density dependence of the /s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.

    2002-11-01

    Several mechanisms of density dependence of the s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms, beyond the conventional model, are tested by parameter fits to a large (106 points) set of data from 16O to 238U, including 'deeply bound' states in 205Pb. Special attention is paid to the proper choice of nuclear density distributions. A density-dependent isovector scattering amplitude suggested recently by Weise to result from a density dependence of the pion decay constant is introduced and found to account for most of the so-called anomalous repulsion. The presence of such an effect might indicate partial chiral symmetry restoration in dense matter. The anomalous repulsion is fully accounted for when an additional relativistic impulse approximation term is included in the potential.

  17. Improved spacecraft radio science using an on-board atomic clock: application to gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Tinto, Massimo; Prestage, John D; Armstrong, J W

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in space-qualified atomic clocks (low-mass, low power-consumption, frequency stability comparable to that of ground-based clocks) can enable interplanetary spacecraft radio science experiments at unprecedented Doppler sensitivities. The addition of an on-board digital receiver would allow the up- and down-link Doppler frequencies to be measured separately. Such separate, high-quality measurements allow optimal data combinations that suppress the currently-leading noise sources: phase scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere and Doppler noise caused by mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna. Here we provide a general expression for the optimal combination of ground and on-board Doppler data and compute the sensitivity such a system would have to low-frequency gravitational waves (GWs). Assuming a plasma scintillation noise calibration comparable to that already demonstrated with the multi-link CASSINI radio system, the space-clock/digital-receiver instrumentation enhancements would ...

  18. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229 nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, Yushi; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the 4th harmonic using two successive second harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes $^{111}$Cd and $^{113}$Cd, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  19. Dressed Gain from the Parametrically Amplified Four-Wave Mixing Process in an Atomic Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wen, Feng; Che, Junling; Zhang, Dan; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    With a forward cone emitting from the strong pump laser in a thermal rubidium atomic vapor, we investigate the non-degenerate parametrically amplified four-wave mixing (PA-FWM) process with dressing effects in a three-level “double-Λ” configuration both theoretically and experimentally. By seeding a weak probe field into the Stokes or anti-Stokes channel of the FWM, the gain processes are generated in the bright twin beams which are called conjugate and probe beams, respectively. However, the strong dressing effect of the pump beam will dramatically affect the gain factors both in the probe and conjugate channels, and can inevitably impose an influence on the quantum effects such as entangled degree and the quantum noise reduction between the two channels. We systematically investigate the intensity evolution of the dressed gain processes by manipulating the atomic density, the Rabi frequency and the frequency detuning. Such dressing effects are also visually evidenced by the observation of Autler-Townes splitting of the gain peaks. The investigation can contribute to the development of quantum information processing and quantum communications. PMID:26463588

  20. Theoretical study on the degradation reaction of octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin with atomic oxygen O((3)P) in dielectric barrier discharge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Hu, Jingtian; Qi, Chuansong

    2014-11-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) have been used in the degradation of dioxins due to the large number of excimers and free radicals produced in discharge process. In this article, the density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the degradation mechanism of octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) with the atomic oxygen O((3)P) in DBD reactor. The reactants, intermediates, transition states and products are optimized at the MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level. The vibrational frequencies have been calculated at the same level. The reaction pathways and mechanisms are analyzed in detail. The effect of removing the chlorine atom on environment also has been discussed.

  1. Generation of single photons with highly tunable wave shape from a cold atomic quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Ho, Melvyn; Chávez, Matías; Teo, Colin; Sangouard, Nicolas; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    We report on a single photon source with highly tunable photon shape based on a cold ensemble of Rubidium atoms. We follow the DLCZ scheme to implement an emissive quantum memory, which can be operated as a photon pair source with controllable delay. We find that the temporal wave shape of the emitted read photon can be precisely controlled by changing the shape of the driving read pulse. We generate photons with temporal durations varying over three orders of magnitude up to 10 {\\mu}s without a significant change of the read-out efficiency. We prove the non-classicality of the emitted photons by measuring their antibunching, showing near single photon behavior at low excitation probabilities. We also show that the photons are emitted in a pure state by measuring unconditional autocorrelation functions. Finally, to demonstrate the usability of the source for realistic applications, we create ultra-long single photons with a rising exponential or doubly peaked wave shape which are important for several quantum...

  2. Bilayer honeycomb lattice with ultracold atoms: Multiple Fermi surfaces and incommensurate spin density wave instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Santanu; Sensarma, Rajdeep

    2016-12-01

    We propose an experimental setup using ultracold atoms to implement a bilayer honeycomb lattice with Bernal stacking. In the presence of a potential bias between the layers and at low densities, fermions placed in this lattice form an annular Fermi sea. The presence of two Fermi surfaces leads to interesting patterns in Friedel oscillations and RKKY interactions in the presence of impurities. Furthermore, a repulsive fermion-fermion interaction leads to a Stoner instability towards an incommensurate spin density wave order with a wave vector equal to the thickness of the Fermi sea. The instability occurs at a critical interaction strength which goes down with the density of the fermions. We find that the instability survives interaction renormalization due to vertex corrections and discuss how this can be seen in experiments. We also track the renormalization group flows of the different couplings between the fermionic degrees of freedom, and find that there are no perturbative instabilities, and that Stoner instability is the strongest instability which occurs at a critical threshold value of the interaction. The critical interaction goes to zero as the chemical potential is tuned towards the band bottom.

  3. Interaction of atomized colloid with an ac electric field in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor used for deposition of nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profili, Jacopo; Dap, Simon; Levasseur, Olivier; Naude, Nicolas; Belinger, Antoine; Stafford, Luc; Gherardi, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Nanocomposite thin films can be obtained by polymerization of a colloidal solution in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. In such a process, the dispersion of nanoparticles into the matrix is driven by the charging, transport, and deposition dynamics of the atomized colloid. This work examines the interaction of atomized TiO2 nanoparticles with ac electric fields in a plane-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge reactor. Experiments are performed with the discharge off to examine transport and deposition phenomena over a wide range of experimental conditions with a fixed particle charge distribution. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the size distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles collected at different locations along the substrate surface placed on the bottom electrode of the DBD reactor can judiciously be controlled by varying the amplitude and frequency of the ac electric field. These results are also compared to the predictions of a simple particle motion model accounting for the electrostatic force, the gravitational force, and the neutral drag force in the laminar flow. It is found that while the initial charge distribution of atomized particles strongly influences the total deposition yield, its maximal position on the substrate, and the width of the deposited area, the initial size distribution of the particles at the entrance of the reactor mostly changes the size distribution at each position along the substrate surface.

  4. ±800kV平波电抗器安装工艺控制%Installation and Process Control for 士800kV Even Wave Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹邦标

    2011-01-01

    According to the installation process of 士800 kV even wave reactor in Chuxiong Convertor Station,this paper analyzes the characteristics and difficulties of installing even wave reactor and presents enlightening installation methods and hoisting technologies.%通过±800 kV楚雄换流站±800 kV平波电抗器现场安装的实践,分析了平波电抗器安装特点和难点,介绍具有参考意义的安装方案和吊装工艺。

  5. Interaction of a two-level atom with single-mode optical field beyond the rotating wave approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-11-17

    One of the simplest models involving the atom-field interaction is the coupling of a single two-level atom with single-mode optical field. Under the rotating wave approximation, this problem is reduced to a form that can be solved exactly. But the approximation is only valid when the two levels are resonant or nearly resonant with the applied electromagnetic radiation. Here we present an analytical solution without the rotating wave approximation and applicable to general atom-field interaction far away from the resonance. We find that there exists remarkable influence of the initial phase of optical field on the Rabi oscillations and Rabi splitting, and this issue cannot be explored in the context of the rotating wave approximation. Due to the retention of the counter-rotating terms, higher-order harmonic appears during the Rabi splitting. The analytical solution suggests a way to regulate and control the quantum dynamics of a two-level atom and allows for exploring more essential features of the atom-field interaction.

  6. Liquid Water through Density-Functional Molecular Dynamics: Plane-Wave vs Atomic-Orbital Basis Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, Giacomo; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We determine and compare structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water at near ambient conditions through density-functional molecular dynamics simulations, when using either plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets. In both frameworks, the electronic structure and the atomic forces are self-consistently determined within the same theoretical scheme based on a nonlocal density functional accounting for van der Waals interactions. The overall properties of liquid water achieved within the two frameworks are in excellent agreement with each other. Thus, our study supports that implementations with plane-wave or atomic-orbital basis sets yield equivalent results and can be used indiscriminately in study of liquid water or aqueous solutions.

  7. Projector Augmented Wave Method Incorporated into Gauss-Type Atomic Orbital Based Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiao-Gen; Yanai, Takeshi

    2017-07-11

    The Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) method developed by Blöchl is well recognized as an efficient, accurate pseudopotential approach in solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the plane-wave basis. Here we present an approach to incorporate the PAW method into the Gauss-type function (GTF) based DFT implementation, which is widely used for molecular quantum chemistry calculations. The nodal and high-exponent GTF components of valence molecular orbitals (MOs) are removed or pseudized by the ultrasoft PAW treatment, while there is elaborate transparency to construct an accurate and well-controlled pseudopotential from all-electron atomic description and to reconstruct an all-electron form of valence MOs from the pseudo MOs. The smoothness of the pseudo MOs should benefit the efficiency of GTF-based DFT calculations in terms of elimination of high-exponent primitive GTFs and reduction of grid points in the numerical quadrature. The processes of the PAW method are divided into basis-independent and -dependent parts. The former is carried out using the previously developed PAW libraries libpaw and atompaw. The present scheme is implemented by incorporating libpaw into the conventional GTF-based DFT solver. The details of the formulations and implementations of GTF-related PAW procedures are presented. The test calculations are shown for illustrating the performance. With the near-complete GTF basis at the cc-pVQZ level, the total energies obtained using our PAW method with suited frozen core treatments converge to those with the conventional all-electron GTF-based method with a rather small absolute error.

  8. Wave-function Visualization of Core-induced Interaction of Non-hydrogenic Rydberg Atom in Electric Field

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, W; Cheng, H; Zhang, S S; Liu, H P

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the wave-function feature of Rydberg sodium in a uniform electric field and found that the core-induced interaction of non-hydrogenic atom in electric field can be directly visualized in the wave-function. As is well known, the hydrogen atom in electric field can be separated in parabolic coordinates (\\eta, \\xi), whose eigen-function can show a clear pattern towards negative and positive directions corresponding to the so-called red and blue states without ambiguity, respectively. It can be served as a complete orthogonal basis set to study the core-induced interaction of non-hydrogenic atom in electric field. Owing to complete different patterns of the probability distribution for red and blue states, the interaction can be visualized in the wave-function directly via superposition. Moreover, the constructive and destructive interferences between red and blue states are also observed in the wave-function, explicitly explaining the experimental measurement for the spectral oscillator stre...

  9. High-Frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement via Atomic Memory Effects in Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-Hua; HU Xiang-Ming; KONG Ling-Feng; ZHANG Xiu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Atomic memory effects occur when the atomic relaxation times are comparable to or much longer than the cavity relaxation times.We show that by using the memory effects,it is possible to obtain high-frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement between a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes fields in a four-wave mixing system.The physical origin is traced to the dynamical Stark splittings of dressed states due to the parametrically amplified fields.This mechanism provides an alternative and efficient way for sideband entanglement.

  10. Born approximation for scattering of wave packets on atoms. I. Theoretical background for scattering of a wave packet on a potential field

    CERN Document Server

    Karlovets, D V; Serbo, V G

    2015-01-01

    Laser photons carrying non-zero orbital angular momentum are known and exploited during the last twenty years. Recently it has been demonstrated experimentally that such (twisted) electrons can be produced and even focused to a subnanometer scale. Thus, twisted electrons emerge as a new tool in atomic physics. The state of a twisted electron can be considered as a specific wave packet of plane waves. In the present paper-I we consider elastic scattering of the wave packets of fast non-relativistic particles on a potential field. We obtain simple and convenient formulae for a number of events in such a scattering. The equations derived represent, in fact, generalization of the well-known Born approximation for the case when finite sizes and inhomogeneity of the initial packet should be taken into account. To illustrate the obtained results, we consider two simple models corresponding to scattering of a Gaussian wave packet on the Gaussian potential and on the hydrogen atom. The scattering of twisted electrons ...

  11. Dynamics of bisolitonic matter waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate subjected to an atomic beam splitter and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dikande, Alain Moise; Ebobenow, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical scheme for an experimental implementation involving bisolitonic matter waves from an attractive Bose-Einstein condensate, is considered within the framework of a non-perturbative approach to the associate Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The model consists of a single condensate subjected to an expulsive harmonic potential creating a double-condensate structure, and a gravitational potential that induces atomic exchanges between the two overlapping post condensates. Using a non-isospectral scattering transform method, exact expressions for the bright-matter-wave bisolitons are found in terms of double-lump envelopes with the co-propagating pulses displaying more or less pronounced differences in their widths and tails depending on the mass of atoms composing the condensate.

  12. Ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution by ultrasonic atomization and its proposed mechanism based on parametric decay instability of capillary wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masanori; Matsuura, Kazuo; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2001-02-01

    We show the experimental data of selective ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution, using ultrasonic atomization. Pure ethanol could be obtained directly from a solution with several mol% ethanol-water solution at 10 °C. This result can be explained in terms of parametric decay instability of capillary wave, in which high localization and accumulation of acoustic energy occur, leading to ultrasonic atomization. That is, parametric decay instability condenses the energy of longitudinal waves in a highly localized surface area of the capillary wave, and causes ultrasonic atomization.

  13. Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1998-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Catalytic Synthesis of Substrate-Free, Aligned and Tailored High Aspect Ratio Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in an Ultrasonic Atomization Head CVD Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Fahad Ali Rabbani; Zuhair Omar Malaibari; Muataz Ali Atieh; Ammar Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has proven its benchmark, over other methods, for the production of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on commercial and lab scale. In this study, an injection vertical CVD reactor fitted with an ultrasonic atomization head was used in a pilot-plant scale (height 274 cm, radius 25 cm) for semicontinuous production of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). p-Xylene was used as a hydrocarbon precursor in which ferrocene was dissolved and provided the ...

  15. Understanding the Atomic-Level Chemistry and Structure of Oxide Deposits on Fuel Rods in Light Water Nuclear Reactors Using First Principles Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Zs.; O'Brien, C. J.; Brenner, D. W.; Andersson, D. A.; Stanek, C. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of recent studies are discussed in which first principles calculations at the atomic level have been used to expand the thermodynamic database for science-based predictive modeling of the chemistry, composition and structure of unwanted oxides that deposit on the fuel rods in pressurized light water nuclear reactors. Issues discussed include the origin of the particles that make up deposits, the structure and properties of the deposits, and the forms by which boron uptake into the deposits can occur. These first principles approaches have implications for other research areas, such as hydrothermal synthesis and the stability and corrosion resistance of other materials under other extreme conditions.

  16. Dual-dressed four-wave mixing and dressed six-wave mixing in a five-level atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuicui Zuo; Yigang Du; Tong Jiang; Zhiqiang Nie; Yanpeng Zhang; Huaibin Zheng; Chenli Gan; Weifeng Zhang; Keqing Lu

    2008-01-01

    We study the co-existing four-wave mixing (FWM) process with two dressing fields and the six-wave mixing (SWM) process with one dressing field in a five-level system with carefully arranged laser beams. We also show two kinds of doubly dressing mechanisms in the FWM process. FWM and SWM signals propagatingalong the same direction compete with each other. With the properly controlled dressing fields, the FWM signals can be suppressed, while the SWM signals have been enhanced.

  17. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, V. [NRC Kurchatov Institute Tokamak Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-12

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20–40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500–1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure β{sub N} > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D – Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  18. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-01

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure βN > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D - Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  19. Analytical complex at the PIK reactor for studying the supra-atomic structure and dynamics of materials by neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, V. M., E-mail: lebedev@pnpi.spb.ru; Lebedev, V. T.; Ivanova, I. N.; Orlova, D. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    A project of the center for studying reactor materials and solving problems of materials science is presented which will be equipped with the following neutron instruments: a small-angle Membrana diffractometer, a spin-echo spectrometer, and a time-of-flight spectrometer. It is proposed to irradiate materials in the PIK reactor core and use neutron-scattering tools to analyze the structure and dynamics of these materials and investigate radiative defects in the complete experimental cycle (initial material-irradiation-strength tests, thermal loads, and other effects) using materials science techniques.

  20. Effects of ``atomic depletion'' on four-wave mixing in potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendale, S. C.; Gupta, P. K.; Rustagi, K. C.

    1983-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented for a four-wave mixing process involving two photons generated internally by stimulated electronic Raman scattering. Effects of saturation of the Stokes wave due to loss of population in the ground state are analyzed in some detail. It is shown that phase mismatch and the absorption of the generated wave play an important role in determining the efficiency of the mixing process.

  1. Shutdown channels and fitted interlocks in atomic reactors; Chaines de securite et verrouillages installes sur les piles atomiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furet, J.; Landauer, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    This catalogue consists of tables (one per reactor) giving the following information: number and type of detectors, range of the shutdown channels, nature of the associated electronics, thresholds setting off the alarms, fitted interlocks. These cards have been drawn up with a view to an examination of the reactors safety by the 'Reactor Safety Sub-Commission', they take into account the latest decisions. The reactors involved in this review are: Azur, Cabri, Castor-Pollux, Cesar-Marius-2, Edf-2, EL3, EL4, Eole, G1, G2-G3, Harmonie, Isis, Masurca, Melusine, Minerve, Osiris, Pegase, Peggy, PAT, Rapsodie, SENA, Siloe, Siloette, Triton-Nereide, and Ulysse. (authors) [French] Ce catalogue est compose d'un ensemble de tableaux (a raison de un tableau par pile) donnant les renseignements suivants: nombre et nature des detecteurs, dynamique des chaines, nature de l'electronique associee, seuils provoquant des actions de securite, verrouillages installes. Ces fiches ont ete etablies en vue de l'examen de la securite des piles par la 'Sous-Commission de Surete des Piles', et tiennent compte des decisions de celle-ci. Les reacteurs concernes sont: Azur, Cabri, Cator-Pollux, Cesar-Marius-2, Edf-2, EL3, EL4, Eole, G1, G2-G3, Harmonie, Isis, Masurca, Melusine, Minerve, Osiris, Pegase, Peggy, PAT, Rapsodie, SENA, Siloe, Siloette, Triton-Nereide, et Ulysse. (auteurs)

  2. Theoretical Analysis of Time-Dependent Wave-Packet Dynamics:Proton Impact Excitation (2s- 2p) with Li Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shao-Hao; WANG Feng; LI Jia-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Introducing a theoretical method to treat time-dependent wave-packet dynamics for atom collisions, we calculate the cross sections of proton impact excitation (2s - 2p) with a Li atom by directly numerically integrating the time-dependent Schrodinger equation on a three-dimensional Cartesian mesh. Our calculated results are in good agreement with the available experimental measurements.

  3. Weak-light rogue waves, breathers, and their active control in a cold atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to demonstrate the existence of optical Peregrine rogue waves and Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers and realize their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we suggest is a cold, Λ -type three-level atomic gas interacting with a probe and a control laser fields and working under EIT condition. We show that, based on EIT with an incoherent optical pumping, which can be used to cancel optical absorption, (1+1)-dimensional optical Peregrine rogue waves, Akhmediev breathers, and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers can be generated with very low light power. In addition, we demonstrate that the Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers in (2+1)-dimensions obtained can be actively manipulated by using an external magnetic field. As a result, these breathers can display trajectory deflections and bypass obstacles during propagation.

  4. Slow and stored light under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency and four wave mixing in an atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nathaniel Blair

    The recent prospect of efficient, reliable, and secure quantum communication relies on the ability to coherently and reversibly map nonclassical states of light onto long-lived atomic states. A promising technique that accomplishes this employs Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), in which a strong classical control field modifies the optical properties of a weak signal field in such a way that a previously opaque medium becomes transparent to the signal field. The accompanying steep dispersion in the index of refraction allows for pulses of light to be decelerated, then stored as an atomic excitation, and later retrieved as a photonic mode. This dissertation presents the results of investigations into methods for optimizing the memory efficiency of this process in an ensemble of hot Rb atoms. We have experimentally demonstrated the effectiveness of two protocols for yielding the best memory efficiency possible at a given atomic density. Improving memory efficiency requires operation at higher optical depths, where undesired effects such as four-wave mixing (FWM) become enhanced and can spontaneously produce a new optical mode (Stokes field). We present the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the FWM-EIT interaction under continuous-wave (cw), slow light, and stored light conditions. In particular, we provide evidence that indicates that while a Stokes field is generated upon retrieval of the signal field, any information originally encoded in a seeded Stokes field is not independently preserved during the storage process. We present a simple model that describes the propagation dynamics and provides an intuitive description of the EIT-FWM process.

  5. Wave packet studies of the vibrational predissociation of three and four-atom van der Waals complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K.

    1994-03-01

    Vibrational predissociation of XI{sub 2} and X{sub 2}I{sub 2} van der Waals complexes, with X = He and Ne, is studied with wave packets. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out on the three-atom systems. Suitable X{center_dot}{center_dot}I potential interactions are determined, and product distributions are predicted. Reduced dimension models of X{sub 2}I{sub 2}(v{prime}) {yields} 2X + I{sub 2}(v < v{prime}) are investigated. Comparison is made with available experimental results. Mechanistic issues, including the role of intramolecular vibrational relaxation resonances, are addressed.

  6. Four-Wave Mixing Scheme in a Four-Level Ladder-Type Atomic System Based on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; CHEN Ai-Xi; PENG Ju-Cun

    2004-01-01

    @@ A nonlinear optical four-wave mixing scheme is presented and analysed for the generation of coherent light in a nearly four-level ladder-type atomic system in the context of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT).We find that EIT can suppress nonlinear photon absorption and the peak of the generated mixing field is located at the centre of the transparency window where the loss is minimal, though there is a dip in the centre. Such a nonlinear optical process can also be used for generating coherent short-wavelength radiation.

  7. Coherence theory of atomic de Broglie waves and electromagnetic near fields

    OpenAIRE

    Henkel, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Die Arbeit untersucht theoretisch die Wechselwirkung neutraler Teilchen (Atome, Moleküle) mit Oberflächen, soweit sie durch das elektromagnetische Feld vermittelt wird. Spektrale Energiedichten und Kohärenzfunktionen werden hergeleitet und liefern eine umfassende Charakterisierung des Felds auf der sub-Wellenlängen-Skala. Die Ergebnisse finden auf zwei Teilgebieten Anwendung: in der integrierten Atomoptik, wo ultrakalte Atome an thermische Oberflächen koppeln, und in der Nahfeldoptik, wo eine...

  8. Exact Solution for Phenomenon of atomic Collapse and Revival under Rotating Wave and Anti-Rotating Wave Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Bang-Fu; WANG Xiao-Yun; TANG Yan-Fang; MI Xian-Wu; ZHAO He-Ping

    2011-01-01

    An accurate method to solve the Jaynes-Cummings (J-C) Hamiltonian has been investigated here. The phenomenon of atomic collapse and revival predicted by Jaynes-Cummings model is demonstrated. Solutions are consistent with the precious such as using the operator method. Furthermore, the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian including the anti-rotating term is also solved precisely using this accurate way so that results agree with experiments better.Essences of the anti-rotating term are revealed. We discuss the relations of the phenomenon of atonic collapse and revival with the average photons number, the light field phase angle, the resonant frequency, and the size of coupling constant. The discussions may make one select suitable conditions to carry out experiment well and study the virtual light field effect on cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  9. Study of atomic clusters in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance samples by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammelli, S. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)], E-mail: Sebastiano.cammelli@psi.ch; Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-03-31

    Copper and nickel impurities in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel can form nano-clusters, which have a strong impact on the ductile-brittle transition temperature of the material. Thus, for control purposes and simulation of long irradiation times, surveillance samples are submitted to enhanced neutron irradiation. In this work, surveillance samples from a Swiss nuclear power plant were investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The density of Cu and Ni atoms determined in the first and second shells around the absorber is affected by the irradiation and temperature. The comparison of the EXAFS data at Cu and Ni K-edges shows that these elements reside in arrangements similar to bcc Fe. However, the EXAFS analysis reveals local irradiation damage in the form of vacancy fractions, which can be determined with a precision of {approx}5%. There are indications that the formation of Cu and Ni clusters differs significantly.

  10. Activated carbon-modified knotted reactor coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for sensitive determination of arsenic species in medicinal herbs and tea infusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Martinis, Estefanía M. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Research and Development (QUIANID), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Padre J. Contreras 1300, (5500) Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lascalea, Gustavo E. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wuilloud, Rodolfo G., E-mail: rwuilloud@mendoza-conicet.gob.ar [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Research and Development (QUIANID), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Padre J. Contreras 1300, (5500) Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-01-01

    A flow injection system based on a modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR) was developed for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] species preconcentration and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Activated carbon (AC) was immobilized on the inner walls of a PTFE KR by a thermal treatment. A significant increase in analyte retention was obtained with the AC-modified KR (100%) as compared to the regular PTFE KR (25%). The preconcentration method involved the on-line formation of As(III)-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (As-APDC) complex, followed by its adsorption onto the inner walls of the AC-modified KR. After analyte retention, the complex was eluted with acetone directly into the graphite furnace of ETAAS. The parameters affecting the flow injection system were evaluated with a full central composite face centered design with three center points. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained with 10 ml of sample. The detection limit was 4 ng L{sup −1} and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate measurements at 0.2 μg L{sup −1} of As were 4.3% and 4.7% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The developed methodology was highly selective towards As(III), while As(V), monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic [DMA(V)] were not retained in the AC-modified KR. The proposed method was successfully applied for As speciation analysis in infusions originated from medicinal herbs and tea. - Highlights: • We report an efficient method for As speciation. • We have modified a knotted reactor with activated carbon for high sorption capacity. • We provide a simple procedure for surface modification of a PTFE knotted reactor. • We have selectively separated inorganic As species from complex matrix samples. • We have implemented a modified KR in a flow injection system coupled to ETAAS.

  11. 缀饰原子的简化波函数%A Simplified Wave Function for Dressed Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书民; 陈激; 周子舫; 张声涛

    2003-01-01

    A wave function for laser dressed atom is derived as a perturbative solution of the time-dependent Schrdinger equation in the velocity gauge. With the use of the average excitation energy approximation and the closure approximation, the solution is reduced to a time-dependent operator acting on the "bare" atomic state. In soft-photon approximation, the average excitation energy only appears in the first and second order terms of field frequency. Such a simplified dressed wave function is useful in the calculation of laser-assisted scattering, especially in the laser-assisted rearrangement collisions.%作为含时薛定谔方程的微扰近似解, 在速度规范下给出了激光场中缀饰原子的一个波函数. 利用平均激发能近似和完备关系, 可将此波函数简化为一个含时的相乘算符作用于无场时的"裸原子"态上. 在软光子近似下, 平均激发能仅出现在光场频率的一阶和二阶项上. 此波函数适用于计算激光辅助的散射过程, 特别是重排过程.

  12. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  13. Catalytic Synthesis of Substrate-Free, Aligned and Tailored High Aspect Ratio Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in an Ultrasonic Atomization Head CVD Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Ali Rabbani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD method has proven its benchmark, over other methods, for the production of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT on commercial and lab scale. In this study, an injection vertical CVD reactor fitted with an ultrasonic atomization head was used in a pilot-plant scale (height 274 cm, radius 25 cm for semicontinuous production of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. p-Xylene was used as a hydrocarbon precursor in which ferrocene was dissolved and provided the cracking catalyst. Atomization of the feed solution resulted in full and even dispersion of the catalytic solution. This dispersion led to the production of high aspect ratio MWCNTs (ranging from 8,000 to 12,000 at 850°C. Different experimental parameters affecting the quality and quantity of the produced CNTs were investigated. These included temperature, reaction time, and flow rate of the reaction and carrier gases. Different properties of the produced CNTs were characterized using SEM and TEM, while TGA was used to evaluate their purity. Specific surface area of selected samples was calculated by BET.

  14. Integrable multi atom matter-radiation models without rotating wave approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, Anjan

    2004-01-01

    Interacting matter-radiation models close to physical systems are proposed, which without rotating wave approximation and with matter-matter interactions are Bethe ansatz solvable. This integrable system is constructed from the elliptic Gaudin model at high spin limit, where radiative excitation can be included perturbatively.

  15. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  16. Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradyan, Gevorg; Muradyan, Atom Zh.

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation traveling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the pump field’s generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: nonsaturating dependence of refractive index on dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation term contribution in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO2 laser) or larger.

  17. Dynamics of atomic spin-orbit-state wave packets produced by short-pulse laser photodetachment

    CERN Document Server

    Law, S M K

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the experiment by Hultgren et al. [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 87}, 031404 (2013)] on orbital alignment and quantum beats in coherently excited atomic fine-structure manifolds produced by short-pulse laser photodetachment of C$^-$, Si$^-$ and Ge$^-$ negative ions, and derive a formula that describes the beats. Analysis of the experimental data enables us to extract the non-coherent background contribution for each species, and indicates the need for a full density matrix treatment of the problem.

  18. Faraday Waves in Cold-Atom Systems with Two- and Three-Body Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomio, Lauro; Gammal, A.; Abdullaev, F. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report an investigation on Bose-Einstein condensates with two-body (cubic) and three-body (quintic) interactions in the corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equation, considering s-wave two-body scattering length a_s periodically varying in time. For the quintic interacting term, the dependence on a_s was considered within two models, being quadratic or quartic. It was shown that parametric instabilities can lead to th e generation of Faraday wave resonances in this system, with wavelengths depending on the background scattering length, as well as on the corresponding modulation parameters. A few sample results are shown here for repulsive a_s, in case of quadratic and quartic three-body interactions. The effect of dissipation is also verified on the amplitude of the resonances. Analytical predictions for the resonance positions are confirmed by our numerical simulations.

  19. Storage and Retrieval of Image using a Four-Wave Mixing System in a Cold Atomic Ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jinghui; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Shi, Baosen; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2012-01-01

    We realized storage and retrieval of image of light in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap of Rubidium 85 using a four-wave mixing system. When we imprint an image on a signal laser beam, the generated idler field also carries this image information. The retrieved signal and idler fields are observed this image information. That means the spatial patterns of the signal and idler are simultaneously mapped into the long-lived ground state coherence of the atoms. It is worth noticing that the retrieval efficiency is oscillating due to the time evolution of the ground state coherence in a uniform magnetic field. This image storage result holds promise for application in image processing, remote sensing and quantum communication.

  20. Controlling multi-wave mixing signals via photonic band gap of electromagnetically induced absorption grating in atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Huaibin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate dressed multi-wave mixing (MWM) and the reflection of the probe beam due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) grating can coexist in a five-level atomic ensemble. The reflection is derived from the photonic band gap (PBG) of EIA grating, which is much broader than the PBG of EIT grating. Therefore, EIA-type PBG can reflect more energy from probe than EIT-type PBG does, which can effectively affect the MWM signal. The EIA-type as well as EIT-type PBG can be controlled by multiple parameters including the frequency detunings, propagation angles and powers of the involved light fields. Also, the EIA-type PBG by considering both the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive indices is also investigated. The theoretical analysis agrees well with the experimental results. This investigation has potential applications in all-optical communication and information processing.

  1. Continuous-wave, single-frequency 229  nm laser source for laser cooling of cadmium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Yushi; Yarborough, J M; Merzlyak, Yevgeny; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayashida, Keitaro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-15

    Continuous-wave output at 229 nm for the application of laser cooling of Cd atoms was generated by the fourth harmonic using two successive second-harmonic generation stages. Employing a single-frequency optically pumped semiconductor laser as a fundamental source, 0.56 W of output at 229 nm was observed with a 10-mm long, Brewster-cut BBO crystal in an external cavity with 1.62 W of 458 nm input. Conversion efficiency from 458 nm to 229 nm was more than 34%. By applying a tapered amplifier (TA) as a fundamental source, we demonstrated magneto-optical trapping of all stable Cd isotopes including isotopes Cd111 and Cd113, which are applicable to optical lattice clocks.

  2. Spin-wave storage using chirped control fields in atomic frequency comb-based quantum memory

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb can store a large number of temporal modes of the electromagnetic field at the single photon level without the need to increase the optical depth of the storage material. The readout of light modes is made efficient thanks to the rephasing of the optical-wavelength coherence similarly to photon echo-type techniques and the re-emission time is given by the comb structure. For on-demand r...

  3. Self-Channeling of High-Power Long-Wave Infrared Pulses in Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, K.; Kolesik, M.; Wright, E. M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    We simulate and elucidate the self-channeling of high-power 10 μ m infrared pulses in atomic gases. The major new result is that the peak intensity can remain remarkably stable over many Rayleigh ranges. This arises from the balance between the self-focusing, diffraction, and defocusing caused by the excitation induced dephasing due to many-body Coulomb effects that enhance the low-intensity plasma densities. This new paradigm removes the Rayleigh range limit for sources in the 8 - 12 μ m atmospheric transmission window and enables transport of individual multi-TW pulses over multiple kilometer ranges.

  4. Atomic scale images of acceptors in III-V semiconductors. Band bending, tunneling paths and wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, S.

    2007-10-26

    This thesis reports measurements of single dopant atoms in III-V semiconductors with low temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). It investigates the anisotropic spatial distribution of acceptor induced tunneling processes at the {l_brace}110{r_brace} cleavage planes. Two different tunneling processes are identified: conventional imaging of the squared acceptor wave function and resonant tunneling at the charged acceptor. A thorough analysis of the tip induced space charge layers identifies characteristic bias windows for each tunnel process. The symmetry of the host crystal's band structure determines the spatial distribution of the tunneling paths for both processes. Symmetry reducing effects at the surface are responsible for a pronounced asymmetry of the acceptor contrasts along the principal [001] axis. Uniaxial strain fields due to surface relaxation and spin orbit interaction of the tip induced electric field are discussed on the basis of band structure calculations. High-resolution STS studies of acceptor atoms in an operating p-i-n diode confirm that an electric field indeed changes the acceptor contrasts. In conclusion, the anisotropic contrasts of acceptors are created by the host crystal's band structure and concomitant symmetry reduction effects at the surface. (orig.)

  5. Phase correlation between four-wave mixing and optical fields in double Λ-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Taek; Moon, Han Seb

    2016-12-12

    We study the spectral features and phase of four-wave mixing (FWM) light according to the relative phase-noise of the optical fields coupled to a double Λ-type atomic system of the 5S1/2-5P1/2 transition of 87Rb atoms. We observe that the spectral shape of the FWM spectrum is identical to that of the two-photon absorption (TPA) spectrum due to two-photon coherence and that it is independent of the relative phase-noise of the pump light. From these results, we clarify that the two-photon coherence plays a very important role in the FWM process. Furthermore, we measure the relative linewidth of the FWM signal to the probe and pump lasers by means of a beat interferometer. We confirmed that the phase of the FWM signal is strongly correlated with that of the pump laser under the condition of phase-locked probe and coupling lasers for two-photon coherence.

  6. Electronic and atomic structures of the Sr3Ir4Sn13 single crystal: A possible charge density wave material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.-T.; Srivastava, M. K.; Wu, C.-C.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.; Shao, Y.-C.; Liang, Y.-H.; Du, C.-H.; Chiou, J.-W.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chen, J.-L.; Pao, C.-W.; Lee, J.-F.; Kuo, C. N.; Lue, C. S.; Wu, M.-K.; Pong, W.-F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray scattering (XRS), x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic techniques were used to study the electronic and atomic structures of the high-quality Sr3Ir4Sn13 (SIS) single crystal below and above the transition temperature (T* ≈ 147 K). The evolution of a series of modulated satellite peaks below the transition temperature in the XRS experiment indicated the formation of a possible charge density wave (CDW) in the (110) plane. The EXAFS phase derivative analysis supports the CDW-like formation by revealing different bond distances [Sn1(2)-Sn2] below and above T* in the (110) plane. XANES spectra at the Ir L3-edge and Sn K-edge demonstrated an increase (decrease) in the unoccupied (occupied) density of Ir 5d-derived states and a nearly constant density of Sn 5p-derived states at temperatures T atomic structures and the CDW-like phase in the SIS single crystal. PMID:28106144

  7. A CALCULATION OF SEMI-EMPIRICAL ONE-ELECTRON WAVE FUNCTIONS FOR MULTI-ELECTRON ATOMS USED FOR ELEMENTARY PROCESS SIMULATION IN NONLOCAL PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tchernycheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper deals with development outcomes for creation method of one-electron wave functions of complex atoms, relatively simple, symmetrical for all atom electrons and free from hard computations. The accuracy and resource intensity of the approach are focused on systematic calculations of cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes of inelastic collisions of atoms or molecules with electrons (ionization, excitation, excitation transfer, and others. Method. The method is based on a set of two iterative processes. At the first iteration step the Schrödinger equation was solved numerically for the radial parts of the electron wave functions in the potential of the atomic core self-consistent field. At the second iteration step the new approximationfor the atomic core field is created that uses found solutions for all one-electron wave functions. The solution optimization for described multiparameter problem is achieved by the use of genetic algorithm. The suitability of the developed method was verified by comparing the calculation results with numerous data on the energies of atoms in the ground and excited states. Main Results. We have created the run-time version of the program for creation of sets of one-electron wave functions and calculation of the cross sections and constants of collisional transition rates in the first Born approximation. The priori available information about binding energies of the electrons for any many-particle system for creation of semi-empirical refined solutions for the one-electron wave functions can be considered at any step of this procedure. Practical Relevance. The proposed solution enables a simple and rapid preparation of input data for the numerical simulation of nonlocal gas discharge plasma. The approach is focused on the calculation of discharges in complex gas mixtures requiring inclusion in the model of a large number of elementary collisional and radiation

  8. Polarized Spatial Splitting of Four-Wave Mixing Signal in Multi-Level Atomic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yu-Xin; ZHAO Jin-Yan; SONG Yue; DAI Guo-Xian; HUO Shu-Li; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2011-01-01

    @@ We illustrate our experimental observation of the periodic changes of spatial splitting of the generated four-wave mixing(FWM)signal induced by different polarization states of one of the dressing beams.It is pointed out that the changes of intensity of the dressing beam and the FWM signal have influences on the spatial splitting and their influences compete with each other.The differences between p- and s-polarized FWM beams are demonstrated.The influences of the dressing beams, which lead to the larger spatial splitting with different polarization states or frequency detuning, are observed as well.%We illustrate our experimental observation of the periodic changes of spatial splitting of the generated four-wave mixing (FWM) signal induced by different polarization states of one of the dressing beams. It is pointed out that the changes of intensity of the dressing beam and the FWM signal have influences on the spatial splitting and their influences compete with each other. The differences between p- and s-polarized FWM beams are demonstrated.The influences of the dressing beams, which lead to the larger spatial splitting with different polarization states or frequency detuning, are observed as well.

  9. Downward diffusive transport velocity of atomic oxygen 80-110 km, and inferences of wave effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution of atomic oxygen in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (80-120 km) is characterized by molecular diffusion transport above 100 km, and mixing processes including turbulence below. Considering O is produced by photo-dissociation in the 140 km altitude region and lost in the upper mesosphere by chemical recombination, the total transport of O between the production and loss regimes must be consistent. Recombination O loss chemistry using densities from SABER drives a downward transport velocity of 1.0 cm s-1, at 95 km, peaking 4.5 cm s -1 near 83 km. The shape of the altitude profile of O transport velocity suggests mechanisms for the transport processes including damped AGWs and tides.

  10. d-wave superfluid with gapless edges in a cold-atom trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne-Louise Gadsbølle; Francis Song, H.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-01-01

    We consider a strongly repulsive fermionic gas in a two-dimensional optical lattice confined by a harmonic trapping potential. To address the strongly repulsive regime, we consider the t-J Hamiltonian. The presence of the harmonic trapping potential enables the stabilization of coexisting and com...... is revealed by a downturn of the Fermi liquid order parameter at the center of the trap where the d-wave gap has a maximum. The density profile evolves linearly with distance.......We consider a strongly repulsive fermionic gas in a two-dimensional optical lattice confined by a harmonic trapping potential. To address the strongly repulsive regime, we consider the t-J Hamiltonian. The presence of the harmonic trapping potential enables the stabilization of coexisting...

  11. Recent progress on tritium technology research and development for a fusion reactor in Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, T.; Nakamura, H.; Kawamura, Y.; Iwai, Y.; Isobe, K.; Yamada, M.; Kurata, R.; Edao, Y. [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Oyaizu, M.; Yamanishi, T. [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho-mura (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) manages 2 tritium handling laboratories: Tritium Processing Laboratory (TPL) in Tokai and DEMO-RD building in Rokkasho. TPL has been accumulating a gram level tritium safety handling experiences without any accidental tritium release to the environment for more than 25 years. Recently, our activities have focused on 3 categories, as follows. First, the development of a detritiation system for ITER. This task is the demonstration test of a wet Scrubber Column (SC) as a pilot scale (a few hundreds m{sup 3}/h of processing capacity). Secondly, DEMO-RD tasks are focused on investigating the general issues required for DEMO-RD design, such as structural materials like RAFM (Reduced Activity Ferritic/Martensitic steels) and SiC/SiC, functional materials like tritium breeder and neutron multiplier, and tritium. For the last 4 years, we have spent a lot of time and means to the construction of the DEMO-RD facility and to its licensing, so we have just started the actual research program with tritium and other radioisotopes. This tritium task includes tritium accountancy, tritium basic safety research such as tritium interactions with various materials, which will be used for DEMO-RD and durability. The third category is the recovery work from the Great East Japan earthquake (2011 earthquake). It is worth noting that despite the high magnitude of the earthquake, TPL was able to confine tritium properly without any accidental tritium release.

  12. 径向步进倒料行波堆的数值研究%Numerical Study of Radial Stepwise Fuel Load Reshuffling Traveling Wave Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大林; 郑美银; 田文喜; 秋穗正; 苏光辉

    2015-01-01

    行波堆是一种可实现自持增殖‐燃耗的新概念快堆,它可直接使用天然铀、贫铀、钍等可转换核材料,实现非常高的燃料利用率。基于行波堆的原理,提出了具有现实应用价值的径向步进倒料行波堆的概念,并将其与典型钠冷快堆的设计相结合,采用数值方法对由外而内的径向步进行波堆二维渐近稳态特性进行了研究。计算结果表明:渐近 kef随倒料循环周期近似抛物线分布,而渐近燃耗随倒料循环周期线性增长,满足临界条件的倒料循环周期中最大燃耗可达38%;堆芯功率峰随着倒料循环周期的增长,从燃料卸出区(堆芯中心)向燃料导入区(堆芯外围)移动,功率峰值逐渐降低,在高燃耗情况下,靠近堆芯中心的轴向功率分布呈M形。%Traveling wave reactor is a new conceptual fast breeder reactor ,which can adopt natural uranium ,depleted uranium and thorium directly to realize the self sustain‐able breeding and burning to achieve very high fuel utilization fraction .Based on the mechanism of traveling wave reactor ,a concept of radial stepwise fuel load reshuffling traveling wave reactor was proposed for realistic application .It was combined with the typical design of sodium‐cooled fast reactors ,with which the asymptotic characteristics of the inwards stepwise fuel load reshuffling were studied numerically in two‐dimension . The calculated results show that the asymptotic kef parabolically varies with the reshuff‐ling cycle length ,while the burnup increases linearly .The highest burnup satisfying the reactor critical condition is 38% .The power peak shifts from the fuel discharging zone (core centre) to the fuel uploading zone (core periphery) and correspondingly the power peaking factor decreases along with the reshuffling cycle length .In addition ,at the high burnup case the axial power distribution close to the core centre displays the M

  13. Unified field theory from the classical wave equation: Preliminary application to atomic and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Múnera, Héctor A., E-mail: hmunera@hotmail.com [Centro Internacional de Física (CIF), Apartado Aéreo 4948, Bogotá, Colombia, South America (Colombia); Retired professor, Department of Physics, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia, South America (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    It is postulated that there exists a fundamental energy-like fluid, which occupies the flat three-dimensional Euclidean space that contains our universe, and obeys the two basic laws of classical physics: conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of total energy; the fluid is described by the classical wave equation (CWE), which was Schrödinger’s first candidate to develop his quantum theory. Novel solutions for the CWE discovered twenty years ago are nonharmonic, inherently quantized, and universal in the sense of scale invariance, thus leading to quantization at all scales of the universe, from galactic clusters to the sub-quark world, and yielding a unified Lorentz-invariant quantum theory ab initio. Quingal solutions are isomorphic under both neo-Galilean and Lorentz transformations, and exhibit nother remarkable property: intrinsic unstability for large values of ℓ (a quantum number), thus limiting the size of each system at a given scale. Unstability and scale-invariance together lead to nested structures observed in our solar system; unstability may explain the small number of rows in the chemical periodic table, and nuclear unstability of nuclides beyond lead and bismuth. Quingal functions lend mathematical basis for Boscovich’s unified force (which is compatible with many pieces of evidence collected over the past century), and also yield a simple geometrical solution for the classical three-body problem, which is a useful model for electronic orbits in simple diatomic molecules. A testable prediction for the helicoidal-type force is suggested.

  14. Incommensurate atomic density waves in the high-pressure IVb phase of barium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Arakcheeva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The host–guest structures of elements at high pressure discovered a decade ago still leave many open questions due to the lack of precise models based on full exploitation of the diffraction data. This concerns in particular Ba IV, which is stable in the range 12–45 GPa. With the example of phase Ba IVb, which is characterized here for the first time, a systematic analysis is presented of possible host–guest structure models based on high-quality single-crystal diffraction data obtained with synchrotron radiation at six different pressures between 16.5 and 19.6 GPa. It is shown that a new incommensurately modulated (IM structure model better fits the experimental data. Unlike the composite models which are commonly reported for the Ba IV phases, the IM model reveals a density wave and its pressure-dependent evolution. The crucial role played by the selected model in the interpretation of structure evolution under pressure is discussed. The findings give a new experimental basis for a better understanding of the nature of host–guest structures.

  15. Unified field theory from the classical wave equation: Preliminary application to atomic and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnera, Héctor A.

    2016-07-01

    It is postulated that there exists a fundamental energy-like fluid, which occupies the flat three-dimensional Euclidean space that contains our universe, and obeys the two basic laws of classical physics: conservation of linear momentum, and conservation of total energy; the fluid is described by the classical wave equation (CWE), which was Schrödinger's first candidate to develop his quantum theory. Novel solutions for the CWE discovered twenty years ago are nonharmonic, inherently quantized, and universal in the sense of scale invariance, thus leading to quantization at all scales of the universe, from galactic clusters to the sub-quark world, and yielding a unified Lorentz-invariant quantum theory ab initio. Quingal solutions are isomorphic under both neo-Galilean and Lorentz transformations, and exhibit nother remarkable property: intrinsic unstability for large values of ℓ (a quantum number), thus limiting the size of each system at a given scale. Unstability and scale-invariance together lead to nested structures observed in our solar system; unstability may explain the small number of rows in the chemical periodic table, and nuclear unstability of nuclides beyond lead and bismuth. Quingal functions lend mathematical basis for Boscovich's unified force (which is compatible with many pieces of evidence collected over the past century), and also yield a simple geometrical solution for the classical three-body problem, which is a useful model for electronic orbits in simple diatomic molecules. A testable prediction for the helicoidal-type force is suggested.

  16. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  17. SciDAC - Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with MHD -- General Atomics Support of ORNL Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abla, G

    2012-11-09

    The Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM) project is dedicated to conduct research on integrated multi-physics simulations. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is a framework that was created by the SWIM team. It provides an integration infrastructure for loosely coupled component-based simulations by facilitating services for code execution coordination, computational resource management, data management, and inter-component communication. The IPS framework features improving resource utilization, implementing application-level fault tolerance, and support of the concurrent multi-tasking execution model. The General Atomics (GA) team worked closely with other team members on this contract, and conducted research in the areas of computational code monitoring, meta-data management, interactive visualization, and user interfaces. The original website to monitor SWIM activity was developed in the beginning of the project. Due to the amended requirements, the software was redesigned and a revision of the website was deployed into production in April of 2010. Throughout the duration of this project, the SWIM Monitoring Portal (http://swim.gat.com:8080/) has been a critical production tool for supporting the project's physics goals.

  18. Activated carbon-modified knotted reactor coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for sensitive determination of arsenic species in medicinal herbs and tea infusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalba, Alexander Castro; Martinis, Estefanía M.; Lascalea, Gustavo E.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    A flow injection system based on a modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR) was developed for arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] species preconcentration and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Activated carbon (AC) was immobilized on the inner walls of a PTFE KR by a thermal treatment. A significant increase in analyte retention was obtained with the AC-modified KR (100%) as compared to the regular PTFE KR (25%). The preconcentration method involved the on-line formation of As(III)-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (As-APDC) complex, followed by its adsorption onto the inner walls of the AC-modified KR. After analyte retention, the complex was eluted with acetone directly into the graphite furnace of ETAAS. The parameters affecting the flow injection system were evaluated with a full central composite face centered design with three center points. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained with 10 ml of sample. The detection limit was 4 ng L- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for six replicate measurements at 0.2 μg L- 1 of As were 4.3% and 4.7% for As(III) and As(V), respectively. The developed methodology was highly selective towards As(III), while As(V), monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic [DMA(V)] were not retained in the AC-modified KR. The proposed method was successfully applied for As speciation analysis in infusions originated from medicinal herbs and tea.

  19. Phase-modulated electronic wave-packet interferometry reveals high resolution vibronic spectra of free Rb atoms and Rb*He molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bruder, Lukas; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Phase-modulated wave-packet interferometry is combined with mass-resolved photoion detection to investigate rubidium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets in a molecular beam experiment. The spectra of atomic Rb electronic states show a vastly enhanced sensitivity and spectral resolution when compared to conventional pump-probe wave-packet interferometry. Furthermore, the formation of Rb*He exciplex molecules is probed and for the first time a fully resolved vibrational spectrum for transitions between the lowest excited $5\\Pi_{3/2}$ and the high-lying electronic states $2^2\\Pi$, $4^2\\Delta$, $6^2\\Sigma$ is obtained and compared to theory. The feasibility of applying coherent multidimensional spectroscopy to dilute cold gas phase samples is demonstrated in these experiments.

  20. Creation evidence of the second non-dispersive Zakharenko wave by helium atomic beams in superfluid helium-II at low temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A A Zakharenko

    2007-10-01

    In this work, the experimental results of the creation of the second non-dispersive Zakharenko wave (ph = g ≠ 0) in the negative roton branch (the so-called second sound) of the bulk elementary excitations (BEEs) energy spectra are introduced. Several BEE signals detected by a bolometer situated in the isotopically pure liquid helium-II at low temperatures ∼ 100 mK are shown, which give evidence of negative roton creation in the liquid by helium atomic beams striking the liquid surface. The negative roton signals were clearly distinguished by the following ways: the negative roton signal created by helium atomic beams appeared earlier than the positive roton signal created by the beams, and presence of both positive and negative roton signals together. It is natural that the negative roton creation by the beams requires the 4He-atom energies ∼ 12 K, while the positive roton creation by the atomic beams requires energies ∼ 35 K. Therefore, successive increase in the heater power resulting in an increase in the 4He-atom energies gives solid evidence that the negative rotons are first created in the liquid by the helium atomic beams.

  1. 基于非局部TV正则化的波原子去噪算法%Denoising Algorithm with Wave Atoms Based on Nonlocal TV Regularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玉莲; 冯象初

    2011-01-01

    结合新的多尺度几何分析工具波原子和非局部TV正则化提出了一种新的纹理图像去噪模型.该模型充分利用了波原子对振荡纹理图像的稀疏表示和非局部TV能较好地处理纹理图像的优点,使得新方法处理后的纹理图像避免了伪吉布斯振荡现象.实验结果表明,新方法的信噪比有一定提高,在保持图像的细节方面与单纯的波原子阈值和非局部TV比较也有明显的改善,取得了比较好的视觉效果.%A novel denoising model for texture images was proposed, which combines the new multiscale geometric analysis tool-wave atoms and nonlocal total variation regularization scheme. This model well considers the advantages:wave atoms which has the ability of sparse representation of the oscillatory texture images and nonlocal TV version has the ability to handle better textures. Numerical experiments show that the proposed model significantly improves the SNR, performance of preserving details is much better than both only wave atoms threshold and nonlocal TV, therefore together with better visual effects.

  2. Calculation of state-to-state differential and integral cross sections for atom-diatom reactions with transition-state wave packets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Bin [Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Sun, Zhigang, E-mail: zsun@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, and State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: zsun@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    A recently proposed transition-state wave packet method [R. Welsch, F. Huarte-Larrañaga, and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064117 (2012)] provides an efficient and intuitive framework to study reactive quantum scattering at the state-to-state level. It propagates a few transition-state wave packets, defined by the eigenfunctions of the low-rank thermal flux operator located near the transition state, into the asymptotic regions of the reactant and product arrangement channels separately using the corresponding Jacobi coordinates. The entire S-matrix can then be assembled from the corresponding flux-flux cross-correlation functions for all arrangement channels. Since the transition-state wave packets can be defined in a relatively small region, its transformation into either the reactant or product Jacobi coordinates is accurate and efficient. Furthermore, the grid/basis for the propagation, including the maximum helicity quantum number K, is much smaller than that required in conventional wave packet treatments of state-to-state reactive scattering. This approach is implemented for atom-diatom reactions using a time-dependent wave packet method and applied to the H + D{sub 2} reaction with all partial waves. Excellent agreement with benchmark integral and differential cross sections is achieved.

  3. Calculation of state-to-state differential and integral cross sections for atom-diatom reactions with transition-state wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2014-06-01

    A recently proposed transition-state wave packet method [R. Welsch, F. Huarte-Larrañaga, and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064117 (2012)] provides an efficient and intuitive framework to study reactive quantum scattering at the state-to-state level. It propagates a few transition-state wave packets, defined by the eigenfunctions of the low-rank thermal flux operator located near the transition state, into the asymptotic regions of the reactant and product arrangement channels separately using the corresponding Jacobi coordinates. The entire S-matrix can then be assembled from the corresponding flux-flux cross-correlation functions for all arrangement channels. Since the transition-state wave packets can be defined in a relatively small region, its transformation into either the reactant or product Jacobi coordinates is accurate and efficient. Furthermore, the grid/basis for the propagation, including the maximum helicity quantum number K, is much smaller than that required in conventional wave packet treatments of state-to-state reactive scattering. This approach is implemented for atom-diatom reactions using a time-dependent wave packet method and applied to the H + D2 reaction with all partial waves. Excellent agreement with benchmark integral and differential cross sections is achieved.

  4. Quantum dynamics through a wave packet method to study electron-hydrogen and atom-dihydrogen collisions; Dynamique quantique par une methode de paquets d'ondes. Etude des collisions electron-hydrogene et atome-dihydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, L

    2002-11-01

    The thesis concerns the development and implementation of numerical methods for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We first considered the case of electron-hydrogen scattering. The originality of our method is the use of a non-uniform radial grid defined by a Schwarz interpolation based on a Coulomb reference function. This grid allows many hydrogen bound states and associated matrix elements of various operators to be reproduced to machine accuracy. The wave function is propagated in time using a Split-Operator method. The efficiency of our method allows the wave function to be propagated out to large distances for all partial waves. We obtain excitation and ionization cross sections in excellent agreement with the best experimental and theoretical data. We subsequently adapted the method and the program package to study reactive atom-dihydrogen scattering. The wave packet is described using product Jacobi coordinates on a regular grid of radial coordinates combined with a basis of Legendre polynomials for the angular part (partial wave S). The wave function is analysed using a time-to-energy Fourier transform, which provides results over the energy range covered by the initial wave packet in one calculation. The method was first tested on the quasi-direct (F,H2) reaction and then applied to the indirect (C(1D),H2)reaction. The state-to-state reaction probabilities are in good agreement with those obtained by a time-independent approach. In particular, the strongly resonant structure of the (C(1D),H2) reaction probabilities is well reproduced. (author)

  5. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  6. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  7. An emerging reactor technology for chemical synthesis: surface acoustic wave-assisted closed-vessel Suzuki coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ketav; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of an energy-efficient surface acoustic wave (SAW) device for driving closed-vessel SAW-assisted (CVSAW), ligand-free Suzuki couplings in aqueous media. The reactions were carried out on a mmolar scale with low to ultra-low catalyst loadings. The reactions were driven by heating resulting from the penetration of acoustic energy derived from RF Raleigh waves generated by a piezoelectric chip via a renewable fluid coupling layer. The yields were uniformly high and the reactions could be executed without added ligand and in water. In terms of energy density this new technology was determined to be roughly as efficient as microwaves and superior to ultrasound.

  8. Reactor monitoring using antineutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, N. S.

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear reactors have served as the antineutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Measurements made with antineutrino detectors could therefore offer an alternative means for verifying the power history and fissile inventory of a reactor as part of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and/or other reactor safeguards regimes. Several efforts to develop this monitoring technique are underway worldwide.

  9. World must build two atomic reactors each day the next hundred years. [Summary of and commentary on book, 'Mankind at the Turning Point'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-07-24

    In summarizing and commenting on the ideas presented in Mesarovic and Pestel's book ''Mankind at the Turning Point'' it is pointed out that the global energy crisis makes comprehensive long-term planning a necessity. Assuming, optimistically, that nuclear power alone is able to supply the total projected energy demand in 100 years, it is stated that this will require 3000 nuclear power stations, each with 8 fast breeder reactors, totally 100 GW(t). This means a net rate of construction of four reactors per week, which again means allowing for a 30-year life, two reactors per day, every day, for the next hundred years. Fueling of these reactors will require the production and transport of 15 x 10/sup 6/ kg of /sup 239/Pu per year. It is therefore obvious that the energy crisis is not only a technological, but also a political, social, and even psychological problem.

  10. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  11. Spectrum, radial wave functions, and hyperfine splittings of the Rydberg states in heavy alkali-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, Ali; Schopohl, Nils

    2016-07-01

    We present numerically accurate calculations of the bound-state spectrum of the highly excited valence electron in the heavy alkali-metal atoms solving the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with a modern spectral collocation method that applies also for a large principal quantum number n ≫1 . As an effective single-particle potential we favor the reputable potential of Marinescu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 982 (1994)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.982. Recent quasiclassical calculations of the quantum defect of the valence electron agree for orbital angular momentum l =0 ,1 ,2 ,... overall remarkably well with the results of the numerical calculations, but for the Rydberg states of rubidium and also cesium with l =3 this agreement is less fair. The reason for this anomaly is that in rubidium and cesium the potential acquires for l =3 deep inside the ionic core a second classical region, thus invalidating a standard Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculation with two widely spaced turning points. Comparing then our numerical solutions of the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with the uniform analytic WKB approximation of Langer constructed around the remote turning point rn,j ,l (" close=")n -δ0)">+ we observe everywhere a remarkable agreement, apart from a tiny region around the inner turning point rn,j ,l (-). For s states the centrifugal barrier is absent and no inner turning point exists: rn,j ,0 (-)=0 . With the help of an ansatz proposed by Fock we obtain for the s states a second uniform analytic approximation to the radial wave function complementary to the WKB approximation of Langer, which is exact for r →0+ . From the patching condition, that is, for l =0 the Langer and Fock solutions should agree in the intermediate region 0 application we consider recent spectroscopic data for the hyperfine splittings of the isotopes 85Rb and 87Rb and find a remarkable agreement with the predicted scaling relation An,j ,0 (HFS )=const .

  12. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle; 1: l'atome. 2: la radioactivite. 3: l'homme et les rayonnements. 4: l'energie. 5: l'energie nucleaire: fusion et fission. 6: le fonctionnement d'un reacteur nucleaire. 7: le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  13. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  14. Noncollinear wave mixing of attosecond XUV and few-cycle optical laser pulses in gas-phase atoms: Toward multidimensional spectroscopy involving XUV excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Fidler, Ashley; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, which records transient wave-mixing signals in a medium, is a powerful tool to access microscopic information using light sources in the radio-frequency and optical regimes. The extension of this technique towards the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or even x-ray regimes holds the promise to uncover rich structural or dynamical information with even higher spatial or temporal resolution. Here, we demonstrate noncollinear wave mixing between weak XUV attosecond pulses and a strong near-infrared (NIR) few-cycle laser pulse in gas phase atoms (one photon of XUV and two photons of NIR). In the noncollinear geometry the attosecond and either one or two NIR pulses interact with argon atoms. Nonlinear XUV signals are generated in a spatially resolved fashion as required by phase matching. Different transition pathways can be identified from these background-free nonlinear signals according to the specific phase-matching conditions. Time-resolved measurements of the spatially gated XUV signals reveal electronic coherences of Rydberg wave packets prepared by a single XUV photon or XUV-NIR two-photon excitation, depending on the applied pulse sequences. These measurements open possible applications of tabletop multidimensional spectroscopy to the study of dynamics associated with valence or core excitation with XUV photons.

  15. Handbook explaining the fundamentals of nuclear and atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlen, D. F.; Morse, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    Indoctrination document presents nuclear, reactor, and atomic physics in an easy, straightforward manner. The entire subject of nuclear physics including atomic structure ionization, isotopes, radioactivity, and reactor dynamics is discussed.

  16. Determination of dopant atomic positions with kinematical X-ray standing waves; Untersuchung von Fremdatomen in kristallinen Materialien mit kinematischen stehenden Roentgenwellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Bente

    2011-11-15

    Recent advances in the kinematic X-ray standing wave technique (KXSW) for the determination of the atomic coordinates and displacement parameters in nonperfect crystalline materials are described in this thesis. The methodology has been improved by considering three significant aspects: - the inclusion of weak multiple beam contributions - the excitation of secondary fluorescence in multiple-element samples - the influence of the crystal mosaicity on the fluorescence yield. The improvements allowed to successfully apply the method to investigate complex oxide materials of current interest for potential device applications. The thermally-induced interdiffusion of cobalt and manganese thin films on zinc oxide single crystals has been studied to determine which lattice sites are occupied preferentially. The data analysis revealed that after thermal diffusion the adsorbed atoms occupied zinc sites in the host lattice. The mean deviation of the cobalt atomic position from the zinc lattice site was comparable to the thermal displacement parameter of the zinc atoms. In the case of manganese a secondary phase was found on the surface. Measurements performed on LaSrMnO{sub 4} provided new insight concerning the rotation of the oxygen octahedron around the manganese atoms and the concomitant displacements of the strontium and lanthanum atoms. It was found that the oxygen octahedra are rotated around the [100]-direction by 4,5 . The measurements in transmission geometry performed on titanium dioxide (rutile) demonstrated that KXSW measurements in the Laue geometry is a viable technique. By performing KXSW under grazing-incidence conditions it is possible to achieve depth resolution. The results clearly show that the extended KXSW technique is a versatile method for characterizing complex material systems. (orig.)

  17. Atomic long-range order effects on Curie temperature and adiabatic spin-wave dynamics in strained Fe-Co alloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2016-08-01

    The strained Fe-Co alloy in body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure has raised considerable interest due to its giant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. On the basis of the classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with ab initio interatomic exchange interactions, we perform a theoretical study of fundamental finite temperature magnetic properties of Fe1 -xCox alloy films as a function of three variables: chemical composition 0.3 ≤x ≤0.8 , bct geometry [a ,c (a )] arising from in-plane strain and associated out-of-plane relaxation, and atomic long-range order (ALRO). The Curie temperatures TC(x ,a ) obtained from Monte Carlo simulations display a competition between a pronounced dependence on tetragonality, strong ferromagnetism in the Co-rich alloy, and the beginning instability of ferromagnetic order in the Fe-rich alloy when c /a →√{2 } . Atomic ordering enhances TC and arises mainly due to different distributions of atoms in neighboring coordination shells rather than altering exchange interactions significantly. We investigate the ordering effect on the shape of the adiabatic spin-wave spectrum for selected pairs (x ,a ) . Our results indicate that long-wavelength acoustic spin-wave excitations show dependencies on x , a , and ALRO similar to those of TC. The directional anisotropy of the spin-wave stiffness d (x ,a ) peaks in narrow ranges of composition and tetragonality. ALRO exhibits a strong effect on d for near equiconcentration Fe-Co. We also discuss our findings in the context of employing Fe-Co as perpendicular magnetic recording medium.

  18. Atom lens without chromatic aberrations

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, Maxim A; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2012-01-01

    We propose a lens for atoms with reduced chromatic aberrations and calculate its focal length and spot size. In our scheme a two-level atom interacts with a near-resonant standing light wave formed by two running waves of slightly different wave vectors, and a far-detuned running wave propagating perpendicular to the standing wave. We show that within the Raman-Nath approximation and for an adiabatically slow atom-light interaction, the phase acquired by the atom is independent of the incident atomic velocity.

  19. Establishment of licensing process for development reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik (and others)

    2006-02-15

    A study on licensing processes for development reactors has been performed to prepare the licensing of development reactors developed in Korea. The contents and results of the study are summarized as follows. The licensing processes for nuclear reactors in Korea, U.S.A., Japan, France, U.K., Canada, and IAEA were surveyed and analyzed to obtain technical bases necessary for establishing licensing processes applicable to development reactors in Korea. Based on the technical bases obtained the above analysis, the purpose, power output, and design characteristics of development reactors were analyzed in detail. The analysis results suggested that development reactors should be classified as a new reactor category (called as 'development reactor') separated from the current reactor categories such as the research reactor and the power reactor. Therefore, it is proposed to establish a new reactor category classified as 'development reactor' for the development reactors. And licensing processes, including licensing technical requirements, licensing document requirements, and other regulatory requirements, were also proposed for the development reactors. In order to institutionalize the licensing processes developed in this study, it is necessary to revise the current laws. Therefore, draft provisions of Atomic Energy Act, Enforcement Decree of the Atomic Energy Act, and Enforcement Regulation of the Atomic Energy Act have been developed for the preparation of the future legalization of the licensing processes proposed for the development reactors. Conclusively, a proposal of licensing processes and draft provisions of laws have been developed for the development reactors. The results proposed in this study can be applied directly to the licensing of the future development reactors. Furthermore, they will also contribute to establishing successfully the licensing processes of the development reactors.

  20. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H2), which reacted with WF6 at the substrate to deposit W. The

  1. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  2. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, D. N; Yu, P.; Balslev, S.;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5×106 atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  3. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Yu, Ping; Balslev, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5 x 10(6) atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  4. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, D. N; Yu, P.; Balslev, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5×106 atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  5. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Yu, Ping; Balslev, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5 x 10(6) atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  7. Validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in microwave discharges created by surface wave in O2-N2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, A.; Chéreau, D.; Henda, K.; Safari, R.; Leprince, P.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of actinometry to monitor oxygen atom concentration in O2-N2 microwave discharges created by surface wave is investigated. The plasma is created with a gas flow in a quartz tube of inner diameter 16 mm at pressures in the Torr range. First, it is shown that the reliability of actinometry can be deduced from the longitudinal profile of the actinometry signal. Second, absolute concentrations of oxygen atoms are estimated from the experimental actinometry signal and agree satisfactorily with concentrations simultaneously measured by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption downstream from the plasma. Moreover, upon varying the nitrogen percentage (0%-100%), it is evidenced that the actinometry signal is proportional to the concentration measured by VUV absorption. Furthermore, it is evidenced that the oxygen dissociation rate is only 2% in pure oxygen plasmas, while it reaches 15% (433 MHz) or 30% (2450 MHz) for mixtures containing more than 20% of nitrogen. This drastic increase in [O] upon the addition of N2 is extensively discussed and, finally, attributed to a decrease in the recombination frequency of oxygen atoms on the quartz wall, in the presence of nitrogen.

  8. The Development of Nufreq-N AN Analytical Model for the Stability Analysis of Nuclear Coupled Density-Wave Oscillations in Boiling Water Nuclear Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Goon Cherl

    A state-of-the-art one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR). The model accounts for phasic slip, distributed spacers, subcooled boiling, space/time -dependent power distributions and distributed heated wall dynamics. In addition to a parallel channel stability analysis, a detailed model was derived for the BWR loop analysis of both the natural and forced circulation modes of operation. In its final form, this model constitutes a multi -input, multi-output(MIMO) linear system, which features a general nodal neutron kinetics model. Kinetics parameters for use in the kinetics model have been obtained by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4 has been investigated with the Nyquist criterion. The computer implementation of this model, NUFREQ -N, was used for the parametric study of a typical BWR/4 and comparisons were made with existing in-core and out -of-core data. Also, NUFREQ-N was used to analyze the expected stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4. The parametric results revealed important factors influencing BWR stability margin. It was found that NUFREQ -N generally agreed well with out-of-core data. This was especially true for the predicted power-to-flow transfer function, which is the most important transfer function in thermal-hydraulic stability analysis. In the stability analysis of a typical BWR/4 it was found that it is very important to use accurate models of thermal-hydraulic and neutron kinetic phenomena. Moreover, the accuracy of the nuclear input data is extremely important.

  9. Increasing Fuel Utilization of Breed and Burn Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sanzo, Christian Diego

    Breed and Burn reactors (B&B), also referred to Traveling Wave Reactors, are fast spectrum reactors that can be fed indefinitely with depleted uranium only, once criticality is achieved without the need for fuel reprocessing. Radiation damage to the fuel cladding limits the fuel utilization of B&B reactors to ˜ 18-20% FIMA (Fissions of Initial Metal Atoms) -- the minimum burnup required for sustaining the B&B mode of operation. The fuel discharged from this type of cores contain ˜ 10% fissile plutonium. Such a high plutonium content poses environmental and proliferation concerns, but makes it possible to utilize the fuel for further energy production. The objectives of the research reported in this dissertation are to analyze the fuel cycle of B&B reactors and study new strategies to extend the fuel utilization beyond ˜ 18-20% FIMA. First, the B&B reactor physics is examined while recycling the fuel every 20% FIMA via a limited separation processing, using either the melt refining or AIROX dry processes. It was found that the maximum attainable burnup varies from 54% to 58% FIMA -- depending on the recycling process and on the fraction of neutrons lost via leakage and reactivity control. In Chapter 3 the discharge fuel characteristics of B&B reactors operating at 20% FIMA and 55% FIMA is analyzed and compared. It is found that the 20% FIMA reactor discharges a fuel with about ˜ 80% fissile plutonium over total plutonium content. Subsequently a new strategy of minimal reconditioning, called double cladding is proposed to extend the fuel utilization in specifically designed second-tier reactors. It is found that with this strategy it is possible to increase fuel utilization to 30% in a sodium fast reactor and up to 40% when a subcritical B&B core is driven by an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. Lastly, a fuel cycle using Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) to reduce the plutonium content of discharged B&B reactors is analyzed. It was found that it is

  10. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  11. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  12. Effects of post-irradiation annealing and re-irradiation on microstructure in surveillance test specimens of the Loviisa-1 reactor studied by atom probe tomography and positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, T.; Kuramoto, A.; Nagai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Nozawa, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Valo, M.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a microstructural study of a surveillance test specimen from the Loviisa-1 reactor in Finland, which is a Russian-type pressurized water reactor (VVER-440), after initial irradiation to a neutron fluence of 2.5 × 1019 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV), post-irradiation annealing at 475 °C for 100 h and re-irradiation to three different fluences up to 2.7 × 1019 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) were used to characterize the test specimens. APT results showed the formation of Cu-rich solute clusters (SCs) during the initial irradiation and their subsequent coarsening during annealing. After re-irradiation, a small number of SCs formed once again. The hardening due to the SCs was estimated using the Russell-Brown model based on the APT results, and was in good agreement with the measured hardening after the initial irradiation and post-irradiation annealing. In contrast, during the first-step of re-irradiation, the estimated hardening due to the SCs was smaller than the measured hardening. This suggested that the hardening after re-irradiation was due to some microstructure other than the observed SCs. This difference was attributed to newly-formed matrix defects during re-irradiation, which was supported by the PAS results. However in subsequent steps of re-irradiation, the hardening was almost constant.

  13. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Bong Kim; Thierry Lasserre; Yifang Wang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  14. BOILING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  15. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  16. 反应性动态加入对脉冲堆中子脉冲波形的影响%Effects of Loading Reactivity at Dynamic State on Wave of Neutrons in Burst Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高辉; 刘晓波; 范晓强

    2013-01-01

    在点堆模型基础上开发了脉冲模拟程序,该程序考虑了缓发中子效应、裂变热反馈效应和脉冲棒的行进过程,可以描述脉冲堆爆发脉冲全过程的中子强度、裂变能以及反应性的变化,并经过实验数据验证.用该程序计算CFBR-Ⅱ堆在反应性动态加载过程中全波形、峰功率、反应性等脉冲特征参数,结果表明:脉冲引发的越晚,其峰功率和裂变产额越大,而且其最大裂变产额与静态爆发脉冲情况下的裂变产额相同.%Based on the point reactor model, the program for simulating the burst of reactors, including delay neutron, thermal feedback and reactivity of rod, was developed. The program proves to be suitable to burst reactor by experimental data. The program can describe the process of neutron-intensity change in burst reactors. With the program, the parameters of burst (wave of burst, power of peak and reactivity of reactor) under the condition of dynamic reactivity can be calculated. The calculated result demonstrates that the later the burst is initiated, the greater its power of peak and yield are and that the maximum yield coordinates with the yield under static state.

  17. Atoms Talking to SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Kim, Z; Wood, A K; Anderson, J R; Dragt, A J; Hafezi, M; Lobb, C J; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L; Taylor, J M; Vlahacos, C P; Wellstood, F C

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to couple trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms to a superconducting flux qubit through a magnetic dipole transition. We plan to trap atoms on the evanescent wave outside an ultrathin fiber to bring the atoms to less than 10 $\\mu$m above the surface of the superconductor. This hybrid setup lends itself to probing sources of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Our current plan has the intermediate goal of coupling the atoms to a superconducting LC resonator.

  18. Membrane reactor. Membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindo, Y.; Wakabayashi, K. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    Many reaction examples were introduced of membrane reactor, to be on the point of forming a new region in the field of chemical technology. It is a reactor to exhibit excellent function, by its being installed with membrane therein, and is generally classified into catalyst function type and reaction promotion type. What firstly belongs to the former is stabilized zirconia, where oxygen, supplied to the cathodic side of membrane with voltage, impressed thereon, becomes O {sup 2 {minus}} to be diffused through the membrane and supplied, as variously activated oxygenous species, on the anodic side. Examples with many advantages can be given such as methane coupling, propylene oxidation, methanating reaction of carbon dioxide, etc. Apart, palladium film and naphion film also belong to the former. While examples of the latter comprise, among others, decomposition of hydrogen sulfide by porous glass film and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane or palladium alloy film, which are expected to be developed and materialized in the industry. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  19. History of fast reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, J.H.; Frost, B.R.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Mustelier, J.P. (COGEMA, Velizy-Villacoublay (France))

    1992-01-01

    Most of the first generation of fast reactors that were operated at significant power levels employed solid metal fuels. They were constructed in the United States and United Kingdom in the 1950s and included Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-I and -II operated by Argonne National Laboratory, United States, the Enrico Fermi Reactor operated by the Atomic Power Development Associates, United States and DFR operated by the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). Their paper tracer pre-development of fast reactor fuel from these early days through the 1980s including ceramic fuels.

  20. Radiation of Sound Waves Via Soliton Excitation of the Angarmonic Chain of Atoms in a Dislocation Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Shchukina, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    It is demonstrated that propagation of the soliton described by the Boussinesq equation along a linear defect of the crystal structure leads to radiation of sound waves (analog of the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect). Radiation that has a continuous spectrum diverges conically from the dislocation line, and the apex angle of the cone is determined by the ratio of the sound speed in the crystal to the soliton speed. With increasing soliton speed, the maximum of the spectral flux density of sound energy is displaced toward higher frequencies. An analytical expression for energy losses is derived.

  1. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, UFC, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  2. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengdi, E-mail: M.Yang@utwente.nl; Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  3. Beyond quantum mechanics? Hunting the 'impossible' atoms (Pauli Exclusion Principle violation and spontaneous collapse of the wave function at test)

    CERN Document Server

    Piscicchia, K; Bartalucci, S; Bassi, A; Bertolucci, S; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Clozza, A; De Paolis, L; Di Matteo, S; Donadi, S; d'Uffizi, A; Egger, J-P; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Laubenstein, M; Marton, J; Milotti, E; Pietreanu, D; Ponta, T; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Sperandio, L; Doce, O Vazquez; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01

    The development of mathematically complete and consistent models solving the so-called "measurement problem", strongly renewed the interest of the scientific community for the foundations of quantum mechanics, among these the Dynamical Reduction Models posses the unique characteristic to be experimentally testable. In the first part of the paper an upper limit on the reduction rate parameter of such models will be obtained, based on the analysis of the X-ray spectrum emitted by an isolated slab of germanium and measured by the IGEX experiment. The second part of the paper is devoted to present the results of the VIP (Violation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment and to describe its recent upgrade. The VIP experiment established a limit on the probability that the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) is violated by electrons, using the very clean method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper.

  4. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  5. Development and application of modeling tools for sodium fast reactor inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît; Baronian, Vahan

    2014-02-01

    To support the development of in-service inspection methods for the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID) project led by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), several tools that allow situations specific to Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) to be modeled have been implemented in the CIVA software and exploited. This paper details specific applications and results obtained. For instance, a new specular reflection model allows the calculation of complex echoes from scattering structures inside the reactor vessel. EMAT transducer simulation models have been implemented to develop new transducers for sodium visualization and imaging. Guided wave analysis tools have been developed to permit defect detection in the vessel shell. Application examples and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  6. Reactor monitoring and safeguards using antineutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bowden, N S

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have served as the antineutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Measurements made with antineutrino detectors could therefore offer an alternative means for verifying the power history and fissile inventory of a reactors, as part of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other reactor safeguards regimes. Several efforts to develop this monitoring technique are underway across the globe.

  7. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  8. Cost-Effective Systems for Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Michael; Medina, Phillip A., IV; Antic, Aleks; Rosin, Joseph T.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the design and testing of two different home-built atomic layer deposition (ALD) systems for the growth of thin films with sub-monolayer control over film thickness. The first reactor is a horizontally aligned hot-walled reactor with a vacuum purging system. The second reactor is a vertically aligned cold-walled reactor with a…

  9. A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

  10. Multifunctional reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much

  11. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. > Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the {delta}-ferrite phase. > The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% {delta}-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  12. Photoionization of hydrogen atom by coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses: Direct propagation of electron wave packets on enormous spatial grids

    CERN Document Server

    Demekhin, Philipp V; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2013-01-01

    The time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the hydrogen atom and its interaction with coherent intense high-frequency short laser pulses is solved numerically exactly by employing the code implemented for the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method. Thereby, the wavefunction is followed in space and time for times longer than the pulse duration. Results are explicitly shown for 3 and 10 fs pulses. Particular attention is paid to identifying the effect of dynamic interference of photoelectrons emitted with the same kinetic energy at different times during the rising and falling sides of the pulse predicted in [\\emph{Ph.V. Demekhin and L.S. Cederbaum}, Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{108}, 253001 (2012)]. In order to be able to see the dynamic interference pattern in the computed electron spectra, the photoelectron wave packet has to be propagated over long distances. Clearly, complex absorption potentials often employed to compute spectra of emitted particles cannot be used to detect dy...

  13. Solid-liquid interfacial free energy of ice Ih, ice Ic, and ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water via the capillary wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Michael; Vorselaars, Bart; Allen, Michael P; Quigley, David

    2017-02-21

    We apply the capillary wave method, based on measurements of fluctuations in a ribbon-like interfacial geometry, to determine the solid-liquid interfacial free energy for both polytypes of ice I and the recently proposed ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water. We discuss various choices for the molecular order parameter, which distinguishes solid from liquid, and demonstrate the influence of this choice on the interfacial stiffness. We quantify the influence of discretisation error when sampling the interfacial profile and the limits on accuracy imposed by the assumption of quasi one-dimensional geometry. The interfacial free energies of the two ice I polytypes are indistinguishable to within achievable statistical error and the small ambiguity which arises from the choice of order parameter. In the case of ice 0, we find that the large surface unit cell for low index interfaces constrains the width of the interfacial ribbon such that the accuracy of results is reduced. Nevertheless, we establish that the interfacial free energy of ice 0 at its melting temperature is similar to that of ice I under the same conditions. The rationality of a core-shell model for the nucleation of ice I within ice 0 is questioned within the context of our results.

  14. Solid-liquid interfacial free energy of ice Ih, ice Ic, and ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water via the capillary wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Michael; Vorselaars, Bart; Allen, Michael P.; Quigley, David

    2017-02-01

    We apply the capillary wave method, based on measurements of fluctuations in a ribbon-like interfacial geometry, to determine the solid-liquid interfacial free energy for both polytypes of ice I and the recently proposed ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water. We discuss various choices for the molecular order parameter, which distinguishes solid from liquid, and demonstrate the influence of this choice on the interfacial stiffness. We quantify the influence of discretisation error when sampling the interfacial profile and the limits on accuracy imposed by the assumption of quasi one-dimensional geometry. The interfacial free energies of the two ice I polytypes are indistinguishable to within achievable statistical error and the small ambiguity which arises from the choice of order parameter. In the case of ice 0, we find that the large surface unit cell for low index interfaces constrains the width of the interfacial ribbon such that the accuracy of results is reduced. Nevertheless, we establish that the interfacial free energy of ice 0 at its melting temperature is similar to that of ice I under the same conditions. The rationality of a core-shell model for the nucleation of ice I within ice 0 is questioned within the context of our results.

  15. [The Chinese nuclear test and 'atoms for peace' as a measure for preventing nuclear armament of Japan: the nuclear non-proliferation policy of the United States and the introduction of light water reactors into Japan, 1964-1968].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2014-07-01

    Japan and the United States signed in 1968 a new atomic energy agreement through which US light-water nuclear reactors, including those of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company, were to be introduced into Japan. This paper studies the history of negotiations for the 1968 agreement using documents declassified in the 1990s in the US and Japan. After the success of the Chinese nuclear test in October 1964, the United States became seriously concerned about nuclear armament of other countries in Asia including Japan. Expecting that Japan would not have its own nuclear weapons, the US offered to help the country to demonstrate its superiority in some fields of science including peaceful nuclear energy to counter the psychological effect of the Chinese nuclear armament. Driven by his own political agenda, the newly appointed Prime Minister Eisaku Sato responded to the US expectation favorably. When he met in January 1965 with President Johnson, Sato made it clear that Japan would not pursue nuclear weapons. Although the US continued its support after this visit, it nevertheless gave priority to the control of nuclear technology in Japan through the bilateral peaceful nuclear agreement. This paper argues that the 1968 agreement implicitly meant a strategic measure to prevent Japan from going nuclear and also a tactic to persuade Japan to join the Nuclear Non -Proliferation Treaty.

  16. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, January 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-02-24

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Atomic Laboratories Products Operation, February, 1956. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  17. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for June 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-07-28

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Atomic Products Operation, June, 1955. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  18. Fast determination of trace elements in organic fertilizers using a cup-horn reactor for ultrasound-assisted extraction and fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonel Silva; Vieira, Heulla Pereira; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2014-02-01

    A fast and accurate method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction in a cup-horn sonoreactor was developed to determine the total content of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in organic fertilizers by fast sequential flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FS FAAS). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions for the extraction procedure. An aliquot containing approximately 120 mg of the sample was added to a 500 µL volume of an acid mixture (HNO3/HCl/HF, 5:3:3, v/v/v). After a few minutes, 500 µL of deionized water was added and eight samples were simultaneously sonicated for 10 min at 50% amplitude, allowing a sample throughput of 32 extractions per hour. The performance of the method was evaluated with a certified reference material of sewage sludge (CRM 029). The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 0.58% to 5.6%. The recoveries of analytes were found to 100%, 109%, 96%, 92%, 101%, 104% and 102% for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, respectively. The linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantification were calculated and the values obtained were adequate for the quality control of organic fertilizers. The method was applied to the analysis of several commercial organic fertilizers and organic wastes used as fertilizers, and the results were compared with those obtained using the microwave digestion procedure. A good agreement was found between the results obtained by microwave and ultrasound procedures with recoveries ranging from 80.4% to 117%. Two organic waste samples were not in accordance with the Brazilian legislation regarding the acceptable levels of contaminants.

  19. Reactor vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A

    1999-01-01

    A reactor vessel (1) comprises a reactor body (2) through which channels (3) are provided whose surface comprises longitudinal inwardly directed parts (4) and is provided with a catalyst (6), as well as buffer bodies (8, 12) connected to the channels (3) on both sides of the reactor body (2) and comprising connections for supplying (9, 10, 11) and discharging (13, 14, 15) via the channels (3) gases and/or liquids entering into a reaction with each other and substances formed upon this reactio...

  20. Evolved Models for Elementary Particles and Atoms Require Alternating Neutrino/Antineutrino Pairs Along Interlocked or Looped Strings. Traveling Waves, TW, and Standing Waves, SW, Alternate at Nodal Notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Roger David; McLeod, David Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Our hydrogen atom interacts with a neutron star. Its stringy TW/SW electron is cut by a neutrino scissor that instantly becomes its end anti-node. The string has one extra neutrino in 100,000. Antimatter remains concealed. Our Dumbo Proton of a TW state is similarly cut. Inside the star, electron string/spring compresses 100,000 and 1836 times more, to proton's linear mass density. Electrostatics encourages that caboose, stringy electron, to couple with a cut proton. Linear charge densities neutralize while composite length contracts 20%. The writhing string evicts an antineutrino at closure on Pauli's authority, becoming Mickey Neutron, with looped quarks. Unstable Mickey Neutron has his ear notch forced into an ear notch of stable Dumbo Proton, achieving immortality in this deuteron marriage. Tritium is in a m'enage a trois. Alpha Nucleus has a # grid. Meta state Ne-20 predicts alpha eviction to O-16. Schr"odinger finally prevails, so string theory and Wave Mechanics can prosper.

  1. EINSTEIN, SCHROEDINGER, AND ATOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider gravitation theory in multidimensional space. The model of the metric satisfying the basic requirements of quantum theory is proposed. It is shown that gravitational waves are described by the Liouville equation and the Schrodinger equation as well. The solutions of the Einstein equations describing the stationary states of arbitrary quantum and classical systems with central symmetry have been obtained. Einstein’s atom model has been developed, and proved that atoms and atomic nuclei can be represented as standing gravitational waves

  2. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  3. Reactor Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Bong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very recently the most precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle θ13. This paper provides an overview of the upcoming experiments and of the projects under development, including the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible use of neutrinos for society, for nonproliferation of nuclear materials, and geophysics.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  5. Reactor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lema, Juan M.; López, Carmen; Eibes, Gemma; Taboada-Puig, Roberto; Moreira, M. Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    In this chapter, the engineering aspects of processes catalyzed by peroxidases will be presented. In particular, a discussion of the existing technologies that utilize peroxidases for different purposes, such as the removal of recalcitrant compounds or the synthesis of polymers, is analyzed. In the first section, the essential variables controlling the process will be investigated, not only those that are common in any enzymatic system but also those specific to peroxidative reactions. Next, different reactor configurations and operational modes will be proposed, emphasizing their suitability and unsuitability for different systems. Finally, two specific reactors will be described in detail: enzymatic membrane reactors and biphasic reactors. These configurations are especially valuable for the treatment of xenobiotics with high and poor water solubility, respectively.

  6. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Lasserre, T.; Sobel, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrin...

  7. Surface passivation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via atomic layer deposition in a rotating fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Deng, Zhang; Cao, Kun [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Yin, Hong-Feng [Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Shan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Iron(II,III) oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles have shown great promise in many magnetic-related applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia treatment, and targeted drug delivery. Nevertheless, these nanoparticles are vulnerable to oxidation and magnetization loss under ambient conditions, and passivation is usually required for practical applications. In this work, a home-built rotating fluidized bed (RFB) atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor was employed to form dense and uniform nanoscale Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation layers on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The RFB reactor facilitated the precursor diffusion in the particle bed and intensified the dynamic dismantling of soft agglomerates, exposing every surface reactive site to precursor gases. With the aid of in situ mass spectroscopy, it was found that a thicker fluidization bed formed by larger amount of particles increased the residence time of precursors. The prolonged residence time allowed more thorough interactions between the particle surfaces and the precursor gas, resulting in an improvement of the precursor utilization from 78% to nearly 100%, even under a high precursor feeding rate. Uniform passivation layers around the magnetic cores were demonstrated by both transmission electron microscopy and the statistical analysis of Al mass concentrations. Individual particles were coated instead of the soft agglomerates, as was validated by the specific surface area analysis and particle size distribution. The results of thermogravimetric analysis suggested that 5 nm-thick ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings could effectively protect the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles from oxidation. The x-ray diffraction patterns also showed that the magnetic core crystallinity of such passivated nanoparticles could be well preserved under accelerated oxidation conditions. The precise thickness control via ALD maintained the saturation magnetization at 66.7 emu/g with a 5 nm-thick Al

  8. CORRIGENDUM: Atoms riding Rayleigh waves Atoms riding Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, G.; Echenique, P. M.; Toennies, J. P.; Traeger, F.

    2010-09-01

    In the original paper the affiliation list is incorrect. The correct address list is as follows: G Benedek1, 5, P M Echenique1, 2, J P Toennies3 and F Traeger4 1 Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizábal 4, 20018 Donostia—San Sebastián, Spain 2 Departamento de Física de Materiales and CFM (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, E-20018 San Sebastián/Donostia, Spain 3 Max Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Bunsenstraße 10 D-37073 Göttingen, Germany 4 Fakultät für Chemie und Biochemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany 5 Permanent address: Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universitá di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano, Italy

  9. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Advanced plants to meet rising expectations, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna; A flexible and economic small reactor, by Mario D. Carelli and Bojan Petrovic, Westinghouse Electric Company; A simple and passively safe reactor, by Yury N. Kuznetsov, Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (NIKIET), Russia; Gas-cooled reactors, by Jeffrey S. Merrifield, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; ISI project managment in the PRC, by Chen Chanbing, RINPO, China; and, Fort Calhoun refurbishment, by Sudesh Cambhir, Omaha Public Power District.

  10. Application of Box-Behnken design in the optimisation of an on-line pre-concentration system using knotted reactor for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Anderson S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, Nucleo de Excelencia em Quimica Analitica da Bahia, Campus Universitario de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-290 (Brazil); Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Departamento de Quimica e Exatas, Campus de Jequie, Jequie, Bahia 45206-190 (Brazil); Santos, Walter N.L. dos [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, Nucleo de Excelencia em Quimica Analitica da Bahia, Campus Universitario de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-290 (Brazil); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, Nucleo de Excelencia em Quimica Analitica da Bahia, Campus Universitario de Ondina, Salvador, Bahia 40170-290 (Brazil)]. E-mail: slcf@ufba.br

    2005-06-30

    The present paper proposes an on-line pre-concentration system for cadmium determination in drinking water using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cadmium(II) ions are retained as 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) complex at the walls of a knotted reactor, followed of elution using hydrochloric acid solution. The optimization was performed in two steps using factorial design for preliminary evaluation and a Box-Behnken design for determination of the critical experimental conditions. The variables involved were: sampling flow-rate, reagent concentration, pH and buffer concentration, and as response the analytical signal (absorbance). The validation process was performed considering the parameters: linearity and other characteristics of the calibration curve, analytical features of on-line pre-concentration system, precision, effect of other ions in the pre-concentration system and accuracy. Using the optimized experimental conditions, the procedure allows cadmium determination with a detection limit (3 {sigma} / S) of 0.10 {mu}g L{sup -1}, a quantification limit (10 {sigma} / S) of 0.33 {mu}g L{sup -1}, and a precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.7% (n = 7) and 2.4% (n = 7) for cadmium concentrations of 5 and 25 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. A pre-concentration factor of 18 and a sampling frequency of 48 h{sup -1} were obtained. The recovery for cadmium in the presence of several ions demonstrated that this procedure could be applied for the analysis of water samples. The method was applied for cadmium determination in drinking water samples collected in Salvador City, Brazil. The cadmium concentrations found in five samples were lower than the maximum permissible levels established by the World Health Organization.

  11. Observation of correlated atom pairs in spontaneous four wave mixing of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates; Observation de paires d'atomes correles au travers de la collision de deux condensats de Bose-Einstein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, A

    2007-11-15

    In this thesis, we report on the observation of pairs of correlated atoms produced in the collision of two Bose-Einstein condensates of metastable helium. Three laser beams perform a Raman transfer which extracts the condensate from the magnetic trap and separates it into two parts with opposite mean momenta. While the condensates propagate, elastic scattering of pairs of atoms occurs, whose momenta satisfy energy and momentum conservation laws. Metastable helium atoms large internal energy allows the use of a position-sensitive, single-atom detector which permits a three-dimensional reconstruction of the scattered atoms'momenta. The statistics of these momenta show correlations for atoms with opposite momenta. The measured correlation volume can be understood from the uncertainty-limited momentum spread of the colliding condensates. This interpretation is confirmed by the observation of the momentum correlation function for two atoms scattered in the same direction. This latter effect is a manifestation of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for indistinguishable bosons. Such a correlated-atom-pair source is a first step towards experiments in which one would like to confirm the pairs'entanglement. (author)

  12. The survey of Neutron moderating properties of zirconium hydride nanoparticles (ZrH2 in the reactors of nuclear powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nozad Golikand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydrides as a Neutron Moderator (NMs have effective and impressive application in nuclear reactors. Unquestionably, Retarder should be close to the atomic mass of the neutron to be able to reduce its energy with no interaction with the neutrons. The hydrogen atom nucleons have the atomic Mass close to the Neutron. Surprisingly, Metal hydrides can absorb a high percentage of hydrogen. Metal Hydrides have very good properties at high temperatures and can also maintain it even at higher temperatures. Due to the high volume of hydrogen stored in the metal hydrides, they blurt their good mechanical properties and Moderating Effect out on the incidence of the various reactors. Since they have ultrahigh functionality of Hydrogen storage, and likewise, they reveal their unique neutron moderating and thermal properties, in the present research, it was scrutinized the feasibility and circumstance of using them in the nuclear reactors of atomic energy powerhouse. Hence, in order to sonochemical reaction synthesis of zirconium hydride noparticles (ZrH2, the precursor of zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4 and potassium hydroxide (KOH were utilized as neutralizing acidic environment, exposure to the ultrasound waves. Eventually, some diverse metal salts were come on competitive comparison with zirconium hydride salt that the zirconium hydride nanoparticles had the best performance as compared to all of them.

  13. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  14. 气升式反应器超声破碎海带提取硫酸酯多糖%Extraction of Sulfate Radical Polysaccharide from Laminaria Japonica Enhanced by Ultrasonic Wave in an Air-lift Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王谦; 黄猛; 赵兵; 王玉春; 欧阳藩; 伍志春

    2001-01-01

    在内径8 cm、有效容积为1 L的气升式循环超声破碎浸提装置中, 进行了超声波强化海带硫酸酯多糖浸提实验. 在pH 5.0、提取温度40oC、液固比45、提取时间25 min、通气量75 L/h 、超声功率120 W、超声作用时间百分比为100%的工艺条件下,硫酸酯多糖的提取率可达1.86%, 比传统水提法高,且极大地缩短了提取时间,比相同条件下不用超声时的提取率(1.11%)高得多. 此法所得多糖的SO42- 含量(26.5%)比水法浸提(20.8%)和相同条件下不用超声时(21.3%)都要高,显示出超声波在强化海带硫酸酯多糖浸提方面的良好应用前景.%The extraction of sulfate radical polysaccharide from Laminaria Japonica enhanced by ultrasonic wave in an air-lift reactor was reported. The optimal experimental conditions in this reactor (diameter 8 cm, working volume 1 liter) were pH 5.0, operation temperature 40oC, mass ratio of liquid to solid 45, extraction time 25 min, air flow rate 75 L/h, ultrasonic power 120 W, ultrasonic duty cycle 100%. Under the above conditions, the extraction ratio of sulfate radical polysaccharide reached 1.86%, higher than that by treatment for 3 h in water at 100oC and that under the same conditions without ultrasonic wave applied. The content of SO42- in sulfate radical polysaccharide of the former was 5.7% higher due to application of ultrasonic wave. The experimental results showed that this novel extraction process is prospective in the extraction of polysaccharide from seaweed.

  15. Wave Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    In classical continuum physics, a wave is a mechanical disturbance. Whether the disturbance is stationary or traveling and whether it is caused by the motion of atoms and molecules or the vibration of a lattice structure, a wave can be understood as a specific type of solution of an appropriate mathematical equation modeling the underlying physics. Typical models consist of partial differential equations that exhibit certain general properties, e.g., hyperbolicity. This, in turn, leads to the possibility of wave solutions. Various analytical techniques (integral transforms, complex variables, reduction to ordinary differential equations, etc.) are available to find wave solutions of linear partial differential equations. Furthermore, linear hyperbolic equations with higher-order derivatives provide the mathematical underpinning of the phenomenon of dispersion, i.e., the dependence of a wave's phase speed on its wavenumber. For systems of nonlinear first-order hyperbolic equations, there also exists a general ...

  16. Verification of Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internal Structures of Liquid Metal Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-02-15

    The reactor internal structures and components of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures and components. Reactor internals of LMR can not be visually examined due to opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing techniques using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the visual inspection of reactor internals. Recently, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium inspection. In this study, visualization technique, ranging technique and monitoring technique have been suggested for the remote inspection of reactor internals by using the waveguide sensor. The feasibility of these remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been evaluated by an experimental verification.

  17. Verification of Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internal Structures of Liquid Metal Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-02-15

    The reactor internal structures and components of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures and components. Reactor internals of LMR can not be visually examined due to opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing techniques using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the visual inspection of reactor internals. Recently, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium inspection. In this study, visualization technique, ranging technique and monitoring technique have been suggested for the remote inspection of reactor internals by using the waveguide sensor. The feasibility of these remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been evaluated by an experimental verification.

  18. Tritium management in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1978-05-01

    This is a review paper covering the key environmental and safety issues and how they have been handled in the various magnetic and inertial confinement concepts and reference designs. The issues treated include: tritium accident analyses, tritium process control, occupational safety, HTO formation rate from the gas-phase, disposal of tritium contaminated wastes, and environmental impact--each covering the Joint European Tokamak (J.E.T. experiment), Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Russian T-20, The Next Step (TNS) designs by Westinghouse/ORNL and General Atomic/ANL, the ANL and ORNL EPR's, the G.A. Doublet Demonstration Reactor, the Italian Fintor-D and the ORNL Demo Studies. There are also the following full scale plant reference designs: UWMAK-III, LASL's Theta Pinch Reactor Design (RTPR), Mirror Fusion Reactor (MFR), Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR), and the Mirror Hybrid Reactor (MHR). There are four laser device breakeven experiments, SHIVA-NOVA, LLL reference designs, ORNL Laser Fusion power plant, the German ''Saturn,'' and LLL's Laser Fusion EPR I and II.

  19. Sonochemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  20. Semiclassical Formalism as Applied to the Computation of Resonant Energies and Associated Stationary State Wave Functions for the Interaction of the Fluorine Atom with the Hydrogen Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Carling Clay

    The semiclassical interpretation of the experimentally confirmed computational discovery of the resonances for the collinear interaction of the fluorine atom with the hydrogen molecule as action quantizing classical trajectories is extended to the J = 0 3D reaction in a successful attempt to recover the analogous quantum calculation of the resonance eigenvalues. Confirmation of the semiclassical analogues for both collinear and 3D reactions is then strengthened through a successful construction of stationary state wave functions when compared to the full quantum calculation, using a time-dependent approach to semiclassical dynamics requiring such action quantizing trajectories. Extension to future studies are initiated by constructing outgoing scattering states through a semiclassical adiabatic formalism with which the width of the resonance peaks may then be computed. Discoveries incidental to the major objectives required inspection to address the ambiguities associated with multiple semiclassical analogues and were satisfactorily resolved through linear stability analysis and computation of Lyaponov exponents for quasiperiodic trajectories. Successful generalizations for the quantization of the alternative analogues were developed with resultant unification of bound trajectory initial position loci on the V = E potential energy surface. In particular, two such independently discovered loci are demonstrated to be components of a continuous unified locus such that the point of unification corresponds to the onset of linear stability for both qualitative varieties. An additional complication encountered in the 3D studies for semiclassical quantization of the quasiperiodic trajectories is avoided by employment of a procedure developed for iteratively converging upon action quantizing energies requiring only arbitrary trajectories. The consistency of these studies with those of earlier workers is demonstrated by comparing the behavior expected for deviations from

  1. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashige, Kengo

    1996-06-21

    In an LMFBR type reactor, partitions are disposed to a coolant channel at positions lower than the free liquid level, and the width of the partitions is adapted to have a predetermined condition. Namely, when low temperature fluid overflowing the wall of the coolant channel, flows down and collided against the free liquid surface in the coolant channel, since the dropping speed thereof is reduced abruptly, large pressure waves are caused by kinetic force of the low temperature fluid. However, if appropriate numbers of partitions having an appropriate shape are formed, the dropping speed of the low temperature fluid is moderated to reduce the pressure waves. In addition, since the pressure waves are dispersed to the circumferential and lateral directions of the coolant flow channel respectively, the propagation of the pressure waves can be prevented effectively. Further, when the flow of the low temperature fluid is changed to the circumferential direction, for example, by earthquakes, since the partitions act as members resisting against the circumferential change of the low temperature fluid, the change of the direction can be suppressed. (N.H.)

  2. Naval reactors physics handbook. Volume 3: The physics of intermediate spectrum reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehn, J.R. [ed.] [Knolls Atomic Power Lab., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1958-09-01

    The present volume has been prepared for persons with some knowledge of the physics of nuclear reactors. It is intended to make available the accumulated physics experience of the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in its work on intermediate spectrum reactors. Only those portions have been selected which were deemed to be most useful and significant to other physicists concerned with the problems of reactor design. The volume is divided into four parts which are more or less independent of one another. Part 1 (Chaps. 2--9), Investigation of Reactor Characteristics by Critical Assemblies, reflects the importance of the properties of critical assemblies and of the techniques for obtaining experimental information about such assemblies. Part 2 (Chaps. 10--20), Reactivity Effects Associated with Reactor Operation, details the use of both critical assemblies and reactor theory to make and test predictions of the manner in which the reactivity of an intermediate power reactor will vary during operation. Part 3 (Chaps. 21--26), Heat Generation and Nuclear Materials Problems, considers how reactor heat generation is spread out in space and time, and what nuclear effects result from the presence of beryllium or sodium in the reactor. Part 4 (Chaps. 27--38), Reactor Kinetics and Temperature Coefficients, relates to the transient or near-transient behavior of intermediate reactors.

  3. Fast combustion waves and chemi-ionization processes in a flame initiated by a powerful local plasma source in a closed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artem'ev, K V; Berezhetskaya, N K; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, N G; Kossyi, I A; Popov, N A; Tarasova, N M; Filimonova, E A; Firsov, K N

    2015-08-13

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the initiation of combustion in a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a freely localized laser spark and by a high-current multispark discharge in a closed chamber. It is shown that, preceding the stage of 'explosive' inflammation of a gas mixture, there appear two luminous objects moving away from the initiator along an axis: a relatively fast and uniform wave of 'incomplete combustion' under laser spark ignition and a wave with a brightly glowing plasmoid behind under ignition from high-current slipping surface discharge. The gas mixtures in both the 'preflame' and developed-flame states are characterized by a high degree of ionization as the result of chemical ionization (plasma density n(e)≈10(12) cm(-3)) and a high frequency of electron-neutral collisions (ν(en)≈10(12) s(-1)). The role of chemical ionization in constructing an adequate theory for the ignition of a gas mixture is discussed. The feasibility of the microwave heating of both the preflame and developed-flame plasma, supplementary to a chemical energy source, is also discussed.

  4. Fast combustion waves and chemi-ionization processes in a flame initiated by a powerful local plasma source in a closed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artem'ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kazantsev, S. Yu.; Kononov, N. G.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.; Filimonova, E. A.; Firsov, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the initiation of combustion in a stoichiometric methane–oxygen mixture by a freely localized laser spark and by a high-current multispark discharge in a closed chamber. It is shown that, preceding the stage of ‘explosive’ inflammation of a gas mixture, there appear two luminous objects moving away from the initiator along an axis: a relatively fast and uniform wave of ‘incomplete combustion’ under laser spark ignition and a wave with a brightly glowing plasmoid behind under ignition from high-current slipping surface discharge. The gas mixtures in both the ‘preflame’ and developed-flame states are characterized by a high degree of ionization as the result of chemical ionization (plasma density ne≈1012 cm−3) and a high frequency of electron–neutral collisions (νen≈1012 s−1). The role of chemical ionization in constructing an adequate theory for the ignition of a gas mixture is discussed. The feasibility of the microwave heating of both the preflame and developed-flame plasma, supplementary to a chemical energy source, is also discussed. PMID:26170426

  5. Evaluation of a sodium-water reaction event caused by steam generator tubes break in the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang June; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Kang, Seok Hun; Lee, Kwi Lim; Choi, Chi Woong; Lee, Seung Won; Yoo, Jin; Jeong, Jae Ho; Jeong, Tae Kyeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. This reactor uses sodium as a reactor coolant to transfer the core heat energy to the turbine. Sodium has chemical characteristics that allow it to violently react with materials such as a water or steam. When a sodium–water reaction (SWR) occurs due to leakage or breakage of steam generator tubes, high-pressure waves and corrosive reaction products are produced, which threaten the structural integrity of the components of the intermediate heat-transfer system (IHTS) and the safety of the primary heat-transfer system (PHTS). In the PGSFR, SWR events are included in the design-basis event. This event should be analyzed from the viewpoint of the integrities of the IHTS and fuel rods. To evaluate the integrity of the IHTS based on the consequences of the SWR, the behaviors of the generated high-pressure waves are analyzed at the major positions of a failed IHTS loop using a sodium–water advanced analysis method-II code. The integrity of the fuel rods must be consistently maintained below the safety acceptance criteria to avoid the consequences of the SWR. The integrity of the PHTS is evaluated using the multidimensional analysis of reactor safety-liquid metal reactor code to model the whole plant.

  6. Linear atomic quantum coupler

    CERN Document Server

    El-Orany, Faisal A A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of them includes a localized and/or a trapped atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchanging energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way, i.e. as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM), and with the atom-mode in the second waveguide via evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for the system and deduce the exact form for the wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional linear coupler, the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions, the system can yield the results of the two-m...

  7. The Atom and the Ocean, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, E. W. Seabrook

    Included is a brief description of the characteristics of the ocean, its role as a resource for food and minerals, its composition and its interactions with land and air. The role of atomic physics in oceanographic exploration is illustrated by the use of nuclear reactors to power surface and submarine research vessels and the design and use of…

  8. NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration proposes to build a nuclear research reactor which will be located in the Plum Brook Ordnance Works near Sandusky, Ohio. The purpose of this report is to inform the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission in regard to the design Lq of the reactor facility, the characteristics of the site, and the hazards of operation at this location. The purpose of this research reactor is to make pumped loop studies of aircraft reactor fuel elements and other reactor components, radiation effects studies on aircraft reactor materials and equipment, shielding studies, and nuclear and solid state physics experiments. The reactor is light water cooled and moderated of the MTR-type with a primary beryllium reflector and a secondary water reflector. The core initially will be a 3 by 9 array of MTR-type fuel elements and is designed for operation up to a power of 60 megawatts. The reactor facility is described in general terms. This is followed by a discussion of the nuclear characteristics and performance of the reactor. Then details of the reactor control system are discussed. A summary of the site characteristics is then presented followed by a discussion of the larger type of experiments which may eventually be operated in this facility. The considerations for normal operation are concluded with a proposed method of handling fuel elements and radioactive wastes. The potential hazards involved with failures or malfunctions of this facility are considered in some detail. These are examined first from the standpoint of preventing them or minimizing their effects and second from the standpoint of what effect they might have on the reactor facility staff and the surrounding population. The most essential feature of the design for location at the proposed site is containment of the maximum credible accident.

  9. A Quantum Model of Atoms (the Energy Levels of Atoms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, Francois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the model for all atoms which was developed on the same basis as Bohr's model for the hydrogen atom. Calculates the radii and the energies of the orbits. Demonstrates how the model obeys the de Broglie's hypothesis that the moving electron exhibits both wave and particle properties. (Author/ASK)

  10. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  11. D and DR Reactors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The world's second full-scale nuclear reactor was the D Reactor at Hanford which was built in the early 1940's and went operational in December of 1944.D Reactor ran...

  12. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  13. Atom-Light Hybrid Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Qiu, Cheng; Chen, Shuying; Guo, Jinxian; Chen, L Q; Ou, Z Y; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-07-24

    A new type of hybrid atom-light interferometer is demonstrated with atomic Raman amplification processes replacing the beam splitting elements in a traditional interferometer. This nonconventional interferometer involves correlated optical and atomic waves in the two arms. The correlation between atoms and light developed with the Raman process makes this interferometer different from conventional interferometers with linear beam splitters. It is observed that the high-contrast interference fringes are sensitive to the optical phase via a path change as well as the atomic phase via a magnetic field change. This new atom-light correlated hybrid interferometer is a sensitive probe of the atomic internal state and should find wide applications in precision measurement and quantum control with atoms and photons.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics in atom optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wenyu; Dyrting, S.; Milburn, G.J. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    In this paper theoretical work on classical and quantum nonlinear dynamics of cold atoms is reported. The basic concepts in nonlinear dynamics are reviewed and then applied to the motion of atoms in time-dependent standing waves and to the atomic bouncer. The quantum dynamics for the cases of regular and chaotic classical dynamics is described. The effect of spontaneous emission and external noise is also discussed. 104 refs., 1 tab., 21 figs.

  15. Technical Research for Dedicated Isotope Production Reactor of South Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU; Yao; LIU; Xing-min; CHEN; Hui-qiang; SUN; Zhen; WU; Yuan-yuan

    2012-01-01

    <正>Research reactor plays an important part in nuclear science and technology, application and power development. Currently, many countries in Middle East and Africa are ready to develop their own nuclear industry. South Africa sent its User Requirements Specification (URS) for a dedicated isotope production reactor to several institutes or companies, among of which Department of Reactor Engineering Research and Design (DRERD) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) is a competitive candidate.

  16. Materials science research for sodium cooled fast reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baldev Raj

    2009-06-01

    The paper gives an insight into basic as well as applied research being carried out at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research for the development of advanced materials for sodium cooled fast reactors towards extending the life of reactors to nearly 100 years and the burnup of fuel to 2,00,000 MWd/t with an objective of providing fast reactor electricity at an affordable and competitive price.

  17. International Conference on Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    CERN Document Server

    Mintz, Stephan; Perlmutter, Arnold; Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    1996-01-01

    The International Conference, Orbis Scientiae 1996, focused on the topics: The Neutrino Mass, Light Cone Quantization, Monopole Condensation, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves which we have adopted as the title of these proceedings. Was there any exciting news at the conference? Maybe, it depends on who answers the question. There was an almost unanimous agreement on the overall success of the conference as was evidenced by the fact that in the after-dinner remarks by one of us (BNK) the suggestion of organizing the conference on a biannual basis was presented but not accepted: the participants wanted the continuation of the tradition to convene annually. We shall, of course, comply. The expected observation of gravitational waves will constitute the most exciting vindication of Einstein's general relativity. This subject is attracting the attention of the experimentalists and theorists alike. We hope that by the first decade of the third millennium or earlier, gravitational waves will be detected,...

  18. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic

  19. ɛ -pseudoclassical model for quantum resonances in a cold dilute atomic gas periodically driven by finite-duration standing-wave laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Benjamin T.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Gardiner, Simon A.; Astier, Hippolyte P. A. G.; Andersen, Mikkel F.; Daszuta, Boris

    2016-12-01

    Atom interferometers are a useful tool for precision measurements of fundamental physical phenomena, ranging from the local gravitational-field strength to the atomic fine-structure constant. In such experiments, it is desirable to implement a high-momentum-transfer "beam splitter," which may be achieved by inducing quantum resonance in a finite-temperature laser-driven atomic gas. We use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate these quantum resonances in the regime where the gas receives laser pulses of finite duration and derive an ɛ -classical model for the dynamics of the gas atoms which is capable of reproducing quantum resonant behavior for both zero-temperature and finite-temperature noninteracting gases. We show that this model agrees well with the fully quantum treatment of the system over a time scale set by the choice of experimental parameters. We also show that this model is capable of correctly treating the time-reversal mechanism necessary for implementing an interferometer with this physical configuration and that it explains an unexpected universality in the dynamics.

  20. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  1. Reactor and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, John A.

    1976-08-10

    A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

  2. All-Atom Molecular-Level Computational Analyses of Polyurea/Fused-Silica Interfacial Decohesion Caused by Impinging Tensile Stress-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial decohesion, Reactive forcefields Paper type Research paper International Journal of Structural Integrity Vol. 5 No. 4, 2014 pp. 339-367 © Emerald ...interaction was conducted to provide additional insight into the outcome of the stress-wave/interface interactions. 4. Results and discussion The main emphasis

  3. Hydrogen release from reactor-irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepikov, A.Kh. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Tazhibaeva, I.L. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Shestakov, V.P. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Romanenko, O.G. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Chikhray, Y.V. [Kazakh State Univ., Alma-Ata (Kazakstan); Kenzhin, E.A. [IAE NNC RK, Semipalatinsk-21 (Russian Federation); Cherepnin, Yu.S. [IAE NNC RK, Semipalatinsk-21 (Russian Federation); Tikhomirov, L.N. [IAE NNC RK, Semipalatinsk-21 (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    Experiments on gas release of reactor-irradiated beryllium samples were carried out and compared to control samples. The simultaneous influence of reactor irradiation and exposure to hydrogen results in more hydrogen retention in beryllium, than if beryllium is initially irradiated and then exposed to hydrogen. Appearance of low temperature peaks at 460 K and 540 K with 0.71 eV/atom and 0.84 eV/atom desorption activation energies, respectively, assessed in a frame of a second order desorption model, is mainly responsible for the increase in hydrogen content. These peaks can be attributed to chemical hydrogen bonds with surface oxide. The simultaneous influence of hydrogen and nuclear reactor irradiation at a temperature of 1150 K was assumed to increase significantly microcrack formation near the surface of beryllium samples, resulting in an increase in low temperature peak intensities. (orig.).

  4. Quantum correlations by four-wave mixing in an atomic vapor in a non-amplifying regime: a quantum beam splitter for photons

    CERN Document Server

    Glorieux, Quentin; Guibal, Samuel; Likforman, Jean-Pierre; Coudreau, Thomas; 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.053826

    2011-01-01

    We study the generation of intensity quantum correlations using four-wave mixing in a rubidium vapor. The absence of cavity in these experiments allows to deal with several spatial modes simultaneously. In the standard, amplifying, configuration, we measure relative intensity squeezing up to 9.2 dB below the standard quantum limit. We also theoretically identify and experimentally demonstrate an original regime where, despite no overall amplification, quantum correlations are generated. In this regime a four-wave mixing set-up can therefore play the role of a photonic beam splitter with non--classical properties, i.e. a device that splits a coherent state input into two quantum correlated beams.

  5. Physics of waves

    CERN Document Server

    Elmore, William C

    1985-01-01

    Because of the increasing demands and complexity of undergraduate physics courses (atomic, quantum, solid state, nuclear, etc.), it is often impossible to devote separate courses to the classic wave phenomena of optics, acoustics, and electromagnetic radiation. This brief comprehensive text helps alleviate the problem with a unique overview of classical wave theory in one volume.By examining a sequence of concrete and specific examples (emphasizing the physics of wave motion), the authors unify the study of waves, developing abstract and general features common to all wave motion. The fundam

  6. Precision position measurement of single atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziauddin; Rahmatullah; Almas Khan

    2012-01-01

    Atom localization in a five-level atomic system under the effect of three driving fields and one standing wave field is suggested.A spontaneously emitted photon from the proposed system is measured in a detector.Precision position measurement of an atom is controlled via phase and vacuum field detuning without considering the parity violation.

  7. Atomic energy

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    Interviews following the 1991 co-operation Agreement between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project (LHC) . With Chidambaram, R, Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and Professor Llewellyn-Smith, Christopher H, Director-General, CERN.

  8. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  9. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  10. Investigation of Isfahan miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) for boron neutron capture therapy by MCNP simulation

    OpenAIRE

    S. Z. Kalantari; H Tavakoli; Nami, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the important neutron sources for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a nuclear reactor. It needs a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The optimum conditions of the neutron spectra for BNCT are provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In this paper, Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) as a neutron source for BNCT was investigated. For this purpose, we designed a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) for the reactor and the neutron transport from the core of the reactor t...

  11. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  12. REVIEW OF REACTOR SAFETY ANALYSES OF FAST AND LIQUID METAL COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, R. E.; Wittenbrock, N. G.

    1967-11-01

    Safety analysis reports on United States fast and liquid metal cooled reactors were reviewed to gain a better understanding of the safety philosophy applied to the design of these facilities. This information was compiled to help guide the design and safety analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility. No attempt was made to draw conclusions concerning the relative merit of different approaches and philosophies used by different reactor design teams. The facilities reviewed were; Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant (FERMI) Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HALLAM) Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor (SEFOR) Fast Reactor Test Facility (FARET) Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) Fast Reactor Zero Power Experiment (ZPR - III). The information gathered from the safety analysis reports is tabulated under these headings: Control and Safety Systems; Reactor Protection Systems; Backup Systems; Containment or Confinement Systems; Inherent Reactivity Effects and Important Physics Parameters; Fuel and Fuel Handling; Accidents Considered and Chemical Problems; Site; Exhaust Ventilation System; and Waste Effluents.

  13. SCALAR WAVES AND WIRELESS POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is established that in the classical electrodynamics with Lorenz gauge there are solutions in the form of waves of scalar and vector potential at zero magnetic and electric field. It is shown that wave scalar and vector potential can interact with the substance, causing ionization of the atoms and molecules. The analogue of scalar waves in electrodynamics and sound waves in gas dynamics is discussed. Proposed technical application of the waves of scalar and vector potential similar to acoustic waves. Discusses Tesla invented electrical device capable of generating and receiving scalar waves

  14. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  15. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  16. A reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Baldoncini, Marica; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillate...

  17. Atomic entanglement and decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, Claudiu

    output channel and is capable of producing mesoscopic Schrodinger cat states in a single step. As a first step to understanding the role of cooperative decoherence, of importance in the case of dense pencil-shaped atomic ensembles, the collective spin decoherence of a two multilevel atom system is derived. This calculation is also relevant to entanglement loss for two qubits manipulated using with reading/writing pulses. Finally, a scheme is proposed in which arbitrarily strong entanglement can be produced in a four-wave mixing setup, where the preparation of the atoms in a dark state limits the decoherence to negligible values.

  18. Attrition reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  19. Application of invariant embedding to reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Akinao; Parsegian, V L

    1972-01-01

    Application of Invariant Embedding to Reactor Physics describes the application of the method of invariant embedding to radiation shielding and to criticality calculations of atomic reactors. The authors intend to show how this method has been applied to realistic problems, together with the results of applications which will be useful to shielding design. The book is organized into two parts. Part A deals with the reflection and transmission of gamma rays by slabs. The chapters in this section cover topics such as the reflection and transmission problem of gamma rays; formulation of the probl

  20. Inert gas atomization of chemical grade silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, D.; Ferreira Neto, J.B.; Salgado, L.; Nogueira, P.F.; Poco, J.G.R. [Metallurgy Div. Cidade Univ., Inst. for Technological Research, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    The use of inert gas atomization to obtain chemical grade silicon particles was investigated. Both cooling rate and chemical composition are very important regarding a tailored microstructure, related with silicon performance during the synthesis of the silanos, an intermediary raw material in the silicone production. Previously refined silicon was used as raw material. Silicon with different aluminum contents were atomized and analyzed. The atomization temperature was set around 1520 C, and it was used a confined atomization nozzle. It was necessary to use a long atomization chamber to allow the cooling of the coarse silicon particles. After atomization, the powder was characterized and classified. The coarse fraction was milled. Two different particle size groups (different cooling rates) and the as atomized particles were investigated. The chemical behavior during the synthesis of the silanos was analyzed in a laboratory reactor. The relationship between cooling rate, aluminum content and silicon performance during the silanos synthesis is discussed. (orig.)

  1. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hiroto

    1995-02-07

    A reactor container of the present invention has a structure that the reactor container is entirely at the same temperature as that at the inlet of the reactor and, a hot pool is incorporated therein, and the reactor container has is entirely at the same temperature and has substantially uniform temperature follow-up property transiently. Namely, if the temperature at the inlet of the reactor core changes, the temperature of the entire reactor container changes following this change, but no great temperature gradient is caused in the axial direction and no great heat stresses due to axial temperature distribution is caused. Occurrence of thermal stresses caused by the axial temperature distribution can be suppressed to improve the reliability of the reactor container. In addition, since the laying of the reactor inlet pipelines over the inside of the reactor is eliminated, the reactor container is made compact and the heat shielding structures above the reactor and a protection structure of container walls are simplified. Further, secondary coolants are filled to the outside of the reactor container to simplify the shieldings. The combined effects described above can improve economical property and reliability. (N.H.).

  2. Atom gravimeters and gravitational redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Peter; Borde, Christian J; Reynaud, Serge; Salomon, Christophe; Cohen-Tannoudji, Claude; 10.1038/nature09340

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper, H. Mueller, A. Peters and S. Chu [A precision measurement of the gravitational redshift by the interference of matter waves, Nature 463, 926-929 (2010)] argued that atom interferometry experiments published a decade ago did in fact measure the gravitational redshift on the quantum clock operating at the very high Compton frequency associated with the rest mass of the Caesium atom. In the present Communication we show that this interpretation is incorrect.

  3. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  4. ATOMIC PHYSICS, AN AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM, VOLUME 4, SUPPLEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DETERLINE, WILLIAM A.; KLAUS, DAVID J.

    THE AUTOINSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS IN THIS TEXT WERE PREPARED FOR USE IN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY, OFFERING SELF-TUTORING MATERIAL FOR LEARNING ATOMIC PHYSICS. THE TOPICS COVERED ARE (1) RADIATION USES AND NUCLEAR FISSION, (2) NUCLEAR REACTORS, (3) ENERGY FROM NUCLEAR REACTORS, (4) NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND FUSION, (5) A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW, AND (6) A…

  5. The Mystery of Matter, World of the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, William G.

    This booklet is one in the "World of the Atome Series" for junior high school students and their teachers. It describes the fascinating story of the search for the key to the structure of matter. These topics are reviewed: the chemical atom of the 19th century, the planetary atom, the wave atom, inside the elementary particles, and the mystery of…

  6. Narrow deeply bound K- and p atomic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2000-01-01

    Examples of recently predicted narrow `deeply bound' K- and p atomic states are shown. The saturation of widths for strong absorptive potentials due to the induced repulsion, and the resulting suppression of atomic wave functions within the nucleus, are demonstrated. Production reactions for K- atomic states using φ(1020) decay, and the (p,p) reaction for p atomic states, are discussed.

  7. In-situ RHEED analysis of atomic layer deposition and characterization of AL203 gate dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bankras, R.G.; Aarnink, A.A.I.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2003-01-01

    A new custom designed reactor was realized at the MESA+ cleanroom to fabricate high-k dielectrics using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Key features of the reactor are: a small reactor volume, in-situ RHEED analysis and low background pressure. The effect of precursor and purge pulse times is discuss

  8. Atomic Calligraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  9. Single-atom spintronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susan Z. HUA; Matthew R. SULLIVAN; Jason N. ARMSTRONG

    2006-01-01

    Recent work on magnetic quantum point contacts (QPCs) was discussed. Complete magnetoresistance loops across Co QPCs as small as a single atom was measured. The remarkable feature of these QPCs is the rapid oscillatory decay in magnetoresistance with the increase of contact size. In addition,stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops are observed,resulting from varying transmission probability of the available discrete conductance channels because the sample is cycled between the ferromagnetic (F) and antiferromagnetic (AF) aligned states. Quantized conductance combined with spin dependent transmission of electron waves gives rise to a multi-channel system with a quantum domain wall acting as a valve,i.e.,a quantum spin-valve. Behavior of a few-atom QPC is built on the behavior of a single-atom QPC and hence the summarization of results as 'single-atom spintronics'. An evolutionary trace of spin-dependent electron transmission from a single atom to bulk is provided,the requisite hallmarks of artefact-free magnetoresistance is established across a QPC - stepwise or quantum magnetoresistance loops and size dependent oscillatory magnetoresistance.

  10. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  11. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  12. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  13. Ex-vessel Steam Explosion Analysis for Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Leskovar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A steam explosion may occur during a severe accident, when the molten core comes into contact with water. The pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor ex-vessel steam explosion study, which was carried out with the multicomponent three-dimensional Eulerian fuel–coolant interaction code under the conditions of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications project reactor exercise, is presented and discussed. In reactor calculations, the largest uncertainties in the prediction of the steam explosion strength are expected to be caused by the large uncertainties related to the jet breakup. To obtain some insight into these uncertainties, premixing simulations were performed with both available jet breakup models, i.e., the global and the local models. The simulations revealed that weaker explosions are predicted by the local model, compared to the global model, due to the predicted smaller melt droplet size, resulting in increased melt solidification and increased void buildup, both reducing the explosion strength. Despite the lower active melt mass predicted for the pressurized water reactor case, pressure loads at the cavity walls are typically higher than that for the boiling water reactor case. This is because of the significantly larger boiling water reactor cavity, where the explosion pressure wave originating from the premixture in the center of the cavity has already been significantly weakened on reaching the distant cavity wall.

  14. A linear atomic quantum coupler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Orany, Faisal A A [Department of Mathematics and computer Science, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University 41522, Ismailia (Egypt); Wahiddin, M R B, E-mail: el_orany@hotmail.co, E-mail: faisal.orany@mimos.m, E-mail: mridza@mimos.m [Cyberspace Security Laboratory, MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-04-28

    In this paper we develop the notion of the linear atomic quantum coupler. This device consists of two modes propagating into two waveguides, each of which includes a localized atom. These waveguides are placed close enough to allow exchange of energy between them via evanescent waves. Each mode interacts with the atom in the same waveguide in the standard way as the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) and with the atom-mode system in the second waveguide via the evanescent wave. We present the Hamiltonian for this system and deduce its wavefunction. We investigate the atomic inversions and the second-order correlation function. In contrast to the conventional coupler the atomic quantum coupler is able to generate nonclassical effects. The atomic inversions can exhibit a long revival-collapse phenomenon as well as subsidiary revivals based on the competition among the switching mechanisms in the system. Finally, under certain conditions the system can yield the results of the two-mode JCM.

  15. Preliminary design of a Binary Breeder Reactor; Diseno preliminar de un reactor esferico de quema/cria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, E. Y.; Francois, J. L.; Lopez S, R. C., E-mail: eliasgarcerv@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    A binary breeder reactor (BBR) is a reactor that by means of the transmutation and fission process can operates through the depleted uranium burning with a small quantity of fissile material. The advantages of a BBR with relation to other nuclear reactor types are numerous, taking into account their capacity to operate for a long time without requiring fuel reload or re-arrangement. In this work four different simulations are shown carried out with the MCNPX code with libraries Jeff-3.1 to 1200 K. The objective of this study is to compare two different models of BBR: a spherical reactor and a cylindrical one, using two fuel cycles for each one of them (U-Pu and Th-U) and different reflectors for the two different geometries. For all the models a super-criticality state was obtained at least 10.9 years without carrying out some fuel re-arrangement or reload. The plutonium-239 production was achieved in the models where natural uranium was used in the breeding area, while the production of uranium-233 was observed in the cases where thorium was used in the fertile area. Finally, a behavior of stationary wave reactor was observed inside the models of spherical reactor when contemplating the power uniform increment in the breeding area, while inside the cylindrical models was observed the behavior of a traveling wave reactor when registering the displacement of the burnt wave along the cylindrical model. (Author)

  16. Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program for Advanced Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Kim, Jong-Wook; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    This report provides the design requirements of an integral type reactor vessel surveillance program for an integral type reactor in accordance with the requirements of Korean MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Development) Notice 2008-18. This report covers the requirements for the design of surveillance capsule assemblies including their test specimens, test block materials, handling tools, and monitors of the surveillance capsule neutron fluence and temperature. In addition, this report provides design requirements for the program for irradiation surveillance of reactor vessel materials, a layout of specimens and monitors in the surveillance capsule, procedures of installation and retrieval of the surveillance capsule assemblies, and the layout of the surveillance capsule assemblies in the reactor.

  17. Kinetic Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  18. Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internals of Liquid Metal Reactor by using Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Jae Han

    2006-02-15

    The primary components such as a reactor core, heat exchangers, pumps and internal structures of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection and continuous monitoring as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures. Reactor core and internal structures of LMR can not be visually examined due to an opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing and remote inspection techniques by using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the in-service inspection of reactor internals. The remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic wave have been developed and applied for the visualization and ISI of reactor internals. The under sodium viewing technique has a limitation for the application of LMR due to the high temperature and irradiation environment. In this study, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium viewing and remote inspection. The Lamb wave propagation of a waveguide sensor has been analyzed and the zero-order antisymmetric A{sub 0} plate wave was selected as the application mode of the sensor. The A{sub 0} plate wave can be propagated in the dispersive low frequency range by using a liquid wedge clamped to the waveguide. A new technique is presented which is capable of steering the radiation beam angle of a waveguide sensor without a mechanical movement of the sensor assembly. The steering function of the ultrasonic radiation beam can be achieved by a frequency tuning method of the excitation pulse in the dispersive range of the A{sub 0} mode. The technique provides an opportunity to overcome the scanning limitation of a waveguide sensor. The beam steering function has been evaluated by an experimental verification. The ultrasonic C-scanning experiments are performed in water and the feasibility of the ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been verified. The various remote

  19. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  20. Atom optical shop testing of electrostatic lenses using an atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William F; Gregoire, Maxwell D; Cronin, Alexander D

    2013-01-01

    We used an atom interferometer for atom optical shop testing of lenses for atomic de Broglie waves. We measured focal lengths and spherical aberrations of electrostatic lenses in three independent ways based on contrast data, phase data, or calculations of de Broglie wavefront curvature. We report focal lengths of -2.5 km and -21.7 km with 5% uncertainty for different lenses. All three methods give consistent results. Understanding how lenses magnify and distort atom interference fringes helps improve atom beam velocity measurements made with phase choppers [New J. Phys. 13, 115007 (2011)], which in turn will improve the accuracy of atomic polarizability measurements.

  1. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  2. Mitigate Strategy of Very High Temperature Reactor Air-ingress Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Tae Kyu [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Arcilesi, David J.; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N. [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Oh, Chang H.; Kim, Eung S. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2016-10-15

    A critical safety event of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Since a VHTR uses graphite as a core structure, if there is a break on the pressure vessel, the air in the reactor cavity could ingress into the reactor core. The worst case scenario of the accident is initiated by a double-ended guillotine break of the cross vessel that connects the reactor vessel and the power conversion unit. The operating pressures in the vessel and containment are about 7 and 0.1 MPa, respectively. In the VHTR, the reactor pressure vessel is located within a reactor cavity which is filled with air during normal operation. Therefore, the air-helium mixture in the cavity may ingress into the reactor pressure vessel after the depressurization process. In this paper, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, FLUENT, was used to figure out air-ingress mitigation strategies in the gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) designed by General Atomics, Inc. After depressurization, there is almost no air in the reactor cavity; however, the air could flow back to the reactor cavity since the reactor cavity is placed in the lowest place in the reactor building. The heavier air could flow to the reactor cavity through free surface areas in the reactor building. Therefore, Argon gas injection in the reactor cavity is introduced. The injected argon would prevent the flow by pressurizing the reactor cavity initially, and eventually it prevents the flow by making the gas a heavier density than air in the reactor cavity. The gate opens when the reactor cavity is pressurized during the depressurization and it closes by gravity when the depressurization is terminated so that it can slow down the air flow to the reactor cavity.

  3. Elastic Scattering Properties of Ultracold Strontium Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张计才; 朱遵略; 刘玉芳; 孙金锋

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the elastic scattering properties of strontium atoms at ultracold temperatures.The scattering parameters,such as s-wave scattering lengths,effective ranges and p-wave scattering lengths,are calculated for all stable isotope combinations of Sr atoms by the quantal method and semiclassical method,respectively.Good agreements are obtained.The scattering parameters are very sensitive to small changes of the reduced mass.Due to the repulsive interisotope and intraisotope s-wave scattering length and large elastic cross sections,84Sr-86Srmixture is a good candidate to realize Bose-Bose quantum degenerate atomic gases.%We investigate the elastic scattering properties of strontium atoms at ultracold temperatures. The scattering parameters, such as s-wave scattering lengths, effective ranges and p-wave scattering lengths, are calculated for all stable isotope combinations of Sr atoms by the quantal method and semiclassical method, respectively. Good agreements are obtained. The scattering parameters are very sensitive to small changes of the reduced mass. Due to the repulsive interisotope and intraisotope s-wave scattering length and large elastic cross sections, MSr-s(iSr mixture is a good candidate to realize Bose-Bose quantum degenerate atomic gases.

  4. Improved safety fast reactor with “reservoir” for delayed neutrons generating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Apse, V. A.; Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the possibility to improve safety of fast reactors by using weak neutron absorber with large atomic weight as a material for external neutron reflector and for internal cavity in the reactor core (the neutron “reservoir”) where generation of some additional “delayed” neutron takes place. The effects produced by the external neutron reflector and the internal neutron “reservoir” on kinetic behavior of fast reactors are inter-compared. It is demonstrated that neutron kinetics of fast reactors with such external and internal zones becomes the quieter as compared with neutron kinetics of thermal reactors.

  5. Present status and future perspectives of research and test reactor in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaieda, Keisuke [Department of Research Reactor, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Since 1957, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has constructed several research and test reactors to fulfill a major role in the study of nuclear energy and fundamental research. At present four reactors, the Japan Research Reactor No. 3 and No. 4 (JRR-3M and JRR-4 respectively), the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) are in operation, and a new High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) has recently reached first criticality and now in the power up test. In 1966, the Kyoto University built the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and started its operation for joint use program of the Japanese universities. This paper introduces these reactors and describes their present operational status and also efforts for aging management. The recent tendency of utilization and future perspectives is also reported. (author)

  6. SNTP program reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Lewis A.; Sapyta, Joseph J.

    1993-06-01

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is evaluating the feasibility of a particle bed reactor for a high-performance nuclear thermal rocket engine. Reactors operating between 500 MW and 2,000 MW will produce engine thrusts ranging from 20,000 pounds to 80,000 pounds. The optimum reactor arrangement depends on the power level desired and the intended application. The key components of the reactor have been developed and are being tested. Flow-to-power matching considerations dominate the thermal-hydraulic design of the reactor. Optimal propellant management during decay heat cooling requires a three-pronged approach. Adequate computational methods exist to perform the neutronics analysis of the reactor core. These methods have been benchmarked to critical experiment data.

  7. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  8. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  9. Significance assessment of small-medium sized reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Minoru [Japan Atomic Power Co., Research and Development Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Preliminary assessment for deployment of small-medium sized reactor (S and M reactor) as a future option has been conducted at the JAPCO (Japan Atomic Power Company) under the cooperation with the CRIERI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry). Significance of the S and M reactor introduction is listed as follows; lower investment cost, possible siting near demand side, enlarged freedom of siting, shorter transmission line, good compatibility with slow increase of demand and plain explanation of safety using simpler system such as integral type vessel without piping, natural convection core cooling and passive safety system. The deployment of simpler plant system, modular shop fabrication, ship-shell structured building and longer operation period can assure economics comparable with that of a large sized reactor, coping with scale-demerit. Also the S and M reactor is preferable in size for the nuclear heat utilization such as hydrogen production. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Uncertainty analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X. B.; Lu, F.; Wang, L. Z.; Chen, Y. X.; Zhong, W. L.; An, F. P.

    2016-06-01

    Reactor simulation is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. Therefore, how to evaluate the antineutrino flux uncertainty results from reactor simulation is an important question. In this study, a method of the antineutrino flux uncertainty result from reactor simulation was proposed by considering the correlation coefficient. In order to use this method in the Daya Bay antineutrino experiment, the open source code DRAGON was improved and used for obtaining the fission fraction and correlation coefficient. The average fission fraction between DRAGON and SCIENCE code was compared and the difference was less than 5% for all the four isotopes. The uncertainty of fission fraction was evaluated by comparing simulation atomic density of four main isotopes with Takahama-3 experiment measurement. After that, the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux results from reactor simulation was evaluated as 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

  11. Reference mirror hybrid fusion-fission reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.

    1977-06-08

    The status of the reference mirror hybrid reactor design being performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. The design draws on the experience developed at LLL in previous hybrid reactor conceptual designs and on GA expertise in gas-cooling technology and fission reactor mechanical design. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. We consider our projections for the plasma physics parameters to be conservative, in that they are well-founded on the experiments in 2XIIB and the interpretation of these experiments.

  12. Significance assessment of small-medium sized reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Minoru [Japan Atomic Power Co., Research and Development Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Preliminary assessment for deployment of small-medium sized reactor (S and M reactor) as a future option has been conducted at the JAPCO (Japan Atomic Power Company) under the cooperation with the CRIERI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry). Significance of the S and M reactor introduction is listed as follows; lower investment cost, possible siting near demand side, enlarged freedom of siting, shorter transmission line, good compatibility with slow increase of demand and plain explanation of safety using simpler system such as integral type vessel without piping, natural convection core cooling and passive safety system. The deployment of simpler plant system, modular shop fabrication, ship-shell structured building and longer operation period can assure economics comparable with that of a large sized reactor, coping with scale-demerit. Also the S and M reactor is preferable in size for the nuclear heat utilization such as hydrogen production. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Atomic-position Localization Via Dual Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Nha, H; Chang, J S; An, K; Nha, Hyunchul; Lee, Jai-Hyung; Chang, Joon-Sung; An, Kyungwon

    2002-01-01

    We study localization of atomic position when a three-level atom interacts with a quantized standing-wave field in the Ramsey interferometer setup. Both the field quadrature amplitude and the atomic internal state are measured to obtain the atomic position information. It is found that this dual measurement scheme produces an interference pattern superimposed on a diffraction-like pattern in the atomic position distribution, where the former pattern originates from the state-selective measurement and the latter from the field measurement. The present scheme results in a better resolution in the position localization than the field-alone measurement schemes. We also discuss the measurement-correlated mechanical action of the standing-wave field on the atom in the light of Popper's test.

  14. Optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, N; Gill, P; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femto-second optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in $10^{18}$. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  15. Study on water cooled high conversion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochiai, Masaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    As a part of study on advanced reactors for the future, conceptual design of high conversion water cooled reactors is being studied, aiming at the contribution to nuclear fuel cycle by the LWR technology, since the utilization of LWRs will extend over a long period of time . We are studying on the reactor core concepts for BWR and PWR reactor systems. As for BWR system, three types of reactor cores are investigating for three different design goals; long operation period, high conversion ratio and high applicability for the existing BWR system. In all the cases, we have obtained a fair prospect of a large core concept with a capacity of 1,000 MWe class having negative void reactivity coefficient. This study is a part of JAERI-JAPCO (Japan Atomic Power Company) cooperative studies. Various kinds of conceptual designs will be created until the end of FY 1999. The designs will be checked and reviewed at that time, then experimental studies on the realization of the concepts will start with further design works from FY 2000. (author)

  16. Thermohydraulics of reactors; Thermohydraulique des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delhaye, J.M

    2008-07-01

    This scientific and technical handbook about PWR reactors thermohydraulics is the result of many years of teaching in the framework of the CEA-INSTN's atomic engineering training courses, in engineering schools and during continuing training activities. Its main goal is to present in a rigorous and pedagogical way the basic knowledge necessary for the understanding and modeling of single phase and two-phase thermohydraulic phenomena encountered during the design and operation of nuclear reactors. In particular, heat transfers in two-phase flows are presented in a detailed way. Most chapters include some nuclear engineering examples of application of the studied concepts, and some exercises aiming at mastering these concepts. Each example or exercise is accompanied by its detailed solution. Content: - thermohydraulic characteristics of reactors; - design and thermal dimensioning of reactors; - thermal engineering of the fuel element; - two-phase flow configurations in ducts; - recalls about single-phase flow equations; - basic equations for two-phase flows; - modeling of two-phase flows inside ducts; - pressure drops in ducts; - boiling and vapor condensation heat transfers; - two-phase flow instabilities in ducts; - two-phase flow blocking; thermohydraulics of naval propulsion reactors.

  17. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  18. Einstein's Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    2011-01-01

    In 1905, Einstein formulated his special relativity for point particles. For those particles, his Lorentz covariance and energy-momentum relation are by now firmly established. How about the hydrogen atom? It is possible to perform Lorentz boosts on the proton assuming that it is a point particle. Then what happens to the electron orbit? The orbit could go through an elliptic deformation, but it is not possible to understand this problem without quantum mechanics, where the orbit is a standing wave leading to a localized probability distribution. Is this concept consistent with Einstein's Lorentz covariance? Dirac, Wigner, and Feynman contributed important building blocks for understanding this problem. The remaining problem is to assemble those blocks to construct a Lorentz-covariant picture of quantum bound states based on standing waves. It is shown possible to assemble those building blocks using harmonic oscillators.

  19. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru

    1997-04-04

    An LMFBR type reactor comprises a plurality of reactor cores in a reactor container. Namely, a plurality of pot containing vessels are disposed in the reactor vessel and a plurality of reactor cores are formed in a state where an integrated-type fuel assembly is each inserted to a pot, and a coolant pipeline is connected to each of the pot containing-vessel to cool the reactor core respectively. When fuels are exchanged, the integrated-type fuel assembly is taken out together with the pot from the reactor vessel in a state where the integrated-type fuel assembly is immersed in the coolants in the pot as it is. Accordingly, coolants are supplied to each of the pot containing-vessel connected with the coolant pipeline and circulate while cooling the integrated-type fuel assembly for every pot. Then, when the fuels are exchanged, the integrated type fuel assembly is taken out to the outside of the reactor together with the pot by taking up the pot from the pot-containing vessel. Then, neutron economy is improved to thereby improve reactor power and the breeding ratio. (N.H.)

  20. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Villarino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors.

  1. Multi purpose research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raina, V.K. [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: vkrain@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Sasidharan, K. [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sengupta, Samiran [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, Tej [Research Reactor Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2006-04-15

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor.

  2. Use of MCNP for characterization of reactor vessel internals waste from decommissioned nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, E.F.; Pauley, K.A.; Reid, B.D.

    1995-09-01

    This study describes the use of the Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon (MCNP) code for determining activation levels of irradiated reactor vessel internals hardware. The purpose of the analysis is to produce data for the Department of Energy`s Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program. An MCNP model was developed to analyze the Yankee Rowe reactor facility. The model incorporates reactor geometry, material compositions, and operating history data acquired from Yankee Atomic Electric Company. In addition to the base activation analysis, parametric studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of activation to specific parameters. A component sampling plan was also developed to validate the model results, although the plan was not implemented. The calculations for the Yankee Rowe reactor predict that only the core baffle and the core support plates will be activated to levels above the Class C limits. The parametric calculations show, however, that the large uncertainties in the material compositions could cause errors in the estimates that could also increase the estimated activation level of the core barrel to above the Class C limits. Extrapolation of the results to other reactor facilities indicates that in addition to the baffle and support plates, core barrels may also be activated to above Class C limits; however the classification will depend on the specific operating conditions of the reactor and the specific material compositions of the metal, as well as the use of allowable concentration averaging practices in packaging and classifying the waste.

  3. NEW INTERPRETATION OF THE ATOMIC SPECTRA OF THE HYDROGEN ATOM: A MIXED MECHANISM OF CLASSICAL LC CIRCUITS AND QUANTUM WAVE-PARTICLE DUALITY NUEVA INTERPRETACIÓN DEL ESPECTRO ATÓMICO DEL ÁTOMO DE HIDRÓGENO: UN MECANISMO MIXTO DE CIRCUITOS LC Y LA DUALIDAD ONDA CUÁNTICA-PARTÍCULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Torres-Silva

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the energy conversion laws of the macroscopic harmonic LC oscillator, the electromagnetic wave (photon and the hydrogen atom. As our analysis indicates, the energies of these apparently different systems obey exactly the same energy conversion law. Based on our results and the wave-particle duality of electrons, we find that the hydrogen atom is, in fact, a natural chiral microscopic LC oscillator. In the framework of classical electromagnetic field theory we analytically obtain, for the hydrogen atom, the quantized electron orbit radius , and quantized energy , (n = 1, 2, 3, · · ·, where is the Bohr radius and is the Rydberg constant. Without the adaptation of any other fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, we present a reasonable explanation of the polarization of photon, selection rules and Pauli exclusion principle. Our results also reveal an essential connection between electron spin and the intrinsic helical movement of electrons and indicate that the spin itself is the effect of quantum confinement.En este trabajo se presenta un estudio de las leyes macroscópicas de conversión de energía del oscilador armónico LC, la onda electromagnética (fotones y el átomo de hidrógeno. Como nuestro análisis indica, las energías de estos aparentemente diferentes sistemas obedecen exactamente la misma ley de conversión de la energía. Sobre la base de nuestros resultados y de la dualidad onda-partícula del electrón, nos encontramos con que el átomo de Hidrógeno, de hecho, es un oscilador LC microscópico naturalmente quiral. En el marco de la teoría clásica de campos electromagnéticos se obtiene analíticamente, para el átomo de hidrógeno, el radio cuantizado de la órbita electrónica , y la energía cuantizada , (n=1, 2, 3.., donde es el radio de Bohr, y es la constante de Rydberg. Sin la adaptación de otros principios fundamentales de la mecánica cuántica, se presenta una explicación razonable de

  4. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  5. The RES Reactor. A test reactor for the French naval propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivet, Sylvestre [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Minguet, Jean-Luc [AREVA-Technicatome, BP17, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the Cadarache nuclear research centre the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) operates, with the support of TECHNICATOME as nuclear operator, the experimental facilities which are necessary for the French naval propulsion program. Since the sixties these facilities have brought a large contribution to the development and to the technical support for the nuclear propulsion; they have been used also to train the French Navy operators. The last experimental reactor, the RNG, is now at the end of its life cycle after thirty years of a profitable operation. A replacement reactor is needed to sustain any evolution of the naval propulsion reactors as well as to guarantee a safe operation and a high level of availability of the existing onboard reactors. The aim of the RES program is namely to build such a test facility. Its construction program started in 2003. By the year 2009 the RES reactor will take over the mission of the RNG. We present hereafter: - A brief history of the French experimental reactors built in support to the naval propulsion, - The needs of the naval propulsion and the related objectives of the RES program, - The corresponding architecture and main characteristics of the RES facility, - The current status of the RES construction. The contents of the paper is as follows: 1. Introduction; 2. History of the French nuclear propulsion experimental reactors; 3. Needs of the naval propulsion and related objectives of the RES reactor; 4. RES architecture and main characteristics; 4.1. The pool module; 4.2. The reactor module; 4.3. The RES reactor, an innovative concept; 5. Realisation status; 6. Conclusion. To summarize, from the year 2009 the RES will be an efficient facility available for irradiation and qualification programs. Its large experimental capabilities will allow relevant fuel and core irradiations. This will give access to a real progress in the knowledge of fuel and core physics as well as in the related simulation tools. This reactor

  6. Spin waves theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stancil, Daniel D

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic materials can support propagating waves of magnetization; since these are oscillations in the magneto static properties of the material, they are called magneto static waves (sometimes 'magnons' or 'magnetic polarons'). This book discusses magnetic properties of materials, and magnetic moments of atoms and ions

  7. Replacement reactor to revolutionise magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, G

    2002-01-01

    Electric motors, hearing aids and magnetic resonance imaging are only some of the applications that will benefit from the first advances in magnets in a quarter of a century. Magnets achieve their characteristics when electrons align themselves to produce a unified magnetic field. Neutrons can probe these magnetic structures. The focus is not just on making more powerful magnets, but also identifying the characteristics that make magnets cheaper and easier for industry to manufacture. Staff from the ANSTO's Neutron Scattering Group have already performed a number of studies on the properties of magnets using using HIFAR, but the Replacement Research Reactor that will produce cold neutrons would allow scientists to investigate the atomic properties of materials with large molecules. A suite of equipment will enable studies at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields

  8. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  9. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  10. Light water reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  11. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  12. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  13. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  14. Reference design for the standard mirror hybrid reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, D.J.; Fink, J.H.; Galloway, T.R.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, J.D.; Devoto, R.S.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.W.; Rao, S.B.; Rao, S.R.

    1978-05-22

    This report describes the results of a two-year study by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Co. to develop a conceptual design for the standard (minimum-B) mirror hybrid reactor. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing nuclear fuel (/sup 239/Pu) for consumption in fission power reactors (light water reactors). The deuterium-tritium plasma produces approximately 400 MW of fusion power with a plasma Q of 0.64. The fast-fission blanket, which is fueled with depleted uranium and lithium, generates sufficient tritium to run the reactor, has a blanket energy multiplication of M = 10.4, and has a net fissile breeding ratio of Pu/n = 1.51. The reactor has a net electrical output of 600 MWe, a fissile production of 2000 kg of plutonium per year (at a capacity factor of 0.74), and a net plant efficiency of 0.18. The plasma-containment field is generated by a Yin-Yang magnet using NbTi superconductor, and the neutral beam system uses positive-ion acceleration with beam direct conversion. The spherical blanket is based on gas-cooled fast reactor technology. The fusion components, blanket, and primary heat-transfer loop components are all contained within a prestressed-concrete reactor vessel, which provides magnet restraint and supports the primary heat-transfer loop and the blanket.

  15. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Measurements in Nuclear Reactor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian T.

    Several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants (NGNP), are investigating new fuels, materials, and inspection paradigms for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials during irradiation. In DOE-NE's FCRD program, ultrasonic based technology was identified as a key approach that should be pursued to obtain the high-fidelity, high-accuracy data required to characterize the behavior and performance of new candidate fuels and structural materials during irradiation testing. The radiation, high temperatures, and pressure can limit the available tools and characterization methods. In this thesis, two ultrasonic characterization techniques will be explored. The first, finite amplitude wave propagation has been demonstrated to be sensitive to microstructural material property changes. It is a strong candidate to determine fuel evolution; however, it has not been demonstrated for in-situ reactor applications. In this thesis, finite amplitude wave propagation will be used to measure the microstructural evolution in Al-6061. This is the first demonstration of finite amplitude wave propagation at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and during an irradiation test. Second, a method based on contact nonlinear acoustic theory will be developed to identify compressed cracks. Compressed cracks are typically transparent to ultrasonic wave propagation; however, by measuring harmonic content developed during finite amplitude wave propagation, it is shown that even compressed cracks can be characterized. Lastly, piezoelectric transducers capable of making these measurements are developed. Specifically, three piezoelectric sensors (Bismuth Titanate, Aluminum Nitride, and Zinc Oxide) are tested in the Massachusetts

  16. Nonadiabatic quantum chaos in atom optics

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V

    2012-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of atomic matter waves in a standing-wave laser field is studied. In the dressed-state picture, wave packets of ballistic two-level atoms propagate simultaneously in two optical potentials. The probability to make a transition from one potential to another one is maximal when centroids of wave packets cross the field nodes and is given by a simple formula with the single exponent, the Landau--Zener parameter $\\kappa$. If $\\kappa \\gg 1$, the motion is essentially adiabatic. If $\\kappa \\ll 1$, it is (almost) resonant and periodic. If $\\kappa \\simeq 1$, atom makes nonadiabatic transitions with a splitting of its wave packet at each node and strong complexification of the wave function as compared to the two other cases. This effect is referred as nonadiabatic quantum chaos. Proliferation of wave packets at $\\kappa \\simeq 1$ is shown to be connected closely with chaotic center-of-mass motion in the semiclassical theory of point-like atoms with positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponent. Th...

  17. Development of a research nuclear reactor simulator using LABVIEW®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Aldo Marcio Fonseca; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Pinto, Antonio Juscelino; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency recommends the use of safety and friendly interfaces for monitoring and controlling the operational parameters of the nuclear reactors. The most important variable in the nuclear reactors control is the power released by fission of the fuel in the core which is directly proportional to neutron flux. It was developed a digital system to simulate the neutron evolution flux and monitoring their interaction on the other operational parameters. The control objective is to bring the reactor power from its source level (mW) to a few W. It is intended for education of basic reactor neutronic principles such as the multiplication factor, criticality, reactivity, period, delayed neutron and control by rods. The 250 kW IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor at Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN (Belo Horizonte/Brazil) was used as reference. TRIGA reactors, developed by General Atomics (GA), are the most widely used research reactor in the world. They are cooled by light water under natural convection and are characterized by being inherently safety. The simulation system was developed using the LabVIEW® (Laboratory Virtual Instruments Engineering Workbench) software, considering the modern concept of virtual instruments (VI's). The main purpose of the system is to provide to analyze the behavior, and the tendency of some processes that occur in the reactor using a user-friendly operator interface. The TRIGA simulator system will allow the study of parameters, which affect the reactor operation, without the necessity of using the facility.(author)

  18. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  19. Researches on a reactor core in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, S; Iinuma, T; Kubo, K; Kato, H; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a study on a fusion reactor core is presented in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), including the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, a HIB interaction with a background gas, reactor cavity gas dynamics, the reactor gas backflow to the beam lines, and a HIB fusion reactor design. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with a standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. In a fusion reactor the HIB charge neutralization is needed for a ballistic HIB transport. Multiple mechanical shutters would be installed at each HIB port at the reactor wall to stop the blast waves and the chamber gas backflow, so that the accelerator final elements would be protected from the ...

  20. Submicrometer position control of single trapped neutral atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Dotsenko, I.; Alt, W; Khudaverdyan, M.; Kuhr, S.; Meschede, D.; Miroshnychenko, Y.; Schrader, D.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2004-01-01

    We optically detect the positions of single neutral cesium atoms stored in a standing wave dipole trap with a sub-wavelength resolution of 143 nm rms. The distance between two simultaneously trapped atoms is measured with an even higher precision of 36 nm rms. We resolve the discreteness of the interatomic distances due to the 532 nm spatial period of the standing wave potential and infer the exact number of trapping potential wells separating the atoms. Finally, combining an initial position...

  1. Rectified optical force on dark-state atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, E. A.; Kosachiov, D. V.

    1997-12-01

    We show that an imperfection of velocity-selective coherent population trapping (VSCPT) in three-level atoms excited by standing light waves causes a rectified force on cooled atoms. The rectified force as well as the cooling force are calculated both analytically and numerically for 0953-4075/30/24/010/img5 and cascade three-level systems. Combination of these forces with the VSCPT mechanism can lead to localization of very cold atoms in potential wells created by the rectified force. This effect should be taken into account in experiments with VSCPT in standing waves, and can be used for realizing superlattices of cold atoms, in particular, cold Rydberg atoms.

  2. Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor for Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzberg, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual design is for a liquid metal (LM) cooled nuclear reactor that would provide heat to a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion subsystem to provide electricity for electric propulsion thrusters and spacecraft power. The baseline power level is 100 kWe to the user. For long term power generation, UN pin fuel with Nb1Zr alloy cladding was selected. As part of the SP-100 Program this fuel demonstrated lifetime with greater than six atom percent burnup, at temperatures in the range of 1400-1500 K. The CBC subsystem was selected because of the performance and lifetime database from commercial and aircraft applications and from prior NASA and DOE space programs. The high efficiency of the CBC also allows the reactor to operate at relatively low power levels over its 15-year life, minimizing the long-term power density and temperature of the fuel. The scope of this paper is limited to only the nuclear components that provide heated helium-xenon gas to the CBC subsystem. The principal challenge for the LM reactor concept was to design the reactor core, shield and primary heat transport subsystems to meet mission requirements in a low mass configuration. The LM concept design approach was to assemble components from prior programs and, with minimum change, determine if the system met the objective of the study. All of the components are based on technologies having substantial data bases. Nuclear, thermalhydraulic, stress, and shielding analyses were performed using available computer codes. Neutronics issues included maintaining adequate operating and shutdown reactivities, even under accident conditions. Thermalhydraulic and stress analyses calculated fuel and material temperatures, coolant flows and temperatures, and thermal stresses in the fuel pins, components and structures. Using conservative design assumptions and practices, consistent with the detailed design work performed during the SP-100 Program, the mass of the reactor, shield, primary heat

  3. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Dandan; Kisielowski, Christian; Dou, Letian; Kornienko, Nikolay; Bekenstein, Yehonadav; Wong, Andrew B; Alivisatos, A Paul; Yang, Peidong

    2016-12-14

    The radiation-sensitive nature of halide perovskites has hindered structural studies at the atomic scale. We overcome this obstacle by applying low dose-rate in-line holography, which combines aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with exit-wave reconstruction. This technique successfully yields the genuine atomic structure of ultrathin two-dimensional CsPbBr3 halide perovskites, and a quantitative structure determination was achieved atom column by atom column using the phase information of the reconstructed exit-wave function without causing electron beam-induced sample alterations. An extraordinarily high image quality enables an unambiguous structural analysis of coexisting high-temperature and low-temperature phases of CsPbBr3 in single particles. On a broader level, our approach offers unprecedented opportunities to better understand halide perovskites at the atomic level as well as other radiation-sensitive materials.

  4. Convergent variational calculation of positronium-hydrogen-atom scattering lengths

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, S K; Adhikari, Sadhan K.; Mandal, Puspajit

    2001-01-01

    We present a convergent variational basis-set calculational scheme for elastic scattering of positronium atom by hydrogen atom in S wave. Highly correlated trial functions with appropriate symmetry are needed for achieving convergence. We report convergent results for scattering lengths in atomic units for both singlet ($=3.49\\pm 0.20$) and triplet ($=2.46\\pm 0.10$) states.

  5. Atoms in Valence Bond. Method, implementation and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The Atoms in Valence Bond (AiVB) approach is presented. The main goal was to develop a new and innovative approach, within the existing Valence Bond framework, to build and analyze the molecular VB wave function in terms of atoms and their atomic states, in a very user-friendly environment. The nece

  6. Ghost imaging with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  7. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  9. Ultrasonic atomization of liquids in drop-chain acoustic fountains

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    When focused ultrasound waves of moderate intensity in liquid encounter an air interface, a chain of drops emerges from the liquid surface to form what is known as a drop-chain fountain. Atomization, or the emission of micro-droplets, occurs when the acoustic intensity exceeds a liquid-dependent threshold. While the cavitation-wave hypothesis, which states that atomization arises from a combination of capillary-wave instabilities and cavitation bubble oscillations, is currently the most accep...

  10. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  11. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  12. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW`s low phase velocity ({omega}/k{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} V{sub Ti} {much_lt} V{sub {alpha}}) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion {alpha}-particles. In addition, the property of IBW`s that k{sub {perpendicular}} {rho}{sub i} {approx} 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW`s can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research.

  13. Spatial confinement of muonium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaw, K. S.; Antognini, A.; Prokscha, T.; Kirch, K.; Liszkay, L.; Salman, Z.; Crivelli, P.

    2016-08-01

    We report the achievement of spatial confinement of muonium atoms (the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Muonium emitted into a vacuum from mesoporous silica reflects between two SiO2 confining surfaces separated by 1 mm. From the data, one can extract that the reflection probability on the confining surfaces kept at 100 K is about 90% and the reflection process is well described by a cosine law. This technique enables new experiments with this exotic atomic system and is a very important step towards a measurement of the 1 S -2 S transition frequency using continuous-wave laser spectroscopy.

  14. Spatial confinement of muonium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Khaw, K S; Prokscha, T; Kirch, K; Liszkay, L; Salman, Z; Crivelli, P

    2016-01-01

    We report the achievement of spatial confinement of muonium atoms (the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Muonium emitted into vacuum from mesoporous silica is forced to bounce back and forth between two SiO$_2$ confining surfaces separated by 1 mm. From the data, one can extract that the reflection on the confining surfaces is well described by a cosine law. This technique opens up a way to perform new experiments with this exotic atomic system and is a very important step towards a measurement of the 1S-2S transition frequency using continuous wave laser spectroscopy.

  15. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  16. Gas cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-06-01

    Although most of the development work on fast breeder reactors has been devoted to the use of liquid metal cooling, interest has been expressed for a number of years in alternative breeder concepts using other coolants. One of a number of concepts in which interest has been retained is the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). As presently envisioned, it would operate on the uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel cycle, similar to that used in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), and would use helium gas as the coolant.

  17. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  18. Interferometric laser cooling of atomic rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, Alexander; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matthew; Freegarde, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We report the 1-D cooling of atoms using a velocity-dependent optical force based upon Ramsey matter-wave interferometry. The interferometer is realised with stimulated Raman transitions between ground hyperfine states, and after 12 cycles of the cooling sequence, we observe a reduction in the temperature of a freely moving cloud of magneto-optically cooled $^{85}$Rb atoms from 20 $\\mu$K to 4 $\\mu$K, accompanied in this first demonstration by an acceleration of the centre of mass of the atom cloud. This pulse-based laser cooling technique could in principle be extended to molecules and atoms that lack a closed radiative transition.

  19. One Atomic Beam as a Detector of Classical Harmonic Vibrations with Micro Amplitudes and Low Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Werner

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simplest detector of harmonic vibrations with micro amplitudes and low frequencies, i.e. the detector consisting of one atomic beam. Here the atomic beam is induced by a plane harmonic wave and has a classical collective harmonic vibrations, which vibrant directions are perpendicular to the wave vectors of atomic beam. Compared with the detector consisting of atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the new detector has two advantages: (1) it is suitable for the detection of the harmonic vibrations induced either by a longitudinal plane harmonic wave or by a transverse plane harmonic wave; (2) the quantum noise fluctuation of the atomic beam is exactly zero.

  20. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  1. The current status of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tri Wulan Tjiptono; Syarip

    1998-10-01

    The Kartini reactor reached the first criticality on January 25, 1979. In the first three years, the reactor power is limited up to 50 kW thermal power and on July 1, 1982 has been increased to 100 kW. It has been used as experiments facility by researcher of Atomic Energy National Agency and students of the Universities. Three beam tubes used as experiments facilities, the first, is used as a neutron source for H{sub 2}O-Natural Uranium Subcritical Assembly, the second, is developed for neutron radiography facility and the third, is used for gamma radiography facility. The other facilities are rotary rack and two pneumatic transfer systems, one for delayed neutron counting system and the other for the new Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) facility. The rotary rack used for isotope production for NAA purpose (for long time irradiation), the delayed neutron counting system used for analysis the Uranium contents of the ores and the new NAA is provided for short live elements analysis. In the last three years the Reactor Division has a joint use program with the Nuclear Component and Engineering Center in research reactor instrumentation and control development. (author)

  2. The Atomic orbitals of the topological atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador Sedano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These c...

  3. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  4. New reactor type proposed

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Russian scientists at the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering in Moscow are hoping to develop a new reactor that will use lead and bismuth as fuel instead of uranium and plutonium" (1/2 page).

  5. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  6. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  7. Atoms in Valence Bond – AiVB : synopsis and test results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, M.L.; van Lenthe, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The Atoms in Valence Bond (AiVB) method, a new approach in the Valence Bond, is introduced. This approach combines the ideas behind the early Atoms in Molecules (AIM) developments, e.g. by Moffit [21], to understand a molecular wave function in terms of proper atomic wave functions, with the availab

  8. Study of instabilities in phase by using the tool {sup D}ynamics{sup :} analysis of the evolution space temporary of the waves of density in channels of reactors BWR; Estudio de las Inestabilidades en Fase Mediante la Herramienta Dinamics: analisis de la Evolucion Espacio Temporal de las Ondas de Densidad en Canales de Reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, J. L.; Escriva, R.; Merino, R.; Melara, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the basics of Dynamics V2 to code It allows calculations of stability for oscillations in phase in BWR reactors in the time domain. The equations of the model are exposed and is the integration of the equations. The model can be used in a large number of nodes thrust for the calculations to an acceptable computational cost, it has simplified dynamics of recirculation loop and the code has been incorporated the Oscillation in phase boundary conditions. The code incorporates the equations of boiling sub-cooled which allows to make more realistic calculations as well as subroutines to calculate the subroutines-based properties of the MATPRO and ASME.

  9. Development of an atomic gravimeter based on atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum; Park, Sang Eon; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Hong, Hyun-Gue; Park, Chang Yong; Lee, Won-Kyu; Yu, Dai-Hyuk

    2015-05-01

    We present an atomic gravimeter under development at KRISS in Korea for precise measurement of absolute gravity. It is based on atomic interference of laser cooled 87Rb atoms in free fall. The temperature of the atoms is cooled to about 5 μK in a magneto-optic trap. Three Raman light pulses are applied for splitting, reflecting and recombining the atoms clouds while the atoms are in free fall. The pulse width and spacing time of Raman pulses is 40 μs and about 50 ms, respectively. During the interferometry, the frequency difference between the two counter-propagating Raman beams is chirped to compensate for Doppler shift induced by gravitational acceleration. The interference signals are measured at different spacing times to find the chirping rate at which the phase of interference fringe is independent of the spacing time. The chirping rate (~ 25.1 MHz/s) corresponds to g .keff/2 π, where keff = k1 +k2 (k1 and k2 are wave numbers for two Raman beams). At present, we are going to introduce an anti-vibration platform and a magnetic shield for accuracy evaluation of the gravimeter. In the presentation, the preliminary results of the KRISS gravimeter will be discussed.

  10. Multi-Wave Mixing Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yanpeng

    2009-01-01

    "Multi-Wave Mixing Processes - From Ultrafast Polarization Beats to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency" discusses the interactions of efficient multi-wave mixing (MWM) processes enhanced by atomic coherence in multilevel atomic systems. It covers topics in five major areas: attosecond and femtosecond polarization beats of four-wave mixing (FWM) processes; heterodyne detection of FWM, six-wave mixing (SWM) and eight-wave mixing (EWM) processes; Raman and Rayleigh enhanced polarization beats; coexistence and interactions of MWM processes via electromagnetically induced transparency(EIT); multi-dressing MWM processes. The book is intended for researchers, advanced undergraduate and graduate students in Nonlinear Optics. Dr. Yanpeng Zhang is a professor at the Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi'an Jiaotong University. Dr. Min Xiao is a professor of Physics at University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, U.S.A.

  11. Future Reactor Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ opens a gateway for the next generation experiments to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy and the leptonic CP-violating phase. Future reactor experiments will focus on mass hierarchy determination and the precision measurement of mixing parameters. Mass hierarchy can be determined from the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos based on the interference effect of two separated oscillation modes. Relative and absolute measure...

  12. Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measu...

  13. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  14. Helias reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beidler, C.D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Grieger, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Harmeyer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kisslinger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Karulin, N. [Nuclear Fusion Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maurer, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany); Nuehrenberg, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Rau, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Sapper, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wobig, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    The present status of Helias reactor studies is characterised by the identification and investigation of specific issues which result from the particular properties of this type of stellarator. On the technical side these are issues related to the coil system, while physics studies have concentrated on confinement, alpha-particle behaviour and ignition conditions. The usual assumptions have been made in those fields which are common to all toroidal fusion reactors: blanket and shield, refuelling and exhaust, safety and economic aspects. For blanket and shield sufficient space has been provided, a detailed concept will be developed in future. To date more emphasis has been placed on scoping and parameter studies as opposed to fixing a specific set of parameters and providing a detailed point study. One result of the Helias reactor studies is that physical dimensions are on the same order as those of tokamak reactors. However, it should be noticed that this comparison is difficult in view of the large spectrum of tokamak reactors ranging from a small reactor like Aries, to a large device such as SEAFP. The notion that the large aspect ratio of 10 or more in Helias configurations also leads to large reactors is misleading, since the large major radius of 22 m is compensated by the average plasma radius of 1.8 m and the average coil radius of 5 m. The plasma volume of 1400 m{sup 3} is about the same as the ITER reactor and the magnetic energy of the coil system is about the same or even slightly smaller than envisaged in ITER. (orig.)

  15. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Villarino; Alicia Doval

    2011-01-01

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper ...

  16. Preliminary Options Assessment of Versatile Irradiation Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the work undertaken at INL from April 2016 to January 2017 and aimed at analyzing some options for designing and building a versatile test reactor; the scope of work was agreed upon with DOE-NE. Section 2 presents some results related to KNK II and PRISM Mod A. Section 3 presents some alternatives to the VCTR presented in [ ] as well as a neutronic parametric study to assess the minimum power requirement needed for a 235U metal fueled fast test reactor capable to generate a fast (>100 keV) flux of 4.0 x 1015 n /cm2-s at the test location. Section 4 presents some results regarding a fundamental characteristic of test reactors, namely displacement per atom (dpa) in test samples. Section 5 presents the INL assessment of the ANL fast test reactor design FASTER. Section 6 presents a summary.

  17. The reactor antineutrino anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haser, Julia; Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Major discoveries were made in the past few years in the field of neutrino flavour oscillation. Nuclear reactors produce a clean and intense flux of electron antineutrinos and are thus an essential neutrino source for the determination of oscillation parameters. Most currently the reactor antineutrino experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO have accomplished to measure θ{sub 13}, the smallest of the three-flavour mixing angles. In the course of these experiments two anomalies emerged: (1) the reanalysis of the reactor predictions revealed a deficit in experimentally observed antineutrino flux, known as the ''reactor antineutrino anomaly''. (2) The high precision of the latest generation of neutrino experiments resolved a spectral shape distortion relative to the expected energy spectra. Both puzzles are yet to be solved and triggered new experimental as well as theoretical studies, with the search for light sterile neutrinos as most popular explanation for the flux anomaly. This talk outlines the two reactor antineutrino anomalies. Discussing possible explanations for their occurrence, recent and upcoming efforts to solve the reactor puzzles are highlighted.

  18. Moon base reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  19. Spontaneous emission of two interacting atoms near an interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dehua Wang

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of two interacting excited atoms near a dielectric interface is studied using the photon closed-orbit theory and the dipole image method.The total emission rate of one atom during the emission process is calculated as a function of the distance between the atom and the interface.The results suggest that the spontaneous emission rate depends not only on the atomic-interface distances,but also on the orientation of the two atomic dipoles and the initial distance between the two atoms.The oscillation in the spontaneous emission rate is caused by the interference between the outgoing electromagnetic wave emitted from one atom and other waves arriving at this atom after traveling along various classical orbits.Each peak in the Fourier transformed spontaneous emission rate corresponds with one action of photon classical orbit.

  20. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  1. Calculated irradiation response of materials using fission reactor (HFIR, ORR, and EBR-II) neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1979-08-01

    In order to plan radiation damage experiments in fission reactors keyed toward fusion reactor applications, it is necessary to have available for these facilities displacement per atom (dpa) and gas production rates for many potential materials. This report supplies such data for the elemental constituents of alloys of interest to the United States fusion reactor alloy development program. The calculations are presented for positions of interest in the HFIR, ORR, and EBR-II reactors. DPA and gas production rates in alloys of interest can be synthesized from these results.

  2. Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, A; Misner, A; Palmer, T

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to three percent within seven days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

  3. WILDCAT: a catalyzed D-D tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    WILDCAT is a conceptual design of a catalyzed D-D, tokamak, commercial, fusion reactor. WILDCAT utilizes the beneficial features of no tritium breeding, while not extrapolating unnecessarily from existing D-T designs. The reactor is larger and has higher magnetic fields and plasma pressures than typical D-T devices. It is more costly, but eliminates problems associated with tritium breeding and has tritium inventories and throughputs approximately two orders of magnitude less than typical D-T reactors. There are both a steady-state version with Alfven-wave current drive and a pulsed version. Extensive comparison with D-T devices has been made, and cost and safety analyses have been included. All of the major reactor systems have been worked out to a level of detail appropriate to a complete, conceptual design.

  4. Soliton Atom Laser with Quantum State Transfer Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiong-Jun; JING Hui; GE Mo-Lin

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the nonlinear effects in the quantum states transfer technique from photons to matter waves in the three-level case, which may provide the formation of a soliton atom laser with nonclassical atoms. The validity of quantum transfer mechanism is confirmed in the presence of the intrinsic nonlinear atomic interactions. The accompanied frequency chirp effect is shown to have no influence on the grey solitons formed by the output atom laser and the possible quantum depletion effect is also briefly discussed.

  5. Suspension of atoms using optical pulses, and application to gravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K J; Burke, J H T; Sackett, C A

    2009-04-17

    Atoms from a (87)Rb condensate are suspended against gravity using repeated reflections from a pulsed optical standing wave. Up to 100 reflections are observed, yielding suspension times of over 100 ms. The local gravitational acceleration can be determined from the pulse rate required to achieve suspension. Further, a gravitationally sensitive atom interferometer was implemented using the suspended atoms. This technique could potentially provide a precision measurement of gravity without requiring the atoms to fall a large distance.

  6. Study on secondary shutdown systems in Tehran research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, H.R.; Fadaei, A.H., E-mail: Fadaei_amir@aut.ac.ir; Gharib, M.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A study was undertaken to summarize the techniques for secondary shutdown systems (SSS). • Neutronic calculation performed for proposed systems as SSS. • Dumping the heavy water stored in the reflector vessel is capable to shut down reactor. • Neutronic and transient calculation was done for validating the selected SSS. • All calculation shown that this system has advantages in safety and neutron economy. - Abstract: One important safety aspect of any research reactor is the ability to shut down the reactor. Usually, research reactors, currently in operation, have a single shutdown system based on the simultaneous insertion of the all control rods into the reactor core through gravity. Nevertheless, the International Atomic Energy Agency currently recommends use of two shutdown systems which are fully independent from each other to guarantee secure shutdown when one of them fails. This work presents an investigative study into secondary shutdown systems, which will be an important safety component in the research reactor and will provide another alternative way to shut down the reactor emergently. As part of this project, a study was undertaken to summarize the techniques that are currently used at world-wide research reactors for recognizing available techniques to consider in research reactors. Removal of the reflector, removal of the fuels, change in critical shape of reactor core and insertion of neutron absorber between the core and reflector are selected as possible techniques in mentioned function. In the next step, a comparison is performed for these methods from neutronic aspects. Then, chosen method is studied from the transient behavior point of view. Tehran research reactor which is a 5 MW open-pool reactor selected as a case study and all calculations are carried out for it. It has 5 control rods which serve the purpose of both reactivity control and shutdown of reactor under abnormal condition. Results indicated that heavy

  7. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis...

  8. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  9. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  10. Post irradiation examination of thermal reactor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, D. N.; Viswanathan, U. K.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.; Anantharaman, S.

    2008-12-01

    The post irradiation examination (PIE) facility at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been in operation for more than three decades. Over these years this facility has been utilized for examination of experimental fuel pins and fuels from commercial power reactors operating in India. In a program to assess the performance of (U,Pu)O 2 MOX fuel prior to its introduction in commercial reactors, three experimental MOX fuel clusters irradiated in the pressurized water loop (PWL) of CIRUS up to burnup of 16 000 MWd/tU were examined. Fission gas release from these pins was measured by puncture test. Some of these fuel pins in the cluster contained controlled porosity pellets, low temperature sintered (LTS) pellets, large grain size pellets and annular pellets. PIE has also been carried out on natural UO 2 fuel bundles from Indian PHWRs, which included two high burnup (˜15 000 MWd/tU) bundles. Salient investigations carried out consisted of visual examination, leak testing, axial gamma scanning, fission gas analysis, microstructural examination of fuel and cladding, β, γ autoradiography of the fuel cross-section and fuel central temperature estimation from restructuring. A ThO 2 fuel bundle irradiated in Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS) up to a nominal fuel burnup of ˜11 000 MWd/tTh was also examined to evaluate its in-pile performance. The performance of the BWR fuel pins of Tarapur Atomic Power Stations (TAPS) was earlier assessed by carrying out PIE on 18 fuel elements selected from eight fuel assemblies irradiated in the two reactors. The burnup of these fuel elements varied from 5000 to 29 000 MWd/tU. This paper provides a brief review of some of the fuels examined and the results obtained on the performance of natural UO 2, enriched UO 2, MOX, and ThO 2 fuels.

  11. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  12. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  13. Scaleable, High Efficiency Microchannel Sabatier Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Microchannel Sabatier Reactor System (MSRS) consisting of cross connected arrays of isothermal or graded temperature reactors is proposed. The reactor array...

  14. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  15. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  16. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  17. Polarized neutron reflectometry at Dhruva reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surendra Singh; Saibal Basu

    2004-08-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) is an ideal non-destructive tool for chemical and magnetic characterization of thin films and multilayers. We have installed a position sensitive detector-based polarized neutron reflectometer at Dhruva reactor, Trombay. In this paper we will discuss the results obtained from this instrument for two multilayer samples. The first sample is a (Ni–Mo alloy)/Ti multilayer sample. We have determined the chemical structure of this multilayer by unpolarized neutron reflectometry (NR). The other sample is a Fe/Ge multilayer sample for which we obtained the chemical structure by NR and magnetic moment per Fe atom by PNR.

  18. Spin-sensitive atom mirror via spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Zheng, Ren-Fei; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    Based on the spin-orbit coupling recently implemented in a neutral cold-atom gas, we propose a scheme to realize spin-dependent scattering of cold atoms. In particular we consider a matter wave packet of cold-atom gas impinging upon a step potential created by the optical light field, inside of which the atoms are subject to spin-orbit interaction. We show that the proposed system can act as a spin polarizer or spin-selective atom mirror for the incident atomic beam. The principle and the operating parameter regime of the system are carefully discussed.

  19. Stable atomic hydrogen possible application in intense polarized sources

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Rieubland, Jean Michel

    1982-01-01

    The authors briefly review the status of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and discuss a possible way of extending the present limit of density. Pulse extraction of stabilized atoms by millimetre wave is proposed as a means of producing polarized atomic beams of uniform velocity and low divergence. It is speculated that these atoms could be used either as jet targets of a conventional type, or as a stored atomic beam target by injecting them into a storage ring intersecting with an accelerator beam. When used in a polarized ion source, the high density of the atomic beam could possibly also improve the ionizer efficiency.

  20. Coupled dynamics of atoms and radiation pressure driven interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Meiser, D.; Meystre, P.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the motion of the end mirror of a cavity in whose standing wave mode pattern atoms are trapped. The atoms and the light field strongly couple to each other because the atoms form a distributed Bragg mirror with a reflectivity that can be fairly high. We analyze how the dipole potential in which the atoms move is modified due to this backaction of the atoms. We show that the position of the atoms can become bistable. These results are of a more general nature and can be applied to ...

  1. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  2. Quantum Effects of Uniform Bose Atomic Gases with Weak Attraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ze

    2011-01-01

    @@ We find that uniform Bose atomic gases with weak attraction can undergo a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer(BCS)condensation below a critical temperature.In the BCS condensation state,bare atoms with opposite wave vectors are bound into pairs,and unpaired bare atoms are transformed into a new kind of quasi-particles,i.e.the dressed atoms.The atom-pair system is a condensate or a superfluid and the dressed-atom system is a normal fluid.The critical temperature and the effective mass of dressed atoms are derived analytically.The transition from the BCS condensation state to the normal state is a first-order phase transition.%We find that uniform Bose atomic gases with weak attraction can undergo a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)condensation below a critical temperature. In the BCS condensation state, bare atoms with opposite wave vectors are bound into pairs, and unpaired bare atoms are transformed into a new kind of quasi-particles, i.e. the dressed atoms. The atom-pair system is a condensate or a superfluid and the dressed-atom system is a normal fluid. The critical temperature and the effective mass of dressed atoms are derived analytically. The transition from the BCS condensation state to the normal state is a first-order phase transition.

  3. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  4. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Iida, Masaaki; Moriki, Yasuyuki

    1994-10-18

    A reactor core is divided into a plurality of coolants flowrate regions, and electromagnetic pumps exclusively used for each of the flowrate regions are disposed to distribute coolants flowrates in the reactor core. Further, the flowrate of each of the electromagnetic pumps is automatically controlled depending on signals from a temperature detector disposed at the exit of the reactor core, so that the flowrate of the region can be controlled optimally depending on the burning of reactor core fuels. Then, the electromagnetic pumps disposed for every divided region are controlled respectively, so that the coolants flowrate distribution suitable to each of the regions can be attained. Margin for fuel design is decreased, fuels are used effectively, as well as an operation efficiency can be improved. Moreover, since the electromagnetic pump has less flow resistance compared with a mechanical type pump, and flow resistance of the reactor core flowrate control mechanism is eliminated, greater circulating flowrate can be ensured after occurrence of accident in a natural convection using a buoyancy of coolants utilizable for after-heat removal as a driving force. (N.H.).

  5. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  6. Detecting Neutral Atoms on an Atom Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Wilzbach, M.; Haase, A.; Schwarz, M; Heine, D.; Wicker, K.; Liu, X; Brenner, K. -H.; Groth, S.; Fernholz, Th.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Detecting single atoms (qubits) is a key requirement for implementing quantum information processing on an atom chip. The detector should ideally be integrated on the chip. Here we present and compare different methods capable of detecting neutral atoms on an atom chip. After a short introduction to fluorescence and absorption detection we discuss cavity enhanced detection of single atoms. In particular we concentrate on optical fiber based detectors such as fiber cavities and tapered fiber d...

  7. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  8. Jordan's First Research Reactor Project: Driving Forces, Present Status and the Way Ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xoubi, Ned, E-mail: Ned@Xoubi.co [Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), P.O.Box 70, Shafa Badran, 11934 Amman (Jordan)

    2011-07-01

    In a gigantic step towards establishing Jordan's nuclear power program, Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) is building the first nuclear research and test reactor in the Kingdom. The new reactor will serve as the focal point for Jordan Center for Nuclear Research (JCNR), a comprehensive state of the art nuclear center not only for Jordan but for the whole region, the center will include in addition to the reactor a radioisotopes production plant, a nuclear fuel fabrication plant, a cold neutron source (CNS), a radioactive waste treatment facility, and education and training center. The JRTR reactor is the only research reactor new build worldwide in 2010, it is a 5 MW light water open pool multipurpose reactor, The reactor core is composed of 18 fuel assemblies, MTR plate type, with 19.75% enriched uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) in an aluminum matrix. It is reflected on all sides by beryllium and graphite blocks. Reactor power is upgradable to 10 MW with a maximum thermal flux of 1.45x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The reactor reactivity is controlled by four Hafnium Control Absorber Rods (CAR). Jordan Center for Nuclear Research is located in Ramtha city, it is owned by Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC), and is contracted to Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Daewoo E and C. The JCNR project is a 56 months EPC fixed price contract for the design engineering, construction, and commissioning the JCNR reactor, and other nuclear facilities. The project presents many challenges for both the owner and the contractor, being the first nuclear reactor for Jordan, and the first nuclear export for Korea. The driving forces, present status and the way ahead will be presented in this paper. (author)

  9. Delay in atomic photoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kheifets, A S

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the time delay between emission of photoelectrons from the outer valence $ns$ and $np$ sub-shells in noble gas atoms following absorption of an attosecond XUV pulse. By solving the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation and carefully examining the time evolution of the photoelectron wave packet, we establish the apparent "time zero" when the photoelectron leaves the atom. Various processes such as elastic scattering of the photoelectron on the parent ion and many-electron correlation affect the quantum phase of the dipole transition matrix element, the energy dependence of which defines the emission timing. This qualitatively explains the time delay between photoemission from the $2s$ and $2p$ sub-shells of Ne as determined experimentally by attosecond streaking [{\\em Science} {\\bf 328}, 1658 (2010)]. However, with our extensive numerical modeling, we were only able to account for less than a half of the measured time delay of $21\\pm5$~as. We argue that the XUV pulse alone cannot produce such a larg...

  10. Ghost Imaging with Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Khakimov, R I; Shin, D K; Hodgman, S S; Dall, R G; Baldwin, K G H; Truscott, A G

    2016-01-01

    Ghost imaging is a technique -- first realized in quantum optics -- in which the image emerges from cross-correlation between particles in two separate beams. One beam passes through the object to a bucket (single-pixel) detector, while the second beam's spatial profile is measured by a high resolution (multi-pixel) detector but never interacts with the object. Neither detector can reconstruct the image independently. However, until now ghost imaging has only been demonstrated with photons. Here we report the first realisation of ghost imaging of an object using massive particles. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold metastable helium atoms, originating from two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) via $s$-wave scattering. We use the higher-order Kapitza-Dirac effect to generate the large number of correlated atom pairs required, enabling the creation of a ghost image with good visibility and sub-millimetre resolution. Future extensions could include ghost interfe...

  11. Atom-by-Atom Construction of a Quantum Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petta, Jason R

    2017-03-28

    Scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) are conventionally used to probe surfaces with atomic resolution. Recent advances in STM include tunneling from spin-polarized and superconducting tips, time-domain spectroscopy, and the fabrication of atomically precise Si nanoelectronics. In this issue of ACS Nano, Tettamanzi et al. probe a single-atom transistor in silicon, fabricated using the precision of a STM, at microwave frequencies. While previous studies have probed such devices in the MHz regime, Tettamanzi et al. probe a STM-fabricated device at GHz frequencies, which enables excited-state spectroscopy and measurements of the excited-state lifetime. The success of this experiment will enable future work on quantum control, where the wave function must be controlled on a time scale that is much shorter than the decoherence time. We review two major approaches that are being pursued to develop spin-based quantum computers and highlight some recent progress in the atom-by-atom fabrication of donor-based devices in silicon. Recent advances in STM lithography may enable practical bottom-up construction of large-scale quantum devices.

  12. Report by the AERES on the unit: Reactor Study Department (DER) under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA); Rapport de l'AERES sur l'unite: Departement d'Etudes des Reacteurs (DER) sous tutelle des etablissements et organismes: CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-02-15

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, the DER (Departement d'Etudes des Reacteurs, Reactor Study Department) whose activity if focused on four main themes: neutron transport simulation in reactor cores, thermal-hydraulic simulation of reactors, design and safety of innovative reactors, nuclear instrumentation for reactors. The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved, risks and recommendations, productions and publications, scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. These same aspects are then discussed and commented for each theme

  13. Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  14. Operation of Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    3.1 Annual Report of SPR Operation Chu Shaochu Having overseen by National Nuclear Safety Administration and specialists, the reactor restarted up successfully after Safety renovation on April 16, 1996. In August 1996 the normal operation of SPR was approved by the authorities of Naitonal Nuclear Safety Administration. 1 Operation status In 1996, the reactor operated safely for 40 d and the energy released was about 137.3 MW·d. The operation status of SPR is shown in table 1. The reactor started up to higher power (power more than 1 MW) and lower power (for physics experiments) 4 times and 14 times respectively. Measurement of control rod efficiency and other measurement tasks were 2 times and 5 times respectively.

  15. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  16. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

  17. An Overview of Reactor Concepts, a Survey of Reactor Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    Public Affairs Office and is releasaole to the National Technical Information Services (NTIS). At NTIS, it will be available to the general public...Reactors that use deu- terium (heavy water) as a coolant can use natural uranium as a fuel. The * Canadian reactor, CANDU , utilizes this concept...reactor core at the top and discharged at the Dotton while the reactor is in operation. The discharged fuel can then b inspected to see if it can De used

  18. Demonstration of a Sagnac-Type Cold Atom Interferometer with Stimulated Raman Transitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; LI Run-Bing; YAN Hui; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Cold-matter-wave Sagnac interferometers possess many advantages over their thermal atomic beam counterparts when they are used as precise inertial sensors. We report a realization of a Sagnac-type interferometer with cold atoms.

  19. Stimulated Emission of an Atom in Circularly Polarized Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锦茴; 曾高坚; 叶永华

    2003-01-01

    We study the stimulated emission of a two-level atom in an electromagnetic wave of circular polarization. The correlation function G(r1t, r2t) = of atom radiation fields at dipole approximation are computed. Under the resonance condition, the atom stimulated emission is influenced by the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave discussed. We have found that the time-averaged value of energy density does not depend on the initial conditions. We have also deduced the relation between the emission power of an atom and the Rabi frequency Ω.

  20. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.